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Sample records for dwpf hydrogen generation

  1. DWPF CATALYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION PROGRAM - REVIEW OF CURRENT STATUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.

    2009-07-10

    Significant progress has been made in the past two years in improving the understanding of acid consumption and catalytic hydrogen generation during the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processing of waste sludges in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). This report reviews issues listed in prior internal reviews, describes progress with respect to the recommendations made by the December 2006 external review panel, and presents a summary of the current understanding of catalytic hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, are historically known catalysts for the conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Rh, Ru, and Pd are present in the DWPF SRAT feed as by-products of thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U in the original waste. Rhodium appears to become most active for hydrogen as the nitrite ion concentration becomes low (within a factor of ten of the Rh concentration). Prior to hydrogen generation, Rh is definitely active for nitrite destruction to N{sub 2}O and potentially active for nitrite to NO formation. These reactions are all consistent with the presence of a nitro-Rh complex catalyst, although definite proof for the existence of this complex during Savannah River Site (SRS) waste processing does not exist. Ruthenium does not appear to become active for hydrogen generation until nitrite destruction is nearly complete (perhaps less nitrite than Ru in the system). Catalytic activity of Ru during nitrite destruction is significantly lower than that of either Rh or Pd. Ru appears to start activating as Rh is deactivating from its maximum catalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The slow activation of the Ru, as inferred from the slow rate of increase in hydrogen generation that occurs after initiation, may imply that some species (perhaps Ru itself) has some bound nitrite on it. Ru, rather than Rh, is primarily responsible for the

  2. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

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    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a

  3. DWPF Hydrogen Generation Study-Form of Noble Metal SRAT Testing

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    Bannochie, C

    2005-09-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, investigate the factors that contribute to hydrogen generation to determine if current conservatism in setting the DWPF processing window can be reduced. A phased program has been undertaken to increase understanding of the factors that influence hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell, CPC. The hydrogen generation in the CPC is primarily due to noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid with a minor contribution from radiolytic processes. Noble metals have historically been added as trim chemicals to process simulations. The present study investigated the potential conservatism that might be present from adding the catalytic species as trim chemicals to the final sludge simulant versus co-precipitating the noble metals into the insoluble sludge solids matrix. Two sludge simulants were obtained, one with co-precipitated noble metals and one without noble metals. Co-precipitated noble metals were expected to better match real waste behavior than using trimmed noble metals during CPC simulations. Portions of both sludge simulants were held at 97 C for about eight hours to qualitatively simulate the effects of long term storage on particle morphology and speciation. The two original and two heat-treated sludge simulants were then used as feeds to Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, process simulations. Testing was done at relatively high acid stoichiometries, {approx}175%, and without mercury in order to ensure significant hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation rates were monitored during processing to assess the impact of the form of noble metals. The following observations were made on the data: (1) Co-precipitated noble metal simulant processed similarly to trimmed noble metal simulant in most respects, such as nitrite to nitrate conversion, formate destruction, and pH, but differently with respect to hydrogen generation: (A

  4. CATALYTIC INTERACTIONS OF RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM, AND MERCURY DURING SIMULATED DWPF CPC PROCESSING WITH HYDROGEN GENERATION

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    Koopman, D

    2008-10-09

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels were performed as part of the ongoing investigation into catalytic hydrogen generation. Rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury have been identified as the principal elemental factors affecting the peak hydrogen generation rate in the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) for a given acid addition. The primary goal of this study is to identify any significant interactions between the three factors. Noble metal concentrations were similar to recent sludge batches. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%. An experimental matrix was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), two duplicate midpoint runs, and two additional replicate runs to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing can identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. Six Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed to supplement the SME hydrogen generation database. Some of the preliminary findings from this study include: (1) Rh was linked to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the first two hours after acid addition in preliminary statistical modeling. (2) Ru was linked conclusively to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the last four hours of reflux in preliminary statistical modeling. (3) Increasing the ratio of Hg/Rh shifted the noble metal controlling the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate from

  5. A STATISTICAL REVIEW OF DWPF LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS GENERATED DURING THE PROCESSING OF BATCHES 300 THROUGH 356

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T

    2006-08-31

    In this report, the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides summaries and comparisons of composition measurements for glass samples that were generated during the processing of batches 300 through 356 at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These analyses, which include measurements of samples from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as samples of glass standards, were provided to SCS by the DWPF Laboratory (DWPF Lab) of Waste Laboratory Services. The comparisons made by SCS were extensive given that these data allowed for contrasts between preparation methods and between the two spectrometers that are currently in use at the DWPF Lab. In addition to general comparisons, specific questions that were posed in the Technical Task Request (TTR) behind this effort were addressed in this report.

  6. Nitric-glycolic flowsheet testing for maximum hydrogen generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site is developing for implementation a flowsheet with a new reductant to replace formic acid. Glycolic acid has been tested over the past several years and found to effectively replace the function of formic acid in the DWPF chemical process. The nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduces mercury, significantly lowers the chemical generation of hydrogen and ammonia, allows purge reduction in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), stabilizes the pH and chemistry in the SRAT and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), allows for effective adjustment of the SRAT/SME rheology, and is favorable with respect to melter flammability. The objective of this work was to perform DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) testing at conditions that would bound the catalytic hydrogen production for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet.

  7. DWPF simulant CPC studies for SB8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D. C.; Zamecnik, J. R.

    2013-06-25

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) accepted a technical task request (TTR) from Waste Solidification Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) and to develop the flowsheet for SB8 in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Separate studies were conducted for frit development and glass properties (including REDOX). The SRNL CPC effort had two primary phases divided by the decision to drop Tank 12 from the SB8 constituents. This report focuses on the second phase with SB8 compositions that do not contain the Tank 12 piece. A separate report will document the initial phase of SB8 testing that included Tank 12. The second phase of SB8 studies consisted of two sets of CPC studies. The first study involved CPC testing of an SB8 simulant for Tank 51 to support the CPC demonstration of the washed Tank 51 qualification sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells facility. SB8-Tank 51 was a high iron-low aluminum waste with fairly high mercury and moderate noble metal concentrations. Tank 51 was ultimately washed to about 1.5 M sodium which is the highest wash endpoint since SB3-Tank 51. This study included three simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle with the sludge-only flowsheet at nominal DWPF processing conditions and three different acid stoichiometries. These runs produced a set of recommendations that were used to guide the successful SRNL qualification SRAT/SME demonstration with actual Tank 51 washed waste. The second study involved five SRAT/SME runs with SB8-Tank 40 simulant. Four of the runs were designed to define the acid requirements for sludge-only processing in DWPF with respect to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. The fifth run was an intermediate acid stoichiometry demonstration of the coupled flowsheet for SB8. These runs produced a set of processing

  8. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  9. DWPF Simulant CPC Studies For SB8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, J. D.

    2013-09-25

    Prior to processing a Sludge Batch (SB) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), flowsheet studies using simulants are performed. Typically, the flowsheet studies are conducted based on projected composition(s). The results from the flowsheet testing are used to 1) guide decisions during sludge batch preparation, 2) serve as a preliminary evaluation of potential processing issues, and 3) provide a basis to support the Shielded Cells qualification runs performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). SB8 was initially projected to be a combination of the Tank 40 heel (Sludge Batch 7b), Tank 13, Tank 12, and the Tank 51 heel. In order to accelerate preparation of SB8, the decision was made to delay the oxalate-rich material from Tank 12 to a future sludge batch. SB8 simulant studies without Tank 12 were reported in a separate report.1 The data presented in this report will be useful when processing future sludge batches containing Tank 12. The wash endpoint target for SB8 was set at a significantly higher sodium concentration to allow acceptable glass compositions at the targeted waste loading. Four non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 40 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry (146% acid) SRAT testing up to 31% of the DWPF hydrogen limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 48% of of the DWPF limit for the high acid run. Two non-coupled tests were conducted using simulant representing Tank 51 at 110-146% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Hydrogen was generated during high acid stoichiometry SRAT testing up to 16% of the DWPF limit. SME hydrogen generation reached 49% of the DWPF limit for hydrogen in the SME for the high acid run. Simulant processing was successful using previously established antifoam addition strategy. Foaming during formic acid addition was not observed in any of the runs. Nitrite was destroyed in all runs and no N2O was detected

  10. DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

    2011-06-29

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

  11. Miscibility Evaluation Of The Next Generation Solvent With Polymers Currently Used At DWPF, MCU, And Saltstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, funded the development of an enhanced Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. This effort lead to the development of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) with Tris (3,7-dimethyl octyl) guanidine (TiDG). The first deployment target for the NGS solvent is within the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the new chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the affected facility. This report provides the calculated data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers known to be used or present in the MCU, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Saltstone facilities that will be exposed to the NGS showed that TiDG could selectively affect the elastomers and some thermoplastics to varying extents, but the typical use of these polymers in a confined geometry will likely prevent the NGS from impacting component performance. The polymers identified as of primary concern include Grafoil® (flexible graphite), Tefzel®, Isolast®, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM). Certain polymers like NBR and EPDM were found to interact mildly with NGS but their calculated swelling and the confined geometry will impede interaction with NGS. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid (cellulose fibers-reinforced glycerin and protein) may leach protein and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) may leach plasticizer (such as Bis-Ethylhexyl-Phthalates) into the NGS solvent. Either case

  12. SLUDGE BATCH 4 FOLLOW-UP QUALIFICATION STUDIES TO EVALUATE HYDROGEN GENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareizs, J; David Koopman, D; Dan Lambert, D; Cj Bannochie, C

    2007-08-23

    Follow-up testing was conducted to better understand the excessive hydrogen generation seen in the initial Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) qualification Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) simulation in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. This effort included both radioactive and simulant work. The initial SB4 qualification test produced 0.59 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SRAT, which was just below the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lbs/hr, and the test produced over 0.5 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SME cycle on two separate occasions, which were over the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lbs/hr.

  13. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  14. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  15. DWPF SIMULANT CPC STUDIES FOR SB7B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.

    2011-11-01

    Lab-scale DWPF simulations of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) processing were performed. Testing was performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory - Aiken County Technology Laboratory (SRNL-ACTL). The primary goal of the simulations was to define a likely operating window for acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). In addition, the testing established conditions for the SRNL Shielded Cells qualification simulation of SB7b-Tank 40 blend, supported validation of the current glass redox model, and validated the coupled process flowsheet at the nominal acid stoichiometry. An acid window of 105-140% by the Koopman minimum acid (KMA) equation (107-142% DWPF Hsu equation) worked for the sludge-only flowsheet. Nitrite was present in the SRAT product for the 105% KMA run at 366 mg/kg, while SME cycle hydrogen reached 94% of the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle limit in the 140% KMA run. The window was determined for sludge with added caustic (0.28M additional base, or roughly 12,000 gallons 50% NaOH to 820,000 gallons waste slurry). A suitable processing window appears to be 107-130% DWPF acid equation for sludge-only processing allowing some conservatism for the mapping of lab-scale simulant data to full-scale real waste processing including potentially non-conservative noble metal and mercury concentrations. This window should be usable with or without the addition of up to 7,000 gallons of caustic to the batch. The window could potentially be wider if caustic is not added to SB7b. It is recommended that DWPF begin processing SB7b at 115% stoichiometry using the current DWPF equation. The factor could be increased if necessary, but changes should be made with caution and in small increments. DWPF should not concentrate past 48 wt.% total solids in the SME cycle if moderate hydrogen generation is occurring simultaneously. The coupled flowsheet simulation made more hydrogen in the SRAT and SME cycles than the sludge-only run with the

  16. Hydrogen Generation From Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Cohen; Stephen Porter; Oscar Chow; David Henderson

    2009-03-06

    Small-scale (100-500 kg H2/day) electrolysis is an important step in increasing the use of hydrogen as fuel. Until there is a large population of hydrogen fueled vehicles, the smaller production systems will be the most cost-effective. Performing conceptual designs and analyses in this size range enables identification of issues and/or opportunities for improvement in approach on the path to 1500 kg H2/day and larger systems. The objectives of this program are to establish the possible pathways to cost effective larger Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolysis systems and to identify areas where future research and development efforts have the opportunity for the greatest impact in terms of capital cost reduction and efficiency improvements. System design and analysis was conducted to determine the overall electrolysis system component architecture and develop a life cycle cost estimate. A design trade study identified subsystem components and configurations based on the trade-offs between system efficiency, cost and lifetime. Laboratory testing of components was conducted to optimize performance and decrease cost, and this data was used as input to modeling of system performance and cost. PEM electrolysis has historically been burdened by high capital costs and lower efficiency than required for large-scale hydrogen production. This was known going into the program and solutions to these issues were the focus of the work. The program provided insights to significant cost reduction and efficiency improvement opportunities for PEM electrolysis. The work performed revealed many improvement ideas that when utilized together can make significant progress towards the technical and cost targets of the DOE program. The cell stack capital cost requires reduction to approximately 25% of today’s technology. The pathway to achieve this is through part count reduction, use of thinner membranes, and catalyst loading reduction. Large-scale power supplies are available

  17. DWPF Welder Parametric Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1998-11-20

    After being filled with glass, DWPF canistered waste forms will be welded closed using an upset resistance welding process. This final closure weld must be leaktight, and must remain so during extended storage at SRS. As part of the DWPF Startup Test Program, a parametric study (DWPF-WP-24) has been performed to determine a range of welder operating parameters which will produce acceptable welds. The parametric window of acceptable welds defined by this study is 90,000 + 15,000 lb of force, 248,000 + 22,000 amps of current, and 95 + 15 cycles* for the time of application of the current.

  18. Hydrogen generation from renewable resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loges, Bjoern

    2009-09-04

    In this thesis, the hydrogen generation by dehydrogenation of 2-propanol and formic acid as model substances for renewable resources have been studied, which is of importance for hydrogen storage. For the base-assisted dehydrogenation of 2-propanol, a ruthenium diamine catalyst system has been investigated. For the selective decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen and carbon dioxide, a system has been established containing ruthenium catalysts and formic acid amine adducts as substrates. The best catalyst activity and productivity have been achieved with in situ generated ruthenium phosphine catalysts, e.g. [RuCl{sub 2}(benzene)]{sub 2} / dppe (TOF = 900 h{sup -1}, TON = 260,000). The gas evolved has been directly used in fuel cells. Furthermore, the influence of irradiation with visible light has been described for the ruthenium phosphine catalysts. (orig.)

  19. The DWPF Melter proposed heat up sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.E.

    1989-08-11

    Per the request of DWPT supervision, a proposed heatup sequence for the DWPF Melter has been documented in this report. DWPF personnel will use this report as a guide to write the detailed DWPF Melter startup plan. 6 refs.

  20. Hydrogen Generation Via Fuel Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, John F.

    2003-07-01

    Reforming is the conversion of a hydrocarbon based fuel to a gas mixture that contains hydrogen. The H2 that is produced by reforming can then be used to produce electricity via fuel cells. The realization of H2-based power generation, via reforming, is facilitated by the existence of the liquid fuel and natural gas distribution infrastructures. Coupling these same infrastructures with more portable reforming technology facilitates the realization of fuel cell powered vehicles. The reformer is the first component in a fuel processor. Contaminants in the H2-enriched product stream, such as carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), can significantly degrade the performance of current polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC's). Removal of such contaminants requires extensive processing of the H2-rich product stream prior to utilization by the fuel cell to generate electricity. The remaining components of the fuel processor remove the contaminants in the H2 product stream. For transportation applications the entire fuel processing system must be as small and lightweight as possible to achieve desirable performance requirements. Current efforts at Argonne National Laboratory are focused on catalyst development and reactor engineering of the autothermal processing train for transportation applications.

  1. Hydrogen generation in tru waste transportation packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B; Sheaffer, M K; Fischer, L E

    2000-03-27

    This document addresses hydrogen generation in TRU waste transportation packages. The potential sources of hydrogen generation are summarized with a special emphasis on radiolysis. After defining various TRU wastes according to groupings of material types, bounding radiolytic G-values are established for each waste type. Analytical methodologies are developed for prediction of hydrogen gas concentrations for various packaging configurations in which hydrogen generation is due to radiolysis. Representative examples are presented to illustrate how analytical procedures can be used to estimate the hydrogen concentration as a function of time. Methodologies and examples are also provided to show how the time to reach a flammable hydrogen concentration in the innermost confinement layer can be estimated. Finally, general guidelines for limiting the hydrogen generation in the payload and hydrogen accumulation in the innermost confinement layer are described.

  2. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

    2010-10-01

    below the DWPF target with 750 g of steam per g of mercury. However, rheological properties did not improve and were above the design basis. Hydrogen generation rates did not exceed DWPF limits during the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. However, hydrogen generation during the SRAT cycle approached the DWPF limit. The glass fabricated with the Tank 51 SB6 SME product and Frit 418 was acceptable with respect to chemical durability as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT response was also predictable by the current durability models of the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). It should be noted, however, that in the first attempt to make glass from the SME product, the contents of the fabrication crucible foamed over. This may be a result of the SME product's REDOX (Reduction/Oxidation - Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe) of 0.08 (calculated from SME product analytical results). The following are recommendations drawn from this demonstration. In this demonstration, at the request of DWPF, SRNL caustic boiled the SRAT contents prior to acid addition to remove water (to increase solids concentration). During the nearly five hours of caustic boiling, 700 ppm of antifoam was required to control foaming. SRNL recommends that DWPF not caustic boil/concentrate SRAT receipt prior to acid addition until further studies can be performed to provide a better foaming control strategy or a new antifoam is developed for caustic boiling. Based on this set of runs and a recently completed demonstration with the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) sample, it is recommended that DWPF not add formic acid at the design addition rate of two gallons per minute for this sludge batch. A longer acid addition time appears to be helpful in allowing slower reaction of formic acid with the sludge and possibly decreases the chance of a foam over during acid addition.

  3. Liquidus Temperature Data for DWPF Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GF Piepel; JD Vienna; JV Crum; M Mika; P Hrma

    1999-05-21

    This report provides new liquidus temperature (TL) versus composition data that can be used to reduce uncertainty in TL calculation for DWPF glass. According to the test plan and test matrix design PNNL has measured TL for 53 glasses within and just outside of the current DWPF processing composition window. The TL database generated under this task will directly support developing and enhancing the current TL process-control model. Preliminary calculations have shown a high probability of increasing HLW loading in glass produced at the SRS and Hanford. This increase in waste loading will decrease the lifecycle tank cleanup costs by decreasing process time and the volume of waste glass produced.

  4. Room temperature micro-hydrogen-generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasio, Don; Tasic, Sonja; Zenhausern, Frederic

    A new compact and cost-effective hydrogen-gas generator has been made that is well suited for supplying hydrogen to a fuel-cell for providing base electrical power to hand-carried appliances. This hydrogen-generator operates at room temperature, ambient pressure and is orientation-independent. The hydrogen-gas is generated by the heterogeneous catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous alkaline borohydride solution as it flows into a micro-reactor. This reactor has a membrane as one wall. Using the membrane keeps the liquid in the reactor, but allows the hydrogen-gas to pass out of the reactor to a fuel-cell anode. Aqueous alkaline 30 wt% borohydride solution is safe and promotes long application life, because this solution is non-toxic, non-flammable, and is a high energy-density (≥2200 W-h per liter or per kilogram) hydrogen-storage solution. The hydrogen is released from this storage-solution only when it passes over the solid catalyst surface in the reactor, so controlling the flow of the solution over the catalyst controls the rate of hydrogen-gas generation. This allows hydrogen generation to be matched to hydrogen consumption in the fuel-cell, so there is virtually no free hydrogen-gas during power generation. A hydrogen-generator scaled for a system to provide about 10 W electrical power is described here. However, the technology is expected to be scalable for systems providing power spanning from 1 W to kW levels.

  5. DWPF Development Plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzscheiter, E.W.

    1994-05-09

    The DWPF Development Plan is based on an evaluation process flowsheet and related waste management systems. The scope is shown in Figure 1 entitled ``DWPF Process Development Systems.`` To identify the critical development efforts, each system has been analyzed to determine: The identification of unresolved technology issues. A technology issue (TI) is one that requires basic development to resolve a previously unknown process or equipment problem and is managed via the Technology Assurance Program co-chaired by DWPF and SRTC. Areas that require further work to sufficiently define the process basis or technical operating envelop for DWPF. This activity involves the application of sound engineering and development principles to define the scope of work required to complete the technical data. The identification of the level of effort and expertise required to provide process technical consultation during the start-up and demonstration of this first of a kind plant.

  6. SCIX IMPACT ON DWPF CPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.

    2011-07-14

    A program was conducted to systematically evaluate potential impacts of the proposed Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The program involved a series of interrelated tasks. Past studies of the impact of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and monosodium titanate (MST) on DWPF were reviewed. Paper studies and material balance calculations were used to establish reasonable bounding levels of CST and MST in sludge. Following the paper studies, Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulant was modified to have both bounding and intermediate levels of MST and ground CST. The SCIX flow sheet includes grinding of the CST which is larger than DWPF frit when not ground. Nominal ground CST was not yet available, therefore a similar CST ground previously in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was used. It was believed that this CST was over ground and that it would bound the impact of nominal CST on sludge slurry properties. Lab-scale simulations of the DWPF CPC were conducted using SB10 simulants with no, intermediate, and bounding levels of CST and MST. Tests included both the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. Simulations were performed at high and low acid stoichiometry. A demonstration of the extended CPC flowsheet was made that included streams from the site interim salt processing operations. A simulation using irradiated CST and MST was also completed. An extensive set of rheological measurements was made to search for potential adverse consequences of CST and MST and slurry rheology in the CPC. The SCIX CPC impact program was conducted in parallel with a program to evaluate the impact of SCIX on the final DWPF glass waste form and on the DWPF melter throughput. The studies must be considered together when evaluating the full impact of SCIX on DWPF. Due to the fact that the alternant flowsheet for DWPF has not been selected, this study did not

  7. Hydrogen Generation from Plasmatron Reforming Ethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Fu-bing; HU You-ping; LI Ge-sheng; GAO Xiao-hong

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen generation through plasmatron reforming of ethanol has been carried out in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The reforming of pure ethanol and mixtures of ethanol-water have been studied. The gas chromatography (GC) analysis has shown that in all conditions the reforming yield was H2, CO, CH4 and CO2 as the main products, and with little C2* . The hydrogen-rich gas can be used as fuel for gasoline engine and other applications.

  8. Implementation of flowsheet change to minimize hydrogen and ammonia generation during chemical processing of high level waste in the defense waste processing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Dan P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, Wesley H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, Matthew S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Luther, Michelle C. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Brandenburg, Clayton H. [Univ.of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-09-27

    Testing was completed to develop a chemical processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), designed to vitrify and stabilize high level radioactive waste. DWPF processing uses a reducing acid (formic acid) and an oxidizing acid (nitric acid) to rheologically thin the slurry and complete the necessary acid base and reduction reactions (primarily mercury and manganese). Formic acid reduces mercuric oxide to elemental mercury, allowing the mercury to be removed during the boiling phase of processing through steam stripping. In runs with active catalysts, formic acid can decompose to hydrogen and nitrate can be reduced to ammonia, both flammable gases, due to rhodium and ruthenium catalysis. Replacement of formic acid with glycolic acid eliminates the generation of rhodium- and ruthenium-catalyzed hydrogen and ammonia. In addition, mercury reduction is still effective with glycolic acid. Hydrogen, ammonia and mercury are discussed in the body of the report. Ten abbreviated tests were completed to develop the operating window for implementation of the flowsheet and determine the impact of changes in acid stoichiometry and the blend of nitric and glycolic acid as it impacts various processing variables over a wide processing region. Three full-length 4-L lab-scale simulations demonstrated the viability of the flowsheet under planned operating conditions. The flowsheet is planned for implementation in early 2017.

  9. Implementation of flowsheet change to minimize hydrogen and ammonia generation during chemical processing of high level waste in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Dan P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, Wesley H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, Matthew S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Luther, Michelle C. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Brandenburg, Clayton H. [Univ.of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-09-27

    Testing was completed to develop a chemical processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), designed to vitrify and stabilize high level radioactive waste. DWPF processing uses a reducing acid (formic acid) and an oxidizing acid (nitric acid) to rheologically thin the slurry and complete the necessary acid base and reduction reactions (primarily mercury and manganese). Formic acid reduces mercuric oxide to elemental mercury, allowing the mercury to be removed during the boiling phase of processing through steam stripping. In runs with active catalysts, formic acid can decompose to hydrogen and nitrate can be reduced to ammonia, both flammable gases, due to rhodium and ruthenium catalysis. Replacement of formic acid with glycolic acid eliminates the generation of rhodium- and ruthenium-catalyzed hydrogen and ammonia. In addition, mercury reduction is still effective with glycolic acid. Hydrogen, ammonia and mercury are discussed in the body of the report. Ten abbreviated tests were completed to develop the operating window for implementation of the flowsheet and determine the impact of changes in acid stoichiometry and the blend of nitric and glycolic acid as it impacts various processing variables over a wide processing region. Three full-length 4-L lab-scale simulations demonstrated the viability of the flowsheet under planned operating conditions. The flowsheet is planned for implementation in early 2017.

  10. DWPF MATERIALS EVALUATION SUMMARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, T.; Chandler, G.; Daugherty, W.; Imrich, K.; Jankins, C.

    1996-09-12

    To better ensure the reliability of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) remote canyon process equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed as part of the overall startup test program. Specific test programs included FA-04 ('Process Vessels Erosion/Corrosion Studies') and FA-05 (melter inspection). At the conclusion of field testing, Test Results Reports were issued to cover the various test phases. While these reports completed the startup test requirements, DWPF-Engineering agreed to compile a more detailed report which would include essentially all of the materials testing programs performed at DWPF. The scope of the materials evaouation programs included selected equipment from the Salt Process Cell (SPC), Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Melt Cell, Canister Decon Cell (CDC), and supporting facilities. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections (work completed in 1992) and follow-up inspections after completion of the DWPF cold chemical runs. Process equipment inspected included: process vessels, pumps, agitators, coils, jumpers, and melter top head components. Various NDE (non-destructive examination) techniques were used during the inspection program, including: ultrasonic testing (UT), visual (direct or video probe), radiography, penetrant testing (PT), and dimensional analyses. Finally, coupon racks were placed in selected tanks in 1992 for subsequent removal and corrosion evaluation after chemical runs.

  11. Development of photovoltaic hydrogen and hypochlorite generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.L.; Beltran, E.D.; Meas, Y.; Ortega, R.; Orozco, G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2010-07-15

    Sodium hypochlorite is among the most efficient methods to disinfect water. Although sodium hypochlorite can be generated from chemical reactions of chlorine gas, the transportation of chlorine is a safety concern. In-situ generation of sodium hypochlorite in an electrolysis cell is therefore desirable. This study examined the feasibility of electrolytically producing both hypochlorite and hydrogen using photovoltaic energy. Since the hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to generate electricity and the hypochlorite can be used to purify drinking water, the integrated process may be operated economically because the products from both the anode and the cathode are valuable. The apparatus used in this study was designed and constructed in such a way that the photovoltaic module was coupled to the hydrogen and hypochlorite generator. The apparatus is suitable for operation in remote areas. The rates of hydrogen and hypochlorite generation were measured and the current/voltage characteristics of both the PV module and the electrolysis cell were analyzed. The electrolytic process yielded a sodium hypochlorite solution that was stable at pH 7. This study showed that environmental conditions such as solar intensity, ambient temperature and surface temperature of the photovoltaic module have a small effect on the rate of hydrogen production. Photovoltaic cells can supply the necessary electric current and voltage to produce 5 litres of 3.5 g/l NaOCl daily when a membrane is incorporated in the cell. The quantity of sodium hypochlorite produced by membraneless electrolysis with 2 photovoltaic modules could purify water for 40 families. It was concluded that long-term testing under real operating conditions is needed in order to estimate the capital cost of the equipment. 15 refs., 8 tabs., 5 figs.

  12. SRAT CHEMISTRY AND ACID CONSUMPTION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D; David Best, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-12-03

    Due to higher than expected hydrogen generation during the Tank 51-Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) qualification run, DWPF engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to expand the ongoing catalytic hydrogen generation program. The work presented in this Technical Report was identified as part of SRNL/Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) meetings to define potential causes of catalytic hydrogen generation as well as from an external technical review panel commissioned to evaluate SRNL hydrogen related data and programs. New scope included improving the understanding of SRAT/SME process chemistry, particularly as it related to acid consumption and hydrogen generation. The expanded hydrogen program scope was covered under the technical task request (TTR): HLW-DWPF-TTR-2007-0016. A task technical and quality assurance plan (TT&QAP) was issued to cover focus areas raised in meetings with LWO plus a portion of the recommendations made by the review panel. A supporting analytical study plan was issued. It was also noted in the review of catalytic hydrogen generation that control of the DWPF acid stoichiometry was an important element in controlling hydrogen generation. A separate TTR was issued to investigate ways of improving the determination of the acid requirement during processing: HLWDWPF-TTR-0015. A separate TT&QAP was prepared for this task request. This report discusses some progress on this task related to developing alternative acid equations and to performing experimental work to supplement the existing database. Simulant preparation and preliminary flowsheet studies were already documented. The prior work produced a sufficient quantity of simulant for the hydrogen program and melter feed rheology testing. It also defined a suitable acid addition stoichiometry. The results presented in this report come from samples and process data obtained during sixteen 22-L SRAT/SME simulations that were performed in the second half of 2007 to produce eight SME

  13. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL WITH MATRIX SIMULANTS AND SUPERNATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.

    2012-05-07

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current DWPF flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the CPC since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT and QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  14. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SLUDGE AND SUPERNATE SIMULANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2012-08-28

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  15. Liquidus Temperature Data for DWPF Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vienna, John D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Mika, Martin (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Crum, Jarrod V.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Piepel, Gregory F.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    1998-12-01

    A liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) database has been developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass composition region to support DWPF process control schemes. A test matrix consisting of 53 glasses (including two duplicates) was generated at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) using statistical experimental design methods. To ensure homogeneity, glasses were melted twice. Both melts were performed at T = T{sub 5} + {Delta}T, where T{sub 5} is the temperature at which the melt viscosity is 5 Pa{center_dot}s and {Delta}T {ge} 100 C. The T{sub 5} value was estimated using a PNNL viscosity database. Its span for the test matrix was 1007 C to 1284 C. Melting at T > T{sub 5} (from 1107 C to 1400 C) was necessary to dissolve (and possibly volatilize) some of the RuO{sub 2}. All glasses contained a large fraction of 0.09 mass% RuO{sub 2}, which prevented a reliable detection of spinel near the liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) when the melting temperature was T{sub 5}. T{sub L} was measured by heat-treating glass samples over a range of constant temperatures. They used optical microscopy to detect the presence or absence of crystals in the samples. T{sub L} was determined from observing crystallization within the bulk glass (more than 0.5 mm from the glass surface). The T{sub L} values were adjusted by measuring the T{sub L} of an internal PNNL standard glass in each furnace and checked by a National Bureau of Stands (NBS) standard glass. All measured T{sub L} values are summarized in Table I-S. The accuracy of values is estimated at {+-} 10 C, based on the accuracy of calibrated thermocouples and the ability to discern spinel crystals in glass near T{sub L}. Another possible source of error is glass redox connected with the difference between the melting temperature and T{sub L}. The heat treatment period of samples was long enough to ensure equilibrating the glass with atmospheric air. However, repeated

  16. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M

    2005-04-05

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted

  17. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.B.; King, A.D. Jr.; Bhattacharyya, N.K. [and others

    1996-02-01

    The most promising method for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear wastes is a vitrification process in which the wastes are incorporated into borosilicate glass logs, the logs are sealed into welded stainless steel canisters, and the canisters are buried in suitably protected burial sites for disposal. The purpose of the research supported by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) project of the Department of Energy through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and summarized in this report was to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen generation process and to predict the rate and amount of hydrogen generation during the treatment of HWVP feed simulants with formic acid. The objectives of the study were to determine the key feed components and process variables which enhance or inhibit the.production of hydrogen. Information on the kinetics and stoichiometry of relevant formic acid reactions were sought to provide a basis for viable mechanistic proposals. The chemical reactions were characterized through the production and consumption of the key gaseous products such as H{sub 2}. CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}0, NO, and NH{sub 3}. For this mason this research program relied heavily on analyses of the gases produced and consumed during reactions of the HWVP feed simulants with formic acid under various conditions. Such analyses, used gas chromatographic equipment and expertise at the University of Georgia for the separation and determination of H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and NO.

  18. Hydrogen Generation by Solar Photolysis of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetzel, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Prospects of near term fuel cell applications for transportation and communication have stimulated recently great interest in systems that can generate hydrogen through water cleavage by sunlight. A device that appears very promising to accomplish this goal is a tandem cell based on two superimposed photoactive layers [1]. The top layer consists of nanocrystalline oxide film absorbing the blue part of the solar spectrum and producing oxygen from water under light excitation. This is placed directly on top of a dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO2 film (DSC) capturing the green and red part of the solar spectrum. The voltage generated by this second photosystem enables hydrogen production to proceed without application of an external electric bias. The overall reaction corresponds to the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen by visible light. The maximum conversion efficiency achieved so far with these systems is about 6-7 electrode a nanocrystalline WO3 film. The use of nanoparticles for the top layer has several great advantages. They are translucent avoiding losses by light scattering and their small size is within the minority carrier diffusion length, allowing the valence band hole reaction with water at the particle surface to proceed with high efficiency. Recent work has focused on replacing the WO3 by semiconductor oxide absorbing a larger fraction of visible light than tungsten trioxide, e.g. Fe2O3.The principles and current state of this research will be briefly reviewed. Literature 1. M. Graetzel, "Photoelectrochemical Cells" Nature, 414, 332-344 (2001)

  19. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plan (HWVP) process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutson, N.D.

    1992-08-10

    Vitrification facilities are being developed worldwide to convert high-level nuclear waste to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. Facilities in the United States include the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. At each of these sites, highly radioactive defense waste will be vitrified to a stable borosilicate glass. The DWPF and WVDP are near physical completion while the HWVP is in the design phase. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. Because of the similarities of the DWPF and HWVP processes, the IDMS facility has also been used to characterize the processing behavior of a reference NCAW simulant. The demonstration was undertaken specifically to determine material balances, to characterize the evolution of offgas products (especially hydrogen), to determine the effects of noble metals, and to obtain general HWVP design data. The campaign was conducted from November, 1991 to February, 1992.

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS WITH TANK 40 AND H CANYON NEPTUNIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M

    2009-04-28

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) from Tank 40. SB5 contains the contents of Tank 51 from November 2008, qualified by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the heel in Tank 40 remaining from Sludge Batch 4. Current Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) plans are to (1) decant supernatant from Tank 40 to remove excess liquid caused by a leaking slurry pump and (2) receive a Np stream from H Canyon It should be noted that the Np stream contains significant nitrate requiring addition of nitrite to Tank 40 to maintain a high nitrite to nitrate ratio for corrosion control. SRNL has been requested to qualify the proposed changes; determine the impact on DWPF processability in terms of hydrogen generation, rheology, etc.; evaluate antifoam addition strategy; and evaluate mercury stripping. Therefore, SRNL received a 3 L sample of Tank 40 following the transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40 (Tank Farm Sample HTF-40-08-157 to be used in testing and to perform the required Waste Acceptance Product Specifications radionuclide analyses). Based on Tank Farm projections, SRNL decanted a portion* of the sample, added sodium nitrite, and added a Np solution from H Canyon representative of the Np to be dispositioned to Tank 40 (neutralized to 0.6 M excess hydroxide). The resulting material was used in a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) demonstration -- a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle. Preliminary data from the demonstration has been reported previously. This report includes discussion of these results and additional results, including comparisons to Tank Farm projections and the SB5 demonstration.

  1. Photocatalysis in Generation of Hydrogen from Water

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-04-18

    Solar energy can be converted by utilizing the thermal or photoelectric effects of photons. Concentrated solar power systems utilize thermal energy from the sun by either making steam and then generating power or shifting the chemical equilibrium of a reaction (e.g., water splitting or CO2 reduction) that occurs at extremely high temperatures. The photocatalytic system contains powder photocatalysts. Each photocatalyst particle should collect sufficient photons from the solar flux to cause the required multielectron reactions to occur. The band gap and band edge positions of semiconductors are the most critical parameters for assessing the suitability of photocatalysts for overall water splitting. The most important requirement when selecting photocatalyst materials is the band positions relative to hydrogen and oxygen evolution potentials. For most photocatalysts, surface modification by cocatalysts was found to be essential to achieve overall water splitting.

  2. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  3. Double heterojunction nanowire photocatalysts for hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongying, P.; Vietmeyer, F.; Aleksiuk, D.; Ferraudi, G. J.; Krylova, G.; Kuno, M.

    2014-03-01

    Charge separation and charge transfer across interfaces are key aspects in the design of efficient photocatalysts for solar energy conversion. In this study, we investigate the hydrogen generating capabilities and underlying photophysics of nanostructured photocatalysts based on CdSe nanowires (NWs). Systems studied include CdSe, CdSe/CdS core/shell nanowires and their Pt nanoparticle-decorated counterparts. Femtosecond transient differential absorption measurements reveal how semiconductor/semiconductor and metal/semiconductor heterojunctions affect the charge separation and hydrogen generation efficiencies of these hybrid photocatalysts. In turn, we unravel the role of surface passivation, charge separation at semiconductor interfaces and charge transfer to metal co-catalysts in determining photocatalytic H2 generation efficiencies. This allows us to rationalize why Pt nanoparticle decorated CdSe/CdS NWs, a double heterojunction system, performs best with H2 generation rates of ~434.29 +/- 27.40 μmol h-1 g-1 under UV/Visible irradiation. In particular, we conclude that the CdS shell of this double heterojunction system serves two purposes. The first is to passivate CdSe NW surface defects, leading to long-lived charges at the CdSe/CdS interface capable of carrying out reduction chemistries. Upon photoexcitation, we also find that CdS selectively injects charges into Pt NPs, enabling simultaneous reduction chemistries at the Pt NP/solvent interface. Pt nanoparticle decorated CdSe/CdS NWs thus enable reduction chemistries at not one, but rather two interfaces, taking advantage of each junction's optimal catalytic activities.Charge separation and charge transfer across interfaces are key aspects in the design of efficient photocatalysts for solar energy conversion. In this study, we investigate the hydrogen generating capabilities and underlying photophysics of nanostructured photocatalysts based on CdSe nanowires (NWs). Systems studied include CdSe, CdSe/CdS core

  4. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Adamson, D. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to understand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here.

  5. DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-10-15

    both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off

  6. DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-10-15

    both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off

  7. Hydrogen generation from magnesium hydride by using organic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yen-Hsi

    In this paper, the hydrolysis of solid magnesium hydride has been studied with the high concentration of catalyst at the varying temperature. An organic acid (acetic acid, CH3COOH) has been chosen as the catalyst. The study has three objectives: first, using three different weights of MgH 2 react with aqueous solution of acid for the hydrogen generation experiments. Secondly, utilizing acetic acid as the catalyst accelerates hydrogen generation. Third, emphasizing the combination of the three operating conditions (the weight of MgH2, the concentration of acetic acid, and the varying temperature) influence the amount of hydrogen generation. The experiments results show acetic acid truly can increase the rate of hydrogen generation and the weight of MgH2 can affect the amount of hydrogen generation more than the varying temperature.

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ARP PRODUCT SIMULANT AND SB4 TANK 40 SLUDGE SLURRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D; John Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Kim Crapse, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-14

    The radioactive startup of two new SRS processing facilities, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side-Solvent-Extraction Unit (MCU) will add two new waste streams to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The ARP will remove actinides from the 5.6 M salt solution resulting in a sludge-like product that is roughly half monosodium titanate (MST) insoluble solids and half sludge insoluble solids. The ARP product will be added to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) at boiling and dewatered prior to pulling a SRAT receipt sample. The cesium rich MCU stream will be added to the SRAT at boiling after both formic and nitric acid have been added and the SRAT contents concentrated to the appropriate endpoint. A concern was raised by an external hydrogen review panel that the actinide loaded MST could act as a catalyst for hydrogen generation (Mar 15, 2007 report, Recommendation 9). Hydrogen generation, and it's potential to form a flammable mixture in the off-gas, under SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processing conditions has been a concern since the discovery that noble metals catalyze the decomposition of formic acid. Radiolysis of water also generates hydrogen, but the radiolysis rate is orders of magnitude lower than the noble metal catalyzed generation. As a result of the concern raised by the external hydrogen review panel, hydrogen generation was a prime consideration in this experiment. Testing was designed to determine whether the presence of the irradiated ARP simulant containing MST caused uncontrolled or unexpected hydrogen production during experiments simulating the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) due to activation of titanium. A Shielded Cells experiment, SC-5, was completed using SB4 sludge from Tank 405 combined with an ARP product produced from simulants by SRNL researchers. The blend of sludge and MST was designed to be prototypic of planned DWPF SRAT and SME cycles. As glass quality was not an objective

  9. Material compatibility evaluation for DWPF nitric-glycolic acid-literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Skidmore, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-06-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid.

  10. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  11. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  12. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs., E-mail: tazsolt@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Cormos, C. C., E-mail: cormos@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Agachi, P. S. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos, Postal code: 400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  13. A self-regulating hydrogen generator for micro fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, Saeed; Pengwang, Eakkachai; Shannon, Mark A. [Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Masel, Richard I. [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 213 Roger Adams Lab, 600 S. Mathews, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    The ever-increasing power demands and miniaturization of portable electronics, micro-sensors and actuators, and emerging technologies such as cognitive arthropods have created a significant interest in development of micro fuel cells. One of the major challenges in development of hydrogen micro fuel cells is the fabrication and integration of auxiliary systems for generating, regulating, and delivering hydrogen gas to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this paper, we report the development of a hydrogen gas generator with a micro-scale control system that does not consume any power. The hydrogen generator consists of a hydride reactor and a water reservoir, with a regulating valve separating them. The regulating valve consists of a port from the water reservoir and a movable membrane with via holes that permit water to flow from the reservoir to the hydride reactor. Water flows towards the hydride reactor, but stops within the membrane via holes due to capillary forces. Water vapor then diffuses from the via holes into the hydride reactor resulting in generation of hydrogen gas. When the rate of hydrogen consumed by the MEA is lower than the generation rate, gas pressure builds up inside the hydride reactor, deflecting the membrane, closing the water regulator valve, until the pressure drops, whereby the valve reopens. We have integrated the self-regulating micro hydrogen generator to a MEA and successfully conducted fuel cell tests under varying load conditions. (author)

  14. A self-regulating hydrogen generator for micro fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Saeed; Pengwang, Eakkachai; Masel, Richard I.; Shannon, Mark A.

    The ever-increasing power demands and miniaturization of portable electronics, micro-sensors and actuators, and emerging technologies such as cognitive arthropods have created a significant interest in development of micro fuel cells. One of the major challenges in development of hydrogen micro fuel cells is the fabrication and integration of auxiliary systems for generating, regulating, and delivering hydrogen gas to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this paper, we report the development of a hydrogen gas generator with a micro-scale control system that does not consume any power. The hydrogen generator consists of a hydride reactor and a water reservoir, with a regulating valve separating them. The regulating valve consists of a port from the water reservoir and a movable membrane with via holes that permit water to flow from the reservoir to the hydride reactor. Water flows towards the hydride reactor, but stops within the membrane via holes due to capillary forces. Water vapor then diffuses from the via holes into the hydride reactor resulting in generation of hydrogen gas. When the rate of hydrogen consumed by the MEA is lower than the generation rate, gas pressure builds up inside the hydride reactor, deflecting the membrane, closing the water regulator valve, until the pressure drops, whereby the valve reopens. We have integrated the self-regulating micro hydrogen generator to a MEA and successfully conducted fuel cell tests under varying load conditions.

  15. Thermochemical hydrogen generation of indium oxide thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taekyung Lim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of alternative energy resources is an urgent requirement to alleviate current energy constraints. As such, hydrogen gas is gaining attention as a future alternative energy source to address existing issues related to limited energy resources and air pollution. In this study, hydrogen generation by a thermochemical water-splitting process using two types of In2O3 thin films was investigated. The two In2O3 thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD and sputtering deposition systems contained different numbers of oxygen vacancies, which were directly related to hydrogen generation. The as-grown In2O3 thin film prepared by CVD generated a large amount of hydrogen because of its abundant oxygen vacancies, while that prepared by sputtering had few oxygen vacancies, resulting in low hydrogen generation. Increasing the temperature of the In2O3 thin film in the reaction chamber caused an increase in hydrogen generation. The oxygen-vacancy-rich In2O3 thin film is expected to provide a highly effective production of hydrogen as a sustainable and efficient energy source.

  16. Thermochemical hydrogen generation of indium oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Taekyung; Ju, Sanghyun

    2017-03-01

    Development of alternative energy resources is an urgent requirement to alleviate current energy constraints. As such, hydrogen gas is gaining attention as a future alternative energy source to address existing issues related to limited energy resources and air pollution. In this study, hydrogen generation by a thermochemical water-splitting process using two types of In2O3 thin films was investigated. The two In2O3 thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and sputtering deposition systems contained different numbers of oxygen vacancies, which were directly related to hydrogen generation. The as-grown In2O3 thin film prepared by CVD generated a large amount of hydrogen because of its abundant oxygen vacancies, while that prepared by sputtering had few oxygen vacancies, resulting in low hydrogen generation. Increasing the temperature of the In2O3 thin film in the reaction chamber caused an increase in hydrogen generation. The oxygen-vacancy-rich In2O3 thin film is expected to provide a highly effective production of hydrogen as a sustainable and efficient energy source.

  17. Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electrochemical cell is proposed for the efficient generation of 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in pure water using only power, oxygen and water. H2O2 is an...

  18. Cold weather hydrogen generation system and method of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreier, Ken Wayne (Madison, CT); Kowalski, Michael Thomas (Seymour, CT); Porter, Stephen Charles (Burlington, CT); Chow, Oscar Ken (Simsbury, CT); Borland, Nicholas Paul (Montpelier, VT); Goyette, Stephen Arthur (New Hartford, CT)

    2010-12-14

    A system for providing hydrogen gas is provided. The system includes a hydrogen generator that produces gas from water. One or more heat generation devices are arranged to provide heating of the enclosure during different modes of operation to prevent freezing of components. A plurality of temperature sensors are arranged and coupled to a controller to selectively activate a heat source if the temperature of the component is less than a predetermined temperature.

  19. Cold weather hydrogen generation system and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, Ken Wayne; Kowalski, Michael Thomas; Porter, Stephen Charles; Chow, Oscar Ken; Borland, Nicholas Paul; Goyette, Stephen Arthur

    2010-12-14

    A system for providing hydrogen gas is provided. The system includes a hydrogen generator that produces gas from water. One or more heat generation devices are arranged to provide heating of the enclosure during different modes of operation to prevent freezing of components. A plurality of temperature sensors are arranged and coupled to a controller to selectively activate a heat source if the temperature of the component is less than a predetermined temperature.

  20. Phase Stability Determinations of DWPF Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, S.L.

    1999-10-22

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. To fulfill this requirement, glass samples were heat treated at various times and temperatures. These results will provide guidance to the repository program about conditions to be avoided during shipping, handling and storage of DWPF canistered waste forms.

  1. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate tank materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to undertand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here. The composition of the Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) RCT material is largely a low base solution of 0.2M NaNO2 and 0.1M NaNO3 with a small amount of formate present. Insoluble solids comprise only 0.05 wt.% of the slurry. The solids appear to be largely sludge-like solids based on elemental composition and SEM-EDS analysis. The sample contains an elevated concentration of I-129 (38x) and substantial 59% fraction of Tc-99, as compared to the incoming SB8 Tank 40 feed material. The Hg concentration is 5x, when compared to Fe, of that expected based on sludge carryover. The total U and Pu concentrations are reduced significantly, 0.536 wt.% TS and 2.42E-03 wt.% TS, respectively, with the fissile components, U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, an order of magnitude lower in concentration than those in the SB8 Tank 40 DWPF feed material. This report will be revised to include the foaming study requested in the TTR and outlined in the TTQAP when that work is concluded.

  2. Hydrogen generation at ambient conditions: application in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddien, Albert; Loges, Björn; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The efficient generation of hydrogen from formic acid/amine adducts at ambient temperature is demonstrated. The highest catalytic activity (TOF up to 3630 h(-1) after 20 min) was observed in the presence of in situ generated ruthenium phosphine catalysts. Compared to the previously known methods to generate hydrogen from liquid feedstocks, the systems presented here can be operated at room temperature without the need for any high-temperature reforming processes, and the hydrogen produced can then be directly used in fuel cells. A variety of Ru precursors and phosphine ligands were investigated for the decomposition of formic acid/amine adducts. These catalytic systems are particularly interesting for the generation of H2 for new applications in portable electric devices.

  3. Hydrogen generation via anaerobic fermentation of paper mill wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Vazquez, Idania; Sparling, Richard; Risbey, Derek; Rinderknecht-Seijas, Noemi; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the hydrogen production from paper mill wastes using microbial consortia of solid substrate anaerobic digesters. Inocula from mesophilic, continuous solid substrate anaerobic digestion (SSAD) reactors were transferred to small lab scale, batch reactors. Milled paper (used as a surrogate paper waste) was added as substrate and acetylene or 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) was spiked for methanogenesis inhibition. In the first phase of experiments it was found that acetylene at 1% v/v in the headspace was as effective as BES in inhibiting methanogenic activity. Hydrogen gas accumulated in the headspace of the bottles, reaching a plateau. Similar final hydrogen concentrations were obtained for reactors spiked with acetylene and BES. In the second phase of tests the headspace of the batch reactors was flushed with nitrogen gas after the first plateau of hydrogen was reached, and subsequently incubated, with no further addition of inhibitor nor substrate. It was found that hydrogen production resumed and reached a second plateau, although somewhat lower than the first one. This procedure was repeated a third time and an additional amount of hydrogen was obtained. The plateaux and initial rates of hydrogen accumulation decreased in each subsequent incubation cycle. The total cumulative hydrogen harvested in the three cycles was much higher (approx. double) than in the first cycle alone. We coined this procedure as IV-SSAH (intermittently vented solid substrate anaerobic hydrogen generation). Our results point out to a feasible strategy for obtaining higher hydrogen yields from the fermentation of industrial solid wastes, and a possible combination of waste treatment processes consisting of a first stage IV-SSAH followed by a second SSAD stage. Useful products of this approach would be hydrogen, organic acids or methane, and anaerobic digestates that could be used as soil amenders after post-treatment.

  4. Hydrogen generation via anaerobic fermentation of paper mill wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez Vazquez, I.; Poggi Varaldo, H.M. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Dept. of Biotechnology and Bioengineering; Sparling, R.; Risbey, D. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg (Canada). Dept. of Microbiology; Rinderknecht Seijas, N. [ESIQUIE-IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Division Base Sciences

    2005-11-15

    The objective of this work was to determine the hydrogen production from paper mill wastes using microbial consortia of solid substrate anaerobic digesters. Inocula from mesophilic, continuous solid substrate anaerobic digestion (SSAD) reactors were transferred to small lab scale, batch reactors. Milled paper (used as a surrogate paper waste) was added as substrate and acetylene or 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) was spiked for methanogenesis inhibition. In the first phase of experiments it was found that acetylene at 1% v/v in the headspace was as effective as BES in inhibiting methanogenic activity. Hydrogen gas accumulated in the headspace of the bottles, reaching a plateau. Similar final hydrogen concentrations were obtained for reactors spiked with acetylene and BES. In the second phase of tests the headspace of the batch reactors was flushed with nitrogen gas after the first plateau of hydrogen was reached, and subsequently incubated, with no further addition of inhibitor nor substrate. It was found that hydrogen production resumed and reached a second plateau, although somewhat lower than the first one. This procedure was repeated a third time and an additional amount of hydrogen was obtained. The plateaux and initial rates of hydrogen accumulation decreased in each subsequent incubation cycle. The total cumulative hydrogen harvested in the three cycles was much higher (approx. double) than in the first cycle alone. We coined this procedure as IV-SSAH (intermittently vented solid substrate anaerobic hydrogen generation). Our results point out to a feasible strategy for obtaining higher hydrogen yields from the fermentation of industrial solid wastes, and a possible combination of waste treatment processes consisting of a first stage IV-SSAH followed by a second SSAD stage. Useful products of this approach would be hydrogen, organic acids or methane, and anaerobic digestates that could be used as soil amenders after post-treatment. (author)

  5. Molecular cobalt pentapyridine catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Sun, Yujie

    2013-11-05

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition including the moiety of the general formula. [(PY5Me.sub.2)CoL].sup.2+, where L can be H.sub.2O, OH.sup.-, a halide, alcohol, ether, amine, and the like. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water or sea water can be subject to low electric potentials, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen.

  6. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from

  7. Development of a low cost, portable solar hydrogen generation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kyle; Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, Ashok; Wingo, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen is a clean energy source that is environmentally friendly and safe. It is well known that electrolysis is a common method used to produce hydrogen. Other high cost methods for hydrogen production can be countered by the development of this low cost pulse width modulated circuit, using direct current provided by naturally existing solar energy as a power source. Efforts are being made in the scientific community to produce a low cost, portable, solar hydrogen generating device for a number of clean energy applications such as fuel cells and energy storage. Proof of concept has already been tested in the laboratory and a small prototype system is being designed and fabricated in the workshop at Alabama A&M University. Our results of this study and details of the electronic circuit and the prototype are presented.

  8. Organics Characterization Of DWPF Alternative Reductant Simulants, Glycolic Acid, And Antifoam 747

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wiedenman, B. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Lambert, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Crump, S. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Papathanassiu, A. E. [Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, W. K. [Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, I. L. [Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The present study examines the fate of glycolic acid and other organics added in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as part of the glycolic alternate flowsheet. Adoption of this flowsheet is expected to provide certain benefits in terms of a reduction in the processing time, a decrease in hydrogen generation, simplification of chemical storage and handling issues, and an improvement in the processing characteristics of the waste stream including an increase in the amount of nitrate allowed in the CPC process. Understanding the fate of organics in this flowsheet is imperative because tank farm waste processed in the CPC is eventually immobilized by vitrification; thus, the type and amount of organics present in the melter feed may affect optimal melt processing and the quality of the final glass product as well as alter flammability calculations on the DWPF melter off gas. To evaluate the fate of the organic compounds added as the part of the glycolic flowsheet, mainly glycolic acid and antifoam 747, samples of simulated waste that was processed using the DWPF CPC protocol for tank farm sludge feed were generated and analyzed for organic compounds using a variety of analytical techniques at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). These techniques included Ion Chromatography (IC), Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy. A set of samples were also sent to the Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for analysis by NMR Spectroscopy at the University of Maryland, College Park. Analytical methods developed and executed at SRNL collectively showed that glycolic acid was the most prevalent organic compound in the supernatants of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) products examined. Furthermore, the studies suggested that commercially available glycolic acid contained minor amounts

  9. DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

    2013-06-18

    On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facility’s Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPF’s proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

  10. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system.

  11. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system.

  12. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a Late Wash' facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  13. Hydrogen generation from biogenic and fossil fuels by autothermal reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, Thomas; Heinzel, Angelika; Vogel, Bernhard

    Hydrogen generation for fuel cell systems by reforming technologies from various fuels is one of the main fields of investigation of the Fraunhofer ISE. Suitable fuels are, on the one hand, gaseous hydrocarbons like methane, propane but also, on the other hand, liquid hydrocarbons like gasoline and alcohols, e.g., ethanol as biogenic fuel. The goal is to develop compact systems for generation of hydrogen from fuel being suitable for small-scale membrane fuel cells. The most recent work is related to reforming according to the autothermal principle — fuel, air and steam is supplied to the reactor. Possible applications of such small-scale autothermal reformers are mobile systems and also miniature fuel cell as co-generation plant for decentralised electricity and heat generation. For small stand-alone systems without a connection to the natural gas grid liquid gas, a mixture of propane and butane is an appropriate fuel.

  14. Supercontinuum generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides at telecommunication wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safioui, Jassem; Leo, François; Kuyken, Bart; Gorza, Simon-Pierre; Selvaraja, Shankar Kumar; Baets, Roel; Emplit, Philippe; Roelkens, Gunther; Massar, Serge

    2014-02-10

    We report supercontinuum (SC) generation centered on the telecommunication C-band (1550 nm) in CMOS compatible hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides. A broadening of more than 550 nm is obtained in 1cm long waveguides of different widths using as pump picosecond pulses with on chip peak power as low as 4 W.

  15. Efficiency of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitalas, R.

    1989-03-01

    An explicit formula for the efficiency of the PP chain energy generation in terms of the branching fractions to the three PP chains is derived and the variation of the efficiency with temperature and hydrogen abundance is illustrated. The PP chain efficiency is shown to have a minimum as a function of Y/X. The combined efficiency of simultaneous nuclear energy generation by the PP chain and the equilibrium CN cycle is then presented. 6 refs.

  16. Dealloyed Ruthenium Film Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Chemical Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramis B. Serin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thin-film ruthenium (Ru and copper (Cu binary alloys have been prepared on a Teflon™ backing layer by cosputtering of the precious and nonprecious metals, respectively. Alloys were then selectively dealloyed by sulfuric acid as an etchant, and their hydrogen generation catalysts performances were evaluated. Sputtering time and power of Cu atoms have been varied in order to tailor the hydrogen generation performances. Similarly, dealloying time and the sulfuric acid concentration have also been altered to tune the morphologies of the resulted films. A maximum hydrogen generation rate of 35 mL min−1 was achieved when Cu sputtering power and time were 200 W and 60 min and while acid concentration and dealloying time were 18 M and 90 min, respectively. It has also been demonstrated that the Ru content in the alloy after dealloying gradually increased with the increasing the sputtering power of Cu. After 90 min dealloying, the Ru to Cu ratio increased to about 190 times that of bare alloy. This is the key issue for observing higher catalytic activity. Interestingly, we have also presented template-free nanoforest-like structure formation within the context of one-step alloying and dealloying used in this study. Last but not least, the long-time hydrogen generation performances of the catalysts system have also been evaluated along 3600 min. During the first 600 min, the catalytic activity was quite stable, while about 24% of the catalytic activity decayed after 3000 min, which still makes these systems available for the development of robust catalyst systems in the area of hydrogen generation.

  17. A planar microfabricated electrolyzer for hydrogen and oxygen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L.; Myer, B.; Tellefsen, K.; Pau, S.

    We present the design, fabrication and testing of a microfabricated planar reactor for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) using thin film Pt electrodes and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fluidic chamber. The reactor is designed to separate gases by flow dynamics and reactor flow is analyzed by three-dimensional finite element analysis. The planar geometry is scalable, compact and stackable. Using KOH 28 wt% electrolyte, we have achieved a hydrogen generation density of 0.23 kg h -1 m -3 and an efficiency of 48% with a flow rate of 10 ml min -1 and cell voltage of 3 V.

  18. Marrying gas power and hydrogen energy: A catalytic system for combining methane conversion and hydrogen generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, J.; Gaudillère, C.; Farrusseng, D.; Rothenberg, G.

    2009-01-01

    Ceria-based catalysts are good candidates for integrating methane combustion and hydrogen generation. These new, tuneable catalysts are easily prepared. They are robust inorganic crystalline materials, and perform well at the 400 °C-550 °C range, in some cases even without precious metals. This make

  19. Autotrophic denitrification using hydrogen generated from metallic iron corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunger, Neha; Bose, Purnendu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogenotrophic denitrification was demonstrated using hydrogen generated from anoxic corrosion of metallic iron. For this purpose, a mixture of hydrogenated water and nitrate solution was used as reactor feed. A semi-batch reactor with nitrate loading of 2000 mg m(-3) d(-1) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of 0.27 mg N L(-1) (99% nitrate removal). A continuous flow reactor with nitrate loading of 28.9 mg m(-3) d(-1) and HRT of 15.6 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of approximately 0.025 mg N L(-1) (95% nitrate removal). In both cases, the concentration of nitrate degradation by-products, viz., ammonia and nitrite, were below detection limits. The rate of denitrification in the reactors was controlled by hydrogen availability, and hence to operate such reactors at higher nitrate loading rates and/or lower HRT than reported in the present study, hydrogen concentration in the hydrogenated water must be significantly increased.

  20. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  1. Generator cooling hydrogen purity improvement system using hydrogen absorbing alloy; Suiso kyuzo gokin riyo hatsudenkinai suiso jundo kojo system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, H.; Kabutomori, T.; Wakisaka, Y. [Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Y.; Kogi, T.; Sato, J.; Haruki, N. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan); Fujita, T. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-09-15

    Described herein is a system which uses a hydrogen-absorbing alloy to purify a hydrogen gas stream used as a coolant for power generator. Hydrogen in the stream containing impurities such as nitrogen can be selectively absorbed by sufficiently cooled hydrogen-absorbing alloy. Impurity gases concentrated in the alloy pores are released, and then the alloy is heated to release hydrogen. This purifies hydrogen to at least 99.99%. This system essentially consists of an hydrogen-absorbing unit, hot water production/supply system which circulates hot water of 80 to 90degC to release hydrogen out of the alloy, pretreatment unit, and temperature and pressure sensors. It is confirmed, by the test in which the system is connected to a commercial power generator of 600MW, that the system can be continuously operated to purify hydrogen to at least 99.9% for an extended period. 4 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Generation of hydrogen from photocatalytic cleavage of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallinson, R.G.; Resasco, D.E.; Lobban, L.L.; Nicholas, K.M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes the objectives, methods and early results on the US Department of Energy sponsored project to generate hydrogen from splitting of water using photocatalysts. The approach uses organometallic photosensitizers adsorbed onto platinated titania. Platinized titania is a photocatalyst for water splitting, but does not absorb sunlight in the visible range, where most of the sun`s energy is contained. Organometallic photosensitizers are synthesized, attached to platinized titania and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, action spectra and hydrogen generation ability. Thus far, Copper, Iron and Ruthenium catalyst systems have been produced and characterized in this manner. Suitable sensitized systems that have the desirable properties have not yet been found.

  3. DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANTS TO DETERMINE MCU SOLVENT BUILD-UP IN CONTINOUS RUNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D; Frances Williams, F; S Crump, S; Russell Eibling, R; Thomas02 White, T; David Best, D

    2006-05-25

    The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) facility and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) are scheduled to begin processing salt waste in fiscal year 2007. A portion of the streams generated in these salt processing facilities will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to be incorporated in the glass matrix. Before the streams are introduced, a combination of impact analyses and research and development studies must be performed to quantify the impacts on DWPF processing. The Process Science & Engineering (PS&E) section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 to evaluate the impacts on DWPF processing. Simulant Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet studies have been performed using previous composition and projected volume estimates for the ARP sludge/monosodium titanate (MST) stream. Initial MCU incorporation testing for the DWPF flowsheet indicated unacceptable levels of Isopar{reg_sign}L were collecting in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) condenser system and unanticipated quantities of modifier were carrying over into the SRAT condenser system. This work was performed as part of Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) flowsheet testing and was reported by Baich et al. Due to changes in the flammability control strategy for DWPF for salt processing, the incorporation strategy for ARP changed and additional ARP flowsheet tests were necessary to validate the new processing strategy. The last round of ARP testing included the incorporation of the MCU stream and identified potential processing issues with the MCU solvent. The identified issues included the potential carry-over and accumulation of the MCU solvent components in the CPC condensers and in the recycle stream to the Tank Farm. Solvent retention in the DWPF condensers contradicts the DWPF solvent control strategy. Therefore, DWPF requested SRNL to perform additional MCU flowsheet studies to better

  4. Description of DWPF reference waste form and canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    This document describes the reference waste form and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The facility is planned for location at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and is scheduled for construction authorization during FY-1983. The reference canister is fabricated of 24-in.-OD 304L stainless steel pipe with a dished bottom, domed head, and lifting and welding flanges on the head neck. The overall canister length is 9 ft 10 in., with a wall thickness of 3/8-in. (schedule 20 pipe). The canister length was selected to reduce equipment cell height in the DWPF to a practical size. The canister diameter was selected to ensure that a filled canister with its shipping cask could be accommodated on a legal-weight truck. The overall dimensions and weight appear to be generally compatible with preliminary assessments of repository requirements. The reference waste form is borosilicate glass containing approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides with the balance glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its high resistance to leaching by water, its relatively high solubility for nuclides found in the sludge, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 58% SiO/sub 2/ and 15% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/. This composition results in a low average leachability in the waste form of approximately 5 x 10/sup -9/ g/cm/sup 2/-day based on /sup 137/Cs over 365 days in 25/sup 0/C water. The canister is filled with 3260 lb of glass which occupies about 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 425 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and 15-year-old supernate from the Stage 1 and Stage 2 processes. The radionuclide content of the canister is about 150,000 curies, with a radiation level of 2 x 10/sup 4/ rem/hour at 1 cm.

  5. DWPF GC FILTER ASSEMBLY SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C.; Imrich, K.

    2009-11-11

    On March 18, 2009 a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) GC Line Filter Assembly was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This filter assembly was removed from operation following the completion of Sludge Batch 4 processing in the DWPF. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request. This document reports the pictures, observations, samples collected, and analytical results for the assembly. The assembly arrived at SRNL separated into its three component filters: high efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-1, HEPA-2, and a high efficiency mist evaporator (HEME). Each stage of the assembly's media was sampled and examined visually and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solids built up in the filter housing following the first stage HEME, were dissolved in dilute nitric acid and analyzed by ICP-AES and the undissolved white solids were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The vast majority of the material in each of the three stages of the DWPF GC Line Filter Assembly appears to be contaminated with a Hg compound that is {approx}59 wt% Hg on a total solids basis. The Hg species was identified by XRD analysis to contain a mixture of Hg{sub 4}(OH)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Hg{sub 10}(OH){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}. Only in the core sample of the second stage HEPA, did this material appear to be completely covering portions of the filter media, possibly explaining the pressure drops observed by DWPF. The fact that the material migrates through the HEME filter and both HEPA filters, and that it was seen collecting on the outlet side of the HEME filter, would seem to indicate that these filters are not efficient at removing this material. Further SRAT off-gas system modeling should help determine the extent of Hg breakthrough past the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT). The SRAT off-gas system has not been modeled since startup of the facility. Improvements to the efficiency of Hg stripping prior to the ammonia scrubber would seem

  6. Aluminum chloride for accelerating hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, U. B.; Akdim, O.; Miele, P.

    The present research paper reports preliminary results about the utilization of anhydrous aluminum chloride (AlCl 3) for accelerating hydrogen generation through hydrolysis of aqueous solution of sodium borohydride (NaBH 4) at 80 °C. To the best of our knowledge, AlCl 3 has never been considered for that reaction although many transition metal salts had already been assessed. AlCl 3 reactivity was compared to those of AlCl 3·6H 2O, AlF 3, CoCl 2, RuCl 3 and NiCl 2. With AlCl 3 and a NaBH 4 solution having a gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (GHSC) of 2.9 wt.%, almost 100% hydrogen was generated in few seconds, i.e., with a hydrogen generation rate (HGR) of 354 L min -1 g -1(Al). This HGR is one of the highest rates ever reported. Higher HGRs were obtained by mixing AlCl 3 with CoCl2, RuCl 3 or NiCl 2. For example, the system RuCl 3:AlCl 3 (50:50 mass proportion) showed a HGR > 1000 L min -1 g -1(Ru:Al). The hydrolysis by-products (once dried) were identified (by XRD, IR and elemental analysis) as being Al(OH) 3, NaCl and Na 2B(OH) 4Cl and it was observed that even in situ formed Al(OH) 3 has catalytic abilities with HGRs of 5 L min -1 g -1(Al). All of these preliminary results are discussed, which concludes that AlCl 3 has a potential as accelerator for single-use NaBH 4-based storage system.

  7. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  8. One Step Hydrogen Generation Through Sorption Enhanced Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, Jeff [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2017-08-03

    One-step hydrogen generation, using Sorption Enhanced Reforming (SER) technology, is an innovative means of providing critical energy and environmental improvements to US manufacturing processes. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is developing a Compact Hydrogen Generator (CHG) process, based on SER technology, which successfully integrates previously independent process steps, achieves superior energy efficiency by lowering reaction temperatures, and provides pathways to doubling energy productivity with less environmental pollution. GTI’s prior CHG process development efforts have culminated in an operational pilot plant. During the initial pilot testing, GTI identified two operating risks- 1) catalyst coating with calcium aluminate compounds, 2) limited solids handling of the sorbent. Under this contract GTI evaluated alternative materials (one catalyst and two sorbents) to mitigate both risks. The alternate catalyst met performance targets and did not experience coating with calcium aluminate compounds of any kind. The alternate sorbent materials demonstrated viable operation, with one material enabling a three-fold increase in sorbent flow. The testing also demonstrated operation at 90% of its rated capacity. Lastly, a carbon dioxide co-production study was performed to assess the advantage of the solid phase separation of carbon dioxide- inherent in the CHG process. Approximately 70% lower capital cost is achievable compared to SMR-based hydrogen production with CO2 capture, as well as improved operating costs.

  9. Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Hydrogenation Reactions on Platinum Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krier, James M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is used to characterize intermediate species of hydrogenation reactions on the surface of platinum nanoparticle catalysts. In contrast to other spectroscopy techniques which operate in ultra-high vacuum or probe surface species after reaction, SFG collects information under normal conditions as the reaction is taking place. Several systems have been studied previously using SFG on single crystals, notably alkene hydrogenation on Pt(111). In this thesis, many aspects of SFG experiments on colloidal nanoparticles are explored for the first time. To address spectral interference by the capping agent (PVP), three procedures are proposed: UV cleaning, H2 induced disordering and calcination (core-shell nanoparticles). UV cleaning and calcination physically destroy organic capping while disordering reduces SFG signal through a reversible structural change by PVP.

  10. A New Method for Generating Hydrogen from Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-Bo; LI Ke-Xin; LI Hong; FAN Yu-Zun; YU Zhe-Xun; LI Dong-Mei; LUO Yan-Hong; CHEN Li-Quan

    2008-01-01

    A new method for generating hydrogen by the reaction of A1 powder with water using iodine as additive is developed. 12 can penetrate through the surface oxide layer on atuminium to form AlI3. High solubility of AlI3 in water is benefited to activate Al surface. It is found that the production of hydrogen becomes significant above 60℃ and obeys a logarithm rule. The pH value varies from 5 to 3 then back to 4.5 during the reaction,which is determined mainly by the kinetics of hydration reaction of AlI3 and the reaction of Al and HI produced spontaneously.

  11. Statistical Review of Data from DWPF's Process Samples for Batches 19 Through 30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.B.

    1999-04-06

    The measurements derived from samples taken during the processing of batches 19 through 30 at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) affords an opportunity for review and comparisons. This report has looked at some of the statistics from these data. Only the data reported by the DWPF lab (that is, the data provided by the lab as representative of the samples taken) are available for this analysis. In some cases, the sample results reported may be a subset of the sample results generated by the analytical procedures. A thorough assessment of the DWPF lab's analytical procedures would require the complete set of data. Thus, the statistics reported here, specifically, as they relate to analytical uncertainties, are limited to the reported data for these samples, A fell for the consistency of the incoming slurry is the estimation of the components of variation for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipts. In general, for all of the vessels, the data from batches after 21 show smaller batch-to-batch variation than the data from all the batches. The relative contributions of batch-to-batch versus residual, which includes analytical, are presented in these analyses.

  12. A Renewably Powered Hydrogen Generation and Fueling Station Community Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Sekura, Linda S.; Prokopius, Paul; Theirl, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The proposed project goal is to encourage the use of renewable energy and clean fuel technologies for transportation and other applications while generating economic development. This can be done by creating an incubator for collaborators, and creating a manufacturing hub for the energy economy of the future by training both white- and blue-collar workers for the new energy economy. Hydrogen electrolyzer fueling stations could be mass-produced, shipped and installed in collaboration with renewable energy power stations, or installed connected to the grid with renewable power added later.

  13. Sum frequency generation spectroscopy study of hydrogenated stepped Si(111) surfaces made by molecular hydrogen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, K. T. T.; Sattar, M. A.; Miyauchi, Y.; Mizutani, G.; Rutt, H. N.

    2017-09-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on stepped Si(111) surfaces 9.5° miscut in the [ 1 ̅ 1 ̅ 2 ] direction has been investigated in situ in a UHV chamber with a base pressure of 10-8 Pa. The H-Si(111)1×1 surface was prepared by exposing the wafer to ultra-pure hydrogen gas at a pressure of 470 Pa. Termination of hydrogen on terraces and steps was observed by sum frequency generation (SFG) with several polarization combinations such as ppp, ssp, pps, spp, psp, sps, pss and sss. Here the 1st, 2nd and 3rd symbols indicate SFG, visible and IR polarizations, respectively. ppp and ssp-SFG clearly showed only two modes: the Si-H stretching vibration terrace mode at 2082 cm-1 (A) and the vertical step dihydride vibration mode at 2094 cm-1 (C1). Interesting points are the appearance of the C1 mode in contrast to the previous SFG spectrum of the H-Si(111)1×1 surface with the same miscut surface angle prepared by wet chemical etching. We suggest that the formation of step dihydride and its orientation on the Si(111) stepped surfaces depend strongly on the preparation method.

  14. An integrated MEMS infrastructure for fuel processing: hydrogen generation and separation for portable power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varady, M. J.; McLeod, L.; Meacham, J. M.; Degertekin, F. L.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2007-09-01

    Portable fuel cells are an enabling technology for high efficiency and ultra-high density distributed power generation, which is essential for many terrestrial and aerospace applications. A key element of fuel cell power sources is the fuel processor, which should have the capability to efficiently reform liquid fuels and produce high purity hydrogen that is consumed by the fuel cells. To this end, we are reporting on the development of two novel MEMS hydrogen generators with improved functionality achieved through an innovative process organization and system integration approach that exploits the advantages of transport and catalysis on the micro/nano scale. One fuel processor design utilizes transient, reverse-flow operation of an autothermal MEMS microreactor with an intimately integrated, micromachined ultrasonic fuel atomizer and a Pd/Ag membrane for in situ hydrogen separation from the product stream. The other design features a simpler, more compact planar structure with the atomized fuel ejected directly onto the catalyst layer, which is coupled to an integrated hydrogen selective membrane.

  15. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

    2008-07-31

    DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

  16. Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen generation from barium tantalate composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Roland; Soldat, Julia; Busser, G Wilma; Wark, Michael

    2013-04-01

    (111)-layered Ba5Ta4O15 photocatalysts were synthesised by a solid state reaction route and a citrate synthesis route, and their structural and electronic properties were investigated. After citrate route preparation, the presence of a second phase, namely Ba3Ta5O15, was determined by X-ray powder diffraction and absorption spectroscopy. The existence of this phase had a profound effect on the photocatalytic activity of this Ba5Ta4O15/Ba3Ta5O15 composite in comparison to the pure Ba5Ta4O15 materials. The photocatalytic performance of the barium tantalates was evaluated by investigating the capability in ˙OH radical formation and hydrogen generation. Strongly increased hydrogen evolution rates for the Ba5Ta4O15/Ba3Ta5O15 composite, up to 160% higher than for the pure Ba5Ta4O15, were determined, and only very small amounts of Rh co-catalyst, deposited on the photocatalysts by stepwise reductive photo-deposition, were needed to achieve these results.

  17. Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for Solar Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Craig A.

    2014-11-26

    Under program auspices we have investigated material chemistries suitable for the solar generation of hydrogen by water photoelectrolysis. We have built upon, and extended, our knowledge base on the synthesis and application of TiO2 nanotube arrays, a material architecture that appears ideal for water photoelectrolysis. To date we have optimized, refined, and greatly extended synthesis techniques suitable for achieving highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays of given length, wall thickness, pore diameter, and tube-to-tube spacing for use in water photoelectrolysis. We have built upon this knowledge based to achieve visible light responsive, photocorrosion stable n-type and p-type ternary oxide nanotube arrays for use in photoelectrochemical diodes.

  18. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong Wook; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2016-04-20

    Photocatalytic hydrogen (H2 ) generation in a water splitting process has recently attracted tremendous interest because it allows the direct conversion of clean and unlimited solar energy into the ideal energy resource of H2 . For efficient photocatalytic H2 generation, the role of the photocatalyst is critical. With increasing demand for more efficient, sustainable, and cost-effective photocatalysts, various types of semiconductor photocatalysts have been intensively developed. In particular, on the basis of its superior catalytic and tunable electronic properties, nitrogen-doped graphene is a potential candidate for a high-performance photocatalyst. Nitrogen-doped graphene also offers additional advantages originating from its unique two-dimensional sp(2) -hybridized carbon network including a large specific surface area and exceptional charge transport properties. It has been reported that nitrogen-doped graphene can play diverse but positive functions including photo-induced charge acceptor/meditator, light absorber from UV to visible light, n-type semiconductor, and giant molecular photocatalyst. Herein, we summarize the recent progress and general aspects of nitrogen-doped graphene as a photocatalyst for photocatalytic H2 generation. In addition, challenges and future perspectives in this field are also discussed.

  19. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program`s maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model`s predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  20. Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerrell, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program's maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model's predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

  1. Development of a new hydrogen purification system by using hydrogen absorbing alloy for generator cooling; Suiso kyuzo gokin riyo hatsudenkinai suiso jundo kojo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruki, N.; Sato, J.; Kogi, T.; Nishimura, Y. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Takeda, H. [Japan Steel works Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] Fujita, T. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-20

    Hydrogen absorbing alloys have a number of useful functions, such as energy conversion, hydrogen storage and purification. As an application to separation and purification of hydrogen, we have developed a new hydrogen purification system by using a hydrogen absorbing alloy for generator cooling. For demonstration testing with an actual machine, a hydrogen recovery and purification device using 120kg of alloy was manufactured and installed on No.5 turbine-synchronous generator at Himeji No.2 power station. This device is designed to improve the purity of the hydrogen gas in generator containing impurities such as nitrogen and oxygen. The test results tell that the purity of the hydrogen gas in the generator can be enhanced from 98% to 99.9% and maintained at this level under continuous operation. An application of the hydrogen purification system is expected to decrease the generator`s windage loss, resulting higher generator efficiency. 2 refs., 18 figs.

  2. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  3. Spark Discharge Generated Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vons, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the largest obstacles to the large scale application of hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles is the absence of hydrogen storage methods suitable for application on-board of these vehicles. Metal hydrides are materials in which hydrogen is reversibly absorbed by one or more metals or

  4. Spark Discharge Generated Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vons, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the largest obstacles to the large scale application of hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles is the absence of hydrogen storage methods suitable for application on-board of these vehicles. Metal hydrides are materials in which hydrogen is reversibly absorbed by one or more metals or combinatio

  5. Computational design of materials for solar hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Naoto

    Photocatalysis has a great potential for the production of hydrogen from aquerous solution under solar light. In this talk, two different approaches toward the computational materials desing for solar hydrogen generation will be presented. Tin (Sn), which has two major oxidation states, Sn2+ and Sn4+, is abundant on the earth's crust. Recently, visible-light responsive photocatalytc H2 evolution reaction was identified over a mixed valence tin oxide Sn3O4. We have carried out crystal structure prediction for mixed valence tin oxides in different atomic compositions under ambient pressure condition using advanced computational methods based on the evolutionary crystal-structure search and density-functional theory. The predicted novel crystal structures realize the desirable band gaps and band edge positions for H2 evolution under visible light irradiation. It is concluded that multivalent tin oxides have a great potential as an abundant, cheap and environmentally-benign solar-energy conversion photofunctional materials. Transition metal doping is effective for sensitizing SrTiO3 under visible light. We have theoretically investigated the roles of the doped Cr in STO based on hybrid density-functional calculations. Cr atoms are preferably substituting for Ti under any equilibrium growth conditions. The lower oxidation state Cr3+, which is stabilized under an n-type condition of STO, is found to be advantageous for the photocatalytic performance. It is firther predicted that lanthanum is the best codopant for stabilizing the favorable oxidation state, Cr3+. The prediction was validated by our experiments that La and Cr co-doped STO shows the best performance among examined samples. This work was supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO) and International Research Fellow program of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through project P14207.

  6. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  7. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  8. SME Acceptability Determination For DWPF Process Control (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-12

    The statistical system described in this document is called the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). K. G. Brown and R. L. Postles were the originators and developers of this system as well as the authors of the first three versions of this technical basis document for PCCS. PCCS has guided acceptability decisions for the processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) since the start of radioactive operations in 1996. The author of this revision to the document gratefully acknowledges the firm technical foundation that Brown and Postles established to support the ongoing successful operation at the DWPF. Their integration of the glass propertycomposition models, developed under the direction of C. M. Jantzen, into a coherent and robust control system, has served the DWPF well over the last 20+ years, even as new challenges, such as the introduction into the DWPF flowsheet of auxiliary streams from the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and other processes, were met. The purpose of this revision is to provide a technical basis for modifications to PCCS required to support the introduction of waste streams from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) into the DWPF flowsheet. An expanded glass composition region is anticipated by the introduction of waste streams from SWPF, and property-composition studies of that glass region have been conducted. Jantzen, once again, directed the development of glass property-composition models applicable for this expanded composition region. The author gratefully acknowledges the technical contributions of C.M. Jantzen leading to the development of these glass property-composition models. The integration of these models into the PCCS constraints necessary to administer future acceptability decisions for the processing at DWPF is provided by this sixth revision of this document.

  9. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen...... evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...... sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively....

  10. Combining photocatalytic hydrogen generation and capsule storage in graphene based sandwich structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Li, Xiyu; Zhang, Guozhen; Cui, Peng; Wang, Xijun; Jiang, Xiang; Zhao, Jin; Luo, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    The challenge of safe hydrogen storage has limited the practical application of solar-driven photocatalytic water splitting. It is hard to isolate hydrogen from oxygen products during water splitting to avoid unwanted reverse reaction or explosion. Here we propose a multi-layer structure where a carbon nitride is sandwiched between two graphene sheets modified by different functional groups. First-principles simulations demonstrate that such a system can harvest light and deliver photo-generated holes to the outer graphene-based sheets for water splitting and proton generation. Driven by electrostatic attraction, protons penetrate through graphene to react with electrons on the inner carbon nitride to generate hydrogen molecule. The produced hydrogen is completely isolated and stored with a high-density level within the sandwich, as no molecules could migrate through graphene. The ability of integrating photocatalytic hydrogen generation and safe capsule storage has made the sandwich system an exciting candidate for realistic solar and hydrogen energy utilization.

  11. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  12. Durable pd-based alloy and hydrogen generation membrane thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Raymond C.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Vanderspurt, Thomas Henry

    2010-02-02

    A durable Pd-based alloy is used for a H.sub.2-selective membrane in a hydrogen generator, as in the fuel processor of a fuel cell plant. The Pd-based alloy includes Cu as a binary element, and further includes "X", where "X" comprises at least one metal from group "M" that is BCC and acts to stabilize the .beta. BCC phase for stability during operating temperatures. The metal from group "M" is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Cr, Nb, Ta, V, Mo, and W, with Nb and Ta being most preferred. "X" may further comprise at least one metal from a group "N" that is non-BCC, preferably FCC, that enhances other properties of the membrane, such as ductility. The metal from group "N" is selected from the group consisting of Ag, Au, Re, Ru, Rh, Y, Ce, Ni, Ir, Pt, Co, La and In. The at. % of Pd in the binary Pd--Cu alloy ranges from about 35 at. % to about 55 at. %, and the at. % of "X" in the higher order alloy, based on said binary alloy, is in the range of about 1 at. % to about 15 at. %. The metals are selected according to a novel process.

  13. Hydrogen Plasma Generation with 200 MHz RF Ion Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongtae; Park, Kwangmook; Seo, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Han-Sung; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The ion source for the system is required to be rugged with 2000 hours maintenance free operation time because it is installed in the vessel filled with SF6 gas at the pressure of 10 bar. A 200 MHz RF ion source is considered as an ion source. It is a simple construction and provides long life operation. The specifications of the ion source are 5 kV extraction voltage and 1 mA beam current referenced to the proton. RF ion source has been developed and undergone a performance test. Results of the test are presented. 200 MHz RF ion source is designated and manufactured. First of all test stand test of ion source are set up for a performance test of ion source. It includes a RF ion source, a 200-MHz RF system, beam extraction system, vacuum system, beam extraction system, and beam diagnostic system. At pressure of 1.2E-5 torr, hydrogen plasma is generated with net RF power 70 W. Pyrex tube surrounded by an inductive coil takes the role of vessel and discharge is enhanced with field of permanent magnets.

  14. Integrated photoelectrochemical energy storage: solar hydrogen generation and supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yongqi; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Current solar energy harvest and storage are so far realized by independent technologies (such as solar cell and batteries), by which only a fraction of solar energy is utilized. It is highly desirable to improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy. Here, we construct an integrated photoelectrochemical device with simultaneous supercapacitor and hydrogen evolution functions based on TiO(2)/transition metal hydroxides/oxides core/shell nanorod arrays. The feasibility of solar-driven pseudocapacitance is clearly demonstrated, and the charge/discharge is indicated by reversible color changes (photochromism). In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H(2) generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. Specific capacitances of 482 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) and 287 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) are obtained with TiO(2)/Ni(OH)(2) nanorod arrays. This study provides a new research strategy for integrated pseudocapacitor and solar energy application.

  15. Hydrogen generation by the hydrolysis reaction of ball-milled aluminium-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyu; Zhao, Zhongwei; Liu, Xuheng; Hao, Mingming; Chen, Ailiang; Tang, Zhongyang

    2014-05-01

    The addition of Li can prevent an inert alumina film from forming on the surface of Al alloy particles, allowing the rapid hydrogen generation of Al alloys to be achieved. However, because the Li content is less than 10%, the hydrogen generation rate and hydrogen yield of Al-Li alloys are significantly decreased. In this work, NaCl is introduced to prepare Al-Li alloys with low Li contents by ball milling. The research results show that by increasing the amount of NaCl added, the ball milling time and Li content can effectively improve the hydrogen generation of the alloys. Under optimal preparation conditions, the ultimate hydrogen yield of Al-Li alloys can reach 100%. The initial water temperature has almost no effect on the generation of hydrogen, even at 0 °C. Ca2+ and Mg2+ can combine with OH- to form the insoluble compounds Ca(OH)2 and Mg(OH)2, which can prevent hydrogen generation. NO3- reacts with Al to form ammonia and reduce the hydrogen yield of the alloys. Therefore, Al-Li alloys should be prevented from reacting with water containing Ca2+, Mg2+ and NO3-. Al-Li alloys must be stored in isolation from air to maintain good hydrogen-generation performances.

  16. Electroless Plated Co-Ni-P-B/Ni Foam Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Sodium Borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daeil; Kim, Taegyu

    2016-02-01

    Co-Ni-P-B catalyst supported on Ni foam was prepared using electroless plating for hydrogen generation from an alkaline NaBH4 solution. Co-B, Co-P-B, and Co-Ni-B were prepared for comparison. Surface morphology of catalyst/Ni foams were observed using SEM analysis. The Co- Ni-P-B/Ni foam catalyst showed the superior performance on hydrogen generation rate due to the uniform formation of catalyst particles on the surface of Ni foam. Characteristics of hydrogen generation rate on the Co-N-P-B/Ni foam catalyst were investigated at the variety of NaBH4 and NaOH concentrations. The hydrogen generation rate increased with decreasing NaBH4 concentration, while increasing NaOH concentration. Durability test was performed, resulting in the stable hydrogen generation for 6 hours.

  17. Control of Hydrogen Generation from Water Molecules Dissociated by Activated Aluminum Particles Based on Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Koji; Takahara, Kenji; Kajiwara, Toshinori; Watanabe, Masao

    This paper proposes a control system to keep hydrogen generation by a reaction between water and activated aluminum particles at desired level. Because the activated aluminum particles are produced shredded aluminum sawdust, the characteristics of hydrogen generation vary depending on its samples. Therefore, the fuzzy control system to determine the quantum of the activated aluminum particles is designed based on the measured characteristics of hydrogen generation. Error form a desired value, error rate and dead time of the reaction are chosen as the labels of the proposed fuzzy membership functions. The reactor vessel that the activated aluminum particles are put into is developed to generate hydrogen continuously. Three types of aluminum particles of the characteristic are used for the experiments. The proposed system is confirmed to be useful for the control of hydrogen generation, coping with the effect of reacting characteristic changes according to the activated aluminum samples.

  18. Commercializing larger PEM-based hydrogen generators for energy and industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulthrop, L.; Anderson, E.; Chow, O.; Friedland, R.; Porter, S. [Distributed Energy Systems, Wallingford, CT (United States)

    2007-07-01

    As economic, security and environmental drivers converge, there is a demand for larger and better on-site hydrogen generators. This paper outlined the measures needed to scale-up a commercial 12 kg/day proton exchange membrane (PEM) hydrogen generator to a 100 to 500 kg hydrogen per day capacity range. The commercial hydrogen generators using PEM water electrolysis are well proven and currently serve industrial applications worldwide in more than 50 countries. However, North American liquid hydrogen shortages, increasing trucking costs, developing economies with no liquid infrastructure, utilities, and forklift fuel cell fueling applications are all working to increase market demand for commercial on-site hydrogen generation. Water electrolysis was recently identified as the hydrogen technology that will enable solar renewable energy to fill the 17 TW carbon free energy gap projected worldwide by 2050. The scale-up must consider fixed cost as well as operating costs of the electrolyzer and power conditioning, compression and storage ancillaries. It was noted that although commercial applications may be well-satisfied with a 100 kg hydrogen/day PEM hydrogen generator module for the next five years, after that, the 500 kg hydrogen/day module will be required for hydrogen vehicle fueling stations, utility load-leveling, and renewables to hydrogen generation. It was suggested that a paced development effort can be synchronized with evolving fuel cell markets and market price points. The projection of future market price points can be generated using market data and specific cases of the H2A model developed by the United States Department of Energy for electrolysis based fueling. H2A modeling and system analysis identify the components and subsystem development priorities, requirements, and challenges. Codes and standards are maturing to help manufacturers and certification authorities make safe and compliant equipment. It was noted that this development effort is

  19. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, R. K., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in; Sahajwalla, V. [Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Shukla, S.; Saxena, S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Lee, G.-H. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Alwarappan, S., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS{sub 2}, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS{sub 2} film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS{sub 2} is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS{sub 2} shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS{sub 2} is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  20. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D MoS2, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS2 film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS2 is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS2 shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS2 is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  1. Study on the Hydrogen Generation Rules of Coal Oxidation at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao He

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on a hydrogen desorption experiment and a comparative experiment of low-temperature coal oxidation performed prior to and after hydrogen desorption, this paper demonstrates the occurrence of hydrogen adsorption in coal at room temperature and reveals that the hydrogen generated in the process of coal oxidation originates from coal oxidation and desorption. The results show that the hydrogen accumulation generated only by coal oxidation and the hydrogen accumulation generated solely by desorption both exhibit a LangmuirEXT1 function equation relationship with temperature. The result of the present research can provide a theoretical basis for the accurate prediction of spontaneous coal combustion and is of great significance to the prevention and control of coal spontaneous combustion in coal mines, industrial coal storage and transportation.

  2. IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION KT07-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2011-01-12

    . The measured PCT responses were well predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models. The measured viscosity values for each KT07-series glass were acceptable for DWPF processing and were well predicted by the current PCCS model. Overall, the results show that the inclusion of relatively high concentrations of noble metals (in terms of expected values for a DWPF sludge batch) had no significant impact on the properties and performance of these glass compositions. There were no significant differences in the measured properties when compared to those of the KT04-series glasses, which did not contain noble metals. Liquidus temperature measurements are still underway and there may be an impact of the noble metals on those measurements. However, no adverse effects were noted in terms of crystallization after slow cooling. At the completion of these studies, all of the data generated will be reviewed with regard to the applicability of the DWPF PCCS models and recommendations will be made as to whether the validation ranges of the current models can be extended, or whether some or all of the models need to be refit to allow for the incorporation of the SCIX streams. As changes are made to the projected sludge compositions and the volume of the SCIX material, additional evaluations should be performed.

  3. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a ``Late Wash` facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  4. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-07-14

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  5. Hydrogen Generator by Methane Pyrolysis with Carbon Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop, fabricate, and test a system to provide 99.999% hydrogen by efficiently performing methane pyrolysis. The system has three unique...

  6. NaBH4 generator integrated with energy conversion device based on hydrogen combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netskina, O. V.; Fursenko, R. V.; Komova, O. V.; Odintsov, E. S.; Simagina, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    A thermoelectric energy conversion device operating on the heat generated by a hydrogen diffusion microflame has been developed. For the first time, a NaBH4 hydrogen generator has been employed as a source of fuel for such type of power generator. A 1%Ru-3%Co/Sibunit catalyst ensures hydrogen generation at a rate of 3 cm3 s-1 during 3 h. Power and efficiency characteristics of the integrated system consisting of a hydrogen generator and an energy converter based on combustion technologies have been studied experimentally. The total efficiency and the generated power of the system were measured to achieve values of up to 1.23% and 0.25 W, respectively. Ways to further improve the system's power output and efficiency characteristics have been discussed.

  7. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-11-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  8. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-01-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet, over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. Present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH$^*$ can be used as a descriptor to screen for selectivity trends between the 2e$^-$ water oxidation to H$_2$O$_2$ and the 4e$^-$ oxidation to O$_2$. We show that materials that bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO$_2$, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rati...

  9. Effect of water injection on hydrogen generation during severe accident in PWR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jun; CAO Xuewu

    2009-01-01

    Effect of water injection on hydrogen generation during severe accident in a 1000 MWe pressurized water reactor was studied.The analyses were carried out with different water injection rates at different core damage stages.The core can be quenched and accident progression can be terminated by water injection at the time before cohesive core debris is formed at lower core region.Hydrogen generation rate decreases with water injection into the core at the peak core temperature of 1700 K,because the core is quenched and reflooded quickly.The water injection at the peak core temperature of 1900 K,the hydrogen generation rate increases at low injection rates of the water,as the core is quenched slowly and the core remains in uncovered condition at high temperatures for a longer time than the situation of high injection rate.At peak core temperature of 2100-2300 K,the Hydrogen generation rate increases by water injection because of the steam serving to the high temperature steam-starved core.Hydrogen generation rate increases significantly after water injection into the core at peak core temperature of 2500 K because of the steam serving to the relocating Zr-U-O mixture.Almost no hydrogen generation can be seen in base case after formation of the molten pool at the lower core region.However,hydrogen is generated if water is injected into the molten pool,because steam serves to the crust supporting the molten pool.Reactor coolant system (RCS) depressurization by opening power operated relief valves has important effect on hydrogen generation.Special attention should be paid to hydrogen generation enhancement caused by RCS depressurization.

  10. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation using glycerol wastewater over Pt/TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LI; Yuexiang LI; Shaoqin PENG; Gongxuan LU; Shuben LI

    2009-01-01

    Using glycerol as electron donor, photocataly-tic hydrogen generation over Pt/TiO2 was investigated.The results show that glycerol can not only improve the efficiency of photocatalytic hydrogen generation but can also be decomposed effectively. The factors which affect photocatalytic hydrogen generation, such as irradiation time, initial concentration of the glycerol solution, pH-value of the suspensions and the coexisting substances were studied. The final oxidation products of glycerol were H2O and CO2. Glyceraldhyde, glycoladehyde, glycolic acid and formaldehyde were identified as the intermedi-ates. A possible reaction mechanism was discussed.

  11. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  12. Investment in hydrogen tri-generation for wastewater treatment plants under uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharieh, Kaveh; Jafari, Mohsen A.; Guo, Qizhong

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we present a compound real option model for investment in hydrogen tri-generation and onsite hydrogen dispensing systems for a wastewater treatment plant under price and market uncertainties. The ultimate objective is to determine optimal timing and investment thresholds to exercise initial and subsequent options such that the total savings are maximized. Initial option includes investment in a 1.4 (MW) Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) fed by mixture of waste biogas from anaerobic digestion and natural gas, along with auxiliary equipment. Produced hydrogen in MCFC via internal reforming, is recovered from the exhaust gas stream using Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) purification technology. Therefore the expansion option includes investment in hydrogen compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) systems which creates additional revenue by selling hydrogen onsite in retail price. This work extends current state of investment modeling within the context of hydrogen tri-generation by considering: (i) Modular investment plan for hydrogen tri-generation and dispensing systems, (ii) Multiple sources of uncertainties along with more realistic probability distributions, (iii) Optimal operation of hydrogen tri-generation is considered, which results in realistic saving estimation.

  13. Toxicological analysis of 17 autopsy cases of hydrogen sulfide poisoning resulting from the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maebashi, Kyoko; Iwadate, Kimiharu; Sakai, Kentaro; Takatsu, Akihiro; Fukui, Kenji; Aoyagi, Miwako; Ochiai, Eriko; Nagai, Tomonori

    2011-04-15

    Although many cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning have been reported, in most of these cases, it resulted from the accidental inhalation of hydrogen sulfide gas. In recent years, we experienced 17 autopsy cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning due to the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, the concentrations of sulfide and thiosulfate in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid and pleural effusion were examined using GC/MS. The sulfide concentrations were blood: 0.11-31.84, urine: 0.01-1.28, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.02-1.59 and pleural effusion: 2.00-8.59 (μg/ml), while the thiosulfate concentrations were blood: 0-0.648, urine: 0-2.669, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.004-0.314 and pleural effusion: 0.019-0.140 (μmol/ml). In previous reports, the blood concentration of thiosulfate was said to be higher than that of sulfide in hydrogen sulfide poisoning cases, although the latter was higher than the former in 8 of the 14 cases examined in this study. These results are believed to be strongly influenced by the atmospheric concentration of hydrogen sulfide the victims were exposed to and the time interval between exposure and death.

  14. Enzymatic generation of hydrogen peroxide shows promising antifouling effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, J.B.; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Laursen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) potential of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced enzymatically in a coating containing starch, glucoamylase, and hexose oxidase was evaluated in a series of laboratory tests and in-sea field trials. Dissolved H2O2 inhibited bacterial biofilm formation by eight of nine marine...

  15. Autothermal hydrogen generation from methanol in a ceramic microchannel network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Angela M.; Wilhite, Benjamin A.

    In this paper, the authors present the first demonstration of a new class of integrated ceramic microchannel reactors for all-in-one reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. The reactor concept employs precision-machined metal distributors capable of realizing complex flow distribution patterns with extruded ceramic microchannel networks for cost-effective thermal integration of multiple chemical processes. The presently reported reactor is comprised of five methanol steam reforming channels packed with CuO/γ-Al 2O 3, interspersed with four methanol combustion channels washcoated with Pt/γ-Al 2O 3, for autothermal hydrogen production (i.e., without external heating). Results demonstrate the capability of this new device for integrating combustion and steam reforming of methanol for autothermal production of hydrogen, owing to the axially self-insulating nature of distributor-packaged ceramic microchannels. In the absence of any external insulation, stable reforming of methanol to hydrogen at conversions >90% and hydrogen yields >70% was achieved at a maximum reactor temperature of 400 °C, while simultaneously maintaining a packaging temperature <50 °C.

  16. Solar-hydrogen generation and solar concentration (Conference Presentation)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinello, Enrico; Modestino, Miquel A.; Schüttauf, Jan-Willem; Lambelet, David; Delfino, Antonio; Domine, Didier; Faes, Antonin; Despeisse, Matthieu; Bailat, Julien; Psaltis, Demetri; Fernandez Rivas, David; Ballif, Christophe; Moser, Christophe; Sulima, Oleg V.; Conibeer, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    We successfully demonstrated and reported the highest solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with crystalline silicon cells and Earth-abundant electrocatalysts under unconcentrated solar radiation. The combination of hetero-junction silicon cells and a 3D printed Platinum/Iridium-Oxide electrolyzer has been p

  17. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M. [Proton Energy Systems, Inc., Rocky Hill, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  18. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Retail Stations, Data through Quarter 4 of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-05-31

    This publication includes 86 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through the fourth quarter of 2016. These CDPs include data from retail stations only.

  19. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Retail Stations, Data Through Quarter 3 of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-07

    This publication includes 80 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2016 for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through the third quarter of 2016. These CDPs include data from retail stations only.

  20. Corrosion impact of reductant on DWPF and downstream facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Imrich, K. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilderman, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-12-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternate reductant in the preparation of high level waste for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). During processing, the glycolic acid is not completely consumed and small quantities of the glycolate anion are carried forward to other high level waste (HLW) facilities. The impact of the glycolate anion on the corrosion of the materials of construction throughout the waste processing system has not been previously evaluated. A literature review had revealed that corrosion data in glycolate-bearing solution applicable to SRS systems were not available. Therefore, testing was recommended to evaluate the materials of construction of vessels, piping and components within DWPF and downstream facilities. The testing, conducted in non-radioactive simulants, consisted of both accelerated tests (electrochemical and hot-wall) with coupons in laboratory vessels and prototypical tests with coupons immersed in scale-up and mock-up test systems. Eight waste or process streams were identified in which the glycolate anion might impact the performance of the materials of construction. These streams were 70% glycolic acid (DWPF feed vessels and piping), SRAT/SME supernate (Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels and piping), DWPF acidic recycle (DWPF condenser and recycle tanks and piping), basic concentrated recycle (HLW tanks, evaporators, and transfer lines), salt processing (ARP, MCU, and Saltstone tanks and piping), boric acid (MCU separators), and dilute waste (HLW evaporator condensate tanks and transfer line and ETF components). For each stream, high temperature limits and worst-case glycolate concentrations were identified for performing the recommended tests. Test solution chemistries were generally based on analytical results of actual waste samples taken from the various process facilities or of prototypical simulants produced in the laboratory. The materials of construction for most vessels

  1. Experimental and modelling evaluation of an ammonia-fuelled microchannel reactor for hydrogen generation / Steven Chiuta

    OpenAIRE

    Chiuta, Steven

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, ammonia (NH3) decomposition was assessed as a fuel processing technology for producing on-demand hydrogen (H2) for portable and distributed fuel cell applications. This study was motivated by the present lack of infrastructure to generate H2 for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. An overview of past and recent worldwide research activities in the development of reactor technologies for portable and distributed hydrogen generation via NH3 decomposition wa...

  2. Continuous/Batch Mg/MgH2/H2O-Based Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew; Huang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    A proposed apparatus for generating hydrogen by means of chemical reactions of magnesium and magnesium hydride with steam would exploit the same basic principles as those discussed in the immediately preceding article, but would be designed to implement a hybrid continuous/batch mode of operation. The design concept would simplify the problem of optimizing thermal management and would help to minimize the size and weight necessary for generating a given amount of hydrogen.

  3. Generation of Hydrogen from Photolysis of Organic Acids by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Photodecomposition of ten kinds of organic acids by Rhodopseudomonas palustris for producing hydrogen has been investigated. By using acetate as hydrogen donor, dynamics of hydrogen production and cell growth has been determined; the influences of acetate concentration, temperature, light intensity and the effects of the interaction among metal ions (Fe3+, Ni2+), acetate and glutamate in aqueous solution on hydrogen production have been examined for optimizing the conditions of H2 generation. The results show that H2 production is partially correlated with cell growth; Ni2+ inhibits hydrogen production, but enhances cell growth; Fe3+ promotes hydrogen production evidently. The highest rate of H2 production is 22.1 mL L-1 h-1 under the conditions of 35 ~ 37℃, 6000 ~ 8000 lx, 30 mmolL-1 of acetate, 9 mmolL-1 of glutamate, and 50 (molL-1 of Fe3+.

  4. Hydrogen generation and storage from hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, A.M.F.R.; Falcao, D.S. [Departamento de Eng. Quimica, Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Silva, R.A.; Rangel, C.M. [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia e Inovacao, Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 (Portugal)

    2006-08-15

    The catalytic hydrolysis of alkaline sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution was studied using a non-noble; nickel-based powered catalyst exhibiting strong activity even after long time storage. This easy-to-prepare catalyst showed an enhanced activity after being recovered from previous use. The effects of temperature, NaBH{sub 4} concentration, NaOH concentration and pressure on the hydrogen generation rate were investigated. Particular importance has the effect of pressure, since the maximum reached pressure of hydrogen is always substantially lower than predictions (considering 100% conversion) due to solubility effects. The solubility of hydrogen is greatly enhanced by the rising pressure during reaction, leading to storage of hydrogen in the liquid phase. This effect can induce new ways of using this type of catalyst and reactor for the construction of hydrogen generators and even containers for portable and in situ applications. (author)

  5. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  6. Solar-hydrogen generation and solar concentration (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinello, Enrico; Modestino, Miguel A.; Schüttauf, Jan-Willem; Lambelet, David; Delfino, Antonio; Dominé, Didier; Faes, Antonin; Despeisse, Matthieu; Bailat, Julien; Psaltis, Demetri; Fernandez Rivas, David; Ballif, Christophe; Moser, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We successfully demonstrated and reported the highest solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with crystalline silicon cells and Earth-abundant electrocatalysts under unconcentrated solar radiation. The combination of hetero-junction silicon cells and a 3D printed Platinum/Iridium-Oxide electrolyzer has been proven to work continuously for more than 24 hours in neutral environment, with a stable 13.5% solar-to-fuel efficiency. Since the hydrogen economy is expected to expand to a global scale, we demonstrated the same efficiency with an Earth-abundant electrolyzer based on Nickel in a basic medium. In both cases, electrolyzer and photovoltaic cells have been specifically sized for their characteristic curves to intersect at a stable operating point. This is foreseen to guarantee constant operation over the device lifetime without performance degradation. The next step is to lower the production cost of hydrogen by making use of medium range solar concentration. It permits to limit the photoabsorbing area, shown to be the cost-driver component. We have recently modeled a self-tracking solar concentrator, able to capture sunlight within the acceptance angle range +/-45°, implementing 3 custom lenses. The design allows a fully static device, avoiding the external tracker that was necessary in a previously demonstrated +/-16° angular range concentrator. We will show two self-tracking methods. The first one relies on thermal expansion whereas the second method relies on microfluidics.

  7. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, for use in fuel cells, engines, and turbines for transportation or mobile applications. Hydrogen is desirable as an energy carrier, because its oxidation by air releases substantial energy (thermally or electrochemically) and produces only water as a product. In contrast, hydrocarbon energy carriers inevitably produce CO2, contributing to global warming. While CO2 capture may prove feasible in large stationary applications, implementing it in transportation and mobile applications is a daunting challenge. Thus a zero-emission energy carrier like hydrogen is especially needed in these cases. Use of H2 as an energy carrier also brings new challenges such as safe handling of compressed hydrogen and implementation of new transport, storage, and delivery processes and infrastructure. With current storage technologies, hydrogen's energy per volume is very low compared to other automobile fuels. High density storage of compressed hydrogen requires combinations of high pressure and/or low temperature that are not very practical. An alternative for storage is use of solid light weight hydrogenous material systems which have long durability, good adsorption properties and high activity. Substantial research has been conducted on carbon materials like activated carbon, carbon nanofibers, and carbon nanotubes due to their high theoretical hydrogen capacities. However, the theoretical values have not been achieved, and hydrogen uptake capacities in these materials are below 10 wt. %. In this thesis we investigated the use of silicon for hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation via water oxidation of silicon had been ignored due to slow reaction kinetics. We hypothesized that the hydrogen generation rate could be improved by using high surface area silicon nanoparticles. Our laser-pyrolysis-produced nanoparticles showed surprisingly rapid hydrogen generation and high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical maximum of two moles of H2 per

  8. DWPF Flowsheet Studies with Simulants to Determine Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit Solvent Partitioning and Verify Actinide Removal Process Incorporation Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, C

    2006-04-21

    The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) facility and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) are scheduled to begin processing salt waste in fiscal year 2007. A portion of the streams generated in the salt processing facilities will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to be incorporated in the glass matrix. Before the streams are introduced, a combination of impact analyses and research and development studies must be performed to quantify the impacts on DWPF processing. The Process Science & Engineering (PS&E) section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 to evaluate the impacts on DWPF processing. Simulant Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet studies have been performed using previous composition and projected volume estimates for the ARP sludge/monosodium titanate (MST) stream. Due to changes in the flammability control strategy for DWPF for salt processing, the incorporation strategy for ARP has changed and additional ARP flowsheet tests were necessary to validate the new processing strategy. The last round of ARP testing included the incorporation of the MCU stream and identified potential processing issues with the MCU solvent. The identified issues included the potential carry-over and accumulation of the MCU solvent components in the CPC condensers and in the recycle stream to the Tank Farm. Therefore, DWPF requested SRNL to perform additional MCU flowsheet studies to better quantify the organic distribution in the CPC vessels. The previous MCU testing used a Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) simulant since it was anticipated that both of these facilities would begin salt processing during SB4 processing. The same sludge simulant recipe was used in this round of ARP and MCU testing to minimize the number of changes between the two phases of testing so a better comparison could be made. ARP and MCU stream simulants were made for this phase of testing

  9. Development of generator-cooling hydrogen purity improvement system using hydrogen absorbing alloy; Suiso kyuzo gokin ni yoru hatsudenkinai suiso jundo kojo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Y.; Sato, J.; Haruki, N.; Kogi, T.; Okuno, Y. [The Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan); Takeda, H.; Wakisaka, Y. [The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Fujita, T. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-31

    A generator-cooling hydrogen purity improvement system was developed by utilizing hydrogen absorbing and discharging functions of hydrogen storage alloy. For demonstration test with an actual machine, four elements, Ca, Ni, Mm and Al, were used as hydrogen storage alloys. To treat hydrogen gas with a wide range of purity and reduce hydrogen gas feed, flow operation for hydrogen purity improvement, batch operation, and recycle operation for maintaining the hydrogen purity were performed. As a result of the generator-cooling hydrogen purity improvement demonstration test, it was found that the hydrogen purity can be enhanced from 97.69% before operation to 99.9% after operation for 104 hours and to 99.95% after operation for 140 hours. The hydrogen recovery rates during flow test and batch test were between 92 and 95%. For the hydrogen purity maintaining test, it was confirmed that the high hydrogen purity of 99.9% has been continuously maintained for 140 days, and that the hydrogen recovery rate was over 99%. 2 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Analysis of the DWPF glass pouring system using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calloway, T.B. Jr.; Jantzen, C.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Medich, L.; Spennato, N. [Pavillion Technologies, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-05

    Neural networks were used to determine the sensitivity of 39 selected Melter/Melter Off Gas and Melter Feed System process parameters as related to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter Pour Spout Pressure during the overall analysis and resolution of the DWPF glass production and pouring issues. Two different commercial neural network software packages were used for this analysis. Models were developed and used to determine the critical parameters which accurately describe the DWPF Pour Spout Pressure. The model created using a low-end software package has a root mean square error of {+-} 0.35 inwc (< 2% of the instrument`s measured range, R{sup 2} = 0.77) with respect to the plant data used to validate and test the model. The model created using a high-end software package has a R{sub 2} = 0.97 with respect to the plant data used to validate and test the model. The models developed for this application identified the key process parameters which contribute to the control of the DWPF Melter Pour Spout pressure during glass pouring operations. The relative contribution and ranking of the selected parameters was determined using the modeling software. Neural network computing software was determined to be a cost-effective software tool for process engineers performing troubleshooting and system performance monitoring activities. In remote high-level waste processing environments, neural network software is especially useful as a replacement for sensors which have failed and are costly to replace. The software can be used to accurately model critical remotely installed plant instrumentation. When the instrumentation fails, the software can be used to provide a soft sensor to replace the actual sensor, thereby decreasing the overall operating cost. Additionally, neural network software tools require very little training and are especially useful in mining or selecting critical variables from the vast amounts of data collected from process computers.

  11. Freeze and restart of the DWPF Scale Glass Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.S.

    1989-07-31

    After over two years of successful demonstration of many design and operating concepts of the DWPF Melter system, the last Scale Glass Melter campaign was initiated on 6/9/88 and consisted of two parts; (1) simulation of noble metal buildup and (2) freeze and subsequent restart of the melter under various scenarios. The objectives were to simulate a prolonged power loss to major heating elements and to examine the characteristics of transient melter operations during a startup with a limited supply of lid heat. Experimental results indicate that in case of a total power loss to the lower electrodes such as due to noble metal deposition, spinel crystals will begin to form in the SRL 165 composite waste glass pool in 24 hours. The total lid heater power required to initiate joule heating was the same as that during slurry-feeding. Results of a radiative heat transfer analysis in the plenum indicate that under the identical operating conditions, the startup capabilities of the SGM and the DWPF Melter are quite similar, despite a greater lid heater to melt surface area ratio in the DWPF Melter.

  12. Control of microbially generated hydrogen sulfide in produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, E.D.; Vance, I.; Gammack, G.F.; Duncan, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    Production of hydrogen sulfide in produced waters due to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a potentially serious problem. The hydrogen sulfide is not only a safety and environmental concern, it also contributes to corrosion, solids formation, a reduction in produced oil and gas values, and limitations on water discharge. Waters produced from seawater-flooded reservoirs typically contain all of the nutrients required to support SRB metabolism. Surface processing facilities provide a favorable environment in which SRB flourish, converting water-borne nutrients into biomass and H{sub 2}S. This paper will present results from a field trial in which a new technology for the biochemical control of SRB metabolism was successfully applied. A slip stream of water downstream of separators on a produced water handling facility was routed through a bioreactor in a side-steam device where microbial growth was allowed to develop fully. This slip stream was then treated with slug doses of two forms of a proprietary, nonbiocidal metabolic modifier. Results indicated that H{sub 2}S production was halted almost immediately and that the residual effect of the treatment lasted for well over one week.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, J.

    2011-11-14

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently received a deposit sample from the Melter Primary Off Gas System (POG) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This sample was composed of material that had been collected while the quencher was in operation January 27, 2011 through March 31, 2011. DWPF requested, through a technical assistance request, characterization of the melter off-gas deposits by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The purpose of the Melter Off-Gas System is to reduce the amount of radioactive particles and mercury in the gases vented to the atmosphere. Gases emitted from the melter pass through the primary film cooler, quencher, Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT), Steam Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), a condenser, a high efficiency mist eliminator, and a high efficiency particulate air filter, before being vented to the Process Vessel Vent System. The film coolers cool the gases leaving the melter vapor space from {approx}750 C to {approx}375 C, by introducing air and steam to the flow. In the next step, the quencher cools the gas to about 60 C by bringing the condensate from the OGCT in contact with the effluent (Figure 1). Most of the steam in the effluent is then condensed and the melter vapor space pressure is reduced. The purpose of the OGCT is to collect and store the condensate formed during the melter operation. Condensate from the OGCT is circulated to the SAS and atomized with steam. This atomized condensate is mixed with the off-gas to wet and join the particulate which is then removed in the cyclone. The next stage incorporates a chilled water condenser which separates the vapors and elemental mercury from the off-gas steam. Primary off-gas deposit samples from the DWPF melter have previously been analyzed. In 2003, samples from just past the film cooler, from the inlet of the quencher and inside the quencher were analyzed at SRNL. It was determined that the samples were a

  14. Hydrogen generation from steam reforming of ethanol in dielectric barrier discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Yijun Lü; Xu Zhang; Shuanghui Hu

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge(DBD)was used for the generation of hydrogen from ethanol reforming.Effects of reaction conditions,such as vaporization temperature,ethanol flow rate,water/ethanol ratio,and addition of oxygen,on the ethanol conversion and hydrogen yield,were studied.The results showed that the increase of ethanol flow rate decreased ethanol conversion and hydrogen yield,and high water/ethanol ratio and addition of oxygen were advantageous.Ethanol conversion and hydrogen yield increased with the vaporization room temperature up to the maximum at first,and then decreased slightly.The maximum hydrogen yield of 31.8% was obtained at an ethanol conversion of 88.4% under the optimum operation conditions of vaporization room temperature of 120℃,ethanol flux of 0.18 mL/min,water/ethanol ratio of 7.7 and oxygen volume concentration of 13.3%.

  15. Enviro-Friendly Hydrogen Generation from Steel Mill-Scale via Metal-Steam Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Kesavan, Sathees

    2006-01-01

    An economically viable and environmental friendly method of generating hydrogen for fuel cells is by the reaction of certain metals with steam, called metal-steam reforming (MSR). This technique does not generate any toxic by-products nor contributes to the undesirable greenhouse effect. From the standpoint of favorable thermodynamics, total…

  16. Radiolytic hydrogen generation at silicon carbide–water interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, Jennifer [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Reiff, Sarah C. [Radiation Laboratory and Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Pimblott, Simon M. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); LaVerne, Jay A., E-mail: laverne.1@nd.edu [Radiation Laboratory and Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    While many of the proposed uses of SiC in the nuclear industry involve systems that are assumed to be dry, almost all materials have dissociated chemisorbed water associated with their surface, which can undergo chemistry in radiation fields. Silicon carbide α-phase and β-phase nanoparticles with water were irradiated with γ-rays and 5 MeV {sup 4}He ions followed by the determination of the production of molecular hydrogen, H{sub 2}, and characterization of changes in the particle surface. The yields of H{sub 2} from SiC–water slurries were always greater than expected from a simple mixture rule indicating that the presence of SiC was influencing the production of H{sub 2} from water, probably through an energy transfer from the solid to liquid phase. Although the increase in H{sub 2} yields was modest, a decrease in the water mass percentage led to an increase in H{sub 2} yields, especially for very low amounts of water. Surface analysis techniques included diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), nitrogen absorption with the Brunauer – Emmett – Teller (BET) methodology for surface area determination, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Little change in the SiC surface was observed following radiolysis except for some conversion of β-phase SiC to the α-phase and the formation of SiO{sub 2} with He ion radiolysis. - Highlights: • SiC–water interfaces were irradiated with γ-rays and 5 MeV He ions. • Hydrogen production from SiC–water slurries was greater than that for pure water. • Raman spectroscopy shows conversion of the α-phase SiC to the β-phase. • He ion radiolysis resulted in the formation of SiO{sub 2} on the surface.

  17. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  18. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

    2010-04-30

    This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

  19. Electroless Nickel-Based Catalyst for Diffusion Limited Hydrogen Generation through Hydrolysis of Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon P. Anderson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts based on electroless nickel and bi-metallic nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles were synthesized for the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation. The catalysts were synthesized by polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticle-catalyzation and activation of Al2O3 substrate and electroless Ni or Ni-Mo plating of the substrate for selected time lengths. Catalytic activity of the synthesized catalysts was tested for the hydrolyzation of alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for hydrogen generation. The effects of electroless plating time lengths, temperature and NaBH4 concentration on hydrogen generation rates were analyzed and discussed. Compositional analysis and surface morphology were carried out for nano-metallized Al2O3 using Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis (EDAX. The as-plated polymer-stabilized electroless nickel catalyst plated for 10 min and unstirred in the hydrolysis reaction exhibited appreciable catalytic activity for hydrolysis of NaBH4. For a zero-order reaction assumption, activation energy of hydrogen generation using the catalyst was estimated at 104.6 kJ/mol. Suggestions are provided for further work needed prior to using the catalyst for portable hydrogen generation from aqueous alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for fuel cells.

  20. Literature search for offsite data to improve the DWPF melter off-gas model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W.E.

    2000-05-04

    This report documents the literature search performed and any relevant data that may help relax some of the constraints on the DWPF melter off-gas model. The objective of this task was to look for outside sources of technical data to help reduce some of the conservatism built in the DWPF melter off-gas model.

  1. Minimising hydrogen sulphide generation during steam assisted production of heavy oil

    OpenAIRE

    Wren Montgomery; Sephton, Mark A.; Watson, Jonathan S.; Huang Zeng; Andrew C. Rees

    2015-01-01

    The majority of global petroleum is in the form of highly viscous heavy oil. Traditionally heavy oil in sands at shallow depths is accessed by large scale mining activities. Recently steam has been used to allow heavy oil extraction with greatly reduced surface disturbance. However, in situ thermal recovery processes can generate hydrogen sulphide, high levels of which are toxic to humans and corrosive to equipment. Avoiding hydrogen sulphide production is the best possible mitigation strateg...

  2. Efficiency and economics of large scale hydrogen liquefaction. [for future generation aircraft requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen is being considered as a substitute for conventional hydrocarbon-based fuels for future generations of commercial jet aircraft. Its acceptance will depend, in part, upon the technology and cost of liquefaction. The process and economic requirements for providing a sufficient quantity of liquid hydrogen to service a major airport are described. The design is supported by thermodynamic studies which determine the effect of process arrangement and operating parameters on the process efficiency and work of liquefaction.

  3. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  4. Effects of acid accelerators on hydrogen generation from solid sodium borohydride using small scale devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesan, Sankaran; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan (Ravi) [Department of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This work describes hydrogen generation using a heterogeneous chemical system for small scale portable applications. Hydrogen generation using acidified water and solid sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) is presented. The effects of two modes of contacts - (1) a flow through type and (2) a diffusion type - contact in a 5 mm{sup 3} device are discussed. The effects of contacting several mineral and benign acids with NaBH{sub 4} are compared by monitoring hydrogen yield. Among the mineral acids examined, HCl generates a maximum hydrogen yield of 97% of the theoretical yield at 3N concentration. The benign acids are required in higher concentration compared to mineral acids. Formic acid produces 87% of the hydrogen yield at 12N. The products of the reaction have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. A combination of acid strength, porosity of the interface, and solubility of the byproducts contributes to the different hydrogen yields in the presence of various acids. (author)

  5. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Katherine [Proton OnSite; Dalton, Luke [Proton OnSite; Roemer, Andy [Proton OnSite; Carter, Blake [Proton OnSite; Niedzwiecki, Mike [Proton OnSite; Manco, Judith [Proton OnSite; Anderson, Everett [Proton OnSite; Capuano, Chris [Proton OnSite; Wang, Chao-Yang [Penn State University; Zhao, Wei [Penn State University

    2014-02-05

    Renewable hydrogen from proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is gaining strong interest in Europe, especially in Germany where wind penetration is already at critical levels for grid stability. For this application as well as biogas conversion and vehicle fueling, megawatt (MW) scale electrolysis is required. Proton has established a technology roadmap to achieve the necessary cost reductions and manufacturing scale up to maintain U.S. competitiveness in these markets. This project represents a highly successful example of the potential for cost reduction in PEM electrolysis, and provides the initial stack design and manufacturing development for Proton’s MW scale product launch. The majority of the program focused on the bipolar assembly, from electrochemical modeling to subscale stack development through prototyping and manufacturing qualification for a large active area cell platform. Feasibility for an advanced membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with 50% reduction in catalyst loading was also demonstrated. Based on the progress in this program and other parallel efforts, H2A analysis shows the status of PEM electrolysis technology dropping below $3.50/kg production costs, exceeding the 2015 target.

  6. In-vessel Zircaloy oxidation/hydrogen generation behavior during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronenberg, A.W. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-09-01

    In-vessel Zircaloy oxidation and hydrogen generation data from various US Nuclear Regulatory Commission severe-fuel damage test programs are presented and compared, where the effects of Zircaloy melting, bundle reconfiguration, and bundle quenching by reflooding are assessed for common findings. The experiments evaluated include fuel bundles incorporating fresh and previously irradiated fuel rods, as well as control rods. Findings indicate that the extent of bundle oxidation is largely controlled by steam supply conditions and that high rates of hydrogen generation continued after melt formation and relocation. Likewise, no retardation of hydrogen generation was noted for experiments which incorporated control rods. Metallographic findings indicate extensive oxidation of once-molten Zircaloy bearing test debris. Such test results indicate no apparent limitations to Zircaloy oxidation for fuel bundles subjected to severe-accident coolant-boiloff conditions. 46 refs., 22 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Dye-Sensitized Photocatalytic Water Splitting and Sacrificial Hydrogen Generation: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Chowdhury

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Today, global warming and green energy are important topics of discussion for every intellectual gathering all over the world. The only sustainable solution to these problems is the use of solar energy and storing it as hydrogen fuel. Photocatalytic and photo-electrochemical water splitting and sacrificial hydrogen generation show a promise for future energy generation from renewable water and sunlight. This article mainly reviews the current research progress on photocatalytic and photo-electrochemical systems focusing on dye-sensitized overall water splitting and sacrificial hydrogen generation. An overview of significant parameters including dyes, sacrificial agents, modified photocatalysts and co-catalysts are provided. Also, the significance of statistical analysis as an effective tool for a systematic investigation of the effects of different factors and their interactions are explained. Finally, different photocatalytic reactor configurations that are currently in use for water splitting application in laboratory and large scale are discussed.

  8. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition and generation pathway of biogenic gas in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ping; WANG Xiaofeng; XU Yin; SHI Baoguang; XU Yongchang

    2009-01-01

    The carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic gas is of great importance for the study of its generation pathway and reservoiring characteristics. In this paper, the formation pathways and reservoiring characteristics of biogenic gas reservoirs in China are described in terms of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of 31 gas samples from 10 biogenic gas reservoirs. The study shows that the hydrogen isotopic compositions of these biogenic gas reservoirs can be divided into three intervals:δDCH4>-200‰,-250‰<δDCH4<-200‰ and δDCH4<-250‰. The forerunners believed that the main generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of continental fresh water is acetic fermentation. Our research results showed that the generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of marine facies is typical CO2- reduction, the biogenic gas has heavy hydrogen isotopic composition: its δDCH4 values are higher than -200‰; that the biogenic gas under the condition of continental facies also was generated by the same way, but its hydrogen isotopic composition is lighter than that of biogenetic gas generated under typical marine facies condition: -250‰<δDCH4<-200‰, the δDCH4 values may be related to the salinity of the water medium in ancient lakes. From the relevant data of the Qaidam Basin, it can be seen that the hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic methane has the same variation trend with increasing salinity of water medium. There are biogenic gas reservoirs formed in transitional regions under the condition of continental facies. These gas reservoirs resulted from both CO2- reduction and acetic fermentation, the formation of which may be related to the non-variant salinity of ancient water medium and the relatively high geothermal gradient, as is the case encountered in the Baoshan Basin. The biogenic gas generating in these regions has light hydrogen isotopic composition: δDCH4<-250‰, and relatively heavy carbon isotopic

  9. Minimising hydrogen sulphide generation during steam assisted production of heavy oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Wren; Sephton, Mark A.; Watson, Jonathan S.; Zeng, Huang; Rees, Andrew C.

    2015-02-01

    The majority of global petroleum is in the form of highly viscous heavy oil. Traditionally heavy oil in sands at shallow depths is accessed by large scale mining activities. Recently steam has been used to allow heavy oil extraction with greatly reduced surface disturbance. However, in situ thermal recovery processes can generate hydrogen sulphide, high levels of which are toxic to humans and corrosive to equipment. Avoiding hydrogen sulphide production is the best possible mitigation strategy. Here we use laboratory aquathermolysis to reproduce conditions that may be experienced during thermal extraction. The results indicate that hydrogen sulphide generation occurs within a specific temperature and pressure window and corresponds to chemical and physical changes in the oil. Asphaltenes are identified as the major source of sulphur. Our findings reveal that for high sulphur heavy oils, the generation of hydrogen sulphide during steam assisted thermal recovery is minimal if temperature and pressure are maintained within specific criteria. This strict pressure and temperature dependence of hydrogen sulphide release can allow access to the world's most voluminous oil deposits without generating excessive amounts of this unwanted gas product.

  10. Generating hydrogen for mobile devices; Wasserstofferzeugung fuer die mobile Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, W. [Vodafone Pilotentwicklung GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    In future vehicles, more and more functions will be powered by electricity. These are for example ''steer by wire'', ''break by wire'', air conditioning and infotainment. This growing demand for electricity is a new challenge for the automotive industry. The so called APU (auxilliary power unit) is a convincing solution. This power generating unit based on fuel cell technology will provide electrical power in all operation situations. The article deals with the main focus of P{sup 21}-power for the 21st century, the Mannesmann Fuel Cell Product Center of the Vodafone Pilotentwicklung. (orig.)

  11. Optimization and field demonstration of hybrid hydrogen generator/high efficiency furnace system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entchev, E.; Coyle, I.; Szadkowski, F. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A-1M1 (Canada); Manning, M.; Swinton, M. [National Research Council Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Graydon, J.; Kirk, D. [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogen is seen as an energy carrier of the future and significant research on hydrogen generation, storage and utilization is accomplished around the world. However, an appropriate intermediate step before wide hydrogen introduction will be blending conventional fuels such as natural gas, oil or diesel with hydrogen and follow up combustion through conventional means. Due to changes in the combustion and flame characteristics of the system additional research is needed to access the limits and the impact of the fuel mix on the combustion systems performance. The hybrid system consists of a 5 kW{sub el} electrolyzer and a residential 15 kW{sub th} high efficiency gas fired furnace. The electrolyzer was integrated with the furnace gas supply and setup to replace 5-25% of the furnace natural gas flow with hydrogen. A mean for proper mixing of hydrogen with natural gas was provided and a control system for safe system operation was developed. Prior to the start of the field trial the hybrid system was investigated in laboratory environment. It was subjected to a variety of steady state and cycling conditions and a detailed performance and optimization analysis was performed with a range of hydrogen/natural gas mixtures. The optimized system was then installed at the Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies (CCHT) Experimental research house. The energy performance of the hybrid system was compared to the energy performance of an identical high efficiency furnace in the Control research house next door. (author)

  12. Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat-Regenerated Salt Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m3 H2/m3·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H2/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Hydrogen generation in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells using a heat-regenerated salt solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Cusick, Roland D; Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m(3) H(2)/m(3)·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H(2)/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes.

  14. Hydrogen generation from small-scale wind-powered electrolysis system in different power matching modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goekcek, Murat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Nigde University, Campus, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2010-10-15

    This study presents a techno-economic evaluation on hydrogen generation from a small-scale wind-powered electrolysis system in different power matching modes. For the analysis, wind speed data, which measured as hourly time series in Kirklareli, Turkey, were used to predict the electrical energy and hydrogen produced by the wind-hydrogen energy system and their variation according to the height of the wind turbine. The system considered in this study is primarily consisted of a 6 kW wind-energy conversion system and a 2 kW PEM electrolyzer. The calculation of energy production was made by means of the levelized cost method by considering two different systems that are the grid-independent system and the grid-integrated system. Annual production of electrical energy and hydrogen was calculated as 15,148.26 kWh/year and 102.37 kg/year, respectively. The highest hydrogen production is obtained in January. The analyses showed that both electrical energy and hydrogen production depend strongly on the hub height of wind turbine in addition to the economic indicators. In the grid-integrated system, the calculated levelized cost of hydrogen changes in the range of 0.3485-4.4849 US$/kg for 36 m hub height related to the specific turbine cost. The grid-integrated system can be considered as profitable when the excess electrical energy delivered by system sold to the grid. (author)

  15. Flight Hydrogen Sensor for use in the ISS Oxygen Generation Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    MSadoques, George, Jr.; Makel, Darby B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the hydrogen sensor Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) used on the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), to be operated on the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrogen sensor ORU is being provided by Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) to monitor the oxygen outlet for the presence of hydrogen. The hydrogen sensor ORU is a triple redundant design where each sensor converts raw measurements to actual hydrogen partial pressure that is reported to the OGA system controller. The signal outputs are utilized for system shutdown in the event that the hydrogen concentration in the oxygen outlet line exceeds the specified shutdown limit. Improvements have been made to the Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensing element, screening, and calibration process to meet OGA operating requirements. Two flight hydrogen sensor ORUs have successfully completed the acceptance test phase. This paper also describes the sensor s performance during acceptance testing, additional tests planned to extend the operational performance calibration cycle, and integration with the OGA system.

  16. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Summary and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.P.

    2001-07-11

    The objective for this task is to understand and apply the control of glass batch chemistry (frit composition) and/or changes in chemical processing strategies to improve the overall melting process for Macrobatch 3 (MB3) (Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) sludge-only processing). For melt rate limited systems, a small increase in melting efficiency translates into substantial savings by reducing operational costs without compromising the quality of the final waste product. This report summarizes the key information collected during the FY01 melt-rate testing completed to support the conclusion that switching from Frit 200, the frit currently used to prepare all the glass produced in radioactive processing, to Frit 320 should improve the melt rate during processing of DWPF MB3 sludge (Note: MB3 is referred to as Sludge Batch 2 in the High-Level Waste System Plan). The report also includes recommendations that should be addressed prior to implementation of the new frit and future research that should be completed to further improve melt rate. No analysis has been completed to determine if Frit 320 can be used in processing of other sludge macrobatches. The testing in this report is based on dried-slurry testing of a MB3 melter feed prepared from nonradioactive simulants. Additional testing, particularly with a melter feed slurry and actual waste, would be required before implementing the new frit in DWPF, and a variability study would also be necessary. The work to date, at most, provides relative data until actual melter data can be obtained and compared.

  17. Coupling a PEM fuel cell and the hydrogen generation from aluminum waste cans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Susana Silva; Albanil Sanchez, Loyda; Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Mor. CP 62210 (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Cuerpo Academico de Energia y Sustentabilidad, UPCH, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2007-10-15

    High purity hydrogen was generated from the chemical reaction of aluminum and sodium hydroxide. The aluminum used in this study was obtained from empty soft drink cans and treated with concentrated sulfuric acid to remove the paint and plastic film. One gram of aluminum was reacted with a solution of 2moldm{sup -3} of sodium hydroxide to produce hydrogen. The hydrogen produced from aluminum cans and oxygen obtained from a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer or air, was fed to a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell to produce electricity. Yields of 44 mmol of hydrogen contained in a volume of 1.760dm{sup 3} were produced from one gram of aluminum in a time period of 20 min. (author)

  18. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Hydrogen Generation Rate Measurement Apparatus Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-01

    The generation rate of hydrogen gas in the Hanford tank waste will be measured during the qualification of the staged tank waste for processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. Based on a review of past practices in measurement of the hydrogen generation, an apparatus to perform this measurement has been designed and tested for use during waste feed qualification. The hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus (HGRMA) described in this document utilized a 100 milliliter sample in a continuously-purged, continuously-stirred vessel, with measurement of hydrogen concentration in the vent gas. The vessel and lid had a combined 220 milliliters of headspace. The vent gas system included a small condenser to prevent excessive evaporative losses from the sample during the test, as well as a demister and filter to prevent particle migration from the sample to the gas chromatography system. The gas chromatograph was an on line automated instrument with a large-volume sample-injection system to allow measurement of very low hydrogen concentrations. This instrument automatically sampled the vent gas from the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus every five minutes and performed data regression in real time. The fabrication of the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus was in accordance with twenty three (23) design requirements documented in the conceptual design package, as well as seven (7) required developmental activities documented in the task plan associated with this work scope. The HGRMA was initially tested for proof of concept with physical simulants, and a remote demonstration of the system was performed in the Savannah River National Laboratory Shielded Cells Mockup Facility. Final verification testing was performed using non-radioactive simulants of the Hanford tank waste. Three different simulants were tested to bound the expected rheological properties expected during waste feed qualification testing. These

  19. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Hydrogen Generation Rate Measurement Apparatus Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-01

    The generation rate of hydrogen gas in the Hanford tank waste will be measured during the qualification of the staged tank waste for processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. Based on a review of past practices in measurement of the hydrogen generation, an apparatus to perform this measurement has been designed and tested for use during waste feed qualification. The hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus described in this document and shown in Figure 0-1 utilized a 100 milliliter sample in a continuously-purged, continuously-stirred vessel, with measurement of hydrogen concentration in the vent gas. The vessel and lid had a combined 220 milliliters of headspace. The vent gas system included a small condenser to prevent excessive evaporative losses from the sample during the test, as well as a demister and filter to prevent particle migration from the sample to the gas chromatography system. The gas chromatograph was an on line automated instrument with a large-volume sample-injection system to allow measurement of very low hydrogen concentrations. This instrument automatically sampled the vent gas from the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus every five minutes and performed data regression in real time. The fabrication of the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus was in accordance with twenty three (23) design requirements documented in the conceptual design package, as well as seven (7) required developmental activities documented in the task plan associated with this work scope. The HGRMA was initially tested for proof of concept with physical simulants and a remote demonstration of the system was performed in the Savannah River National Laboratory Shielded Cells Mockup Facility. Final verification testing was performed using non-radioactive simulants of the Hanford tank waste. Three different simulants were tested to bound the expected rheological properties expected during waste feed qualification

  20. Hot-Wire generated atomic hydrogen and its impact on thermal ALD in $TiCl_4/NH_3$ system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bui, H.; Kovalgin, A.Y.; Aarnink, A.A.I.; Wolters, R.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the generation of atomic hydrogen made by the dissociation of molecular hydrogen upon collision with a tungsten (W) filament kept at a high temperature (T ≈ 1600–1900◦C). We demonstrate the ability to create atomic hydrogen and to introduce it in short pulses in experiments on etching of

  1. Chemiluminescence assay for catechin based on generation of hydrogen peroxide in basic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Kanemitsu, Mahina; Tajima, Noriko; Maeda, Masako

    2002-11-20

    We have determined that the catechin group in basic solution efficiently produces hydrogen peroxide; moreover, a highly sensitive analysis methodology was developed to measure catechin employing a peroxalate chemiluminescence detection system. Identification of hydrogen peroxide generated by catechin was determined by ESR as well as peroxalate chemiluminescence using catalase and SOD. As a result, catechin-generated superoxide by electron reduction to dissolved oxygen in basic solution, followed by production of hydrogen peroxide through dismutation reaction. This method could measure several tea catechins, (+)-catechin (CC), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) and gallic acid, with measurement range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -3} mol/l and sensitivity of 10{sup -8} mol/l. This method was also applied to the determination of total catechin levels in green tea, black tea and roasted green tea.

  2. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best

  3. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  4. The Effects of CO2 Addition on the Partial Oxidation of Heptane for Hydrogen Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran RAN; Guo Xing XIONG; Shi Shan SHENG; Wei Shen YANG

    2004-01-01

    The effects of CO2 on the partial oxidation of heptane for hydrogen generation have been studied. Based on the experimental results and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, the validity of CO2 addition to weaken the hot spots, and the feasibility of the autothermal operation are discussed.

  5. High performance photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation and solar cells with a double type II heterojunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Lai-Hung; Gomulya, Widianta; Protesescu, Loredana; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of CdSe quantum dot (QD) sensitized electrodes by direct adsorption of colloidal QDs on mesoporous TiO2 followed by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) ligand exchange. High efficiency photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation is demonstrated by means of these electrodes. The

  6. Low-level hydrogen peroxide generation by unbleached cotton nonwovens: implications for wound healing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation during cotton fiber development. The compon...

  7. Early-time photodynamics of ruthenium-based photocatalysts for light-induced hydrogen generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to provide a fundamental understanding of the early-time photodynamics of a series of Ru/M (M = Pd or Pt) bimetallic photocatalysts for light-induced hydrogen generation. This class of complexes adopts a general structure involving a Ru(II) center coordinated to two peripheral ligan

  8. Simultaneous in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction over Pd-Fe catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Contreras, Sandra; Llorca Piqué, Jordi; Domínguez Escalante, Montserrat; Sueiras, Jesús; Medina, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    High mineralization degree of organic compounds can be achieved by a novel environmentally-friendly full heterogeneous Pd–Fe catalytic system, which involves in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide from formic acid and oxygen, and oxidation of organic compounds by Fenton process in a one-pot reaction.

  9. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  10. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. The low temperature, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has recently been identified as an attractive option for stationary power generation, based on the relatively simple and benign materials employed, the zero-emission character of the device, and the expected high power density, high reliability and low cost. However, a PEMFC stack fueled by hydrogen with the combined properties of low cost, high performance and high reliability has not yet been demonstrated. Demonstration of such a stack will remove a significant barrier to implementation of this advanced technology for electric power generation from hydrogen. Work done in the past at LANL on the development of components and materials, particularly on advanced membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs), has contributed significantly to the capability to demonstrate in the foreseeable future a PEMFC stack with the combined characteristics described above. A joint effort between LANL and an industrial stack manufacturer will result in the demonstration of such a fuel cell stack for stationary power generation. The stack could operate on hydrogen fuel derived from either natural gas or from renewable sources. The technical plan includes collaboration with a stack manufacturer (CRADA). It stresses the special requirements from a PEMFC in stationary power generation, particularly maximization of the energy conversion efficiency, extension of useful life to the 10 hours time scale and tolerance to impurities from the reforming of natural gas.

  11. A third-generation dispersion and third-generation hydrogen bonding corrected PM6 method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Jimmy Charnley; Christensen, Anders Steen; Svendsen, Casper Steinmann;

    2014-01-01

    We present new dispersion and hydrogen bond corrections to the PM6 method, PM6-D3H+, and its implementation in the GAMESS program. The method combines the DFT-D3 dispersion correction by Grimme et al. with a modified version of the H+ hydrogen bond correction by Korth. Overall, the interaction en...... vibrational free energies. While the GAMESS implementation is up to 10 times slower for geometry optimizations of proteins in bulk solvent, compared to MOPAC, it is sufficiently fast to make geometry optimizations of small proteins practically feasible....... energy of PM6-D3H+ is very similar to PM6-DH2 and PM6-DH+, with RMSD and MAD values within 0.02 kcal/mol of one another. The main difference is that the geometry optimizations of 88 complexes result in 82, 6, 0, and 0 geometries with 0, 1, 2, and 3 or more imaginary frequencies using PM6-D3H+ implemented...

  12. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Melt Rate Furnace Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M.E.

    2001-07-24

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) would like to increase its canister production rate. The goal of this study is to improve the melt rate in DWPF specifically for Macrobatch 3. However, the knowledge gained may result in improved melting efficiencies translating to future DWPF macrobatches and in higher throughput for other Department of Energy's (DOE) melters. Increased melting efficiencies decrease overall operational costs by reducing the immobilization campaign time for a particular waste stream. For melt rate limited systems, a small increase in melting efficiency translates into significant hard dollar savings by reducing life cycle operational costs.

  13. ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from

  14. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-09-29

    The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector

  15. Brewery wastewaters in photobiological hydrogen generation in presence of Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, K.; Waligorska, M.; Laniecki, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001 (concentration of inoculum-0.36 g dry wt/l) and brewery wastewaters were applied in photobiogeneration of hydrogen under illumination of 116 W/m{sup 2}. The best results were obtained with filtered wastewaters sterilized at 120 C for 20 min and maximal concentration of waste in medium equal 10% v/v. The main product in generated biogas was hydrogen (90%). After sterilization the amount of generated hydrogen was tripled (from 0.76 to 2.2 l H{sub 2}/l medium), whereas waste concentration of 10% v/v resulted in the best substrate yield (0.22 l H{sub 2}/l of waste). Under these conditions the amount of generated hydrogen was 2.24 l H{sub 2}/l medium and light conversion efficiency reached value of 1.7%. The modified Gompertz equations served in modeling of the kinetics of the studied process. (author)

  16. Helium-3 Generation from the Interaction of Deuterium Plasma inside a Hydrogenated Lattice: Red Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Leal-Escalante, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Helium-3 has been created in a nuclear fusion reaction by fusing deuterium ions from deuterium plasma with hydrogen ions in a “RED” (the Spanish word for net) or crystal lattice, a method we called red fusion ("Fusion en la red cristalina"), because is a new method to make nuclear fusion reaction. In this paper, it will be show the experimental results where the helium-3 has been generated for the first time in this kind of new method to confine deuterium and hydrogen inside the RED or lattice of the hydrogenated crystal and that confinement inside the RED facilitated overcoming the Coulomb barrier between them and helium-3 and phonons are produced in this fusion reaction. The results of a long time research in which helium-3, has been created in a fusion reaction inside the lattice or RED of the crystal that contained hydrogen after adequate interaction of deuterium plasma at appropriate high temperature and magnetic confinement of the Mirror/Cusp Plasma Machine at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, designed by the authors. Several mass spectra and visible light spectrum where the presence of helium-3 was detected are shown. The experiment was repeated more than 200 times showing always the generation of helium-3. In this experiment no gamma rays were detected. For this experiment several diagnostic instruments were used. The data collection with these control instrumentation are shown. Thus, it is an important new way to generate Helium-3. reserved.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of passive generation of parabolic similaritons in tapered hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Chao; Li, Feng; Yuan, Jinhui; Kang, Zhe; Zhang, Xianting; Yan, Binbin; Sang, Xinzhu; Wu, Qiang; Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Kangping; Wang, Liang; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu; Wai, P K A

    2017-06-19

    Parabolic pulses have important applications in both basic and applied sciences, such as high power optical amplification, optical communications, all-optical signal processing, etc. The generation of parabolic similaritons in tapered hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic wires at telecom (λ ~ 1550 nm) and mid-IR (λ ≥ 2100 nm) wavelengths is demonstrated and analyzed. The self-similar theory of parabolic pulse generation in passive waveguides with increasing nonlinearity is presented. A generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation is used to describe the coupled dynamics of optical field in the tapered hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonic wires with either decreasing dispersion or increasing nonlinearity. The impacts of length dependent higher-order effects, linear and nonlinear losses including two-photon absorption, and photon-generated free carriers, on the pulse evolutions are characterized. Numerical simulations show that initial Gaussian pulses will evolve into the parabolic pulses in the waveguide taper designed.

  18. Refinements in an Mg/MgH2/H2O-Based Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew; Huang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    Some refinements have been conceived for a proposed apparatus that would generate hydrogen (for use in a fuel cell) by means of chemical reactions among magnesium, magnesium hydride, and steam. The refinements lie in tailoring spatial and temporal distributions of steam and liquid water so as to obtain greater overall energy-storage or energy-generation efficiency than would otherwise be possible. A description of the prior art is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the present refinements. The hydrogen-generating apparatus in question is one of two versions of what was called the "advanced hydrogen generator" in "Fuel-Cell Power Systems Incorporating Mg-Based H2 Generators" (NPO-43554), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 1 (January 2009), page 52. To recapitulate: The apparatus would include a reactor vessel that would be initially charged with magnesium hydride. The apparatus would exploit two reactions: The endothermic decomposition reaction MgH2-->Mg + H2, which occurs at a temperature greater than or equal to 300 C, and The exothermic oxidation reaction MgH2 + H2O MgO + 2H2, which occurs at a temperature greater than or equal to 330 C.

  19. Lens Endogenous Peptide αA66-80 Generates Hydrogen Peroxide and Induces Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Murugesan; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Sharma, K Krishna

    2017-02-01

    In previous studies, we reported the presence of a large number of low-molecular-weight (LMW) peptides in aged and cataract human lens tissues. Among the LMW peptides, a peptide derived from αA-crystallin, αA66-80, was found in higher concentration in aged and cataract lenses. Additional characterization of the αA66-80 peptide showed beta sheet signature, and it formed well-defined unbranched fibrils. Further experimental data showed that αA66-80 peptide binds α-crystallin, impairs its chaperone function, and attracts additional crystallin proteins to the peptide α-crystallin complex, leading to the formation of larger light scattering aggregates. It is well established that Aβ peptide exhibits cell toxicity by the generation of hydrogen peroxide. The αA66-80 peptide shares the principal properties of Aβ peptide. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine whether the fibril-forming peptide αA66-80 has the ability to generate hydrogen peroxide. The results show that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide, in the amount of 1.2 nM H2O2 per µg of αA66-80 peptide by incubation at 37°C for 4h. We also observed cytotoxicity and apoptotic cell death in αA66-80 peptide-transduced Cos7 cells. As evident, we found more TUNEL-positive cells in αA66-80 peptide transduced Cos7 cells than in control cells, suggesting peptide-mediated cell apoptosis. Additional immunohistochemistry analysis showed the active form of caspase-3, suggesting activation of the caspase-dependent pathway during peptide-induced cell apoptosis. These results confirm that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide and promotes hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell apoptosis.

  20. Alkali free hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.J.F.; Pinto, A.M.F.R. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Gales, L. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto and Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas Abel Salazar, Largo Prof. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, V.R.; Rangel, C.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Energia e Geologia - LNEG, Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit Estrada do Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-15

    The present study is related with the production of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}), at elevated pressures and with high gravimetric storage density, to supply a PEM fuel cell on-demand. To achieve this goal, solid sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) was mixed with a proper amount of a powder reused nickel-ruthenium based catalyst (Ni-Ru based/NaBH{sub 4}: 0.2 and 0.4 g/g; {approx}150 times reused) inside the bottom of a batch reactor. Then, a stoichiometric amount of pure liquid water (H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4}: 2-8 mol/mol) was added and the catalyzed NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis evolved, in the absence of an alkali inhibitor. In this way, this research work is designated alkali free hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} for H{sub 2} generation. This type of hydrolysis is excellent from an environmental point of view because it does not involve strongly caustic solutions. Experiments were performed in three batch reactors with internal volumes 646, 369 and 229 cm{sup 3}, and having different bottom geometries (flat and conical shapes). The H{sub 2} generated was a function of the added water and completion was achieved with H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4} = 8 mol/mol. The results show that hydrogen yields and rates increase remarkably increasing both system temperature and pressure. Reactor bottom shape influences deeply H{sub 2} generation: the conical bottom shape greatly enhances the rate and practically eliminates the reaction induction time. Our system of compressed hydrogen generation up to 1.26 MPa shows 6.3 wt% and 70 kg m{sup -3}, respectively, for gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities (materials-only basis) and therefore is a viable hydrogen storage candidate for portable applications. (author)

  1. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Tanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  2. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  3. ELIMINATION OF THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF POUR STREAM SAMPLE AND THE GLASS FABRICATION AND TESTING OF THE DWPF SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

    2012-05-11

    A recommendation to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification sample was made by a Six-Sigma team chartered to eliminate non-value-added activities for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) sludge batch qualification program and is documented in the report SS-PIP-2006-00030. That recommendation was supported through a technical data review by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is documented in the memorandums SRNL-PSE-2007-00079 and SRNL-PSE-2007-00080. At the time of writing those memorandums, the DWPF was processing sludge-only waste but, has since transitioned to a coupled operation (sludge and salt). The SRNL was recently tasked to perform a similar data review relevant to coupled operations and re-evaluate the previous recommendations. This report evaluates the validity of eliminating the characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification samples based on sludge-only and coupled operations. The pour stream sample has confirmed the DWPF's ability to produce an acceptable waste form from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) blending and product composition/durability predictions for the previous sixteen years but, ultimately the pour stream analysis has added minimal value to the DWPF's waste qualification strategy. Similarly, the information gained from the glass fabrication and PCT of the sludge batch qualification sample was determined to add minimal value to the waste qualification strategy since that sample is routinely not representative of the waste composition ultimately processed at the DWPF due to blending and salt processing considerations. Moreover, the qualification process has repeatedly confirmed minimal differences in glass behavior from actual radioactive waste to glasses fabricated from simulants or batch chemicals. In

  4. Prediction of gas pressurization and hydrogen generation for shipping hazard analysis : Six unstabilized PU 02 samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, E. W. (Eddie W.); Veirs, D. K. (Douglas Kirk); Lyman, J. L. (John L.)

    2001-01-01

    Radiolysis of water to form hydrogen gas is a safety concern for safe storage and transport of plutonium-bearing materials. Hydrogen gas is considered a safety hazard if its concentration in the container exceeds five percent hydrogen by volume, DOE Docket No. 00-1 1-9965. Unfortunately, water cannot be entirely avoided in a processing environment and these samples contain a range of water inherently. Thermodynamic, chemical, and radiolysis modeling was used to predict gas generation and changes in gas composition as a function of time within sealed containers containing plutonium bearing materials. The results are used in support of safety analysis for shipping six unstabilized (i.e. uncalcined) samples from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sits (RFETS) to the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) program at Los Alamos National Lab (LANL). The intent of this work is to establish a time window in which safe shipping can occur.

  5. A Novel Self-Assembling Al-based Composite Powder with High Hydrogen Generation Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yuheng; Liu, Hongxin; Yang, Tao; Chen, Xinren; Yang, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xingjun

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel self-assembling hydrogen generation powder comprised of 80Al-10Bi-10Sn wt.% was prepared using the gas atomization method and then collected in an air environment. The morphological and hydrolysis properties of the powders were investigated. The results indicated that the powders formed unique core/shell microstructures with cracked surfaces and (Bi, Sn)-rich phases distributed on the Al grain boundaries. The powders exhibited good oxidation resistance and reacted violently with distilled water at temperatures as low as 0 °C. Furthermore, at 30 °C, the powders exhibited a hydrogen conversion yield of 91.30% within 16 minutes. The hydrogen produced by this powder could be directly used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The mechanisms of the hydrolysis reactions were also analyzed.

  6. Hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride solution using a ruthenium supported on graphite catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yan; Dai, Hong-Bin; Ma, Lai-Peng; Wang, Ping; Cheng, Hui-Ming [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The catalyst with high activity and durability plays a crucial role in the hydrogen generation systems for the portable fuel cell generators. In the present study, a ruthenium supported on graphite catalyst (Ru/G) for hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution is prepared by a modified impregnation method. This is done by surface pretreatment with NH{sub 2} functionalization via silanization, followed by adsorption of Ru (III) ion onto the surface, and then reduced by a reducing agent. The obtained catalyst is characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Very uniform Ru nanoparticles with sizes of about 10 nm are chemically bonded on the graphite surface. The hydrolysis kinetics measurements show that the concentrations of NaBH{sub 4} and NaOH all exert considerable influence on the catalytic activity of Ru/G catalyst towards the hydrolysis reaction of NaBH{sub 4}. A hydrogen generation rate of 32.3 L min{sup -1} g{sup -1} (Ru) in a 10 wt.% NaBH{sub 4} + 5 wt.% NaOH solution has been achieved, which is comparable to other noble catalysts that have been reported. (author)

  7. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  8. YIELD STRESS REDUCTION OF DWPF MELTER FEED SLURRIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M; Michael02 Smith, M

    2006-12-28

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate). The pretreatment process acidifies the sludge with nitric and formic acids, adds the glass formers as glass frit, then concentrates the resulting slurry to approximately 50 weight percent (wt%) total solids. This slurry is fed to the joule-heated melter where the remaining water is evaporated followed by calcination of the solids and conversion to glass. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is currently assisting DWPF efforts to increase throughput of the melter. As part of this effort, SRNL has investigated methods to increase the solids content of the melter feed to reduce the heat load required to complete the evaporation of water and allow more of the energy available to calcine and vitrify the waste. The process equipment in the facility is fixed and cannot process materials with high yield stresses, therefore increasing the solids content will require that the yield stress of the melter feed slurries be reduced. Changing the glass former added during pretreatment from an irregularly shaped glass frit to nearly spherical beads was evaluated. The evaluation required a systems approach which included evaluations of the effectiveness of beads in reducing the melter feed yield stress as well as evaluations of the processing impacts of changing the frit morphology. Processing impacts of beads include changing the settling rate of the glass former (which effects mixing and sampling of the melter feed slurry and the frit addition equipment) as well as impacts on the melt behavior due to decreased surface area of the beads versus frit

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF REMOTE HANFORD CONNECTOR GASKET REPLACEMENT TOOLING FOR DWPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krementz, D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey

    2009-05-05

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop tooling and equipment to remotely replace gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors to reduce personnel radiation exposure as compared to the current hands-on method. It is also expected that radiation levels will continually increase with future waste streams. The equipment is operated in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell (REDC), which is equipped with compressed air, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and an electro-mechanical manipulator (EMM) arm for operation of the remote tools. The REDC does not provide access to electrical power, so the equipment must be manually or pneumatically operated. The MSM's have a load limit at full extension of ten pounds, which limited the weight of the installation tool. In order to remotely replace Hanford connector gaskets several operations must be performed remotely, these include: removal of the spent gasket and retaining ring (retaining ring is also called snap ring), loading the new snap ring and gasket into the installation tool and installation of the new gasket into the Hanford connector. SRNL developed and tested tools that successfully perform all of the necessary tasks. Removal of snap rings from horizontal and vertical connectors is performed by separate air actuated retaining ring removal tools and is manipulated in the cell by the MSM. In order install a new gasket, the snap ring loader is used to load a new snap ring into a groove in the gasket installation tool. A new gasket is placed on the installation tool and retained by custom springs. An MSM lifts the installation tool and presses the mounted gasket against the connector block. Once the installation tool is in position, the gasket and snap ring are installed onto the connector by pneumatic actuation. All of the tools are located on a custom work table with a pneumatic valve station that directs compressed air to the desired

  10. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation from water under visible light using core/shell nano-catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Shih, K; Li, X Y

    2010-01-01

    A microemulsion technique was employed to synthesize nano-sized photocatalysts with a core (CdS)/shell (ZnS) structure. The primary particles of the photocatalysts were around 10 nm, and the mean size of the catalyst clusters in water was about 100 nm. The band gaps of the catalysts ranged from 2.25 to 2.46 eV. The experiments of photocatalytic H(2) generation showed that the catalysts (CdS)(x)/(ZnS)(1-x) with x ranging from 0.1 to 1 were able to produce hydrogen from water photolysis under visible light. The catalyst with x=0.9 had the highest rate of hydrogen production. The catalyst loading density also influenced the photo-hydrogen production rate, and the best catalyst concentration in water was 1 g L(-1). The stability of the nano-catalysts in terms of size, morphology and activity was satisfactory during an extended test period for a specific hydrogen production rate of 2.38 mmol g(-1) L(-1) h(-1) and a quantum yield of 16.1% under visible light (165 W Xe lamp, lambda>420 nm). The results demonstrate that the (CdS)/(ZnS) core/shell nano-particles are a novel photo-catalyst for renewable hydrogen generation from water under visible light. This is attributable to the large band-gap ZnS shell that separates the electron/hole pairs generated by the CdS core and hence reduces their recombinations.

  11. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  12. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  13. Acetaldehyde behavior over platinum based catalyst in hydrogen stream generated by ethanol reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Lima, Adriana F.F. [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela 82/507, 20081-310 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica e INOG (Instituto Nacional de Oleo Gas), UERJ-CNPq, FAPERJ, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Colman, Rita C. [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e de Petroleo, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Passos da Patria, 156/bl E/240, 24210-240 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Zotin, Fatima M.Z. [Instituto de Quimica e INOG (Instituto Nacional de Oleo Gas), UERJ-CNPq, FAPERJ, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); CETEM-MCT, Av. Pedro Calmon, 900, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-908 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Appel, Lucia G. [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela 82/507, 20081-310 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    Due to the greenhouse effect, hydrogen production from bioethanol reforming is a very important subject in heterogeneous catalysis research. Pt based catalysts are employed in H{sub 2} purification processes and also as electrocatalysts of PEM (''Proton Exchange Membrane'') fuel cells. Hydrogen obtained from ethanol reforming may contain, as contaminants, acetaldehyde and small amounts of CO. This aldehyde can be decarbonylated on Pt based catalysts generating carbon monoxide and methane, rendering the hydrogen purification more challenging. Moreover, acetaldehyde might also change the electrocatalyst behavior. Therefore, this contribution aims at studying the acetaldehyde behavior in the presence of platinum based catalysts in hydrogen atmosphere. The Pt/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/USY catalysts and an electrocatalyst were characterized by n-butylamine, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, ATG/DTG measurements and cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction. It was observed that the acid-basic properties of the supports promote condensation reactions. When in contact with Pt based catalysts, acetaldehyde undergoes C-C and C=O bond scissions. The former occurs at a wide range of temperatures, whereas the latter only at low temperatures (<200 C). The C-C bond scission (decarbonylation) produces methane and CO. The C=O bond scission generates carbon residues on the catalyst as well as oxygen species, which in turn is able to eliminate CO from the catalytic surface. The data also show that decarbonylation is not a structure-sensitive reaction. (author)

  14. Hydrogen generation from deliquescence of ammonia borane using Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chang-Chen; Chen, Bing-Hung

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen generation from the catalyzed deliquescence/hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB) using the Ni-Co catalyst supported on the graphene oxide (Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst) under the conditions of limited water supply was studied with the molar feed ratio of water to ammonia borane (denoted as H2O/AB) at 2.02, 3.97 and 5.93, respectively. The conversion efficiency of ammonia borane to hydrogen was estimated both from the cumulative volume of the hydrogen gas generated and the conversion of boron chemistry in the hydrolysates analyzed by the solid-state 11B NMR. The conversion efficiency of ammonia borane could reach nearly 100% under excess water dosage, that is, H2O/AB = 3.97 and 5.93. Notably, the hydrogen storage capacity could reach as high as 6.5 wt.% in the case with H2O/AB = 2.02. The hydrolysates of ammonia borane in the presence of Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst were mainly the mixture of boric acid and metaborate according to XRD, FT-IR and solid-state 11B NMR analyses.

  15. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawodzinski, C.; Wilson, M.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. A central objective of a LANL/Industry collaborative effort supported by the Hydrogen Program is to integrate PEM fuel cell and novel stack designs at LANL with stack technology of H-Power Corporation (H-Power) in order to develop a manufacturable, low-cost/high-performance hydrogen/air fuel cell stack for stationary generation of electric power. A LANL/H-Power CRADA includes Tasks ranging from exchange, testing and optimization of membrane-electrode assemblies of large areas, development and demonstration of manufacturable flow field, backing and bipolar plate components, and testing of stacks at the 3-5 cell level and, finally, at the 4-5 kW level. The stack should demonstrate the basic features of manufacturability, overall low cost and high energy conversion efficiency. Plans for future work are to continue the CRADA work along the time line defined in a two-year program, to continue the LANL activities of developing and testing stainless steel hardware for longer term stability including testing in a stack, and to further enhance air cathode performance to achieve higher energy conversion efficiencies as required for stationary power application.

  16. Checkout and start-up of the integrated DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) melter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.E.; Hutson, N.D.; Miller, D.H.; Morrison, J.; Shah, H.; Shuford, J.A.; Glascock, J.; Wurzinger, F.H.; Zamecnik, J.R.

    1989-11-11

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a one-ninth-scale demonstration of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation, melter, and off-gas systems. The IDMS will be the first engineering-scale melter system at SRL to process mercury and flowsheet levels of halides and sulfates. This report includes a summary of the IDMS program objectives, system and equipment descriptions, and detailed discussions of the system checkout and start-up. 10 refs., 44 figs., 20 tabs.

  17. High-purity hydrogen generation by ultraviolet illumination with the membrane composed of titanium dioxide nanotube array and Pd layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Masashi; Noda, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2011-09-01

    High-purity hydrogen generation was observed by using a membrane composed of a bilayer of an anodized titanium dioxide nanotube array (TNA) and a hydrogen permeable metal. This membrane was fabricated by transferring a TNA embedded in a titanium foil onto a sputtered 10-μm-thick palladium film. Alcohols are reformed photocatalytically and concurrently generated hydrogen is purified through the Pd layer. H2 with a purity of more than 99% was obtained from liquid alcohols under ultraviolet illumination onto the membrane. Thus, we demonstrated the integration of photocatalytic hydrogen production and purification within a single membrane.

  18. Photoassisted electrolysis of water for hydrogen generation with TiO{sub 2} aggregate film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Guanying [Research Institute of Photonics, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian, 116034 (China); Zhang Qifeng; Liu Dawei; Xi Junting; Cao Guozhong, E-mail: gzcao@uw.edu, E-mail: gycao@dlpu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the nanocrystallite aggregates of TiO{sub 2} were synthesized and characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The aggregates are of submicron size, formed by nano-sized crystallites and able to offer both a large specific surface area and desirable size comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Therefore, the TiO{sub 2} aggregates were also studied as photoelectrode in photoelectrochemical cell for hydrogen generation. The results show that the hydrogen generation rates are 0.47 ml/h*cm{sup 2} and 0.27 ml/h*cm{sup 2} during the first test with and without illumination, respectively. The current density also presented continually increasing during the light-on period. This was attributed to the photogenerated current, which benefited from the TiO{sub 2} aggregates and may significantly enhance the electrolysis rate of water.

  19. Towards numerical simulation of turbulent hydrogen combustion based on flamelet generated manifolds in OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancello, A.; Bastiaans, R. J. M.; de Goey, L. P. H.

    2013-10-01

    This work proposes an application of the Flamelet-Generated Manifolds (FGM) technique in the OpenFOAM environment. FGM is a chemical reduced method for combustion modeling. This technique treats the combustion process as the solution of a small amount of controlling variables. Regarding laminar simulation, a progress variable and enthalpy evolution can describe satisfactorily the problem. From a turbulent point of view, FGM can be applied to LES and RANS simulations, where the subgrid chemical terms are described with a β - PDF approach. These approaches apply satisfactorily in relatively simple gases, nevertheless for hydrogen are not more valid, due to preferential diffusion effects and instability of the flame structure. The overall aim of this research is to find technical solution for hydrogen gas turbines design in the next generation of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants.

  20. Radcalc for Windows 2.0 transportation packaging software to determine hydrogen generation and transportation classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.R.

    1996-10-21

    Radclac for Windows is a user friendly menu-driven Windows compatible software program with applications in the transportation of radioactive materials. It calculates the radiolytic generation of hydrogen gas in the matrix of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes. It also calculates pressure buildup due to hydrogen and the decay heat generated in a package at seal time. It computes the quantity of a radionuclide and its associated products for a given period of time. In addition, the code categorizes shipment quantities as reportable quantity (RQ), radioactive Type A or Type B, limited quality (LQ), low specific activity (LSA), highway road controlled quality (HRCQ), and fissile excepted using US Department of Transportation (DOT) definitions and methodologies.

  1. REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

    2011-12-20

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently

  2. Hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical effect of the Cu-doped TiO2 photoanode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Ngoc Tai; Hoa Dao, Thi; Hoang To, Le Hong; Vu, Dinh Lam; Le, Van Hong

    2014-09-01

    TiO2 film photoanodes with a size of 1 × 1 cm2 were fabricated by a spin coating method. Cu-doped TiO2 powder with various Cu concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 at%) and surfactant were used as starting materials in coating Cu-doped TiO2 thin films onto FTO/glass substrate. Crystalline structure of TiO2 material, microstructure of the photoanode films and their thickness were identified by x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. Hydrogen generation from water by photoelectrochemical effect in the visible light was observed by recording I/V characteristics of the photoanode in dark and light regimes. The obtained results have shown that the hydrogen generation efficiency of photoanode nonlinearly depends on Cu concentration. The nonlinear dependence of the hydrogen generation efficiency may be due to a change of resistivity of the film photoanode that is related with the random distribution of the hetero-junction between interfaces of TiO2 and CuO nanoparticles.

  3. Easy synthesis of bismuth iron oxide nanoparticles as photocatalyst for solar hydrogen generation from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jinyi

    In this study, high purity bismuth iron oxide (BiFeO3/BFO) nanoparticles of size 50-80 nm have been successfully synthesized by a simple sol-gel method using urea and polyvinyl alcohol at low temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement is used to optimize the synthetic process to get highly crystalline and pure phase material. Diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible (DRUV-Vis) spectrum indicates that the absorption cut-off wavelength of the nanoparticles is about 620 nm, corresponding to an energy band gap of 2.1 eV. Compared to BaTiO3, BFO has a better degradation of methyl orange under light radiation. Also, photocatalytic tests prove this material to be efficient towards water splitting under simulated solar light to generate hydrogen. The simple synthetic methodology adopted in this paper will be useful in developing low-cost semiconductor materials as effective photocatalysts for hydrogen generation. Photocatalytic tests followed by gas chromatography (GC) analyses show that BiFeO3 generates three times more hydrogen than commercial titania P25 catalyst under the same experimental conditions.

  4. Hydrocarbon reforming catalysts and new reactor designs for compact hydrogen generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.; Schwab, E.; Urtel, H. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Farrauto, R. [BASF Catalysts LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-30

    A hydrogen based future energy scenario will use fuel cells for the conversion of chemically stored energy into electricity. Depending upon the type of fuel cell, different specifications will apply for the feedstock which is converted in the cell, ranging from very clean hydrogen for PEM-FC's to desulfurized methane for SOFC and MCFC technology. For the foreseeable future, hydrogen will be supplied by conventional reforming, however operated in compact and dynamic reformer designs. This requires that known catalyst formulations are offered in specific geometries, giving flexibility for novel reactor design options. These specific geometries can be special tablet shapes as well as monolith structures. Finally, also nonhydrocarbon feedstock might be used in special applications, e.g. bio-based methanol and ethanol. BASF offers catalysts for the full process chain starting from feedstock desulfurization via reforming, high temperature shift, low temperature shift to CO fine polishing either via selective oxidation or selective methanation. Depending upon the customer's design, most stages can be served either with precious metal based monolith solutions or base metal tablet solutions. For the former, we have taken the automobile catalyst monolith support and extended its application to the fuel cell hydrogen generation. Washcoats of precious metal supported catalysts can for example be deposited on ceramic monoliths and/or metal heat exchangers for efficient generation of hydrogen. Major advantages are high through puts due to more efficient heat transfer for catalysts on metal heat exchangers, lower pressure drop with greater catalyst mechanical and thermal stability compared to particulate catalysts. Base metal tablet catalysts on the other hand can have intrinsic cost advantages, larger fractions of the reactor can be filled with active mass, and if produced in unconventional shape, again novel reactor designs are made possible. Finally, if it comes to

  5. Mixed Ionic and Electonic Conductors for Hydrogen Generation and Separation: A New Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-12-31

    Composite mixed conductors comprising one electronic conducting phase, and one ionic conducting phase (MIECs) have been developed in this work. Such MIECs have applications in generating and separating hydrogen from hydrocarbon fuels at high process rates and high purities. The ionic conducting phase comprises of rare-earth doped ceria and the electronic conducting phase of rare-earth doped strontium titanate. These compositions are ideally suited for the hydrogen separation application. In the process studied in this project, steam at high temperatures is fed to one side of the MIEC membrane and hydrocarbon fuel or reformed hydrocarbon fuel to the other side of the membrane. Oxygen is transported from the steam side to the fuel side down the electrochemical potential gradient thereby enriching the steam side flow in hydrogen. The remnant water vapor can then be condensed to obtain high purity hydrogen. In this work we have shown that two-phase MIECs comprising rare-earth ceria as the ionic conductor and doped-strontium titanate as the electronic conductor are stable in the operating environment of the MIEC. Further, no adverse reaction products are formed when these phases are in contact at elevated temperatures. The composite MIECs have been characterized using a transient electrical conductivity relaxation technique to measure the oxygen chemical diffusivity and the surface exchange coefficient. Oxygen permeation and hydrogen generation rates have been measured under a range of process conditions and the results have been fit to a model which incorporates the oxygen chemical diffusivity and the surface exchange coefficient from the transient measurements.

  6. The effect of plutonium dioxide water surface coverage on the generation of hydrogen and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veirs, Douglas K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crowder, Mark L. [Savannah River National Laboratory

    2012-06-20

    The conditions for the production of oxygen during radiolysis of water adsorbed onto plutonium dioxide powder are discussed. Studies in the literature investigating the radiolysis of water show that both oxygen and hydrogen can be generated from water adsorbed on high-purity plutonium dioxide powder. These studies indicate that there is a threshold in the amount of water below which oxygen is not generated. The threshold is associated with the number of monolayers of adsorbed water and is shown to occur at approximately two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water. Material in equilibrium with 50% relative humidity (RH) will be at the threshold for oxygen generation. Using two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water as the threshold for oxygen production, the total pressure under various conditions is calculated assuming stoichiometric production of hydrogen and oxygen. The specific surface area of the oxide has a strong effect on the final partial pressure. The specific surface areas resulting in the highest pressures within a 3013 container are evaluated. The potential for oxygen generation is mitigated by reduced relative humidity, and hence moisture adsorption, at the oxide surface which occurs if the oxide is warmer than the ambient air. The potential for oxygen generation approaches zero as the temperature difference between the ambient air and the material approaches 6 C.

  7. Multi-Generation Concentrating Solar-Hydrogen Power System for Sustainable Rural Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krothapalli, A.; Greska, B.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes an energy system that is designed to meet the demands of rural populations that currently have no access to grid-connected electricity. Besides electricity, it is well recognized that rural populations need at least a centralized refrigeration system for storage of medicines and other emergency supplies, as well as safe drinking water. Here we propose a district system that will employ a multi-generation concentrated solar power (CSP) system that will generate electricity and supply the heat needed for both absorption refrigeration and membrane distillation (MD) water purification. The electricity will be used to generate hydrogen through highly efficient water electrolysis and individual households can use the hydrogen for generating electricity, via affordable proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, and as a fuel for cooking. The multi-generation system is being developed such that its components will be easy to manufacture and maintain. As a result, these components will be less efficient than their typical counterparts but their low cost-to-efficiency ratio will allow for us to meet our installation cost goal of $1/Watt for the entire system. The objective of this paper is to introduce the system concept and discuss the system components that are currently under development. (auth)

  8. White-light emission from solid carbon in aqueous solution during hydrogen generation induced by nanosecond laser pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Shota; Maeda, Kosuke

    2016-07-01

    We previously discovered a novel method of hydrogen generation from high-grade charcoal in an aqueous solution using nanosecond laser pulse irradiation. In this paper, white-light emission during this reaction is reported: A broad spectrum over the visible range is observed above a threshold excitation energy density. The white-light emission is a simultaneous product of the hydrogen generation reaction and is attributed to blackbody radiation in accordance with Planck's Law at a temperature above 3800 K. Consequently, we propose that hydrogen generation induced by laser irradiation proceeds similarly to classical coal gasification, which features reactions at high pressure and high temperature.

  9. Commercial Optimization of a 100 kg/day PEM based Hydrogen Generator For Energy and Industrial Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulthrop, L.; Anderson, E.; Chow, O.; Friedland, R.; Maloney, T.; Schiller, M. [Hydrogen Technology Group of Proton Energy, a Distributed Energy Systems Company Wallingford, CT USA 06492 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Commercial hydrogen generators using PEM water electrolysis are well proven, serving industrial applications worldwide in over 50 countries. Now, market and environmental requirements are converging to demand larger on-site hydrogen generators. North American liquid H{sub 2} shortages, increasing trucking costs, developing economies with no liquid infrastructure, utilities, and forklift fuel cell fueling applications are all working to increase market demand for commercial on-site H{sub 2} generation. These commercial applications may be satisfied by a 100 kg H{sub 2}/day module; this platform can be the pathway towards a 500 kg H{sub 2}/day generator desired for small fore-court hydrogen vehicle fueling stations. This paper discusses the steps necessary and activities already underway to develop a 100 to 500 kg H{sub 2}/day PEM hydrogen generator platform to meet commercial market cost targets and approach US DoE transportation fueling cost targets. (authors)

  10. The ZECOMIX experimental facility for hydrogen and power generation from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Calabro; P. Deiana; P. Fiorini; S. Stendardo; G. Girardi [ENEA - Italian Agency for New Technologies, Rome (Italy). Energy and Environment Energy and Plants Division

    2006-07-01

    The Zecomix project, conceived by ENEA in the framework of Italian National Hydrogen Project, is aimed at studying an integrated process that produces both hydrogen and electricity from coal, with zero emissions and very high efficiency. The Zero Emission Coal Mixed technology concept combines two different systems: the Zero Emission Coal gasification and the Zero Emission Combustion Technology based on Hydrogen-fuelled internal combustion turbine cycle. The key element is the integration of a gasification process, characterized by coal hydrogasification technology and carbon dioxide sequestration, with the power island, where an oxy-combustion occurs. The experimental facility will be realized at the ENEA Research Centre of Casaccia at about thirty kilometres from the centre of Rome. It consists of a very flexible plant, in which more components can be tested separately or connected together. The plant is provided with an atmospheric fixed bed gasifier coal and a carbonator/calcinator reactor; moreover a pressurized hydrogasifier reactor and a 100 kWe microturbine test bench are present. Other auxiliary components are a gas mixing system, for hydrogen-based syngas production, and a 200 kW steam generator. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Hydrogen Generation Through Renewable Energy Sources at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony; Prokopius, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation of the potential for generating high pressure, high purity hydrogen at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) was performed. This evaluation was based on producing hydrogen utilizing a prototype Hamilton Standard electrolyzer that is capable of producing hydrogen at 3000 psi. The present state of the electrolyzer system was determined to identify the refurbishment requirements. The power for operating the electrolyzer would be produced through renewable power sources. Both wind and solar were considered in the analysis. The solar power production capability was based on the existing solar array field located at NASA GRC. The refurbishment and upgrade potential of the array field was determined and the array output was analyzed with various levels of upgrades throughout the year. The total available monthly and yearly energy from the array was determined. A wind turbine was also sized for operation. This sizing evaluated the wind potential at the site and produced an operational design point for the wind turbine. Commercially available wind turbines were evaluated to determine their applicability to this site. The system installation and power integration were also addressed. This included items such as housing the electrolyzer, power management, water supply, gas storage, cooling and hydrogen dispensing.

  12. Simultaneous Hydrogen Generation and Waste Acid Neutralization in a Reverse Electrodialysis System

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-09-02

    Waste acid streams produced at industrial sites are often co-located with large sources of waste heat (e.g., industrial exhaust gases, cooling water, and heated equipment). Reverse electrodialysis (RED) systems can be used to generate electrical power and hydrogen gas using waste heat-derived solutions, but high electrode overpotentials limit system performance. We show here that an ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) RED system can achieve simultaneous waste acid neutralization and in situ hydrogen production, while capturing energy from excess waste heat. The rate of acid neutralization was dependent on stack flow rate and increased 50× (from 0.06 ± 0.04 to 3.0 ± 0.32 pH units min -1 m-2 membrane), as the flow rate increased 6× (from 100 to 600 mL min-1). Acid neutralization primarily took place due to ammonium electromigration (37 ± 4%) and proton diffusion (60 ± 5%). The use of a synthetic waste acid stream as a catholyte (pH ≈ 2) also increased hydrogen production rates by 65% (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 8.7 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3 catholyte day -1) compared to an AmB electrolyte (pH ≈ 8.5). These findings highlight the potential use of dissimilar electrolytes (e.g., basic anolyte and acidic catholyte) for enhanced power and hydrogen production in RED stacks. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  13. Methanolysis of ammonia borane by shape-controlled mesoporous copper nanostructures for hydrogen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qilu; Huang, Ming; Lu, Zhang-Hui; Yang, Yuwen; Zhang, Yuxin; Chen, Xiangshu; Yang, Zhen

    2015-01-21

    Diverse mesoporous CuO nanostructures have been prepared by a facile and scaleable wet-chemical method and reduced to mesoporous Cu nanostructures by using the reductant ammonia borane (AB). These mesoporous Cu nanostructures have been applied as a catalyst for hydrogen generation from the methanolysis of AB. The catalytic results show that the reaction rate and the amount of hydrogen evolution significantly relied on their morphologies. Compared with the nanosheet-like, bundle-like and dandelion-like Cu, the flower-like Cu nanostructures exhibit the highest catalytic activity with a total turnover frequency (TOF) value of 2.41 mol H2 mol catalyst(-1) min(-1) and a low activation energy value of 34.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol(-1) at room temperature. Furthermore, the flower-like Cu nanostructures have also shown excellent activity in recycling tests. The low cost and high performance of Cu nanocatalysts may offer high potential for its practical application in hydrogen generation from the methanolysis of AB.

  14. Ultrahigh figure-of-merit for hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride using ternary metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lunghao; Ceccato, R.; Raj, R.

    We report further increase in the figure-of-merit (FOM) for hydrogen generation from NaBH 4 than reported in an earlier paper [1], where a sub-nanometer layer of metal catalysts are deposited on carbon nanotube paper (CNT paper) that has been functionalized with polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN) ceramic film. Ternary, Ru-Pd-Pt, instead of the binary Pd-Pt catalyst used earlier, together with a thinner CNT paper is shown to increase the figure-of-merit by up to a factor of six, putting is above any other known catalyst for hydrogen generation from NaBH 4. The catalysts are prepared by first impregnating the functionalized CNT-paper with solutions of the metal salts, followed by reduction in a sodium borohydride solution. The reaction mechanism and the catalyst efficiency are described in terms of an electric charge transfer, whereby the negative charge on the BH 4 - ion is exchanged with hydrogen via the electronically conducting SiCN/CNT substrate [1].

  15. Generation Performance of a Fuel Cell Using Hydrogen and Di-methyl-ether (DME) Mixed Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Tadao; Watanabe, Takashi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Susumu

    Di-methyl-ether (DME), an oxygenated hydrocarbon, can facilitate hydrogen manufacture by steam reforming reaction at low temperature. Methanol and DME steam reforming at 250-300°C, reforming DME into hydrogen, can be performed easily with small-scale and simple equipment. Whether the hydrogen output from the reformer for supply to the fuel cell includes DME, and how this affects the generation performance has yet to be confirmed. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the supply of a fuel cell with mixtures of DME and H2 in varying proportions and to clarify the effect on generation performance. Conclusions are as follows: (1) For a supply of DME and H2 mixed gas, DME is consumed after the H2 is consumed. By comparing the experimental values with theoretical values of consumption of pure H2, a mixture of DME and H2, and pure DME, it proved to be possible to roughly predict the experimental values by calculation. (2) The voltage value moved to near the DME voltage after the H2 was consumed, the current density increased after the H2 was consumed. (3) During continuous running the voltage load was observed to fluctuate.

  16. Graphene Porous Foam Loaded with Molybdenum Carbide Nanoparticulate Electrocatalyst for Effective Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Xia, Han; Peng, Zhen; Lv, Cuncai; Jin, Lihuang; Zhao, Yaoxing; Huang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chi

    2016-04-21

    A facile method is developed for the synthesis of graphene porous foam (Gr PF) loaded with dispersed molybdenum carbide (Mo2 C) nanoparticles; the material exhibits effective catalytic activity in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Mo2 C/Gr PF is synthesized by the carbonization of glucose and the carbothermal reduction of hexaammonium molybdate in a confined space defined by the intervals between sodium chloride nanoparticles. The synthesis in the confined space results in thin Gr PF (≈8 nm) loaded with aggregation-free small Mo2 C nanoparticles [(13±2) nm]. The overpotential required for a current density of 20 mA cm(-2) in the electrochemical hydrogen generation is as small as 199 mV in acidic solution and 380 mV in basic solution. The performance is superior to that of a Mo2 C/C composite and compares favorably to those reported for Mo2 C nanostructures. The Mo2 C/Gr PF affords stable water electrolysis in both acidic and basic solution and exhibits nearly 100 % faradaic efficiency. The prominent performance, long-term stability, and high faradic efficiency make Mo2 C/Gr PF a promising HER catalyst for practical hydrogen generation from water electrolysis.

  17. Study of hydrogen generation plant coupled to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicholas Robert

    Hydrogen generation using a high temperature nuclear reactor as a thermal driving vector is a promising future option for energy carrier production. In this scheme, the heat from the nuclear reactor drives an endothermic water-splitting plant, via coupling, through an intermediate heat exchanger. While both high temperature nuclear reactors and hydrogen generation plants have high individual degrees of development, study of the coupled plant is lacking. Particularly absent are considerations of the transient behavior of the coupled plant, as well as studies of the safety of the overall plant. The aim of this document is to contribute knowledge to the effort of nuclear hydrogen generation. In particular, this study regards identification of safety issues in the coupled plant and the transient modeling of some leading candidates for implementation in the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Sulfur Iodine (SI) and Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycles are considered as candidate hydrogen generation schemes. Several thermodynamically derived chemical reaction chamber models are coupled to a well-known reference design of a high temperature nuclear reactor. These chemical reaction chamber models have several dimensions of validation, including detailed steady state flowsheets, integrated loop test data, and bench scale chemical kinetics. Eight unique case studies are performed based on a thorough literature review of possible events. The case studies are: (1) feed flow failure from one section of the chemical plant to another, (2) product flow failure (recycle) within the chemical plant, (3) rupture or explosion within the chemical plant, (4) nuclear reactor helium inlet overcooling due to a process holding tank failure, (5) helium inlet overcooling as an anticipated transient without SCRAM, (6) total failure of the chemical plant, (7) parametric study of the temperature in an individual reaction chamber, and (8) control rod insertion in the nuclear reactor. Various parametric

  18. Carbon quantum dots coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Feng; Shen, Mingrong; Fang, Liang, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Thin Films, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-based Functional Materials and Devices, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Junling [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-04-13

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opal (io-BiVO{sub 4}) structure that shows dramatic improvement of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation has been fabricated using electrodeposition with a template. The io-BiVO{sub 4} maximizes photon trapping through slow light effect, while maintaining adequate surface area for effective redox reactions. CQDs are then incorporated to the io-BiVO{sub 4} to further improve the photoconversion efficiency. Due to the strong visible light absorption property of CQDs and enhanced separation of the photoexcited electrons, the CQDs coated io-BiVO{sub 4} exhibit a maximum photo-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.35%, which is 6 times higher than that of the pure BiVO{sub 4} thin films. This work is a good example of designing composite photoelectrode by combining quantum dots and photonic crystal.

  19. Co-generation of acetylene and hydrogen for a carbide-based fuel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreiro, Louis G.; Burke, A. Alan [Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Code 8231, 1176 Howell Street, Newport, RI 02841 (United States); Dubois, Lily [Stonehill College, Department of Chemistry, 320 Washington Street, Easton, MA 02357 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The co-generation of acetylene and hydrogen from the hydrolysis of calcium carbide and calcium hydride was investigated as part of a unique carbide-based fuel system intended for high-temperature fuel cells. To gain better control of this highly energetic reaction, glycerin was used to coat the reactant particles to form slurry prior to their reaction with water. This process was shown to moderate the rate of gas production, as well as to provide a means for preparing slurry that could be pumped into the reactor vessel. It was also observed that the presence of calcium hydroxide, a by-product of hydrolysis, lowered the solubility of acetylene resulting in a higher initial flow rate due to less acetylene being dissolved in solution. However, the buildup of calcium hydroxide with time inhibited the hydrolysis of both calcium carbide and calcium hydride causing the acetylene and hydrogen flow rates to decrease. (author)

  20. Molecular molybdenum persulfide and related catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Christopher J.; Karunadasa, Hemamala I.; Majda, Marcin

    2016-11-22

    New metal persulfido compositions of matter are described. In one embodiment the metal is molybdenum and the metal persulfido complex mimics the structure and function of the triangular active edge site fragments of MoS.sub.2, a material that is the current industry standard for petroleum hydro desulfurization, as well as a promising low-cost alternative to platinum for electrocatalytic hydrogen production. This molecular [(PY5W.sub.2)MoS.sub.2].sup.x+ containing catalyst is capable of generating hydrogen from acidic-buffered water or even seawater at very low overpotentials at a turnover frequency rate in excess of 500 moles H.sub.2 per mole catalyst per second, with a turnover number (over a 20 hour period) of at least 19,000,000 moles H.sub.2 per mole of catalyst.

  1. Molecular molybdenum persulfide and related catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Christopher J.; Karunadasa, Hemamala I.; Majda, Marcin

    2016-04-19

    New metal persulfido compositions of matter are described. In one embodiment the metal is molybdenum and the metal persulfido complex mimics the structure and function of the triangular active edge site fragments of MoS.sub.2, a material that is the current industry standard for petroleum hydro desulfurization, as well as a promising low-cost alternative to platinum for electrocatalytic hydrogen production. This molecular [(PY5W.sub.2)MoS.sub.2].sup.x+ containing catalyst is capable of generating hydrogen from acidic-buffered water or even seawater at very low overpotentials at a turnover frequency rate in excess of 500 moles H.sub.2 per mole catalyst per second, with a turnover number (over a 20 hour period) of at least 19,000,000 moles H.sub.2 per mole of catalyst.

  2. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  3. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  4. Experimental Study of Plasma Under-liquid Electrolysis in Hydrogen Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严宗诚; 陈砺; 王红林

    2006-01-01

    The application and characteristics of relatively big volume plasma produced with cathodic glow discharges taking place across a gaseous envelope over the cathode which was dipped into electrolyte in hydrogen generation were studied. A critical investigation of the influence of methanol concentration and voltage across the circuit on the composition and power consumption per cubic meter of cathode liberating gas was carried out. The course of plasma under-liquid electrolysis has the typical characteristics of glow discharge electrolysis. The cathode liberating gas was in substantial excess of the Faraday law value. When the voltage across the circuit was equal to 550 V, the volume of cathodic gas with sodium carbonate solution was equal to 16.97 times the Faraday law value. The study showed that methanol molecules are more active than water molecules.The methanol molecules were decomposed at the plasma-catholyte interface by the radicals coming out the plasma mantle.Energy consumption per cubic meter of cathodic gases (WV) decreased while methanol concentration of the electrolytes increased. When methanol concentration equaled 5% (ψ), WV was 10.381×103 kJ/m3, less than the corresponding theoretic value of conventional water electrolysis method. The cathodic liberating gas was a mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide with over 95% hydrogen, if methanol concentration was more than 15% (ψ). The present research work revealed an innovative application of glow discharge and a new highly efficient hydrogen generation method, which depleted less resource and energy than normal electrolysis and is environmentally friendly.

  5. [Russian oxygen generation system "Elektron-VM": hydrogen content in electrolytically produced oxygen for breathing by International Space Station crews].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshkin, V Yu; Kurmazenko, E A

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the particulars of hydrogen content in electrolysis oxygen produced aboard the ISS Russian segment by oxygen generator "Elektron-VM" (SGK) for crew breathing. Hydrogen content was estimated as in the course of SGK operation in the ISS RS, so during the ground life tests. According to the investigation of hydrogen sources, the primary path of H2 appearance in oxygen is its diffusion through the porous diaphragm separating the electrolytic-cell cathode and anode chambers. Effectiveness of hydrogen oxidation in the SGK reheating unit was evaluated.

  6. Classical Dynamics of Harmonic Generation of the Hydrogen Molecular Ion Interacting with Ultrashort Intense Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao-Hong; DUAN Yi-Wu; Wing-Ki Liu; Jian-Min Yuan

    2001-01-01

    Within Born-Oppenheimer approximation, by using the classical trajectory theory, a description for the high order harmonic generation of the hydrogen molecular ion interacting with ultrashort laser pulses has been pre sented. The Coulomb singularities have been remedied by the regularization. The action-angle variables have been used to generate the initial inversion symmetry microcanonical distribution. Within a proper intensity range, a harmonic plateau with only odd harmonics appears. For a larger intensity, because of the existence of chaos, the harmonic spectra become noisier. For a large enough intensity, the ionization takes place and the harmonics disappear. So the chaos causes the noises, the ionization suppresses the harmonic generation, and the onset of the ionization follows the onset of chaos.

  7. Improvement of the efficiency of a space oxygen-hydrogen electrochemical generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhikh, I. N.; Shcherbakov, A. N.; Chelyaev, V. F.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the method used for cooling of an on-board oxygen-hydrogen electrochemical generator (ECG). Apart from electric power, such a unit produces water of reaction and heat; the latter is an additional load on the thermal control system of a space vehicle. This load is undesirable in long-duration space flights, when specific energy characteristics of on-board systems are the determining factors. It is suggested to partially compensate the energy consumption by the thermal control system of a space vehicle required for cooling of the electrochemical generator through evaporation of water of reaction from the generator into a vacuum (or through ice sublimation if the pressure in the ambient space is lower than that in the triple point of water.) Such method of cooling of an electrochemical generator improves specific energy parameters of an on-board electric power supply system, and, due to the presence of the negative feedback, it makes the operation of this system more stable. Estimates suggest that it is possible to compensate approximately one half of heat released from the generator through evaporation of its water of reaction at the electrical efficiency of the electrochemical generator equal to 60%. In this case, even minor increase in the efficiency of the generator would result in a considerable increase in the efficiency of the evaporative system intended for its cooling.

  8. Endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide and its regulation in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genfu eWu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions across all domains of life. In this study, mechanisms of endogenous H2S generation in Shewanella oneidensis were investigated. As a research model with highly diverse anaerobic respiratory pathways, the microorganism is able to produce H2S by respiring on a variety of sulfur-containing compounds with SirACD and PsrABC enzymatic complexes, as well as through cysteine degradation with three enzymes, MdeA, SO_1095, and SseA. We showed that the SirACD and PsrABC complexes, which are predominantly, if not exclusively, responsible for H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species, do not interplay with each other. Strikingly, a screen for regulators controlling endogenous H2S generation by transposon mutagenesis identified global regulator Crp to be essential to all H2S-generating processes. In contrast, Fnr and Arc, two other global regulators that have a role in respiration, are dispensable in regulating H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species. Interestingly, Arc is involved in the H2S generation through cysteine degradation by repressing expression of the mdeA gene. We further showed that expression of the sirA and psrABC operons is subjected to direct regulation of Crp, but the mechanisms underlying the requirement of Crp for H2S generation through cysteine degradation remain elusive.

  9. Hydrogen generation through indirect biophotolysis in batch cultures of the nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesemann, Michael H; Hausmann, Tom S; Carter, Blaine M; Gerschler, Jared J; Benemann, John R

    2010-09-01

    The nitrogen-fixing nonheterocystous cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum was used as a model organism to study hydrogen generation by indirect biophotolysis in nitrogen-limited batch cultures that were continuously illuminated and sparged with argon/CO(2) to maintain anaerobiosis. The highest hydrogen-production rate (i.e., 0.18 mL/mg day or 7.3 micromol/mg day) was observed in cultures with an initial medium nitrate concentration of 1 mM at a light intensity of 100 micromol/m(2) s. The addition of photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) did not reduce hydrogen-production rates relative to unchallenged controls for 50 to 150 h, and intracellular glycogen concentrations decreased significantly during the hydrogen generation period. The insensitivity of the hydrogen-production process to DCMU is indicative of the fact that hydrogen was not derived from water splitting at PSII (i.e., direct biophotolysis) but rather from electrons provided by intracellular glycogen reserves (i.e., indirect biophotolysis). It was shown that hydrogen generation could be sustained for long time periods by subjecting the cultures to alternating cycles of aerobic, nitrogen-limited growth and anaerobic hydrogen production.

  10. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m-3. However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ∼1.5× to 118 W h m-3. Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m-3 or ∼1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  11. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzell, Marta C; Ivanov, Ivan; Cusick, Roland D; Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-28

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m(-3). However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ~1.5× to 118 W h m(-3). Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m(-3) or ~1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  12. [Isolation of a high hydrogen-producing mutant TB34 generated by transposon insertion and analysis of hydrogen production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Guang-Ce; Shi, Liu-Yang; Zhu, Da-Ling

    2012-07-01

    To increase the hydrogen-producing capacity of Pantoea agglomerans BH18, isolated from mangrove sludge, we constructed a stable transposon mutagenesis library of this strain. A Tn7-based transposon was randomly inserted into the genomic DNA. Mutants were screened by kanamycin resistance and identified by amplification of the inserted transposon sequences. A mutant strain TB34 was isolated, whose hydrogen production capacity was significantly improved compared to the wild type strain. In seawater-containing medium supplemented with 10 g x L(-1) glucose and had an initial pH of 7.0, the hydrogen yield (H2/glucose) of the mutant strain was (2.04 +/- 0.04) mol x mol(-1), which was 43% higher than that of the wild type strain. The mutant TB34 showed steady hydrogen production capacity for five consecutive passages. Different carbon sources were tested in the hydrogen production by the mutant TB34 and the results showed that both the mutant strain TB34 and the wild type strain BH18 were able to produce hydrogen on sucrose, glucose and fructose. However, different from the wild type strain, the mutant strain TB34 was also able to produce hydrogen using xylose as substrate, with a hydrogen yield (H2/xylose) of (1.34 +/- 0.09) mol x mol(-1), indicating a broader substrate spectrum in the mutant.

  13. Enhanced Solar-to-Hydrogen Generation with Broadband Epsilon-Near-Zero Nanostructured Photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Yi

    2017-05-08

    The direct conversion of solar energy into fuels or feedstock is an attractive approach to address increasing demand of renewable energy sources. Photocatalytic systems relying on the direct photoexcitation of metals have been explored to this end, a strategy that exploits the decay of plasmonic resonances into hot carriers. An efficient hot carrier generation and collection requires, ideally, their generation to be enclosed within few tens of nanometers at the metal interface, but it is challenging to achieve this across the broadband solar spectrum. Here the authors demonstrate a new photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution based on metal epsilon-near-zero metamaterials. The authors have designed these to achieve broadband strong light confinement at the metal interface across the entire solar spectrum. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy, the authors prove that hot carriers are generated in a broadband fashion within 10 nm in this system. The resulting photocatalyst achieves a hydrogen production rate of 9.5 µmol h-1  cm-2 that exceeds, by a factor of 3.2, that of the best previously reported plasmonic-based photocatalysts for the dissociation of H2 with 50 h stable operation.

  14. Possibly scalable solar hydrogen generation with quasi-artificial leaf approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Kshirodra Kumar; Bhuskute, Bela D; Gopinath, Chinnakonda S

    2017-07-26

    Any solar energy harvesting technology must provide a net positive energy balance, and artificial leaf concept provided a platform for solar water splitting (SWS) towards that. However, device stability, high photocurrent generation, and scalability are the major challenges. A wireless device based on quasi-artificial leaf concept (QuAL), comprising Au on porous TiO2 electrode sensitized by PbS and CdS quantum dots (QD), was demonstrated to show sustainable solar hydrogen (490 ± 25 µmol/h (corresponds to 12 ml H2 h(-1)) from ~2 mg of photoanode material coated over 1 cm(2) area with aqueous hole (S(2-)/SO3(2-)) scavenger. A linear extrapolation of the above results could lead to hydrogen production of 6 L/h.g over an area of ~23 × 23 cm(2). Under one sun conditions, 4.3 mA/cm(2) photocurrent generation, 5.6% power conversion efficiency, and spontaneous H2 generation were observed at no applied potential (see S1). A direct coupling of all components within themselves enhances the light absorption in the entire visible and NIR region and charge utilization. Thin film approach, as in DSSC, combined with porous titania enables networking of all the components of the device, and efficiently converts solar to chemical energy in a sustainable manner.

  15. Integration of direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells for highly efficient power generation from hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Choi, Pyoungho; Smith, Franklyn; Bokerman, Gary [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In view of impending depletion of hydrocarbon fuel resources and their negative environmental impact, it is imperative to significantly increase the energy conversion efficiency of hydrocarbon-based power generation systems. The combination of a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor with a direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells (FC) as a means for a significant increase in chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency is discussed in this paper. The data on development and operation of a thermocatalytic hydrocarbon decomposition reactor and its coupling with a proton exchange membrane FC are presented. The analysis of the integrated power generating system including a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor, direct carbon and hydrogen FC using natural gas and propane as fuels is conducted. It was estimated that overall chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency of the integrated system varied in the range of 49.4-82.5%, depending on the type of fuel and FC used, and CO{sub 2} emission per kW{sub el}h produced is less than half of that from conventional power generation sources. (author)

  16. Final Technical Report for GO15056 Millennium Cell: Development of an Advanced Chemical Hydrogen Storage and Generation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Oscar [Millennium Cell Inc., Eatontown, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are to increase system storage capacity by improving hydrogen generation from concentrated sodium borohydride, with emphasis on reactor and system engineering; to complete a conceptual system design based on sodium borohydride that will include key technology improvements to enable a hydrogen fuel system that will meet the systembased storage capacity of 1.2 kWh/L (36 g H2/L) and 1.5 kWh/kg (45 g H2/kg), by the end of FY 2007; and to utilize engineering expertise to guide Center research in both off-board chemical hydride regeneration and on-board hydrogen generation systems.

  17. Hydrogen generation arising from the {sup 59}Ni(n,p) reaction and its impact on fission-fusion correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Garner, A.F.

    1996-04-01

    Whilte the influence of transmutant helium on radiation-induced microstructural evolution has often been studied, there is a tendency to overlook the influence of concurrently-generated hydrogen. There have been some recent speculation and studies, however, that suggest that the influence of hydrogen may be enhanced in the presence of large amounts of helium, especially at lower irradiation temperatures typical of projected ITER operation. The impact of the (n,p) reaction on both hydrogen generation rates and displacement rates are evaluated in this paper for a variety of neutron spectra employed in fission-fusion correlation.

  18. EVALUATION OF REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DWPF HIGHER CAPACITY CANISTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.; Estochen, E.; Jordan, J.; Kesterson, M.; Mckeel, C.

    2014-08-05

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is considering the option to increase canister glass capacity by reducing the wall thickness of the current production canister. This design has been designated as the DWPF Higher Capacity Canister (HCC). A significant decrease in the number of canisters processed during the life of the facility would be achieved if the HCC were implemented leading to a reduced overall reduction in life cycle costs. Prior to implementation of the change, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct an evaluation of the potential impacts. The specific areas of interest included loading and deformation of the canister during the filling process. Additionally, the effect of the reduced wall thickness on corrosion and material compatibility needed to be addressed. Finally the integrity of the canister during decontamination and other handling steps needed to be determined. The initial request regarding canister fabrication was later addressed in an alternate study. A preliminary review of canister requirements and previous testing was conducted prior to determining the testing approach. Thermal and stress models were developed to predict the forces on the canister during the pouring and cooling process. The thermal model shows the HCC increasing and decreasing in temperature at a slightly faster rate than the original. The HCC is shown to have a 3°F ΔT between the internal and outer surfaces versus a 5°F ΔT for the original design. The stress model indicates strain values ranging from 1.9% to 2.9% for the standard canister and 2.5% to 3.1% for the HCC. These values are dependent on the glass level relative to the thickness transition between the top head and the canister wall. This information, along with field readings, was used to set up environmental test conditions for corrosion studies. Small 304-L canisters were filled with glass and subjected to accelerated environmental testing for 3 months. No evidence of

  19. Room temperature hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of ammonia-borane over an efficient NiAgPd/C catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    NiAgPd nanoparticles are successfully synthesized by in-situ reduction of Ni, Ag and Pd salts on the surface of carbon. Their catalytic activity was examined in ammonia borane (NH3BH3) hydrolysis to generate hydrogen gas. This nanomaterial exhibits a higher catalytic activity than those of monometallic and bimetallic counterparts and a stoichiometric amount of hydrogen was produced at a high generation rate. Hydrogen production rates were investigated in different concentrations of NH3BH3 solutions, including in the borates saturated solution, showing little influence of the concentrations on the reaction rates. The hydrogen production rate can reach 3.6-3.8 mol H2 molcat -1 min-1 at room temperature (21 °C). The activation energy and TOF value are 38.36 kJ/mol and 93.8 mol H2 molcat -1 min-1, respectively, comparable to those of Pt based catalysts. This nanomaterial catalyst also exhibits excellent chemical stability, and no significant morphology change was observed from TEM after the reaction. Using this catalyst for continuously hydrogen generation, the hydrogen production rate can be kept after generating 6.2 L hydrogen with over 10,000 turnovers and a TOF value of 90.3 mol H2 molcat -1 min-1.

  20. Tungsten dust nanoparticles generation from blistering bursts under hydrogen environment in microwave ECR discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouaras, K., E-mail: ouaras@lspm.cnrs.fr; Hassouni, K.; Delacqua, L. Colina; Lombardi, G.; Vrel, D.; Bonnin, X.

    2015-11-15

    Blistering burst induced tungsten dust nanoparticles were observed for the first time when a tungsten sample is submitted to a hydrogen low-temperature discharge under low flux and low incident energy values (20, 120 and 220 eV) at a surface temperature of 500 K. Tungsten nanoparticles (∼50 nm) were organized in 2D domains with diameter that is well correlated to the blister volume losses by burst. These observations suggest that dust nanoparticles were generated from blistering burst.

  1. Possibly scalable solar hydrogen generation with quasi-artificial leaf approach

    OpenAIRE

    Patra, Kshirodra Kumar; Bhuskute, Bela D.; Chinnakonda S. Gopinath

    2017-01-01

    Any solar energy harvesting technology must provide a net positive energy balance, and artificial leaf concept provided a platform for solar water splitting (SWS) towards that. However, device stability, high photocurrent generation, and scalability are the major challenges. A wireless device based on quasi-artificial leaf concept (QuAL), comprising Au on porous TiO2 electrode sensitized by PbS and CdS quantum dots (QD), was demonstrated to show sustainable solar hydrogen (490???25??mol/h (co...

  2. Investigation of cold cathodes of plasma sources generating of hydrogen ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Veresov, L P; Dzkuya, M I; Zhukov, Y N; Kuznetsov, G V; Tsekvava, I A

    2001-01-01

    Designs of a hollow cellular cathode (HCC) and of an inverse cylindrical multichamber magnetronic cathode (ICMMC), used as cold cathodes in duoplasmatron for hydrogen ion beam generation, are described. Their service characteristics are compared. It is ascertained that emission ability of both HCC and ICMMC is approximately the same. However, duoplasmatron with ICMMC features a three times higher gas effectiveness compared with HCC. Service life of duoplasmatron with both types of cathodes amounts to several thousand hours. On the basis of test results the choice is made in favour of ICMMC

  3. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  4. Effective regimes of runaway electron beam generation in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.

    2010-04-01

    Runaway electron beam parameters and current-voltage characteristics of discharge in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at pressures in the range of several Torr to several hundred Torr have been studied. It is found that the maximum amplitudes of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) with a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps are achieved in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at a pressure of ˜60, ˜30, and ˜10 Torr, respectively. It is shown that, as the gas pressure is increased in the indicated range, the breakdown voltage of the gas-filled gap decreases, which leads to a decrease in the SAEB current amplitude. At pressures of helium within 20-60 Torr, hydrogen within 10-30 Torr, and nitrogen within 3-10 Torr, the regime of the runaway electron beam generation changes and, by varying the pressure in the gas-filled diode in the indicated intervals, it is possible to smoothly control the current pulse duration (FWHM) from ˜100 to ˜500 ps, while the beam current amplitude increases by a factor of 1.5-3.

  5. Role of hydrogen generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazuru, Tomoko; Sato, Eisuke F; Nagata, Kumiko; Matsui, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Kasahara, Emiko; Jikumaru, Mika; Inoue, June; Inoue, Masayasu

    2010-12-01

    Some gastrointestinal bacteria synthesize hydrogen (H(2)) by fermentation. Despite the presence of bactericidal factors in human saliva, a large number of bacteria also live in the oral cavity. It has never been shown that oral bacteria also produce H(2) or what role H(2) might play in the oral cavity. It was found that a significant amount of H(2) is synthesized in the oral cavity of healthy human subjects, and that its generation is enhanced by the presence of glucose but inhibited by either teeth brushing or sterilization with povidone iodine. These observations suggest the presence of H(2)-generating bacteria in the oral cavity. The screening of commensal bacteria in the oral cavity revealed that a variety of anaerobic bacteria generate H(2). Among them, Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) generated significantly large amounts of H(2) in the presence of glucose. Biochemical analysis revealed that various proteins in K. pneumoniae are carbonylated under standard culture conditions, and that oxidative stress induced by the presence of Fe(++) and H(2)O(2) increases the number of carbonylated proteins, particularly when their hydrogenase activity is inhibited by KCN. Inhibition of H(2) generation markedly suppresses the growth of K. pneumoniae. These observations suggest that H(2) generation and/or the reduction of oxidative stress is important for the survival and growth of K. pneumoniae in the oral cavity.

  6. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  7. Hydrogen Generation from Biomass-Derived Surgar Alcohols via the Aqueous-Phase Carbohydrate Reforming (ACR) Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randy Cortright

    2006-06-30

    This project involved the investigation and development of catalysts and reactor systems that will be cost-effective to generate hydrogen from potential sorbitol streams. The intention was to identify the required catalysts and reactors systems as well as the design, construction, and operation of a 300 grams per hour hydrogen system. Virent was able to accomplish this objective with a system that generates 2.2 kgs an hour of gas containing both hydrogen and alkanes that relied directly on the work performed under this grant. This system, funded in part by the local Madison utility, Madison, Gas & Electric (MGE), is described further in the report. The design and development of this system should provide the necessary scale-up information for the generation of hydrogen from corn-derived sorbitol.

  8. Preliminary Analysis of Species Partitioning in the DWPF Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kesterson, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Johnson, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-15

    The work described in this report is preliminary in nature since its goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating the off-gas entrainment rates from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter based on a simple mass balance using measured feed and glass pour stream compositions and timeaveraged melter operating data over the duration of one canister-filling cycle. The only case considered in this study involved the SB6 pour stream sample taken while Canister #3472 was being filled over a 20-hour period on 12/20/2010, approximately three months after the bubblers were installed. The analytical results for that pour stream sample provided the necessary glass composition data for the mass balance calculations. To estimate the “matching” feed composition, which is not necessarily the same as that of the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) batch being fed at the time of pour stream sampling, a mixing model was developed involving three preceding MFT batches as well as the one being fed at that time based on the assumption of perfect mixing in the glass pool but with an induction period to account for the process delays involved in the calcination/fusion step in the cold cap and the melter turnover.

  9. SULFATE SOLUBILITY LIMIT VERIFICATION FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.

    2011-10-03

    the targeted values. The results for the SB7b glasses fabricated with Frit 418 showed an apparent trend of increasing sulfate retention with increasing Na{sub 2}O additions to the 5/25/11 sludge projection. This trend appears contradictory to other recent studies of sulfate retention in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) type glasses. Additional apparent contradictions to this trend were found in the data collected in the present study. Overall, the results for the SB7b sulfate study glasses with Frit 418 and the 5/25/11 projection with Na{sub 2}O additions showed that subtle changes in this complex glass composition impacted the degree of sulfate retention. These results do however provide confidence that a 0.6 wt % sulfate limit in glass is warranted for Frit 418 with the SB7b compositions evaluated in this study. The results for the SB7b glasses fabricated with Frit 702 are consistent with those of the previous SB7a study in that Frit 702 allowed for higher sulfate retention as compared to Frit 418 for the same sludge compositions. It is recommended that the DWPF implement a sulfate concentration limit of 0.6 wt % in glass for SB7b processing with Frit 418. If a higher than projected sulfate concentration is measured when SB7b processing begins (i.e., if a sulfate concentration higher than 0.6 wt % becomes necessary to achieve targeted waste loadings), DWPF should consider a transition to Frit 702. The sulfate limit could likely be raised to 0.8 wt % by transitioning to this frit. However, if DWPF considers transitioning from Frit 418 to Frit 702, additional glasses should be fabricated to confirm this higher limit due to the issues with incorrect B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations for some of the glasses made with Frit 702 in this study. There are several factors other than sulfate retention that must also be carefully considered prior to changing frit compositions.

  10. Validation of DWPF Melter Off-Gas Combustion Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.S.

    2000-08-23

    The empirical melter off-gas combustion model currently used in the DWPF safety basis calculations is valid at melter vapor space temperatures above 570 degrees C, as measured in the thermowell. This lower temperature bound coincides with that of the off-gas data used as the basis of the model. In this study, the applicability of the empirical model in a wider temperature range was assessed using the off-gas data collected during two small-scale research melter runs. The first data set came from the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 run in 1985 with the sludge feed coupled with the precipitate hydrolysis product. The second data set came from the 774-A melter run in 1996 with the sludge-only feed prepared with the modified acid addition strategy during the feed pretreatment step. The results of the assessment showed that the data from these two melter runs agreed well with the existing model, and further provided the basis for extending the lower temperature bound of the model to the measured melter vapor space temperature of 445 degrees C.

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Co-Ru Alloy Particle Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Sodium Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kurtinaitienė

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of μm and sub-μm-sized Co, Ru, and Co-Ru alloy species by hydrothermal approach in the aqueous alkaline solutions (pH ≥ 13 containing CoCl2 and/or RuCl3, sodium citrate, and hydrazine hydrate and a study of their catalytic properties for hydrogen generation by hydrolysis of sodium borohydride solution. This way provides a simple platform for fabrication of the ball-shaped Co-Ru alloy catalysts containing up to 12 wt% Ru. Note that bimetallic Co-Ru alloy bowls containing even 7 at.% Ru have demonstrated catalytic properties that are comparable with the ones of pure Ru particles fabricated by the same method. This result is of great importance in view of the preparation of cost-efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from borohydrides. The morphology and composition of fabricated catalyst particles have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  12. Sulfur-Doped Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots as Photocatalysts for Hydrogen Generation in the Aqueous Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliniak, Jacek; Lin, Jia-Hoa; Chen, Yi-Ting; Li, Chuen-Ru; Jokar, Efat; Chang, Chin-Hao; Peng, Chun-Sheng; Lin, Jui-Nien; Lien, Wan-Hsiang; Tsai, Hui-Min; Wu, Tung-Kung

    2017-08-24

    Sulfur-doped graphene oxide quantum dots (S-GOQDs) were synthesized and investigated for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation application. The UV/Vis, FTIR, and photoluminescence spectra of the synthesized S-GOQDs exhibit three absorption bands at 333, 395, and 524 nm, characteristic of C=S and C-S stretching vibration signals at 1075 and 690 cm(-1) , and two excitation-wavelength-independent emission signals with maxima at 451 and 520 nm, respectively, confirming the successful doping of S atom into the GOQDs. Electronic structural analysis suggested that the S-GOQDs exhibit conduction band minimum (CBM) and valence band maximum (VBM) levels suitable for water splitting. Under direct sunlight irradiation, an initial rate of 18 166 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) in pure water and 30 519 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) in 80 % ethanol aqueous solution were obtained. Therefore, metal-free and inexpensive S-GOQDs hold great potential in the development of sustainable and environmentally friendly photocatalysts for efficient hydrogen generation from water splitting. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hydrogen generation from methanolysis of sodium borohydride over Co/Al2O3 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongyan Xu; Lin Zhao; Ping Dai; Shengfu Ji

    2012-01-01

    Co/Al2O3 catalyst is prepared with an impregnation-chemical reduction method and used to catalyze the methanolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) for hydrogen generation.At solution temperature of 0℃,the methanolysis reaction can be effectively accelerated using Co/Al2O3 catalyst and provide a desirable hydrogen generation rate,which makes it suitable for apphcations under the circumstance of low environmental temperature.The byproduct of methanolysis reaction is analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).The characterization results indicate that methanol can be easily recovered after methanolysis reaction by hydrolysis of the methanolysis byproduct,NaB(OCH3)4.The catalytic activity of Co/Al2O3 towards NaBH4 methanolysis can be further improved by appropriate calcination treatment.The catalytic methanolysis kinetics and catalyst reusability are also studied over the Co/Al2O3 catalyst calcined at the optimized temperature.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of K-Ta Mixed Oxides for Hydrogen Generation in Photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Zielińska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available K-Ta mixed oxides photocatalysts have been prepared by impregnation followed by calcination. The influence of the reaction temperature (450°C–900°C on the phase formation, crystal morphology, and photocatalytic activity in hydrogen generation of the produced materials was investigated. The detailed analysis has revealed that all products exhibit high crystallinity and irregular structure. Moreover, two different crystal structures of potassium tantalates such as KTaO3 and K2Ta4O11 were obtained. It was also found that the sample composed of KTaO3 and traces of unreacted Ta2O5 (annealed at 600°C exhibits the highest activity in the reaction of photocatalytic hydrogen generation. The crystallographic phases, optical and vibronic properties were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD and diffuse reflectance (DR UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic methods, respectively. Morphology and chemical composition of the produced samples were studied using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX as its mode.

  15. Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-12-15

    OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study.

  16. Dibenzothiophene hydrodesulfurization over Ru promoted alumina based catalysts using in situ generated hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Yaseen; Shen, Chong; Li, Chunxi [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Lu, Yingzhou [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Catalytic hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) was carried out in a temperature range of 320-400 C using in situ generated hydrogen coupled with the effect of selected organic additives for the first time. Four kinds of alumina based catalysts i.e. Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ru-Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ru-Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for the desulfurization process, which were prepared following incipient impregnation method with fixed metal loadings (wt.%) of Co, Ni, Mo and Ru. The surface area, average pore diameter and pore volume distribution of the fresh and used catalysts were measured by N{sub 2} adsorption using BET method. Catalytic activity was investigated in a batch autoclave reactor in the complete absence of external hydrogen gas. Addition and mutual reaction of specific quantities of water and ethanol provided the necessary in situ hydrogen for the desulfurization reaction. Organic additives like diethylene glycol (DEG), phenol, naphthalene, anthracene, o-xylene, tetralin, decalin and pyridine did impinge the HDS activity of the catalysts in different ways. Liquid samples from reaction products were quantitatively analyzed by HPLC technique while qualitative analyses were made using GC-MS. Both of these techniques showed that Ni-based catalysts were more active than Co-based ones at all conditions. Moreover, incorporation of Ru to both Co and Ni-based catalysts greatly promoted desulfurization activity of these catalysts. DBT conversion of up to 84% was achieved with Ru-Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at 380 C temperature for 11 h. Catalyst systems followed the HDS activity order as: Ru-Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}> Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}> Ru-Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}> Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at all conditions. Cost effectiveness, mild operating conditions and reasonably high catalytic activity using in situ generated hydrogen mechanism proved our process to be useful for HDS of DBT. (author)

  17. The use of renewable energy in the form of methane via electrolytic hydrogen generation using carbon dioxide as the feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kumagai, Naokazu; Izumiya, Koichi; Takano, Hiroyuki; Shinomiya, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kato, Zenta

    2016-12-01

    The history reveals the continuous increase in world energy consumption and carbon emissions. For prevention of intolerable global warming and complete exhaustion of fossil fuels we need complete conversion from fossil fuel consumption to renewable energy. We have been performing the research and development of global carbon dioxide recycling for more than 25 years to supply renewable energy to the world in the form of methane produced by the reaction of carbon dioxide captured from chimney with hydrogen generated electrolytically using electricity generated by renewable energy. We created the cathode and anode for electrolytic hydrogen generation and the catalyst for carbon dioxide methanation by the reaction with hydrogen. The methane formation from renewable energy will be the most convenient and efficient key technology for the use of renewable energy by storage of intermittent and fluctuating electricity generated from renewable energy and by regeneration of stable electricity. Domestic and international cooperation of companies for industrialization is in progress.

  18. Discrete event simulation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1992-02-01

    A discrete event simulation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory has been constructed in the GPSS language. It was used to estimate laboratory analysis times at process analytical hold points and to study the effect of sample number on those times. Typical results are presented for three different simultaneous representing increasing levels of complexity, and for different sampling schemes. Example equipment utilization time plots are also included. SRS DWPF laboratory management and chemists found the simulations very useful for resource and schedule planning.

  19. Rheological Characterization of Unusual DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D. C.

    2005-09-01

    A study was undertaken to identify and clarify examples of unusual rheological behavior in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulant slurry samples. Identification was accomplished by reviewing sludge, Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product simulant rheological results from the prior year. Clarification of unusual rheological behavior was achieved by developing and implementing new measurement techniques. Development of these new methods is covered in a separate report, WSRC-TR-2004-00334. This report includes a review of recent literature on unusual rheological behavior, followed by a summary of the rheological measurement results obtained on a set of unusual simulant samples. Shifts in rheological behavior of slurries as the wt. % total solids changed have been observed in numerous systems. The main finding of the experimental work was that the various unusual DWPF simulant slurry samples exhibit some degree of time dependent behavior. When a given shear rate is applied to a sample, the apparent viscosity of the slurry changes with time rather than remaining constant. These unusual simulant samples are more rheologically complex than Newtonian liquids or more simple slurries, neither of which shows significant time dependence. The study concludes that the unusual rheological behavior that has been observed is being caused by time dependent rheological properties in the slurries being measured. Most of the changes are due to the effect of time under shear, but SB3 SME products were also changing properties while stored in sample bottles. The most likely source of this shear-related time dependence for sludge is in the simulant preparation. More than a single source of time dependence was inferred for the simulant SME product slurries based on the range of phenomena observed. Rheological property changes were observed on the time-scale of a single measurement (minutes) as well as on a time scale of hours

  20. SULFATE SOLUBILITY LIMIT VERIFICATION FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billings, A.

    2011-04-19

    During processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), high sulfate concentrations in the feed are a concern to DWPF as it can lead to the formation of a detrimental, sulfate-rich, molten salt phase on the surface of the glass melt pool. To avoid these issues, a sulfate concentration limit was implemented into the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Related to SB7a frit development efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) assessed the viability of using the current 0.6 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} limit set for SB6 (in glass) and the possibility of increasing the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} solubility limit in PCCS to account for anticipated sulfur concentrations, targeted waste loadings, and inclusion of secondary streams (e.g., Actinide Removal Process (ARP)) with two recommended frits (Frit 418 and Frit 702) for SB7a processing. For a nominal SB7a blend with a 63 inch SB6 heel remaining in Tank 40 (projection SB7a-63), a 0.60 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass limit was determined for waste loadings of 34 wt% up to 40 wt% with Frit 418 based on crucible melts with batched chemicals. SRNL also examined the inclusion of ARP for the same blending scenario (SB7a-63-ARP) with Frit 418 and at least a 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} level, and waste loadings of 34 wt% to 40 wt% were also acceptable. When a visible yellow and/or white sulfate salt layer was visible on the surface of any cooled glass, it was assumed to have surpassed the solubility limit of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for that particular composition. All of the glasses fabricated at these concentrations did not exhibit a sulfate rich salt layer on the surface of the glass melt and retained the majority of the batched SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. At higher levels of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} 'spiked' into the projected sludge compositions over the aforementioned interval of waste loadings, with Frit 418, low viscosity sulfur layers were observed on the surface of glass melts which confirm exceeding the solubility

  1. Hydrogen generation from decomposition of hydrous hydrazine over Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Dai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of highly active and selective catalysts is the central issue in the development of hydrous hydrazine (N2H4·H2O as a viable hydrogen carrier. Herein, we report the synthesis of bimetallic Ni-Ir nanocatalyts supported on CeO2 using a one-pot coprecipitation method. A combination of XRD, HRTEM and XPS analyses indicate that the Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst is composed of tiny Ni-Ir alloy nanoparticles with an average size of around 4 nm and crystalline CeO2 matrix. The Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst exhibits high catalytic activity and excellent selectivity towards hydrogen generation from N2H4·H2O at mild temperatures. Furthermore, in contrast to previously reported Ni-Pt catalysts, the Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst shows an alleviated requirement on alkali promoter to achieve its optimal catalytic performance.

  2. Efficiency Evaluation of a Photovoltaic System Simultaneously Generating Solar Electricity and Hydrogen for Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abermann S.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The direct combination of a photovoltaic system with an energy storage component appears desirable since it produces and stores electrical energy simultaneously, enabling it to compensate power generation fluctuations and supply sufficient energy during low- or non-irradiation periods. A novel concept based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H triple-junction solar cells, as for example a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, and a solar water splitting system integrating a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM electrolyser is presented. The thin film layer-by-layer concept allows large-area module fabrication applicable to buildings, and exhibits strong cost-reduction potential as compared to similar concepts. The evaluation shows that it is possible to achieve a sufficient voltage of greater than 1.5 V for effective water splitting with the a-Si based solar cell. Nevertheless, in the case of grid-connection, the actual energy production cost for hydrogen storage by the proposed system is currently too high.

  3. An effective low Pd-loading catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Xu, Junlei; Ma, Xin

    2017-01-01

    roles. In addition, Ag additive was found to benefit catalyst stability. Most interestingly, the obtained low Pd-loading Pd1Ag6/N-rGO catalyst showed a specific Pd loading turnover frequency of 171 mol Pd−1 h−1 and a specific metal cost turnover frequency of 64.2 $−1 h−1, which were predominant among......As an interesting hydrogen carrier, formic acid is bio-renewable, non-toxic and available in the liquid state at room temperature. The development of active and low-cost catalyst is of significance for hydrogen generation from formic acid. In this study, both a relatively cheap metal (Ag......) and a functional support (nitrogen modified reduced graphene oxide, N-rGO) were applied to prepare Pd catalyst. It was found that the Ag atoms facilitated the formation of Pd-rich surface in the preparation strategy, in which the reductive N-rGO and a two-step feeding process of metal precursors played important...

  4. Trehalose enhancing microbial electrolysis cell for hydrogen generation in low temperature (0 °C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linji; Liu, Wenzong; Wu, Yining; Lee, Poheng; Wang, Aijie; Li, Shuai

    2014-08-01

    This work explored the feasibility of a method combining physical (sonication and base) and biological (partial fermentation) processes for sludge treatment and the effects of trehalose on the hydrogen generation of microbial electrolysis cell at 0 °C. The results demonstrated that the above pretreatment method was favorable, which promoted organics decomposing into lower molecular weight matter. The promotion of trehalose for MEC efficiency was obvious and the optimal concentration of trehalose was 50 mmol/L. With this concentration, the highest hydrogen recovery rate was 0.25 m(3)-H₂/-m(3)-reactor per day. Coulomb efficiency and energy recovery efficiency were 46.4% and 203%, respectively. Further, the consumption order of mixed substances was VFAs>proteins>carbohydrates. For microorganism community, SEM photographs illustrated that the selectivity of environmental temperature for the species of anode bacteria was strong and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis indicated that Microbacterium and Proteobacteria were the two main species and Proteobacteria may be one of the species that produced electrons.

  5. Hydrogen generation from polyvinyl alcohol-contaminated wastewater by a process of supercritical water gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Gasification of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-contaminated wastewater in supercritical water (SCW) was investigated in a continuous flow reactor at 723-873 K, 20-36 MPa and residence time of 20-60 s. The gas and liquid products were analyzed by GC/TCD, TOC analyzer and GC/MS. The main gas products were H2, CH4, CO and CO2. Pressure change had no significant influence on gasification efficiency. Higher temperature and longer residence time enhanced gasification efficiency, and lower temperature favored the production of H2. The effects of KOH catalyst on gas product composition were studied, and gasification efficiency were analyzed. The TOC removal efficiency (TOCR), carbon gasification ratio (CGR) and hydrogen gasification ratio (HGR) were up to 96.00%, 95.92% and 126.40% at 873 K and 60 s, respectively, which suggests PVA can be completely gasified in SCW. The results indicate supercritical water gasification for hydrogen generation is a promising process for the treatment of PVA wastewater.

  6. Removal of SU-8 resists using hydrogen radicals generated by tungsten hot-wire catalyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiko; Arai, Yu; Goto, Yousuke; Horibe, Hideo

    2012-03-01

    We investigated removal of chemically amplified negative-tone i-line resist SU-8 using hydrogen radicals, which was generated by the catalytic decomposition of H2/N2 mixed gas (H2:N2 = 10:90vol.%) using tungsten hot-wire catalyzer. SU-8 with exposure dose from 7 (Dg100×0.5) to 280mJ/cm2 (Dg100×20) were removed by hydrogen radicals without a residual layer. When the distance between the catalyzer and the substrate was 100mm, the catalyzer temperature was 2400°C, and the initial substrate temperature was 50°C, removal rate of SU-8 was 0.17μm/min independent of exposure dose to the SU-8. Finally, we obtained high removal rate for SU-8 (exposure dose = 14mJ/cm2 (Dg100)) of approximately 4μm/min when the distance between the catalyzer and the substrate was 20mm, the catalyzer temperature was 2400°C, and the initial substrate temperature was 165°C.

  7. Organic Polymer Dots as Photocatalysts for Visible Light-Driven Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Fernández-Terán, Ricardo; Zhang, Lei; Fernandes, Daniel L A; Tian, Lei; Chen, Hong; Tian, Haining

    2016-09-26

    For the first time, organic semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) based on poly[(9,9'-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(1,4-benzo-{2,1',3} thiadiazole)] (PFBT) and polystyrene grafting with carboxyl-group-functionalized ethylene oxide (PS-PEG-COOH) are introduced as a photocatalyst towards visible-light-driven hydrogen generation in a completely organic solvent-free system. With these organic Pdots as the photocatalyst, an impressive initial rate constant of 8.3 mmol h(-1)  g(-1) was obtained for visible-light-driven hydrogen production, which is 5-orders of magnitude higher than that of pristine PFBT polymer under the same catalytic conditions. Detailed kinetics studies suggest that the productive electron transfer quench of the excited state of Pdots by an electron donor is about 40 %. More importantly, we also found that the Pdots can tolerate oxygen during catalysis, which is crucial for further application of this material for light-driven water splitting.

  8. Deep-cavity cavitand octa acid as a hydrogen donor: photofunctionalization with nitrenes generated from azidoadamantanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rajib; Gupta, Shipra; Da Silva, José P; Ramamurthy, V

    2013-03-01

    1-azidoadamantane and 2-azidoadamantane form a 1:1 complex with hosts octa acid (OA) and cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) in water. Isothermal titration calorimetric measurements suggest these complexes to be very stable in aqueous solution. The complexes have been characterized by (1)H NMR in solution and by ESI-MS in gas phase. In both phases, the complexes are stable. Irradiation of these complexes (λ > 280 nm) results in nitrenes via the loss of nitrogen from the guest azidoadamantanes. The behavior of nitrenes within OA differs from that in solution. Nitrenes included within octa acid attack one of the four tertiary benzylic hydrogens present at the lower interior part of OA. While in solution intramolecular insertion is preferred, within OA intermolecular C-H insertion seems to be the choice. When azidoadamantanes included in CB7 were irradiated (λ > 280 nm) the same products as in solution resulted but the host held them tightly. Displacement of the product required the use of a higher binding guest. In this case, no intermolecular C-H insertion occurred. Difference in reactivity between OA and CB7 is the result of the location of hydrogens; in OA they are in the interior of the cavity where the nitrene is generated, and in CB7 they are at the exterior. Reactivity of nitrenes within OA is different from that of carbenes that do not react with the host.

  9. An Innovative Test Platform for Hydrogen Production and Zero Emission Power Generation from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabro A; Deiana P; Fiorini P; Stendardo S; Girardi G [ENEA - Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment Energy and Plants Division - Via Anguillarese - 301 00060 S Maria di Galeria - Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The ZECOMIX project, conceived by ENEA in the framework of Italian National Hydrogen Project, is aimed at studying an integrated process that produces both hydrogen and electricity from coal, with zero emissions and very high efficiency. The key element is the integration of a gasification process, characterized by coal hydro-gasification technology and carbon dioxide sequestration, with the power island, where an oxy-combustion occurs. Many optimization analysis and simulations have been carried out demonstrating the possibility to achieve very high net efficiencies (higher than 50% LHV) and very low (quasi-zero) emissions. The project schedule consists of the design, already started, the construction and the operation of an experimental facility finalized to demonstrate the feasibility of the described reference process. The facility will be realized in the ENEA Research Center of Casaccia, near Rome. It consists of a very flexible plant, in which more components can be tested separately or connected together. The plant is provided with a 50 kg/h coal atmospheric fluid bed gasifier, a fluid bed decarbonator/calcinator reactor filled with calcium oxide pellets, a pressurized hydro-gasifier reactor characterized by a pressure variable from 30 to 100 bar, a 100 kWe micro-turbine test bench, with the combustor chamber modified because of de-carbonized syngas fuelling and finally an oxygen/hydrogen combustor test bench, for experimental activities about the definition of stability limits, operative conditions (dilution, temperature pattern, chemicals) and combustion control. Other auxiliary components are mixing station for hydrogen-based syngas production, and an ordinary steam generator. The first part of the research project is aimed at testing the single component, in particular the main preliminary design criteria adopted for hydro-gasification reactor and carbonator reactor are presented in this paper. The second part of the Project is focused on the integration

  10. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation over lanthanum doped TiO2 under UV light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Xie, L; Li, Y; Qu, J L; Zheng, J; Li, X G

    2009-02-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles doped with different amount of lanthanum were obtained by sol-gel approach and followed annealing at different temperature. The crystal size of TiO2 doped with lanthanum was smaller than that of pure TiO2. Photocatalytic activity of TiO2 doped with lanthanum for water splitting into H2 was investigated. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 doped with lanthanum for water splitting into H2 is higher than that of pure TiO2. It was found that the optimal photocatalyst was TiO2 doped with 2 wt% lanthanum and calcined at 600 degrees C for 4 h which had hydrogen generation rate 700.6 micromol h(-1).

  11. Gel-combustion-synthesized ZnO nanoparticles for visible light-assisted photocatalytic hydrogen generation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) synthesized by the gel combustion technique using a bio-fuel, cassava starch (root tubers of Manihot esculenta), have been characterized by various techniques. The X-ray diffractionpattern reveals hexagonal wurtzite structure. The particle size averaged around 45nm with an excellent band gap of 2.5 eV. The scanning electron and transmission electron microscopic images confirm the ZnO NPs to be agglomerated with loop- and chain-like morphology. The ZnO NPs prepared by this method is a promising candidate for photocatalytic hydrogen generation (41 $\\mu$mol h$^{−1}$ g$^{−1}$) under UV light illumination and (140 $\\mu$mol h$^{−1}$ g$^{−1}$) under visible light illumination.

  12. Acoustically induced optical second harmonic generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    CERN Document Server

    Ebothe, J; Cabarrocas, P R I; Godet, C; Equer, B

    2003-01-01

    Acoustically induced second harmonic generation (AISHG) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H) films of different morphology has been observed. We have found that with increasing acoustical power, the optical SHG of Gd : YAB laser light (lambda = 2.03 mu m) increases and reaches its maximum value at an acoustical power density of about 2.10 W cm sup - sup 2. With decreasing temperature, the AISHG signal strongly increases below 48 K and correlates well with the temperature behaviour of differential scanning calorimetry indicating near-surface temperature phase transition. The AISHG maxima were observed at acoustical frequencies of 10-11, 14-16, 20-22 and 23-26 kHz. The independently performed measurements of the acoustically induced IR spectra have shown that the origin of the observed phenomenon is the acoustically induced electron-phonon anharmonicity in samples of different morphology.

  13. Multiple exciton generation for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution reactions with quantum yields exceeding 100%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Crisp, Ryan W.; Gu, Jing; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Pach, Gregory F.; Marshall, Ashley R.; Turner, John A.; Beard, Matthew C.

    2017-04-01

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in quantum dots (QDs) has the potential to greatly increase the power conversion efficiency in solar cells and in solar-fuel production. During the MEG process, two electron-hole pairs (excitons) are created from the absorption of one high-energy photon, bypassing hot-carrier cooling via phonon emission. Here we demonstrate that extra carriers produced via MEG can be used to drive a chemical reaction with quantum efficiency above 100%. We developed a lead sulfide (PbS) QD photoelectrochemical cell that is able to drive hydrogen evolution from aqueous Na2S solution with a peak external quantum efficiency exceeding 100%. QD photoelectrodes that were measured all demonstrated MEG when the incident photon energy was larger than 2.7 times the bandgap energy. Our results demonstrate a new direction in exploring high-efficiency approaches to solar fuels.

  14. Gas generation from radiolytic attack of TRU-contaminated hydrogenous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerwekh, A.

    1979-06-01

    In 1970, the Waste Management and Transportation Division of the Atomic Energy Commission ordered a segregation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated solid wastes. Those below a contamination level of 10 nCi/g could still be buried; those above had to be stored retrievably for 20 y. The possibility that alpha-radiolysis of hydrogenous materials might produce toxic, corrosive, and flammable gases in retrievably stored waste prompted an investigation of gas identities and generation rates in the laboratory and field. Typical waste mixtures were synthesized and contaminated for laboratory experiments, and drums of actual TRU-contaminated waste were instrumented for field testing. Several levels of contamination were studied, as well as pressure, temperature, and moisture effects. G (gas) values were determined for various waste matrices, and degradation products were examined.

  15. Generation of hydrogen peroxide from San Joaquin Valley particles in a cell-free solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM and adverse health effects. One proposed mechanism of PM-mediated health effects is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS – e.g., superoxide (•O2, hydrogen peroxide (HOOH, and hydroxyl radical (•OH – followed by oxidative stress. There are very few quantitative, specific measures of individual ROS generated from PM, but this information would help to more quantitatively address the link between ROS and the health effects of PM. To address this gap, we quantified the generation of HOOH by PM collected at an urban (Fresno and rural (Westside site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV of California during summer and winter from 2006 to 2009. HOOH was quantified by HPLC after extracting the PM in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc. Our results show that the urban PM generally generates much more HOOH than the rural PM but that there is no apparent seasonal difference in HOOH generation. In nearly all of the samples the addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Asc greatly enhances HOOH formation, but a few of the coarse PM samples were able to generate a considerable amount of HOOH in the absence of added Asc, indicating the presence of unknown reductants. Normalized by air volume, the fine PM (PM2.5 generally makes more HOOH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e., 2.5 to 10 μm, primarily because the mass concentration of PM2.5 is much higher than that of PMcf. However, normalized by PM mass, the coarse PM typically generates more HOOH than the fine PM. The amount of HOOH produced by SJV PM is reduced on average by (78±15% when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF is added to the extraction solution, indicating that transition metals play a dominant role in HOOH generation. By

  16. Generation of hydrogen peroxide from San Joaquin Valley particles in a cell-free solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM and adverse health effects. One proposed mechanism of PM-mediated health effects is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS – e.g., superoxide (O2, hydrogen peroxide (HOOH, and hydroxyl radical (OH – followed by oxidative stress. There are very few quantitative, specific measures of individual ROS generated from PM, but this information would help to more quantitatively address the link between ROS and the health effects of PM. To address this gap, we quantified the generation of HOOH by PM collected at an urban (Fresno and rural (Westside site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV of California during summer and winter from 2006 to 2009. HOOH was quantified by HPLC after extracting the PM in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc. Our results show that the urban PM generally generates much more HOOH than the rural PM but that there is no apparent seasonal difference in HOOH generation. In nearly all of the samples the addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Asc greatly enhances HOOH formation, but a few of the coarse PM samples were able to generate a considerable amount of HOOH in the absence of added Asc, indicating the presence of unknown reductants. Normalized by air volume, the fine PM (PM2.5 generally makes more HOOH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e., 2.5 to 10 μm, primarily because the mass concentration of PM2.5 is much higher than that of PMcf. However, normalized by PM mass, the coarse PM typically generates more HOOH than the fine PM. The amount of HOOH produced by SJV PM is reduced on average by (78 ± 15% when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF is added to the extraction solution, indicating that transition metals play a dominant role in HOOH

  17. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. In a membrane reactor process, the thermal energy needed for the endothermic hydrocarbon reforming may be provided by combustion of the membrane reject gas. The energy efficiency of the overall hydrogen generation is maximized by controlling the hydrogen product yield such that the heat value of the membrane reject gas is sufficient to provide all of the heat necessary for the integrated process. Optimization of the system temperature, pressure and operating parameters such as net hydrogen recovery is necessary to realize an efficient integrated membrane reformer suitable for compact portable hydrogen generation. This paper presents results of theoretical model simulations of the integrated membrane reformer concept elucidating the effect of operating parameters on the extent of fuel conversion to hydrogen and hydrogen product yield. Model simulations indicate that the net possible hydrogen product yield is strongly influenced by the efficiency of heat recovery from the combustion of membrane reject gas and from the hot exhaust gases. When butane is used as a fuel, a net hydrogen recovery of 68% of that stoichiometrically possible may be achieved with membrane reformer operation at 600 °C (873 K) temperature and 100 psig (0.791 MPa) pressure provided 90% of available combustion and exhaust gas heat is recovered. Operation at a greater pressure or temperature provides a marginal improvement in the performance whereas operation at a significantly lower temperature or pressure will not be able to achieve the optimal hydrogen yield. Slightly higher, up to 76%, net hydrogen recovery is possible when methanol is used as a fuel due to the lower heat

  18. A novel power generation system based on combination of hydrogen and direct carbon fuel cells for decentralized applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; Choi, Pyoungho; Bokerman, Gary [Central Florida Univ., FL (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Fuel cell (FC) based power generation systems are characterized by highest chemical-toelectrical (CTE) energy conversion efficiency compared to conventional power generators (e.g., internal combustion and diesel engines, turbines). Most efforts in this area relate to hydrogen-FC coupled with hydrocarbon fuel reformers (HFR). However, the overall CTE efficiency of the combined HFR-FC systems is relatively low (about 30-35%). The objective of this work is to develop a highly-efficient power generation system integrating a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor (HDR) with both hydrogen and direct-carbon FC. A unique feature of direct carbon FC is that its theoretical CTE efficiency is close to 100% and the practical efficiency could rich 80-90%. The concept of the integrated hydrogen and direct carbon FC system is discussed and the experimental data on the performance testing of a HDR coupled with PEM FC are presented in this paper. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation Of Methods To Measure Hydrogen Generation Rate In A Shielded Cell Environment And A Method Recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E.

    2012-11-07

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the art for determination of hydrogen generation rates of radioactive slurries and solutions to provide a basis for design, fabrication, testing, and implementation of a measurement method for Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) during qualification of waste feeds for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The HGR measurement will be performed on samples of the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) staged waste feeds for the WTP as well as on samples from selected unit operations testing during the qualification program. SRNL has performed a review of techniques utilized to measure HGR of high level radioactive waste slurries, evaluated the Hanford 222-S Laboratory method for measurement of hydrogen, and reviewed the hydrogen generation rate models for Hanford waste.Based on the literature review, method evaluation, and SRNL experience with measuring hydrogen generation rate, SRNL recommends that a continuous flow system with online gas analysis be used as the HGR measurement method during waste qualification.

  20. Evaluation Of Methods To Measure Hydrogen Generation Rate In A Shielded Cell Environment And A Method Recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E.

    2012-11-07

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the art for determination of hydrogen generation rates of radioactive slurries and solutions to provide a basis for design, fabrication, testing, and implementation of a measurement method for Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) during qualification of waste feeds for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The HGR measurement will be performed on samples of the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) staged waste feeds for the WTP as well as on samples from selected unit operations testing during the qualification program. SRNL has performed a review of techniques utilized to measure HGR of high level radioactive waste slurries, evaluated the Hanford 222-S Laboratory method for measurement of hydrogen, and reviewed the hydrogen generation rate models for Hanford waste.Based on the literature review, method evaluation, and SRNL experience with measuring hydrogen generation rate, SRNL recommends that a continuous flow system with online gas analysis be used as the HGR measurement method during waste qualification.

  1. Preliminary analysis of species partitioning in the DWPF melter. Sludge batch 7A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith III, F. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-01

    The work described in this report is preliminary in nature since its goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating the off-gas carryover from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter based on a simple mass balance using measured feed and glass pour stream (PS) compositions and time-averaged melter operating data over the duration of one canister-filling cycle.

  2. Melt Rate Improvement for DWPF MB3: Foaming Theory and Mitigation Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D.K.

    2001-07-24

    The objective of this research is to enhance the basic understanding of the role of glass chemistry, including the chemical kinetics of pre-melting, solid state reactions, batch melting, and the reaction pathways in glass and/or acid addition strategy changes on the overall melting process for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Macrobatch 3 (MB3).

  3. Literature review: Assessment of DWPF melter and melter off-gas system lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-30

    A glass melter for use in processing radioactive waste is a challenging environment for the materials of construction (MOC) resulting from a combination of high temperatures, chemical attack, and erosion/corrosion; therefore, highly engineered materials must be selected for this application. The focus of this report is to review the testing and evaluations used in the selection of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), glass contact MOC specifically the Monofrax® K-3 refractory and Inconel® 690 alloy. The degradation or corrosion mechanisms of these materials during pilot scale testing and in-service operation were analyzed over a range of oxidizing and reducing flowsheets; however, DWPF has primarily processed a reducing flowsheet (i.e., Fe2+/ΣFe of 0.09 to 0.33) since the start of radioactive operations. This report also discusses the materials selection for the DWPF off-gas system and the corrosion evaluation of these materials during pilot scale testing and non-radioactive operations of DWPF Melter #1. Inspection of the off-gas components has not been performed during radioactive operations with the exception of maintenance because of plugging.

  4. Literature review: Assessment of DWPF melter and melter off-gas system lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-30

    A glass melter for use in processing radioactive waste is a challenging environment for the materials of construction (MOC) resulting from a combination of high temperatures, chemical attack, and erosion/corrosion; therefore, highly engineered materials must be selected for this application. The focus of this report is to review the testing and evaluations used in the selection of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), glass contact MOC specifically the Monofrax® K-3 refractory and Inconel® 690 alloy. The degradation or corrosion mechanisms of these materials during pilot scale testing and in-service operation were analyzed over a range of oxidizing and reducing flowsheets; however, DWPF has primarily processed a reducing flowsheet (i.e., Fe2+/ΣFe of 0.09 to 0.33) since the start of radioactive operations. This report also discusses the materials selection for the DWPF off-gas system and the corrosion evaluation of these materials during pilot scale testing and non-radioactive operations of DWPF Melter #1. Inspection of the off-gas components has not been performed during radioactive operations with the exception of maintenance because of plugging.

  5. THE IMPACT OF THE MCU LIFE EXTENSION SOLVENT ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION EFFORTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D; Edwards, T

    2011-03-24

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NG-CSSX), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S operations as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass formulation activities, and melter operations at DWPF. To support programmatic objectives, the downstream impacts of the boric acid strip effluent (SE) to the glass formulation activities and melter operations are considered in this study. More specifically, the impacts of boric acid additions to the projected SB7b operating windows, potential impacts to frit production temperatures, and the potential impact of boron volatility are evaluated. Although various boric acid molarities have been reported and discussed, the baseline flowsheet used to support this assessment was 0.01M boric acid. The results of the paper study assessment indicate that Frit 418 and Frit 418-7D are robust to the implementation of the 0.01M boric acid SE into the SB7b flowsheet (sludge-only or ARP-added). More specifically, the projected operating windows for the nominal SB7b projections remain essentially constant (i.e., 25-43 or 25-44% waste loading (WL)) regardless of the flowsheet options (sludge-only, ARP added, and/or the presence of the new SE). These results indicate that even if SE is not transferred to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), there would be no need to add boric acid (from a trim tank) to compositionally compensate for the absence of the boric acid SE in either a sludge-only or ARP-added SB7b flowsheet. With respect to boron volatility, the Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) assessments also

  6. Hydrogen peroxide generation and photocatalytic degradation of estrone by microstructural controlled ZnO nanorod arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yangsi; Han Jie; Qiu Wei [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Gao Wei, E-mail: w.gao@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by ZnO nanorod arrays during UV irradiation was detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructure can be controlled by varying reactants' concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic degradation of estrone by ZnO nanorod arrays was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures' effect on photocatalysis and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation was discussed. - Abstract: The strong oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), generated by ZnO nanorod arrays under UV light irradiation was monitored by fluorescence analysis. The ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized via a low temperature hydrothermal method and their dimensions, i.e., diameter and height, can be controlled by adjusting the concentration of zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). The morphology, nanostructure, surface roughness and optical property were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmittance spectra, respectively. The ZnO nanorod arrays were applied in the degradation of estrone, which is an emerging steroid estrogen contaminant. The results revealed that the ZnO nanorod array produced from 25 mM Zn{sup 2+} and HMT had the highest aspect ratio, the largest surface roughness and the lowest band gap energy, which was beneficial to the efficiency of UV light utilization, photocatalytic degradation of estrone and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation.

  7. DWPF saltstone study: Effects of thermal history on leach index and physical integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orebaugh, E.G.

    1992-11-18

    This report summarizes the observations made during the curing and testing of DWPF simulated saltstones which have been cured under isothermal conditions in sealed glass envelopes at temperatures from room temperature to 95[degrees]C. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of curing at and around temperatures representing conditions created within large pours of grout. There appears to be no difference in the leaching resistance of samples cured at the same temperature for varying times to 1 year. Curing at higher temperatures decreases the effective diffusivity of this waste formulation. These results are encouraging in that leaching resistance for samples near the expected maximum vault temperature (55[degrees]C) show effective diffusion coefficients (D[sub effective] [approximately]10[sup [minus]8] cm[sup 2]/sec) that agree with previous work and values that are believed to adequately protect the groundwater. The isothermal conditions of these tests simulate the nearly adiabatic conditions existing near the centerline of the monolith. The elevated temperatures due to hydration heat decrease over long times. This has been simulated by a series (1X) of staged isothermal cures. Since modeling indicated it would take nearly two years for emplaced grout to cool to near ambient temperatures, accelerated (2X) cooling curves were also tested. Specimens cured under these staged-isothermal conditions appear to be no different from specimens cured under isothermal conditions for the same time at the maximum temperature. The unexpected generation of nitrous oxide within saltstone creates internal stresses which cause fracturing when exposed to leaching conditions. Such fracturing is not considered significant for saltstone emplaced in engineered vaults for disposal.

  8. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Rocco-Machado

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite.

  9. Carbon Monoxide-induced Stomatal Closure Involves Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Vicia faba Guard Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ping She; Xi-Gui Song

    2008-01-01

    Here the regulatory role of CO during stomatal movement In Vicla faba L. was surveyed. Results Indicated that, like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), CO donor Hematin induced stomatal closure in dose- and time-dependent manners. These responses were also proven by the addition of gaseous CO aqueous solution with different concentrations, showing the first time that CO and H2O2 exhibit the similar regulation role in the atomatal movement. Moreover, our data showed that ascorbic acid (ASA, an important reducing substrate for H2O2 removal) and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of the H2O2-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase) not only reversed stomatal closure by CO, but also suppressed the H2O2 fluorescence induced by CO, implying that CO induced-atomatal closure probably involves H2O2 signal. Additionally, the CO/NO scavenger hemoglobin (Hb) and CO specific synthetic inhibitor ZnPPIX, ASA and DPI reversed the darkness-induced stomatal closure and H2O2 fluorescence. These results show that, perhaps like H2O2, the levels of CO in guard cells of V. faba are higher In the dark than in light, HO-1 and NADPH oxidase are the enzyme systems responsible for generating endogenous CO and H2O2 in darkness respectively, and that CO is involved in darkness-induced H2O2 synthesis in V. faba guard cells.

  10. Generation of Hydrogen, Lignin and Sodium Hydroxide from Pulping Black Liquor by Electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzai Nong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Black liquor is generated in Kraft pulping of wood or non-wood raw material in pulp mills, and regarded as a renewable resource. The objective of this paper was to develop an effective means to remove the water pollutants by recovery of both lignin and sodium hydroxide from black liquor, based on electrolysis. The treatment of a 1000 mL of black liquor (122 g/L solid contents consumed 345.6 kJ of electric energy, and led to the generation of 30.7 g of sodium hydroxide, 0.82 g of hydrogen gas and 52.1 g of biomass solids. Therefore, the recovery ratios of elemental sodium and biomass solids are 80.4% and 76%, respectively. Treating black liquor by electrolysis is an environmentally friendly technology that can, in particular, be an alternative process in addressing the environmental issues of pulping waste liquor to the small-scale mills without black liquor recovery.

  11. Modelling studies to proper size a hydrogen generator for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggio, G.; Recupero, V.; Di Leonardo, R.; Lagana, M. [Istituto CNR-TAE, Lucia, Messina (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Based upon an extensive survey of literature a mathematical model has been developed to study the temperature profile along the catalytic bed of a reactor for the methane partial oxidation. The model allowed a preliminary design of a 5 Nm{sup 3} syngas/h prototype to be integrated with second generation fuel cells as hydrogen generator (in the framework of the EC-JOU2 contract). This design was based on some target features, including the choice of a GHSV (gas hour space velocity) equal to 80000 h{sup -1}, a catalyst particle size of 1/8inches, a molar air/methane ratio of 2.7 (i.e. O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}=0.53), a linear velocity in the catalytic bed of about 2 m/sec, and an inert/catalyst ratio 3:1. Starting from this data, the work has been concerned with the identification of the controlling regime (kinetic or diffusional), and then with the estimation of the gas composition and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison between experimental and model results has also been accomplished.

  12. A Rapid Microwave-Assisted Thermolysis Route to Highly Crystalline Carbon Nitrides for Efficient Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yufei; Li, Jing; Yuan, Yupeng; Li, Lu; Zhang, Mingyi; Zhou, Chenyan; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-11-14

    Highly crystalline graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) with decreased structural imperfections benefits from the suppression of electron-hole recombination, which enhances its hydrogen generation activity. However, producing such g-C3 N4 materials by conventional heating in an electric furnace has proven challenging. Herein, we report on the synthesis of high-quality g-C3 N4 with reduced structural defects by judiciously combining the implementation of melamine-cyanuric acid (MCA) supramolecular aggregates and microwave-assisted thermolysis. The g-C3 N4 material produced after optimizing the microwave reaction time can effectively generate H2 under visible-light irradiation. The highest H2 evolution rate achieved was 40.5 μmol h(-1) , which is two times higher than that of a g-C3 N4 sample prepared by thermal polycondensation of the same supramolecular aggregates in an electric furnace. The microwave-assisted thermolysis strategy is simple, rapid, and robust, thereby providing a promising route for the synthesis of high-efficiency g-C3 N4 photocatalysts. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Salicylic acid-induced superoxide generation catalyzed by plant peroxidase in hydrogen peroxide-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Makoto; Kawano, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that salicylic acid (SA) induces both immediate spike and long lasting phases of oxidative burst represented by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical (O2(•-)). In general, in the earlier phase of oxidative burst, apoplastic peroxidase are likely involved and in the late phase of the oxidative burst, NADPH oxidase is likely involved. Key signaling events connecting the 2 phases of oxidative burst are calcium channel activation and protein phosphorylation events. To date, the known earliest signaling event in response to exogenously added SA is the cell wall peroxidase-catalyzed generation of O2(•-) in a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent manner. However, this model is incomplete since the source of the initially required H2O2 could not be explained. Based on the recently proposed role for H2O2-independent mechanism for ROS production catalyzed by plant peroxidases (Kimura et al., 2014, Frontiers in Plant Science), we hereby propose a novel model for plant peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative burst fueled by SA.

  14. Ion acceleration enhancement in laser-generated plasmas by metallic doped hydrogenated polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Mezzasalma

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Laser-generated plasmas in vacuum were obtained by ablating hydrogenated polymers at the Physics Department of the University of Messina and at the PALS Laboratory in Prague. In the first case a 3 ns,532 nm Nd:Yag laser, at 1010 W/cm2 intensity was employed.In the second case a 300 ps, 438 nm iodine laser, at 5x1014W/cm2 intensity was employed. Different ion collectors were usedin a time-of-flight configuration to monitor the ejected ions from theplasma at different angles with respect to the direction normal tothe target surface. Measurements demonstrated that the mean ionvelocity, directed orthogonally to the target surface, increases forablation of polymers doped with metallic elements with respect tothe nondoped one. The possible mechanism explaining theresults can be found in the different electron density of theplasma, due to the higher number of electrons coming from the dopingelements. This charge enhancement increases the equivalent ionvoltage acceleration, i.e. the electric field generated in the non-equilibrium plasma placed in front of the ablated target surface.

  15. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. Continuous separation of product hydrogen from the reforming gas mixture is expected to increase the yield of hydrogen significantly as predicted by model simulations. In the laboratory-scale experimental studies reported here steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, butane, methanol and Clearlite ® was conducted to produce pure hydrogen in a single step membrane reformer using commercially available Pd-Ag foil membranes and reforming/WGS catalysts. All of the experimental results demonstrated increase in hydrocarbon conversion due to hydrogen separation when compared with the hydrocarbon conversion without any hydrogen separation. Increase in hydrogen recovery was also shown to result in corresponding increase in hydrocarbon conversion in these studies demonstrating the basic concept. The experiments also provided insight into the effect of individual variables such as pressure, temperature, gas space velocity, and steam to carbon ratio. Steam reforming of butane was found to be limited by reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions used: catalysts used, average gas space velocity, and the reactor characteristics of surface area to volume ratio. Steam reforming of methanol in the presence of only WGS catalyst on the other hand indicated that the membrane reactor performance was limited by membrane permeation, especially at lower temperatures and lower feed pressures due to slower reconstitution of CO and H 2 into methane thus maintaining high hydrogen partial pressures in the reacting gas mixture. The limited amount of data collected with steam reforming of Clearlite ® indicated very good match between theoretical predictions and

  16. Investigation of advanced nanostructured multijunction photoanodes for enhanced solar hydrogen generation via water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hidetaka

    As the worldwide demand for fossil-based fuel increases every day and the fossil reserve continues to be depleted, the need for alternative/renewable energy sources has gained momentum. Electric, hybrid, and hydrogen cars have been at the center of discussion lately among consumers, automobile manufacturers, and politicians, alike. The development of a fuel-cell based engine using hydrogen has been an ambitious research area over the last few decades-ever since Fujishima showed that hydrogen can be generated via the solar-energy driven photo-electrolytic splitting of water. Such solar cells are known as Photo-Electro-Chemical (PEC) solar cells. In order to commercialize this technology, various challenges associated with photo-conversion efficiency, chemical corrosion resistance, and longevity need to be overcome. In general, metal oxide semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO 2, titania) are excellent candidates for PEC solar cells. Titania nanotubes have several advantages, including biocompatibility and higher chemical stability. Nevertheless, they can absorb only 5-7% of the solar spectrum which makes it difficult to achieve the higher photo-conversion efficiency required for successful commercial applications. A two-prong approach was employed to enhance photo-conversion efficiency: 1) surface modification of titania nanotubes using plasma treatment and 2) nano-capping of the titania nanotubes using titanium disilicide. The plasma surface treatment with N2 was found to improve the photo-current efficiency of titania nanotubes by 55%. Similarly, a facile, novel approach of nano-capping titania nanotubes to enhance their photocurrent response was also investigated. Electrochemically anodized titania nanotubes were capped by coating a 25 nm layer of titanium disilicide using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The optical properties of titania nanotubes were not found to change due to the capping; however, a considerable increase (40%) in the photocurrent

  17. Hydrogen Generation from Ammonia Borane and Water Through the Combustion Reactions with Mechanically Alloyed Al/Mg Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-11

    synthesis of ammonia -A ‘‘never ending story? " Angewandte...34 # && , (/ -%(/ &$’$) ) ! -( ( !( &" # ( %’ !&% # ’)( (% (" %’% (" ( & *%" # ’)( *! % + 3 HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM AMMONIA BORANE AND WATER THROUGH THE...FROM AMMONIA BORANE AND WATER THROUGH THE COMBUSTION REACTIONS WITH MECHANICALLY ALLOYED AL/MG POWDER by DANIEL RODRIGUEZ THESIS Presented to

  18. Generation of core–shell nanoparticles Al@Ti by laser ablation in liquid for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, “Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University)”, 9, Institutsky lane, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow (Russian Federation); Barmina, E.V.; Simakin, A.V. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, P.G., E-mail: qzzzma@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye highway, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Core–shell Al@Ti NPs are generated by laser ablation in isopropanol. • Isopropanol was saturated with molecular hydrogen. • The composite metallic Al-Ti target was used. • HR TEM characterization shows that Ti core is covered by epitaxial Al shell. • Al@Ti NPs are promising for hydrogen storage. - Abstract: Core–shell Al@Ti nanoparticles are generated by ablation of a composite Ti–Al target in liquid isopropanol saturated with molecular hydrogen using a Nd:YAG laser with pulse duration of 10 ps and repetition rate of 200 kHz. The target is made of two plates of corresponding metals stacked together and placed into a flowing cell reactor. Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis of generated NPs reveals their core–shell structure with Ti core and Al shell. Average size of NPs determined by means of measuring disk centrifuge is around 40 nm. Saturation of NPs by hydrogen is due to sharp dependence of its solubility in these metals on temperature. XRD studies of generated NPs show the peaks of both metallic Ti and Al with some amount of TiO{sub 2}. No peaks of Ti–Al alloys are observed.

  19. Hydrogen generation using the corrosion of Al-Sn and Al-Si alloys in an alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Yun, Kwi-Sub; Kalubarme, Ramchandra S.; Park, Choong-Nyeon; Park, Chan-Jin

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the effects of adding Sn and Si to Al alloys on the corrosion of the alloys and the generation of hydrogen from an alkaline solution using the alloys. With increasing Sn content of up to 20 wt% in the Al-Sn alloy, the volume fraction of the Sn phase as a cathodic site at grain boundaries increased, and consequently, the hydrogen generation rate from an alkaline solution by the alloy also increased. In addition, the quenched Al-Sn alloys had smaller grain sizes compared to the furnace-cooled alloys, and accordingly, exhibited a slightly higher hydrogen generation rate. A galvanic cell was formed between the Al grain and the Sn phase of the grain boundary, and accordingly, intergranular type corrosion was observed on the Al-Sn alloys. Compared with the Al-Sn alloys, a more uniform type corrosion was observed on the Al-Si alloys because the nobler Si was uniformly distributed in the eutectic region formed between the primary Al grains. The hydrogen generation rate increased with an increasing Si content up to 10 wt% and was greater for the furnace-cooled samples than that for the quenched samples due to the more clearly formed eutectic structure.

  20. Generation of a VUV-to-visible Raman frequency comb in hydrogen-filled kagom\\'e photonic crystal fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Mridha, M. K.; Novoa, D.; Bauerschmidt, S. T.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a purely vibrational Raman comb, extending from the vacuum ultraviolet (184 nm) to the visible (478 nm), in hydrogen-filled kagom\\'e-style photonic crystal fiber pumped at 266 nm. Stimulated Raman scattering and molecular modulation processes are enhanced by higher Raman gain in the ultraviolet. Owing to the pressure-tunable normal dispersion landscape of the fiber-gas system in the ultraviolet, higher-order anti-Stokes bands are generated preferentially in higher-...

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of SCW NPP cycles with thermo-chemical co-generation of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidin, N.; Mokry, S.; Monichan, R.; Chophla, K.; Pioro, I. [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Maria.Naidin@mycampus.uoit.ca, Sarah.Mokry@mycampus.uoit.ca, Romson.Monichan@uoit.ca, Karan.Chophla@mycampus.uoit.ca, Igor.Pioro@uoit.ca; Naterer, G.; Gabriel, K. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Greg.Naterer@uoit.ca, Kamiel.Gabriel@uoit.ca

    2009-07-01

    Research activities are currently conducted worldwide to develop Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts with the objective of improving thermal efficiency and increasing economic competitiveness of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) compared to modern thermal power plants. The Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) concept is one of the six Generation IV options chosen for further investigation and development in several countries including Canada and Russia. Water-cooled reactors operating at subcritical pressures (10 - 16 MPa) have provided a significant amount of electricity production for the past 50 years. However, the thermal efficiency of the current NPPs is not very high (30 - 35%). As such, more competitive designs, with higher thermal efficiencies, which will be close to that of modern thermal power plants (45 - 50%), need to be developed and implemented. Super-Critical Water (SCW) NPPs will have much higher operating parameters compared to current NPPs (i.e., steam pressures of about 25 MPa and steam outlet temperatures up to 625{sup o}C). Furthermore, SCWRs operating at higher temperatures can facilitate an economical co-generation of hydrogen through thermochemical cycles (particularly, the copper-chlorine cycle) or direct high-temperature electrolysis. The two SCW NPP cycles proposed by this paper are based on direct, regenerative, no-reheat and single-reheat configurations. As such, the main parameters and performance in terms of thermal efficiency of the SCW NPP concepts mentioned above are being analyzed. The cycles are generally comprised of: an SCWR, a SC turbine, one deaerator, ten feedwater heaters, and pumps. The SC turbine of the no-reheat cycle consists of one High-Pressure (HP) cylinder and two Low-Pressure (LP) cylinders. Alternatively, the SC turbine for the single-reheat cycle is comprised of one High-Pressure (HP) cylinder, one Intermediate-Pressure (IP) cylinder and two Low-Pressure (LP) cylinders. Since the single

  2. Optimized hydrogen generation in a semicontinuous sodium borohydride hydrolysis reactor for a 60 W-scale fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzac, G. M.; Fernández, A.; Justo, A.; Sarmiento, B.; Jiménez, M. A.; Jiménez, M. M.

    Catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (SBH) is a promising method for the hydrogen supply of fuel cells. In this study a system for controlled production of hydrogen from aqueous sodium borohydride (SBH) solutions has been designed and built. This simple and low cost system operates under controlled addition of stabilized SBH solutions (fuel solutions) to a supported CoB catalyst. The system works at constant temperature delivering hydrogen at 1 L min -1 constant rate to match a 60-W polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). For optimization of the system, several experimental conditions were changed and their effect was investigated. A simple model based only on thermodynamic considerations was proposed to optimize system parameters at constant temperature and hydrogen evolution rate. It was found that, for a given SBH concentration, the use of the adequate fuel addition rate can maximize the total conversion and therefore the gravimetric storage capacity. The hydrogen storage capacity was as high as 3.5 wt% for 19 wt% SBH solution at 90% fuel conversion and an operation temperature of 60 °C. It has been demonstrated that these optimized values can also be achieved for a wide range of hydrogen generation rates. Studies on the durability of the catalyst showed that a regeneration step is needed to restore the catalytic activity before reusing.

  3. Hydrogen generation from ammonia borane and water through the combustion reactions with mechanically alloyed Al/Mg powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Daniel

    Finding and developing a safe and effective method for hydrogen storage is integral to its use as an alternative source of energy. The goal of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the feasibility of developing combustible hydrogen-generating compositions based on ammonia borane and novel energetic materials such as nanocomposite and mechanically alloyed reactive materials, recently obtained by Prof. Edward Dreizin's team at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). Such compositions could be stored for long time and release hydrogen on demand, upon ignition. The first phase of the research included thermodynamic calculations for combustion of ammonia borane with various reactive materials obtained at NJIT. The second phase involved experiments with compositions that appeared to be promising based on thermodynamic calculations. An experimental setup with laser ignition of mixtures was developed for these experiments. As a result of these tests, further work was focused on mixtures of ammonia borane, gelled water, and mechanically alloyed Al/Mg powder. The last part of the research revealed the reaction mechanisms during combustion of these mixtures. For this purpose, isotopic tests, involving use of heavy water and mass-spectroscopy of gaseous combustion products, were conducted. The results of the present work indicate that combustible mixtures of ammonia borane, water, and mechanically alloyed Al/Mg powder are promising for the development of hydrogen generators that release large amounts of hydrogen upon ignition.

  4. Converting Chemical Energy to Electricity through a Three-Jaw Mini-Generator Driven by the Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Wang, Lei; Ji, Fanqin; Shi, Feng

    2016-05-11

    Energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity is one of the most important research advancements to come from the horizontal locomotion of small objects. Until now, the Marangoni effect has been the only propulsion method to produce the horizontal locomotion to induce an electromotive force, which is limited to a short duration because of the specific property of surfactants. To solve this issue, in this article we utilized the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide the propulsion for a sustainable energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity. We fabricated a mini-generator consisting of three parts: a superhydrophobic rotator with three jaws, three motors to produce a jet of oxygen bubbles to propel the rotation of the rotator, and three magnets integrated into the upper surface of the rotator to produce the magnet flux. Once the mini-generator was placed on the solution surface, the motor catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. This generated a large amount of oxygen bubbles that caused the generator and integrated magnets to rotate at the air/water interface. Thus, the magnets passed under the coil area and induced a change in the magnet flux, thus generating electromotive forces. We also investigated experimental factors, that is, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the turns of the solenoid coil, and found that the mini-generator gave the highest output in a hydrogen peroxide solution with a concentration of 10 wt % and under a coil with 9000 turns. Through combining the stable superhydrophobicity and catalyst, we realized electricity generation for a long duration, which could last for 26 000 s after adding H2O2 only once. We believe this work provides a simple process for the development of horizontal motion and provides a new path for energy reutilization.

  5. Analysis and control of an in situ hydrogen generation and fuel cell power system for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolavennu, Panini K.

    A new future in automotive transportation is approaching where vehicles are powered by new, clean and efficient energy sources. While different technologies will contribute to this future, many see fuel cells as the leading long term candidate for becoming the power source for emissions-free, mass produced light vehicles. The development of emissions-free vehicles, which run directly on hydrogen, is the true long term goal. However significant difficulties exist in developing these vehicles, due to hydrogen storage problems. For automotive applications, it is desirable to use a carbon-based hydrogenous fuel. The focus of this research was to analyze a fuel cell system for automotive applications, which generated hydrogen in situ using methane as a fuel source. This system consists of four parts: (1) an in situ hydrogen generation subsystem, (2) a power generation subsystem, (3) a thermal management subsystem and (4) a switching control subsystem. The novelty of this research lies in the fact that the entire system was considered from a systems engineering viewpoint with realistic constraints. A fuel processor subsystem was designed and its volume optimized to less than 100 liters. A relationship between the fuel fed into the fuel processor and the hydrogen coming out of it was developed. Using a fuel cell model an overall relationship between the fuel feed rate and the power output was established. The fuel cell car must be fully operational within a minute or so of a cold-start and must respond to rapidly varying loads. Significant load transitions occur frequently as a result of changes in driving conditions. These engineering constraints were addressed by coupling a battery to the fuel cell. A switching controller was designed and it was validated using realistic power profiles. Finally, a model reference adaptive controller was designed to handle nonlinearities and load transitions. The adaptive controller performance was enhanced by adding dead zone

  6. Minimum Entropy Generation Theorem Investigation and Optimization of Metal Hydride Alloy Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to carry out numerical simulation of the hydrogen storage on exothermic reaction of metal hydride LaNi5 alloy container. In addition to accelerating the reaction speed of the internal metal hydride by internal control tube water-cooled mode, analyze via the application of second law of thermodynamics the principle of entropy generation. Use COMSOL Mutilphysics 4.3 a to engage in finite element method value simulation on two-dimensional axisymmetric model. Also on the premise that the internal control tube parameters the radius ri, the flow rate U meet the metal hydride saturation time, observe the reaction process of two parameters on the tank, entropy distribution and the results of the accumulated entropy. And try to find the internal tube parameter values of the minimum entropy, whose purpose is to be able to identify the reaction process and the reaction results of internal tank’s optimum energy conservation.

  7. Gain generator optimization for hydrogen fluoride overtone and fundamental chemical lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.; Yonehara, Gordon N.; Dering, John P.

    1993-06-01

    The hydrogen fluoride (HF) chemical laser is the baseline concept for SDIO space based laser (SBL) weapons systems. Ground based tests at power levels appropriate for this application have been demonstrated. Because the brightness of a laser beam projected to the far field is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength, shorter wavelengths are desirable to enhance brightness on target. Development of the HF overtone chemical laser ((lambda) equals 1.3 - 1.4 micrometers ) as a growth technology for SBL applications has proceeded rapidly during the past several years. This paper reviews the parametric characterization and optimization of the Hypersonic, Low-Temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for HF overtone and HF fundamental performance. The experiments utilize advanced multilayer dielectric coatings on uncooled silicon substrates. The experimental results reported include laser power, small signal gain, mode footprint, and spectral content. The design of a multiple nozzle HYLTE module as a building block to an advanced high power HF chemical laser device is presented. Design philosophy emphasizes traceability from an intermediate size linear module to a full scale cylindrical gain generator for SBL applications. The key issues addressed are power scalability, fabricability, regenerative cooling capability, and thermal/structural performance.

  8. RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION INSAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) HIGH LEVEL WASTETANKS COMPARISON OF SRS AND HANFORDMODELING PREDICTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C; Ned Bibler, N

    2009-04-15

    In the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS), hydrogen is produced continuously by interaction of the radiation in the tank with water in the waste. Consequently, the vapor spaces of the tanks are purged to prevent the accumulation of H{sub 2} and possible formation of a flammable mixture in a tank. Personnel at SRS have developed an empirical model to predict the rate of H{sub 2} formation in a tank. The basis of this model is the prediction of the G value for H{sub 2} production. This G value is the number of H{sub 2} molecules produced per 100 eV of radiolytic energy absorbed by the waste. Based on experimental studies it was found that the G value for H{sub 2} production from beta radiation and from gamma radiation were essentially equal. The G value for H{sub 2} production from alpha radiation was somewhat higher. Thus, the model has two equations, one for beta/gamma radiation and one for alpha radiation. Experimental studies have also indicated that both G values are decreased by the presence of nitrate and nitrite ions in the waste. These are the main scavengers for the precursors of H{sub 2} in the waste; thus the equations that were developed predict G values for hydrogen production as a function of the concentrations of these two ions in waste. Knowing the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads in the waste allows one to predict the total generation rate for hydrogen in a tank. With this prediction a ventilation rate can be established for each tank to ensure that a flammable mixture is not formed in the vapor space in a tank. Recently personnel at Hanford have developed a slightly different model for predicting hydrogen G values. Their model includes the same precursor for H{sub 2} as the SRS model but also includes an additional precursor not in the SRS model. Including the second precursor for H{sub 2} leads to different empirical equations for predicting the G values for H{sub 2} as a function of the nitrate and nitrite concentrations in

  9. Investigation of Iron Oxide Morphology in a Cyclic Redox Water Splitting Process for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Bobek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A solar fuels generation research program is focused on hydrogen production by means of reactive metal water splitting in a cyclic iron-based redox process. Iron-based oxides are explored as an intermediary reactive material to dissociate water molecules at significantly reduced thermal energies. With a goal of studying the resulting oxide chemistry and morphology, chemical assistance via CO is used to complete the redox cycle. In order to exploit the unique characteristics of highly reactive materials at the solar reactor scale, a monolithic laboratory scale reactor has been designed to explore the redox cycle at temperatures ranging from 675 to 875 K. Using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, the oxide morphology and the oxide state are quantified, including spatial distributions. These images show the change of the oxide layers directly after oxidation and after reduction. The findings show a significant non-stoichiometric O/Fe gradient in the atomic ratio following oxidation, which is consistent with a previous kinetics model, and a relatively constant, non-stoichiometric O/Fe atomic ratio following reduction.

  10. Design and Control of Integrated Systems for Hydrogen Production and Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgis, Dimitrios

    Growing concerns on CO2 emissions have led to the development of highly efficient power plants. Options for increased energy efficiencies include alternative energy conversion pathways, energy integration and process intensification. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) constitute a promising alternative for power generation since they convert the chemical energy electrochemically directly to electricity. Their high operating temperature shows potential for energy integration with energy intensive units (e.g. steam reforming reactors). Although energy integration is an essential tool for increased efficiencies, it leads to highly complex process schemes with rich dynamic behavior, which are challenging to control. Furthermore, the use of process intensification for increased energy efficiency imposes an additional control challenge. This dissertation identifies and proposes solutions on design, operational and control challenges of integrated systems for hydrogen production and power generation. Initially, a study on energy integrated SOFC systems is presented. Design alternatives are identified, control strategies are proposed for each alternative and their validity is evaluated under different operational scenarios. The operational range of the proposed control strategies is also analyzed. Next, thermal management of water gas shift membrane reactors, which are a typical application of process intensification, is considered. Design and operational objectives are identified and a control strategy is proposed employing advanced control algorithms. The performance of the proposed control strategy is evaluated and compared with classical control strategies. Finally SOFC systems for combined heat and power applications are considered. Multiple recycle loops are placed to increase design flexibility. Different operational objectives are identified and a nonlinear optimization problem is formulated. Optimal designs are obtained and their features are discussed and compared

  11. Hydrogen generation during melter feed preparation of Tank 42 sludge and salt washed loaded CST in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W.E.

    1999-12-08

    The main objective of these scoping tests was to measure the rate of hydrogen generation in a series of experiments designed to duplicate the expected SRAT and SME processing conditions in laboratory scale vessels. This document details the testing performed to determine the maximum hydrogen generation expected with a coupled flowsheet of sludge, loaded CST [crystalline silicotitanate], and frit.

  12. Polymer membrane based electrolytic cell and process for the direct generation of hydrogen peroxide in liquid streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Schwartz, Michael (Inventor); Sammells, Anthony F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for generating hydrogen peroxide is provided including a cathode containing a catalyst for the reduction of oxygen, and an anode containing a catalyst for the oxidation of water. A polymer membrane, semipermeable to either protons or hydroxide ions is also included and has a first face interfacing to the cathode and a second face interfacing to the anode so that when a stream of water containing dissolved oxygen or oxygen bubbles is passed over the cathode and a stream of water is passed over the anode, and an electric current is passed between the anode and the cathode, hydrogen peroxide is generated at the cathode and oxygen is generated at the anode.

  13. Hydrogen generation from methylamine using silicon carbide nanotubes as a dehydrogenation catalyst: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Nurazar, Roghaye

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption and decomposition of methylamine on the surface of a pristine silicon-carbide nanotube (SiCNT) are investigated by density functional theory calculations. The adsorption energies of possible stable configurations and the activation energies for possible elementary reactions involved are obtained in the present study. The most favorable reaction channel that generates a hydrogen cyanide molecule and four hydrogen atoms is slightly endothermic; the energy barrier for the decomposition of the CH3NH2 molecule is about 45 kcal/mol. Since the activation energy for the side reaction that generates CH3 and NH2 fragments is relatively high, the generation of side products may be depressed by decreasing the temperature.

  14. Evaluation of Hybrid Power Plants using Biomass, Photovoltaics and Steam Electrolysis for Hydrogen and Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakopoulou, F.; Sanz, J.

    2014-12-01

    Steam electrolysis is a promising process of large-scale centralized hydrogen production, while it is also considered an excellent option for the efficient use of renewable solar and geothermal energy resources. This work studies the operation of an intermediate temperature steam electrolyzer (ITSE) and its incorporation into hybrid power plants that include biomass combustion and photovoltaic panels (PV). The plants generate both electricity and hydrogen. The reference -biomass- power plant and four variations of a hybrid biomass-PV incorporating the reference biomass plant and the ITSE are simulated and evaluated using exergetic analysis. The variations of the hybrid power plants are associated with (1) the air recirculation from the electrolyzer to the biomass power plant, (2) the elimination of the sweep gas of the electrolyzer, (3) the replacement of two electric heaters with gas/gas heat exchangers, and (4) the replacement two heat exchangers of the reference electrolyzer unit with one heat exchanger that uses steam from the biomass power plant. In all cases, 60% of the electricity required in the electrolyzer is covered by the biomass plant and 40% by the photovoltaic panels. When comparing the hybrid plants with the reference biomass power plant that has identical operation and structure as that incorporated in the hybrid plants, we observe an efficiency decrease that varies depending on the scenario. The efficiency decrease stems mainly from the low effectiveness of the photovoltaic panels (14.4%). When comparing the hybrid scenarios, we see that the elimination of the sweep gas decreases the power consumption due to the elimination of the compressor used to cover the pressure losses of the filter, the heat exchangers and the electrolyzer. Nevertheless, if the sweep gas is used to preheat the air entering the boiler of the biomass power plant, the efficiency of the plant increases. When replacing the electric heaters with gas-gas heat exchangers, the

  15. The hydrogen emission of young stellar objects : Key science for next-generation instruments and facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, Paulo J. V.; Benisty, Myriam; Rajabi, Samira; Dougados, Catherine; Massi, Fabrizzio; Bacciotti, Francesca; Le Bouquin, Jean-Baptiste; Malbet, Fabien; Podio, Linda; Renard, Stephanie; Whelan, Emma

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen emission line is a defining characteristic of young stellar objects probing the planet forming regions of the disks. The limiting sensitivity of current interferometers has precluded it's detailed study. We'll review our current understanding of hydrogen emission, recent results and pro

  16. Metal Alloys for The New Generation of Compressors at Hydrogen Stations: Parametric study of Corrosion Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arjomand Kermani, Nasrin; Petrushina, Irina; Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich

    2017-01-01

    Compressors are one of the most costly components at hydrogen stations, which leads to the high price of hydrogen production. The substitution of a solid piston with ionic liquid is a promising option that may solve some of the challenges related to conventional reciprocating compressors and, con...

  17. Methane Formation by Flame-Generated Hydrogen Atoms in the Flame Ionization Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1996-01-01

    The precombustion degradation of organic compounds in the flame ionization detector has been studied (1) by heating the additives in hydrogen in a quartz capillary and analyzing the reaction products by GC and (2) by following the degradation of the additives in a hydrogen flame, by means of a th...

  18. Down-conversion photoluminescence sensitizing plasmonic silver nanoparticles on ZnO nanorods to generate hydrogen by water splitting photochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Po-Yen; Huang, Li-Wen; Shen, Tin-Wei; Wang, Wen-Lin; Su, Yen-Hsun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Melody I. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California, 94720 (United States)

    2015-01-12

    Silver nanoparticles fabricated onto the surface of the ZnO nanorods form the photoanode and generate photoelectric current due to surface plasmon resonance, which serves as anode electrodes in photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. In order to increase the absorption spectrum of photoanode, organic pigments were utilized as photo-sensitizers to generate down-conversion photoluminescence to excite surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoparticles. The way of using light to carry the energy in electronic scattering regime runs the system for the enhancement of solar water splitting efficiency. It was significantly tuned in environmentally sustainable applications for power generation and development of alternative energy.

  19. Engineering design and testing of a ground water remediation system using electrolytically generated hydrogen with a palladium catalyst for dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, R.

    1997-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that dissolved hydrogen causes rapid dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The speed and completeness of these reactions offer advantages in designing remediation technologies for certain ground water contamination problems. However, a practical design challenge arises in the need to saturate the aqueous phase with hydrogen in an expeditious manner. To address this issue, a two-stage treatment reactor has been developed. The first stage consists of an electrolytic cell that generates hydrogen by applying a voltage potential across the influent water stream. The second stage consists of a catalyst column of palladium metal supported on alumina beads. A bench-scale reactor has been used to test this design for treating ground water contaminated with trichloroethene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. In influent streams containing contaminant concentrations up to 4 ppm, initial results confirm that destruction efficiencies greater than 95% may be achieved with residence times short enough to allow practical implementation in specially designed flow-through treatment wells. Results from the bench-scale tests are being used to design a pilot ground water treatment system.

  20. Engineering design and testing of a ground water remediation system using electrolytically generated hydrogen with a palladium catalyst for dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, R.

    1997-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that dissolved hydrogen causes rapid dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The speed and completeness of these reactions offer advantages in designing remediation technologies for certain ground water contamination problems. However, a practical design challenge arises in the need to saturate the aqueous phase with hydrogen in an expeditious manner. To address this issue, a two-stage treatment reactor has been developed. The first stage consists of an electrolytic cell that generates hydrogen by applying a voltage potential across the influent water stream. The second stage consists of a catalyst column of palladium metal supported on alumina beads. A bench-scale reactor has been used to test this design for treating ground water contaminated with trichloroethene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. In influent streams containing contaminant concentrations up to 4 ppm, initial results confirm that destruction efficiencies greater than 95% may be achieved with residence times short enough to allow practical implementation in specially designed flow-through treatment wells. Results from the bench-scale tests are being used to design a pilot ground water treatment system.

  1. Model biogas steam reforming in a thin Pd-supported membrane reactor to generate clean hydrogen for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulianelli, A.; Liguori, S.; Huang, Y.; Basile, A.

    2015-01-01

    Steam reforming of a model biogas mixture is studied for generating clean hydrogen by using an inorganic membrane reactor, in which a composite Pd/Al2O3 membrane separates part of the produced hydrogen through its selective permeation. The characteristics of H2 perm-selectivity of the fresh membrane is expressed in terms of H2/N2 ideal selectivity, in this case equal to 4300. Concerning biogas steam reforming reaction, at 380 °C, 2.0 bar H2O:CH4 = 3:1, GHSV = 9000 h-1 the permeate purity of the recovered hydrogen is around 96%, although the conversion (15%) and hydrogen recovery (>20%) are relatively low; on the contrary, at 450 °C, 3.5 bar H2O:CH4 = 4:1, GHSV = 11000 h-1 the conversion is increased up to more than 30% and the recovery of hydrogen to about 70%. This novel work constitutes a reference study for new developments on biogas steam reforming reaction in membrane reactors.

  2. Novel material for second harmonic generation: 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazolinium(1+) hydrogen L-tartrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulková, Irena; Němec, Ivan; Císařová, Ivana; Němec, Petr; Mička, Zdeněk

    2007-05-01

    The X-ray structural analysis of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazolinium(1+) hydrogen L-tartrate has been carried out. This organic salt crystallises in the monoclinic space group P2 1, a = 7.7130(2) Å, b = 6.7690(2) Å, c = 9.2170(3) Å, β = 95.726(2)°, V = 478.81(2) Å 3, Z = 2, R = 0.0255 for 5922 observed reflections. The crystal structure is formed by a 3D network of hydrogen L-tartrate anions (interconnected by O-H ⋯O hydrogen bonds) with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazolinium(1+) cations located in the cavities of this network and connected with anions via N-H ⋯O and O-H ⋯N hydrogen bonds. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra were recorded, calculated and discussed. Quantitative measurements of second harmonic generation of powdered 3-amino-1,2,4-triazol-4-ium hydrogen L-tartrate at 800 nm were performed and a relative efficiency of 50% (compared to KDP) was observed.

  3. Photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen generation and simultaneous degradation of organic pollutant via CdSe/TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenchao [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Li, Fang [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Dieqing [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Leung, Dennis Y.C., E-mail: ycleung@hku.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong (China); Li, Guisheng, E-mail: liguisheng@shnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: A highly efficient CdSe/TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays photoanode was explored via the electrodeposition with ion-exchange method for photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen evolution and simultaneous degradation of organic pollutant under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • CdSe nanoparticles enhanced TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays electrode was prepared by an electrodeposition with ion-exchange method. • CdSe nanoparticles were strongly bonded on the pore walls of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays, with the formation of CdSe–TiO{sub 2} heterojunctions. • Such CdSe/TiO{sub 2} nanotubes arrays, acting as photoanode, exhibited high efficiency for both generation of hydrogen and degradation of MO in photoelectrocatalysis reaction system under visible-light irradiation. - Abstract: CdSe nanoparticles enhanced TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays electrodes (CdSe/TNTAs) were explored as the photoanode for driving the photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) generation of hydrogen and simultaneous degradation of organic pollutants in a PEC system. The evolution hydrogen and the simultaneous degradation of organic pollutants were performed in an electrolytic cell (three electrodes system) under visible-light (λ > 400 nm). Such CdSe/TiO{sub 2} based PEC system exhibited both high efficiency of hydrogen generation and effective oxidation of methyl orange (MO). Such high PEC performance of CdSe/TNTAs was attributed to the high dispersity of CdSe nanoparticles on both outside and inside of the pore walls of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays, the strong combination and heterojunctions between CdSe and TiO{sub 2} through Cd−O bonds via electrodeposition with ion-exchange method.

  4. High removal rate of cross-linked SU-8 resist using hydrogen radicals generated by tungsten hot-wire catalyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Akihiko, E-mail: a.kono@neptune.kanazawa-it.ac.jp [Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 7-1 Ougigaoka, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Arai, Yu; Maruoka, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Masashi; Goto, Yousuke; Takahashi, Seiji; Nishiyama, Takashi [Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 7-1 Ougigaoka, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Horibe, Hideo [Osaka City University, Sugimoto, Sumiyoshiku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the removal of chemically amplified negative-tone i-line resist SU-8 using hydrogen radicals generated by the catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2} molecules in H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixed gas (H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} = 10:90 vol.%) using a tungsten hot-wire catalyzer. SU-8 resists with exposure doses from 7 to 280 mJ/cm{sup 2} were removed by hydrogen radicals, although the SU-8 removal rate was independent of the exposure dose. The SU-8 removal rate increased with both substrate and catalyzer temperature, in addition to a decrease in the distance between the catalyzer and substrate. A high removal rate for cross-linked SU-8 with an exposure dose of 14 mJ/cm{sup 2} of approximately 4 μm/min was achieved with a catalyzer to substrate distance of 20 mm, and catalyzer and initial substrate temperatures of 2400 and 165 °C, respectively. - Highlights: • Chemically amplified negative-tone i-line resist SU-8 removed by hydrogen radicals • Hydrogen radicals generated by catalytic H{sub 2} decomposition using hot-wire catalyzer • The cross-linked SU-8 resist was removed at a rate of approximately 4 μm/min.

  5. Efficiency and stability aspects of CdS photoanode for solar hydrogen generation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareek, Alka; Gopalakrishnan, Arthi; Borse, Pramod H.

    2016-10-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell based technology is expected to be one of the easiest green technologies to harness and to convert available solar energy into hydrogen [1]. Among the known systems of GaAs, Si, GaP and CdS- Cadmium sulphide is one of the best suited PEC materials that display a balance between its efficiency and stability. It has capability to absorb the visible light photons (E∼1.5eV - 3eV), and displays the band- energetics that suits for water-splitting reaction (H2O→H2+O2), that ultimately is based on the electronic and optical structure of the sulphides. However, the photo-induced dissolution of CdS in an electrolyte during its photo-illumination in PEC cell is its major drawback [2]. Though arsenides and phosphides show higher efficiency however CdS exhibits significant stability. In contrast though TiO2/ ZnO show good stability but CdS displays good optical response towards visible light photons as compared null response of titanate like systems. This necessitates one to identify the practical way to inhibit the photocorrosion in case of CdS photoanodes which is mainly facilitated due to interaction of photogenerated holes with CdS lattice. In past, Pt/ RuO2/ Ru modified CdS surface were found to control the unwanted photocorrosion [3]. Commercially, usage of such materials is un-economic option for any technological usage. The present work discusses that with advent of present day new synthetic routes how the dynamics of photo generated holes and electrons can be controlled to improve the stability and efficiency of the sulphide photoanodes, which in turn shows an an improvement in the performance and stability of the PEC cell for desirable technological applications.

  6. A hydrogen peroxide-generating agent, 6-formylpterin, enhances heat-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, S; Cui, Z-G; Kondo, T; Zhao, Q-L; Ogawa, R; Shoji, M; Arai, T; Makino, K; Furuta, I

    2005-05-01

    The enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis by 6-formylpterin, an intra-cellular generator of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), was examined in human myelomonocytic lymphoma U937 cells. The cells were treated with either 6-formylpterin alone at a nontoxic concentration of 300 microM (37 degrees C), heat shock (44 degrees C per 20 min) alone or a combination of the two, then incubated at 37 degrees C for 6 h. Assessments of apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activation were performed by flow cytometry. Moreover, caspase-8 activation and changes in the intra-cellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were examined. Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bid, cytochrome c and PKCd were detected by Western blotting. The induction of heat-induced apoptosis evaluated by morphological observation and DNA fragmentation were promoted by the addition of 6-formylpterin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased and the activation of caspase-3 and -8 was enhanced in the cells treated with the combination. A decreased-expression of Bid was noted, although no significant changes in Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL expression were observed after the combined treatment. Furthermore, both the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol and the translocation of PKCd from cytosol to mitochondria, which were induced by heat shock, were enhanced by the addition of 6-formylpterin. The number of cells with a higher [Ca2+]i was also increased by the addition of 6-formylpterin. These findings suggest that the increase in [Ca2+]i, the activation of the mitochondria-caspase dependent pathway and the translocation of PKCd to mitochondria play principal roles in the enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis by 6-FP.

  7. Root cause study on hydrogen generation and explosion through radiation-induced electrolysis in the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Genn, E-mail: sajig@bd5.so-net.ne.jp

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Reviewed how LWRs have coped with “water radiolysis”, during normal operation to severe accidents. • Concluded “water radiolysis” is not likely a route course of the hydrogen explosions at Fukushima. • Performed modeling studies based on “radiation-induced electrolysis” on Unit 1–Unit 4. • Generation of several tens of thousands cubic meters hydrogen gas is predicted before the hydrogen explosions. • Upon SBO, early safe disposal of hydrogen from RPVs is indispensable in BWRs. - Abstract: Since the scientific cause for a series of hydrogen explosions during the Fukushima accident has not been established, the author investigated his basic theory named “radiation-induced electrolysis (RIE)” by applying the estimation of the amounts of H{sub 2} generation during the active phase of the Fukushima accident. The author's theory was originally developed by including Faraday's law of electrolysis into the basic time-dependent material balance equation of radiation-chemical species for his study on accelerated corrosion phenomena which is widely observed in aged plants. As such this theory applies to the early phase of the accident before the loss of water levels in the reactor cores, although the simulations were performed from the time of seismic reactor trip to the hydrogen explosions in this paper. Through this mechanism as much as 29,400 m{sup 3}-STP of hydrogen gas is estimated to be accumulated inside the PCV just prior to the hydrogen explosion which occurred one day after the reactor trip in 1F1. With this large volume of hydrogen gas the explosion was a viable possibility upon the “venting” operation. In view of this observation, hydrogen generation from the spent fuel pools was also investigated. For the investigation of the 1F4 SFP, the pool water temperature and flow velocity due to natural circulation were changed widely to identify conditions of large hydrogen generation. During the trial calculations

  8. The Behavior and Effects of the Noble Metals in the DWPF Melter System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bickford, D.F.

    1997-11-30

    Governments worldwide have committed to stabilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) by vitrification to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. All of these nuclear wastes contain the fission-product noble metals: ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium. SRS wastes also contain natural silver from iodine scrubbers. Closely associated with the noble metals are the fission products selenium and tellurium which are chemical analogs of sulfur and which combine with noble metals to influence their behavior and properties. Experience has shown that these melt insoluble metals and their compounds tend to settle to the floor of Joule-heated ceramic melters. In fact, almost all of the major research and production facilities have experienced some operational problem which can be associated with the presence of dense accumulations of these relatively conductive metals and/or their compounds. In most cases, these deposits have led to a loss of production capability, in some cases, to the point that melter operation could not continue. HLW nuclear waste vitrification facilities in the United States are the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the planned Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the operating West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. An extensive noble metals testing program was begun in 1990. The objectives of this task were to explore the effects of the noble metals on the DWPF melter feed preparation and waste vitrification processes. This report focuses on the vitrification portion of the test program.

  9. Literature Review: Assessment of DWPF Melter and Melter Off-gas System Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Testing to date for the MOC for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) melters is being reviewed with the lessons learned from DWPF in mind and with consideration to the changes in the flowsheet/feed compositions that have occurred since the original testing was performed. This information will be presented in a separate technical report that identifies any potential gaps for WTP processing.

  10. Optimization of efficiency and energy density of passive micro fuel cells and galvanic hydrogen generators

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Robert; Krumbholz, Steffen; Reichl, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    A PEM micro fuel cell system is described which is based on self-breathing PEM micro fuel cells in the power range between 1 mW and 1W. Hydrogen is supplied with on-demand hydrogen production with help of a galvanic cell, that produces hydrogen when Zn reacts with water. The system can be used as a battery replacement for low power applications and has the potential to improve the run time of autonomous systems. The efficiency has been investigated as function of fuel cell construction and tested for several load profiles.

  11. Optimization of efficiency and energy density of passive micro fuel cells and galvanic hydrogen generators

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Robert; Wagner,Stefan; Krumbholz, Steffen; Reichl, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDA Publishing Association (http://irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/16838); International audience; A PEM micro fuel cell system is described which is based on self-breathing PEM micro fuel cells in the power range between 1 mW and 1W. Hydrogen is supplied with on-demand hydrogen production with help of a galvanic cell, that produces hydrogen when Zn reacts with water. The system can be used as a battery replacement for low power applications and has the potential to improv...

  12. Analysis Of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F. C.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2012-10-24

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed.

  13. Corrosion Testing of Monofrax K-3 Refractory in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Alternate Reductant Feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-06

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) uses a combination of reductants and oxidants while converting high level waste (HLW) to a borosilicate waste form. A reducing flowsheet is maintained to retain radionuclides in their reduced oxidation states which promotes their incorporation into borosilicate glass. For the last 20 years of processing, the DWPF has used formic acid as the main reductant and nitric acid as the main oxidant. During reaction in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), formate and formic acid release measurably significant H2 gas which requires monitoring of certain vessel’s vapor spaces. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (NG) flowsheet from the nitric-formic (NF) flowsheet is desired as the NG flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing from a safety standpoint as close monitoring of the H2 gas concentration could become less critical. In terms of the waste glass melter vapor space flammability, the switch from the NF flowsheet to the NG flowsheet showed a reduction of H2 gas production from the vitrification process as well. Due to the positive impact of the switch to glycolic acid determined on the flammability issues, evaluation of the other impacts of glycolic acid on the facility must be examined.

  14. PROCESS CHANGES TO DWPF TO INCREASE THROUGHPUT AND INCORPORATE SALT STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, C; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Michael Stone, M; Michael02 Smith, M

    2007-06-13

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been vitrifying High Level Waste sludge since 1996. Sludge batch 1a, 1b, 2, and 3 have been successfully stabilized. In the last several years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has worked with DWPF to implement process and compositional changes to improve throughput. These changes allowed significant increases in waste throughput for processing of sludge batch 3 and will be necessary to maintain reasonable throughput for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). SB4 processing was initiated in June 2007 and will be the first significantly HM-type sludge batch processed. This sludge is high in aluminum and other components troublesome to DWPF processing. In addition, coupled processing is scheduled to start in the next fiscal year, which will also impact throughput. Coupled processing will begin with the incorporation of waste streams from the Actinide Removal Process and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and will eventually transition to the feed from the larger scale Salt Waste Processing Facility. A discussion of the programs to improve throughput and implement salt processing will be provided.

  15. Pd/C synthesized with citric acid: an efficient catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H(2) mol(-1) catalyst h(-1), respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells.

  16. A molecular copper catalyst for electrochemical water reduction with a large hydrogen-generation rate constant in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peili; Wang, Mei; Yang, Yong; Yao, Tianyi; Sun, Licheng

    2014-12-08

    The copper complex [(bztpen)Cu](BF4)2 (bztpen=N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethylenediamine) displays high catalytic activity for electrochemical proton reduction in acidic aqueous solutions, with a calculated hydrogen-generation rate constant (k(obs)) of over 10000 s(-1). A turnover frequency (TOF) of 7000 h(-1) cm(-2) and a Faradaic efficiency of 96% were obtained from a controlled potential electrolysis (CPE) experiment with [(bztpen)Cu](2+) in pH 2.5 buffer solution at -0.90 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) over two hours using a glassy carbon electrode. A mechanism involving two proton-coupled reduction steps was proposed for the dihydrogen generation reaction catalyzed by [(bztpen)Cu](2+).

  17. Induction of Low-Level Hydrogen Peroxide Generation by Unbleached Cotton Nonwovens as Potential Wound Dressing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette T; Nam, Sunghyun; Hinchliffe, Doug; Condon, Brian; Yager, Dorne

    2017-03-06

    Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) generation during cotton fiber development. Traditionally, the processing of cotton into gauze involves scouring and bleaching processes that remove the components in the cuticle and primary cell wall. The use of unbleached, greige cotton fibers in dressings, has been relatively unexplored. We have recently determined that greige cotton can generate low levels of H₂O₂ (5-50 micromolar). Because this may provide advantages for the use of greige cotton-based wound dressings, we have begun to examine this in more detail. Both brown and white cotton varieties were examined in this study. Brown cotton was found to have a relatively higher hydrogen peroxide generation and demonstrated different capacities for H₂O₂ generation, varying from 1 to 35 micromolar. The H₂O₂ generation capacities of white and brown nonwoven greige cottons were also examined at different process stages with varying chronology and source parameters, from field to nonwoven fiber. The primary cell wall of nonwoven brown cotton appeared very intact, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, and possessed higher pectin levels. The levels of pectin, SOD, and polyphenolics, correlated with H₂O₂ generation.

  18. Induction of Low-Level Hydrogen Peroxide Generation by Unbleached Cotton Nonwovens as Potential Wound Dressing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vincent Edwards

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generation during cotton fiber development. Traditionally, the processing of cotton into gauze involves scouring and bleaching processes that remove the components in the cuticle and primary cell wall. The use of unbleached, greige cotton fibers in dressings, has been relatively unexplored. We have recently determined that greige cotton can generate low levels of H2O2 (5–50 micromolar. Because this may provide advantages for the use of greige cotton-based wound dressings, we have begun to examine this in more detail. Both brown and white cotton varieties were examined in this study. Brown cotton was found to have a relatively higher hydrogen peroxide generation and demonstrated different capacities for H2O2 generation, varying from 1 to 35 micromolar. The H2O2 generation capacities of white and brown nonwoven greige cottons were also examined at different process stages with varying chronology and source parameters, from field to nonwoven fiber. The primary cell wall of nonwoven brown cotton appeared very intact, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, and possessed higher pectin levels. The levels of pectin, SOD, and polyphenolics, correlated with H2O2 generation.

  19. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power - for the period August 1, 1999 through October 31, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Brown

    2000-01-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power - for the period August 1, 1999 through October 31, 1999. The highlights for this period are: (1) The methodologies for searching the literature for potentially attractive thermochemical water-splitting cycles, storing cycle and reference data, and screening the cycles have been established; and (2) The water-splitting cycle screening criteria were established on schedule.

  20. Modification of TiO2 nanotubes arrays by CdS and their photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen generation properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JianLing; ZHANG XingWang; LEI LeCheng

    2008-01-01

    In order to realize hydrogen generation under visible light, novel CdS/TiO2 nanotubes arrays are de-veloped by electrochemical anodization of Ti in 0.15 mol/L NH4F+ 0.08 mol/l. H2C2O4 electrolyte. The diameter of the nanotube is 80-100 nm and the length is approximately 550 nm. The CdS nano-particles are deposited on the TiO2 nanotubes arrays by chemical bath deposition (CBD) in the ammonia-thiourea system. A 300 W Xe lamp is used as the light source, CdS/TiO2 nanotube arrays are used as the photoanode with the application of 1.0 V bath voltage, and 0.1 mol/L Na2S + 0.04 mol/L Na2SO3 solution is used as the electrolyte, then the rate of photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen generation is 245.4 μl/(h·cm2). This opens new perspectives for photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen generation by using CdS/TiO2 nanotubes arrays.

  1. BEHAVIOR OF MERCURY DURING DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.; Koopman, D.

    2012-04-09

    retention of mercury in the slurry. Both recovery of mercury in the offgas system and removal (segregation + recovery) from the slurry correlate with slurry consistency. Higher slurry consistency results in better retention of Hg in the slurry (less segregation) and better recovery in the offgas system, but the relationships of recovery and retention with consistency are sludge dependent. Some correlation with slurry yield stress and acid stoichiometry was also found. Better retention of mercury in the slurry results in better recovery in the offgas system because the mercury in the slurry is stripped more easily than the segregated mercury at the bottom of the vessel. Although better retention gives better recovery, the time to reach a particular slurry mercury content (wt%) is longer than if the retention is poorer because the segregation is faster. The segregation of mercury is generally a faster process than stripping. The stripping factor (mass of water evaporated per mass of mercury stripped) of mercury at the start of boiling were found to be less than 1000 compared to the assumed design basis value of 750 (the theoretical factor is 250). However, within two hours, this value increased to at least 2000 lb water per lb Hg. For runs with higher mercury recovery in the offgas system, the stripping factor remained around 2000, but runs with low recovery had stripping factors of 4000 to 40,000. DWPF data shows similar trends with the stripping factor value increasing during boiling. These high values correspond to high segregation and low retention of mercury in the sludge. The stripping factor for a pure Hg metal bead in water was found to be about 10,000 lb/lb. About 10-36% of the total Hg evaporated in a SRAT cycle was refluxed back to the SRAT during formic acid addition and boiling. Mercury is dissolved as a result of nitric acid formation from absorption of NO{sub x}. The actual solubility of dissolved mercury in the acidic condensate is about 100 times higher than

  2. Generation of a VUV-to-visible Raman frequency comb in hydrogen-filled kagom\\'e photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Mridha, M K; Bauerschmidt, S T; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a purely vibrational Raman comb, extending from the vacuum ultraviolet (184 nm) to the visible (478 nm), in hydrogen-filled kagom\\'e-style photonic crystal fiber pumped at 266 nm. Stimulated Raman scattering and molecular modulation processes are enhanced by higher Raman gain in the ultraviolet. Owing to the pressure-tunable normal dispersion landscape of the fiber-gas system in the ultraviolet, higher-order anti-Stokes bands are generated preferentially in higher-order fiber modes. The results pave the way towards tunable fiber-based sources of deep- and vacuum ultraviolet light for applications in, e.g., spectroscopy and biomedicine.

  3. ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-01-20

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7), in June 2010. SB6 is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), H-Canyon Np transfers and SB6 that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51.1 SB6 was processed using Frit 418. Sludge is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Tank (SME). The treated sludge slurry is then transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and fed to the melter. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP) and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. The DWPF requested various analyses of radioactive glass samples obtained from the melter pour stream during processing of SB6 as well as reduction/oxidation (REDOX) analysis of MFT samples to determine the impact of Argon bubbling. Sample analysis followed the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and an Analytical Study Plan (ASP). Four Pour Stream (PS) glass samples and two MFT slurry samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from the DWPF. Table 1-1 lists the sample information for each pour stream glass sample. SB6 PS3 (S03472) was selected as the official pour stream sample for SB6 and full analysis was requested. This report details the visual observations of the as-received SB6 PS No.3 glass sample as well as results for the chemical composition, Product Consistency Test (PCT), radionuclide content, noble metals, and glass density. REDOX results will be provided for all four pour stream samples and vitrified samples of MFT-558 and MFT-568A. Where appropriate, data from other pour stream samples will be provided.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R- AND P-REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-12-29

    at a temperature of 80 C, the risk will again be very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.32 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

  5. Economic comparison of solar hydrogen generation by means of thermochemical cycles and electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, D.; Monnerie, N.; Roeb, M.; Schmitz, M.; Sattler, C. [German Aerospace Center, Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, Solar Research, Linder Hoehe, 51147 Cologne (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    Hydrogen is acclaimed to be an energy carrier of the future. Currently, it is mainly produced by fossil fuels, which release climate-changing emissions. Thermochemical cycles, represented here by the hybrid-sulfur cycle and a metal oxide based cycle, along with electrolysis of water are the most promising processes for 'clean' hydrogen mass production for the future. For this comparison study, both thermochemical cycles are operated by concentrated solar thermal power for multistage water splitting. The electricity required for the electrolysis is produced by a parabolic trough power plant. For each process investment, operating and hydrogen production costs were calculated on a 50 MW{sub th} scale. The goal is to point out the potential of sustainable hydrogen production using solar energy and thermochemical cycles compared to commercial electrolysis. A sensitivity analysis was carried out for three different cost scenarios. As a result, hydrogen production costs ranging from 3.9-5.6 EUR/kg for the hybrid-sulfur cycle, 3.5-12.8 EUR/kg for the metal oxide based cycle and 2.1-6.8 EUR/kg for electrolysis were obtained. (author)

  6. Nano-design of quantum dot-based photocatalysts for hydrogen generation using advanced surface molecular chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation in a suspension system requires a sophisticated nano-device that combines a photon absorber with effective redox catalysts. This study demonstrates an innovative molecular linking strategy for fabricating photocatalytic materials that allow effective charge separation of excited carriers, followed by efficient hydrogen evolution. The method for the sequential replacement of ligands with appropriate molecules developed in this study tethers both quantum dots (QDs), as photosensitizers, and metal nanoparticles, as hydrogen evolution catalysts, to TiO2 surfaces in a controlled manner at the nano-level. Combining hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions on the surface, CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and an Au-Pt alloy were attached to TiO2 without overlapping during the synthesis. The resultant nano-photocatalysts achieved substantially high-performance visible-light-driven photocatalysis for hydrogen evolution. All syntheses were conducted at room temperature and in ambient air, providing a promising route for fabricating visible-light-responsive photocatalysts.

  7. The crystal structure, vibrational spectra, thermal behaviour and second harmonic generation of aminoguanidinium(1+) hydrogen L-tartrate monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháčková, Zorka; Němec, Ivan; Teubner, Karel; Němec, Petr; Vaněk, Přemysl; Mička, Zdeněk

    2007-04-01

    Aminoguanidinium(1+) hydrogen L-tartrate monohydrate was prepared by crystallisation from aqueous solution and X-ray structural analysis was carried out. The substance crystallises in the orthorhombic system in space group P2 12 12 1, a = 7.1380(2) Å, b = 9.9700(4) Å, c = 14.0790(6) Å, V = 1001.94(7) Å 3, Z = 4, R = 0.0271 for 2272 observed reflections. The crystal structure consists of a 3D framework formed by hydrogen tartrate anions and water molecules with incorporated aminoguanidinium(1+) cations connected by a system of hydrogen bonds. The FTIR and FT Raman spectra of natural and N,O-deuterated compounds were measured and discussed at laboratory temperature. DSC measurements were carried out in the temperature range from 95 to 380 K. A weak anomaly was observed at a temperature of 268 K. Quantitative measurements of second harmonic generation of powdered aminoguanidinium(1+) hydrogen tartrate monohydrate at 800 nm were performed relative to KDP and a relative efficiency of 14% was observed.

  8. A third-generation dispersion and third-generation hydrogen bonding corrected PM6 method: PM6-D3H+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy C. Kromann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present new dispersion and hydrogen bond corrections to the PM6 method, PM6-D3H+, and its implementation in the GAMESS program. The method combines the DFT-D3 dispersion correction by Grimme et al. with a modified version of the H+ hydrogen bond correction by Korth. Overall, the interaction energy of PM6-D3H+ is very similar to PM6-DH2 and PM6-DH+, with RMSD and MAD values within 0.02 kcal/mol of one another. The main difference is that the geometry optimizations of 88 complexes result in 82, 6, 0, and 0 geometries with 0, 1, 2, and 3 or more imaginary frequencies using PM6-D3H+ implemented in GAMESS, while the corresponding numbers for PM6-DH+ implemented in MOPAC are 54, 17, 15, and 2. The PM6-D3H+ method as implemented in GAMESS offers an attractive alternative to PM6-DH+ in MOPAC in cases where the LBFGS optimizer must be used and a vibrational analysis is needed, e.g., when computing vibrational free energies. While the GAMESS implementation is up to 10 times slower for geometry optimizations of proteins in bulk solvent, compared to MOPAC, it is sufficiently fast to make geometry optimizations of small proteins practically feasible.

  9. Efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation using heterostructures of Si and chemically exfoliated metallic MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qi; Meng, Fei; English, Caroline R; Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel; Shearer, Melinda J; Liang, Dong; Daniel, Andrew S; Hamers, Robert J; Jin, Song

    2014-06-18

    We report the preparation and characterization of highly efficient and robust photocathodes based on heterostructures of chemically exfoliated metallic 1T-MoS2 and planar p-type Si for solar-driven hydrogen production. Photocurrents up to 17.6 mA/cm(2) at 0 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode were achieved under simulated 1 sun irradiation, and excellent stability was demonstrated over long-term operation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed low charge-transfer resistances at the semiconductor/catalyst and catalyst/electrolyte interfaces, and surface photoresponse measurements also demonstrated slow carrier recombination dynamics and consequently efficient charge carrier separation, providing further evidence for the superior performance. Our results suggest that chemically exfoliated 1T-MoS2/Si heterostructures are promising earth-abundant alternatives to photocathodes based on noble metal catalysts for solar-driven hydrogen production.

  10. Anoxic photochemical oxidation of siderite generates molecular hydrogen and iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Dongun; Yee, Nathan; Nanda, Vikas; Falkowski, Paul G

    2013-06-18

    Photochemical reactions of minerals are underappreciated processes that can make or break chemical bonds. We report the photooxidation of siderite (FeCO3) by UV radiation to produce hydrogen gas and iron oxides via a two-photon reaction. The calculated quantum yield for the reaction suggests photooxidation of siderite would have been a significant source of molecular hydrogen for the first half of Earth's history. Further, experimental results indicate this abiotic, photochemical process may have led to the formation of iron oxides under anoxic conditions. The reaction would have continued through the Archean to at least the early phases of the Great Oxidation Event, and provided a mechanism for oxidizing the atmosphere through the loss of hydrogen to space, while simultaneously providing a key reductant for microbial metabolism. We propose that the photochemistry of Earth-abundant minerals with wide band gaps would have potentially played a critical role in shaping the biogeochemical evolution of early Earth.

  11. Onboard Hydrogen Generation for a Spark Ignition Engine via Thermochemical Recuperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Isaac Alexander

    A method of exhaust heat recovery from a spark-ignition internal combustion engine was explored, utilizing a steam reforming thermochemical reactor to produce a hydrogen-rich effluent, which was then consumed in the engine. The effects of hydrogen in the combustion process have been studied extensively, and it has been shown that an extension of the lean stability limit is possible through hydrogen enrichment. The system efficiency and the extension of the operational range of an internal combustion engine were explored through the use of a methane fueled naturally aspirated single cylinder engine co-fueled with syngas produced with an on board methane steam reformer. It was demonstrated that an extension of the lean stability limit is possible using this system.

  12. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  13. Thermodynamic investigation of waste cooking oil based hydrogen generation system with chemical looping process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla Faleh

    2016-07-01

    The results show that coke formation can be thermodynamically inhibited by increasing the S/C ratio and/or the NiO/C ratio. The conditions that maximize hydrogen production, minimize methane and carbon monoxide content as well as avoid coke formation at thermoneutral conditions were found to be S/C = 5, T = 600 °C and NiO/C = 0.493. Under these conditions, a hydrogen yield of 144.3 mol/kg of soybean waste cooking oil can be obtained, which appears to be an attractive result for starting experimental research.

  14. Power generation in fuel cells using liquid methanol and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is directed to an encapsulated fuel cell including a methanol source that feeds liquid methanol (CH.sub.3 OH) to an anode. The anode is electrical communication with a load that provides electrical power. The fuel cell also includes a hydrogen peroxide source that feeds liquid hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2 O.sub.2) to the cathode. The cathode is also in communication with the electrical load. The anode and cathode are in contact with and separated by a proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membrane.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-10-29

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Conservative calculations estimate that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. Grout temperatures less than 100 C should however, still provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. (2) Minimize the fill rate as much as

  16. Plasmonic ZnO/Ag embedded structures as collecting layers for photogenerating electrons in solar hydrogen generation photoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao Ming; Chen, Chih Kai; Tseng, Ming Lun; Wu, Pin Chieh; Chang, Chia Min; Cheng, Liang-Chien; Huang, Hsin Wei; Chan, Ting Shan; Huang, Ding-Wei; Liu, Ru-Shi; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-09-09

    A new fabrication strategy in which Ag plasmonics are embedded in the interface between ZnO nanorods and a conducting substrate is experimentally demonstrated using a femtosecond-laser (fs-laser)-induced plasmonic ZnO/Ag photoelectrodes. This fs-laser fabrication technique can be applied to generate patternable plasmonic nanostructures for improving their effectiveness in hydrogen generation. Plasmonic ZnO/Ag nanostructure photoelectrodes show an increase in the photocurrent of a ZnO nanorod photoelectrodes by higher than 85% at 0.5 V. Both localized surface plasmon resonance in metal nanoparticles and plasmon polaritons propagating at the metal/semiconductor interface are available for improving the capture of sunlight and collecting charge carriers. Furthermore, in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy is performed to monitor the plasmonic-generating electromagnetic field upon the interface between ZnO/Ag nanostructures. This can reveal induced vacancies on the conduction band of ZnO, which allow effective separation of charge carriers and improves the efficiency of hydrogen generation. Plasmon-induced effects enhance the photoresponse simultaneously, by improving optical absorbance and facilitating the separation of charge carriers.

  17. Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design in Optoelectronics and Hydrogen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 22-April-2013 to 21-April-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design...15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum Dots , Optoelectronic Applications, Charge Transfer, Superlattices, Density Functional Theory, Coupling...FA2386-13-1-4074 “ Quantum Dot Superlattice Enabled Rational Design in Optoelectronics and Hydrogen Generation” April 21, 2014 PI and Co-PI

  18. Design of a Fuel Processor System for Generating Hydrogen for Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolavennu, Panini K.; Telotte, John C.; Palanki, Srinivas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to design a train of tubular reactors that use a methane feed to produce hydrogen of the desired purity so that it can be utilized by a fuel cell for automotive applications. Reaction engineering principles, which are typically covered at the undergraduate level, are utilized to design this reactor train. It is shown…

  19. Integration of first and second generation biofuels: Fermentative hydrogen production from wheat grain and straw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A.; Bakker, R.R.C.; Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Koukios, E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Integrating of lignocellulose-based and starch-rich biomass-based hydrogen production was investigated by mixing wheat straw hydrolysate with a wheat grain hydrolysate for improved fermentation. Enzymatic pretreatment and hydrolysis of wheat grains led to a hydrolysate with a sugar concentration of

  20. A two-stage bio hydrogen process for energy generation from municipal solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo-Benitez, J. a.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-07-01

    Energy supply and disposal of solid wastes are two big challenges that great cities face at the present time. Several experts have shown that hydrogen is the fuel of the future, due to their high energy content (three times more than that of the gasoline) and its clean combustion. (Author)

  1. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF REACTOR VESSELS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.

    2010-11-10

    The R- and P-reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of physically isolating and stabilizing the reactor vessel by filling it with a grout material. The reactor vessels contain aluminum alloy materials, which pose a concern in that aluminum corrodes rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout. A product of the corrosion reaction is hydrogen gas and therefore potential flammability issues were assessed. A model was developed to calculate the hydrogen generation rate as the reactor is being filled with the grout material. Three options existed for the type of grout material for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options included ceramicrete (pH 6-8), a calcium aluminate sulfate (CAS) based cement (pH 10), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.4). Corrosion data for aluminum in concrete were utilized as input for the model. The calculations considered such factors as the surface area of the aluminum components, the open cross-sectional area of the reactor vessel, the rate at which the grout is added to the reactor vessel, and temperature. Given the hydrogen generation rate, the hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of the reactor vessel above the grout was calculated. This concentration was compared to the lower flammability limit for hydrogen. The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the CAS grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters did not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. Therefore, it was recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. On the other hand, the R-reactor vessel

  2. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D. (ed.); Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; Just-in-Time'' precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  3. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D. (ed.); Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; Just-in-Time'' precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  4. Toward enhanced hydrogen generation from water using oxygen permeating LCF membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    © the Owner Societies. Hydrogen production from water thermolysis can be enhanced by the use of perovskite-type mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes, through which oxygen permeation is driven by a chemical potential gradient. In this work, water thermolysis experiments were performed using 0.9 mm thick La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-δ (LCF-91) perovskite membranes at 990 °C in a lab-scale button-cell reactor. We examined the effects of the operating conditions such as the gas species concentrations and flow rates on the feed and sweep sides on the water thermolysis rate and oxygen flux. A single step reaction mechanism is proposed for surface reactions, and three-resistance permeation models are derived. Results show that water thermolysis is facilitated by the LCF-91 membrane especially when a fuel is added to the sweep gas. Increasing the gas flow rate and water concentration on the feed side or the hydrogen concentration on the sweep side enhances the hydrogen production rate. In this work, hydrogen is used as the fuel by construction, so that a single-step surface reaction mechanism can be developed and water thermolysis rate parameters can be derived. Both surface reaction rate parameters for oxygen incorporation/dissociation and hydrogen-oxygen reactions are fitted at 990 °C. We compare the oxygen fluxes in water thermolysis and air separation experiments, and identify different limiting steps in the processes involving various oxygen sources and sweep gases for this 0.9 mm thick LCF-91 membrane. In the air feed-inert sweep case, the bulk diffusion and sweep side surface reaction are the two limiting steps. In the water feed-inert sweep case, surface reaction on the feed side dominates the oxygen permeation process. Yet in the water feed-fuel sweep case, surface reactions on both the feed and sweep sides are rate determining when hydrogen concentration in the sweep side is in the range of 1-5 vol%. Furthermore, long term studies show that the surface

  5. Silver quantum cluster (ag9 )-grafted graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets for photocatalytic hydrogen generation and dye degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Kishore; Jang, Eunyong; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Tae Joo

    2015-06-15

    We report the visible-light photocatalytic properties of a composite system consisting of silver quantum clusters [Ag9 (H2 MSA)7 ] (H2 MSA=mercaptosuccinic acid) embedded on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (AgQCs-GCN). The composites were prepared through a simple chemical route; their structural, chemical, morphological, and optical properties were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Embedment of [Ag9 (H2 MSA)7 ] on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (GCN) resulted in extended visible-light absorption through multiple single-electron transitions in Ag quantum clusters and an effective electronic structure for hydroxyl radical generation, which enabled increased activity in the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and methyl orange dye molecules compared with pristine GCN and silver nanoparticle-grafted GCN (AgNPs-GCN). Similarly, the amount of hydrogen generated by using AgQCs-GCN was 1.7 times higher than pristine GCN. However, the rate of hydrogen generated using AgQCs-GCN was slightly less than that of AgNPs-GCN because of surface hydroxyl radical formation. The plausible photocatalytic processes are discussed in detail.

  6. Electrodeposited synthesis of self-supported Ni-P cathode for efficient electrocatalytic hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixian Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the key challenges for electrochemical water splitting is the development of low-cost and efficient hydrogen evolution cathode. In this work, a self-supported Ni-P cathode was synthesized by a facile electrodeposition method. The composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The Ni-P cathode performed low onset over-potential, good catalytic activity and long-term stability under neutral and alkaline conditions. The mechanism of Ni-P electrode for hydrogen production was discussed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The excellent performance of Ni-P cathode was mainly attributed to the synergistic effect of phosphate anions and the self-supported feature.

  7. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Moeller-Holst, S.; Webb, D.M.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1998-08-01

    The objective is to develop and demonstrate a 4 kW, hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) stack, based on non-machined stainless steel hardware and on membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) of low catalyst loadings. The stack is designed to operate at ambient pressure on the air-side and can accommodate operation at higher fuel pressures, if so required. This is to be accomplished by working jointly with a fuel cell stack manufacturer, based on a CRADA. The performance goals are 57% energy conversion efficiency hydrogen-to-electricity (DC) at a power density of 0.9 kW/liter for a stack operating at ambient inlet pressures. The cost goal is $600/kW, based on present materials costs.

  8. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation with Ag-loaded LiNbO3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Beata Zielińska

    2014-06-01

    In this contribiution LiNbO3 and Ag-loaded LiNbO3 photocatalysts were tested in the reaction of hydrogen evolution. The silver modified samples contained different loading of co-catalyst in the range of 0.5–4 wt%. It was essential to optimize the sample composition to achieve an efficient hydrogen evolution. The optimal sample contained 2 wt% of silver. The detailed analysis indicated that silver was deposited on the surface of LiNbO3 in the form of Ag2O. Therefore, it is supposed that Ag2O was responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity in the studied reaction. The crystallographic phases and optical and vibronic properties were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and diffuse reflectance (DR) UV–Vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic methods, respectively. Morphology of the produced samples were studied using a highresolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM).

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Titanium Dioxide Photoelectrodes for Generation of Hydrogen by Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Realpe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The photoelectrochemical water splitting for the production of hydrogen was evaluated through the preparation of photoelectrodes of different substrates (glass, aluminium, graphite with TiO2 film. The film on each substrate was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. The results show that the TiO2 was deposited in dispersed form and in small clusters on the surface of the substrate and it had no effect on the crystal structure of the semiconductor; furthermore, good adhesion of the films on substrates was obtained except with graphite substrate. The hydrogen production process was carried out using UV light, halogen light and sunlight as photon sources, and it was evaluated by the current flow through the external circuit of the cell. The highest photocurrent values were obtained with the aluminium photoelectrode, averaging 1092.03 uA.

  10. Electrodeposited synthesis of self-supported Ni-P cathode for efficient electrocatalytic hydrogen generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixian Wu; Yuming Dong n; Pingping Jiang; Guangli Wang; Yanmei Chen; Xiuming Wu

    2016-01-01

    One of the key challenges for electrochemical water splitting is the development of low-cost and efficient hydrogen evolution cathode. In this work, a self-supported Ni-P cathode was synthesized by a facile electrodeposition method. The composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The Ni-P cathode performed low onset over-potential, good catalytic activity and long-term stability under neutral and alkaline conditions. The mechanism of Ni-P electrode for hydrogen production was discussed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The excellent performance of Ni-P cathode was mainly attributed to the synergistic effect of phosphate anions and the self-supported feature.

  11. PVP-stabilized Ru–Rh nanoparticles as highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of ammonia borane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakap, Murat, E-mail: mrtrakap@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    Herein, the utilization of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected ruthenium–rhodium nanoparticles (3.4 ± 1.4 nm) as highly efficient catalysts in the hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen generation is reported. They are prepared by co-reduction of ruthenium and rhodium metal ions in ethanol/water mixture by an alcohol reduction method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They are durable and highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane even at very low concentrations and temperature, providing average turnover frequency of 386 mol H{sub 2} (mol cat){sup −1} min{sup −1} and maximum hydrogen generation rate of 10,680 L H{sub 2} min{sup −1} (mol cat){sup −1}. Poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected ruthenium–rhodium nanoparticles also provide activation energy of 47.4 ± 2.1 kJ/mol for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane. - Highlights: • Ru-Rh@PVP NPs provide a TOF of 386 mol H{sub 2} (mol cat){sup −1} min{sup −1} for hydrolysis of AB. • Maximum HG rate is 9680 L H{sub 2} min{sup −1} (mol cat){sup −1} for the hydrolysis of AB. • Activation energy is 47.4 ± 2.1 kJ mol{sup −1} for the hydrolysis of AB.

  12. Theoretical Research Program on Bio-inspired Inorganic Hydrogen Generating Catalysts and Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selloni, Annabella; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-04-17

    In this project, we have successfully designed and characterized a promising biomimetic catalyst/electrode complex, [FeFe]P/FeS2 for producing hydrogen from water. It is comprised of earth-abundant materials and, with a diffusion-limited rate in acidified water, is efficient as well as oxygen tolerant. The theoretical techniques we have developed and the experience we have gained are broadly applicable for the design and analysis of biomimetic electrochemically active catalysts.

  13. A modelling evaluation of an ammonia-fuelled microchannel reformer for hydrogen generation

    OpenAIRE

    Chiuta, Steven; Everson, Raymond C.; Neomagus, Hein W.J.P.; Le Grange, Louis A.; Bessarabov, Dmitri G.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen production from an ammonia-fuelled microchannel reactor is simulated in a three-dimensional (3D) model implemented via Comsol Multiphysics™. The work described in this paper endeavours to obtain a mathematical framework that provides an understanding of reaction-coupled transport phenomena within the microchannel reactor. The transport processes and reactor performance are elucidated in terms of velocity, temperature, and species concentration distributions, as well as local reaction...

  14. Theoretical study of piezoelectrochemical reactions in molecular compression chambers: In-situ generation of molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichierri, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen-containing molecular compression chambers (MCCs) undergo stepwise protonation followed by a 2-electron reduction step which affords molecular hydrogen in situ. This piezoelectrochemical reaction is favored by the high compression that characterizes the molecular skeleton of MCC and its fluorinated analogue. Besides H2, the MCCs are also capable of trapping molecular fluorine and the small monoatomic gases helium and neon. A topological analysis of the electronic charge density reveals the presence of closed-shell interactions between hosts and guests.

  15. Renewable Bio-solar Hydrogen Production from Robust Oxygenic Phototrophs: The Second Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-22

    of Biotechnology , 2013. 166: p. 65– 75. 4) McNeely K., Kumaraswamy G.K., et al. (2014). Metabolic Switching of Central Carbon Metabolism in...Response to Nitrate: Application to Autofermentative Hydrogen Production in Cyanobacteria. Journal of Biotechnology , 182-183, 83-91. 5) Smith, PF, Kaplan...Waksman Institute of Microbiology and the Dept of Chemistry & Chem. Biology, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 5. Telephone

  16. Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooteghem Van, Suellen

    2005-09-13

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  17. Enhanced hydrogen generation using a saline catholyte in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2011-11-01

    High rates of hydrogen gas production were achieved in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) without a catholyte phosphate buffer by using a saline catholyte solution and a cathode constructed around a stainless steel mesh current collector. Using the non-buffered salt solution (68 mM NaCl) produced the highest current density of 131 ± 12 A/m3, hydrogen yield of 3.2 ± 0.3 mol H2/mol acetate, and gas production rate of 1.6 ± 0.2 m3 H2/m 3·d, compared to MECs with catholytes externally sparged with CO2 or containing a phosphate buffer. The salinity of the catholyte achieved a high solution conductivity, and therefore the electrode spacing did not appreciably affect performance. The coulombic efficiency with the cathode placed near the membrane separating the chambers was 83 ± 4%, similar to that obtained with the cathode placed more distant from the membrane (84 ± 4%). Using a carbon cloth cathode instead of the stainless steel mesh cathode did not significantly affect performance, with all reactor configurations producing similar performance in terms of total gas volume, COD removal, rcat and overall energy recovery. These results show MEC performance can be improved by using a saline catholyte without pH control. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sequential generation of hydrogen and methane from glutamic acid through combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Lin, Richen; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-03-01

    Glutamic acid can hardly produce hydrogen via dark- or photo-fermentation without pretreatment. In this study, a novel process of acidogenic pretreatment with bacteria and zeolite treatment for NH4(+) removal was proposed to use glutamic acid as feedstock in photo-fermentation for efficient hydrogen production. Glutamic acid pretreated with acidogenic bacteria produces soluble metabolite products. After zeolite treatment, the acidulated solution, which mainly contains acetate, butyrate, and NH4(+), shows a decrease in NH4(+) concentration from 36.7mM to 3.2mM (NH4(+) removal efficiency of 91.1%). After NH4(+) removal, the treated solution is incubated with photosynthetic bacteria, exhibiting a maximum hydrogen yield of 292.9mL/g(-glutamic acid) during photo-fermentation. The residual solution from photo-fermentation is reused by methanogenic bacteria to produce a maximum methane yield of 102.7mL/g. The heating value conversion efficiency from glutamic acid to gas fuel significantly increases from 18.9% during photo-fermentation to 40.9% in the combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis process.

  19. On methane generation and decarburization in low-alloy Cr-Mo steels during hydrogen attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schloegl, S.M.; Leeuwen, Y. van; Giessen, E. van der

    2000-01-01

    Low-carbon, low-alloy Cr-Mo steels may fail by hydrogen attach when they are exposed to high hydrogen pressures at elevated temperature. During this process, the dissolved hydrogen reacts with the carbides of the steel to form methane in grain boundary cavities. The methane pressure inside these cavities depends on the microstructure of the used steel, which consists of a ferritic matrix and alloy carbides such as M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, M{sub 6}C, and M{sub 2}C. The different phases in the multicomponent system Fe-Cr-Mo-V-C are modeled with the sublattice model. Their Gibbs energies are then used to calculate the equilibrium methane pressure as a function of the microstructure. Driven by the methane pressure, the cavities grow due to grain boundary diffusion and dislocation creep, which is described by analytical relations. This leads to progressive development of damage inside the materials but, at the same time, to a decrease of the carbon content in the steel. This reduction depends on, among other factors, the methane pressure and the damage state. As the carbon content also affects the creep parameters, this process of decarburization may accelerate the cavity growth. Model calculations are used to obtain insight into the influence of this decarburization process on damage evolution and the final lifetime.

  20. Impacts of glycolate and formate radiolysis and thermolysis on hydrogen generation rate calculations for the Savannah River Site tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-14

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) personnel requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluate available data and determine its applicability to defining the impact of planned glycolate anion additions to Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) on Tank Farm flammability (primarily with regard to H2 production). Flammability evaluations of formate anion, which is already present in SRS waste, were also needed. This report describes the impacts of glycolate and formate radiolysis and thermolysis on Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) calculations for the SRS Tank Farm.

  1. Efficient and Stable MoS2 /CdSe/NiO Photocathode for Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Generation from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuming; Chen, Yanmei; Jiang, Pingping; Wang, Guangli; Wu, Xiuming; Wu, Ruixian; Zhang, Chi

    2015-08-01

    A novel CdSe/NiO heteroarchitecture was designed, prepared, and used as a photocathode for hydrogen generation from water. The composite films were structurally, optically, and photoelectrochemically characterized. The deposition of CdSe on the NiO film enhanced light harvesting in the visible-light region and photoelectrochemical properties. Moreover, the CdSe/NiO photoelectrode showed superior stability both in nitrogen-saturated and air-saturated neutral environments. The CdSe/NiO photoelectrode after MoS2 modification retained the stability of the CdSe/NiO electrode and exhibited higher photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical performances than the unmodified CdSe/NiO electrode. In pH 6 buffer solution, an average hydrogen-evolution rate of 0.52 μmol h(-1)  cm(-2) at -0.131 V (versus reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE) was achieved on a MoS2 /CdSe/NiO photocathode, with almost 100 % faradaic efficiency.

  2. Examination Of Sulfur Measurements In DWPF Sludge Slurry And SRAT Product Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Wiedenman, B. J.

    2012-11-29

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to re-sample the received SB7b WAPS material for wt. % solids, perform an aqua regia digestion and analyze the digested material by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), as well as re-examine the supernate by ICP-AES. The new analyses were requested in order to provide confidence that the initial analytical subsample was representative of the Tank 40 sample received and to replicate the S results obtained on the initial subsample collected. The ICP-AES analyses for S were examined with both axial and radial detection of the sulfur ICP-AES spectroscopic emission lines to ascertain if there was any significant difference in the reported results. The outcome of this second subsample of the Tank 40 WAPS material is the first subject of this report. After examination of the data from the new subsample of the SB7b WAPS material, a team of DWPF and SRNL staff looked for ways to address the question of whether there was in fact insoluble S that was not being accounted for by ion chromatography (IC) analysis. The question of how much S is reaching the melter was thought best addressed by examining a DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Product sample, but the significant dilution of sludge material, containing the S species in question, that results from frit addition was believed to add additional uncertainty to the S analysis of SME Product material. At the time of these discussions it was believed that all S present in a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt sample would be converted to sulfate during the course of the SRAT cycle. A SRAT Product sample would not have the S dilution effect resulting from frit addition, and hence, it was decided that a DWPF SRAT Product sample would be obtained and submitted to SRNL for digestion and sample preparation followed by a round-robin analysis of the prepared samples by the DWPF Laboratory, F/H Laboratories, and SRNL for S and sulfate. The

  3. Water soluble decontamination coating for Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, C.L.

    1986-12-17

    Water soluble sodium borate glass coating was successfully codeveloped by Clemson University (Dr. H.G. Lefort) and Du Pont as an alternative decontamination process to frit slurry blasting of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters. Slurry blasting requires transport of abrasive slurries, might cause galling by entrapped frit particles, and could result in frit slurry freezeup in pumps and retention basins. Contamination can be removed from precoated canisters with a gentle hot water rinse. Glass waste spilled on a coated canister will spall off spontaneously during canister cooling. A glass coating appears to prevent transfer of contamination to the Canister Decontamination Cell (CDC) guides and cradle. 1 ref., 5 tabs.

  4. Tank 42 sludge-only process development for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.P.

    2000-03-22

    Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the development of a sludge-only process for Tank 42 sludge since at the current processing rate, the Tank 51 sludge has been projected to be depleted as early as August 1998. Testing was completed using a non-radioactive Tank 42 sludge simulant. The testing was completed under a range of operating conditions, including worst case conditions, to develop the processing conditions for radioactive Tank 42 sludge. The existing Tank 51 sludge-only process is adequate with the exception that 10 percent additional acid is recommended during sludge receipt and adjustment tank (SRAT) processing to ensure adequate destruction of nitrite during the SRAT cycle.

  5. DESIGN, SYNTHESIS AND STUDY OF MULTI-COMPONENT AND INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR LIGHT-DRIVEN HYDROGEN GENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Richard Eisenberg

    2012-07-18

    The research focussed on fundamental problems in the conversion of light to stored chemical energy. Specifically, work was completed on the design, synthesis and study of multi-component super- and supramolecular systems for photoinduced charge separation, one of the key steps in artificial photosynthesis, and on the use of these and related systems for the photochemical generation of H2 from water. At the center of these systems are chromophores comprised of square planar coordinated Pt(II) ions with arylacetylide and either diimine or terpyridyl ligands. Previous work had shown that the chromophores are photoluminescent in fluid solution with long-lived metal-to-ligand charge transfer (3MLCT) excited states that are necessarily directional. An advance which set the stage for a number of proposed studies was the light-driven production of hydrogen from water using a Pt(terpyridyl)(arylacetylide)+ chromophore and a sacrificial electron donor. The reaction is catalytic and appears to rival previously reported ruthenium bipyridyl systems in terms of H2 production. Variation of system components and mechanistic studies were conducted to understand better the individual steps in the overall process and how to improve its efficiency. Success with light driven H2 generation was employed as a key probe as new systems were constructed consisting of triads for photoinduced charge separation placed in close proximity to the H2 generating catalyst - a Pt colloid - through direct linkage or supramolecular interactions with the polymer used to stabilize the colloid. In order to prepare new donor-chromophore-acceptor (D-C-A) triads and associated D-C and C-A dyads, new ligands were synthesized having functional groups for different coupling reactions such as simple amide formation and Pd-catalyzed coupling. In these systems, the donor was attached to the arylacetylide ligands and the acceptor was linked to the diimine or terpyridyl chelate. Research under the contract proved

  6. MHD-, ships-, jet engine unit consisting of electrochemical cells producing hydrogen, magneto-caloric hydrogen liquefier, liquid hydrogen-cooled high temperature superconductor-, MHD-, jet engine, liquid hydrogen internal combustion engine as high temperature-, superconductor-, generator-drive. High temperature superconductor coil and permanent magnet superconductor hollow cylinder as battery. MHD-Schiffs-Strahltriebwerks-Aggregat bestehend aus Wasserstoff-produzierenden elektrochemischen Solarzellen, magnetokalorischem Wasserstoffverfluessiger, Fluessigwasserstoff gekuehltem Hochtemperatur-Supraleiter-MHD-Strahltriebwerk, Fluessigwasserstoff-Verbrennungsmotor als Hochtemperatur-Supraleiter-Generator-Antrieb, Hochtemperatur-Supraleiter-Spule und permanentmagnetischem Supraleiter-Hohlzylinder als Akku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berling, E.

    1991-05-02

    MHD-, ships-, jet engine-unit consisting of electrochemical cells producing hydrogen, magneto-caloric hydrogen liquifier, liquid hydrogen-cooled high temperature superconductor-, MHD-, jet engine, liquid hydrogen internal combustion engine as high temperature-, superconductor-, generator-drive. High temperature superconductor coil and permanent magnet superconductor hollow cylinder as battery. Ships water jet engines with magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) low temperature superconductor drive are known. The invention of the ceramic high temperature superconductor MHD drive, which is cooled with liquid hydrogen. The hydrogen is obtained electro-chemically directly from seawater, and is liquified magneto-calorically. The high temperature superconductor elements of the engine, liquifier, generator, storage coil, permanent magnet hollow cylinder store are coupled by a common liquid hydrogen cooling circuit. The internal combustion engine driving the generator is fuelled by the same liquid hydrogen by which the high temperature superconductor elements are cooled.

  7. Production of HBR from bromine and steam for off-peak electrolytic hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlief, R.E.; Hanrahan, R.J.; Stoy, M.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a renewable energy source based solar-electrolytic system for production of hydrogen and oxygen. It employs water, bromine, solar energy and supplemental electrical power. The concept is being developed by Solar Reactor Technologies, Inc., (SRT), with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). An overview of the nature and objectives of this program is provided here, and technical progress made during the first (three-month) performance period of the Phase I work effort is reported. The SRT concept entails (1) absorption of concentrated solar radiation by bromine vapor Br{sub 2(g)} in a high-temperature reactor producing Br{sub (g)} atoms, (2) reaction of Br{sub (g)} with water yielding hydrogen bromide (HBr), and (3) electrolysis of stored hydrogen bromide for production of H{sub 2(g)} and recovery of Br{sub 2(I)}. Incorporation of solar radiation in the primary photochemical step (1) reduces by 50 - 70% the electrical power required to split water. The SRT concept is very attractive from an economic viewpoint as well. The reversible fuel cell, employed in the SRT electrolysis concept is capitalized via its use in load leveling by the utility. A 1 kW solar reactor was designed and constructed during the first three-month performance period by SRT personnel at the University of Florida, Gainesville. It was employed in taking survey data of the reaction between bromine and steam at temperatures between 900 and 1300 K. This reaction was run under purely thermal conditions, i.e. in the absence of solar photons. The experimental data are reported and interpreted employing concomitant thermodynamic calculations. The anticipated improvement is discussed briefly as well as the effect of a photochemical boost to the reaction. The amount of this enhancement will be studied in the next three month performance period.

  8. On-board hydrogen generation for transport applications: the HotSpot™ methanol processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Neil; Ellis, Suzanne R.; Frost, Jonathan C.; Golunski, Stanislaw E.; van Keulen, Arjan N. J.; Lindewald, Nicklas G.; Reinkingh, Jessica G.

    In the absence of a hydrogen infrastructure, development of effective on-board fuel processors is likely to be critical to the commercialisation of fuel-cell cars. The HotSpot™ reactor converts methanol, water and air in a single compact catalyst bed into a reformate containing mainly CO2 and hydrogen (and unreacted nitrogen). The process occurs by a combination of exothermic partial oxidation and endothermic steam reforming of methanol, to produce 750 l of hydrogen per hour from a 245-cm3 reactor. The relative contribution of each reaction can be tuned to match the system requirements at a given time. Scale-up is achieved by the parallel combination of the required number of individual HotSpot reactors, which are fed from a central manifold. Using this modular design, the start-up and transient characteristics of a large fuel-processor are identical to that of a single reactor. When vaporised liquid feed and air are introduced into cold reactors, 100% output is achieved in 50 s; subsequent changes in throughput result in instantaneous changes in output. Surplus energy within the fuel-cell powertrain can be directed to the manifold, where it can be used to vaporise the liquid feeds and so promote steam reforming, resulting in high system efficiency. The small amount of CO that is produced by the HotSpot reactions is attenuated to <10 ppm by a catalytic clean-up unit. The HotSpot concept and CO clean-up strategy are not limited to the processing of methanol, but are being applied to other organic fuels.

  9. Compact Cryogenic Source of Periodic Hydrogen and Argon Droplet Beams for Intense Laser-Plasma Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, R A Costa; Kühnel, M; Hochhaus, D C; Schottelius, A; Polz, J; Kaluza, M C; Neumayer, P; Grisenti, R E

    2011-01-01

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen (H2) and argon (Ar) droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art low-repetition rate high-power lasers, in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We demonstrate this explicitly by irradiating Ar droplets with pulses from a Petawatt laser.

  10. Compact cryogenic source of periodic hydrogen and argon droplet beams for relativistic laser-plasma generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, R. A. Costa; Kalinin, A.; Kuehnel, M.; Schottelius, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hochhaus, D. C.; Neumayer, P. [EMMI Extreme Matter Institute and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Polz, J. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Froebelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen and argon droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art high-power lasers in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We show this by irradiating argon droplets with multi-terawatt pulses.

  11. Laboratory Studies of Hydrogen Gas Generation Using the Cobalt Chloride Catalyzed Sodium Borohydride-Water Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    is a plot of total hydrogen gas as a function of reaction time. This experiment was conducted in the pressure tank at an applied pressure of 13 psig...function of reaction time. This experiment was conducted in the pressure tank at an applied pressure of 50 psig using a H2O:NaBH4 ratio of 4.6:1 and 3.0... pressure tank (McMaster-Carr, part number. 6778K21). The pressure tank has a 185-psig maximum pressure rating at 37.8 ºC and a maximum operating

  12. Studies on hydrogen generation characteristics of hydrolysis of the ball milling Al-based materials in pure water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Mei-Qiang [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian (China). Materials and Thermochemistry Laboratory; Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Xu, Fen; Sun, Li-Xian [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian (China). Materials and Thermochemistry Laboratory

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, a series of Al-based materials were prepared by ball milling and/or melting. The XRD, SEM and TG-DTA techniques were used for sample analyses. Effects of different metals such as Zn, Ca, Ga, Bi, Mg, In and Sn on the hydrogen generation through hydrolysis of the Al alloy were evaluated in pure water. The results showed that mechanical milling was more favorable than the melting method to synthesize the Al alloys containing some metals with lower melting point and easier vaporization in the melting process. Addition of Bi and Sn could more significantly enhance Al reactivity with water in Al alloy than other metals such as Zn, Ca and Ga. Especially Al-Bi alloy had a faster hydrolysis rate than Al-Sn alloy at room temperature. For Al-Bi alloy, the addition of Zn and Ga accelerated the alloy hydrolysis while the effect of addition of other metals (Sn, In, Mg) on the hydrolysis of the alloy was reverse. Furthermore, the effect of some compounds (NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, CaH{sub 2}) on the hydrolysis of the Al-Bi alloy was explored. It showed that the milling Al-Bi alloy together with the compounds could accelerate the formation of its mico-galvanic cell between the anode (Al) and cathode (Bi). The alloy composition was therefore optimized to be Bi, Zn, Ga, CaH{sub 2} and Al. The optimized Al alloy demonstrated a high hydrogen generation rate and theoretic hydrogen yields. (author)

  13. Hydrogen generation from 2,2,4-trimethyl pentane reforming over molybdenum carbide at low steam-to-carbon ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheekatamarla, Praveen K.; Thomson, William J.

    Because of the need for an efficient and inexpensive reforming catalyst, the objective of this work is to determine the feasibility of employing Mo 2C catalyst for the steam reforming and oxy-steam reforming of the higher hydrocarbons typical of transportation fuels such as gasoline. It is shown that bulk Mo 2C catalysts can successfully reform 2,2,4-trimethyl pentane (isooctane) to generate H 2, CO and CO 2 at very low steam/carbon ratios, without coke formation, eliminating the need for pre-reforming. Maximum hydrogen generation was observed at a S/C ratio of 1.3 and 1000 °C during SR reactions and S/C of 0.71, O 2/C of 0.12 at 900 °C during oxidative steam reforming reactions.

  14. Dye-sensitized Pt@TiO2 core–shell nanostructures for the efficient photocatalytic generation of hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pt@TiO2 core–shell nanostructures were prepared through a hydrothermal method. The dye-sensitization of these Pt@TiO2 core–shell structures allows for a high photocatalytic activity for the generation of hydrogen from proton reduction under visible-light irradiation. When the dyes and TiO2 were co-excited through the combination of two irradiation beams with different wavelengths, a synergic effect was observed, which led to a greatly enhanced H2 generation yield. This is attributed to the rational spatial distribution of the three components (dye, TiO2, Pt, and the vectored transport of photogenerated electrons from the dye to the Pt particles via the TiO2 particle bridge.

  15. Generation of Useful Hydrocarbons and Hydrogen during Photocatalytic Decomposition of Acetic Acid on CuO/Rutile Photocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Mozia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented studies have focused on a photocatalytic generation of useful hydrocarbons, mainly methane and ethane, from acetic acid under N2 atmosphere. CuO-loaded rutile, as well as unmodified rutile and anatase-phase TiO2 photocatalysts were applied in the experiments. The efficiency of the catalysts towards methane generation changed in the following order: Cu-TiO2 (10% Cu > crude TiO2≈Cu-TiO2 (20% Cu > Cu-TiO2 (5% Cu > rutile. The amount of CH4 produced in the presence of the catalyst containing 10 wt% of Cu was higher for ca. 33% than in case of pure rutile. The concentration of ethane was 14–16 times lower than the amount of methane, regardless of the catalyst used. Low concentrations of hydrogen were also detected in the gaseous mixtures. After 5 hours of the process conducted with the catalyst containing 5–20 wt% of Cu the concentration of hydrogen amounted to 0.06–0.14 vol.%, respectively.

  16. Significant improvements in InGaN/GaN nano-photoelectrodes for hydrogen generation by structure and polarization optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tao; Zhi, Ting; Liu, Bin; Li, Mingxue; Zhuang, Zhe; Dai, Jiangping; Li, Yi; Jiang, Fulong; Luo, Wenjun; Xie, Zili; Chen, Dunjun; Chen, Peng; Li, Zhaosheng; Zou, Zhigang; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-02-08

    The photoelectrodes based on III-nitride semiconductors with high energy conversion efficiency especially for those self-driven ones are greatly desirable for hydrogen generation. In this study, highly ordered InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well nanorod-based photoelectrodes have been fabricated by a soft UV-curing nano-imprint lithography and a top-down etching technique, which improve the incident photon conversion efficiency (IPCE) from 16% (planar structure) to 42% (@ wavelength = 400 nm). More significantly, the turn-on voltage is reduced low to -0.6 V, which indicates the possibility of achieving self-driven. Furthermore, SiO2/Si3N4 dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors are employed to further improve the IPCE up to 60%. And the photocurrent (@ 1.1 V) is enhanced from 0.37 mA/cm(2) (original planar structure) to 1.5 mA/cm(2). These improvements may accelerate the possible applications for hydrogen generation with high energy-efficiency.

  17. Determination of photo conversion efficiency of nanotubular titanium oxide photo-electrochemical cell for solar hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, K. S.; Mahajan, V. K.; Misra, M.

    Anodized and annealed titanium oxide nanotubes show enhanced photo activity and can be used as photo anodes for water electrolysis in hydrogen generation. Application of an external potential to the photo anode is required for enhancement of the photocurrent. This additional electrical energy input complicates the photo conversion efficiency calculation. In this investigation, the photo-electrochemical behavior of anodized titanium oxide nanotubular arrays have been characterized in various electrolytes. Increase in the applied potential increased the photocurrent under illumination with visible light. A simple experimental method for calculating the photo conversion efficiency has been proposed. According to this method, the potential difference between the photo anode and cathode is measured with and without light illumination. The product of the photocurrent and the increase in potential due to light irradiation is considered as the net power output. The photocurrent and the conversion efficiency increased with increase in the pH of the electrolyte. TiO 2 nanotubular arrays annealed at 350 °C for 6 h in nitrogen atmosphere showed a maximum photo conversion efficiency of ∼4% in 1 M KOH electrolyte and ∼3% in 3.5 wt.% sodium chloride solution. The results indicate that nanotubular TiO 2 can be potentially used for the photo electrolysis of seawater to generate hydrogen.

  18. Method and apparatus for electrokinetic co-generation of hydrogen and electric power from liquid water microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saykally, Richard J; Duffin, Andrew M; Wilson, Kevin R; Rude, Bruce S

    2013-02-12

    A method and apparatus for producing both a gas and electrical power from a flowing liquid, the method comprising: a) providing a source liquid containing ions that when neutralized form a gas; b) providing a velocity to the source liquid relative to a solid material to form a charged liquid microjet, which subsequently breaks up into a droplet spay, the solid material forming a liquid-solid interface; and c) supplying electrons to the charged liquid by contacting a spray stream of the charged liquid with an electron source. In one embodiment, where the liquid is water, hydrogen gas is formed and a streaming current is generated. The apparatus comprises a source of pressurized liquid, a microjet nozzle, a conduit for delivering said liquid to said microjet nozzle, and a conductive metal target sufficiently spaced from said nozzle such that the jet stream produced by said microjet is discontinuous at said target. In one arrangement, with the metal nozzle and target electrically connected to ground, both hydrogen gas and a streaming current are generated at the target as it is impinged by the streaming, liquid spray microjet.

  19. Preparation of Rh/Ni Bimetallic Nanoparticles and Their Catalytic Activities for Hydrogen Generation from Hydrolysis of KBH4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiong Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ISOBAM–104 protected Rh/Ni bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs of 3.1 nm in diameter were synthesized by a co–reduction method with a rapid injection of KBH4 solution. The catalytic activities of as–prepared BNPs for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of a basic KBH4 solution were evaluated. Ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry (UV–Vis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and high–resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM were employed to characterize the structure, particle size, and chemical composition of the resultant BNPs. Catalytic activities for hydrolysis of KBH4 and catalytic kinetics of prepared BNPs were also investigated. It was shown that Rh/Ni BNPs displayed much higher catalytic activities than that of Rh or Ni monometallic nanoparticles (MNPs, and the prepared Rh10Ni90 BNPs possessed the highest catalytic activities with a value of 11580 mol–H2·h−1·mol–Rh−1. The high catalytic activities of Rh/Ni BNPs could be attributed to the electron transfer effect between Rh and Ni atoms, which was confirmed by a density functional theory (DFT calculation. The apparent activation energy for hydrogen generation of the prepared Rh10Ni90 BNPs was about 47.2 ± 2.1kJ/mol according to a kinetic study.

  20. A novel mechanism of formaldehyde neurotoxicity: inhibition of hydrogen sulfide generation by promoting overproduction of nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qing Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Formaldehyde (FA induces neurotoxicity by overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. Increasing studies have shown that hydrogen sulfide (H(2S, an endogenous gastransmitter, protects nerve cells against oxidative stress by its antioxidant effect. It has been shown that overproduction of nitric oxide (NO inhibits the activity of cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS, the predominant H(2S-generating enzyme in the central nervous system. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesize that FA-caused neurotoxicity involves the deficiency of this endogenous protective antioxidant gas, which results from excessive generation of NO. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether FA disturbs H(2S synthesis in PC12 cells, and whether this disturbance is associated with overproduction of NO. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We showed that exposure of PC12 cells to FA causes reduction of viability, inhibition of CBS expression, decrease of endogenous H(2S production, and NO production. CBS silencing deteriorates FA-induced decreases in endogenous H(2S generation, neurotoxicity, and intracellular ROS accumulation in PC12 cells; while ADMA, a specific inhibitor of NOS significantly attenuates FA-induced decreases in endogenous H(2S generation, neurotoxicity, and intracellular ROS accumulation in PC12 cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that FA induces neurotoxicity by inhibiting the generation of H(2S through excess of NO and suggest that strategies to manipulate endogenous H(2S could open a suitable novel therapeutic avenue for FA-induced neurotoxicity.

  1. Photo-electrochemical hydrogen generation using band-gap modified nanotubular titanium oxide in solar light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, K. S.; Misra, M.; Mahajan, V. K.; Gandhi, T.; Pillai, P.; Mohapatra, S. K.

    Anodization of Ti in acidified fluoride solution results in an ordered nanotubular titanium oxide surface. In this study, vertically oriented arrays of TiO 2 nanotubes were prepared by incorporating nitrate and phosphate species during the anodization process. These nanotubes were annealed at 650 °C in a carbonaceous atmosphere using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace for a brief period. The carbon-modified nanotubular TiO 2 produced a photo-current density of more than 2.75 mA cm -2 at 0.2 V Ag/AgCl under solar light illumination. This photo-current density corresponds to a hydrogen evolution rate of about 11 l h -1 using a photo-anode of 1 m 2 area. The enhanced hydrogen evolution behavior of carbon-modified nanotubular TiO 2 is highly reproducible and sustainable for long duration. Annealed (at 350 °C in nitrogen atmosphere) TiO 2 nanotubes showed improved photo-activity as compared to the as-anodized or thermally oxidized TiO 2 photo-anodes.

  2. Hanford waste vitrification plant hydrogen generation study: Preliminary evaluation of alternatives to formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Kumar, V.

    1996-02-01

    Oxalic, glyoxylic, glycolic, malonic, pyruvic, lactic, levulinic, and citric acids as well as glycine have been evaluated as possible substitutes for formic acid in the preparation of feed for the Hanford waste vitrification plant using a non-radioactive feed stimulant UGA-12M1 containing substantial amounts of aluminum and iron oxides as well as nitrate and nitrite at 90C in the presence of hydrated rhodium trichloride. Unlike formic acid none of these carboxylic acids liberate hydrogen under these conditions and only malonic and citric acids form ammonia. Glyoxylic, glycolic, malonic, pyruvic, lactic, levulinic, and citric acids all appear to have significant reducing properties under the reaction conditions of interest as indicated by the observation of appreciable amounts of N{sub 2}O as a reduction product of,nitrite or, less likely, nitrate at 90C. Glyoxylic, pyruvic, and malonic acids all appear to be unstable towards decarboxylation at 90C in the presence of Al(OH){sub 3}. Among the carboxylic acids investigated in this study the {alpha}-hydroxycarboxylic acids glycolic and lactic acids appear to be the most interesting potential substitutes for formic acid in the feed preparation for the vitrification plant because of their failure to produce hydrogen or ammonia or to undergo decarboxylation under the reaction conditions although they exhibit some reducing properties in feed stimulant experiments.

  3. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation from hydriodic acid using methylammonium lead iodide in dynamic equilibrium with aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunghak; Chang, Woo Je; Lee, Chan Woo; Park, Sangbaek; Ahn, Hyo-Yong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2017-01-01

    The solar-driven splitting of hydrohalic acids (HX) is an important and fast growing research direction for H2 production. In addition to the hydrogen, the resulting chemicals (X2/X3-) can be used to propagate a continuous process in a closed cycle and are themselves useful products. Here we present a strategy for photocatalytic hydrogen iodide (HI) splitting using methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) in an effort to develop a cost-effective and easily scalable process. Considering that MAPbI3 is a water-soluble ionic compound, we exploit the dynamic equilibrium of the dissolution and precipitation of MAPbI3 in saturated aqueous solutions. The I- and H+ concentrations of the aqueous solution are determined to be the critical parameters for the stabilization of the tetragonal MAPbI3 phase. Stable and efficient H2 production under visible light irradiation was demonstrated. The solar HI splitting efficiency of MAPbI3 was 0.81% when using Pt as a cocatalyst.

  4. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected

  5. High-Energy, Multicolor Femtosecond Pulses from the Deep Ultraviolet to the Near Infrared Generated in a Hydrogen-Filled Gas Cell and Hollow Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Motoyoshi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate four-wave mixing in hydrogen gas using a gas cell and a hollow fiber for the generation of high-energy, multicolor femtosecond (fs optical pulses. Both a hydrogen-filled gas cell and hollow fiber lead to the generation of multicolor fs pulses in a broad spectral range from the deep ultraviolet to the near infrared. However, there is a difference in the energy distribution of the multicolor emission between the gas cell and the hollow fiber. The hydrogen-filled gas cell generates visible pulses with higher energies than the pulses created by the hollow fiber. We have generated visible pulses with energies of several tens of microjoules. The hydrogen-filled hollow fiber, on the other hand, generates ultraviolet pulses with energies of a few microjoules, which are higher than the energies of the ultraviolet pulses generated in the gas cell. In both schemes, the spectral width of each emission line supports a transform-limited pulse duration shorter than 15 fs. Four-wave mixing in hydrogen gas therefore can be used for the development of a light source that emits sub-20 fs multicolor pulses in a wavelength region from the deep ultraviolet to the near infrared with microjoule pulse energies.

  6. Results of Hg speciation testing on DWPF SMECT-4, SMECT-6, and RCT-2 samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-04

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.i,ii The fifteenth shipment of samples was designated to include Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) samples from Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 738 and a Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample from SRAT Batch 736. The DWPF sample designations for the three samples analyzed are provided in Table 1. The Batch 738 ‘Baseline’ SMECT sample was taken prior to Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) addition and concentration and therefore, precedes the SMECT-5 sample reported previously. iii The Batch 738 ‘End of SRAT Cycle’ SMECT sample was taken at the conclusion of SRAT operations for this batch (PRFT addition/concentration, acid additions, initial concentration, MCU addition, and steam stripping). Batch 738 experienced a sludge slurry carryover event, which introduced sludge solids to the SMECT that were particularly evident in the SMECT-5 sample, but less evident in the ‘End of SRAT Cycle’ SMECT-6 sample. The Batch 736 ‘After SME’ RCT sample was taken after completion of SMECT transfers at the end of the SME cycle.

  7. Results of Hg speciation testing on DWPF SMECT-8, OGCT-1, AND OGCT-2 samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-22

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team. The sixteenth shipment of samples was designated to include a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) sample from Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 738 processing and two Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) samples, one following Batch 736 and one following Batch 738. The DWPF sample designations for the three samples analyzed are provided. The Batch 738 ‘End of SME Cycle’ SMECT sample was taken at the conclusion of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) operations for this batch and represents the fourth SMECT sample examined from Batch 738. Batch 738 experienced a sludge slurry carryover event, which introduced sludge solids to the SMECT that were particularly evident in the SMECT-5 sample, but less evident in the ‘End of SME Cycle’ SMECT-8 sample.

  8. Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

    2012-12-17

    The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. Twenty-seven radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b. Each of these radionuclides has a half-life greater than ten years and contributes more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis at some point from production through the 1100 year period between 2015 and 3115. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are the most extensive conducted to date. Some method development/refinement occurred during the conduct of these measurements, leading to lower detection limits and more accurate measurement of some isotopes than was previously possible.

  9. DWPF Melter Off-Gas Flammability Assessment for Sludge Batch 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-07-11

    The slurry feed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter contains several organic carbon species that decompose in the cold cap and produce flammable gases that could accumulate in the off-gas system and create potential flammability hazard. To mitigate such a hazard, DWPF has implemented a strategy to impose the Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) limits on all key operating variables affecting off-gas flammability and operate the melter within those limits using both hardwired/software interlocks and administrative controls. The operating variables that are currently being controlled include; (1) total organic carbon (TOC), (2) air purges for combustion and dilution, (3) melter vapor space temperature, and (4) feed rate. The safety basis limits for these operating variables are determined using two computer models, 4-stage cold cap and Melter Off-Gas (MOG) dynamics models, under the baseline upset scenario - a surge in off-gas flow due to the inherent cold cap instabilities in the slurry-fed melter.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide is endogenously generated in rat skeletal muscle and exerts a protective effect against oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jian-tong; LI Wei; YANG Jin-yan; TANG Chao-shu; LI Qi; JIN Hong-fang

    2013-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle has recently been recognized as an endocrine organ that can express,synthesize and secrete a variety of bioactive molecules which exert significant regulatory effects.Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is endogenously produced in mammalian tissues and participates in a number of physiological and pathophysiological processes.We aimed to verify whether H2S could be endogenously generated and released by rat skeletal muscle,and determine the biological effects of H2S in rat skeletal muscle.Methods The study was divided into two parts:detection of endogenous H2S generation and release in rat skeletal muscle and determination of antioxidative activity of skeletal muscle-derived H2S.H2S content and production in tissues were detected by sensitive sulfur electrode method.The expressions of H2S producing enzymes cystathionine β-synthase,cystathionine Y-lyase and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting and their tissue distributions were observed by immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent analysis.Rat skeletal muscular ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury model was created and evaluated by histological analysis under microscope.The malondialdehyde (MDA) contents,hydrogen peroxide levels,superoxide anion and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were detected using spectrophotometer.Results H2S could be endogenously generated and released by skeletal muscle of Sprague-Dawley rats (H2S content:(2.06±0.43) nmol/mg; H2S production:(0.17±0.06) nmol.min-1·mg-1).Gene and protein expressions of the three H2S producing enzymes were detected in skeletal muscle,as well as the liver and kidney.Endogenous H2S content and production were decreased in skeletal muscles of rats with I-R skeletal muscle injury (P <0.05).Furthermore,H2S significantly protected rat skeletal muscle against I-R injury and resulted in decreased MDA content,reduced hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion levels,but increased SOD activity and

  11. Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

    2013-04-26

    The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

  12. 5 kW DC/DC converter for hydrogen generation from photovoltaic sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrigos, A.; Blanes, J.M.; Carrasco, J.A.; Lizan, J.L. [Area de Tecnologia Electronica, Universidad Miguel Hernandez de Elche, Avda. de la Universidad s/n, 03202 Elche, Alicante (Spain); Beneito, R. [AIJU, Avda. de la Industria 23, 03440 Ibi, Alicante (Spain); Molina, J.A. [Grupo SITEC, Calle Cadiz 38, Poligono Industrial L' Alfac III, 03440 Ibi, Alicante (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    This paper covers the design of a DC-DC power converter aimed for hydrogen production from photovoltaic sources. Power conditioning for such application is usually driven by different constraints: high step-down conversion ratio is required if the input voltage of such equipment has to be compatible with photovoltaic sources that are connected to grid-connected inverters; galvanic isolation; high efficiency and low mass. Taking into account those factors, this work proposes a push-pull DC/DC converter for power levels up to 5 kW. The operation and features of the converter are presented and analyzed. Design guidelines are suggested and experimental validation is also given. (author)

  13. Dark Photocatalysis: Storage of Solar Energy in Carbon Nitride for Time-Delayed Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Klose, Daniel; Kasap, Hatice; Podjaski, Filip; Pignié, Marie-Claire; Reisner, Erwin; Jeschke, Gunnar; Lotsch, Bettina V

    2017-01-09

    While natural photosynthesis serves as the model system for efficient charge separation and decoupling of redox reactions, bio-inspired artificial systems typically lack applicability owing to synthetic challenges and structural complexity. We present herein a simple and inexpensive system that, under solar irradiation, forms highly reductive radicals in the presence of an electron donor, with lifetimes exceeding the diurnal cycle. This radical species is formed within a cyanamide-functionalized polymeric network of heptazine units and can give off its trapped electrons in the dark to yield H2 , triggered by a co-catalyst, thus enabling the temporal decoupling of the light and dark reactions of photocatalytic hydrogen production through the radical's longevity. The system introduced here thus demonstrates a new approach for storing sunlight as long-lived radicals, and provides the structural basis for designing photocatalysts with long-lived photo-induced states.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2010-05-24

    operations in the R-reactor vessel is low for the Portland cement. Alternatively, if the grout fill rate is less than 0.5 inch/min and the grout is maintained at a temperature of 80 C, the risk is again low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.97 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

  15. Formaldehyde impairs learning and memory involving the disturbance of hydrogen sulfide generation in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Qing; Zhuang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Ping; Fang, Heng-Rong; Zhou, Cheng-Fang; Gu, Hong-Feng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Chun-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA), a well-known indoor and outdoor pollutant, has been implicated as the responsible agent in the development of neurocognitive disorders. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), the third gasotransimitter, is an endogenous neuromodulator, which facilitates the induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation, involving the functions of learning and memory. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of FA on the formation of learning and memory and the generation of endogenous H(2)S in the hippocampus of rats. We found that the intracerebroventricular injection of FA in rats impairs the function of learning and memory in the Morris water maze and novel object recognition test and increases the formation of apoptosis and lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. We also showed that FA exposure inhibits the expression of cystathionine β-synthase, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous H(2)S generation in hippocampus and decreases the production of endogenous H(2)S in hippocampus in rats. These results suggested that FA-disturbed generation of endogenous H(2)S in hippocampus leads to the oxidative stress-mediated neuron damage, ultimately impairing the function of learning and memory. Our findings imply that the disturbance of endogenous H(2)S generation in hippocampus is a potential contributing mechanism underling FA-caused learning and memory impairment.

  16. Studies in hydride generation atomic fluorescence determination of selenium and tellurium. Part 1 — self interference effect in hydrogen telluride generation and the effect of KI

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ulivo, A.; Marcucci, K.; Bramanti, E.; Lampugnani, L.; Zamboni, R.

    2000-08-01

    The effects of tetrahydroborate (0.02-1%) and iodide (0-3 M) were investigated in determination of tellurium and selenium by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The effect of tetrahydroborate and iodide concentration were tested on the shape of calibration curves in concentration range of 1-1000 ng ml -1 analyte. Reductant deficiency resulted in a moderate sensitivity depression for tellurium but dramatically reduced the useful dynamic range down to 50 ng ml -1. On the contrary, selenium calibration curves retained a linear character even under conditions generating strong sensitivity depression. Curvature and rollover of tellurium calibration curves has been addressed to a self-interference effect caused by the formation of finely dispersed elemental tellurium. Iodide ions were found to have beneficial or no negative effects in the hydrogen telluride generation. Addition of iodide on-line to the sample has been proved effective in the control of the self-interference effect and allows to work in mild reaction conditions. Moreover, it allows a good control of Cu(II) interference and eliminates Ni(II) and Co(II) interferences. The method has been successfully applied to determination of tellurium in copper and lead ores certified reference materials.

  17. Hydrodynamic analysis of a three-fluidized bed reactor cold flow model for chemical looping hydrogen generation. Pressure characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhipeng; Xiang, Wenguo; Chen, Shiyi; Wang, Dong [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    Chemical looping hydrogen generation (CLHG) can produce pure hydrogen with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} from fossils fuel. The process involves a metal oxide, as an oxygen carrier, such as iron oxide. The CLHG system consists of three reactors: a fuel reactor (FR), a steam reactor (SR) and an air reactor (AR). In the FR, the fuel gases react with iron oxides (hematite Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, wuestite FeO), generating reduced iron oxides (FeO or even Fe), and with full conversion of gaseous fuels, pure CO{sub 2} can be obtained after cooling the flue gas from the fuel reactor; in the SR, FeO and Fe reacts with steam to generate magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and H{sub 2}, the latter representing the final target product of the process; in the AR, the magnetite is oxidized back to hematite which is used in another cycle. A cold flow model of three-fluidized bed for CLHG corresponding to 50 KW hot units has been built. A major novelty of this facility is the compact fuel reactor, which integrates a bubble and a fast fluidized bed to avoid the incomplete conversion of the fuel gas caused by the thermodynamics equilibrium. In order to study the pressure characteristics and the solids concentration of the system, especially in the fuel reactor, the gas velocity of three reactors, gas flow of L-type value, total solids inventory (TSI) and the secondary air of fuel reactor were varied. Results show that the pressure and the solids concentration are strongly influenced by the fluidizing-gas velocity of three reactors. Moreover, the entrainment of the upper part of fuel reactor increases as the total solids inventory increases, and the operating range of the FR can be changed by introducing secondary air or increasing the total solids inventory.

  18. Effect of three disinfectants (chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide on the microleakage of 7th generation bonding agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salari Behzad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorhexidin 2%, sodium hypochlorite 2.5% and hydrogen peroxide 3% as three effective and regular disinfectants on the microleakage of 7th generation bonding agents in vitro.   Materials and Methods: 45 extracted molar teeth without carries were collected and disinfected. On buccal and lingual aspects of these teeth conventional class V cavity preparation were done (90 cavities, then randomly divided to 4 groups, three of them had 10 teeth (20 cavities and one of them had 5 teeth (10 cavities as control group. Cavities in each experimental group prepared with one of the disinfectants and then 7th generation bonding (Optibond all in one, kerr was used as noted by manufacturer, then cavities filled with composite and polished. Bonding agent was used without our previous disinfectants manipulation in control group. Specimens were thermocycled with 1000 thermal cycles between 5 and 55 0 C each for 30 seconds and then immersed in the methylene blue 5%, then sectioned mesiodistally and investigated for microleakage under stereomicroscope (Olympus, Japan. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon mean rank tests.   Results: Despite the lower mean rank values for the untreated group at both occlusal and gingival aspects, the Kruskal-Wallis procedure (α=0.05 showed that the treatment factor did not significantly affect the mean rank values neither in occlusal (P=0.12 nor in gingival (P=0.39 part of cavities.   Conclusion: According to the results of this study, antimicrobial agents such as chlorhexidine 2%, sodium hypochloride 2.5% and hydrogen peroxide 3% can be used perior to 7th generation dentin bonding agent(Optibond all in one, kerr without much concern.

  19. DWPF saltstone study: Effects of thermal history on leach index and physical integrity. Part 2, Final report: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orebaugh, E.G.

    1992-11-18

    This report summarizes the observations made during the curing and testing of DWPF simulated saltstones which have been cured under isothermal conditions in sealed glass envelopes at temperatures from room temperature to 95{degrees}C. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of curing at and around temperatures representing conditions created within large pours of grout. There appears to be no difference in the leaching resistance of samples cured at the same temperature for varying times to 1 year. Curing at higher temperatures decreases the effective diffusivity of this waste formulation. These results are encouraging in that leaching resistance for samples near the expected maximum vault temperature (55{degrees}C) show effective diffusion coefficients (D{sub effective} {approximately}10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/sec) that agree with previous work and values that are believed to adequately protect the groundwater. The isothermal conditions of these tests simulate the nearly adiabatic conditions existing near the centerline of the monolith. The elevated temperatures due to hydration heat decrease over long times. This has been simulated by a series (1X) of staged isothermal cures. Since modeling indicated it would take nearly two years for emplaced grout to cool to near ambient temperatures, accelerated (2X) cooling curves were also tested. Specimens cured under these staged-isothermal conditions appear to be no different from specimens cured under isothermal conditions for the same time at the maximum temperature. The unexpected generation of nitrous oxide within saltstone creates internal stresses which cause fracturing when exposed to leaching conditions. Such fracturing is not considered significant for saltstone emplaced in engineered vaults for disposal.

  20. Effect of combined slow pyrolysis and steam gasification of sugarcane bagasse on hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthasarathy, Prakash; Narayanan, Sheeba [National Institute of Technology, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-11-15

    The present work aims at improving the generation of H2 from sugarcane bagasse in steam gasification process by incorporating slow pyrolysis technique. As a bench scale study, slow pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse is performed at various pyrolysis temperature (350, 400, 450, 500 and 550 .deg. C) and feed particle size (90generation. In the combined process (slow pyrolysis of biomass followed by steam gasification of char), first slow pyrolysis is carried out at the effective conditions (pyrolysis temperature and particle size) of char generation (determined from bench scale study) and steam gasification is at varying gasification temperature (600, 650, 700, 750 and 800 .deg. C) and steam to biomass (S/B) ratio (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6) to determine the effective conditions of H{sub 2} generation. The effect of temperature and S/B on gas product composition and overall product gas volume was also investigated. At effective conditions (gasification temperature and S/B) of H2 generation, individual slow pyrolysis and steam gasification were also experimented to evaluate the performance of combined process. The effective condition of H{sub 2} generation in combined process was found to be 800 .deg. C (gasification temperature) and 5 (S/B), respectively. The combined process produced 35.90% and 23.60% more gas volume (overall) than slow pyrolysis and steam gasification process, respectively. With respect to H{sub 2} composition, the combined process generated 72.37% more than slow pyrolysis and 17.91% more than steam gasification process.

  1. Sacrificial hydrogen generation from aqueous triethanolamine with Eosin Y-sensitized Pt/TiO2 photocatalyst in UV, visible and solar light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Pankaj; Gomaa, Hassan; Ray, Ajay K

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we have studied Eosin Y-sensitized sacrificial hydrogen generation with triethanolamine as electron donor in UV, visible, and solar light irradiation. Aeroxide TiO2 was loaded with platinum metal via solar photo-deposition method to reduce the electron hole recombination process. Photocatalytic sacrificial hydrogen generation was influenced by several factors such as platinum loading (wt%) on TiO2, solution pH, Eosin Y to Pt/TiO2 mass ratio, triethanolamine concentration, and light (UV, visible and solar) intensities. Detailed reaction mechanisms in visible and solar light irradiation were established. Oxidation of triethanolamine and formaldehyde formation was correlated with hydrogen generation in both visible and solar lights. Hydrogen generation kinetics followed a Langmuir-type isotherm with reaction rate constant and adsorption constant of 6.77×10(-6) mol min(-1) and 14.45 M(-1), respectively. Sacrificial hydrogen generation and charge recombination processes were studied as a function of light intensities. Apparent quantum yields (QYs) were compared for UV, visible, and solar light at four different light intensities. Highest QYs were attained at lower light intensity because of trivial charge recombination. At 30 mW cm(-2) we achieved QYs of 10.82%, 12.23% and 11.33% in UV, visible and solar light respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation of Pt-Sr(Zr1-xYx)03-δ-Ti02 heterojunction under the irradiation of simulated sunlight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhui YAN; Qiang LIU; Luxiong GUAN; Feng LIANG; Haojie GU

    2009-01-01

    The Pt-Sr(Zr1-xYx)O3-δ-Ti02 (Pt-SZYT) heterojunction photocatalysts were prepared by a photodepo-sition method. The composite particles were characterized by XRD, SEM, UV-Vis DRS, and PL techniques. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation in H2C2O4 aqueous solution under the irradiation of simulated sunlight was used as a probe reaction to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of the photocatalysts. The effects of the content of Pt loading and the concentration of oxalic acid on the photocatalytic activity of the catalyst were discussed. The continuous photocatalytic activity of the Pt-SZYT and the relationship between PL intensity and hydrogen generation were also discussed. The results show that Pt-SZYT catalysts had high photocatalytic activity of hydrogen generation. The content of Pt loading and the concentration of oxalic acid have important influence on the photocatalytic hydrogen generation. The optimal loading content of platinum was 0.90 mass%. Under this condition, the average rate of photocatalytic hydrogen generation was 1.68mmol-h ' when the concentration of oxalic acid was 50mmol-L"'. The higher the photocatalytic activity, the weaker the PL intensity, which was demonstrated by the analysis of PL spectra.

  3. Polyacrylonitrile Fibers Anchored Cobalt/Graphene Sheet Nanocomposite: A Low-Cost, High-Performance and Reusable Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Huang, Guoji; Hou, Chengyi; Wang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang

    2016-06-01

    Cobalt and its composites are known to be active and inexpensive catalysts in sodium borohydride (NaBH4) hydrolysis to generate clean and renewable hydrogen energy. A novel fiber catalyst, cobalt/graphene sheet nanocomposite anchored on polyacrylonitrile fibers (Co/GRs-PANFs), which can be easily recycled and used in any reactor with different shapes, were synthesized by anchoring cobalt/graphene (Co/GRs) on polyacrylonitrile fibers coated with graphene (GRs-PANFs) at low temperature. The unique structure design effectively prevents the inter-sheet restacking of Co/GRs and fully exploits the large surface area of novel hybrid material for generate hydrogen. And the extra electron transfer path supplied by GRs on the surface of GRs-PANFs can also enhance their catalysis performances. The catalytic activity of the catalyst was investigated by the hydrolysis of NaBH4 in aqueous solution with GRs-PANFs. GRs powders and Co powders were used as control groups. It was found that both GRs and fiber contributed to the hydrogen generation rate of Co/GRs-PANFs (3222 mL x min(-1) x g(-1)), which is much higher than that of cobalt powders (915 mL x min(-1) x g(-1)) and Co/GRs (995 mL x min(-1) x g(-1)). The improved hydrogen generation rate, low cost and uncomplicated recycling make the Co/GRs-PANFs promising candidate as catalysts for hydrogen generation.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide is generated during the very early stages of aggregation of the amyloid peptides implicated in Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabner, Brian J; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Turnbull, Stuart; German, Matthew J; Paleologou, Katerina E; Hayashi, Yoshihito; Cooper, Leanne J; Fullwood, Nigel J; Allsop, David

    2005-10-28

    Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia are neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the presence of numerous amyloid plaques in the brain. These lesions contain fibrillar deposits of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and the British dementia peptide (ABri), respectively. Both peptides are toxic to cells in culture, and there is increasing evidence that early "soluble oligomers" are the toxic entity rather than mature amyloid fibrils. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this toxicity are not clear, but in the case of Abeta, one prominent hypothesis is that the peptide can induce oxidative damage via the formation of hydrogen peroxide. We have developed a reliable method, employing electron spin resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with the spin-trapping technique, to detect any hydrogen peroxide generated during the incubation of Abeta and other amyloidogenic peptides. Here, we monitored levels of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during different stages of aggregation of Abeta-(1-40) and ABri and found that in both cases it was generated as a short "burst" early on in the aggregation process. Ultrastructural studies with both peptides revealed that structures resembling "soluble oligomers" or "protofibrils" were present during this early phase of hydrogen peroxide formation. Mature amyloid fibrils derived from Abeta-(1-40) did not generate hydrogen peroxide. We conclude that hydrogen peroxide formation during the early stages of protein aggregation may be a common mechanism of cell death in these (and possibly other) neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen generation on cubic, orthorhombic, and tetragonal KNbO3 microcubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Zhao, Kun; Yu, Jiaguo; Jin, Jian; Qi, Yang; Li, Huiquan; Hou, Xinjuan; Liu, Gang

    2013-08-01

    Potassium niobate (KNbO3) microcubes with orthorhombic and tetragonal phases were hydrothermally prepared and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, micro-Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The photoreactivity of the as-prepared KNbO3 samples was evaluated regarding the hydrogen evolution from aqueous methanol under UV, and the results were compared with that of cubic KNbO3 microcubes. The photocatalytic reactivity was shown to be phase-dependent, following the order cubic > orthorhombic > tetragonal. Insight into the phase-dependent photocatalytic properties was gained by first-principles density functional calculations. The best photocatalytic performance of cubic KNbO3 is ascribed to it having the highest symmetry in the bulk structure and associated unique electronic structure. Further, the surface electronic structure plays a key role leading to the discrepancy in photoreactivity between orthorhombic and tetragonal KNbO3. The results from this study are potentially applicable to a range of perovskite-type mixed metal oxides useful in water splitting as well as other areas of heterogeneous photocatalysis.Potassium niobate (KNbO3) microcubes with orthorhombic and tetragonal phases were hydrothermally prepared and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, micro-Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The photoreactivity of the as-prepared KNbO3 samples was evaluated regarding the hydrogen evolution from aqueous methanol under UV, and the results were compared with that of cubic KNbO3 microcubes. The photocatalytic reactivity was

  6. Graphene-based materials: fabrication, characterization and application for the decontamination of wastewater and wastegas and hydrogen storage/generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hou; Yuan, Xingzhong; Wu, Yan; Huang, Huajun; Peng, Xin; Zeng, Guangming; Zhong, Hua; Liang, Jie; Ren, Miaomiao

    2013-07-01

    Graphene, as an ideal two-dimensional material and single-atom layer of graphite, has attracted exploding interests in multidisciplinary research because of its unique structure and exceptional physicochemical properties. Especially, graphene-based materials offer a wide range of potentialities for environmental remediation and energy applications. This review shows an extensive overview of the main principles and the recent synthetic technologies about designing and fabricating various innovative graphene-based materials. Furthermore, an extensive list of graphene-based sorbents and catalysts from vast literature has been compiled. The adsorptive and catalytic properties of graphene-based materials for the removal of various pollutants and hydrogen storage/production as available in the literature are presented. Tremendous adsorption capacity, excellent catalytic performance and abundant availability are the significant factors making these materials suitable alternatives for environmental pollutant control and energy-related system, especially in terms of the removal of pollutants in water, gas cleanup and purification, and hydrogen generation and storage. Meanwhile, a brief discussion is also included on the influence of graphene materials on the environment, and its toxicological effects. Lastly, some unsolved subjects together with major challenges in this germinating area of research are highlighted and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of graphene-based materials in the field of adsorption and catalysis science represents a viable and powerful tool, resulting in the superior improvement of environmental pollution control and energy development.

  7. Hydrogen Generation from Catalytic Steam Reforming of Acetic Acid by Ni/Attapulgite Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishuang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, catalytic steam reforming of acetic acid derived from the aqueous portion of bio-oil for hydrogen production was investigated using different Ni/ATC (Attapulgite Clay catalysts prepared by precipitation, impregnation and mechanical blending methods. The fresh and reduced catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption–desorption, TEM and temperature program reduction (H2-TPR. The comprehensive results demonstrated that the interaction between active metallic Ni and ATC carrier was significantly improved in Ni/ATC catalyst prepared by precipitation method, from which the mean of Ni particle size was the smallest (~13 nm, resulting in the highest metal dispersion (7.5%. The catalytic performance of the catalysts was evaluated by the process of steam reforming of acetic acid in a fixed-bed reactor under atmospheric pressure at two different temperatures: 550 °C and 650 °C. The test results showed the Ni/ATC prepared by way of precipitation method (PM-Ni/ATC achieved the highest H2 yield of ~82% and a little lower acetic acid conversion efficiency of ~85% than that of Ni/ATC prepared by way of impregnation method (IM-Ni/ATC (~95%. In addition, the deactivation catalysts after reaction for 4 h were analyzed by XRD, TGA-DTG and TEM, which demonstrated the catalyst deactivation was not caused by the amount of carbon deposition, but owed to the significant agglomeration and sintering of Ni particles in the carrier.

  8. CoP nanosheet assembly grown on carbon cloth: A highly efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    There exists a strong demand to replace expensive noble metal catalysts with cheap metal sulfides or phosphides for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Recently metal phosphides such as NixP, FeP and CoP have been considered as promising candidates to replace Pt cathodes. Here we report that the nanocrystalline CoP nanosheet assembly on carbon cloth can be formed by a two-step process: electrochemical deposition of Co species followed by gas phase phosphidation. The CoP catalyst in this report exhibits a Tafel slope of 30.1mV/dec in 0.5M H2SO4 and 42.6mV/dec in 1M KOH. The high HER performance of our CoP catalysts is attributed to the rugae-like morphology which results in a high double-layer capacitance and high density of active sites, estimated as 7.77×1017sites/cm2. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Understanding and Enhancing the Photostability of Nanoporous Metal Oxide Thin Films for Solar Hydrogen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrada, Kalyan Chakravarthi

    Solar water splitting is an environmentally benign process which has received wide attention in the recent years as an alternate method for a clean and safe production of hydrogen. This process employs a semiconductor based photocatalyst, water, and sunlight to produce hydrogen. Metal-oxide based semiconductors are considered to be ideal photocatalytic materials because of their stability against photo-corrosion combined with relatively narrow energy band-gap, appropriately placed band edge positions with reference to oxygen and hydrogen energy levels, less scattering of charges due to wider valence band, high dielectric constant, natural abundance, and non-toxicity. In this dissertation, two metal oxide based semiconductors viz., iron (III) oxide and bismuth (III) oxide were investigated to understand and enhance their photo activity as photoanodes for solar water splitting application. Iron (III) oxide has a well suited band gap to capture solar spectrum but it suffers from inappropriately positioned band edges, recombination losses due to low electron mobility, and a small minority carrier diffusion length. However, it was hypothesized that the Iron (III) oxide might show interesting photoelectrochemical properties by alloying with 4f elements and shifting the conduction band minimum of the iron oxide favorably to more negative potentials. In the present study, a nanoporous iron oxide layer incorporated with Nd3+ and B3+ was synthesized by electrochemical anodization of a FeNdB alloy. The photoelectrochemical behavior of this oxide was compared with thermally oxidized FeNdB alloy and the iron oxides obtained by anodization and thermal oxidation of pure iron foil. Incorporation of Nd3+ and B3+ in the iron oxide showed a direct bandgap of 2.05 eV, an indirect bandgap of 1.9 eV and shifted the flatband potentials to --0.8 VAg/AgCl in 1 M KOH solution. The FeNdB oxide showed marginally better catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction than pure iron oxide

  10. Ultrastable nitrogen-doped carbon encapsulating molybdenum phosphide nanoparticles as highly efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zonghua; Amiinu, Ibrahim Saana; Liu, Xiaobo; Wang, Min; Mu, Shichun

    2016-10-06

    There is a crucial demand for cost-effective hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts towards future renewable energy systems, and the development of such catalysts operating under all pH conditions still remains a challenging task. In this work, a one-step facile approach to synthesizing nitrogen-doped carbon encapsulating molybdenum phosphide nanoparticles (MoP NPs@NC) is introduced by using ammonium molybdate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and melamine as precursor. Benefitting from structural advantages, including ultrasmall nanoparticles, large exposed surface area and fast charge transfer, MoP NPs@NC exhibits excellent HER catalytic activities with small overpotentials at all pH values (j = 10 mA cm(-2) at η = 115, 136 and 80 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively.). Meanwhile, the high catalytic activities of MoP NPs@NC under both neutral and basic conditions have never been achieved before for molybdenum phosphide-based catalysts. Additionally, the encapsulation by N-doped carbon effectively prevents the MoP NPs from corrosion, exhibiting nearly unfading stability after 100 h testing in 0.5 M H2SO4. Thus, our work could pave a new avenue for unprecedented design and fabrication of novel low-cost metal phosphide electrocatalysts encapsulated by N-doped carbon.

  11. A Visible-Light-Active Heterojunction with Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Shiba P; Hood, Zachary D; More, Karren L; Chen, Vincent W; Lachgar, Abdou

    2016-07-21

    A visible-light-active carbon nitride (CN)/strontium pyroniobate (SNO) heterojunction photocatalyst was fabricated by deposition of CN over hydrothermally synthesized SNO nanoplates by a simple thermal decomposition process. The microscopic study revealed that nanosheets of CN were anchored to the surface of SNO resulting in an intimate contact between the two semiconductors. Diffuse reflectance UV/Vis spectra show that the resulting CN/SNO heterojunction possesses intense absorption in the visible region. The structural and spectral properties endowed the CN/SNO heterojunction with remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activity. Specifically, the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution rate per mole of CN was found to be 11 times higher for the CN/SNO composite compared to pristine CN. The results clearly show that the composite photocatalyst not only extends the light absorption range of SNO but also restricts photogenerated charge-carrier recombination, resulting in significant enhancement in photocatalytic activity compared to pristine CN. The relative band positions of the composite allow the photogenerated electrons in the conduction band of CN to migrate to that of SNO. This kind of charge migration and separation leads to the reduction in the overall recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers, which is regarded as one of the key factors for the enhanced activity. A plausible mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of the heterostructured composite is proposed based on observed activity, photoluminescence, time-resolved fluorescence emission decay, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and band position calculations.

  12. Concurrent desalination and hydrogen generation using microbial electrolysis and desalination cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haiping; Jenkins, Peter E; Ren, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    The versatility of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) makes them promising for various applications, and good combinations could make the system more applicable and economically effective. An integrated BES called microbial electrolysis and desalination cell (MEDC) was developed to concurrently desalinate salt water, produce hydrogen gas, and potentially treat wastewater. The reactor is divided into three chambers by inserting a pair of ion exchange membranes, with each chamber serving one of the three functions. With an added voltage of 0.8 V, lab scale batch study shows the MEDC achieved the highest H(2) production rate of 1.5 m(3)/m(3) d (1.6 mL/h) from the cathode chamber, while also removing 98.8% of the 10 g/L NaCl from the middle chamber. The anode recirculation alleviated pH and high salinity inhibition on bacterial activity and further increased system current density from 87.2 to 140 A/m(3), leading to an improved desalination rate by 80% and H(2) production by 30%. Compared to slight changes in desalination, H(2) production was more significantly affected by the applied voltage and cathode buffer capacity, suggesting cathode reactions were likely affected by the external power supply in addition to the anode microbial activity.

  13. Estimate Of The Decay Rate Constant of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation From Landfilled Drywall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research was conducted to investigate the impact of particle size on H2S gas emissions and estimate a decay rate constant for H2S gas generation from the anaerobic decomposition of drywall. Three different particle sizes of regular drywall and one particle size of paperless drywa...

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRECIPITATE REACTOR FEED TANK (PRFT) SAMPLE FROM THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.

    2014-05-12

    A sample of from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) was pulled and sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in June of 2013. The PRFT in DWPF receives Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/ Monosodium Titanate (MST) material from the 512-S Facility via the 511-S Facility. This 2.2 L sample was to be used in small-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing in the Shielded Cells Facility of SRNL. A 1L sub-sample portion was characterized to determine the physical properties such as weight percent solids, density, particle size distribution and crystalline phase identification. Further chemical analysis of the PRFT filtrate and dissolved slurry included metals and anions as well as carbon and base analysis. This technical report describes the characterization and analysis of the PRFT sample from DWPF. At SRNL, the 2.2 L PRFT sample was composited from eleven separate samples received from DWPF. The visible solids were observed to be relatively quick settling which allowed for the rinsing of the original shipping vials with PRFT supernate on the same day as compositing. Most analyses were performed in triplicate except for particle size distribution (PSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PRFT slurry samples were dissolved using a mixed HNO3/HF acid for subsequent Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analyses performed by SRNL Analytical Development (AD). Per the task request for this work, analysis of the PRFT slurry and filtrate for metals, anions, carbon and base were primarily performed to support the planned chemical process cell testing and to provide additional component concentrations in addition to the limited data available from DWPF. Analysis of the insoluble solids portion of the PRFT slurry was aimed at detailed characterization of these solids (TGA, PSD

  15. FY13 GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATIONS OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SIMULANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Best, D.

    2014-03-13

    Savannah River Remediation is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility flowsheet to replace formic acid with glycolic acid in order to improve processing cycle times and decrease by approximately 100x the production of hydrogen, a potentially flammable gas. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Processing Cell since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the safety significant gas chromatographs and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, eliminating the use of formic acid is highly desirable. Previous testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with glycolic acid allows the reduction and removal of mercury without significant catalytic hydrogen generation. Five back-to-back Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycles and four back-to-back Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were successful in demonstrating the viability of the nitric/glycolic acid flowsheet. The testing was completed in FY13 to determine the impact of process heels (approximately 25% of the material is left behind after transfers). In addition, back-to-back experiments might identify longer-term processing problems. The testing was designed to be prototypic by including sludge simulant, Actinide Removal Product simulant, nitric acid, glycolic acid, and Strip Effluent simulant containing Next Generation Solvent in the SRAT processing and SRAT product simulant, decontamination frit slurry, and process frit slurry in the SME processing. A heel was produced in the first cycle and each subsequent cycle utilized the remaining heel from the previous cycle. Lower SRAT purges were utilized due to the low hydrogen generation. Design basis addition rates and boilup rates were used so the processing time was shorter than current processing rates.

  16. Effect of nitrogen and intrinsic defect complexes on conversion efficiency of ZnO for hydrogen generation from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y H; Russo, S P; Feng, Y P

    2011-09-21

    Band gap narrowing is important for applications of ZnO, especially for photoelectrochemical water splitting. In this work, we carried out first-principles electronic structure calculations with a hybrid density functional on defected ZnO. It is found that nitrogen substitutional doping alone cannot explain the largely enhanced conversion efficiency observed in nitrogen doped ZnO. Instead, complex defects formed by substitutional nitrogen and intrinsic defects play an important role in the band gap narrowing, in agreement with recent experimental results. We propose ZnO fabricated in a Zn-rich environment with heavy nitrogen doping as a photocatalyst for hydrogen generation from water splitting. A method for controlling the band gap of ZnO is also proposed.

  17. 钢铁厂制氢方法的比较及选用%Comparison and Selection of Hydrogen Generation Methods for Steel Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓莉

    2014-01-01

    介绍了钢铁厂几种制氢方法的比较和选取,分析了各种制氢方法的特点和适用范围,提出工程设计中应考虑的一些因素来选择制氢方案,并提出最佳制氢方案。%Comparison and selection of several hydrogen generation methods for steel plants are introduced, the characteristics and applicable range of the hydrogen generation methods are analyzed, some factors influencing the selection to be considered in project design are presented and the best hydrogen generation plan is forwarded.

  18. Nanostructured CdS sensitized CdWO4 nanorods for hydrogen generation from hydrogen sulfide and dye degradation under sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Yogesh A; Panmand, Rajendra P; Kadam, Sunil R; Kulkarni, Aniruddha K; Apte, Sanjay K; Naik, Sonali D; Munirathnam, N; Kulkarni, Milind V; Kale, Bharat B

    2017-02-01

    In this report, CdS nanoparticles have been grown on the surface of CdWO4 nanorods via an in-situ approach and their high photocatalytic ability toward dye degradation and H2 evolution from H2S splitting under visible light has been demonstrated. The structural and optical properties as well as morphologies with varying amount of CdS to form CdS@CdWO4 have been investigated. Elemental mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis proved the sensitization of CdWO4 nanorods by CdS nanoparticles. A decrease in the PL emission of CdWO4 was observed with increasing amount of CdS nanoparticles loading possibly due to the formation of trap states. Considering the band gap in visible region, the photocatalytic study has been performed for H2 production from H2S and dye degradation under natural sunlight. The steady evolution of H2 was observed from an aqueous H2S solution even without noble metal. Moreover, the rate of photocatalytic H2 evolution over CdS modified CdWO4 is ca. 5.6 times higher than that of sole CdWO4 under visible light. CdS modified CdWO4 showed a good ability toward the photo-degradation of methylene Blue. The rate of dye degradation over CdS modified CdWO4 is ca. 7.4 times higher than that of pristine CdWO4 under natural sunlight. With increase in amount of CdS nanoparticle loading on CdWO4 nanorods the hydrogen generation was observed to be decreased where as dye degradation rate is increased. Such nano-heterostructures may have potential in other photocatalytic reactions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F. C.; Crawford, C. L.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2013-11-18

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9), in January 2012. SB7b is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and the SB7b material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7b was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Form Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two pour stream glass samples were collected while processing SB7b. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where one was analyzed and the other was archived. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The sum of oxides for the official SB7b pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%); The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7b is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7b pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7b Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample; As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the SB7b pour stream sample; The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7b pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.8 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass; The measured density of the SB7b pour stream glass was 2.70 g/cm{sup 3}; The Fe{sup 2+}/ΣFe ratio of the SB7b pour stream samples was 0.07.

  20. ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) POUR STREAM SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-05-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of oxides for the official SB7a pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%). (2) The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7a is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7a pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7a Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample. (3) As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the official SB7a pour stream sample. (4) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7a pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.64 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER AND STEAM ATOMIZED SCRUBBER DEPOSIT SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

    2007-06-06

    This report summarizes the results from the characterization of deposits from the inlets of the primary off-gas Quencher and Steam Atomized Scrubber (SAS) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), as requested by a technical assistance request. DWPF requested elemental analysis and compound identification to help determine the potential causes for the substance formation. This information will be fed into Savannah River National Laboratory modeling programs to determine if there is a way to decrease the formation of the deposits. The general approach to the characterization of these samples included x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) The deposits are not high level waste glass from the DWPF melt pool based on comparison of the compositions of deposits to the composition of a sample of glass taken from the pour stream of the melter during processing of Sludge Batch 3. (2) Chemical composition results suggest that the deposits are probably a combination of sludge and frit particles entrained in the off-gas. (3) Gamma emitters, such as Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-154, Am-241, and Am-243 were detected in both the Quencher and SAS samples with Cs-137 having the highest concentration of the gamma emitters. (4) No evidence existed for accumulation of fissile material (U-233, U-235, and Pu-239) relative to Fe in either deposit. (5) XRD results indicated both samples were primarily amorphorous and contained some crystals of the iron oxides, hematite and magnetite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4})), along with sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}). The other main crystalline compound in the SAS deposit was mercurous chloride. The main crystalline compound in the Quencher deposit was a uranium oxide compound. These are all sludge components. (6) SEM analysis of the Quencher deposit revealed crystalline uranium compounds within the sample

  2. Auxin-induced hydrogen sulfide generation is involved in lateral root formation in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tao; Cao, Zeyu; Li, Jiale; Shen, Wenbiao; Huang, Liqin

    2014-03-01

    Similar to auxin, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), mainly produced by l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES; EC 4.4.1.1) in plants, could induce lateral root formation. The objective of this study was to test whether H2S is also involved in auxin-induced lateral root development in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings. We observed that auxin depletion-induced down-regulation of transcripts of SlDES1, decreased DES activity and endogenous H2S contents, and the inhibition of lateral root formation were rescued by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor). However, No additive effects were observed when naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) was co-treated with NaHS (lower than 10 mM) in the induction of lateral root formation. Subsequent work revealed that a treatment with NAA or NaHS could simultaneously induce transcripts of SlDES1, DES activity and endogenous H2S contents, and thereafter the stimulation of lateral root formation. It was further confirmed that H2S or HS(-), not the other sulfur-containing components derived from NaHS, was attributed to the stimulative action. The inhibition of lateral root formation and decreased of H2S metabolism caused by an H2S scavenger hypotaurine (HT) were reversed by NaHS, but not NAA. Molecular evidence revealed that both NaHS- or NAA-induced modulation of some cell cycle regulatory genes, including the up-regulation of SlCDKA;1, SlCYCA2;1, together with simultaneous down-regulation of SlKRP2, were differentially reversed by HT pretreatment. To summarize, above results clearly suggested that H2S might, at least partially, act as a downstream component of auxin signaling to trigger lateral root formation.

  3. Generation of Hydrogen and Methane during Experimental Low-Temperature Reaction of Ultramafic Rocks with Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Donaldson, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks is widely recognized as a source of molecular hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) to support microbial activity, but the extent and rates of formation of these compounds in low-temperature, near-surface environments are poorly understood. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature reaction of water with ultramafic rocks and minerals. Experiments were performed by heating olivine or harzburgite with aqueous solutions at 90°C for up to 213 days in glass bottles sealed with butyl rubber stoppers. Although H2 and CH4 increased steadily throughout the experiments, the levels were very similar to those found in mineral-free controls, indicating that the rubber stoppers were the predominant source of these compounds. Levels of H2 above background were observed only during the first few days of reaction of harzburgite when CO2 was added to the headspace, with no detectable production of H2 or CH4 above background during further heating of the harzburgite or in experiments with other mineral reactants. Consequently, our results indicate that production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature alteration of ultramafic rocks may be much more limited than some recent experimental studies have suggested. We also found no evidence to support a recent report suggesting that spinels in ultramafic rocks may stimulate H2 production. While secondary silicates were observed to precipitate during the experiments, formation of these deposits was dominated by Si released by dissolution of the glass bottles, and reaction of the primary silicate minerals appeared to be very limited. While use of glass bottles and rubber stoppers has become commonplace in experiments intended to study processes that occur during serpentinization of ultramafic rocks at low temperatures, the high levels of H2, CH4, and SiO2 released during heating indicate that these reactor materials are unsuitable for this purpose.

  4. THE USE OF DI WATER TO MITIGATE DUSTING FOR ADDITION OF DWPF FRIT TO THE SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.

    2010-07-21

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) presently is in the process to determine means to reduce water utilization in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process, thus reducing effluent and processing times. The frit slurry addition system mixes the dry frit with water, yielding approximately a 50 weight percent slurry containing frit and the other fraction water. This slurry is discharged into the SME and excess water is removed via boiling. To reduce this water load to the SME, DWPF has proposed using a pneumatic system in conveying the frit to the SME, in essence a dry delivery system. The problem associated with utilizing a dry delivery system with the existing frit is the generation of dust when discharged into the SME. The use of water has been shown to be effective in the mining industry as well in the DOE complex to mitigate dusting. The method employed by SRNL to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting in dry powders was effective, between a lab and bench scale tests. In those tests, it was shown that as high as five weight percent (wt%) of water addition was required to mitigate dust from batches of glass forming minerals used by the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, Washington. The same method used to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting was used in this task to determine the quantity of water to mitigate this dusting using as-received frit. The ability for water to mitigate dusting is due to its adhesive properties as shown in Figure 1-1. Wetting the frit particles allows for the smaller frit particles (including dust) to adhere to the larger frit particles or to agglomerate into large particles. Fluids other than water can also be used, but their adhesive properties are different than water and the quantity required to mitigate dusting is different, as was observed in reference 1. Excessive water, a few weight percentages greater than that required to mitigate dusting can cause the resulting material not to flow. The primary

  5. Experimental Hydrogen Plant with Metal Hydrides to Store and Generate Electrical Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzatti, Frank; Nizolli, Vinícius; Ferrigolo, Fredi Zancan; Farret, Felix Alberto; de Mello, Marcos Augusto Silva

    2016-02-01

    Generation of electrical energy with renewable sources is interruptible due to the primary energy characteristics (sun, wind, hydro, etc.). In these cases, it is necessary to use energy storage so increasing penetrability of these sources connected to the distribution system. This paper discusses in details some equipment and accessories of an integrated power plant using fuel cell stack, electrolyzer and metal hydrides. During the plant operation were collected the power consumption data and established the efficiency of each plant component. These data demonstrated an overall efficiency of about 11% due to the low efficiencies of the commercial electrolyzers and power inverters used in the experiments.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide generated by NADPH oxidase is involved in high blue-light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Xing, Da; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-08-01

    One of the most important functions of blue light is to induce chloroplast movements by reducing the damage to photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated by various environmental stimuli, can act as a signaling molecule that regulates a number of developmental processes and environmental responses. To investigate whether H2O2 is involved in high blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements, we use luminescence spectrometer to observe H2O2 generation with the assistance of the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescin diacetate (H2DCF-DA). After treatment with high blue light, a large quantity of H2O2 indicated by the fluorescence intensity of DCF is produced in a dose-dependent manner in leaf strip of Arabidopsis. Enzymatic assay shows that the activity of NADPH oxidase, which is a major site for H2O2 generation, also rapidly increases in treated strips. Exogenously applied H2O2 can promote the high blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Moreover, high blue light-induced H2O2 generation can be abolished completely by addition of exogenous catalase (CAT), and partly by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (DCMU), which are an NADPH oxidase inhibitor and a blocker of electron transport chain. And subsequent chloroplast movements can be abolished by CAT and DPI, but not by DCMU. These results presented here suggested that high blue light can induce oxidative burst, and NADPH oxidase as a major producer for H2O2 is involved in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements.

  7. DWPF nitric-glycolic flowsheet chemical process cell chemistry. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-01

    The conversions of nitrite to nitrate, the destruction of glycolate, and the conversion of glycolate to formate and oxalate were modeled for the Nitric-Glycolic flowsheet using data from Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulant runs conducted by SRNL from 2011 to 2015. The goal of this work was to develop empirical correlations for these variables versus measureable variables from the chemical process so that these quantities could be predicted a-priori from the sludge composition and measurable processing variables. The need for these predictions arises from the need to predict the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of the glass from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. This report summarizes the initial work on these correlations based on the aforementioned data. Further refinement of the models as additional data is collected is recommended.

  8. Impact of glycolate anion on aqueous corrosion in DWPF and downstream facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-15

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternate reductant in the preparation of high level waste for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). During processing, the glycolic acid may not be completely consumed with small quantities of the glycolate anion being carried forward to other high level waste (HLW) facilities. The impact of the glycolate anion on the corrosion of the materials of construction (MoC) throughout the waste processing system has not been previously evaluated. A literature review had revealed that corrosion data were not available for the MoCs in glycolic-bearing solutions applicable to SRS systems. Data on the material compatibility with only glycolic acid or its derivative products were identified; however, data were limited for solutions containing glycolic acid or the glycolate anion.

  9. Electrocemical Production of Ocean Alkalinity for Carbon Dioxide and Acid Mitigation, and Hydrogen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, G. H.

    2008-12-01

    Various schemes have been proposed to increase air-to-sea CO2 transfer and storage, including the addition of alkalinity to the ocean. Examples include the addition of: Ca(OH)2 derived from the thermal calcination of limestone (Kheshgi, 1995), NaOH from the electrochemical splitting of salt (House et al., 2007), and CaCO3 to carbonate-undersaturated waters (Harvey, 2008). Diluted in the ocean (to pH1/2O2+H2+Ca(HCO3)2aq. Laboratory experiments showed that such a system can generate excess alkalinity and elevated pH in seawater that subsequently allowed the absorption of 0.8 mM atmospheric CO2. Thus at larger scales, wind-, wave-, or solar-powered, fixed/floating platforms at the shoreline, in coastal waters, or in the open ocean might be employed to electrochemically increase ocean alkalinity. Such platforms would then: 1) enhance the ocean's natural absorption of atmospheric CO2, 2) help neutralize or offset the effects of ongoing ocean acidification, via the calcium hydroxide and/or bicarbonate production, and 3) generate carbon-negative H2 in the ratio 22kg CO2 absorbed/kg H2 produced.

  10. New generation of full composite vessels for 70 MPa gaseous hydrogen storage : results and achievements of the French HyBou project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nony, F. [CEA Materials, Monts (France); Weber, M. [Air Liquide, Paris (France); Tcharkhtchi, A. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Arts et Metiers, Paris (France); Lafarie-Frenot, M.C. [Ecole Nationale Superique De Mecanique et d' Aerotechnique, Poitiers (France); Perrier, O. [Raigi, Arbouville (France)

    2009-07-01

    The French collaborative Project known as HyBou explores hydrogen storage as a key enabling technology for the extensive use of hydrogen as an energy carrier. HyBou aims to develop robust, safe and efficient compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH2) storage systems and validate innovative materials and processes suitable for storage vessel manufacturing with improved performance at low cost. The development of a new generation of type-4 70 MPa vessel was described along with a newly developed liner based on polyurethane materials. The new liner presents increased thermal stability, hydrogen barrier properties and cost effectiveness. The project also aims to evaluate the potential of new high resistance fibers and develop an improved thermosetting resin for composite winding with enhanced mechanical resistance and durability. A specific apparatus was therefore designed to characterize and evaluate coupled thermal and mechanical fatigue resistance in representative conditions.

  11. Controllable hydrogen generation performance from Al/NaBH4 composite activated by La metal and CoCl2 salt in pure water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianbo; FEI Yong; PAN Hua; FAN Meiqiang; WANG Liangliang; YAO Jun

    2012-01-01

    A novel composition of Al/NaBH4 mixture activated by La and CoCl2 in water for hydrogen generation was investigated.The composition had good stability at 298 K with high La content and low CoCl2 content,but presented good hydrogen generation performance with increasing global temperature.For example,The Al-15 wt.%La-5 wr.%CoCl2/NaBH4 mixture (mass ratio of 1∶1)yielded 1664 ml hydrogen/1 g mixture with 100% efficiency within 60 min at 333 K.The hydrogen generation rate and amount could be regulated by changing composition design,hydrolytic condition,etc.There existed a synergistic effect of La and CoCl2.Increasing La content was helpful to decrease crystal size of the mixture,but its hydrolysis byproduct La(OH)3 deposited on Al surface and had side effect on Al hydrolysis.Increased CoCl2 content was attributed to the producing of more actively catalytic sites Co2B/Al(OH)3 formed in the hydrolytic process.Co2B had dual catalytic effect on Al/NaBH4 hydrolysis.It deposited on Al surface and acted as a cathode of a micro galvanic cell.Co2B/Al(OH)3 was also a good promoter to NaBH4 hydrolysis.Therefore,the Al/NaBH4 mixture activated by La and CoCl2 may be applied as hydrogen generation material and the experimental data lays a foundation for designing practical hydrogen generators.

  12. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model: Revisions for Processing High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The DWPF will soon be receiving wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) containing increased concentrations of TiO2, Na2O, and Cs2O . The SWPF is being built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to process TiO2 concentrations >2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new viscosity data were developed over the range of 1.90 to 6.09 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 2005 viscosity model. An alternate viscosity model is also derived for potential future use, should the DWPF ever need to process other titanate-containing ion exchange materials. The ultimate limit on the amount of TiO2 that can be accommodated from SWPF will be determined by the three PCCS models, the waste composition of a given sludge

  13. Interim glycol flowsheet reduction/oxidation (redox) model for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Zamecnik, J. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-08

    Control of the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of glasses containing high concentrations of transition metals, such as High Level Waste (HLW) glasses, is critical in order to eliminate processing difficulties caused by overly reduced or overly oxidized melts. Operation of a HLW melter at Fe+2/ΣFe ratios of between 0.09 and 0.33, a range which is not overly oxidizing or overly reducing, helps retain radionuclides in the melt, i.e. long-lived radioactive 99Tc species in the less volatile reduced Tc4+ state, 104Ru in the melt as reduced Ru+4 state as insoluble RuO2, and hazardous volatile Cr6+ in the less soluble and less volatile Cr+3 state in the glass. The melter REDOX control balances the oxidants and reductants from the feed and from processing additives such as antifoam. Currently, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is running a formic acid-nitric acid (FN) flowsheet where formic acid is the main reductant and nitric acid is the main oxidant. During decomposition formate and formic acid releases H2 gas which requires close control of the melter vapor space flammability. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (GN) flowsheet is desired as the glycolic acid flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing. Development of an EE term for glycolic acid in the GN flowsheet is documented in this study.

  14. Generation of hydrogen from polyvinyl chloride by milling and heating with CaO and Ni(OH)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongamp, William; Zhang, Qiwu; Shoko, Miyagi; Saito, Fumio

    2009-08-15

    This work discusses an alternative process option for the treatment of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) by producing hydrogen (H(2)) gas, at the same time fixing chlorine for proper environmental control. In the first-stage, a milling operation is performed in a planetary ball mill to obtain a mixture of PVC sample with CaO and Ni(OH)(2) to be used as feed in the second-step, involving heating of the milled product. Analyses by thermogravimetry-mass spectroscopy (TG-MS) and gas chromatography (GC) showed H(2), CH(4), CO and CO(2) as main constituents. The results clearly show that addition of Ni(OH)(2) to provide nickel as catalyst and CaO as adsorbent to fix CO(2) and HCl gases generated during heating, assisted in clean H(2) generation with concentration near 90% at temperatures between 450 and 550 degrees C. Analyses of solids after heating by X-ray diffraction and TG-DTA techniques showed both CaOHCl and CaCO(3) as main phases in the product. This process could be developed to treat PVC wastes together with other polymers and/or plastic wastes for production of H(2) gas.

  15. The Effect of Herbicides on Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Isolated Vacuoles of Red Beet Root (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Pradedova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of herbicides on the hydrogen peroxide generation in vacuolar extracts of red beet root (Beta vulgaris L. was investigated. Belonging to different chemical classes of herbicide compounds have been used. Herbicides differ from each other in the mechanism of effects on plants. Clopyralid (aromatic acid herbicide, derivative of picolinic acid and 2.4-D (phenoxyacetic herbicide, characterized by hormone-like effects, contributed to the formation of H2O2 in vacuolar extracts. Fluorodifen (nitrophenyl ether herbicide and diuron (urea herbicide also have increased contents H2O2. These compounds inhibit the electron transport, photosynthesis, and photorespiration in sensitive plants. Herbicidal effect of glyphosate (organophosphorus herbicide is due to the inhibition of amino acid synthesis in plant cells. Glyphosate did not affect the content of H2O2 in vacuolar extracts. Herbicide dependent H2O2-generation did not occur with oxidoreductase inhibitors, potassium cyanide and sodium azide. The results suggest that the formation of ROS in the vacuoles due to activity of oxidoreductases, which could interact with herbicides.

  16. A LOPA application to the hydrogen cooling system of the main electric generator of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Flavia M.; Frutuoso e Melo, Paulo Fernando Ferreira [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: flaviamvasconcelos@gmail.com; frutuoso@con.ufrj.br; Saldanha, P.L. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Reatores]. E-mail: saldanha@cnen.gov.br

    2008-07-01

    The Layer of Protection Analysis (LOPA) is a powerful analytical tool for assessing the adequacy of protection layers used to mitigate risks in a process plant. LOPA applies semi-quantitative measures to evaluate the frequency of potential incidents and the probability of failure of protection layers. This paper presents an application of the Layer of Protection Analysis technique to a nuclear power plant in order to evaluate the cooling system of an electric generator, so as to identify scenarios that might lead to a plant shutdown. Next, the frequencies of occurrence of these events and the probability of failure on demand of the independent protection layers are determined. Here a difficulty is related to the lack of failure and initiating event data. The consequences identified are listed as impact events and are classified as to their severity level. The initiating causes are listed for each impact event and the likelihood is estimated for each initiating cause. Independent Protection Layers (ILPs) are listed. The mitigated event likelihood is studied and additional ILPs can be evaluated and added to reduce the risk. As a conclusion, LOPA demonstrated that the hydrogen inner-cooling electric generator system is in compliance with the risk scenarios adopted for this study. Some suggestions were made in order to automate some manual actions to increase the system reliability. (author)

  17. Saturation Ion Current Densities in Inductively Coupled Hydrogen Plasma Produced by Large-Power Radio Frequency Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songbai; Lei, Guangjiu; Bi, Zhenhua; Ghomi, H.; Yang, Size; Liu, Dongping

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the saturation ion current densities (Jions) in hydrogen inductively coupled plasma (ICP) produced by a large-power (2-32 kW) radio frequency (RF) generator is reported, then some reasonable explanations are given out. With the increase of RF power, the experimental results show three stages: in the first stage (2-14 kW), the electron temperature will rise with the increase of RF power in the ICP, thus, the Jions increases continually as the electron temperature rises in the ICP. In the second stage (14-20 kW), as some H- ions lead to the mutual neutralization (MN), the slope of Jions variation firstly decreases then increases. In the third stage (20-32 kW), both the electronic detachment (ED) and the associative detachment (AD) in the ICP result in the destruction of H- ions, therefore, the increased amplitude of the Jions in the third stage is weaker than the one in the first stage. In addition, with the equivalent transformer model, we successfully explain that the Jions at different radial locations in ICP has the same rule. Finally, it is found that the Jions has nothing to do with the outer/inner puffing gas pressure ratio, which is attributed to the high-speed movement of hydrogen molecules. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2011GB108011 and 2010GB103001), the Major International (Regional) Project Cooperation and Exchanges of China (No. 11320101005) and the Startup Fund from Fuzhou University (No. 510071)