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Sample records for dwarf starburst galaxies

  1. The link between mass distribution and starbursts in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Skillman, Evan D; Dolphin, Andrew E; McGaugh, Stacy S; Williams, Benjamin F

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that starburst dwarf galaxies have steeply rising rotation curves in their inner parts, pointing to a close link between the intense star formation and a centrally concentrated mass distribution (baryons and dark matter). More quiescent dwarf irregulars typically have slowly rising rotation curves, although some "compact" irregulars with steep, inner rotation curves exist. We analyze archival Hubble Space Telescope images of two nearby "compact" irregular galaxies (NGC 4190 and NGC 5204), which were selected solely on the basis of their dynamical properties and their proximity. We derive their recent star-formation histories by fitting color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations, and find that the star-formation properties of both galaxies are consistent with those of known starburst dwarfs. Despite the small sample, this strongly reinforces the notion that the starburst activity is closely related to the inner shape of the potential well.

  2. Dwarf Galaxy Starburst Statistics in the Local Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Janice C; Funes, José G S J; Shoko Sakai; Akiyama, Sanae

    2008-01-01

    An unresolved question in galaxy evolution is whether the star formation histories of low mass systems are preferentially dominated by starbursts or modes that are more quiescent and continuous. Here, we quantify the prevalence of global starbursts in dwarf galaxies at the present epoch, and infer their characteristic durations and amplitudes. The analysis is based on the H-alpha component of the 11 Mpc H-alpha UV Galaxy Survey (11HUGS), which is providing H-alpha and GALEX UV imaging for an approximately volume-limited sample of ~300 star-forming galaxies within 11 Mpc. We first examine the completeness properties of the sample, and then directly tally the number of bursting dwarfs and compute the fraction of star formation that is concentrated in such systems. Our results are consistent with a picture where dwarfs that are currently experiencing massive global bursts are just the ~6% tip of a low-mass galaxy iceberg. Moreover, bursts are only responsible for about a quarter of the total star formation in th...

  3. Observational Constraints on the Molecular Gas Content in Nearby Starburst Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Dolphin, Andrew E; Cannon, John M; Holtzman, Jon; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F

    2012-01-01

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in nineteen nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming a SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high HI surface densities (~10^2-10^3 Msun pc^-2), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H_2 in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in HI surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations app...

  4. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE MOLECULAR GAS CONTENT IN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

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    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Using star formation histories derived from optically resolved stellar populations in 19 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we measure the stellar mass surface densities of stars newly formed in the bursts. By assuming a star formation efficiency (SFE), we then calculate the inferred gas surface densities present at the onset of the starbursts. Assuming an SFE of 1%, as is often assumed in normal star-forming galaxies, and assuming that the gas was purely atomic, translates to very high H I surface densities ({approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}), which are much higher than have been observed in dwarf galaxies. This implies either higher values of SFE in these dwarf starburst galaxies or the presence of significant amounts of H{sub 2} in dwarfs (or both). Raising the assumed SFEs to 10% or greater (in line with observations of more massive starbursts associated with merging galaxies), still results in H I surface densities higher than observed in 10 galaxies. Thus, these observations appear to require that a significant fraction of the gas in these dwarf starbursts galaxies was in the molecular form at the onset of the bursts. Our results imply molecular gas column densities in the range 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} for the sample. In the galaxies where CO observations have been made, these densities correspond to values of the CO-H{sub 2} conversion factor (X{sub CO}) in the range >(3-80) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, or up to 40 Multiplication-Sign greater than Galactic X{sub CO} values.

  5. EXTREME EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES IN CANDELS: BROADBAND-SELECTED, STARBURSTING DWARF GALAXIES AT z > 1

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    Van der Wel, A.; Rix, H.-W.; Jahnke, K. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Straughn, A. N. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Finkelstein, S. L.; Salmon, B. W. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Koekemoer, A. M.; Ferguson, H. C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Weiner, B. J. [Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry St., University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Wuyts, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bell, E. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Faber, S. M.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Scarlata, C. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. S.E. Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Hathi, N. P. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Dunlop, J. S. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Newman, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O' Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Dickinson, M. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); De Mello, D. F., E-mail: vdwel@mpia.de [Department of Physics, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); and others

    2011-12-01

    We identify an abundant population of extreme emission-line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift z {approx} 1.7 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). Sixty-nine EELG candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared broadband magnitudes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [O III] emission lines-with rest-frame equivalent widths {approx}1000 A-in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are galaxies with {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous starburst phase with M{sub *}/ M-dot{sub *} of only {approx}15 Myr. These bursts may cause outflows that are strong enough to produce cored dark matter profiles in low-mass galaxies. The individual star formation rates and the comoving number density (3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3}) can produce in {approx}4 Gyr much of the stellar mass density that is presently contained in 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that many or even most of the stars in present-day dwarf galaxies formed in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z > 1.

  6. A Widespread, Clumpy Starburst in the Isolated Ongoing Dwarf Galaxy Merger dm1647+21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privon, G. C.; Stierwalt, S.; Patton, D. R.; Besla, G.; Pearson, S.; Putman, M.; Johnson, K. E.; Kallivayalil, N.; Liss, S.; Titans, TiNy

    2017-09-01

    Interactions between pairs of isolated dwarf galaxies provide a critical window into low-mass hierarchical, gas-dominated galaxy assembly and the build-up of stellar mass in low-metallicity systems. We present the first Very Large Telescope/Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (VLT/MUSE) optical integral field unit (IFU) observations of the interacting dwarf pair dm1647+21 selected from the TiNy Titans survey. The Hα emission is widespread and corresponds to a total unobscured star formation rate (SFR) of 0.44 M ⊙ yr‑1, which is 2.7 times higher than the SFR inferred from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. The implied specific SFR (sSFR) for the system is elevated by more than an order of magnitude above non-interacting dwarfs in the same mass range. This increase is dominated by the lower-mass galaxy, which has a sSFR enhancement of >50. Examining the spatially resolved maps of classic optical line diagnostics, we find that the interstellar medium (ISM) excitation can be fully explained by star formation. The velocity field of the ionized gas is not consistent with simple rotation. Dynamical simulations indicate that the irregular velocity field and the stellar structure is consistent with the identification of this system as an ongoing interaction between two dwarf galaxies. The widespread, clumpy enhancements in the star formation in this system point to important differences in the effect of mergers on dwarf galaxies, compared to massive galaxies; rather than the funneling of gas to the nucleus and giving rise to a nuclear starburst, starbursts in low-mass galaxy mergers may be triggered by large-scale ISM compression, and thus may be more distributed.

  7. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reines, Amy E; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Johnson, Kelsey E; Brogan, Crystal L

    2011-02-03

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first 'seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize 2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize 2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids.

  8. Observations of the impact of starbursts on the interstellar medium in dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Amanda T.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Schommer, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies play a crucial role in our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies, and the concept of supernova-driven mass outflows is a vital ingredient in theories of the structure and evolution of dwarf galaxies. Despite the theoretical importance of these outflows, there is a very limited amount of direct observational evidence for their existence. We have therefore begun a detailed multi-wave-band search for outflows in dwarf (M(sub B) greater than or = -18) galaxies with extensive recent or ongoing centrally concentrated star formation. We report the first results of this search in the present paper. Observations of the ionized gas in dwarf amorphous galaxies with centrally concentrated populations of massive stars provide evidence for the large-scale expansion of their expansion of their ionized interstellar media. Fabry-Perot H alpha images reveal the presence of kiloparsec-scale 'superbubbles' and filaments which tend to be oriented along the galaxy minor axis. These structures are comparable in size to the chracteristic optical sizes of the galaxies, and dominate the morphology of the galaxies at low surface brightness in H alpha. Since expanding structure of this size and velocity are not observed in all low-mass galaxies with recent or ongoing star formation, we suggest that we are witnessing transient events that likely have a relatively low 'duty cycle' in such galaxies. That is, we argue that the particular galaxies in the present paper have had significantly elevated star formation rates over the past 10(exp 7)-10(exp 8) yr (i.e., these are starburst or young poststarburst systems). This interpretation is consistent with the optical colors and emission-line properties of these galaxies.

  9. Discovery of a Metal-Line Absorber Associated with a Local Dwarf Starburst Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Keeney, B A; Rosenberg, J L; Tumlinson, J; York, D G; Keeney, Brian A.; Stocke, John T.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Tumlinson, Jason; York, Donald G.

    2006-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared images, H I 21 cm emission maps, optical spectroscopy, and Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph ultraviolet spectroscopy of the QSO/galaxy pair SBS 1122+594/IC 691. The QSO sight line lies at a position angle of 27 degrees from the minor axis of the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy IC 691 (cz_gal = 1204+-3 km/s, L_B ~ 0.09 L*, current star formation rate = 0.08-0.24 solar masses per year) and 33 kpc (6.6 arcmin) from its nucleus. We find that IC 691 has an H I mass of M_HI = (3.6+-0.1) x 10^8 solar masses and a dynamical mass of M_dyn = (3.1+-0.5) x 10^10 solar masses. The UV spectrum of SBS 1122+594 shows a metal-line (Ly-alpha + C IV) absorber near the redshift of IC 691 at cz_abs = 1110+-30 km/s. Since IC 691 is a dwarf starburst and the SBS 1122+594 sight line lies in the expected location for an outflowing wind, we propose that the best model for producing this metal-line absorber is a starburst wind from IC 691. We place consistent metallicity lim...

  10. EVIDENCE FOR AN INTERACTION IN THE NEAREST STARBURSTING DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY IC 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nidever, David L.; Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ashley, Trisha; Simpson, Caroline E. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Ott, Jürgen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Johnson, Megan [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Stanimirović, Snežana [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Putman, Mary [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Jütte, Eva [Astronomisches Institut der Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Oosterloo, Tom A. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Burton, W. Butler, E-mail: dnidever@umich.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    Using deep 21 cm H I data from the Green Bank Telescope we have detected an ≳18.3 kpc long gaseous extension associated with the starbursting dwarf galaxy IC 10. The newly found feature stretches 1.°3 to the northwest and has a large radial velocity gradient reaching to ∼65 km s{sup –1} lower than the IC 10 systemic velocity. A region of higher column density at the end of the extension that possesses a coherent velocity gradient (∼10 km s{sup –1} across ∼26') transverse to the extension suggests rotation and may be a satellite galaxy of IC 10. The H I mass of IC 10 is 9.5 × 10{sup 7} (d/805 kpc){sup 2} M {sub ☉} and the mass of the new extension is 7.1 × 10{sup 5} (d/805 kpc){sup 2} M {sub ☉}. An IC 10-M31 orbit using known radial velocity and proper motion values for IC 10 show that the H I extension is inconsistent with the trailing portion of the orbit so that an M31-tidal or ram pressure origin seems unlikely. We argue that the most plausible explanation for the new feature is that it is the result of a recent interaction (and possible late merger) with another dwarf galaxy. This interaction could not only have triggered the origin of the recent starburst in IC 10, but could also explain the existence of previously found counter-rotating H I gas in the periphery of the IC 10 which was interpreted as originating from primordial gas infall.

  11. The magnetized galactic wind and synchrotron halo of the starburst dwarf galaxy IC10

    CERN Document Server

    Chyzy, Krzysztof T; Beck, Rainer; Urbanik, Marek; Heesen, Volker; Bomans, Dominik J

    2016-01-01

    We aim to explore whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in low-mass dwarf galaxies and, if so, whether such fields can be affected by galactic outflows and spread out into the intergalactic medium (IGM). We performed a radio continuum polarimetry study of IC10, the nearest starbursting dwarf galaxy, using a combination of multifrequency interferometric (VLA) and single-dish (Effelsberg) observations. VLA observations at 1.43 GHz reveal an extensive and almost spherical radio halo of IC10 in total intensity, extending twice more than the infrared-emitting galactic disk. The halo is magnetized with a magnetic field strength of 7 microG in the outermost parts. Locally, the magnetic field reaches about 29 microG in HII complexes, becomes more ordered, and weakens to 22 microG in the synchrotron superbubble and to 7-10 microG within HI holes. At the higher frequency of 4.86 GHz, we found a large-scale magnetic field structure of X-shaped morphology, similar to that observed in several edge-on...

  12. The Complex Neutral Gas Dynamics Of The Dwarf Starburst Galaxy NGC 625

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, J M; Skillman, E D; Côté, S; Cannon, John M.; Skillman, Evan D.; Cote, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    We present new multi-configuration HI aperture synthesis imaging of the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 625 obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Total HI column density images show gas well-aligned with the optical major axis, and low-column density HI extending to > 6 optical scale lengths. The HI velocity field, on the other hand, is highly disturbed, with neutral gas at nearly all detected velocities within the central region. After considering various interpretations, we find that a blowout scenario most accurately describes the data. Since at our resolution we do not detect any large evacuated holes in the HI disk, we interpret this blowout to be the result of the extended (both spatially and temporally) star formation event which NGC 625 has undergone in the last 100 Myr. This is one of the clearest examples of HI outflow detected in a dwarf galaxy. We find no obvious external trigger for this extended star formation event. We detect strong radio continuum emission from the largest HII...

  13. Mid-infrared Colors of Dwarf Galaxies: Young Starbursts Mimicking Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Kevin N.; Reines, Amy E.; Greene, Jenny E.; Stern, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Searching for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in dwarf galaxies is important for our understanding of the seed black holes that formed in the early universe. Here, we test infrared selection methods for AGN activity at low galaxy masses. Our parent sample consists of ˜18,000 nearby dwarf galaxies (M * great care must be taken when selecting AGNs in dwarf galaxies using infrared colors, as star-forming dwarf galaxies are capable of heating dust in such a way that mimics the infrared colors of more luminous AGNs. In particular, a simple W1-W2 color cut alone should not be used to select AGNs in dwarf galaxies. With these complications in mind, we present a sample of 41 dwarf galaxies that fall in the WISE infrared color space typically occupied by more luminous AGNs and that are worthy of follow-up observations.

  14. Evidence for an Interaction in the Nearest Starbursting Dwarf Irregular Galaxy IC 10

    CERN Document Server

    Nidever, David L; Slater, Colin T; Ott, Juergen; Johnson, Megan; Bell, Eric F; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Putman, Mary; Majewski, Steven R; Simpson, Caroline E; Juette, Eva; Oosterloo, Tom A; Burton, W Butler

    2013-01-01

    Using deep 21-cm HI data from the Green Bank Telescope we have detected an ~18.3 kpc-long gaseous extension associated with the starbursting dwarf galaxy IC 10. The newly-found feature stretches 1.3 deg to the northwest and has a large radial velocity gradient reaching to ~65 km/s lower than the IC 10 systemic velocity. A region of higher column density at the end of the extension that possesses a coherent velocity gradient (~10 km/s across ~26 arcmin) transverse to the extension suggests rotation and may be a satellite galaxy of IC 10. The HI mass of IC 10 is 9.5x10^7 (d/805 kpc)^2 Msun and the mass of the new extension is 7.1x10^5 (d/805 kpc)^2 Msun. An IC 10-M31 orbit using known radial velocity and proper motion values for IC 10 show that the HI extension is inconsistent with the trailing portion of the orbit so that an M31-tidal or ram pressure origin seems unlikely. We argue that the most plausible explanation for the new feature is that it is the result of a recent interaction (and possible late merger...

  15. Optical and Near Infrared studies of the photometric structure and starburst activity of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noeske, K. G.

    2003-03-01

    This thesis describes three studies of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs), focussed on the structure of the stellar components, the star-forming activity, and the environment of such galaxies, as well as the physical background of their morphological variety. The analysis of deep Near Infrared (NIR) image data of a significant sample of BCDs allows to study the evolved stellar low surface brightness (LSB) components of BCDs more precisely than previous studies at visible wavelengths. Azimuthally averaged radial surface brightness profiles (SBPs) show an exponential intensity distribution of the stellar LSB components at large galactocentric radii. This result, along with the derived exponential scale lengths which are systematically smaller than those of dwarf Irregular and dwarf Elliptical galaxies, agrees with previous optical studies. Towards smaller radii, however, the NIR data reveal an inwards-flattening of the SBPs of the stellar LSB components with respect to their outer exponential slopes in more than half of the BCDs under study. Such inwards-flattening exponential SBPs are frequent in dwarf Irregulars and dwarf Ellipticals, but were hitherto largely undiscovered in the stellar hosts of BCDs. The physical origin of such SBPs in dwarf galaxies is to date not understood. Empirical approaches to their systematization and quantitative investigation are discussed, along with the various implications of the discovery of such SBPs in many BCDs for the understanding of such galaxies. Based on the derived structural information on the stellar LSB components and the starburst components, the hypothesis is raised that below a certain threshold density of the stellar LSB component, of the order of 0.4 solar masses per cubic parsec, burst-like star formation does not occur in gas-rich dwarf galaxies. On this hypothesis, the observed relations between the structure of the stellar LSB components of BCDs and their luminosity can be reproduced, as well as the systematic

  16. Inflows and Outflows in the Dwarf Starburst Galaxy NGC 5253: High-Resolution HI Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kobulnicky, Henry A

    2007-01-01

    VLA and Parkes 64 m radiotelescope 21-cm observations of the starburst dwarf galaxy NGC 5253 reveal a multi-component non-axisymmetric HI distribution. The component associated with the stellar body shows evidence for a small amount of rotational support aligned with the major axis, in agreement with optically measured kinematics and consistent with the small galaxian mass. Approximately 20-30% of the HI emission is associated with a second component, an HI "plume" extending along the optical minor axis to the southeast. We consider outflow, inflow, and tidal origins for this feature. Outflow appears improbable, inflow is a possibility, and tidal debris is most consistent with the observations. These observations also reveal a filamentary third component that includes an 800 pc diameter HI shell or bubble to the west of the nucleus, coinciding with an Halpha shell. The mass of HI in the shell may be as large as ~4x10^6 Msun. This large mass, coupled with the lack of expansion signatures in the neutral and ion...

  17. Chandra & XMM-Newton Observations of NGC5253. Analysis of the X-ray Emission from a Dwarf Starburst Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, L K; Strickland, D K; Heckman, T M; Summers, Lesley K.; Stevens, Ian R.; Strickland, David K.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray data of NGC5253, a local starbursting dwarf elliptical galaxy, in the early stages of a starburst episode. Contributions to the X-ray emission come from discrete point sources and extended diffuse emission, in the form of what appear to be multiple superbubbles, and smaller bubbles probably associated with individual star clusters. Chandra detects 17 sources within the optical extent of NGC5253 down to a completeness level corresponding to a luminosity of 1.5E37 erg/s.The slope of the point source X-ray luminosity function is -0.54, similar to that of other nearby dwarf starburst galaxies. Several different types of source are detected within the galaxy, including X-ray binaries and the emission associated with star-clusters. Comparison of the diffuse X-ray emission with the observed Halpha emission shows similarities in their extent. The best spectral fit to the diffuse emission is obtained with an absorbed, two temperature model giving temperatures for the two gas com...

  18. Extreme Emission Line Galaxies in CANDELS: Broad-Band Selected, Star-Bursting Dwarf Galaxies at z>1

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wel, A; Rix, H -W; Finkelstein, S L; Koekemoer, A M; Weiner, B J; Wuyts, S; Bell, E F; Faber, S M; Trump, J R; Koo, D; Ferguson, H C; Scarlata, C; Hathi, N P; Dunlop, J S; Newman, J A; Dickinson, M; Salmon, B; Kocevski, D F de Mello D D; Lai, K; Grogin, N A; Rodney, S A; Guo, Yicheng; McGrath, E G; Lee, K -S; Calvo, G B; Huang, K -H

    2011-01-01

    We identify an abundant population of extreme emission line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift z=1.6-1.8 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). 69 EELG candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared, broad-band fluxes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [OIII] emission lines -- with rest-frame equivalent widths ~1000\\AA -- in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are dwarf galaxies with ~10^8 Msol in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous starburst phase with M*/(dM*/dt) of only ~15 Myr. These bursts may cause outflows that are strong enough to produce cored dark matter profiles in low-mass galaxies. The individual star formation rates and the co-moving number density (3.7 x 10^-4 Mpc^-3) can produce in ~4 Gyr much of the stellar mass density that is presently contained in 10^8-10^9 Mso...

  19. Localized starbursts in dwarf galaxies produced by impact of low metallicity cosmic gas clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Munoz-Tunon, C; Elmegreen, D M; Perez-Montero, E; Amorin, R; Filho, M E; Ascasibar, Y; Papaderos, P; Vilchez, J M

    2015-01-01

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter haloes. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local Universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) optical spectra of ten XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60 % solar on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6 % solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possib...

  20. Mid-Infrared Colors of Dwarf Galaxies: Young Starbursts Mimicking Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hainline, Kevin N; Greene, Jenny E; Stern, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Searching for active galactic nuclei (AGN) in dwarf galaxies is important for our understanding of the seed black holes that formed in the early Universe. Here, we test infrared selection methods for AGN activity at low galaxy masses. Our parent sample consists of ~18,000 nearby dwarf galaxies (M*< 3 x 10^9 Msun, $z<0.055$) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with significant detections in the first three bands of the AllWISE data release from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). First, we demonstrate that the majority of optically-selected AGNs in dwarf galaxies are not selected as AGNs using WISE infrared color diagnostics and that the infrared emission is dominated by the host galaxies. We then investigate the infrared properties of optically-selected star-forming dwarf galaxies, finding that the galaxies with the reddest infrared colors are the most compact, with blue optical colors, young stellar ages and large specific star formation rates. These results indicate that great care must be tak...

  1. Hubble Space Telescope study of resolved red giant stars in the outer halos of nearby dwarf starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryś, Agnieszka; van der Marel, Roeland P; Aloisi, Alessandra; Annibali, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    [abridged] Aims. We observed the outer parts of NGC 1569 and NGC 4449, two of the closest and strongest dwarf starburst galaxies in the local universe, to characterize their stellar density and populations, and obtain new insights into the structure, formation, and evolution of starburst galaxies and galaxy halos. Methods. We obtained HST/WFPC2 images between 5 and 8 scale radii from the center, along the intermediate and minor axes. We performed point-source photometry to determine color magnitude diagrams of I vs. V-I. We compared the results at different radii, including also our prior HST/ACS results for more centrally located fields. Results. We detect stars in the RGB and TP-AGB (carbon star) phases in all outer fields, but not younger stars such as those present at smaller radii. The RGB star density profile is well fit by either a de Vaucouleurs profile or a power-law profile, but has more stars at large radii than a single exponential. To within the uncertainties, there are no radial gradients in the...

  2. LOCALIZED STARBURSTS IN DWARF GALAXIES PRODUCED BY THE IMPACT OF LOW-METALLICITY COSMIC GAS CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Filho, M. E. [Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Elmegreen, B. G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Granada (Spain); Amorín, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Ascasibar, Y. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Papaderos, P., E-mail: jos@iac.es [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2015-09-10

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter halos. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here, we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias optical spectra of 10 XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60% solar, on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6% solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possible if the metal-poor gas fell onto the disk recently. We analyze several possibilities for the origin of the metal-poor gas, favoring the metal-poor gas infall predicted by numerical models. If this interpretation is correct, XMPs trace the cosmic web gas in their surroundings, making them probes to examine its properties.

  3. Properties of free-free, dust, and CO emissions in the starbursts of blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The central star-forming regions in three blue compact dwarf galaxies (He 2-10, NGC 5253, and II Zw 40) were observed in the 340 GHz (880 micron) band at 5 arcsec resolution with the Submillimetre Array (SMA). Continuum emission associated with the central star-forming complex was detected in all these galaxies. The SMA 880 micron flux is decomposed into free-free emission and dust emission by using centimetre-wavelength data in the literature. We find that free-free emission contributes half or more of the SMA 880 micron flux in the central starbursts in those three galaxies. In spite of the dominance of free-free emission at 880 micron, the radio-to-far infrared (FIR) ratios in the central star-forming regions are not significantly higher than those of the entire systems, showing the robustness of radio-FIR relation. Based on the robustness of the radio-FIR relation, we argue that the free--free fraction in the 880 micron emission is regulated by the dust temperature. We also analyze the CO (J = 3--2) emiss...

  4. FISICA observations of the starburst galaxy, NGC 1569

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Raines, S. N.; Gruel, N.; Elston, R.; Guzman, R.; Julian, J.; Boreman, G.; Glenn, P. E.; Hull-Allen, C. G.; Hoffman, J.; Rodgers, M.; Thompson, K.; Flint, S.; Comstock, L.; Myrick, B.

    2006-06-01

    Using the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology and Astrophysics (FISICA) we obtained observations of the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 1569. We present our JH band spectra, particularly noting the existence of extended emission in Paschen β and He I.

  5. The Panchromatic STARBurst IRregular Dwarf Survey (STARBIRDS) Data

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Skillman, Evan D

    2016-01-01

    Understanding star formation in resolved low mass systems requires the integration of information obtained from observations at different wavelengths. We have combined new and archival multi-wavelength observations on a set of 20 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies to create a data archive of calibrated, homogeneously reduced images. Named the panchromatic "STARBurst IRregular Dwarf Survey" (STARBIRDS) archive, the data are publicly accessible through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). This first release of the archive includes images from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Telescope (GALEX), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Spitzer Space Telescope (Spitzer) MIPS instrument. The datasets include flux calibrated, background subtracted images, that are registered to the same world coordinate system. Additionally, a set of images are available which are all cropped to match the HST field of view. The GALEX and Spitzer images are available with foreground and background contamina...

  6. High-Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of an Equivalent Width-Selected Sample of Starbursting Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseda, Michael V.; VanDerWeL, Arjen; DaChuna, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Pacafichi, Camilla; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Franx, Marijn; VanDokkum, Pieter; Bell, Eric F.; Ferguson, Harry C.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lundgren, Britt F.; Marchesini, Danilo; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Straughn, Amber N.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations from the Large Binocular Telescope and the Very Large Telescope reveal kinematically narrow lines (approx. 50 km/s) for a sample of 14 Extreme Emission Line Galaxies (EELGs) at redshifts 1.4 < zeta < 2.3. These measurements imply that the total dynamical masses of these systems are low ( 3 × 10(exp 9) M). Their large [O III]5007 equivalent widths (500 - 1100 A) and faint blue continuum emission imply young ages of 10-100 Myr and stellar masses of 10(exp 8)-10(exp 9) M, confirming the presence of a violent starburst. The stellar mass formed in this vigorous starburst phase thus represents a large fraction of the total (dynamical) mass, without a significantly massive underlying population of older stars. The occurrence of such intense events in shallow potentials strongly suggests that supernova-driven winds must be of critical importance in the subsequent evolution of these systems.

  7. The Dwarf Starburst Host Galaxy of a Type Ia SN at z = 1.55 from CANDELS

    CERN Document Server

    Frederiksen, Teddy F; Maund, Justyn R; Rodney, Steven A; Riess, Adam G; Dahlen, Tomas; Mobasher, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    We present VLT/X-shooter observations of a high redshift, type Ia supernova host galaxy, discovered with HST/WFC3 as part of the CANDELS Supernova project. The galaxy exhibits strong emission lines of Ly{\\alpha}, [O II], H{\\beta}, [O III], and H{\\alpha} at z = 1.54992(+0.00008-0.00004). From the emission-line fluxes and SED fitting of broad-band photometry we rule out AGN activity and characterize the host galaxy as a young, low mass, metal poor, starburst galaxy with low intrinsic extinction and high Ly{\\alpha} escape fraction. The host galaxy stands out in terms of the star formation, stellar mass, and metallicity compared to its lower redshift counterparts, mainly because of its high specific star-formation rate. If valid for a larger sample of high-redshift SN Ia host galaxies, such changes in the host galaxy properties with redshift are of interest because of the potential impact on the use of SN Ia as standard candles in cosmology.

  8. Initial luminosity functions of starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnovsky, S.; Izotova, I.

    2016-12-01

    For the sample of about 800 starburst galaxies the initial luminosity functions which appear the distributions of galaxy luminosities at zero starburst age are considered based on the data of luminosities of galaxies in the recombination Hα emission line in the regions of ionised hydrogen and the ultraviolet continuum. We find the initial luminosity functions for the starburst galaxies with Hα emission and ultraviolet continuum are satisfactory approximated with log-normal function.

  9. Chandra Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Andrea; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present early X-ray results from Chandra for two starburst galaxies, M82 and NGC3256, obtained using AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) and the HRC. For M82 the arcsecond spatial resolution enables us to separate the point source component from the extended emission for the first time. Astrometry reveals that most of the X-ray sources are not coincident with the family of compact radio sources believed to be Super Nova Remnants (SNRs). In addition, based on three epoch Chandra observations, several of the X-ray sources are clearly variable indicating that they are binaries. When we deconvolve the extended and point source components detected in the hard X-ray band, we find that 50 percent arises from the extended component. This fact, together with its morphology, constrains the various models proposed to explain the hard X-ray emission. For NGC3256 we resolve two closely separated nuclei. These new data support a pure starburst origin for the total X-ray emission rather than a composite AGN/starburst, thereby making NGC3256 one of the most X-ray luminous starburst galaxies known.

  10. The mass loss process in dwarf galaxies from 3D hydrodynamical simulations: the role of dark matter and starbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, Luciana O; Lanfranchi, Gustavo A; Caproni, Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological models predict a much larger number of low mass dark matter haloes than has been observed in the Local Group of galaxies. One possible explanation is the increased difficulty of detecting these haloes if most of the visible matter is lost at early evolutionary phases through galactic winds. In this work we study the current models of triggering galactic winds in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph) from supernovae, and study, based on 3D hydrodynamic numerical simulations, the correlation of the mass loss rates and important physical parameters as the dark matter halo mass and its radial profile, and the star formation rate. We find that the existence of winds is ubiquitous, independent on the gravitational potential. Our simulations revealed that the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) may play a major role on pushing matter out of these systems, even for very massive haloes. The instability is responsible for 5 - 40% of the mass loss during the early evolution of the galaxy, ...

  11. Metallic Winds in Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Valdez, F.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Hernández-Martínez, L.; Esquivel, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present results from models of galactic winds driven by energy injected from nuclear (at the galactic center) and non-nuclear starbursts. The total energy of the starburst is provided by very massive young stellar clusters, which can push the galactic interstellar medium and produce an important outflow. Such outflow can be a well or partially mixed wind, or a highly metallic wind. We have performed adiabatic 3D N-Body/Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of galactic winds using the gadget-2 code. The numerical models cover a wide range of parameters, varying the galaxy concentration index, gas fraction of the galactic disk, and radial distance of the starburst. We show that an off-center starburst in dwarf galaxies is the most effective mechanism to produce a significant loss of metals (material from the starburst itself). At the same time, a non-nuclear starburst produces a high efficiency of metal loss, in spite of having a moderate to low mass loss rate.

  12. Local starburst galaxies and their descendants

    CERN Document Server

    Bergvall, Nils; Way, Michael J; Blomqvist, Anna; Holst, Emma; Östlin, Göran; Zackrisson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Despite the frequent discussion of the starburst phenomenon, the concept remains ill-defined. Here we use a strict definition of "starburst" to examine the statistical properties of local starburst galaxies. A second aim is to establish a link between starburst and post-starburst galaxies and seek relationships to active galaxies. We selected potential starburst galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and analyzed their stellar content using a spectral evolutionary model. We applied an age dependent dust attenuation correction and derived star formation rates (SFR), ages and masses of the young and old populations. We compared these masses with dynamical masses derived from the H-alpha emission line width and found a tight 1-1 relation. The final starburst sample was selected using the the birthrate parameter b=SFR/, demanding that b>=3. The post-starburst sample was selected from the citerion EW(Hdelta_abs)>=6 A. We find that only one out of 300 star-forming galaxies is a starburst galaxy. The median star...

  13. Evolution of dwarf galaxies : A dynamical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelli, Federico; Fraternali, Filippo; Verheijen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    For a rotating galaxy, the inner circular-velocity gradient dRV(0) provides a direct estimate of the central dynamical mass density, including gas, stars, and dark matter. We consider 60 low-mass galaxies with high-quality H I and/or stellar rotation curves (including starbursting dwarfs, irregulars

  14. Evolution of dwarf galaxies: a dynamical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelli, Federico; Fraternali, Filippo; Verheijen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    For a rotating galaxy, the inner circular-velocity gradient dRV(0) provides a direct estimate of the central dynamical mass density, including gas, stars, and dark matter. We consider 60 low-mass galaxies with high-quality H I and/or stellar rotation curves (including starbursting dwarfs, irregulars

  15. The X-ray Binary Population of the Nearby Dwarf Starburst Galaxy IC 10: Variable and Transient X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Silas G T; Williams, Benjamin F; Prestwich, Andrea; Binder, Breanna; Christodoulou, Dimitris M

    2016-01-01

    We have monitored the Cassiopeia dwarf galaxy (IC 10) in a series of 10 Chandra ACIS-S observations to capture its variable and transient X-ray source population, which is expected to be dominated by High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). We present a sample of 21 X-ray sources that are variable between observations at the 3 sigma level, from a catalog of 110 unique point sources. We find 4 transients (flux variability ratio greater than 10) and a further 8 objects with ratio > 5. The observations span years 2003 - 2010 and reach a limiting luminosity of >10$^{35}$ erg/s, providing sensitivity to X-ray binaries in IC 10 as well as flare stars in the foreground Milky Way. The nature of the variable sources is investigated from light-curves, X-ray spectra, energy quantiles, and optical counterparts. The purpose of this study is to discover the composition of the X-ray binary population in a young starburst environment. IC 10 provides a sharp contrast in stellar population age (<10 My) when compared to the Magella...

  16. Lyman alpha emission in starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunth, Daniel

    1999-07-01

    We propose to perform a deep study of Ly-alpha emission and destruction in 3 star-forming galaxies. These objects have been already observed with the GHRS and exhibit a variety of situations, with Ly-alpha showing P Cyg profiles, secondary emissions or even a deep damped absorption line with no emission. They also span a range of intrinsic properties: IZW18 is a gas-rich, metal deficient dust free dwarf galaxy, Haro 2 has a simple morphology while IRAS 08339+6517 is a luminous IRAS starburst galaxy with more dust and complex Ly- alpha profile. The use of STIS will allow for the first time to study the geometrical/kinematical configuration of the ionized and neutral gas across the galaxies nuclear regions and pin point the effects of porosity and the kinematical structure of the ISM, that may play the key roles {in addition to dust} in the detectability of the line. This study will have important impact for cosmology since Ly-alpha emitters are nowaday found at high-re dshift. We strongly emphasize that since Ly-alpha is primarely a diagnostic of the ISM, a full understanding of how the ISM and Ly-alpha are related is a necessary step before we can hope to correlate Ly-alpha to the cosmic star-formation rate. Our results will be interpreted against the model of superbubble evolution developed with G. Tenorio Tagle.

  17. The X-Ray Binary Population of the Nearby Dwarf Starburst Galaxy IC 10: Variable and Transient X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Silas; Cappallo, Rigel; Williams, Benjamin F.; Prestwich, Andrea; Binder, Breanna; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.

    2017-02-01

    We have monitored the Cassiopeia dwarf galaxy (IC 10) in a series of 10 Chandra ACIS-S observations to capture its variable and transient X-ray source population, which is expected to be dominated by High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). We present a sample of 21 X-ray sources that are variable between observations at the 3σ level, from a catalog of 110 unique point sources. We find four transients (flux variability ratio greater than 10) and a further eight objects with ratios >5. The observations span the years 2003–2010 and reach a limiting luminosity of >1035 erg s‑1, providing sensitivity to X-ray binaries in IC 10 as well as flare stars in the foreground Milky Way. The nature of the variable sources is investigated from light curves, X-ray spectra, energy quantiles, and optical counterparts. The purpose of this study is to discover the composition of the X-ray binary population in a young starburst environment. IC 10 provides a sharp contrast in stellar population age (<10 My) when compared to the Magellanic Clouds (40–200 My) where most of the known HMXBs reside. We find 10 strong HMXB candidates, 2 probable background Active Galactic Nuclei, 4 foreground flare-stars or active binaries, and 5 not yet classifiable sources. Complete classification of the sample requires optical spectroscopy for radial velocity analysis and deeper X-ray observations to obtain higher S/N spectra and search for pulsations. A catalog and supporting data set are provided.

  18. ISO Images of Starbursts and Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mirabel, I F

    1999-01-01

    We present some highlights from the mid-infrared (5-16 micron) images of mergers of massive galaxies obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). We have observed: 1) ultraluminous infrared nuclei, 2) luminous dust-enshrouded extranuclear starbursts, and 3) active galaxy nuclei (AGNs). In this contribution we discuss the observations of Arp 299, a prototype for very luminous infrared galaxies, the Antennae which is a prototype of mergers, and Centaurus A which is the closest AGN to Earth. From these observations we conclude the following: 1) the most intense starbursts in colliding systems of galaxies and the most massive stars are dust-enshrouded in regions that appear inconspicuous at optical wavelengths, 2) the most intense nuclear infrared sources are a combination of AGN and starburst activity, 3) the hosts of radio loud AGNs that trigger giant double-lobe structures may be symbiotic galaxies composed of barred spirals inside ellipticals.

  19. Dwarf-Galaxy Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina; Brinks, Elias; Kravtsov, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies provide opportunities for drawing inferences about the processes in the early universe by observing our "cosmological backyard"-the Local Group and its vicinity. This special issue of the open-access journal Advances in Astronomy is a snapshot of the current state of the art of dwarf-galaxy cosmology.

  20. Investigating Dwarf Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasooriya, Sachithra; Dunn, Jacqueline M.

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have proposed that dwarf elliptical / spheroidal galaxies form through the transformation of dwarf irregular galaxies. Early and late type dwarfs resemble each other in terms of their observed colors and light distributions (each can often be represented by exponential disks), providing reason to propose an evolutionary link between the two types. The existence of dwarf spirals has been largely debated. However, more and more recent studies are using the designation of dwarf spiral to describe their targets of interest. This project seeks to explore where dwarf spirals fit into the above mentioned evolutionary sequence, if at all. Optical colors will be compared between a sample of dwarf irregular, dwarf elliptical, and dwarf spiral galaxies. The dwarf irregular and dwarf elliptical samples have previously been found to overlap in both optical color and surface brightness profile shape when limiting the samples to their fainter members. A preliminary comparison including the dwarf spiral sample will be presented here, along with a comparison of available ultraviolet and near-infrared data. Initial results indicate a potential evolutionary link that merits further investigation.

  1. Hubble space telescope grism spectroscopy of extreme starbursts across cosmic time: The role of dwarf galaxies in the star formation history of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atek, Hakim; Kneib, Jean-Paul [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, EPFL, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Pacifici, Camilla [Yonsei University Observatory, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Malkan, Matthew; Ross, Nathaniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Charlot, Stephane; Lehnert, Matthew [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Lee, Janice [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bedregal, Alejandro [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bunker, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, OX13RH (United Kingdom); Colbert, James W.; Rafelski, Marc [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Hathi, Nimish [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Siana, Brian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Teplitz, Harry I. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Near infrared slitless spectroscopy with the Wide Field Camera 3, on board the Hubble Space Telescope, offers a unique opportunity to study low-mass galaxy populations at high redshift (z ∼ 1-2). While most high-z surveys are biased toward massive galaxies, we are able to select sources via their emission lines that have very faint continua. We investigate the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass (M{sub *}) relation for about 1000 emission line galaxies identified over a wide redshift range of 0.3 ≲ z ≲ 2.3. We use the Hα emission as an accurate SFR indicator and correct the broadband photometry for the strong nebular contribution to derive accurate stellar masses down to M{sub *} ∼10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}. We focus here on a subsample of galaxies that show extremely strong emission lines (EELGs) with rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 200 to 1500 Å. This population consists of outliers to the normal SFR-M{sub *} sequence with much higher specific SFRs (>10 Gyr{sup –1}). While on-sequence galaxies follow continuous star formation processes, EELGs are thought to be caught during an extreme burst of star formation that can double their stellar mass in a period of less than 100 Myr. The contribution of the starburst population to the total star formation density appears to be larger than what has been reported for more massive galaxies in previous studies. In the complete mass range 8.2 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub ☉}) <10 and a SFR lower completeness limit of about 2 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (10 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) at z ∼ 1 (z ∼ 2), we find that starbursts having EW{sub rest}(Hα) > 300, 200, and 100 Å contribute up to ∼13%, 18%, and 34%, respectively, to the total SFR of emission-line-selected sample at z ∼ 1-2. The comparison with samples of massive galaxies shows an increase in the contribution of starbursts toward lower masses.

  2. Super Star Cluster Nebula in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 660

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, J. P.; Turner, J. L.; Tsai, C.-W.; Beck, S. C.; Ho, P. T. P.

    2004-12-01

    We have mapped the starburst galaxy NGC 660 at 100mas resolution at K band (1.3 cm) with the NRAO Very Large Array. A peculiar galaxy at a distance of 13 Mpc, NGC 660 contains concentrated central star formation of power ˜ 2 x 1010 Lsun. Our 1.3 cm continuum image reveals a bright, compact source of less than 10 pc extent with a rising spectral index. We infer that this is optically thick free-free emission from a super star cluster nebula. The nebula is less than 10 pc in size, comparable in luminosity to the ``supernebula" in the dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253. We estimate that there are a few thousand O stars contained in this single young cluster. There are a number of other weaker continuum sources, either slightly smaller or more evolved clusters of similar size within the central 300 parsecs of the galaxy. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  3. A multifrequency view of starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, J K; Schoeneberg, S

    2011-01-01

    During the past few years, first observations of starburst galaxies at >GeV energies could be made with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (GeV range) and Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (TeV range). The two nearest starbursts, M82 and NGC253 were detected, and most recently, the detection of two starburst-Seyfert composites (NGC1068 and NGC4945) were reported. The emission for the two starbursts is best explained by hadronic interactions, and thus providing a first, unique opportunity to study the role of cosmic rays in galaxies. In this paper, the role of cosmic rays for the non-thermal component of galaxies is reviewed by discussing the entire non-thermal frequency range from radio emission to TeV energies. In particular, the interpretation of radio emission arising from electron synchrotron radiation is predicted to be correlated to TeV emission coming from interactions of accelerated hadrons. This is observed for the few objects known at TeV energies, but the correlation needs to be established with si...

  4. Accretion phenomena in nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibali, F.; Tosi, M.; Aloisi, A.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Cignoni, M.; Ciotti, L.; Cusano, F.; Nipoti, C.; Sacchi, E.; Paris, D.; Romano, D.

    2017-03-01

    We present two pilot studies for the search and characterization of accretion events in star-forming dwarf galaxies. Our strategy consists of two complementary approaches: i) the direct search for stellar substructures around dwarf galaxies through deep wide-field imaging, and ii) the characterization of the chemical properties in these systems up to large galacto-centric distances. We show our results for two star-forming dwarf galaxies, the starburst irregular NGC 4449, and the extremely metal-poor dwarf DDO 68.

  5. Starbursts in Isolated Galaxies: the influence of the ISM model

    CERN Document Server

    Theis, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We study the stability properties of isolated star forming dwarf galaxies which undergo dynamically driven starbursts induced by stellar feedback. Here we focus on the impact of the adopted ISM model, i.e. either a diffuse or a clumpy ISM. We apply a one-zone model extended for active dynamical evolution. We found two major types of repetitive star bursts: one set (type A) of quasi-periodic starbursts is related to the dynamical timescale of the galaxy. In that case, the star formation follows the variations of the gas density induced by decaying virial oscillations. The second set (type B) of starbursts is characterized by long quiescence periods given by the sum of the dynamical and the dissipative timescale: after a first burst, the inserted energy leads to a substantial expansion of the system, by this stopping any significant star formation activity. A next burst might occur, when the gas reaches high densities again, i.e. after the gas recollapsed and the energy injected by stellar feedback is dissipate...

  6. Pre-Starbursts in Luminous IR Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Y; Hwang, C Y; Lo, K Y; Veilleux, S; Gao, Yu; Gruendl, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    We present first results of our on-going BIMA Key Project: imaging the CO(1-0) emission from a sample of 10 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) that are at various merging stages, with special emphasis on systems apparently in the early/intermediate stages of merging. We present here CO images with $\\sim 5''$ resolution. An important result is the recognition of a plausible pre-starburst phase in some early LIRG mergers (e.g., Arp 302 and NGC 6670). Our initial analysis suggests that a merger-induced starburst phase may not begin before the nuclear separation between the merging galaxies reaches roughly 10 kpc. The surface gas density seems to increase from a few times $10^2 \\Msun pc^{-2} to >10^3 \\Msun pc^{-2}$ while the prominent CO extent systematically decreases as merging progresses.

  7. The Chandra view of NGC1800 and the X-ray scaling properties of dwarf starbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, J; Ponman, T J

    2004-01-01

    The superb spatial resolution of Chandra is utilized to study the X-ray morphology of the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC1800 embedded in a small group of galaxies. Diffuse galactic emission is detected, extending several kpc above the galactic plane, with an overall morphology similar to the galactic winds seen in nearby X-ray bright starburst galaxies. This makes NGC1800 the most distant dwarf starburst with a clear detection of diffuse X-ray emission. The diffuse X-ray luminosity of 1.3+/-0.3 *10^38 erg/s accounts for at least 60 per cent of the total soft X-ray output of the galaxy. A hot gas temperature of kT=0.25 keV and metallicity Z~0.05Z_Sun are derived, the latter in consistency with results from optical spectroscopy of the interstellar medium. Our failure to detect any hot gas associated with the embedding galaxy group translates into an upper limit to the group X-ray luminosity of L_X<10^41 erg/s. There is no convincing evidence that the outflowing wind of NGC1800 is currently interacting with any i...

  8. An Atlas of Starburst Galaxy Emission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of high ionization lines (e.g. [Ne V] and He II λ4686) from star-forming regions have prompted a need to study the production mechanisms of these high ionization lines. Our study addresses the following questions: 1. What are specific cloud parameters that influence the strength of emission lines in starburst galaxies? 2. How can these parameters be tuned in simulations to match observations? We adopt the locally optimally emitting cloud model, a model previously used to study AGN, for our study of star-forming regions. We present the results of hundreds of photoionization simulations spanning 15 orders of magnitude in hydrogen ionizing photon flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density. We vary both properties of the starbursts (SEDs, evolutionary histories, ages), as well as cloud properties (such as the abundances and metallicity), tracking nearly 100 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Finally, we compare these results to the results of other studies on star-forming regions. The results of our photoionization calculations should prove useful for the analysis of starburst galaxy emission-line data.

  9. A multiwavelength study of the starburst galaxy NGC 7771

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Richard I.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Ward, Martin J.

    1997-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the interacting starburst galaxy NGC 7771, including new optical and ultraviolet spectra and a previously unpublished soft X-ray ROSAT image and spectrum. The FIR, radio, and X-ray fluxes suggest that a massive burst of star formation is currently in progress, but the small equivalent width of the Balmer emission lines, the weak UV flux, the low abundance of ionized oxygen, and the shape of the optical spectrum lead us to conclude that there are few O stars. This might normally suggest that star formation has ceased, but the barred gravitational potential and large gas reserves of the galaxy imply that this should not be so, and we therefore consider other explanations. We argue that the observations cannot be due to effects of geometry, density-bounded nebulae, or dust within the nebulae, and conclude that a truncated IMF is required. The dwarf galaxy NGC 7770 appears to be in the initial stages of a merger with NGC 7771, and the resulting tidal perturbations may have induced the apparent two-armed spiral pattern, and driven a substantial fraction of the disk gas inwards. The presence of a bulge in NGC 7771 may be moderating the starburst so that, while still occurring on a large scale with a supernova rate of 0.8-1/yr, it is less violent and the IMF has a relatively low upper mass limit. We find that there is a cluster of stars obscuring part of the starburst region, and we offer an explanation of its origin.

  10. A Multiwavelength Study of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 7771

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Richard I.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Ward, Martin J.

    1997-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the interacting starburst galaxy NGC 7771, including new optical and ultra-violet spectra and a previously unpublished soft X-ray ROSAT image and spectrum. The far-infrared, radio, and X-ray fluxes suggest that a massive burst of star-formation is currently in progress but the small equivalent width of the Balmer emission lines (equivalent width H(alpha approximately equals 100 A), the weak UV flux, the low abundance of ionised oxygen, and the shape of the optical spectrum lead us to conclude that there are few 0 stars. This might normally suggest that star-formation has ceased but the galaxy's barred gravitational potential and large gas reserves imply that this should not be so, and we therefore consider other explanations. We argue that the observations cannot be due to effects of geometry, density bounded nebulae, or dust within the nebulae, and conclude that a truncated IMF is required. The dwarf galaxy NGC 7770 appears to be in the initial stages of a merger with NGC 7771, and the resulting tidal perturbations may have induced the apparent two-armed spiral pattern, and driven a substantial fraction of the disk gas inwards. The presence of a bulge in NGC 7771 may be moderating the starburst so that, while still occuring on a large scale with a supernova rate of 0.8-1/yr, it is less violent and the IMF has a relatively low upper mass limit. We find that there is a cluster of stars obscuring part of the starburst region, and we offer an explanation of its origin.

  11. Connections between galaxy mergers and Starburst: evidence from local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Wentao; Zhang, Youcai

    2014-01-01

    Major mergers and interactions between gas-rich galaxies with comparable masses are thought to be the main triggers of starburst. In this work, we study, for a large stellar mass range, the interaction rate of the starburst galaxies in the local universe. We focus independently on central and satellite star forming galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Here the starburst galaxies are selected in the star formation rate (SFR) stellar mass plane with SFR five times larger than the median value found for "star forming" galaxies of the same stellar mass. Through visual inspection of their images together with close companions determined using spectroscopic redshifts, we find that ~50% of the "starburst" populations show evident merger features, i.e., tidal tails, bridges between galaxies, double cores and close companions. In contrast, in the control sample we selected from the normal star forming galaxies, only ~19% of galaxies are associated with evident mergers. The interaction rates may increa...

  12. From Starburst to Quiescence: Testing AGN feedback in Rapidly Quenching Post-Starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yesuf, Hassen M; Trump, Jonathan R; Koo, David C; Fang, Jerome J; Liu, F S; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses SDSS, GALEX, and WISE observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts in the narrow mass range $\\log M(M_\\odot) = 10.3-10.7$, and identifies "transiting" post-starbursts which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, $\\sim 0.3\\%$ of galaxies are starbursts, $\\sim 0.1\\%$ are quenched post-starbursts, and $\\sim 0.5\\%$ are the transiting types in between. The transiting post-starbursts have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The AGN fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about 3 times higher ($\\gtrsim 36 \\pm 8 \\%$) than that of normal star-forming galaxies of the same mass, but ther...

  13. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  14. HI Recycling Formation of Tidal Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Duc, P A; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Brinks, Elias

    2000-01-01

    Galactic collisions trigger a number of phenomena, such as transportation inward of gas from distances of up to kiloparsecs from the center of a galaxy to the nuclear region, fuelling a central starburst or nuclear activity. The inverse process, the ejection of material into the intergalactic medium by tidal forces, is another important aspect and can be studied especially well through detailed HI observations of interacting systems which have shown that a large fraction of the gaseous component of colliding galaxies can be expelled. Part of this tidal debris might fall back, be dispersed throughout the intergalactic medium or recondense to form a new generation of galaxies: the so-called tidal dwarf galaxies. The latter are nearby examples of galaxies in formation. The properties of these recycled objects are reviewed here and different ways to identify them are reviewed.

  15. THE PANCHROMATIC STARBURST IRREGULAR DWARF SURVEY (STARBIRDS): OBSERVATIONS AND DATA ARCHIVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Mitchell, Noah P.; Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    Understanding star formation in resolved low mass systems requires the integration of information obtained from observations at different wavelengths. We have combined new and archival multi-wavelength observations on a set of 20 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies to create a data archive of calibrated, homogeneously reduced images. Named the panchromatic “STARBurst IRregular Dwarf Survey” archive, the data are publicly accessible through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes. This first release of the archive includes images from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Telescope (GALEX), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Spitzer Space Telescope (Spitzer) Multiband Imaging Photometer instrument. The data sets include flux calibrated, background subtracted images, that are registered to the same world coordinate system. Additionally, a set of images are available that are all cropped to match the HST field of view. The GALEX and Spitzer images are available with foreground and background contamination masked. Larger GALEX images extending to 4 times the optical extent of the galaxies are also available. Finally, HST images convolved with a 5″ point spread function and rebinned to the larger pixel scale of the GALEX and Spitzer 24 μm images are provided. Future additions are planned that will include data at other wavelengths such as Spitzer IRAC, ground-based Hα, Chandra X-ray, and Green Bank Telescope H i imaging.

  16. From starburst to quiescence: testing active galactic nucleus feedback in rapidly quenching post-starburst galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Wild, Vivienne [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M {sub ☉}) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies 'transiting' post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ∼0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ∼0.1% are QPSBs, and ∼0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (≳ 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of ≳ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as 'dust-obscured galaxies' (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of ≳ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during

  17. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies keystones of galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Gallagher, S; Wyse, F G

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  18. 3D Simulations of Galactic Winds in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Marcolini, A; D'Ercole, A; Marcolini, Andrea; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Ercole, Annibale D'

    2002-01-01

    We present 3D hydrodynamical simulations of galactic winds in dwarf, gas-rich galaxies. The galaxy is moving through the ICM of a small galaxy group at v=200 km/s. The ram pressure removes the galactic gas at large radii, but does not strongly influence the ISM near the center. A starburst generates a galactic wind. The newly produced metals are expelled in the ICM and carried to large distance from the galaxy by the ram pressure. 500 Myr after the starburst only a few percent of the heavy elements produced are present in the central region of the dwarf galaxy. A large collection of ram pressure + wind models will be presented in a forthcoming paper.

  19. A top-heavy stellar initial mass function in starbursts as an explanation for the high mass-to-light ratios of ultra compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dabringhausen, J; Baumgardt, H

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown recently that the dynamical V-band mass-to-light ratios of compact stellar systems with masses from 10^6 to 10^8 Solar masses are not consistent with the predictions from simple stellar population (SSP) models. Top-heavy stellar initial mass functions (IMFs) in these so-called ultra compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) offer an attractive explanation for this finding, the stellar remnants and retained stellar envelopes providing the unseen mass. We therefore construct a model which quantifies by how much the IMFs of UCDs would have to deviate in the intermediate-mass and high-mass range from the canonical IMF in order to account for the enhanced M/L_V ratio of the UCDs. The deduced high-mass IMF in the UCDs depends on the age of the UCDs and the number of faint products of stellar evolution retained by them. Assuming that the IMF in the UCDs is a three-part power-law equal to the canonical IMF in the low-mass range and taking 20% as a plausible choice for the fraction of the remnants of high-mass s...

  20. Calibrating UV Star Formation Rates for Dwarf Galaxies from STARBIRDS

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dolphin, Andrew E; Mitchell, Noah P

    2015-01-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing star formation activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color-magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The datasets are from the panchromatic STARBurst IRregular Dwarf Survey (STARBIRDS) and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, HST optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs - using four different models - agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far UV predicted fluxes do not. Further, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated far U...

  1. Resolving The Generation of Starburst Winds in Galaxy Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Murray, Norman; Hernquist, Lars; Narayanan, Desika; Hayward, Christopher C

    2013-01-01

    We study galaxy super-winds driven in major mergers, using pc-resolution simulations with detailed models for stellar feedback that can self-consistently follow the formation/destruction of GMCs and generation of winds. The models include molecular cooling, star formation at high densities in GMCs, and gas recycling and feedback from SNe (I&II), stellar winds, and radiation pressure. We study mergers of systems from SMC-like dwarfs and Milky Way analogues to z~2 starburst disks. Multi-phase super-winds are generated in all passages, with outflow rates up to ~1000 M_sun/yr. However, the wind mass-loading efficiency (outflow rate divided by SFR) is similar to that in isolated galaxy counterparts of each merger: it depends more on global galaxy properties (mass, size, escape velocity) than on the dynamical state of the merger. Winds tend to be bi- or uni-polar, but multiple 'events' build up complex morphologies with overlapping, differently-oriented bubbles/shells at a range of radii. The winds have complex...

  2. AGB populations in post-starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Melnick, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In a previous paper we compared the SEDs of a sample of 808 K+A galaxies from the FUV to the MIR to the predictions of the spectrum synthesis models explicitly using AGB components. Here we use the new AGB-light models from C. Maraston (including less fuel for the later stages of stellar evolution and improved calibrations) to address the discrepancies between our observations and the AGB-heavy models used in our previous paper, which over-predict the infrared fluxes of post-starburst galaxies by an order of magnitude. The new models yield a much better fit to the data, especially in the near-IR, compared to previous realizations where AGB stars caused a large excess in the H and K bands. We { also compare the predictions of the M2013 models to those with BC03 and find that both reproduce the observations equally well. } We still find a significant discrepancy with { both sets of models} in the Y and J bands, which however is probably due to the spectral features of AGB stars. We also find that { both the M20...

  3. Are Diffuse High Energy Neutrinos from Starburst Galaxies Observable?

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2006-01-01

    Loeb and Waxman have argued that high energy neutrinos from the decay of pions produced in interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar gas in starburst galaxies would be produced with a large enough flux to be observable. Their model is reexamined here and it is shown that the the neutrino flux from starburst galaxies, even given the various assumptions made by them, is more than an order of magnitude lower than the flux which they predict. The predicted neutrino flux would be below the atmospheric neutrino foreground flux at energies below 300 TeV and therefore would be unobservable. PeV neutrinos from starburst galaxies are also unlikely to be detected. Compared with predicted fluxes from other extragalactic high energy neutrino sources, PeV starburst neutrinos would have a flux considerably below that predicted for AGN models.

  4. Post-starburst galaxies: more than just an interesting curiosity

    CERN Document Server

    Wild, Vivienne; Johansson, Peter H; Tresse, Laurence; Charlot, Stephane; Pollo, Agnieszka; Le Fevre, Olivier; de Ravel, Loic

    2008-01-01

    From the VIMOS VLT DEEP Survey (VVDS) we select a sample of 16 galaxies with spectra which identify them as having recently undergone a strong starburst and subsequent fast quenching of star formation. These post-starburst galaxies lie in the redshift range 0.510^9.75Msun. They have a number density of 1x10^-4 per Mpc^3, almost two orders of magnitude sparser than the full galaxy population with the same mass limit. We compare with simulations to show that the galaxies are consistent with being the descendants of gas rich major mergers. Starburst mass fractions must be larger than ~5-10% and decay times shorter than ~10^8 years for post-starburst spectral signatures to be observed in the simulations. We find that the presence of black hole feedback does not greatly affect the evolution of the simulated merger remnants through the post-starburst phase. The multiwavelength spectral energy distributions of the post-starburst galaxies show that 5/16 have completely ceased the formation of new stars. These 5 galax...

  5. Starburst Galaxies: Outflows of Metals and Energy into the IGM

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, David K; Ptak, Andrew; Schlegel, Eric; Tremonti, Christy; Tsuru, Takeshi; Tuellmann, Ralph; Zezas, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    What is the contribution of mass, metals and energy from starburst galaxies to the Intergalactic Medium? Starburst galaxies drive galactic-scale outflows or "superwinds" that may be responsible for removing metals from galaxies and polluting the Intergalactic Medium (IGM). In the last decade tremendous progress was made in mapping cool entrained gas in superwinds through UV/optical imaging and absorption line spectroscopy. These studies demonstrated that superwinds are ubiquitous in galaxies forming stars at high surface densities and that the most powerful starbursts can drive outflows near escape velocity. Theoretical models of galaxy evolution have begun to incorporate superwinds, using various ad-hoc prescriptions based on our knowledge of the cool gas. However, these efforts are fundamentally impeded by our lack of information about the hot phase of these outflows. The hot X-ray emitting phase of a superwind contains the majority of its energy and newly-synthesized metals, and given its high specific ene...

  6. The Evolution of Stars and Gas in starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, R C; Lacerda, R R; Fernandes, Roberto Cid; Leao, Joao Rodrigo Souza; Lacerda, Reiner Rodrigues

    2003-01-01

    In systems undergoing starbursts the evolution of the young stellar population is expected to drive changes in the emission line properties. This evolution is usually studied theoretically, with a combination of evolutionary synthesis models for the spectral energy distribution of starbursts and photoionization calculations. In this paper we present a more empirical approach to this issue. We apply empirical population synthesis techniques to samples of Starburst and HII galaxies in order to measure their evolutionary state and correlate the results with their emission line properties. A couple of useful tools are introduced which greatly facilitate the interpretation of the synthesis: (1) an evolutionary diagram, whose axis are the strengths of the young, intermediate age and old components of the stellar population mix, and (2) the mean age of stars associated with the starburst, $\\ov{t}_{SB}$. These tools are tested with grids of theoretical galaxy spectra and found to work very well even when only a small...

  7. Hubble Space Telescope Grism Spectroscopy of Extreme Starbursts Across Cosmic Time: The Role of Dwarf Galaxies in the Star Formation History of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Atek, Hakim; Pacifici, Camilla; Malkan, Matthew; Charlot, Stephane; Lee, Janice; Bedregal, Alejandro; Bunker, Andrew J; Colbert, James W; Dressler, Alan; Hathi, Nimish; Lehnert, Matthew; Martin, Crystal L; McCarthy, Patrick; Rafelski, Marc; Ross, Nathaniel; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I

    2014-01-01

    Near infrared slitless spectroscopy with the Wide Field Camera 3, onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, offers a unique opportunity to study low-mass galaxy populations at high-redshift ($z\\sim$1-2). While most high$-z$ surveys are biased towards massive galaxies, we are able to select sources via their emission lines that have very-faint continua. We investigate the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass ($M_{\\star}$) relation for about 1000 emission-line galaxies identified over a wide redshift range of $0.3 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 2.3$. We use the H$_{\\alpha}$ emission as an accurate SFR indicator and correct the broadband photometry for the strong nebular contribution to derive accurate stellar masses down to $M_{\\star} \\sim 10^{7} M_{\\odot}$. We focus here on a subsample of galaxies that show extremely strong emission lines (EELGs) with rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 200 to 1500 \\AA. This population consists of outliers to the normal SFR-$M_{\\star}$ sequence with much higher specific SFRs ($> 10$ Gy...

  8. Detection of Gamma Rays from a Starburst Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Becherini, Y.; Behera, B.; Bernlöhr, K.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Borrel, V.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bühler, R.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fiasson, A.; Förster, A.; Fontaine, G.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gérard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Göring, D.; Hauser, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jung, I.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Keogh, D.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Marandon, V.; Martineau-Huynh, O.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-F.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Orford, K. J.; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raubenheimer, B. C.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sikora, M.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Superina, G.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Venter, L.; Vialle, J. P.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.

    2009-11-01

    Starburst galaxies exhibit in their central regions a highly increased rate of supernovae, the remnants of which are thought to accelerate energetic cosmic rays up to energies of ~1015 electron volts. We report the detection of gamma rays—tracers of such cosmic rays—from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 using the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray flux above 220 billion electron volts is F = (5.5 ± 1.0stat ± 2.8sys) × 10-13 cm-2 s-1, implying a cosmic-ray density about three orders of magnitude larger than that in the center of the Milky Way. The fraction of cosmic-ray energy channeled into gamma rays in this starburst environment is five times as large as that in our Galaxy.

  9. Detection of Gamma Rays From a Starburst Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F

    2009-01-01

    Starburst galaxies exhibit in their central regions a highly increased rate of supernovae, the remnants of which are thought to accelerate energetic cosmic rays up to energies of ~ 10^15 eV. We report the detection of gamma rays -- tracers of such cosmic rays -- from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 using the H.E.S.S. array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray flux above 220 GeV is F = (5.5 +/- 1.0stat +/- 2.8sys) x 10^-13 ph. s-1 cm-2, implying a cosmic-ray density about three orders of magnitude larger than that in the center of the Milky Way. The fraction of cosmic-ray energy channeled into gamma rays in this starburst environment is 5 times larger than that in our Galaxy.

  10. Detection of gamma rays from a starburst galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Barres de Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bühler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L-M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Füssling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J-P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Paz Arribas, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P-O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Superina, G; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2009-11-20

    Starburst galaxies exhibit in their central regions a highly increased rate of supernovae, the remnants of which are thought to accelerate energetic cosmic rays up to energies of approximately 10(15) electron volts. We report the detection of gamma rays--tracers of such cosmic rays--from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 using the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray flux above 220 billion electron volts is F = (5.5 +/- 1.0(stat) +/- 2.8(sys)) x 10(-13) cm(-2) s(-1), implying a cosmic-ray density about three orders of magnitude larger than that in the center of the Milky Way. The fraction of cosmic-ray energy channeled into gamma rays in this starburst environment is five times as large as that in our Galaxy.

  11. Starburst galaxies as seen by gamma-ray telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ohm, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Starburst galaxies have a highly increased star-formation rate compared to regular galaxies and inject huge amounts of kinetic power into the interstellar medium via supersonic stellar winds, and supernova explosions. Supernova remnants, which are considered to be the main source of cosmic rays (CRs), form an additional, significant energy and pressure component and might influence the star-formation process in a major way. Observations of starburst galaxies at \\gamma-ray energies gives us the unique opportunity to study non-thermal phenomena associated with hadronic CRs and their relation to the star-formation process. In this work, recent observations of starburst galaxies with space and ground-based \\gamma-ray telescopes are being reviewed and the current state of theoretical work on the \\gamma-ray emission is discussed. A special emphasis is put on the prospects of the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array for the study of starburst galaxies in particular and star-forming galaxies in general.

  12. Starburst galaxies as seen by gamma-ray telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohm, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Starburst galaxies have a highly increased star-formation rate compared to regular galaxies and inject huge amounts of kinetic power into the interstellar medium via supersonic stellar winds, and supernova explosions. Supernova remnants, which are considered to be the main source of cosmic rays (CRs), form an additional, significant energy and pressure component and might influence the star-formation process in a major way. Observations of starburst galaxies at γ-ray energies give us the unique opportunity to study non-thermal phenomena associated with hadronic CRs and their relation to the star-formation process. In this work, recent observations of starburst galaxies with space and ground-based γ-ray telescopes are being reviewed, and the current state of theoretical work on the γ-ray emission is discussed. A special emphasis is put on the prospects of the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array for the study of starburst galaxies in particular and star-forming galaxies in general. xml:lang="fr"

  13. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    North, P.; Cescutti, G.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Lemasle, B.; Venn, K. A.; Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Primas, F.; Francois, P.

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other

  14. Dark influences II. Gas and star formation in minor mergers of dwarf galaxies with dark satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starkenburg, T. K.; Helmi, A.; Sales, L. V.

    2016-01-01

    Context. It has been proposed that mergers induce starbursts and lead to important morphological changes in galaxies. Most studies so far have focused on large galaxies, but dwarfs might also experience such events, since the halo mass function is scale-free in the concordance cosmological model.

  15. New constraints on the escape of ionizing photons from starburst galaxies using ionization-parameter mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Veilleux, Sylvain [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); McDonald, Michael, E-mail: jazast@umich.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    The fate of ionizing radiation in starburst galaxies is key to understanding cosmic reionization. However, the galactic parameters on which the escape fraction of ionizing radiation depend are not well understood. Ionization-parameter mapping provides a simple, yet effective, way to study the radiative transfer in starburst galaxies. We obtain emission-line ratio maps of [S III]/[S II] for six, nearby, dwarf starbursts: NGC 178, NGC 1482, NGC 1705, NGC 3125, NGC 7126, and He 2-10. The narrowband images are obtained with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. Using these data, we previously reported the discovery of an optically thin ionization cone in NGC 5253, and here we also discover a similar ionization cone in NGC 3125. This latter cone has an opening angle of 40° ± 5° (0.4 sr), indicating that the passageways through which ionizing radiation may travel correspond to a small solid angle. Additionally, there are three sample galaxies that have winds and/or superbubble activity, which should be conducive to escaping radiation, yet they are optically thick. These results support the scenario that an orientation bias limits our ability to directly detect escaping Lyman continuum in many starburst galaxies. A comparison of the star formation properties and histories of the optically thin and thick galaxies is consistent with the model that high escape fractions are limited to galaxies that are old enough (≳3 Myr) for mechanical feedback to have cleared optically thin passageways in the interstellar medium, but young enough (≲5 Myr) that the ionizing stars are still present.

  16. New Constraints on the Escape of Ionizing Photons from Starburst Galaxies Using Ionization-parameter Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McDonald, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The fate of ionizing radiation in starburst galaxies is key to understanding cosmic reionization. However, the galactic parameters on which the escape fraction of ionizing radiation depend are not well understood. Ionization-parameter mapping provides a simple, yet effective, way to study the radiative transfer in starburst galaxies. We obtain emission-line ratio maps of [S III]/[S II] for six, nearby, dwarf starbursts: NGC 178, NGC 1482, NGC 1705, NGC 3125, NGC 7126, and He 2-10. The narrowband images are obtained with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. Using these data, we previously reported the discovery of an optically thin ionization cone in NGC 5253, and here we also discover a similar ionization cone in NGC 3125. This latter cone has an opening angle of 40° ± 5° (0.4 sr), indicating that the passageways through which ionizing radiation may travel correspond to a small solid angle. Additionally, there are three sample galaxies that have winds and/or superbubble activity, which should be conducive to escaping radiation, yet they are optically thick. These results support the scenario that an orientation bias limits our ability to directly detect escaping Lyman continuum in many starburst galaxies. A comparison of the star formation properties and histories of the optically thin and thick galaxies is consistent with the model that high escape fractions are limited to galaxies that are old enough (gsim3 Myr) for mechanical feedback to have cleared optically thin passageways in the interstellar medium, but young enough (lsim5 Myr) that the ionizing stars are still present.

  17. Starbursts From 30 Doradus to Lyman Break Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Grijs, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Starbursts are important features of early galaxy evolution. Many of the distant, high-redshift galaxies we are able to detect are in a starbursting phase, often apparently provoked by a violent gravitational interaction with another galaxy. In fact, if we did not know that major starbursts existed, these conference proceedings testify that we would indeed have difficulties explaining the key properties of the Universe! These conference proceedings cover starbursts from the small-scale star-forming regions in nearby galaxies to galaxy-wide events at high redshifts; one of the major themes of the conference proved to be "scalability", i.e., can we scale up the small-scale events to describe the physics on larger scales. The key outcome of this meeting – and these proceedings – is a resounding "yes" as answer to this fundamental, yet profound question. The enhanced synergy facilitated by the collaboration among observers using cutting-edge ground and space-based facilities, theorists and modellers has made ...

  18. Lopsidedness in dwarf irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, A B; Almoznino, E; Van Zee, L; Salzer, J J; Heller, Ana B.; Brosch, Noah; Almoznino, Elchanan; Zee, Liese van; Salzer, John J.

    2000-01-01

    We quantify the amplitude of the lopsidedness, the azimuthal angular asymmetry index, and the concentration of star forming regions, as represented by the distribution of the H$\\alpha$ emission, in a sample of 78 late-type irregular galaxies. We bin the observed galaxies in two groups representing blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and low surface brightness dwarf galaxies (LSBs). The light distribution is analysed with a novel algorithm, which allows detection of details in the light distribution pattern. We find that while the asymmetry of the underlying continuum light, representing the older stellar generations, is relatively small, the H$\\alpha$ emission is very asymmetric and is correlated in position angle with the continuum light. We test a model of random star formation over the extent of a galaxy by simulating HII regions in artificial dwarf galaxies. The implication is that random star formation over the full extent of a galaxy may be generated in LSB dwarf-irregular galaxies but not in BCD galaxies.

  19. The Activity of the Neighbours of AGN and Starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Koulouridis, E; Chavushyan, V; Dultzin, D; Krongold, Y; Georgantopoulos, I; Leon-Tavares, J

    2011-01-01

    We present a follow-up study on a series of papers concerning the role of close interactions as a possible triggering mechanism of the activity of AGN and starburst galaxies. We have already studied the close (< 100 kpc/h) and the large scale (< 1 Mpc/h) environment of Sy1, Sy2 and Bright IRAS galaxies (BIRG) and their respective control samples. The results led us to the conclusion that a close encounter appears capable of activating a sequence where a normal galaxy becomes first a starburst, then a Sy2 and finally a Sy1. However since both galaxies of an interacting pair should be affected, we present here optical spectroscopy and X-ray imaging of the neighbouring galaxies around our original Seyfert and BIRG galaxy samples. Based on optical spectroscopy we find that more than 70% of all neighbouring galaxies exhibit thermal or/and nuclear activity (namely enhanced star formation, starbursting and/or AGN), while an additional X-ray analysis showed that this percentage can reach up to 100%. Furthermore...

  20. Morphological Mutations of Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hensler, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies (DGs) are extremely challenging objects in extragalactic astrophysics. They are expected to originate as the first units in Cold Dark-Matter cosmology. They are the galaxy type most sensitive to environmental influences and their division into multiple types with various properties have invoked the picture of their variant morphological transformations. Detailed observations reveal characteristics which allow to deduce the evolutionary paths and to witness how the environment has affected the evolution. Here we review peculiarities of general morphological DG types and refer to processes which can deplete gas-rich irregular DGs leading to dwarf ellipticals, while gas replenishment implies an evolutionary cycling. Finally, as the less understood DG types the Milky Way satellite dwarf spheroidal galaxies are discussed in the context of transformation.

  1. Search for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies During Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Amorin, R; Aguerri, J A; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    2008-01-01

    Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies are metal poor systems going through a major starburst that cannot last for long. We have identified galaxies which may be BCDs during quiescence (QBCD), i.e., before the characteristic starburst sets in or when it has faded away. These QBCD galaxies are assumed to be like the BCD host galaxies. The SDSS/DR6 database provides ~21500 QBCD candidates. We also select from SDSS/DR6 a complete sample of BCD galaxies to serve as reference. The properties of these two galaxy sets have been computed and compared. The QBCD candidates are thirty times more abundant than the BCDs, with their luminosity functions being very similar except for the scaling factor, and the expected luminosity dimming associated with the end of the starburst. QBCDs are redder than BCDs, and they have larger HII region based oxygen abundance. QBCDs also have lower surface brightness. The BCD candidates turn out to be the QBCD candidates with the largest specific star formation rate (actually, with the largest...

  2. New Constraints on the Escape of Ionizing Photons From Starburst Galaxies Using Ionization-Parameter Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Zastrow, Jordan; Veilleux, Sylvain; McDonald, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The fate of ionizing radiation in starburst galaxies is key to understanding cosmic reionization. However, the galactic parameters on which the escape fraction of ionizing radiation depend are not well understood. Ionization-parameter mapping provides a simple, yet effective, way to study the radiative transfer in starburst galaxies. We obtain emission-line ratio maps of [SIII]/[SII] for six, nearby, dwarf starbursts: NGC 178, NGC 1482, NGC 1705, NGC 3125, NGC 7126, and He 2-10. The narrow-band images are obtained with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. Using these data, we previously reported the discovery of an optically thin ionization cone in NGC 5253, and here we also discover a similar ionization cone in NGC 3125. This latter cone has an opening angle of 40+/-5 degrees (0.4 ster), indicating that the passageways through which ionizing radiation may travel correspond to a small solid angle. Additionally, there are three sample galaxies that have winds and/or superbubble act...

  3. Dwarf galaxies : Important clues to galaxy formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, E

    2003-01-01

    The smallest dwarf galaxies are the most straight forward objects in which to study star formation processes on a galactic scale. They are typically single cell star forming entities, and as small potentials in orbit around a much larger one they are unlikely to accrete much (if any) extraneous matt

  4. Towards a Precision Cosmology from Starburst Galaxies at z>2

    CERN Document Server

    Siegel, E R; Gallego, J P; López, M O; Hidalgo, P R; Gallego, Jorge P.

    2004-01-01

    This work investigates the use of a well-known empirical correlation between the velocity dispersion, metallicity, and luminosity in H beta of nearby HII galaxies to measure the distances to HII-like starburst galaxies at high redshifts. This correlation is applied to a sample of 15 starburst galaxies with redshifts between z=2.17 and z=3.39 to constrain Omega_m, using data available from the literature. A best-fit value of Omega_m = 0.21 +0.30 -0.12 in a Lambda-dominated universe and of Omega_m = 0.11 +0.37 -0.19 in an open universe is obtained. A detailed analysis of systematic errors, their causes, and their effects on the values derived for the distance moduli and Omega_m is carried out. A discussion of how future work will improve constraints on Omega_m by reducing the errors is also presented.

  5. The crystalline fraction of interstellar silicates in starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kemper, F; Woods, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    We present a model using the evolution of the stellar population in a starburst galaxy to predict the crystallinity of the silicates in the interstellar medium of this galaxy. We take into account dust production in stellar ejecta, and amorphisation and destruction in the interstellar medium and find that a detectable amount of crystalline silicates may be formed, particularly at high star formation rates, and in case supernovae are efficient dust producers. We discuss the effect of dust destruction and amorphisation by supernovae, and the effect of a low dust-production efficiency by supernovae, and find that when taking this into account, crystallinity in the interstellar medium becomes hard to detect. Levels of 6.5-13% crystallinity in the interstellar medium of starburst galaxies have been observed and thus we conclude that not all these crystalline silicates can be of stellar origin, and an additional source of crystalline silicates associated with the Active Galactic Nucleus must be present.

  6. Formation of ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies and their evolution into nucleated dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We propose that there is an evolutionary link between ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) with active star formation and nucleated dwarfs based on the results of numerical simulations of dwarf-dwarf merging. We consider the observational fact that low-mass dwarfs can be very gas-rich, and thereby investigate the dynamical and chemical evolution of very gas-rich, dissipative dwarf-dwarf mergers. We find that the remnants of dwarf-dwarf mergers can be dominated by new stellar populations formed from the triggered starbursts and consequently can have blue colors and higher metallicities (Z~[0.2-1]Z_sun). We also find that the remnants of these mergers can have rather high mass-densities (10^4 M_sun pc^-3) within the central 10 pc and small half-light radii (40-100 pc). The radial stellar structures of some merger remnants are similar to those of nucleated dwarfs. Star formation can continue in nuclear gas disks (R<100 pc) surrounding stellar galactic nuclei (SGNs) so that the SGNs can finally have multi...

  7. Starbursts in Barred Spiral Galaxies; 2, Molecular and Optical Study of Three Wolf-Rayet Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Contini, T; Considère, S; Davoust, E

    1997-01-01

    We have searched for dense molecular gas in three barred spiral galaxies with young starbursts, NGC 3049, 5430 and 6764, which are known Wolf-Rayet galaxies. We detected HCN in the latter two, and CS was marginally detected in NGC 6764. The dense molecular gas contents of the three galaxies are compared to those of other galaxies and to other indicators of star formation. The HCN luminosities (relative to the CO and far infrared ones) in these galaxies with very young starbursts are consistent with those observed in galaxies with older starbursts and in normal galaxies, and so are our upper limits to the CS intensities (relative to CO). The starburst ages evaluated from our spectrophotometric observations are in the range 3.4 to 6.0 Myr. A circum-nuclear ring is apparent on our images of NGC 5430, the galaxy with the oldest central starburst; this galaxy also has the widest molecular lines. The central star formation rates derived from the Halpha luminosity are consistent with those expected from the global F...

  8. Dense circum-nuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Claire-Elise; Green, James A; Dawson, Joanne R; Jones, Paul A; López-Sánchez, Ángel R; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Henkel, Christian; Baan, Willem A; Martín, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a study of the dense circum-nuclear molecular gas of starburst galaxies. The study aims to investigate the interplay between starbursts, active galactic nuclei and molecular gas. We characterise the dense gas traced by HCN, HCO$^{+}$ and HNC and examine its kinematics in the circum-nuclear regions of nine starburst galaxies observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect HCN (1$-$0) and HCO$^{+}$ (1$-$0) in seven of the nine galaxies and HNC (1$-$0) in four. Approximately 7 arcsec resolution maps of the circum-nuclear molecular gas are presented. The velocity integrated intensity ratios, HCO$^{+}$ (1$-$0)/HCN (1$-$0) and HNC (1$-$0)/HCN (1$-$0), are calculated. Using these integrated intensity ratios and spatial intensity ratio maps we identify photon dominated regions (PDRs) in NGC 1097, NGC 1365 and NGC 1808. We find no galaxy which shows the PDR signature in only one part of the observed nuclear region. We also observe unusually strong HNC emission in NGC 5236, but it...

  9. Nuclear Starburst Activity in the Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 2273

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Sheng Gu; Lei Shi; Shi-Jun Lei; Wen-Hao Liu; Jie-Hao Huang

    2003-01-01

    We present spectrophotometric results of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 2273.The presence of high-order Balmer absorption lines (H8, H9, H10) and weak equiv-alent widths of CaII K λ3933, CN λ4200, G-band λ4300 and MgIb λ5173 clearlyindicate recent star-forming activity in the nuclear region. Using a simple stel-lar population synthesis model, we find that for the best fit, the contributionsof a power-law featureless continuum, an intermediate-age (~ 108 yr) and an old(> 109 yr) stellar population to the total light at the reference normalization wave-length are 10.0%, 33.4% and 56.6%, respectively. The existence of recent starburstactivity is also consistent with its high fax-infrared luminosity (log LFIR/L = 9.9),its infrared color indexes [α(25, 60) = -1.81 and α(60, 100) = -0.79, typical valuesfor Seyfert galaxies with circuclear starburst], and its q-value (2.23, ratio ofinfrared to radio flux, very similar to that of normal spirals and starburst galaxies).Byrd et al. have suggested that NGC 2273 might have interacted with NGC 2273Bin less than 109 yr ago, so the starburst activity in this galaxy could have beentriggered by tidal interaction, as indicated in recent numerical simulations.

  10. Kinematic Constraints on Evolutionary Scenarios for Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies I. Neutral Gas Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Van Zee, L; Skillman, E D; Zee, Liese van; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of high spatial resolution HI synthesis observations of six blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. Optically, the selected galaxies have smooth, symmetric isophotes, and thus are the most likely of the BCD class to fade into an object morphologically similar to a dwarf elliptical when the current starburst ends. The neutral gas in all six galaxies appears to be rotationally supported, however, indicating that true morphological transformation from a BCD to a dE will require significant loss of angular momentum. Based on the observed neutral gas dynamics of these and other BCDs, it is unlikely that present-day BCDs will evolve directly into dwarf ellipticals after a starburst phase. We discuss alternative evolutionary scenarios for BCDs and place them within the larger context of galaxy formation and evolution models.

  11. TiNy Titans: The Role of Dwarf-Dwarf Interactions in the Evolution of Low Mass Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Stierwalt, S; Patton, D; Johnson, K; Kallivayalil, N; Putman, M; Privon, G; Ross, G

    2014-01-01

    We introduce TiNy Titans (TNT), the first systematic study of star formation and the subsequent processing of the interstellar medium in interacting dwarf galaxies. Here we present the first results from a multiwavelength observational program based on a sample of 104 dwarf galaxy pairs selected from a range of environments within the SDSS and caught in various stages of interaction. The TNT dwarf pairs span mass ratios of M1/M2 100 A, occur in 20% of TNT dwarf pairs, regardless of environment, compared to only 6-8% of matched unpaired dwarfs. Starbursts can be triggered throughout the merger (out to large pair separations) and not just approaching coalescence. Despite their enhanced star formation, most TNT dwarf pairs have similar gas fractions relative to unpaired dwarfs. Thus, there may be significant reservoirs of diffuse, non-starforming gas surrounding the dwarf pairs or the gas consumption timescales may be long in the starburst phase. The only TNT dwarf pairs with low gas fractions (fgas <0.4) and...

  12. FORMATION OF ULTRA-COMPACT BLUE DWARF GALAXIES AND THEIR EVOLUTION INTO NUCLEATED DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, The University of Western Australia 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Western Australia, 6009 (Australia)

    2015-10-10

    We propose that there is an evolutionary link between ultra-compact blue dwarf galaxies (UCBDs) with active star formation and nucleated dwarfs based on the results of numerical simulations of dwarf–dwarf merging. We consider the observational fact that low-mass dwarfs can be very gas-rich, and thereby investigate the dynamical and chemical evolution of very gas-rich, dissipative dwarf–dwarf mergers. We find that the remnants of dwarf–dwarf mergers can be dominated by new stellar populations formed from the triggered starbursts and consequently can have blue colors and higher metallicities (Z ∼ [0.2–1]Z{sub ⊙}). We also find that the remnants of these mergers can have rather high mass densities (10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −3}) within the central 10 pc and small half-light radii (40−100 pc). The radial stellar structures of some merger remnants are similar to those of nucleated dwarfs. Star formation can continue in nuclear gas disks (R < 100 pc) surrounding stellar galactic nuclei (SGNs) so that the SGNs can finally have multiple stellar populations with different ages and metallicities. These very compact blue remnants can be identified as UCBDs soon after merging and as nucleated dwarfs after the young stars fade. We discuss these results in the context of the origins of metal-rich ultra-compact dwarfs and SGNs.

  13. H Emission Line Morphologies in Markarian Starburst Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Chitre; U. C. Joshi

    2001-06-01

    We present broad band and narrow band H emission line images of a sample of optically selected starburst galaxies from the Markarian lists. The emission line morphology is studied and global properties like luminosities, equivalent widths and star formation rates are derived. The radial distribution of H flux and the EW are determined using concentric aperture photometry on the emission line and the continuum images. H flux is generally found to peak in the nuclear region and fall off outwards. The EW is found to peak off-center in most of the cases implying that though the intensity of emission is maximum at the nucleus, the star formation activity relative to the underlying continuum often peaks away from the center in Markarian starburst galaxies.

  14. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  15. The environments of starburst and post-starburst galaxies at z=0.4-0.8

    CERN Document Server

    Poggianti, Bianca M; Zaritsky, Dennis; De Lucia, Gabriella; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Desai, Vandana; Jablonka, Pascale; Halliday, Claire; Rudnick, Gregory; Varela, Jesus; Bamford, Steven; Best, Philip; Clowe, Douglas; Noll, Stefan; Saglia, Roberto; Pello, Roser; Simard, Luc; von der Linden, Anja; White, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Post-starburst (E+A or k+a) spectra, characterized by their exceptionally strong Balmer lines in absorption and the lack of emission lines, belong to galaxies in which the star formation activity ended abruptly sometime during the past Gyr. We perform a spectral analysis of galaxies in clusters, groups, poor groups and the field at z=0.4-0.8 based on the ESO Distant Cluster Survey. The incidence of k+a's at these redshifts depends strongly on environment. K+a's reside preferentially in clusters and, unexpectedly, in a subset of the sigma = 200-400 km/s groups, those that have a low fraction of [OII] emitters. In these environments, 20-30% of the recently star-forming galaxies have had their star formation activity recently truncated. In contrast, there are proportionally fewer k+a's in the field, the poor groups and groups with a high [OII] fraction. The incidence of k+a galaxies correlates with the cluster velocity dispersion: more massive clusters have higher proportions of k+a's. Spectra of dusty starburst...

  16. Galactic winds and circulation of the ISM in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ercole, A

    1999-01-01

    We study, through 2D hydrodynamical simulations, the feedback of a starburst on the ISM of typical gas rich dwarf galaxies. The main goal is to address the circulation of the ISM and metals following the starburst. We assume a single-phase rotating ISM in equilibrium in the galactic potential generated by a stellar disk and a spherical dark halo. The starburst is assumed to occur in a small volume in the center of the galaxy, and it generates a mechanical power of 3.8e39 erg/s or 3.8e40 erg/s for 30 Myr. We found, consistently with previous investigations, that the galactic wind is not very effective in removing the ISM. The metal rich stellar ejecta, instead, may be efficiently expelled from the galaxy and dispersed in the intergalactic medium. Moreover, we found that the central region of the galaxy is always replenished with cold and dense gas after a few 100 Myr from the starbust, achieving the requisite for a new star formation event in 0.5-1 Gyr. The hydrodynamical evolution of galactic winds is thus co...

  17. Infrared line ratios revealing starburst conditions in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Viegas, S M M; Contini, T; Viegas, Sueli M.; Contini, Marcella; Contini, Thierry

    1999-01-01

    The physical conditions in typical starburst galaxies are investigated through critical infrared (IR) line ratios, as previously suggested by Lutz et al. (1998, A&A, 333, L75). The calculations by a composite model which consistently accounts for the coupled effect of shock and photoionization by hot stars definitely fit the observed line ratios of single objects and explain the observed relation between [OIV]/([NeII]+0.44[NeIII]) and [NeIII]/[NeII]. The shock velocity and the gas density are the critical parameters. Most of the shocks are produced in low density-velocity (n_0 = 100 cm-3 and V_s = 50 - 100 km/s) clouds which represent the bulk of the ionized gas in starburst galaxies. However, though they are by many orders less numerous, high-velocity (= 400 - 600 km/s) shocks in dense (= 500 - 800 cm-3) clouds are necessary to reproduce the critical IR line ratios observed in the low-excitation Starburst Nucleus Galaxies (SBNGs: M82, M83, NGC 253, NGC 3256, NGC 3690, and NGC 4945). These model predictio...

  18. Stars at Low Metallicity in Dwarf Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Cole, Andrew; Hunt, LK; Madden, S; Schneider, R

    2008-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies offer an opportunity to understand the properties of low metallicity star formation both today and at the earliest times at the, epoch of the formation of the first stars. Here we concentrate on two galaxies in the Local Group: the dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A, which has been the rece

  19. The Ubiquity of Coeval Starbursts in Massive Galaxy Cluster Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Casey, Caitlin M

    2016-01-01

    The Universe's largest galaxy clusters likely built the majority of their massive $>10^{11} M_\\odot$ galaxies in simultaneous, short-lived bursts of activity well before virialization. This conclusion is reached from emerging datasets on $z>2$ proto-clusters and the characteristics of their member galaxies, in particular, rare starbursts and ultraluminous active galactic nuclei (AGN). The most challenging observational hurdle in identifying such structures is their very large volumes, $\\sim10^{4}$ comoving Mpc$^3$ at $z>2$, subtending areas $\\sim$half a degree on the sky. Thus the contrast afforded by an overabundance of very rare galaxies in comparison to the background can more easily distinguish overdense structures from the surrounding, normal density field. Five $210^{15} M_\\odot$ galaxy clusters in the nearby Universe, a factor of five larger than expected in some simulations. Some tension yet exists between measurements of their volume density of starburst-rich proto-clusters and the expectation that t...

  20. Dark matter in dwarf galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, Matts

    2017-01-01

    Although the cusp-core controversy for dwarf galaxies is seen as a problem, I argue that the cored central profiles can be explained by flattened cusps because they suffer from conflicting measurements and poor statistics and because there is a large number of conventional processes that could have flattened them since their creation, none of which requires new physics. Other problems, such as "too big to fail", are not discussed.

  1. The Nature of the Low-Metallicity ISM in the Dwarf Galaxy NGC 1569

    CERN Document Server

    Galliano, F; Jones, A P; Wilson, C D; Bernard, J P; Le Peintre, F

    2002-01-01

    We are modeling the spectra of dwarf galaxies from infrared to submillimeter wavelengths to understand the nature of the various dust components in low-metallicity environments, which may be comparable to the ISM of galaxies in their early evolutionary state. The overall nature of the dust in these environments appears to differ from those of higher metallicity starbursting systems. Here, we present a study of one of our sample of dwarf galaxies, NGC 1569, which is a nearby, well-studied starbursting dwarf. Using ISOCAM, IRAS, ISOPHOT and SCUBA data with the Desert et al. (1990) model, we find consistency with little contribution from PAHs and Very Small Grains and a relative abundance of bigger colder grains, which dominate the FIR and submillimeter wavelengths. We are compelled to use 4 dust components, adding a very cold dust component, to reproduce the submillimetre excess of our observations.

  2. The Blue Straggler Population in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Momany, Yazan

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter I review the recent developments regarding the study of Blue Stragglers (BSS) in dwarf galaxies. The loose density environment of dwarf galaxies resembles that of the Galactic Halo, hence it is natural to compare their common BSS properties. At the same time, it is unescapable to compare with the BSS properties in Galactic Globular clusters, which constitute the reference point for BSS studies. Admittedly, the literature on BSS in dwarf galaxies is not plentiful. The limitation is mostly due to the large distance to even the closest dwarf galaxies. Nevertheless, recent studies have allowed a deeper insight on the BSS photometric properties that are worth examining.

  3. Winds of change: reionization by starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Mahavir; Frenk, Carlos; Bower, Richard G; Crain, Robert A; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the galaxies that reionized the Universe and the history of cosmic reionization using the "Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their environments" (EAGLE) cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We obtain the evolution of the escape fraction of ionizing photons in galaxies assuming that galactic winds create channels through which 20~percent of photons escape when the local surface density of star formation is greater than $0.1$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$. Such threshold behaviour for the generation of winds is observed, and the rare local objects which have such high star formation surface densities exhibit high escape fractions. In our model the luminosity-weighted mean escape fraction increases with redshift as $\\bar f_{\\rm esc}=0.045~((1+z)/4)^{1.1}$ at $z>3$, and the galaxy number weighted mean as $\\langle f_{\\rm esc} \\rangle=2.2\\times10^{-3}~((1+z)/4)^4$, and becomes constant $\\approx0.2$ at redshift $z>10$. The escape fraction evolves as an increasingly large fr...

  4. Winds of change: reionization by starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mahavir; Theuns, Tom; Frenk, Carlos; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the properties of the galaxies that reionized the Universe and the history of cosmic reionization using the 'Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environments' (eagle) cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We obtain the evolution of the escape fraction of ionizing photons in galaxies assuming that galactic winds create channels through which 20 per cent of photons escape when the local surface density of star formation is greater than 0.1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. Such threshold behaviour for the generation of winds is observed, and the rare local objects that have such high star formation surface densities exhibit high escape fractions of ˜10 per cent. In our model, the luminosity-weighted mean escape fraction increases with redshift as \\bar{f}_esc=0.045 ((1+z)/4)^{1.1} at z > 3, and the galaxy number weighted mean as = 2.2 × 10-3 ((1 + z)/4)4, and becomes constant ≈0.2 at redshift z > 10. The escape fraction evolves as an increasingly large fraction of stars forms above the critical surface density of star formation at earlier times. This evolution of the escape fraction, combined with that of the star formation rate density from eagle, reproduces the inferred evolution of the filling factor of ionized regions during the reionization epoch (6 z z < 6) hydrogen photoionization rate and the optical depth due to Thomson scattering of the cosmic microwave background photons measured by the Planck satellite.

  5. Toward Gas Chemistry in Low Metallicity Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, David S.; Anderson, Crystal N.; Turner, Jean; Ott, Juergen; Beck, Sara C.

    2017-01-01

    Dense gas, which is intimately connected with star formation, is key to understanding star formation. Though challenging to study, dense gas in low metallicity starbursts is important given these system's often extreme star formation and their potential implications for high redshift analogs. High spatial resolution (~50 pc) ALMA observations of several key probes of gas chemistry, including HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), CS(2-1), CCH(1-0;3/2-1/2) and SiO(2-1), towards the nearby super star-cluster (SSC) forming, sub-solar metallicity galaxy NGC 5253 are discussed. Dense gas is observed to be extended well beyond the current compact starburst, reaching into the apparently infalling molecular streamer. The faintness of HCN, the standard dense gas tracer, is extreme both in an absolute sense relative to high metallicity starbursts of a similar intensity and in a relative sense, with the HCO+/HCN ratio being one of the most elevated observed. UV-irradiated molecular gas, traced by CCH, is also extended over the mapped region, not being strongly correlated with the SSC. Despite the accretion of molecular gas from the halo and the intense burst of star formation, chemical signatures of shocked gas, traced by SiO (and HNCO), are not obvious. By placing NGC 5253 in context with other local starbursts, like 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Clouds and the high metallicity proto-typical starburst NGC 253, it is suggested that a combination of gas excitation and abundance changes associated with the sub solar metallicity may explain these anomalous dense gas properties.

  6. Manganese in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    North, P; Jablonka, P; Hill, V; Shetrone, M; Letarte, B; Lemasle, B; Venn, K A; Battaglia, G; Tolstoy, E; Irwin, M J; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2012-01-01

    We provide manganese abundances (corrected for the effect of the hyperfine structure) for a large number of stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor and Fornax, and for a smaller number in the Carina and Sextans dSph galaxies. Abundances had already been determined for a number of other elements in these galaxies, including alpha and iron-peak ones, which allowed us to build [Mn/Fe] and [Mn/alpha] versus [Fe/H] diagrams. The Mn abundances imply sub-solar [Mn/Fe] ratios for the stars in all four galaxies examined. In Sculptor, [Mn/Fe] stays roughly constant between [Fe/H]\\sim -1.8 and -1.4 and decreases at higher iron abundance. In Fornax, [Mn/Fe] does not vary in any significant way with [Fe/H]. The relation between [Mn/alpha] and [Fe/H] for the dSph galaxies is clearly systematically offset from that for the Milky Way, which reflects the different star formation histories of the respective galaxies. The [Mn/alpha] behavior can be interpreted as a result of the metal-dependent Mn yields of type II and ...

  7. The multifrequency spectrum of the starburst galaxy NGC 2782

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, A. L.; Bregman, J. N.; Huggins, P. J.; Glassgold, A. E.; Cohen, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear region of NGC 2782 has been observed at radio, millimeter, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray frequencies to understand the ionization source that gives rise to the narrow emission lines. The continuum is probably caused by a normal galactic population plus considerable numbers of young stars and warm dust. In the ultraviolet and optical spectra, which are powerful diagnostics, no strong lines are detected in the 1200 A-3200 A region aside from L-alpha, and the optical emission lines cover only a narrow ionization range. The line and continuum properties suggest that NGC 2782 is a starburst galaxy, in which young stars photoionize the surrounding gas.

  8. DLA kinematics and outflows from starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Razoumov, Alexei O

    2008-01-01

    We present results from a numerical study of the multiphase interstellar medium in sub-Lyman-break galaxy protogalactic clumps. Such clumps are abundant at z=3 and are thought to be a major contributor to damped Ly-alpha absorption. We model the formation of winds from these clumps and show that during star formation episodes they feature outflows with neutral gas velocity widths up to several hundred km/s. Such outflows are consistent with the observed high-velocity dispersion in DLAs. In our models thermal energy feedback from winds and supernovae results in efficient outflows only when cold (~ 300 K), dense (> 100 msun/pc^3) clouds are resolved at grid resolution of 12 pc. At lower 24 pc resolution the first signs of the multiphase medium are spotted; however, at this low resolution thermal injection of feedback energy cannot yet create hot expanding bubbles around star-forming regions -- instead feedback tends to erase high-density peaks and suppress star formation. At 12 pc resolution feedback compresses...

  9. Contribution from normal and starburst galaxies to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debbijoy Bhattacharya; Parameswaran Sreekumar

    2009-01-01

    The extragalactic diffuse emission at γ-ray energies has interesting cosmo-logical implications since these photons suffer little or no attenuation during their prop-agation from the site of origin. The emission could originate from either truly diffuse processes or from unresolved point sources such as AGNs, normal galaxies and starburst galaxies. Here, we examine the unresolved point source origin of the extragalactic γ-ray background emission from normal galaxies and starburst galaxies. γ-ray emission from normal galaxies is primarily coming from cosmic-ray interactions with interstellar mat-ter and radiation (~90%) along with a small contribution from discrete point sources (~10%). Starburst galaxies are expected to have enhanced supernovae activity which leads to higher cosmic-ray densities, making starburst galaxies sufficiently luminous at γ-ray energies to be detected by the current γ-ray mission (Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope).

  10. THE RADIO–GAMMA CORRELATION IN STARBURST GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichmann, B.; Tjus, J. Becker, E-mail: eiche@tp4.rub.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Plasma-Astroteilchenphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-04-20

    We present a systematic study of non-thermal electron–proton plasma and its emission processes in starburst galaxies in order to explain the correlation between the luminosity in the radio band and the recently observed gamma luminosity. In doing so, a steady state description of the cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and protons within the spatially homogeneous starburst is considered where continuous momentum losses are included as well as catastrophic losses due to diffusion and advection. The primary source of the relativistic CRs, e.g., supernova remnants, provides a quasi-neutral plasma with a power-law spectrum in momentum where we account for rigidity-dependent differences between the electron and proton spectrum. We examine the resulting leptonic and hadronic radiation processes by synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering, Bremsstrahlung, and hadronic pion production. Finally, the observations of NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, and NGC 1068 in the radio and gamma-ray bands as well as the observed supernova rate are used to constrain a best-fit model. In the case of NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945 our model is able to accurately describe the data, showing that: (i) supernovae are the dominant particle accelerators for NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945, but not for NGC 1068; (ii) all considered starburst galaxies are poor proton calorimeters in which for NGC 253 the escape is predominantly driven by the galactic wind, whereas the diffusive escape dominates in NGC 4945 and M82 (at energies >1 TeV); and (iii) secondary electrons from hadronic pion production are important to model the radio flux, but the associated neutrino flux is below the current observation limit.

  11. Starburst in the interacting HII galaxy II Zw 40 and in non-interacting HII galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Telles, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    I summarize the results of our integral field spectroscopic observations of the nearby prototype of HII galaxies, II Zw 40. Observations with GMOS-IFU on GEMINI-North in the optical allowed us to make a detailed kinematic picture of the central starburst, while SINFONI with adaptive optics on the ESO-VLT gave us a near-IR view of the interplay between the ISM phases. Here, I also address the question that not all starbursts require an external trigger such as a galaxy-galaxy encounter, as it seems to be the case for a fraction of low luminosity HII galaxies. We speculate that these may form stars spontaneously like "pop-corn in a pan".

  12. The evolution of the cold interstellar medium in galaxies following a starburst

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlands, K; Nesvadba, N; Sibthorpe, B; Mortier, A; Lehnert, M; da Cunha, E

    2014-01-01

    We present the evolution of dust and molecular gas properties in a sample of 11 $z\\sim0.03$ starburst to post-starburst (PSB) galaxies selected to span an age sequence from ongoing starburst to 1 Gyr after the starburst ended. All PSBs harbour significant molecular gas and dust reservoirs and residual star formation, indicating that complete quenching of the starburst due to exhaustion or expulsion of gas has not occurred during this timespan. As the starburst ages, we observe a clear decrease in the star-formation efficiency, molecular gas and SFR surface density, and effective dust temperature, from levels coincident with starburst galaxies to those of normal star-forming galaxies. These trends are consistent with a natural decrease in the SFR following consumption of molecular gas by the starburst, and corresponding decrease in the interstellar radiation field strength as the starburst ages. The gas and dust contents of the PSBs are coincident with those of star-forming galaxies and molecular gas-rich earl...

  13. Star cluster disruption in the starburst galaxy Messier 82

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shuo; Anders, Peter; Li, Chengyuan

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution, multiple-passband Hubble Space Telescope images spanning the entire optical/near-infrared wavelength range, we obtained a statistically complete sample, $U$-band selected sample of 846 extended star clusters across the disk of the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Based on careful analysis of their spectral energy distributions, we determined their galaxy-wide age and mass distributions. The M82 clusters exhibit three clear peaks in their age distribution, thus defining a relatively young, log(t/yr) 8.5. Comparison of the completeness-corrected mass distributions offers a firm handle on the galaxy's star cluster disruption history. The most massive star clusters in the young and old samples are (almost) all concentrated in the most densely populated central region, while the intermediate-age sample's most massive clusters are more spatially dispersed, which may reflect the distribution of the highest-density gas throughout the galaxy's evolutionary history, combined with the solid-body natu...

  14. Simulations of galactic winds and starbursts in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kapferer, W; Domainko, W; Mair, M; Kronberger, T; Schindler, S; Kimeswenger, S; Van Kampen, E; Breitschwerdt, D; Ruffert, M

    2005-01-01

    We present an investigation of the metal enrichment of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) by galactic winds and merger-driven starbursts. We use combined N-body/hydrodynamic simulations with a semi-numerical galaxy formation model. The mass loss by galactic winds is obtained by calculating transonic solutions of steady state outflows, driven by thermal, cosmic ray and MHD wave pressure. The inhomogeneities in the metal distribution caused by these processes are an ideal tool to reveal the dynamical state of a galaxy cluster. We present surface brightness, X-ray emission weighted temperature and metal maps of our model clusters as they would be observed by X-ray telescopes like XMM-Newton. We show that X-ray weighted metal maps distinguish between pre- or post-merger galaxy clusters by comparing the metallicity distribution with the galaxy-density distribution: pre-mergers have a metallicity gap between the subclusters, post-mergers a high metallicity between subclusters. We apply our approach to two observed gala...

  15. Starburst galaxies in the COSMOS field: clumpy star-formation at redshift 0 < z < 0.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Goñi, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. At high redshift, starburst galaxies present irregular morphologies with 10-20% of their star formation occurring in giant clumps. These clumpy galaxies are considered the progenitors of local disk galaxies. To understand the properties of starbursts at intermediate and low redshift, it is fundamental to track their evolution and the possible link with the systems at higher z. Aims: We present an extensive, systematic, and multiband search and analysis of the starburst galaxies at redshift (0 database to calibrate the color excess as a function of the equivalent width of both spectral lines. This technique allows us to identify 220 starburst galaxies at redshift 0 1010. We classify galaxies into three main types, depending on their HST morphology: single knot (Sknot), single star-forming knot plus diffuse light (Sknot+diffuse), and multiple star-forming knots (Mknots/clumpy) galaxy. We found a fraction of Mknots/clumpy galaxy fclumpy = 0.24 considering out total sample of starburst galaxies up to z ~ 0.5. The individual star-forming knots in our sample follows the same L(Hα) vs. size scaling relation as local giant HII regions. However, they slightly differ from the one provided using samples at high redshift. This result highlights the importance of spatially resolving the star-forming regions for this kind of study. Star-forming clumps in the central regions of Mknots galaxies are more massive, and present higher star formation rates, than those in the outskirts. This trend is less clear when we consider either the mass surface density or surface star formation rate. Sknot galaxies do show properties similar to both dwarf elliptical and irregulars in the surface brightness (μ) versus Mhost diagram in the B-band, and to spheroidals and ellipticals in the μ versus Mhost diagram in the V-band. Conclusions: The properties of our star-forming knots in Sknot+diffuse and Mknots/clumpy galaxies support the predictions of recent numerical simulations claiming

  16. Molecular Superbubbles in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kazushi; Ho, Paul T. P.; Iono, Daisuke; Keto, Eric R.; Mao, Rui-Qing; Matsushita, Satoki; Peck, Alison B.; Wiedner, Martina C.; Wilner, David J.; Zhao, Jun-Hui

    2006-01-01

    The central 2×1 kpc of the starburst galaxy NGC 253 have been imaged using the Submillimeter Array at a 60 pc resolution in the J=2-1 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O, as well as in the 1.3 mm continuum. Molecular gas and dust are distributed mainly in a circumnuclear disk of ~500 pc radius, with warm (~40 K) and high area filling factor gas in its central part. Two gas shells or cavities have been discovered in the circumnuclear disk. They have ~100 pc diameters and have large velocity widths of 80-100 km s-1, suggestive of expansion at ~50 km s-1. Modeled as an expanding bubble, each shell has an age of ~0.5 Myr and needed kinetic energy of ~1×1046 J, as well as mean mechanical luminosity of ~1×1033 W, for its formation. The large energy allows each to be called a superbubble. A ~106 Msolar super star cluster can provide the luminosity and could be a building block of the nuclear starburst in NGC 253. Alternatively, a hypernova can also be the main source of energy for each superbubble, not only because it can provide the mechanical energy and luminosity but also because the estimated rate of superbubble formation and that of hypernova explosions are comparable. Our observations indicate that the circumnuclear molecular disk harboring the starburst is highly disturbed on 100 pc or smaller scales, presumably by individual young clusters and stellar explosions, in addition to being globally disturbed in the form of the well-known superwind.

  17. Updated Models for the Creation of a Low-z QSO Absorber by a Dwarf Galaxy Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Keeney, Brian A; Stocke, John T; Danforth, Charles W; Levesque, Emily M

    2014-01-01

    We present new GALEX images and optical spectroscopy of J1229+02, a dwarf post-starburst galaxy located 81 kpc from the 1585 km/s absorber in the 3C 273 sight line. The absence of H\\alpha\\ emission and the faint GALEX UV fluxes confirm that the galaxy's recent star formation rate is $1$R_{vir}$ are likely intergalactic systems and cannot be identified unambiguously as the circumgalactic material of any one individual galaxy.

  18. Molecular Superbubbles in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, K; Iono, D; Keto, E R; Mao, R Q; Matsushita, S; Peck, A B; Wiedner, M C; Wilner, D J; Zhao, J H; Sakamoto, Kazushi; Ho, Paul T. P.; Iono, Daisuke; Keto, Eric R.; Mao, Rui-Qing; Matsushita, Satoki; Peck, Alison B.; Wiedner, Martina C.; Wilner, David J.; Zhao, Jun-Hui

    2006-01-01

    The central 2x1 kpc of the starburst galaxy NGC 253 has been imaged using the Submillimeter Array at a 60 pc resolution in the J=2-1 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O as well as in the 1.3 mm continuum. Molecular gas and dust are mainly in the circumnuclear disk of ~500 pc radius, with warm (~40 K) and high area-filling factor gas in its central part. Two gas shells or cavities have been discovered in the circumnuclear disk. They have ~100 pc diameters and have large velocity widths of 80-100 km/s, suggestive of expansion at ~50 km/s. Modeled as an expanding bubble, each shell has an age of ~0.5 Myr and needed kinetic energy of ~1E46 J as well as mean mechanical luminosity of ~1E33 W for its formation. The large energy allows each to be called a superbubble. A ~10^6 Msun super star cluster can provide the luminosity, and could be a building block of the nuclear starburst in NGC 253. Alternatively, a hypernova can also be the main source of energy for each superbubble, not only because it can provide the mec...

  19. Shell Galaxies, Dynamical Friction, and Dwarf Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrova, Ivana; Canalizo, Gabriela; Bennert, Nicola; Jilkova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    Using N-body simulations of shell galaxies created in nearly radial minor mergers, we investigate the error of collision dating, resulting from the neglect of dynamical friction and of gradual disruption of the cannibalized dwarf.

  20. Is the interstellar gas of starburst galaxies well mixed?

    CERN Document Server

    Lebouteiller, V; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Kunth, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The extent to which the ISM in galaxies is well mixed is not yet settled. Measured metal abundances in the diffuse neutral gas of star--forming gas--rich dwarf galaxies are deficient with respect to that of the ionized gas. The reasons, if real, are not clear and need to be based on firm grounds. Far-UV spectroscopy of giant HII regions such as NGC604 in the spiral galaxy M33 using FUSE allows us to investigate possible systematic errors in the metallicity derivation. We still find underabundances of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and iron in the neutral phase by a factor of~6. This could either be explained by the presence of less chemically evolved gas pockets in the sightlines or by dense clouds out of which HIIregions form. Those could be more metallic than the diffuse medium.

  1. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distributions of Starburst & Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, M A

    2004-01-01

    We present results of a self-consistent model of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of starburst galaxies. Two parameters control the IR SED, the mean pressure in the ISM and the destruction timescale of molecular clouds. Adding a simplified AGN spectrum provides mixing lines on IRAS color : color diagrams. This reproduces the observed colors of both AGNs and starbursts.

  2. Metals and ionizing photons from dwarf galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvadori, S.; Tolstoy, E.; Ferrara, A.; Zaroubi, S.

    2014-01-01

    We estimate the potential contribution of M <10(9)M(circle dot) dwarf galaxies to the reionization and early metal enrichment of the Milky Way environment, or circum-Galactic medium. Our approach is to use the observed properties of ancient stars ()under tilde>12 Gyr old) measured in nearby dwarf ga

  3. The Evolution of Post-starburst Galaxies from z ~ 1 to the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Strauss, Michael A.; Ho, Shirley; Ross, Nicholas P.

    2016-12-01

    Post-starburst galaxies are in the transitional stage between blue, star-forming galaxies and red, quiescent galaxies and therefore hold important clues for our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this paper, we systematically searched for and identified a large sample of post-starburst galaxies from the spectroscopic data set of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 9. In total, we found more than 6000 objects with redshifts between z ˜ 0.05 and z ˜ 1.3, making this the largest sample of post-starburst galaxies in the literature. We calculated the luminosity function of the post-starburst galaxies using two uniformly selected subsamples: the SDSS main galaxy sample and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS sample. The luminosity functions are reasonably fit by half-Gaussian functions. The peak magnitudes shift as a function of redshift from M ˜ -23.5 at z ˜ 0.8 to M ˜ -20.3 at z ˜ 0.1. This is consistent with the downsizing trend, whereby more massive galaxies form earlier than low-mass galaxies. We compared the mass of the post-starburst stellar population found in our sample to the decline of the global star formation rate and found that only a small amount (˜1%) of all star formation quenching in the redshift range z = 0.2-0.7 results in post-starburst galaxies in the luminosity range our sample is sensitive to. Therefore, luminous post-starburst galaxies are not the place where most of the decline in the star formation rate of the universe is happening.

  4. Understanding dwarf galaxies as galactic building blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, M P

    2003-01-01

    This is a summary of a general discussion held during the third EuroConference on galaxy evolution. Various observational features of the stellar populations in present--day dwarf galaxies were presented to introduce the discussion on the possibility that these systems be the main building blocks of spiral and elliptical galaxies. Many people in the audience turned out to think that the inconsistencies among the observed properties of large and dwarf galaxies are too many to believe that the former are built up only by means of successive accretions of the latter. However, theorists of hierarchical galaxy formation suggested that present--day dwarfs are not representative of the galactic building blocks, which may be completely invisible nowadays. Some of them suggested that, contrary to what is usually assumed in hierarchical modelling, the actual building blocks were still fully gaseous systems when their major mergers occurred. If this is the case, then most of the inconsistencies can be overcome, and the ...

  5. Galaxies Probing Galaxies: Cool Halo Gas from a z = 0.47 Post-Starburst Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Kate H. R.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2010-03-01

    We study the cool gas around a galaxy at z = 0.4729 using Keck/LRIS spectroscopy of a bright (B = 21.7) background galaxy at z = 0.6942 at a transverse distance of 16.5h -1 70 kpc. The background galaxy spectrum reveals strong Fe II, Mg II, Mg I, and Ca II absorption at the redshift of the foreground galaxy, with an Mg II λ2796 rest equivalent width of 3.93 ± 0.08 Å, indicative of a velocity width exceeding 400 km s-1. Because the background galaxy is large (>4h -1 70 kpc), the high covering fraction of the absorbing gas suggests that it arises in a spatially extended complex of cool clouds with large velocity dispersion. Spectroscopy of the massive (log M */M sun = 11.15 ± 0.08) host galaxy reveals that it experienced a burst of star formation about 1 Gyr ago and that it harbors a weak active galactic nucleus. We discuss the possible origins of the cool gas in its halo, including multiphase cooling of hot halo gas, cold inflow, tidal interactions, and galactic winds. We conclude that the absorbing gas was most likely ejected or tidally stripped from the interstellar medium of the host galaxy or its progenitors during the past starburst event. Adopting the latter interpretation, these results place one of only a few constraints on the radial extent of cool gas driven or stripped from a galaxy in the distant universe. Future studies with integral field unit spectroscopy of spatially extended background galaxies will provide multiple sight lines through foreground absorbers and permit analysis of the morphology and kinematics of the gas surrounding galaxies with a diverse set of properties and environments. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  6. HERSCHEL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cigan, Phil; Young, Lisa [Physics Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Cormier, Diane [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Lebouteiller, Vianney; Madden, Suzanne [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM—CNRS—Université Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d’Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hunter, Deidre [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Elmegreen, Bruce [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Hts., NY 10598 (United States); Schruba, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Heesen, Volker, E-mail: pcigan@alumni.nmt.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Collaboration: LITTLE THINGS Team

    2016-01-15

    We present far-infrared (FIR) spectral line observations of five galaxies from the Little Things sample: DDO 69, DDO 70, DDO 75, DDO 155, and WLM. While most studies of dwarfs focus on bright systems or starbursts due to observational constraints, our data extend the observed parameter space into the regime of low surface brightness dwarf galaxies with low metallicities and moderate star formation rates. Our targets were observed with Herschel at the [C ii] 158 μm, [O i] 63 μm, [O iii] 88 μm, and [N ii] 122 μm emission lines using the PACS Spectrometer. These high-resolution maps allow us for the first time to study the FIR properties of these systems on the scales of larger star-forming complexes. The spatial resolution in our maps, in combination with star formation tracers, allows us to identify separate photodissociation regions (PDRs) in some of the regions we observed. Our systems have widespread [C ii] emission that is bright relative to continuum, averaging near 0.5% of the total infrared (TIR) budget—higher than in solar-metallicity galaxies of other types. [N ii] is weak, suggesting that the [C ii] emission in our galaxies comes mostly from PDRs instead of the diffuse ionized interstellar medium (ISM). These systems exhibit efficient cooling at low dust temperatures, as shown by ([O i]+[C ii])/TIR in relation to 60 μm/100 μm, and low [O i]/[C ii] ratios which indicate that [C ii] is the dominant coolant of the ISM. We observe [O iii]/[C ii] ratios in our galaxies that are lower than those published for other dwarfs, but similar to levels noted in spirals.

  7. The identification of post-starburst galaxies at z~1 using multiwavelength photometry: a spectroscopic verification

    CERN Document Server

    Maltby, David T; Wild, Vivienne; Hatch, Nina A; Hartley, William G; Simpson, Chris; McLure, Ross J; Dunlop, James; Rowlands, Kate; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of study, we still do not fully understand why some massive galaxies abruptly switch off their star formation in the early Universe, and what causes their rapid transition to the red sequence. Post-starburst galaxies provide a rare opportunity to study this transition phase, but few have currently been spectroscopically identified at high redshift ($z>1$). In this paper we present the spectroscopic verification of a new photometric technique to identify post-starbursts in high-redshift surveys. The method classifies the broad-band optical-near--infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies using three spectral shape parameters (super-colours), derived from a principal component analysis of model SEDs. When applied to the multiwavelength photometric data in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), this technique identified over 900 candidate post-starbursts at redshifts $0.55 Ang.) and Balmer break, characteristic of post-starburst galaxies. We conclude that photometric methods can be us...

  8. Stellar feedback as the origin of an extended molecular outflow in a starburst galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, J E; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Krips, M; Rudnick, G H; Tremonti, C A; Sell, P H; Coil, A L; Moustakas, J

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed that starburst galaxies can drive molecular gas outflows through stellar radiation pressure. Molecular gas is the phase of the interstellar medium from which stars form, so these outflows curtail stellar mass growth in galaxies. Previously known outflows, however, involve small fractions of the total molecular gas content and are restricted to sub-kiloparsec scales. It is also apparent that input from active galactic nuclei is in at least some cases dynamically important, so pure stellar feedback has been considered incapable of aggressively terminating star formation on galactic scales. Extraplanar molecular gas has been detected in the archetype starburst galaxy M82, but so far there has been no evidence that starbursts can propel significant quantities of cold molecular gas to the same galactocentric radius (~10 kpc) as the warmer gas traced by metal absorbers. Here we report observations of molecular gas in a compact (effective radius 100 pc) massive starburst galaxy at z...

  9. Herschel Spectroscopic Observations of LITTLE THINGS Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cigan, Phil; Cormier, Diane; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Madden, Suzanne; Hunter, Deidre; Brinks, Elias; Elmegreen, Bruce; Schruba, Andreas; Heesen, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We present far-infrared spectral line observations of five galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS sample: DDO 69, DDO 70, DDO 75, DDO 155, and WLM. While most studies of dwarfs focus on bright systems or starbursts due to observational constraints, our data extend the observed parameter space into the regime of low surface brightness dwarf galaxies with low metallicities and moderate star formation rates. Our targets were observed with Herschel at the [CII] 158um, [OI] 63um, [OIII] 88um, and NII 122um emission lines using the PACS Spectrometer. These high-resolution maps allow us for the first time to study the far-infrared properties of these systems on the scales of larger star-forming complexes. The spatial resolution in our maps, in combination with star formation tracers, allows us to identify separate PDRs in some of the regions we observed. Our systems have widespread [CII] emission that is bright relative to continuum, averaging near 0.5% of the total infrared budget - higher than in solar-metallicity galaxi...

  10. HAWK-I infrared supernova search in starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Miluzio, M; Botticella, M T; Cresci, G; Greggio, L; Mannucci, F; Benetti, S; Bufano, F; Elias-Rosa, N; Pastorello, A; Turatto, M; Zampieri, L

    2013-01-01

    The use of SN rates to probe explosion scenarios and to trace the cosmic star formation history received a boost from a number of synoptic surveys. There has been a recent claim of a mismatch by a factor of two between star formation and core collapse SN rates, and different explanations have been proposed for this discrepancy.} We attempted an independent test of the relation between star formation and supernova rates in the extreme environment of starburst galaxies, where both star formation and extinction are extremely high. To this aim we conducted an infrared supernova search in a sample of local starburts galaxies. The rational to search in the infrared is to reduce the bias due to extinction, which is one of the putative reasons for the observed discrepancy between star formation and supernova rates. To evaluate the outcome of the search we developed a MonteCarlo simulation tool that is used to predict the number and properties of the expected supernovae based on the search characteristics and the curr...

  11. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopy of the Prototypical Starburst Galaxy NGC7714

    CERN Document Server

    Brandl, B R; Higdon, S J U; Charmandaris, V; Spoon, H W W; Herter, T L; Hao, L; Bernard-Salas, J; Houck, J R; Armus, L; Soifer, B T; Grillmair, C J; Appleton, P N

    2004-01-01

    We present observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 7714 with the Infrared Spectrograph IRS on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra yield a wealth of ionic and molecular features that allow a detailed characterization of its properties. NGC 7714 has an HII region-like spectrum with strong PAH emission features. We find no evidence for an obscured active galactic nucleus, and with [NeIII]/[NeII]~0.73, NGC7714 lies near the upper end of normal-metallicity starburst galaxies. With very little slicate absorption and a temperature of the hottest dust component of 340K, NGC 7714 is the perfect template for a young, unobscured starburst

  12. Missing dark matter in dwarf galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Oman, Kyle A; Sales, Laura V; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu; White, Simon D M

    2016-01-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the APOSTLE project to examine the fraction of baryons in $\\Lambda$CDM haloes that collect into galaxies. This `galaxy formation efficiency' correlates strongly and with little scatter with halo mass, dropping steadily towards dwarf galaxies. The baryonic mass of a galaxy may thus be used to place a lower limit on total halo mass and, consequently, on its asymptotic maximum circular velocity. A number of dwarfs seem to violate this constraint, having baryonic masses up to ten times higher than expected from their rotation speeds, or, alternatively, rotating at only half the speed expected for their mass. Taking the data at face value, either these systems have formed galaxies with extraordinary efficiency - highly unlikely given their shallow potential wells - or they inhabit haloes with extreme deficits in their dark matter content. This `missing dark matter' is reminiscent of the inner mass deficits of galaxies with slowly-rising rotation curves, but extends...

  13. Morphological transformations of Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    In the Local Group there are three main types of dwarf galaxies: Dwarf Irregulars, Dwarf Spheroidals, and Dwarf Ellipticals. Intermediate/transitional types are present as well. This contribution reviews the idea that the present day variety of dwarf galaxy morphologies in the Local Group might reveal the existence of a transformation chain of events, of which any particular dwarf galaxy represents a manifestation of a particular stage. In other words, all dwarf galaxies that now are part of the Local Group would have formed identically in the early universe, but then evolved differently because of morphological transformations induced by dynamical processes like galaxy harassment, ram pressure stripping, photo-evaporation, and so forth. We start describing the population of dwarf galaxies and their spatial distribution in the LG. Then, we describe those phenomena that can alter the morphology of a dwarf galaxies, essentially by removing, partially or completely, their gas content. Lastly, we discuss morpholo...

  14. Aspects of the interstellar medium in starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Michael N.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers are engaged in a multifaceted program to investigate the stellar content and star formation history of actively star-forming galaxies. A large body of stellar spectra have been examined to identify spectral features characteristic of specific stellar types. These spectral diagnostics are then calibrated in terms of temperature (spectral type), gravity (luminosity class) and metallicity. The spectral data is compiled into a stellar library whose members represent specific locations in the HR diagram. Through the use of population synthesis techniques, both optimizing and evolutionary approaches, the stellar luminosity function in composite populations can be determined by analysis of their integrated light. Researchers have concentrated on the ultraviolet wavelength region (lambda lambda 1200 to 3200), utilizing the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) archives supplemented by additional observations. In the optical, virtually all stars will contribute to the integrated light. In the ultraviolet however, cool stars will produce negligible flux due to their steep ultraviolet-to-visual continua, greatly simplifying the investigation of the hot component in a composite population. The researchers' initial stellar library has been applied to several blue compact galaxies, (BCGs), a class of starburst galaxy which is UV luminous. BCGs possess a complex interstellar medium which affects the emergent stellar continuum in several ways. This presents a challenge to the stellar analysis but affords insight into the properties of the gas and dust from which the massive OB stars have formed. The optimizing synthesis method solves for the stellar luminosity function and extinction simultaneously. This therefore provides an independent measure of the extinction affecting the hot population component. Despite the rise of the reddening law towards the ultraviolet, BCGs are found to be brighter in the ultraviolet than expected.

  15. A Dust-Obscured Massive Maximum-Starburst Galaxy at a Redshift of 6.34

    CERN Document Server

    Riechers, Dominik A; Clements, D L; Dowell, C D; Perez-Fournon, I; Ivison, R J; Bridge, C; Conley, A; Fu, Hai; Vieira, J D; Wardlow, J; Calanog, J; Cooray, A; Hurley, P; Neri, R; Kamenetzky, J; Aguirre, J E; Altieri, B; Arumugam, V; Benford, D J; Bethermin, M; Bock, J; Burgarella, D; Cabrera-Lavers, A; Chapman, S C; Cox, P; Dunlop, J S; Earle, L; Farrah, D; Ferrero, P; Franceschini, A; Gavazzi, R; Glenn, J; Solares, E A Gonzalez; Gurwell, M A; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Hyde, A; Ibar, E; Kovacs, A; Krips, M; Lupu, R E; Maloney, P R; Martinez-Navajas, P; Matsuhara, H; Murphy, E J; Naylor, B J; Nguyen, H T; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Petitpas, G; Rangwala, N; Roseboom, I G; Scott, D; Smith, A J; Staguhn, J G; Streblyanska, A; Thomson, A P; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Wang, L; Zemcov, M; Zmuidzinas, J

    2013-01-01

    Massive present-day early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies probably gained the bulk of their stellar mass and heavy elements through intense, dust-enshrouded starbursts - that is, increased rates of star formation - in the most massive dark matter halos at early epochs. However, it remains unknown how soon after the Big Bang such massive starburst progenitors exist. The measured redshift distribution of dusty, massive starbursts has long been suspected to be biased low in redshift owing to selection effects, as confirmed by recent findings of systems out to redshift z~5. Here we report the identification of a massive starburst galaxy at redshift 6.34 through a submillimeter color-selection technique. We unambiguously determined the redshift from a suite of molecular and atomic fine structure cooling lines. These measurements reveal a hundred billion solar masses of highly excited, chemically evolved interstellar medium in this galaxy, which constitutes at least 40% of the baryonic mass. A "maximum st...

  16. The Evolution of Post-Starburst Galaxies from z~1 to the Present

    CERN Document Server

    Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Ho, Shirley; Ross, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    Post-starburst galaxies are in the transitional stage between blue, star-forming galaxies and red, quiescent galaxies, and therefore hold important clues for our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this paper, we systematically searched for and identified a large sample of post-starburst galaxies from the spectroscopic dataset of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 9. In total, we found more than 6000 objects with redshifts between z ~ 0.05 to z ~ 1.3, making this the largest sample of post-starburst galaxies in the literature. We calculated the luminosity function of the post-starburst galaxies using two uniformly selected subsamples: the SDSS Main Galaxy Sample and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS sample. The luminosity functions are roughly log-normal. The peak magnitudes shift as a function of redshift from M ~ -23.5 at z ~ 0.8 to M ~ -20.5 at z ~ 0.1. This is consistent with the downsizing trend, whereby higher mass galaxies form earlier than low-mass galaxies. We compared...

  17. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies and Missing Baryons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Bournaud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tidal dwarf galaxies form during the interaction, collision, or merger of massive spiral galaxies. They can resemble “normal” dwarf galaxies in terms of mass, size, and become dwarf satellites orbiting around their massive progenitor. They nevertheless keep some signatures from their origin, making them interesting targets for cosmological studies. In particular, they should be free from dark matter from a spheroidal halo. Flat rotation curves and high dynamical masses may then indicate the presence of an unseen component, and constrain the properties of the “missing baryons,” known to exist but not directly observed. The number of dwarf galaxies in the Universe is another cosmological problem for which it is important to ascertain if tidal dwarf galaxies formed frequently at high redshift, when the merger rate was high, and many of them survived until today. In this paper, “dark matter” is used to refer to the nonbaryonic matter, mostly located in large dark halos, that is, CDM in the standard paradigm, and “missing baryons” or “dark baryons” is used to refer to the baryons known to exist but hardly observed at redshift zero, and are a baryonic dark component that is additional to “dark matter”.

  18. Ejection of Supernova-Enriched Gas From Dwarf Disk Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragile, P C; Murray, S D; Lin, D C

    2004-06-15

    We examine the efficiency with which supernova-enriched gas may be ejected from dwarf disk galaxies, using a methodology previously employed to study the self-enrichment efficiency of dwarf spheroidal systems. Unlike previous studies that focused on highly concentrated starbursts, in the current work we consider discrete supernova events spread throughout various fractions of the disk. We model disk systems having gas masses of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} with supernova rates of 30, 300, and 3000 Myr{sup -1}. The supernova events are confined to the midplane of the disk, but distributed over radii of 0, 30, and 80% of the disk radius, consistent with expectations for Type II supernovae. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that the enriched material from supernovae is largely lost when the supernovae are concentrated near the nucleus, as expected for a starburst event. In contrast, we find the loss of enriched material to be much less efficient (as low as 21%) when the supernovae occur over even a relatively small fraction of the disk. The difference is due to the ability of the system to relax following supernova events that occur over more extended regions. Larger physical separations also reduce the likelihood of supernovae going off within low-density ''chimneys'' swept out by previous supernovae. We also find that, for the most distributed systems, significant metal loss is more likely to be accompanied by significant mass loss. A comparison with theoretical predications indicates that, when undergoing self-regulated star formation, galaxies in the mass range considered shall efficiently retain the products of Type II supernovae.

  19. Chandra Observation of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 2146

    CERN Document Server

    Inui, T; Tsuru, T G; Koyama, K; Matsushita, S; Peck, A B; Tarchi, A; Inui, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji; Matsushita, Satoki; Peck, Alison B.; Tarchi, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    We present six monitoring observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 2146 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have detected 67 point sources in the 8'.7 x 8'.7 field of view of the ACIS-S detector. Six of these sources were Ultra-Luminous X-ray Sources, the brightest of which has a luminosity of 5 x 10^{39} ergs s^{-1}. One of the source, with a luminosity of ~1 x 10^{39} ergs s^{-1}, is coincident with the dynamical center location, as derived from the ^{12}CO rotation curve. We suggest that this source may be a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus. We have produced a table where the positions and main characteristics of the Chandra-detected sources are reported. The comparison between the positions of the X-ray sources and those of compact sources detected in NIR or radio does not indicate any definite counterpart. Taking profit of the relatively large number of sources detected, we have derived a logN-logS relation and a luminosity function. The former shows a break at \\~10^{-15} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1}, t...

  20. Chronos and Kairos: Mosfire Observations of Post-Starburst Galaxies in z~1 Clusters and Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaux, Brian C; Lubin, Lori M; Wu, Po-Feng; Gal, Roy R; Rumbaugh, Nicholas; Kocevski, Dale D; Squires, amd Gordon K

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present the exploration of $\\sim$500 spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in and around two large scale structures at $z\\sim1$ drawn from the ORELSE survey. A sub-sample of these galaxies ($\\sim$150) were targeted for the initial phases of a near-infrared MOSFIRE spectroscopic campaign investigating the differences in selections of galaxies which had recently ended a burst of star formation or had rapidly quenched (i.e., post-starburst or K+A galaxies). Selection with MOSFIRE resulted in a post-starburst sample more than double that selected by traditional $z\\sim1$ (observed-frame optical) methods even after the removal of the relatively large fraction of dusty starburst galaxies selected through traditional methods. While the traditional post-starburst fraction increased with increased global density, the MOSFIRE-selected post-starburst fraction was found to be constant in field, group, and cluster environments. However, this fraction relative to the number of galaxies with ongoing star form...

  1. Photometric properties of Local Volume dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sharina, M E; Dolphin, A E; Karachentseva, V E; Tully, R Brent; Karataeva, G M; Makarov, D I; Makarova, L N; Sakai, S; Shaya, E J; Nikolaev, E Yu; Kuznetsov, A N

    2007-01-01

    We present surface photometry and metallicity measurements for 104 nearby dwarf galaxies imaged with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. In addition, we carried out photometry for 26 galaxies of the sample and for Sextans~B on images of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our sample comprises dwarf spheroidal, irregular and transition type galaxies located within ~10 Mpc in the field and in nearby groups: M81, Centaurus A, Sculptor, and Canes Venatici I cloud. It is found that the early-type galaxies have on average higher metallicity at a given luminosity in comparison to the late-type objects. Dwarf galaxies with M_B > -12 -- -13 mag deviate toward larger scale lengths from the scale length -- luminosity relation common for spiral galaxies, h \\propto L^{0.5}_B. The following correlations between fundamental parameters of the galaxies are consistent with expectations if there is pronounced gas-loss through galactic winds: 1) between the luminosit...

  2. On the Assembly of Dwarf Galaxies in Clusters and their Efficient Formation of Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mistani, Pouria A; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Vogelsberger, Mark; Nelson, Dylan; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Torrey, Paul; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy clusters contain a large population of low mass dwarf elliptical galaxies whose exact origin is unclear: their colors, structural properties and kinematics differ substantially from those of dwarf irregulars in the field. We use the Illustris cosmological simulation to study differences in the assembly paths of dwarf galaxies (3e8 < M_*/M_sun < 1e10) according to their environment. We find that cluster dwarfs achieve their maximum total and stellar mass on average ~ 8 and ~ 4.5 Gyr ago, respectively, around the time of infall into the clusters. In contrast, field dwarfs not subjected to environmental stripping, reach their maximum mass at redshift z = 0. This different assembly history naturally produces a color bimodality, with blue isolated dwarfs and redder cluster dwarfs exhibiting negligible star-formation today. The cessation of star formation happens over median times 3.5-5 Gyr depending on stellar mass, and shows a large scatter (~ 1-8 Gyr), with the lower values associated with starburst...

  3. Massive Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Soeren S

    2015-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies can have very high globular cluster specific frequencies, and the GCs are in general significantly more metal-poor than the bulk of the field stars. In some dwarfs, such as Fornax, WLM, and IKN, the fraction of metal-poor stars that belong to GCs can be as high as 20%-25%, an order of magnitude higher than the 1%-2% typical of GCs in halos of larger galaxies. Given that chemical abundance anomalies appear to be present also in GCs in dwarf galaxies, this implies severe difficulties for self-enrichment scenarios that require GCs to have lost a large fraction of their initial masses. More generally, the number of metal-poor field stars in these galaxies is today less than what would originally have been present in the form of low-mass clusters if the initial cluster mass function was a power-law extending down to low masses. This may imply that the initial GC mass function in these dwarf galaxies was significantly more top-heavy than typically observed in present-day star forming environments.

  4. Dust origin in late-type dwarf galaxies: ISM growth vs. type II supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovska, Svitlana

    2014-01-01

    We re-evaluate the roles of different dust sources in dust production as a function of metallicity in late-type dwarf galaxies, with the goal of understanding the relation between dust content and metallicity. The dust content ol late-type dwarf galaxies with episodic star formation is studied with a multicomponent model of dust evolution, which includes dust input from AGB stars, type II SNe and dust growth by accretion of atoms in the ISM. Dust growth in the ISM becomes an important dust source in dwarf galaxies, on the timescale of 0.1 - a few Gyrs. It increases the dust-to-gas ratio (DGR) during post-burst evolution, unlike type II SNe, which eject grains to the ISM only during starbursts. Before the dust growth in the ISM overtakes the dust production, AGB stars can be major sources of dust in metal-poor dwarf galaxies. Our models reproduce the relation between the DGR and oxygen abundance, derived from observations of a large sample of dwarf galaxies. The steep decrease in the DGR at low O values is exp...

  5. On the origin of bursts in blue compact dwarf galaxies: clues from kinematics and stellar populations

    CERN Document Server

    Koleva, M; Zeilinger, W W; Verbeke, R; Schroyen, J; Vermeylen, L

    2014-01-01

    Blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) form stars at, for their sizes, extraordinarily high rates. In this paper, we study what triggers this starburst and what is the fate of the galaxy once its gas fuel is exhausted. We select four BCDs with smooth outer regions, indicating them as possible progenitors of dwarf elliptical galaxies. We have obtained photometric and spectroscopic data with the FORS and ISAAC instruments on the VLT. We analyse their infra-red spectra using a full spectrum fitting technique which yields the kinematics of their stars and ionized gas together with their stellar population characteristics. We find that the_stellar_ velocity to velocity dispersion ratio (v/sigma) of our BCDs is of the order of 1.5, similar to that of dwarf elliptical galaxies. Thus, those objects do not require significant (if any) loss of angular momentum to fade into early type dwarfs. This finding is in discordance with previous studies, which however compared the stellar kinematics of dwarf elliptical galaxies with...

  6. Blue diffuse dwarf galaxies: a clearer picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Bethan L.; Koposov, Sergey E.; Stark, Daniel P.; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.

    2017-03-01

    The search for chemically unevolved galaxies remains prevalent in the nearby Universe, mostly because these systems provide excellent proxies for exploring in detail the physics of high-z systems. The most promising candidates are extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs), i.e. galaxies with population. In 2014, we reoriented this search using only morphological properties and uncovered a population of ∼150 'blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies', and published a sub-sample of 12 BDD spectra. Here, we present optical spectroscopic observations of a larger sample of 51 BDDs, along with their Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric properties. With our improved statistics, we use direct-method abundances to confirm that BDDs are chemically unevolved (7.43 population synthesis models and estimated to be in the range log (M*/M⊙) ≃ 5-9. Unlike other low-metallicity star-forming galaxies, BDDs are in agreement with the mass-metallicity relation at low masses, suggesting that they are not accreting large amounts of pristine gas relative to their stellar mass. BDD galaxies appear to be a population of actively star-forming dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies which fall within the class of low-surface-brightness dIrr galaxies. Their ongoing star formation and irregular morphology make them excellent analogues for galaxies in the early Universe.

  7. Mass and metal ejection efficiency in disk galaxies driven by young stellar clusters of nuclear starburst

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A; Raga, A C; Colin, P

    2011-01-01

    We present results from models of galactic winds driven by energy injected by nuclear starbursts. The total energy of the starburst is provided by young central stellar clusters and parts of the galactic interstellar medium are pushed out as part of the galactic wind (in some cases the galactic wind contains an important part of the metals produced in the new generation of stars). We have performed adiabatic and radiative 3D N-Body/Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of galactic winds using the GADGET-2 code. The numerical models cover a wide range of starburst (from $\\sim10^2$ to $\\sim10^7$ M$_\\odot$) and galactic gas masses (from $\\sim6\\times10^6$ to $\\sim10^{11}$ M$_\\odot$). The concentrated central starburst regions are an efficient engine for producing of the mass and metal loss in galaxies, and also for driving the metal redistribution in the galaxies.

  8. Discovery of Large Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Post-Starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    French, K Decker; Zabludoff, Ann; Narayanan, Desika; Shirley, Yancy; Walter, Fabian; Smith, John-David; Tremonti, Christy A

    2015-01-01

    Post-starburst (or "E+A") galaxies are characterized by low H$\\alpha$ emission and strong Balmer absorption, suggesting a recent starburst, but little current star formation. Although many of these galaxies show evidence of recent mergers, the mechanism for ending the starburst is not yet understood. To study the fate of the molecular gas, we search for CO (1-0) and (2-1) emission with the IRAM 30m and SMT 10m telescopes in 32 nearby ($0.01starburst galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We detect CO in 17 (53%). Using CO as a tracer for molecular hydrogen, and a Galactic conversion factor, we obtain molecular gas masses of $M(H_2)=10^{8.6}$-$10^{9.8} M_\\odot$ and molecular gas mass to stellar mass fractions of $\\sim10^{-2}$-$10^{-0.5}$, comparable to those of star-forming galaxies. The large amounts of molecular gas rule out complete gas consumption, expulsion, or starvation as the primary mechanism that ends the starburst in these galaxies. The upper limits on $M(H_2)$ for th...

  9. Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D. [Department of Astronomy, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism→π{sup 0}→γγ. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

  10. Choirs H I galaxy groups: The metallicity of dwarf galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Meurer, Gerhardt; Bekki, Kenji [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston ACT 2611 (Australia); Kilborn, Virginia, E-mail: sarah@sarahsweet.com.au [Swinburne University of Technology, Mail number H30, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2014-02-10

    We present a recalibration of the luminosity-metallicity relation for gas-rich, star-forming dwarfs to magnitudes as faint as M{sub R} ∼ –13. We use the Dopita et al. metallicity calibrations to calibrate the relation for all the data in this analysis. In metallicity-luminosity space, we find two subpopulations within a sample of high-confidence Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 star-forming galaxies: 52% are metal-rich giants and 48% are metal-medium galaxies. Metal-rich dwarfs classified as tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates in the literature are typically of metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 ± 0.05, while SDSS dwarfs fainter than M{sub R} = –16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 ± 0.10, regardless of their luminosity, indicating that there is an approximate floor to the metallicity of low-luminosity galaxies. Our hydrodynamical simulations predict that TDGs should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. Metallicity can therefore be a useful diagnostic for identifying TDG candidate populations in the absence of tidal tails. At magnitudes brighter than M{sub R} ∼ –16, our sample of 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 H I gas-rich groups is consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes, there is an increase in dispersion of the metallicity of our sample, suggestive of a wide range of H I content and environment. In our sample, we identify three (16% of dwarfs) strong TDG candidates (12 + log(O/H) > 8.6) and four (21%) very metal-poor dwarfs (12 + log(O/H) < 8.0), which are likely gas-rich dwarfs with recently ignited star formation.

  11. The Extraordinary Mid-infrared Spectrum of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy SBS0335-052

    CERN Document Server

    Houck, J R; Brandl, B R; Weedman, D; Herter, T; Uchida, K I; Armus, L; Soifer, B T; Bernard-Salas, J; Spoon, H W W; Devost, D

    2004-01-01

    SBS0335-052 is a blue compact dwarf galaxy (BCD) with one of the lowest known metallicities, Z$\\sim$Z$_{\\sun}$/41, making it a local example of how primordial starburst galaxies and their precursors might appear. A spectrum obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope clearly shows silicate absorption features, emission lines of [SIV] and [NeIII], and puts strong upper limits on the PAH emission features. The observed low resolution spectrum (R~90) extends from 5.3 to 35microns and peaks at ~28microns. The spectrum is compared to IRS observations of the prototypical starburst nucleus NGC7714. SBS0335-052 is quite unlike normal starburst galaxies, which show strong PAH bands, low ionization emission lines, and a continuum peak near 80microns. The continuum difference for $\\lambda >30 \\mu$m implies a substantial reduction in the mass of cold dust. If the spectrum of this very low metallicity galaxy is representative of star forming galaxies at higher redshifts, it may be difficul...

  12. In-spiraling Clumps in Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G; Hunter, Deidre

    2012-01-01

    Giant star-formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the BCD phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived....

  13. On the Fate of Processed Matter in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Silich, S A; Silich, Sergey A.; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    1998-01-01

    Two dimensional calculations of the evolution of remnants generated by the strong mechanical energy deposited by stellar clusters in dwarf galaxies (M \\si $10^9 - 10^{10}$ \\msun) are presented. The evolution is followed for times longer than both the blowout time and the presumed span of energy injection generated by a coeval massive stellar cluster. The remnants are shown to end up wrapping around the central region of the host galaxy, while growing to kpc-scale dimensions. Properties of the remnants such as luminosity, size, swept up mass, and expansion speed are given as a function of time for all calculated cases. The final fate of the swept-up galactic gas and of the matter processed by the central starburst is shown to be highly-dependent on the properties of the low density galactic halo. Superbubbles powered by star clusters, with properties similar to those inferred from the observations, slow down in the presence of an extended halo to expansion speeds smaller than the host galaxy escape velocity. V...

  14. Star formation history in forming dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczik, P.; Kravchuk, S. G.

    The processes of formation and evolution of isolated dwarf galaxies over the Hubble timescale is followed by means of SPH techniques. As an initial protogalaxy perturbation we consider an isolated, uniform, solid -- body rotated sphere involved into the Hubble flow and made of dark and baryonic matter in a 10:1 ratio. The simulations are carried out for the set of models having spin parameters lambda in the range from 0.01 to 0.08 and the total mass of dark matter 1011 M_odot . Our model includes gasdynamics, radiative processes, star formation, supernova feedback and simplified chemistry. The application of modified star formation criterion which accounts for chaotic motions and the time lag between initial development of suitable conditions for star formation and star formation itself (Berczik P.P, Kravchuk S.G. 1997, Ap.Sp.Sci.) provides the realistic description of the process of galaxy formation and evolution. Two parameters: total mass and initial angular momentum of the dwarf protogalaxy play the crucial role in its star formation activity. After the 15 Gyr of the evolution the rapidly rotated dwarf galaxies manifest themselves as an extremly gasrich, heavy element deficient objects showing the initial burst of star formation activity in several spatially separated regions. Slowly rotating objects manifest themselves finally as typical evolved dwarf galaxies.

  15. Blue straggler stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Sigurdsson, S.; Irwin, M. J.; Battaglia, G.

    2007-01-01

    Blue straggler star (BSS) candidates have been observed in all old dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), however whether or not they are authentic BSSs or young stars has been a point of debate. To both address this issue and obtain a better understanding of the formation of BSSs in different environme

  16. The Equipartition Magnetic Field Formula in Starburst Galaxies: Accounting for Pionic Secondaries and Strong Energy Losses

    CERN Document Server

    Lacki, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    Equipartition arguments provide an easy way to find a characteristic scale for the magnetic field from radio emission, by assuming the energy densities in cosmic rays and magnetic fields are the same. Yet most of the cosmic ray content in star-forming galaxies is in protons, which are invisible in radio emission. Therefore, the argument needs assumptions about the proton spectrum, typically that of a constant proton/electron ratio. In some environments, particularly starburst galaxies, the reasoning behind these assumptions does not necessarily hold: secondary pionic positrons and electrons may be responsible for most of the radio emission, and strong energy losses can alter the proton/electron ratio. We derive an equipartition expression that should work in a hadronic loss-dominated environment like starburst galaxies. Surprisingly, despite the radically different assumptions from the classical equipartition formula, numerically the results for starburst magnetic fields are similar. We explain this fortuitou...

  17. Upper Limits to Fluxes of Neutrinos and Gamma-Rays from Starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2006-01-01

    Loeb and Waxman have argued that high energy neutrinos from the decay of pions produced in interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar gas in starburst galaxies would be produced with a large enough flux to be observable. Here we obtain an upper limit to the diffuse neutrino flux from starburst galaxies which is a factor of $\\sim$5 lower than the flux which they predict. Compared with predicted fluxes from other extragalactic high energy neutrino sources, starburst neutrinos with $\\sim$ PeV energies would have a flux considerably below that predicted for AGN models. We also estimate an upper limit for the diffuse GeV $\\gamma$-ray flux from starbust galaxies to be $\\cal{O}

  18. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect due to hyper-starburst galaxy winds

    CERN Document Server

    Rowe, Barnaby

    2010-01-01

    We construct a simple, spherical blastwave model to estimate the pressure structure of the intergalactic medium surrounding hyper-starburst galaxies, and argue that the effects of interaction with star-forming galaxy winds may be approximated at early times by an adiabatically expanding, self-similar `bubble' as described by Weaver et al. (1977) and Ostriker & McKee (1988). This model is used to make observational predictions for the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the shocked bubble plasma. Radiative cooling losses are explored, and it is found that bremsstrahlung will limit the epoch of adiabatic expansion to $10^7$--$10^8$ years: comparable to total hyper-starburst lifetimes. Prospects for making a first Sunyaev-Zel'dovich detection of galaxy wind bubbles using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array are examined for a number of active hyper-starburst sources in the literature.

  19. The Post-Starburst Evolution of Tidal Disruption Event Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    French, K Decker; Zabludoff, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Tidal Disruption Events (TDEs) favor quiescent host galaxies with strong Balmer absorption lines. Here we study eight hosts of optical/UV-detected TDEs to determine the duration of the recent star formation episode, the time elapsed since it ended, and the fraction of stellar mass produced. Most hosts (6/8) have had short recent starbursts of <200 Myr as opposed to a slower decline in star formation. TDE host galaxies span a wide range of post-starburst ages (60-600 Myr for 6/8 galaxies), indicating that TDEs are not limited to a specific time in their hosts' post-starburst evolution. If the disrupted star was a main sequence star that formed in the burst or before, the post-burst ages provide an independent constraint on its likely mass, excluding O, B and the most massive A stars. If the starburst arose from a galaxy merger, the time elapsed since the starburst began constrains the coalescence timescale and thus limits the merger mass ratio to more equal than 12:1 in most (7/8) TDE hosts. This uncommon r...

  20. Starbursts Lessons for the Origin and Evolution of Galaxies and the Inter-Galactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Heckman, T M

    1997-01-01

    Starbursts are episodes of intense star-formation that occur in the central regions of galaxies, and dominate the integrated emission from the galaxy. They are a significant component of the present- day universe, being the site of for testing our ideas about star-formation, the evolution of high-mass stars, and the physics of the interstellar medium. They serve as local analogs of the processes that were important in the origin and early evolution of galaxies and in the heating and chemical enrichment of the inter-galactic medium. In this contribution I review starbursts from this broad cosmogonical perspective, stressing several key lessons we have learned from starbursts: 1) Violent, transient events play a significant role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. 2) Galaxies do not evolve as `Island Universes': starbursts are triggered by galaxy interactions and produce outflows of hot chemically-enriched gas that `pollute' the inter- galactic medium. 3) Dust dramatically affects of view of high-mass star...

  1. Large turbulent reservoirs of cold molecular gas around high-redshift starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falgarone, E.; Zwaan, M. A.; Godard, B.; Bergin, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Andreani, P. M.; Bournaud, F.; Bussmann, R. S.; Elbaz, D.; Omont, A.; Oteo, I.; Walter, F.

    2017-08-01

    Starburst galaxies at the peak of cosmic star formation are among the most extreme star-forming engines in the Universe, producing stars over about 100 million years (ref. 2). The star-formation rates of these galaxies, which exceed 100 solar masses per year, require large reservoirs of cold molecular gas to be delivered to their cores, despite strong feedback from stars or active galactic nuclei. Consequently, starburst galaxies are ideal for studying the interplay between this feedback and the growth of a galaxy. The methylidyne cation, CH+, is a most useful molecule for such studies because it cannot form in cold gas without suprathermal energy input, so its presence indicates dissipation of mechanical energy or strong ultraviolet irradiation. Here we report the detection of CH+ (J = 1–0) emission and absorption lines in the spectra of six lensed starburst galaxies at redshifts near 2.5. This line has such a high critical density for excitation that it is emitted only in very dense gas, and is absorbed in low-density gas. We find that the CH+ emission lines, which are broader than 1,000 kilometres per second, originate in dense shock waves powered by hot galactic winds. The CH+ absorption lines reveal highly turbulent reservoirs of cool (about 100 kelvin), low-density gas, extending far (more than 10 kiloparsecs) outside the starburst galaxies (which have radii of less than 1 kiloparsec). We show that the galactic winds sustain turbulence in the 10-kiloparsec-scale environments of the galaxies, processing these environments into multiphase, gravitationally bound reservoirs. However, the mass outflow rates are found to be insufficient to balance the star-formation rates. Another mass input is therefore required for these reservoirs, which could be provided by ongoing mergers or cold-stream accretion. Our results suggest that galactic feedback, coupled jointly to turbulence and gravity, extends the starburst phase of a galaxy instead of quenching it.

  2. Satellite Dwarf Galaxies in a Hierarchical Universe: The Prevalence of Dwarf-Dwarf Major Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Deason, Alis; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea

    2014-01-01

    Mergers are a common phenomenon in hierarchical structure formation, especially for massive galaxies and clusters, but their importance for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains poorly understood. We investigate the frequency of major mergers between dwarf galaxies in the Local Group using the ELVIS suite of cosmological zoom-in dissipationless simulations of Milky Way- and M31-like host halos. We find that ~10% of satellite dwarf galaxies with M_star > 10^6 M_sun that are within the host virial radius experienced a major merger of stellar mass ratio closer than 0.1 since z = 1, with a lower fraction for lower mass dwarf galaxies. Recent merger remnants are biased towards larger radial distance and more recent virial infall times, because most recent mergers occurred shortly before crossing within the virial radius of the host halo. Satellite-satellite mergers also occur within the host halo after virial infall, catalyzed by the large fraction of dwarf galaxies that fell in as part of a group. The merger ...

  3. The Evolutionary Status of Isolated Dwarf Irregular Galaxies II. Star Formation Histories and Gas Depletion

    CERN Document Server

    Van Zee, L

    2001-01-01

    The results of UBV and H alpha imaging of a large sample of isolated dwarf irregular galaxies are interpreted in the context of composite stellar population models. The observed optical colors are best fit by composite stellar populations which have had approximately constant star formation rates for at least 10 Gyr. The galaxies span a range of central surface brightness, from 20.5 to 25.0 mag arcsec^{-2}; there is no correlation between surface brightness and star formation history. Although the current star formation rates are low, it is possible to reproduce the observed luminosities without a major starburst episode. The derived gas depletion timescales are long, typically ~20 Gyr. These results indicate that dwarf irregular galaxies will be able to continue with their slow, but constant, star formation activity for at least another Hubble time. The sample of isolated dIs is compared to a sample of star bursting dwarf galaxies taken from the literature. The star bursting dwarf galaxies have many similar ...

  4. New Light in Star-Forming Dwarf Galaxies: The PMAS Integral Field View of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy Mrk 409

    CERN Document Server

    Cairos, L M; Papaderos, P; Kehrig, C; Weilbacher, P; Roth, M M; Zurita, C

    2009-01-01

    We present an integral field spectroscopic study of the central 2x2 kpc^2 of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Mrk 409, observed with the Potsdam MultiAperture Spectrophotometer. This study focuses on the morphology, two-dimensional chemical abundance pattern, excitation properties and kinematics of the ionized interstellar medium in the starburst component. We also investigate the nature of the extended ring of ionized gas emission surrounding the bright nuclear starburst region of Mrk 409. PMAS spectra of selected regions along the ring, interpreted with evolutionary and population synthesis models, indicate that their ionized emission is mainly due to a young stellar population with a total mass of ~1.5x10^6 M_sun, which started forming almost coevally ~10 Myr ago. This stellar component is likely confined to the collisional interface of a spherically expanding, starburst-driven super-bubble with denser, swept-up ambient gas, ~600 pc away from the central starburst nucleus. The spectroscopic properties of the ...

  5. Satellites and Haloes of Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sales, Laura V; White, Simon D M; Navarro, Julio F

    2012-01-01

    We study the abundance of satellite galaxies as a function of primary stellar mass using the SDSS/DR7 spectroscopic catalogue. In contrast with previous studies, which focussed mainly on bright primaries, our central galaxies span a wide range of stellar mass, 10^7.5 < M_*^pri/M_sun < 10^11, from dwarfs to central cluster galaxies. Our analysis confirms that the average number of satellites around bright primaries, when expressed in terms of satellite-to-primary stellar mass ratio (m_*^sat/M_*^pri), is a strong function of M_*^pri. On the other hand, satellite abundance is largely independent of primary mass for dwarf primaries (M_*^pri<10^10 M_sun). These results are consistent with galaxy formation models in the LCDM scenario. We find excellent agreement between SDSS data and semi-analytic mock galaxy catalogues constructed from the Millennium-II Simulation. Satellite galaxies trace dark matter substructure in LCDM, so satellite abundance reflects the dependence on halo mass, M_200, of both substru...

  6. An Overview of the Dwarf Galaxy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Madden, S C; Galametz, M; Cormier, D; Lebouteiller, V; Galliano, F; Hony, S; Bendo, G J; Smith, M W L; Pohlen, M; Roussel, H; Sauvage, M; Wu, R; Sturm, E; Poglitsch, A; Contursi, A; Doublier, V; Baes, M; Barlow, M J; Boselli, A; Boquien, M; Carlson, L R; Ciesla, L; Cooray, A; Cortese, L; De Looze, I; Irwin, J A; Isaak, K; Kamenetzky, J; Karczewski, O L; Lu, N; MacHattie, J A; Halloran, B O; Parkin, T J; Rangwala, N; Schirm, M R P; Schulz, B; Spinoglio, L; Vaccari, M; Wilson, C D; Wozniak, H

    2013-01-01

    The Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS) program is studying low-metallicity galaxies using 230h of far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) photometric and spectroscopic observations of the Herschel Space Observatory and draws to this a rich database of a wide range of wavelengths tracing the dust, gas and stars. This sample of 50 galaxies includes the largest metallicity range achievable in the local Universe including the lowest metallicity (Z) galaxies, 1/50 Zsun, and spans 4 orders of magnitude in star formation rates. The survey is designed to get a handle on the physics of the interstellar medium (ISM) of low metallicity dwarf galaxies, especially on their dust and gas properties and the ISM heating and cooling processes. The DGS produces PACS and SPIRE maps of low-metallicity galaxies observed at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 mic with the highest sensitivity achievable to date in the FIR and submm. The FIR fine-structure lines, [CII] 158 mic, [OI] 63 mic, [OI] 145 mic, [OIII] 88 mic, [NIII] 57 mic and [NII...

  7. White dwarf-red dwarf binaries in the Galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselaar, E.J.M. van den

    2007-01-01

    This PhD thesis shows several studies on white dwarf - red dwarf binaries. White dwarfs are the end products of most stars and red dwarfs are normal hydrogen burning low-mass stars. White dwarf - red dwarf binaries are both blue (white dwarf) and red (red dwarf). Together with the fact that they are

  8. Molecular gas during the post-starburst phase: low gas fractions in green-valley Seyfert post-starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; French, K. Decker; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.

    2017-08-01

    Post-starbursts (PSBs) are candidate for rapidly transitioning from starbursting to quiescent galaxies. We study the molecular gas evolution of PSBs at z ∼ 0.03-0.2. We undertook new CO (2-1) observations of 22 Seyfert PSB candidates using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope. This sample complements previous samples of PSBs by including green-valley PSBs with Seyfert-like emission, allowing us to analyse for the first time the molecular gas properties of 116 PSBs with a variety of AGN properties. The distribution of molecular gas to stellar mass fractions in PSBs is significantly different from normal star-forming galaxies in the CO Legacy Database (COLD) GASS survey. The combined samples of PSBs with Seyfert-like emission line ratios have a gas fraction distribution that is even more significantly different and is broader (∼0.03-0.3). Most of them have lower gas fractions than normal star-forming galaxies. We find a highly significant correlation between the WISE 12 and 4.6 μm flux ratios and molecular gas fractions in both PSBs and normal galaxies. We detect molecular gas in 27 per cent of our Seyfert PSBs. Taking into account the upper limits, the mean and the dispersion of the distribution of the gas fraction in our Seyfert PSB sample are much smaller (μ = 0.025, σ = 0.018) than previous samples of Seyfert PSBs or PSBs in general (μ ∼ 0.1-0.2, σ ∼ 0.1-0.2).

  9. Missing dark matter in dwarf galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Kyle A.; Navarro, Julio F.; Sales, Laura V.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu; White, Simon D. M.

    2016-08-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the APOSTLE project along with high-quality rotation curve observations to examine the fraction of baryons in ΛCDM haloes that collect into galaxies. This `galaxy formation efficiency' correlates strongly and with little scatter with halo mass, dropping steadily towards dwarf galaxies. The baryonic mass of a galaxy may thus be used to place a lower limit on total halo mass and, consequently, on its asymptotic maximum circular velocity. A number of observed dwarfs seem to violate this constraint, having baryonic masses up to 10 times higher than expected from their rotation speeds, or, alternatively, rotating at only half the speed expected for their mass. Taking the data at face value, either these systems have formed galaxies with extraordinary efficiency - highly unlikely given their shallow potential wells - or their dark matter content is much lower than expected from ΛCDM haloes. This `missing dark matter' is reminiscent of the inner mass deficit of galaxies with slowly rising rotation curves, but cannot be explained away by star formation-induced `cores' in the dark mass profile, since the anomalous deficit applies to regions larger than the luminous galaxies themselves. We argue that explaining the structure of these galaxies would require either substantial modification of the standard ΛCDM paradigm or else significant revision to the uncertainties in their inferred mass profiles, which should be much larger than reported. Systematic errors in inclination may provide a simple resolution to what would otherwise be a rather intractable problem for the current paradigm.

  10. Pulsar searches in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Herrera, Eduardo; Maccarone, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We have been undertaking a comprehensive survey for pulsars and fast radio transients in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way using the Green Bank Radio Telescope operating at a central frequency of 350 MHz. Our search pipeline allows the detection of periodical signals and single dispersed pulses and it is optimized to search for millisecond radio pulsars. Here we present preliminary results of the searches we have conducted in the Ursa Minoris, Draco and Leo I dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. Our searches have revealed no periodic signals but a few unconfirmed millisecond single pulses at various dispersion measures, possibly related to neutron stars. Detecting neutron stars in these systems can potentially help to test the existence of haloes of dark matter surrounding these systems as predicted by Dehnen & King (2006).

  11. Tests of Modified Gravity with Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2011-01-01

    In modified gravity theories that seek to explain cosmic acceleration, dwarf galaxies in low density environments can be subject to enhanced forces. The class of scalar-tensor theories, which includes f(R) gravity, predict such a force enhancement (massive galaxies like the Milky Way can evade it through a screening mechanism that protects the interior of the galaxy from this "fifth" force). We study observable deviations from GR in the disks of late-type dwarf galaxies moving under gravity. The fifth-force acts on the dark matter and HI gas disk, but not on the stellar disk owing to the self-screening of main sequence stars. We find four distinct observable effects in such disk galaxies: 1. A displacement of the stellar disk from the HI disk. 2. Warping of the stellar disk along the direction of the external force. 3. Enhancement of the rotation curve measured from the HI gas compared to that of the stellar disk. 4. Asymmetry in the rotation curve of the stellar disk. We estimate that the spatial effects can...

  12. The Unexpected Past of a Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-01

    New Light on Cannibalism in the Local Group of Galaxies The Local Group of Galaxies consists of a few large spiral galaxies - for instance the Milky Way galaxy in which we live, and the Andromeda galaxy that is visible to the unaided eye in the northern constellation of the same name - as well as two dozen much smaller galaxies of mostly irregular shape. Whereas the larger galaxies have extended halos of very old stars, no such halos have ever been seen around the smaller ones. Now, however, Dante Minniti and Albert Zijlstra [1], working at the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT), have found a large halo of old and metal-poor stars around one of the dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. This finding is quite unexpected. It revises our understanding of star formation in these galaxies and provides important information about the past evolution of galaxies [2]. Galaxy halos The Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a large, roughly spherical halo of old stars. The diameter is about 100,000 light years and the stars therein, known as Population II stars, are among the oldest known, with ages of 10 billion years or even more. They also differ from the younger stars nearer to the main plane of the Milky Way (in which our 4.7 billion year old Sun is located) by being very metal-poor. Many of the halo stars consist almost solely of hydrogen and helium, reflecting the composition of matter in the young Universe. This halo is important for our understanding of the processes that led to the formation of the Milky Way galaxy. It is believed that many of the halo stars and those of the same type found in globular clusters existed already before the Milky Way had fully formed. Galaxy cannibalism Many astronomers suspect that galaxies evolve and gradually grow larger and heavier by practising cannibalism on their own kind. In this picture, when two galaxies collide in space, the stars and nebulae in the smaller one will disperse and soon be taken over by the larger one, which

  13. The Post-starburst Evolution of Tidal Disruption Event Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, K. Decker; Arcavi, Iair; Zabludoff, Ann

    2017-02-01

    We constrain the recent star formation histories of the host galaxies of eight optical/UV-detected tidal disruption events (TDEs). Six hosts had quick starbursts of absorption line spectrum, we uncover emission lines; at least five hosts have ionization sources inconsistent with star formation that instead may be related to circumnuclear gas, merger shocks, or post-AGB stars.

  14. Constraining Stellar Feedback: Shock-ionized Gas in Nearby Starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Sungryong; Gallagher, John S; Martin, Crystal L; Conselice, Christopher J; Pellerin, Anne

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) We investigate the properties of feedback-driven shocks in 8 nearby starburst galaxies using narrow-band imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We identify the shock--ionized component via the line diagnostic diagram \\oiii/\\hb vs. \\sii (or \

  15. Dark influences II: gas and star formation in minor mergers of dwarf galaxies with dark satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Starkenburg, Tjitske K; Sales, Laura V

    2015-01-01

    Mergers have been proposed to induce starbursts and to lead to important morphological changes in galaxies. Most studies so far have focused on large galaxies, but dwarfs might also experience such events, since the halo mass function is scale-free in the concordance cosmological model. Notably, because of their low mass, most of their interactions will be with dark satellites. In this paper we follow the evolution of gas-rich disky dwarf galaxies as they experience a minor merger with a dark satellite. We aim to characterize the effects of such an interaction on the dwarf's star formation, morphology and kinematical properties. We perform a suite of carefully set-up hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxies that include dark matter, gas, and stars, merging with a satellite consisting solely of dark matter. For the host system we vary the gas fraction, disk size and thickness, halo mass and concentration, while for the satellite we explore different masses, concentrations and orbits. We find that the inter...

  16. Global HI Kinematics in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Stilp, Adrienne M; Warren, Steven R; Skillman, Evan; Ott, Juergen; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2013-01-01

    HI line widths are typically interpreted as a measure of ISM turbulence, which is potentially driven by star formation. In an effort to better understand the possible connections between line widths and star formation, we have characterized \\hi{} kinematics in a sample of nearby dwarf galaxies by co-adding line-of-sight spectra after removing the rotational velocity to produce an average, global \\hi{} line profile. These "superprofiles" are composed of a central narrow peak (~6-10 km/s) with higher-velocity wings to either side that contain ~10-15% of the total flux. The superprofiles are all very similar, indicating a universal global HI profile for dwarf galaxies. We compare characteristics of the superprofiles to various galaxy properties, such as mass and measures of star formation (SF), with the assumption that the superprofile represents a turbulent peak with energetic wings to either side. We use these quantities to derive average scale heights for the sample galaxies. When comparing to physical proper...

  17. The Illusive ISM of Dwarf Galaxies: Excess Submillimetre Emission and CO-Dark Molecular Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Madden, Suzanne C; Cormier, Diane; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Galliano, Frederic; Hony, Sacha; Remy, Aurelie; Sauvage, Marc; Contursi, Alessandra; Sturm, Eckhard; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Pohlen, Michael; Smith, M W L; Bendo, George; O'Halloran, Brian; 2, The SPIRE SAG; consortia., PACS

    2011-01-01

    The Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey investigates the interplay of star formation activity and the the metal-poor gas and dust of dwarf galaxies using FIR and submillimetre imaging spectroscopic and photometric observations in the 50 to 550mu window of the Herschel Space Observatory. The dust SEDs are well constrained with the new Herschel and MIR Spitzer data. A submillimetre excess is often found in low metallicity galaxies, which,if tracing very cold dust, would highlight large dust masses not easily reconciled in some cases, given the low metallicities and expected gas-to-dust mass ratios. The galaxies are also mapped in the FIR fine-structure lines (63 and 145mu OI, 158mu CII, 122 and 205mu NII, 88mu OIII) probing the low density ionised gas, the HII regions and photodissociation regions. While still early in the Herschel mission we can already see, along with earlier studies, that line ratios in the metal-poor ISM differ remarkably from those in the metal-rich starburst environments. In dwarf galaxies, L[CI...

  18. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. III. AN EXTREMELY METAL DEFICIENT GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle A.; Olive, Keith A.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W., E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: berg@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); and others

    2013-07-01

    We present KPNO 4 m and LBT/MODS spectroscopic observations of an H II region in the nearby dwarf irregular galaxy Leo P discovered recently in the Arecibo ALFALFA survey. In both observations, we are able to accurately measure the temperature sensitive [O III] {lambda}4363 line and determine a ''direct'' oxygen abundance of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.17 {+-} 0.04. Thus, Leo P is an extremely metal deficient (XMD) galaxy, and, indeed, one of the most metal deficient star-forming galaxies ever observed. For its estimated luminosity, Leo P is consistent with the relationship between luminosity and oxygen abundance seen in nearby dwarf galaxies. Leo P shows normal {alpha} element abundance ratios (Ne/O, S/O, and Ar/O) when compared to other XMD galaxies, but elevated N/O, consistent with the ''delayed release'' hypothesis for N/O abundances. We derive a helium mass fraction of 0.2509{sup +0.0184}{sub -0.0123}, which compares well with the WMAP + BBN prediction of 0.2483 {+-} 0.0002 for the primordial helium abundance. We suggest that surveys of very low mass galaxies compete well with emission line galaxy surveys for finding XMD galaxies. It is possible that XMD galaxies may be divided into two classes: the relatively rare XMD emission line galaxies which are associated with starbursts triggered by infall of low-metallicity gas and the more common, relatively quiescent XMD galaxies like Leo P, with very low chemical abundances due to their intrinsically small masses.

  19. Dwarf Galaxies in Voids: Dark Matter Halos and Gas Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeft, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Galaxy surveys have shown that luminous galaxies are mainly distributed in large filaments and galaxy clusters. The remaining large volumes are virtually devoid of luminous galaxies. This is in concordance with the formation of the large-scale structure in Universe as derived from cosmological simulations. However, the numerical results indicate that cosmological voids are abundantly populated with dark matter haloes which may in principle host dwarf galaxies. Observational efforts have in contrast revealed, that voids are apparently devoid of dwarf galaxies. We investigate the formation of dwarf galaxies in voids by hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Due to the cosmic ultra-violet background radiation low-mass haloes show generally are reduced baryon fraction. We determine the characteristic mass below which dwarf galaxies are baryon deficient. We show that the circular velocity below which the accretion of baryons is suppressed is approximately 40 km/s. The suppressed baryon accretion is caused by the...

  20. Dwarf Galaxies in Voids: Dark Matter Halos and Gas Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hoeft

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Galaxy surveys have shown that luminous galaxies are mainly distributed in large filaments and galaxy clusters. The remaining large volumes are virtually devoid of luminous galaxies. This is in concordance with the formation of the large-scale structure in the universe as derived from cosmological simulations. However, the numerical results indicate that cosmological voids are abundantly populated with dark matter haloes which may in principle host dwarf galaxies. Observational efforts have in contrast revealed that voids are apparently devoid of dwarf galaxies. We investigate the formation of dwarf galaxies in voids by hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Due to the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation low-mass haloes show generally a reduced baryon fraction. We determine the characteristic mass below which dwarf galaxies are baryon deficient. We show that the circular velocity below which the accretion of baryons is suppressed is approximately 40 kms−1. The suppressed baryon accretion is caused by the photo-heating due to the UV background. We set up a spherical halo model and show that the effective equation of the state of the gas in the periphery of dwarf galaxies determines the characteristic mass. This implies that any process which heats the gas around dwarf galaxies increases the characteristic mass and thus reduces the number of observable dwarf galaxies.

  1. A connection between star formation activity and cosmic rays in the starburst galaxy M 82

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Bautista, M; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Boltuch, D; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Chow, Y C; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Colin, P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nagai, T; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pizlo, F; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vasilev, V V; Vincent, S; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B; 10.1038/nature08557

    2009-01-01

    Although Galactic cosmic rays (protons and nuclei) are widely believed to be dominantly accelerated by the winds and supernovae of massive stars, definitive evidence of this origin remains elusive nearly a century after their discovery [1]. The active regions of starburst galaxies have exceptionally high rates of star formation, and their large size, more than 50 times the diameter of similar Galactic regions, uniquely enables reliable calorimetric measurements of their potentially high cosmic-ray density [2]. The cosmic rays produced in the formation, life, and death of their massive stars are expected to eventually produce diffuse gamma-ray emission via their interactions with interstellar gas and radiation. M 82, the prototype small starburst galaxy, is predicted to be the brightest starburst galaxy in gamma rays [3, 4]. Here we report the detection of >700 GeV gamma rays from M 82. From these data we determine a cosmic-ray density of 250 eV cm-3 in the starburst core of M 82, or about 500 times the averag...

  2. The equipartition magnetic field formula in starburst galaxies: accounting for pionic secondaries and strong energy losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Beck, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    Equipartition arguments provide an easy way to find a characteristic scale for the magnetic field from radio emission by assuming that the energy densities in cosmic rays and magnetic fields are the same. Yet most of the cosmic ray content in star-forming galaxies is in protons, which are invisible in radio emission. Therefore, the argument needs assumptions about the proton spectrum, typically that of a constant proton/electron ratio. In some environments, particularly starburst galaxies, the reasoning behind these assumptions does not necessarily hold: secondary pionic positrons and electrons may be responsible for most of the radio emission, and strong energy losses can alter the proton/electron ratio. We derive an equipartition expression that should work in a hadronic loss-dominated environment like starburst galaxies. Surprisingly, despite the radically different assumptions from the classical equipartition formula, numerically the results for starburst magnetic fields are similar. We explain this fortuitous coincidence using the energetics of secondary production and energy loss times. We show that these processes cause the proton/electron ratio to be ˜100 for GHz-emitting electrons in starbursts.

  3. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: IV The Controlling Parameters of the Starburst SED

    CERN Document Server

    Groves, B; Sutherland, R; Kewley, L; Fischera, J; Leitherer, C; Brandl, B; van Breugal, W

    2007-01-01

    We combine the the stellar spectral synthesis code Starburst99, the nebular modelling code MAPPINGSIII, and a 1-D dynamical evolution model of HII regions around massive clusters of young stars to generate improved models of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of starburst galaxies. We introduce a compactness parameter, C, which characterizes the specific intensity of the radiation field at ionization fronts in HII regions, and which controls the shape of the far-IR dust re-emission, often referred to loosely as the dust ``temperature''. We also investigate the effect of metallicity on the overall SED and in particular, on the strength of the PAH features. We provide templates for the mean emission produced by the young compact HII regions, the older (10 - 100 Myr) stars and for the wavelength-dependent attenuation produced by a foreground screen of the dust used in our model. We demonstrate that these components may be combined to produce a excellent fit to the observed SEDs of star formation dominated ga...

  4. The Faint Globular Cluster in the Dwarf Galaxy Andromeda I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Nelson; Strader, Jay; Sand, David J.; Willman, Beth; Seth, Anil C.

    2017-09-01

    Observations of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies can be used to study a variety of topics, including the structure of dark matter halos and the history of vigorous star formation in low-mass galaxies. We report on the properties of the faint globular cluster (M V -3.4) in the M31 dwarf galaxy Andromeda I. This object adds to the growing population of low-luminosity Local Group galaxies that host single globular clusters.

  5. Evidence of nuclear disks in starburst galaxies from their radial distribution of supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Herrero-Illana, R; Alberdi, A

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions are expected to be responsible for triggering massive star formation and possibly accretion onto a supermassive black hole, by providing large amounts of dense molecular gas down to the central kiloparsec region. Several scenarios to drive the gas further down to the central ~100 pc, have been proposed, including the formation of a nuclear disk around the black hole, where massive stars would produce supernovae. Here, we probe the radial distribution of supernovae and supernova remnants in the nuclear regions of the starburst galaxies M82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, by using high-angular resolution (< 0."1) radio observations published in the literature (for M82 and Arp 220), or obtained by ourselves from the European VLBI Network (Arp 299-A). Our main goal was to characterize the nuclear starbursts in those galaxies and thus test scenarios that propose that nuclear disks of sizes ~100 pc form in the central regions of starburst galaxies. We obtained the radial distribution of super...

  6. Towards a Unified Model for the "Diffuse Ionized Medium" in Normal and Starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J; Lehnert, M D; Wang, Jing; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lehnert, Matthew D.

    1998-01-01

    We analyze H$\\alpha$ images and long-slit spectra of samples of normal and starburst galaxies to better understand the nature of the diffuse, low-surface-brightness gas in these galaxies. We find that in both samples there is a strong inverse correlation between the H$\\alpha$ surface-brightness ($\\Sigma_{H\\alpha}$) and the [SII]/H$\\alpha$ line ratio at a given location in the galaxy. However, the correlation for the starbursts is offset brightward by an order-of-magnitude in H$\\alpha$ surface-brightness at a given line ratio. In contrast, we find that all the galaxies (starburst and normal alike) define a universal relation between line ratio and the relative H$\\alpha$ surface brightness ($\\Sigma_{H\\alpha}/\\Sigma_e$, where $\\Sigma_e$ is the mean H$\\alpha$ surface brightness within the galaxy half-light radius). We show that such a universal correlation is a natural outcome of a model in which the DIM is photoionized gas that has a characteristic thermal pressure ($P$) that is proportional to the mean rate of ...

  7. Star formation history and evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group

    CERN Document Server

    Grossi, M; Pritzl, B J; Knezek, P M; Gallagher, J S; Minchin, R F; Freeman, K C

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the properties of three unusual dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered with the HIPASS survey. From their optical morphology they appear to be low surface brightness dwarf spheroidals, yet they are gas-rich (M_{HI}/L_{B} > 1) with gas-mass-to-stellar light ratios larger than typical dwarf irregular galaxies. Therefore these systems appear different from any dwarfs of the Local Group. They should be favoured hosts for starburst, whereas we find a faint star formation region in only one object. We have obtained 21-cm data and Hubble Space Telescope photometry in V and I bands, and have constructed Colour Magnitude Diagrams (CMDs) to investigate their stellar populations and to set a constraint on their age. From the comparison of the observed and model CMDs we infer that all three galaxies are at least older than 2 Gyr (possibly even as old as 10 Gyr) and remain gas-rich because their star formation rates (SFRs) have been very low (< 10^{-3} M_{sun}/yr) throughout. In such systems, sta...

  8. The Alignment of Red-Sequence Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Haylee; Barkhouse, Wayne; Burgad, Jaford; Foote, Gregory; Rude, Cody; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2015-01-01

    The alignment of cluster galaxies has been used to determine the impact of the high-density environment on the evolution of galaxies. We have undertaken a study to measure the alignment of cluster dwarf galaxies based on a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters imaged at KPNO using the 0.9-meter telescope. To supplement our KPNO sample, we have included an additional 64 low-redshift clusters from the WINGS dataset. From the combined cluster sample (121 clusters), we have selected cluster dwarf galaxies based on their position relative to the cluster red-sequence. We present our preliminary results based on the alignment of the dwarf galaxies with: 1) the major axis of the brightest cluster galaxy, 2) the major axis of the cluster defined by position of the cluster members, and 3) a radius vector pointing from the cluster center to the dwarf galaxy.

  9. Nitrogen Production in Starburst Galaxies Detected by GALEX

    CERN Document Server

    Mallery, Ryan P; Rich, R Michael; Salim, Samir; Charlot, Stephane; Tremonti, Christy; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Wyder, Ted; Barlow, Tom A; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Milliard, Bruno; Szalay, Alexander S; Welsh, Barry Y; Yi, Suk Young

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the production of nitrogen in star forming galaxies with ultraviolet (UV) radiation detected by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Satellite (GALEX). We use a sample of 8,745 GALEX emission line galaxies matched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic sample. We derive both gas-phase oxygen and nitrogen abundances for the sample, and apply stellar population synthesis models to derive stellar masses and star formation histories of the galaxies. We compare oxygen abundances derived using three different diagnostics. We derive the specific star formation rates of the galaxies by modeling the 7-band GALEX+SDSS photometry. We find that galaxies that have log SFR/M$_*$ > -10.0 typically have values of log N/O ~0.05 dex less than galaxies with log SFR/M$_*$ < -10.0 and similar oxygen abundances.

  10. Formation of Isolated Dwarf Galaxies with Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Sawala, Till; White, Simon D M

    2009-01-01

    We present results of high resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the formation and evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Our simulations start from cosmological initial conditions at high redshift. They include metal-dependent cooling, star formation, feedback from type II and type Ia supernovae and UV background radiation, with sub-grid recipes identical to those applied in a previous study of Milky Way type galaxies. We find that a combination of feedback and the cosmic UV background is necessary to explain the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in isolation, and that their effect is strongly moderated by the depth of the gravitational potential. Taking this into account, our models naturally reproduce the observed luminosities and metallicities. The final objects have halo masses between 2.3*10^8 and 1.1*10^9 solar masses, mean velocity dispersions between 6.5 and 9.7 kms^-1, stellar masses ranging from 5*10^5 to 1.2*10^7 solar masses, median metallicities between [Fe/H] = -1.8 and -1.1, and half...

  11. GLOBAL H I KINEMATICS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Warren, Steven R.; Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Ott, Juergen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Koribalski, Baerbel [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-03-10

    H I line widths are typically interpreted as a measure of interstellar medium turbulence, which is potentially driven by star formation (SF). In an effort to better understand the possible connections between line widths and SF, we have characterized H I kinematics in a sample of nearby dwarf galaxies by co-adding line-of-sight spectra after removing the rotational velocity to produce average global H I line profiles. These ''superprofiles'' are composed of a central narrow peak ({approx}6-10 km s{sup -1}) with higher-velocity wings to either side that contain {approx}10%-15% of the total flux. The superprofiles are all very similar, indicating a universal global H I profile for dwarf galaxies. We compare characteristics of the superprofiles to various galaxy properties, such as mass and measures of SF, with the assumption that the superprofile represents a turbulent peak with energetic wings to either side. We use these quantities to derive average scale heights for the sample galaxies. When comparing to physical properties, we find that the velocity dispersion of the central peak is correlated with ({Sigma}{sub HI}). The fraction of mass and characteristic velocity of the high-velocity wings are correlated with measures of SF, consistent with the picture that SF drives surrounding H I to higher velocities. While gravitational instabilities provide too little energy, the SF in the sample galaxies does provide enough energy through supernovae, with realistic estimates of the coupling efficiency, to produce the observed superprofiles.

  12. Dwarf satellite galaxies in the modified dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Milgrom, M

    2000-01-01

    In the modified dynamics (MOND) the inner workings of dwarf satellites can be greatly affected by their mother galaxy-over and beyond its tidal effects. Because of MOND's nonlinearity a system's internal dynamics can be altered by an external field in which it is immersed (even when this field, by itself, is constant in space). As a result, the size and velocity dispersion of the satellite vary as the external field varies along its orbit. A notable outcome of this is a substantial increase in the dwarf's vulnerability to eventual tidal disruption-rather higher than Newtonian dynamics (with a dark-matter halo) would lead us to expect for a satellite with given observed parameters.

  13. FINDING DWARF GALAXIES FROM THEIR TIDAL IMPRINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya [Physics Department, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg Albert-Ueberle Str. 2 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Chang, Philip [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, 2200 E. Kenwood Blvd., Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413 (United States); Blitz, Leo, E-mail: schakra1@fau.edu, E-mail: chang65@uwm.edu [Astronomy Department, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    We describe ongoing work on a new method that allows one to approximately determine the mass and relative position (in galactocentric radius and azimuth) of galactic companions purely from analysis of observed disturbances in gas disks. We demonstrate the validity of this method, which we call Tidal Analysis, by applying it to local spirals with known optical companions, namely M51 and NGC 1512. These galaxies span the range from having a very low mass companion ({approx}one-hundredth the mass of the primary galaxy) to a fairly massive companion ({approx}one-third the mass of the primary galaxy). This approach has broad implications for many areas of astrophysics-for the indirect detection of dark matter (or dark-matter-dominated dwarf galaxies), and for galaxy evolution in its use to decipher the dynamical impact of satellites on galactic disks. Here, we provide a proof of principle of the method by applying it to infer and quantitatively characterize optically visible galactic companions of local spirals, from the analysis of observed disturbances in outer gas disks.

  14. Blue diffuse dwarf galaxies: a clearer picture

    CERN Document Server

    James, Bethan L; Stark, Daniel P; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W; McQuinn, Kristen B W

    2016-01-01

    The search for chemically unevolved galaxies remains prevalent in the nearby Universe, mostly because these systems provide excellent proxies for exploring in detail the physics of high-z systems. The most promising candidates are extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs), i.e., galaxies with <1/10 solar metallicity. However, due to the bright emission line based search criteria traditionally used to find XMPs, we may not be sampling the full XMP population. In 2014 we reoriented this search using only morphological properties and uncovered a population of ~150 `blue diffuse dwarf (BDD) galaxies', and published a sub-sample of 12 BDD spectra. Here we present optical spectroscopic observations of a larger sample of 51 BDDs, along with their SDSS photometric properties. With our improved statistics, we use direct-method abundances to confirm that BDDs are chemically unevolved (7.43<12+log(O/H)<8.01), with ~20% of our sample classified as being XMP galaxies, and find they are actively forming stars at rates ...

  15. Evidence of nuclear disks in starburst galaxies from their radial distribution of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Illana, R.; Pérez-Torres, M. Á.; Alberdi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions are expected to be responsible for triggering massive star formation and possibly accretion onto a supermassive black hole, by providing large amounts of dense molecular gas down to the central kiloparsec region. Several scenarios to drive the gas further down to the central ~100 pc, have been proposed, including the formation of a nuclear disk around the black hole, where massive stars would produce supernovae. Here, we probe the radial distribution of supernovae and supernova remnants in the nuclear regions of the starburst galaxies M 82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, by using high-angular resolution (≲ 0.''1) radio observations published in the literature (for M 82 and Arp 220), or obtained by ourselves from the European VLBI Network (Arp 299-A). Our main goal was to characterize the nuclear starbursts in those galaxies and thus test scenarios that propose that nuclear disks of sizes ~100 pc form in the central regions of starburst galaxies. We obtained the radial distribution of supernovae (SNe) in the nuclear starbursts of M 82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, and derived scale-length values for the putative nuclear disks powering the bursts in those central regions. The scale lengths for the (exponential) disks range from ~20-30 pc for Arp 299-A and Arp 220, up to ~140 pc for M 82. The radial distribution of SNe for the nuclear disks in Arp 299-A and Arp 220 is also consistent with a power-law surface density profile of exponent γ = 1, as expected from detailed hydrodynamical simulations of nuclear disks. Our results support scenarios where a nuclear disk of size ~100 pc is formed in (U)LIRGs, and sustained by gas pressure, in which case the accretion onto the black hole could be lowered by supernova feedback. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Stellar feedback as the origin of an extended molecular outflow in a starburst galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, J E; Hickox, R C; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Krips, M; Rudnick, G H; Tremonti, C A; Sell, P H; Coil, A L; Moustakas, J

    2014-12-04

    Recent observations have revealed that starburst galaxies can drive molecular gas outflows through stellar radiation pressure. Molecular gas is the phase of the interstellar medium from which stars form, so these outflows curtail stellar mass growth in galaxies. Previously known outflows, however, involve small fractions of the total molecular gas content and have typical scales of less than a kiloparsec. In at least some cases, input from active galactic nuclei is dynamically important, so pure stellar feedback (the momentum return into the interstellar medium) has been considered incapable of rapidly terminating star formation on galactic scales. Molecular gas has been detected outside the galactic plane of the archetypal starburst galaxy M82 (refs 4 and 5), but so far there has been no evidence that starbursts can propel substantial quantities of cold molecular gas to the same galactocentric radius (about 10 kiloparsecs) as the warmer gas that has been traced by metal ion absorbers in the circumgalactic medium. Here we report observations of molecular gas in a compact (effective radius 100 parsecs) massive starburst galaxy at redshift 0.7, which is known to drive a fast outflow of ionized gas. We find that 35 per cent of the total molecular gas extends approximately 10 kiloparsecs, and one-third of this extended gas has a velocity of up to 1,000 kilometres per second. The kinetic energy associated with this high-velocity component is consistent with the momentum flux available from stellar radiation pressure. This demonstrates that nuclear bursts of star formation are capable of ejecting large amounts of cold gas from the central regions of galaxies, thereby strongly affecting their evolution by truncating star formation and redistributing matter.

  17. Star formation in proto dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the onset of star formation on the residual gas in primordial low-mass Local-Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies is studied by a series of hydrodynamical simulations. The models have concentrated on the effect of photoionization. The results indicate that photoionization in the presence of a moderate gas density gradient can eject most of the residual gas on a time scale of a few 10 to the 7th power years. High central gas density combined with inefficient star formation, however, may prevent mass ejection. The effect of supernova explosions is discussed briefly.

  18. Spitzer Observations of Tidal Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Higdon, Sarah J U

    2007-01-01

    We present Spitzer observations of Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs) in three interacting systems: NGC 5291, Arp105 and Stephan's Quintet. The spectra show bright emission from polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nebular lines and warm molecular hydrogen, characteristic of recent episodes of star formation. The PAH emission that falls in the IRAC 8.0 micron band leads to the TDGs having an extremely red IRAC color, with [4.5] - [8.0] > 3. The emission from PAHs is characterized by a model with mainly neutral 100-C PAH atoms.

  19. Morphology of Dwarf Galaxies in Isolated Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann, Hong Bae

    2017-08-01

    The environmental dependence of the morphology of dwarf galaxies in isolated satellite systems is analyzed to understand the origin of the dwarf galaxy morphology using the visually classified morphological types of 5836 local galaxies with z ≲ 0.01. We consider six sub-types of dwarf galaxies, dS0, dE, dE_{bc}, dSph, dE_{blue}, and dI, of which the first four sub-types are considered as early-type and the last two as late-type. The environmental parameters we consider are the projected distance from the host galaxy (r_{p}), local and global background densities, and the host morphology. The spatial distributions of dwarf satellites of early-type galaxies are much different from those of dwarf satellites of late-type galaxies, suggesting the host morphology combined with r_{p} plays a decisive role on the morphology of the dwarf satellite galaxies. The local and global background densities play no significant role on the morphology of dwarfs in the satellite systems hosted by early-type galaxies. However, in the satellite system hosted by late-type galaxies, the global background densities of dE and dSph satellites are significantly different from those of dE_{bc}, dE_{blue}, and dI satellites. The blue-cored dwarf satellites (dE_{bc}) of early-type galaxies are likely to be located at r_{p} > 0.3 Mpc to keep their cold gas from the ram pressure stripping by the hot corona of early-type galaxies. The spatial distribution of dE_{bc} satellites of early-type galaxies and their global background densities suggest that their cold gas is intergalactic material accreted before they fall into the satellite systems.

  20. Understanding the shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves in ΛCDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, J. I.; Iorio, G.; Agertz, O.; Fraternali, F.

    2016-11-01

    The shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves is at apparent odds with dark matter halos in a Λ Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. We use mock data from isolated dwarf galaxy simulations to show that this owes to three main effects. Firstly, stellar feedback heats dark matter, leading to a `CORENFW' dark matter density profile with a slowly rising rotation curve. Secondly, if close to a recent starburst, large H I bubbles push the rotation curve out of equilibrium, deforming the rotation curve shape. Thirdly, when galaxies are viewed near face-on, their best fit inclination is biased high. This can lead to a very shallow rotation curve that falsely implies a large dark matter core. All three problems can be avoided, however, by a combination of improved mass models and a careful selection of target galaxies. Fitting our CORENFW model to mock rotation curve data, we show that we can recover the rotation curve shape, dark matter halo mass M200 and concentration parameter c within our quoted uncertainties. We fit our CORENFW model to real data for four isolated dwarf irregulars, chosen to span a wide range of rotation curve shapes. We obtain an excellent fit for NGC 6822 and WLM, with tight constraints on M200, and c consistent with ΛCDM. However, IC 1613 and DDO 101 give a poor fit. For IC 1613, we show that this owes to disequilibria and its uncertain inclination i; for DDO 101, it owes to its uncertain distance D. If we assume iIC1613 ˜ 15° and DDDO101 ˜ 12 Mpc, consistent with current uncertainties, we are able to fit both galaxies very well. We conclude that ΛCDM appears to give an excellent match to dwarf galaxy rotation curves.

  1. How ubiquitous are massive starbursts in interacting galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Di Matteo, P; Martig, M; Combes, F; Melchior, A -L; Semelin, B

    2009-01-01

    Many evidences exist for a connection between galaxy interactions and induced star formation. However, a large range of responses of galaxies to tidal interactions is found, both in observations and in numerical simulations. We will discuss some recent results obtained analysing a large sample (~ 1000) of simulations of interacting pairs and their agreement with the most recent observational works.

  2. An extremely prolific supernova factory in the buried nucleus of the starburst galaxy IC 694

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Torres, M A; Alberdi, A; Polatidis, A

    2009-01-01

    Context. The central kiloparsec of many local Luminous Infra-red Galaxies are known to host intense bursts of massive star formation, leading to numerous explosions of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). However, the dust-enshrouded regions where those supernovae explode prevent their detection at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Aims. We investigate the nuclear region of the starbust galaxy IC 694 (=Arp 299-A) at radio wavelengths, aimed at discovering recently exploded CCSNe, to determine their rate of explosion, which carries crucial information on star formation rates, the initial mass function and starburst scenarios at work. Methods. We use the electronic European VLBI Network to image with milliarcsecond resolution the 5.0 GHz compact radio emission of the inner 150 pc of IC 694. Results. Our observations reveal the presence of a rich cluster of 26 compact radio emitting sources in the central 150 pc of its nuclear starburst region. The large brightness temperatures observed for the compact sources...

  3. AGN and starburst in bright Seyfert galaxies: from IR photometry to IR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Malkan, Matthew A

    2009-01-01

    Infrared photometry and later infrared spectroscopy provided powerful diagnostics to distinguish between the main emission mechanisms in galaxies: AGN and Starburst. After the pioneering work on infrared photometry with IRAS in the far-IR and the S.Pedro Martir and ESO ground-based work in the near-IR, ISO photometry extended up to 200um the coverage of the galaxies energy distributions. Then Spitzer collected accurate mid-infrared spectroscopy on different samples of galaxies. We will review the work done on the 12um galaxy sample since the times of IRAS photometry to the new Spitzer spectroscopy. The main results on the multifrequency data of 12um selected Seyfert galaxies are presented and discussed in the light of unification and evolution models. The spectroscopic work of Spitzer will soon be complemented at longer wavelengths by the Herschel spectrometers and in the future by SPICA at higher redshift.

  4. Testing modified gravity with dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, Hosein; Amiri, Vahid

    2016-12-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light (M*/L) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σlos) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the modified gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant M*/L ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters α and μ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey catalogue of galaxies. We find that the derived M*/L ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of the dSph with reasonable M*/L values, we must vary α and μ on a case by case basis. A common pair of values cannot be found for all dSphs. Comparing with the values found from rotation curve fitting, it appears that μ correlates strongly with galaxy luminosity, shedding doubt on it as a universal constant.

  5. Stellar population gradients and spatially resolved kinematics in luminous post-starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pracy, M B; Sadler, E; Couch, W J; Kuntschner, H; Bekki, K; Owers, M S; Zwaan, M; Turner, J; Bergmann, M

    2013-01-01

    We have used deep integral field spectroscopy obtained with the GMOS instrument on Gemini-North to determine the spatial distribution of the post-starburst stellar population in four luminous E+A galaxies at z<0.04. We find all four galaxies have centrally-concentrated gradients in the young stellar population contained within the central ~1 kpc. This is in agreement with the Balmer line gradients found in local low luminosity E+A galaxies. The results from higher redshift (z~0.1) samples of luminous E+A galaxies have been varied, but in general have found the post-starburst signature to be extended or a galaxy-wide phenomenon or have otherwise failed to detect gradients in the stellar populations. The ubiquity of the detection of a centrally concentrated young stellar population in local samples, and the presence of significant radial gradients in the stellar populations when the E+A galaxy core is well resolved raises the possibility that spatial resolution issues may be important in interpreting the hig...

  6. Cores in Dwarf Galaxies from Fermi Repulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Randall, Lisa; Unwin, James

    2016-01-01

    We show that Fermi repulsion can lead to cored density profiles in dwarf galaxies for sub-keV fermionic dark matter. We treat the dark matter as a quasi-degenerate self-gravitating Fermi gas and calculate its density profile assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. We find that suitable dwarf galaxy cores of larger than 130 pc can be achieved for fermion dark matter with mass in the range 70 eV - 400 eV. While in conventional dark matter scenarios, such sub-keV thermal dark matter would be excluded by free streaming bounds, the constraints are ameliorated in models with dark matter at lower temperature than conventional thermal scenarios, such as the Flooded Dark Matter model that we have previously considered. Modifying the arguments of Tremaine and Gunn we derive a conservative lower bound on the mass of fermionic dark matter of 70 eV and a stronger lower bound from Lyman-$\\alpha$ clouds of about 470 eV, leading to slightly smaller cores than have been observed. We comment on this result and how the tension is rel...

  7. Starbursts versus Truncated Star Formation in Nearby Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, J A; Caldwell, N; Chaboyer, B; Rose, James A.; Gaba, Alejandro E.; Caldwell, Nelson; Chaboyer, Brian

    2001-01-01

    We present long-slit spectroscopy, B and R bandpass imaging, and 21 cm observations of a sample of early-type galaxies in nearby clusters which are known to be either in a star-forming phase or to have had star formation which recently terminated. From the long-slit spectra, obtained with the Blanco 4-m telescope, we find that emission lines in the star-forming cluster galaxies are significantly more centrally concentrated than in a sample of field galaxies. The broadband imaging reveals that two currently star-forming early-type galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster have blue nuclei, again indicating that recent star formation has been concentrated. In contrast, the two galaxies for which star formation has already ended show no central color gradient. The Pegasus I galaxy with the most evident signs of ongoing star formation (NGC7648), exhibits signatures of a tidal encounter. Neutral hydrogen observations of that galaxy with the Arecibo radiotelescope reveal the presence of ~4 x 10^8 solar masses of HI. Arecib...

  8. Lyman alpha emission in starbursts: implications for galaxies at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Mas-Hesse, J M; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Leitherer, C; Terlevich, R J; Terlevich, E

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a high resolution UV 2-D spectroscopic survey of star forming galaxies observed with HST-STIS. Our main aim was to map the Lyman alpha profiles to learn about the gas kinematics and its relation with the escape of Lyman alpha photons and to detect extended Lyman alpha emission due to scattering in gaseous halos. We have combined our data with previously obtained UV spectroscopy on other three star-forming galaxies. We find that the P-Cygni profile is spatially extended, smooth and spans several kiloparsecs covering a region much larger than the starburst itself. We propose a scenario whereby an expanding super-shell is generated by the interaction of the combined stellar winds and supernova ejecta from the young starbursts, with an extended low density halo. The variety of observed Lyman alpha profiles both in our sample and in high redshift starbursts is explained as phases in the time evolution of the super-shell expanding into the disk and halo of the host galaxy. The observed sha...

  9. High-resolution radio observations of nuclear and circumnuclear starbursts in Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Torres, Miguel A

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution radio observations of nearby starburst galaxies have shown that the distribution of their radio emission consists of a compact (<150 pc), high surface brightness, central radio source immersed in a low surface brightness circumnuclear halo. This radio structure is similar to that detected in bright Seyferts galaxies like NGC 7469 or Mrk 331, which display clear circumnuclear rings. While the compact, centrally located radio emission in these starbursts might be generated by a point-like source (AGN), or by the combined effect of multiple radio supernovae and supernova remnants (e.g., the evolved nuclear starburst in Arp~220), it seems well established that the circumnuclear regions of those objects host an ongoing burst of star-formation (e.g., NGC 7469; Colina et al. 2001, Alberdi et al. 2006). Therefore, high-resolution radio observations of Luminous Infra-Red Galaxies (LIRGs) in our local universe are a powerful tool to probe the dominant dust heating mechanism in their nuclear and circu...

  10. POST-STARBURST TIDAL TAILS IN THE ARCHETYPICAL ULTRA LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY Arp 220

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Y.; Matsubayashi, K.; Kajisawa, M.; Shioya, Y.; Ideue, Y. [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Ohyama, Y. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, R.O.C (China); Nagao, T. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Murayama, T. [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Koda, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present our new deep optical imaging and long-slit spectroscopy for Arp 220, the archetypical ultra luminous infrared galaxy in the local universe. Our sensitive H{alpha} imaging has newly revealed large-scale H{alpha} absorption, i.e., post-starburst regions in this merger. One is found in the eastern superbubble and the other is in the two tidal tails that are clearly revealed in our deep optical imaging. The size of the H{alpha} absorption region in the eastern bubble is 5 kpc Multiplication-Sign 7.5 kpc, and the observed H{alpha} equivalent widths are {approx}2 Angstrom-Sign {+-} 0.2 Angstrom-Sign . The sizes of the northern and southern H{alpha}-absorption tidal tails are {approx}5 kpc Multiplication-Sign 10 kpc and {approx}6 kpc Multiplication-Sign 20 kpc, respectively. The observed H{alpha} equivalent widths range from 4 Angstrom-Sign to 7 Angstrom-Sign . In order to explain the presence of the two post-starburst tails, we suggest a possible multiple-merger scenario for Arp 220 in which two post-starburst disk-like structures merged into one, causing the two tails. This favors Arp 220 as a multiple merging system composed of four or more galaxies arising from a compact group of galaxies. Taking our new results into account, we discuss a star formation history in the last 1 Gyr in Arp 220.

  11. From HI to Stars: HI Depletion in Starbursts and Star-Forming Galaxies in the ALFALFA H-alpha Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Jaskot, A E; Salzer, J J; Van Sistine, A; Bell, E F; Haynes, M P

    2015-01-01

    HI in galaxies traces the fuel for future star formation and reveals the effects of feedback on neutral gas. Using a statistically uniform, HI-selected sample of 565 galaxies from the ALFALFA H-alpha survey, we explore HI properties as a function of star formation activity. ALFALFA H-alpha provides R-band and H-alpha imaging for a volume-limited subset of the 21-cm ALFALFA survey. We identify eight starbursts based on H-alpha equivalent width and six with enhanced star formation relative to the main sequence. Both starbursts and non-starbursts have similar HI to stellar mass ratios (MHI/M*), which suggests that feedback is not depleting the starbursts' HI. Consequently, the starbursts do have shorter HI depletion times (t_dep), implying more efficient HI-to-H2 conversion. While major mergers likely drive this enhanced efficiency in some starbursts, the lowest mass starbursts may experience periodic bursts, consistent with enhanced scatter in t_dep at low M*. Two starbursts appear to be pre-coalescence mergers...

  12. Molecular gas in low-metallicity starburst galaxies: Scaling relations and the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor

    CERN Document Server

    Amorín, Ricardo; Aguerri, J A L; Planesas, P

    2015-01-01

    We study the molecular content and the star formation efficiency of 21 Blue Compact Dwarfs (BCDs). We present CO(1-0) and (2-1) observations, further supplemented with additional CO measurements and multiwavelength ancillary data from the literature. We find the CO luminosity to be correlated with the stellar and HI masses, SFR tracers, the size of the starburst and its metallicity. BCDs appear offset from the Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law, showing extremely low ($\\lesssim$0.1 Gyr) H2 and H2+HI depletion timescales. The departure from the SK law is smaller when considering H2+HI rather than H2 only, and is larger for BCDs with lower metallicity and higher specific SFR. Thus, the molecular fraction and H2 depletion timescale of BCDs is found to be strongly correlated with metallicity. Using this and assuming that the empirical correlation found between the specific SFR and galaxy-averaged H2 depletion timescale of more metal-rich galaxies extends to lower masses, we derive a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 convers...

  13. Dusty starburst galaxies in the early Universe as revealed by gravitational lensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, J D; Marrone, D P; Chapman, S C; De Breuck, C; Hezaveh, Y D; Weiβ, A; Aguirre, J E; Aird, K A; Aravena, M; Ashby, M L N; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Biggs, A D; Bleem, L E; Bock, J J; Bothwell, M; Bradford, C M; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Fomalont, E B; Fassnacht, C D; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Greve, T R; Gullberg, B; Halverson, N W; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Hunter, T R; Keisler, R; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Malkan, M; McIntyre, V; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Menten, K M; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L M; Murphy, E J; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Sharon, K; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Spilker, J S; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Vanderlinde, K; Welikala, N; Williamson, R

    2013-03-21

    In the past decade, our understanding of galaxy evolution has been revolutionized by the discovery that luminous, dusty starburst galaxies were 1,000 times more abundant in the early Universe than at present. It has, however, been difficult to measure the complete redshift distribution of these objects, especially at the highest redshifts (z > 4). Here we report a redshift survey at a wavelength of three millimetres, targeting carbon monoxide line emission from the star-forming molecular gas in the direction of extraordinarily bright millimetre-wave-selected sources. High-resolution imaging demonstrates that these sources are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. We detect spectral lines in 23 out of 26 sources and multiple lines in 12 of those 23 sources, from which we obtain robust, unambiguous redshifts. At least 10 of the sources are found to lie at z > 4, indicating that the fraction of dusty starburst galaxies at high redshifts is greater than previously thought. Models of lens geometries in the sample indicate that the background objects are ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, powered by extreme bursts of star formation.

  14. Constraining Galaxy Formation Models with Dwarf Ellipticals in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Conselice, C J

    2005-01-01

    Recent observations demonstrate that dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in clusters, despite their faintness, are likely a critical galaxy type for understanding the processes behind galaxy formation. Dwarf ellipticals are the most common galaxy type, and are particularly abundant in rich galaxy clusters. The dwarf to giant ratio is in fact highest in rich clusters of galaxies, suggesting that cluster dEs do not form in groups that later merge to form clusters. Dwarf ellipticals are potentially the only galaxy type whose formation is sensitive to global, rather than local, environment. The dominant idea for explaining the formation of these systems, through Cold Dark Matter models, is that dEs form early and within their present environments. Recent results suggest that some dwarfs appear in clusters after the bulk of massive galaxies form, a scenario not predicted in standard hierarchical structure formation models. Many dEs have younger and more metal rich stellar populations than dwarfs in lower density enviro...

  15. Dense Molecular Gas Tracers in the Outflow of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fabian; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Leroy, Adam K.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Warren, Steven R.; Hodge, Jacqueline; Levy, Rebecca C.; Meier, David S.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Ott, Jürgen; Rosolowsky, Erik; Scoville, Nick; Weiss, Axel; Zschaechner, Laura; Zwaan, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed study of a molecular outflow feature in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 using ALMA. We find that this feature is clearly associated with the edge of NGC 253's prominent ionized outflow, has a projected length of ∼300 pc, with a width of ∼50 pc, and a velocity dispersion of ∼40 km s‑1, which is consistent with an ejection from the disk about 1 Myr ago. The kinematics of the molecular gas in this feature can be interpreted (albeit not uniquely) as accelerating at a rate of 1 km s‑1 pc‑1. In this scenario, the gas is approaching an escape velocity at the last measured point. Strikingly, bright tracers of dense molecular gas (HCN, CN, HCO+, CS) are also detected in the molecular outflow: we measure an HCN(1–0)/CO(1–0) line ratio of ∼ 1/10 in the outflow, similar to that in the central starburst region of NGC 253 and other starburst galaxies. By contrast, the HCN/CO line ratio in the NGC 253 disk is significantly lower (∼ 1/30), similar to other nearby galaxy disks. This strongly suggests that the streamer gas originates from the starburst, and that its physical state does not change significantly over timescales of ∼1 Myr during its entrainment in the outflow. Simple calculations indicate that radiation pressure is not the main mechanism for driving the outflow. The presence of such dense material in molecular outflows needs to be accounted for in simulations of galactic outflows.

  16. Life and times of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Salvadori, S; Schneider, R

    2008-01-01

    We propose a cosmological scenario for the formation and evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), satellites of the Milky Way (MW). An improved version of the semi-analytical code GAMETE (GAlaxy Merger Tree & Evolution) is used to follow the dSphs evolution simultaneously with the MW formation, matching the observed properties of both. In this scenario dSph galaxies represent fossil objects virializing at z = 7.2 +/- 0.7 (i.e. in the pre-reionization era z > z_rei = 6) in the MW environment, which at that epoch has already been pre-enriched up to [Fe/H] ~ -3; their dynamical masses are in the narrow range M = (1.6 +/- 0.7) x 10^8 M_sun, although a larger spread might be introduced by a more refined treatment of reionization. Mechanical feedback effects are dramatic in such low-mass objects, causing the complete blow-away of the gas ~100 Myr after the formation epoch: 99% of the present-day stellar mass, M_* = (3 +/- 0.7) x 10^6 M_sun, forms during this evolutionary phase, i.e. their age is >13 Gyr....

  17. Testing modified gravity with dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Haghi, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light ($M_*/L$) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion ($\\sigma_{\\emph{los}}$) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the modified gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant $M_*/L$ ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters $ \\alpha $ and $ \\mu $ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey catalogue of galaxies. We find that the derived $M_*/L$ ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of ...

  18. Star Formation History of Dwarf Galaxies in Cosmological Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nagamine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the past and current work on the star formation (SF histories of dwarf galaxies in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The results obtained from different numerical methods are still somewhat mixed, but the differences are understandable if we consider the numerical and resolution effects. It remains a challenge to simulate the episodic nature of SF history in dwarf galaxies at late times within the cosmological context of a cold dark matter model. More work is needed to solve the mysteries of SF history of dwarf galaxies employing large-scale hydrodynamic simulations on the next generation of supercomputers.

  19. The evolution of post-starburst galaxies from z=2 to z= 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Wild, Vivienne; Dunlop, Jim; Simpson, Chris; Rowlands, Kate; Bowler, Rebecca; Maltby, David; McLure, Ross

    2016-01-01

    We present the evolution in the number density and stellar mass functions of photometrically selected post-starburst galaxies in the UKIDSS Deep Survey (UDS), with redshifts of 0.510. We find that this transitionary species of galaxy is rare at all redshifts, contributing ~5% of the total population at z~2, to 2 they are exclusively massive galaxies that have formed the bulk of their stars during a rapid assembly period, followed by complete quenching of further star formation, (2) at z<1 they are caused by the rapid quenching of gas-rich star-forming galaxies, independent of stellar mass, possibly due to environment and/or gas-rich major mergers.

  20. Starbursts and black hole masses in X-shaped radio galaxies: Signatures of a merger event?

    CERN Document Server

    Mezcua, M; Lobanov, A P; León-Tavares, J

    2012-01-01

    We present new spectroscopic identifications of 12 X-shaped radio galaxies and use the spectral data to derive starburst histories and masses of the nuclear supermassive black holes in these galaxies. The observations were done with the 2.1-m telescope of the Observatorio Astron\\'omico Nacional at San Pedro M\\'artir, M\\'exico. The new spectroscopic results extend the sample of X-shaped radio galaxies studied with optical spectroscopy. We show that the combined sample of the X-shaped radio galaxies has statistically higher black holes masses and older episodes of star formation than a control sample of canonical double-lobed radio sources with similar redshifts and luminosities. The data reveal enhanced star formation activity in the X-shaped sample at timescales expected in galactic mergers. We discuss the results obtained in the framework of the merger scenario.

  1. An excess of dusty starbursts related to the Spiderweb galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Dannerbauer, H; De Breuck, C; Wylezalek, D; Santos, J S; Koyama, Y; Seymour, N; Tanaka, M; Hatch, N; Altieri, B; Coia, D; Galametz, A; Kodama, T; Miley, G; Röttgering, H; Sanchez-Portal, M; Valtchanov, I; Venemans, B; Ziegler, B

    2014-01-01

    We present APEX LABOCA 870 micron observations of the field around the high-redshift radio galaxy MRC1138-262 at z=2.16. We detect 16 submillimeter galaxies in this ~140 square arcmin bolometer map with flux densities in the range 3-11 mJy. The raw number counts indicate a density of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) that is up to four times that of blank field surveys. Based on an exquisite multiwavelength database, including VLA 1.4 GHz radio and infrared observations, we investigate whether these sources are members of the protocluster structure at z=2.2. Using Herschel PACS+SPIRE and Spitzer MIPS photometry, we derive reliable far-infrared photometric redshifts for all sources. Follow-up VLT ISAAC and SINFONI near-infrared spectra confirm that four of these SMGs have redshifts of z=2.2. We also present evidence that another SMG in this field, detected earlier at 850 micron, has a counterpart that exhibits Halpha and CO(1-0) emission at z=2.15. Including the radio galaxy and two SMGs with far-IR photometric re...

  2. Starburst-AGN mixing: II. Optically-selected active galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Rebecca L; Ho, I-Ting; Dopita, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    We use 4 galaxies from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey with clear signs of accretion onto supermassive black holes to investigate the relative contribution of star-formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity to the line-emission of each galaxy as a function of radius. The combination of star-formation and AGN activity produces curved "mixing sequences" on standard optical diagnostic diagrams, and the fraction of emission due to AGN activity decreases smoothly with distance from the centre of the galaxy. We use the AGN activity profiles to calculate the size of the AGN narrow line regions, which have radii of ~ 6.3 kpc. We calculate the fractional contribution of the star-formation and the AGN activity to the global Halpha, [O II] $\\lambda \\lambda$ 3727,3729 and [O III] $\\lambda$ 5007 luminosities of each galaxy, and show that both ionization sources contribute significantly to the emission in all three lines. We use weighted combinations of stellar and AGN photoionization mo...

  3. Submillimeter Array observations of ISM in starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, K; Kuo, C Y; Mao, R Q; Matsushita, S; Peck, A B; Wiedner, M C; Iono, Daisuke; Kuo, Cheng-Yu; Mao, Rui-Qing; Matsushita, Satoki; Peck, Alison B.; Sakamoto, Kazushi; Wiedner, Martina C.; team, SMA

    2004-01-01

    The Submillimeter Array (SMA) has been under construction at the 4100 m summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The array is going to allow imaging of lines and continuum at sub-arcsecond resolution in submillimeter wavelengths. The status of the array and the results from recent commissioning observations of nearby galaxies are reported.

  4. Characterizing the population of active galactic nuclei in dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassare, Vivienne F.; Reines, Amy E.; Gallo, Elena; Greene, Jenny E.

    2017-01-01

    Clues to super-massive black hole (BH) formation and growth reside in the population and properties of BHs in local dwarf galaxies. The masses of BHs in these systems are our best observational constraint on the masses of the first BH "seeds" at high redshift. Moreover, present-day dwarf galaxies are unlikely to have undergone major mergers, making them a relatively pristine testbed for studying triggers of BH accretion. However, in order to find BHs in dwarf galaxies outside the Local Group, it is necessary to search for signatures of accretion, i.e., active galactic nuclei (AGN). Until recently, only a handful of dwarf galaxies were known to contain AGN. However, large surveys such as the SDSS have led to the production of samples of over a hundred dwarf galaxies with AGN signatures (see e.g., Reines et al. 2013). My dissertation work has involved in-depth, multi-wavelength follow-up of nearby (z<0.055) dwarf galaxies with optical spectroscopic AGN signatures in SDSS.I analyzed high resolution spectra of dwarf galaxies with narrow-line AGN, which led to the discovery of a 50,000 MSun BH in the nucleus of RGG 118 - the smallest BH yet reported in a galaxy nucleus (Baldassare et al. 2015). I also used multi-epoch optical spectroscopy to study the nature of broad H-alpha emission in dwarf galaxies. A characteristic signature of dense gas orbiting around a BH, broad emission can also be produced by transient stellar processes. I showed that broad H-alpha in star-forming dwarf galaxies fades over a baseline of 5-10 years, and is likely produced by e.g., a Type II SN as opposed to an AGN. However, broad emission in dwarf galaxies with AGN/composite narrow lines is persistent and consistent across observations, suggesting an AGN origin (Baldassare et al. 2016). Finally, I analyzed X-ray and UV observations of dwarf galaxies with broad and narrow-line AGN signatures. All targets had nuclear X-ray detections at levels significantly higher than expected from X-ray binaries

  5. Drivers of HI Turbulence in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Stilp, Adrienne M; Skillman, Evan D; Warren, Steven R; Ott, Juergen; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2013-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen (HI) velocity dispersions are believed to be set by turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM). Although turbulence is widely believed to be driven by star formation (SF), recent studies have shown that this driving mechanism may not be dominant in regions of low SF rate surface density (SFRSD), such as found in dwarf galaxies or the outer regions of spirals. We have generated average HI line profiles in a number of nearby dwarfs and low-mass spirals by co-adding HI spectra in regions with either a common radius or SFRSD. We find that the spatially-resolved superprofiles are composed of a central narrow peak (5-15 km/s) with higher velocity wings to either side. With the assumption that the central peak reflects the turbulent velocity dispersion, we compare HI kinematics to local ISM properties, including surface mass densities and measures of SF. The HI velocity dispersion is correlated most strongly with surface mass density, which points at a gravitational origin for turbulence, but it is...

  6. Dusty starburst galaxies in the early Universe as revealed by gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, J D; Chapman, S C; De Breuck, C; Hezaveh, Y D; Weiss, A; Aguirre, J E; Aird, K A; Aravena, M; Ashby, M L N; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Biggs, A D; Bleem, L E; Bock, J J; Bothwell, M; Bradford, C M; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Fomalont, E B; Fassnacht, C D; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Greve, T R; Gullberg, B; Halverson, N W; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Hunter, T R; Keisler, R; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Malkan, M; McIntyre, V; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Menten, K M; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L M; Murphy, E J; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Sharon, K; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Spilker, J S; Stalder, B; Staniszewski1, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Vanderlinde, K; Welikala, N; Williamson, R; 10.1038/nature1200

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, our understanding of galaxy evolution has been revolutionized by the discovery that luminous, dusty, starburst galaxies were 1,000 times more abundant in the early Universe than at present. It has, however, been difficult to measure the complete redshift 2 distribution of these objects, especially at the highest redshifts (z > 4). Here we report a redshift survey at a wavelength of three millimeters, targeting carbon monoxide line emission from the star-forming molecular gas in the direction of extraordinarily bright millimetrewave-selected sources. High-resolution imaging demonstrates that these sources are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. We detect spectral lines in 23 out of 26 sources and multiple lines in 12 of those 23 sources, from which we obtain robust, unambiguous redshifts. At least 10 of the sources are found to lie at z > 4, indicating that the fraction of dusty starburst galaxies at high redshifts is greater than previously thought. Models of lens geome...

  7. EXTENDED HCN AND HCO{sup +} EMISSION IN THE STARBURST GALAXY M82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicua Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Salter, D.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kepley, A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CS, and HC{sub 3}N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO{sup +} emission. The map covers a field of 1.'2 with an ≈5'' resolution. The HCN and HCO{sup +} observations are short spacings corrected. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO{sup +} J = (1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits on the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are 7 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and 21 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, or ≳ 2% of the total molecular mass in the outflow. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the dense gas outside the central starburst suggests that it is being expelled through chimneys. Assuming a constant outflow velocity, the derived outflow rate of dense molecular gas is ≥0.3 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which would lower the starburst lifetime by ≥5%. The energy required to expel this mass of dense gas is (1-10) × 10{sup 52} erg.

  8. Dwarf galaxies in the Antlia Cluster: First results

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, A V S; Cellone, S A; Richtler, T; Dirsch, B; Infante, L; Aruta, C; Gómez, M

    2006-01-01

    We present the first results of a project aimed to study the galaxy population of the Antlia cluster, the third nearest galaxy cluster after Virgo and Fornax. The observations for the Antlia project consist of Washington wide-field images taken with the MOSAIC camera mounted at the prime focus of the CTIO 4-m Blanco telescope. Our preliminary results correspond to the identification and classification of dwarf galaxies in the central cluster region, extending the list of Ferguson & Sandage (1990). The final aim of our project is to study the luminosity function, morphology and structural parameters of dwarf galaxies in the Antlia cluster with a more complete sample.

  9. An extremely prolific supernova factory in the buried nucleus of the starburst galaxy IC 694

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Romero-Cañizales, C.; Alberdi, A.; Polatidis, A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The central kiloparsec of many local uminous infrared galaxies are known to host intense bursts of massive star formation, leading to numerous explosions of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). However, the dust-enshrouded regions where those supernovae explode hamper their detection at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Aims: We investigate the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy IC 694 (=Arp 299-A) at radio wavelengths, aimed at discovering recently exploded CCSNe, as well as determining their rate of explosion, which carries crucial information about star formation rates, the initial mass function, and the starburst processes in action. Methods: We use the electronic European VLBI Network to image with milliarcsecond resolution the 5.0 GHz compact radio emission of the innermost nuclear region of IC 694. Results: Our observations detect a rich cluster of 26 compact radio emitting sources in the central 150 pc of the nuclear starburst in IC 694. The high brightness temperatures observed for the compact sources are indicative of a non-thermal origin for the observed radio emission, implying that most, if not all, of those sources are young radio supernovae (RSNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs). We find evidence of at least three relatively young, slowly evolving, long-lasting RSNe (A0, A12, and A15) that appear to have unusual properties, suggesting that the conditions in the local circumstellar medium (CSM) play a significant role in determining the radio behaviour of expanding SNe. Their radio luminosities are typical of normal RSNe, which result from the explosion of type IIP/b and type IIL SNe. All of these results provide support for a recent (less than 10-15 Myr) instantaneous starburst in the innermost regions of IC 694. Tables 1, 2 and Appendix are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Suppression of star formation in the galaxy NGC 253 by a starburst-driven molecular wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolatto, Alberto D; Warren, Steven R; Leroy, Adam K; Walter, Fabian; Veilleux, Sylvain; Ostriker, Eve C; Ott, Jürgen; Zwaan, Martin; Fisher, David B; Weiss, Axel; Rosolowsky, Erik; Hodge, Jacqueline

    2013-07-25

    The under-abundance of very massive galaxies in the Universe is frequently attributed to the effect of galactic winds. Although ionized galactic winds are readily observable, most of the expelled mass (that is, the total mass flowing out from the nuclear region) is likely to be in atomic and molecular phases that are cooler than the ionized phases. Expanding molecular shells observed in starburst systems such as NGC 253 (ref. 12) and M 82 (refs 13, 14) may facilitate the entrainment of molecular gas in the wind. Although shell properties are well constrained, determining the amount of outflowing gas emerging from such shells and the connection between this gas and the ionized wind requires spatial resolution better than 100 parsecs coupled with sensitivity to a wide range of spatial scales, a combination hitherto not available. Here we report observations of NGC 253, a nearby starburst galaxy (distance ∼ 3.4 megaparsecs) known to possess a wind, that trace the cool molecular wind at 50-parsec resolution. At this resolution, the extraplanar molecular gas closely tracks the Hα filaments, and it appears to be connected to expanding molecular shells located in the starburst region. These observations allow us to determine that the molecular outflow rate is greater than 3 solar masses per year and probably about 9 solar masses per year. This implies a ratio of mass-outflow rate to star-formation rate of at least 1, and probably ∼3, indicating that the starburst-driven wind limits the star-formation activity and the final stellar content.

  11. The formation of ultra-compact dwarf galaxies and nucleated dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Goerdt, Tobias; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Kaufmann, Tobias; Macciò, Andrea V; Stadel, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Ultra compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) have similar properties as massive globular clusters or the nuclei of nucleated galaxies. Recent observations suggesting a high dark matter content and a steep spatial distribution within groups and clusters provide new clues as to their origins. We perform high-resolution N-body / Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations designed to elucidate two possible formation mechanisms for these systems: the merging of globular clusters in the centre of a dark matter halo, or the massively stripped remnant of a nucleated galaxy. Both models produce density profiles as well as the half light radii that can fit the observational constraints. However, we show that the first scenario results to UCDs that are underluminous and contain no dark matter. This is because the sinking process ejects most of the dark matter particles from the halo centre. Stripped nuclei give a more promising explanation, especially if the nuclei form via the sinking of gas, funneled down inner galactic bars,...

  12. Dwarf galaxies beyond our doorstep: the Centaurus A group

    CERN Document Server

    Crnojević, D; Cole, A A; Koch, A; Rejkuba, M; Da Costa, G; Jerjen, H

    2010-01-01

    The study of dwarf galaxies in groups is a powerful tool for investigating galaxy evolution, chemical enrichment and environmental effects on these objects. Here we present results obtained for dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A complex, a dense nearby (~4 Mpc) group that contains two giant galaxies and about 30 dwarf companions of different morphologies and stellar contents. We use archival optical (HST/ACS) and near-infrared (VLT/ISAAC) data to derive physical properties and evolutionary histories from the resolved stellar populations of these dwarf galaxies. In particular, for early-type dwarfs we are able to construct metallicity distribution functions, find population gradients and quantify the intermediate-age star formation episodes. For late-type dwarfs, we compute recent (~1 Gyr) star formation histories and study their stellar distribution. We then compare these results with properties of the dwarfs in our Milky Way and in other groups. Our work will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the e...

  13. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN A SAMPLE OF SEYFERT AND STARBURST GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martínez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo hemos estudiado la relación entre las líneas de emisión de alta y baja ionización del [O IV] 25,89 um (54,93 eV, [Ne III] 15,56 um (40,96 eV, y [Ne II] 12,81um (21,6 eV con el propósito de restringir la contribución del núcleo activo de galaxias (Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN y la formación estelar en una muestra de 79 galaxias Seyfert del Universo local (z < 0, 08 Weaver et al. (2010. Este estudio se llevó a cabo mediante la utilización del código de fotoionización CLOUDY de Gary Ferland (1996, el cual utilizamos para generar un conjunto de modelos de fotoionización con los cuales fue posible identificar parámetros físicos tales como la densidad de hidrógeno nH y parámetro de ionización U asociados al AGN y la formación estelar. A partir de estos diagnósticos encontramos que los cocientes de línea de emisión observados en la región de línea estrecha (Narrow Line Region, NLR de las galaxias Seyfert pueden ser reproducidos eficientemente por un modelo de dos zonas, el cual está formado por una zona de baja ionización y alta densidad y una de alta ionización y baja densidad. Un modelo similar fue utilizado para modelar las líneas de emisión observadas en las galaxias starburst, para las cuales se encontró que los cocientes observados eran mejor reproducidos mediante la combinación de una zona de baja ionización con una de alta ionización y densidades similares.

  14. Chemodynamic evolution of dwarf galaxies in tidal fields

    CERN Document Server

    Williamson, David; Romeo, Alessandro B

    2016-01-01

    The mass-metallicity relation shows that the galaxies with the lowest mass have the lowest metallicities. As most dwarf galaxies are in group environments, interaction effects such as tides could contribute to this trend. We perform a series of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of dwarf galaxies in external tidal fields to examine the effects of tides on their metallicities and metallicity gradients. In our simulated galaxies, gravitational instabilities drive gas inwards and produce centralized star formation and a significant metallicity gradient. Strong tides can contribute to these instabilities, but their primary effect is to strip the outer low-metallicity gas, producing a truncated gas disk with a large metallicity. This suggests that the role of tides on the mass-metallicity relation is to move dwarf galaxies to higher metallicities.

  15. The prevalence of dwarf galaxy compact groups over cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Galaxy interactions are critical to the evolution of the universe, influencing everything from star formation to the structure of the known universe. By studying galaxy interactions through computer simulations, we are instantaneously able to observe processes that normally take billions of years. “Compact groups” are extremely dense assemblies of at least 3 but typically no more than 10 galaxies that are interacting gravitationally. These groups yield much information about galaxy interactions and mergers in dense environments but are difficult to observe at high redshifts. Compact groups of only dwarf galaxies probe a regime of galaxy evolution that has been hypothesized to be common in the early universe. Here we investigate the populations of such dwarf galaxy compact groups in the Millennium II simulation. Millennium II is a massive n-body simulation of cold dark matter particles on a time scale equivalent to the known universe; allowing us to access to high redshift galaxies and the ability to track their descendants. Our preliminary findings indicate that these dwarf galaxy compact groups do exist in the Millennium II simulation. In the simulation, there is a non-inconsequential number of dwarf compact groups with an evolutionary track that mirrors the more massive compact groups with a peak in groups around a redshift of 2.

  16. The effect of gravitational tides on dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nichols, Matthew; Jablonka, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the local environment on the evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies is poorly understood. We have undertaken a suite of simulations to investigate the tidal impact of the Milky Way on the chemodynamical evolution of dwarf spheroidals that resemble present day classical dwarfs using the SPH code GEAR. After simulating the models through a large parameter space of potential orbits the resulting properties are compared with observations from both a dynamical point of view, but also from the, often neglected, chemical point of view. In general, we find that tidal effects quench the star formation even inside gas-endowed dwarfs. Such quenching, may produce the radial distribution of dwarf spheroidals from the orbits seen within large cosmological simulations. We also find that the metallicity gradient within a dwarf is gradually erased through tidal interactions as stellar orbits move to higher radii. The model dwarfs also shift to higher $\\langle$[Fe/H]$\\rangle$/L ratios, but only when losing $>$$20...

  17. Non-Nuclear Hyper/Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources in the Starbursting Cartwheel Ring Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Y; Appleton, P N; Lucas, R A; Gao, Yu; Lucas, Ray A.

    2003-01-01

    We report the Chandra/ACIS-S detection of more than 20 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs, L_{0.5-10 keV} >~ 3 x 10^{39} ergs/sec) in the Cartwheel collisional ring galaxy system, of which over a dozen are located in the outer active star-forming ring. A remarkable hyperluminous X-ray source (HLX, L_{0.5-10 keV} >~ 10^{41} ergs/sec assuming isotropic radiation), which dominates the X-ray emission from the Cartwheel ring, is located in the same segment of the ring as most ULXs. These powerful H/ULXs appear to be coincident with giant HII region complexes, young star clusters, and radio and mid-infrared hot-spots: all strong indicators of recent massive star formation. The X-ray spectra show that H/ULXs have similar properties as those of the {\\it most luminous} ULXs found in the nearest starbursts and galaxy mergers such as the Antennae galaxies and M82. The close association between the X-ray sources and the starbursting ring strongly suggests that the H/ULXs are intimately associated with the production and r...

  18. Extended HCN and HCO$^{+}$ emission in the starburst galaxy M82

    CERN Document Server

    Salas, Pedro; Salter, Demerese; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Bolatto, Alberto D; Kepley, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO$^{+}$, HNC, CS and HC$_{3}$N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO$^{+}$ emission. The map covers a field of 1.2' with a ~5" resolution. The HCN and HCO$^{+}$ observations are combined with single dish images. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO$^{+}$ J=(1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits to the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are $7\\times10^{6}$ $M_{\\odot}$ and $21\\times10^{6}$ $M_{\\...

  19. Post-starburst Tidal Tails in the Archetypical Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxy Arp 220

    CERN Document Server

    Taniguchi, Y; Kajisawa, M; Shioya, Y; Ohyama, Y; Nagao, T; Ideue, Y; Murayama, T; Koda, J

    2012-01-01

    We present our new deep optical imaging and long-slit spectroscopy for Arp 220 that is the archetypical ULIRG in the local universe. Our sensitive Ha imaging has newly revealed large-scale, Ha absorption, i.e., post-starburst regions in this merger; one is found in the eastern superbubble and the other is in the two tidal tails that are clearly reveled in our deep optical imaging. The size of Ha absorption region in the eastern bubble is 5 kpc x 7.5 kpc and the observed Ha equivalent widths are ~2 A +- 0.2 A. The sizes of the northern and southern Ha-absorption tidal tails are ~5 kpc x 10 kpc and ~6 kpc x 20 kpc, respectively. The observed Ha equivalent widths range from 4 A to 7 A. In order to explain the presence of the two post-starburst tails, we suggest a possible multiple-merger scenario for Arp 220 in which two post-starburst disk-like structures merged into one, and then caused the two tails. This favors that Arp 220 is a multiple merging system composed of four or more galaxies, arising from a compac...

  20. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Alan R.

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant Upsilon (also known as the "mass term'' of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant Upsilon. In the introductory Chapter 1, we present some preliminary background material to define and motivate the study of wave dark matter and describe some of the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In Chapter 2, we present several different ways of describing a spherically symmetric spacetime and the resulting metrics. We then focus our discussion on an especially useful form of the metric of a spherically symmetric spacetime in polar-areal coordinates and its properties. In particular, we show how the metric component functions chosen are extremely compatible with notions in Newtonian mechanics. We also show the monotonicity of the Hawking mass in these coordinates. Finally, we discuss how these coordinates and the metric can be used to solve the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. In Chapter 3, we explore spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, the defining equations of wave dark matter, where the scalar field is of the form f(t, r) = eiotF(r) for some constant o ∈ R and complex-valued function F(r). We show that the corresponding metric is static if and only if F( r) = h(r)eia for some constant alpha ∈ R and real-valued function h(r). We describe the

  1. Understanding the shape and diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves in LCDM

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I; Agertz, O; Fraternali, F

    2016-01-01

    The shape and wide diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves is at apparent odds with dark matter halos in LCDM. We generate mock rotation curve data from dwarf galaxy simulations to show that this owes to bursty star formation driven by stellar feedback. There are three main effects. Firstly, stellar feedback transforms dark matter cusps into cores. Ignoring such transformations leads to a poor fit of the rotation curve shape and a large systematic bias on the halo concentration parameter c. Secondly, if close to a recent starburst, large HI bubbles push the rotation curve out of equilibrium. This makes the gas rotational velocity a poor probe of the underlying potential, leading to a systematic error on the halo virial mass M200 of up to half a dex. Thirdly, when galaxies are viewed near face-on (i<40deg), it is challenging to properly correct for their inclination i. This leads to a very shallow rotation curve, with a systematic underestimate of M200 of over a dex. All three problems can be easily avoid...

  2. Multiwavelength Observations of the Low Metallicity Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy SBS 0335-052

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, D A; Neugebauer, G; Soifer, B T; Frayer, D T; Condon, J J; Dale, Daniel A.; Helou, George; Neugebauer, Gerry; Frayer, David T.; Condon, James J.

    2001-01-01

    New infrared and millimeter observations from Keck, Palomar, ISO, and OVRO and archival data from the NRAO VLA and IRAS are presented for the low metallicity blue compact dwarf galaxy SBS 0335-052. Mid-infrared imaging shows this young star-forming system is compact (0.31"; 80 pc) at 12.5 microns. The large Br-gamma equivalent width (235 Angstroms) measured from integral field spectroscopy is indicative of a ~5 Myr starburst. The central source appears to be optically thin in emission, containing both a warm (~80 K) and a hot (~210 K) dust component, and the overall interstellar radiation field is quite intense, about 10,000 times the intensity in the solar neighborhood. CO emission is not detected, though the galaxy shows an extremely high global H I gas-to-dust mass ratio, high even for blue compact dwarfs. Finally, the galaxy's mid-infrared-to-optical and mid-to-near-infrared luminosity ratios are quite high, whereas its far-infrared-to-radio and far-infrared-to-optical flux ratios are surprisingly similar...

  3. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  4. Dark influences: imprints of dark satellites on dwarf galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starkenburg, T. K.; Helmi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Context. In the context of the current Λ cold dark matter cosmological model small dark matter halos are abundant and satellites of dwarf galaxies are expected to be predominantly dark. Since low mass galaxies have smaller baryon fractions, interactions with these satellites may leave particularly d

  5. Nucleated Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matkovic, Ana; Ferguson, H. C.; Peng, E.; den Brok, M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies show that most dwarf elliptical galaxies (dE) in nearby clusters possess nuclear star clusters. Earlier studies used photographic plates and frequently missed the faint nuclei in dEs. For the first time, we are able to identify nuclei in a large number of dE galaxies in the Coma clust

  6. The mass content of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M.; Andersen, J; BlandHawthorn, J; Nordstrom, B

    2009-01-01

    We present a new determination of the mass content of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on a novel approach which takes into account the two distinct stellar populations present in this galaxy. This method helps to partially break the well-known mass-anisotropy degeneracy present in the mo

  7. Formation Histories of Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Ricotti, M; Ricotti, Massimo; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2004-01-01

    We compare the properties of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group with the simulated galaxies formed before reionization in a cosmological simulation of unprecedented spatial and mass resolution. We find that a subset of the Local Group dwarfs are remarkably similar to the simulated dwarf galaxies in all their properties. Based on this similarity, we propose the hypothesis that Local Group dwarfs form in a variety of ways: some of them are ``true fossils'' of the pre-reionization era, some of them form most of their stars later, after reionization (we call them ``survivors'' of the reionization era), and the rest of them form an intermediate group of ``polluted fossils''. We also identify a simple observational test that is able to falsify our hypothesis.

  8. The Cold Gas Content of Bulgeless Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pilkington, K; Calura, F; Brooks, A M; Mayer, L; Brook, C B; Stinson, G S; Thacker, R J; Few, C G; Cunnama, D; Wadsley, J

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the neutral hydrogen (HI) properties of a fully cosmological hydrodynamical dwarf galaxy, run with varying simulation parameters. As reported by Governato et al. (2010), the high resolution, high star formation density threshold version of this galaxy is the first simulation to result in the successful reproduction of a (dwarf) spiral galaxy without any associated stellar bulge. We have set out to compare in detail the HI distribution and kinematics of this simulated bulgeless disk with what is observed in a sample of nearby dwarfs. To do so, we extracted the radial gas density profiles, velocity dispersion (e.g., velocity ellipsoid, turbulence), and the power spectrum of structure within the cold interstellar medium from the simulations. The highest resolution dwarf, when using a high density star formation threshold comparable to densities of giant molecular clouds, possesses bulk characteristics consistent with those observed in nature, though the cold gas is not as radially exten...

  9. The Mass Dependence of Dwarf Satellite Galaxy Quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.

    2014-09-01

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M sstarf 5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  10. The Evolution of Main-Sequence and Starburst Galaxies Across Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, Manuel

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of the evolution of star formation in galaxies as a function of redshift. Its is now clear that the majority of galaxies at zform a nearly linear correlation between their stellar mass and star formation rates and appear to create most of their stars in timescales of ~1 Gyr. At the highest luminosities, a significant fraction of galaxies deviate from this ‘main-sequence’, showing short duty cycles and thus producing most of their stars in a single burst of star formation (‘starburst’) within a few 100 Myr, being likely driven by major merger activity. Despite the large luminosities of starbursts, main-sequence galaxies appear to dominate the star formation density of the Universe at its peak.While progress has been impressive, a number of questions are still unanswered. In this talk, I will review our current observational understanding of this ‘main-sequence’ vs ‘starburst’ galaxy paradigm, and will address how future observations (e.g. with ALMA) will help us to have better insights into the fundamental properties of these galaxies.

  11. The effect of galaxy mass ratio on merger--driven starbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, T J; Somerville, Rachel S; Primack, Joel R; Dekel, Avishai

    2007-01-01

    We employ numerical simulations of galaxy mergers to explore the effect of galaxy mass ratio on merger--driven starbursts. Our numerical simulations include radiative cooling of gas, star formation, and stellar feedback to follow the interaction and merger of four disk galaxies. The galaxy models span a factor of 23 in total mass and are designed to be representative of typical galaxies in the local Universe. We find that the merger--driven star formation is a strong function of merger mass ratio, with very little, if any, induced star formation for large mass ratio mergers. We define a burst efficiency that is useful to characterize the merger--driven star formation and test that it is insensitive to uncertainties in the feedback parameterization. In accord with previous work we find that the burst efficiency depends on the structure of the primary galaxy. In particular, the presence of a massive stellar bulge stabilizes the disk and suppresses merger--driven star formation for large mass ratio mergers. Dire...

  12. Cold Galaxies on FIRE: Modeling the Most Luminous Starbursts in the Universe with Cosmological Zoom Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Desika

    2014-10-01

    As the most luminous, heavily star-forming galaxies in the Universe, Submillimeter Galaxies at z 2-4 are key players in galaxy evolution. Since their discovery, SMGs have received significant attention from HST in characterizing their physical morphology, stellar masses, and star formation histories. Unfortunately, these physical constraints have been difficult for theorists to reconcile with galaxy formation simulations. Previous generations of simulations have all either {a} neglected baryons; {b} neglected radiative transfer {and connecting to observations}; or {c} neglected cosmological conditions. Here, we propose to conduct the first ever cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of Submillimeter Galaxy formation that couple with bona fide 3D dust radiative transfer calculations. These ultra-high resolution simulations {parsec-scale} will be the first to resolve the sites of dust obscuration, the cosmic growth history of SMGs, and their evolutionary destiny. Our proposal has two principle goals: {1} Develop the first ever model for SMG formation from cosmological simulations that include both baryons and dust radiative transfer; {2} Capitalize on our parsec-scale resolution to understand the connection between the physical properties of star-forming regions in high-z starbursts, and recent IMF constraints from present-epoch massive galaxies.

  13. Clumpy and Extended Starbursts in the Brightest Unlensed Submillimeter Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Iono, Daisuke; Aretxaga, Itziar; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, David; Ikarashi, Soh; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Lee, Minju; Matsuda, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Saito, Toshiki; Tamura, Yoichi; Ueda, Junko; Umehata, Hideki; Wilson, Grant; Michiyama, Tomonari; Ando, Misaki

    2016-01-01

    The central structure in three of the brightest unlensed z=3-4 submillimeter galaxies are investigated through 0.015" - 0.05" (120 -- 360~pc) 860 micron continuum images obtained using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The distribution in the central kpc in AzTEC1 and AzTEC8 are extremely complex, and they are composed of multiple ~200 pc clumps. AzTEC4 consists of two sources that are separated by ~1.5 kpc, indicating a mid-stage merger. The peak star formation rate densities in the central clumps are ~300 - 3000 Msun/yr/kpc^2, suggesting regions with extreme star formation near the Eddington Limit. By comparing the flux obtained by ALMA and Submillimeter Array (SMA), we find that 68-90% of the emission is extended (> 1 kpc) in AzTEC 4 and 8. For AzTEC1, we identify at least 11 additional compact (~200 pc) clumps in the extended 3 - 4 kpc region. Overall, the data presented here suggest that the luminosity surface densities observed at 1 kpc regions, some of which could also be clumpy...

  14. VLA observations of ultraluminous IRAS galaxies active nuclei or starbursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, T; Partridge, B; Strauss, M; Crawford, Thomas; Marr, Jon; Partridge, Bruce; Strauss, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We employed the Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in C configuration to map 39 ultraluminous IRAS galaxies at 6~cm and 20~cm, at resolutions of ~ 4" and 15", respectively, and 24 sources at 6~cm with in the A configuration with a resolution of ~0.5". Most of the sources have radio spectral indices indicative of synchrotron emission (alpha ~ -0.65). There is one source, however, that shows an inverted spectrum with alpha = +2.1; observations at higher frequencies show that the spectrum peaks between 5 and 8 GHz, as high as any of the ``gigahertz peaked spectrum'' sources studied by O'Dea etal. We discuss the implications of this source for observations of fluctuations in the CMB. Two of the sources show multiple unresolved components, another four are doubles with at least one resolved component, 14 show extended emission which could arise from a disk, and two show arc-second long jets. Our data fit the tight correlation found by Helou etal (1985) between far-infrared and micro...

  15. The Universe Going Green: Extraordinarily Strong [OIII]5007 in Typical Dwarf Galaxies at z~3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Matthew Arnold; Cohen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We constructed the average SEDs of U-dropout galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field. This sample contains more than 5000 Lyman-break galaxies at z~3. Their average near- and mid-IR colors were obtained by stacking JHK and IRAC imaging, in bins of stellar mass. At the lowest mass bins an increasingly strong excess flux is seen in the K filter. This excess can reach 1 magnitude in the broadband filter, and we attribute it to strong \\OIII $\\lambda{5007}$ line emission. The equivalent width is extraordinarily high, reaching almost 1000\\Ang\\ for the average z=3 galaxy at an i magnitude of 27. Such extreme [OIII] emission is very rare in the current epoch, only seen in a handful of metal-deficient dwarf starbursts sometimes referred to as ''Green Peas". In contrast, extreme [OIII]--strong enough to dominate the entire broad-band SED--was evidently the norm for faint galaxies at high redshift. We present evidence that these small but numerous galaxies were primarily responsible for the reionization of the Universe.

  16. IC3328 a "dwarf elliptical galaxy" with spiral structure

    CERN Document Server

    Jerjen, H; Binggeli, B; Jerjen, Helmut; Kalnajs, Agris; Binggeli, Bruno

    2000-01-01

    We present the 2-D photometric decomposition of the Virgo galaxy IC3328. The analysis of the global light distribution of this morphologically classified nucleated dwarf elliptical galaxy (dE1,N) reveals a tightly wound, bi-symmetric spiral structure with a diameter of 4.5 kpc, precisely centered on the nucleus of the dwarf. The amplitude of the spiral is only three percent of the dwarf's surface brightness making it the faintest and smallest spiral ever found in a galaxy. In terms of pitch angle and arm winding the spiral is similar to the intermediate-type galaxy M51, but it lacks the dust and prominent HII regions which signal the presence of gas. The visual evidence of a spiral pattern in an early-type dwarf galaxy reopens the question on whether these dwarfs are genuine rotationally supported or anisotropic stellar systems. In the case of IC3328, we argue for a nearly face-on disk (dS0) galaxy with an estimated maximum rotation velocity of v_c,max = 55kms-1. The faintness of the spiral and the small moti...

  17. Star Formation and the ISM in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Young, L M; Dohm-Palmer, R C; Lo, K Y

    2000-01-01

    High spatial and spectral resolution observations of the atomic interstellar medium in nearby dwarf galaxies reveal evidence for warm and cold neutral gas, just like the phases in our own Galaxy. The cold or quiescent phase (about 20% of the HI in the galaxies studied, except for LGS 3) seems to be associated with star formation activity--- it may mark the regions where the conditions are right for star formation. These results help to explain the patterns of star formation activity which are seen in color-magnitude data for the dwarf irregulars.

  18. The Activity of the Neighbours of AGN and Starburst Galaxies: Towards an evolutionary sequence of AGN activity

    CERN Document Server

    Koulouridis, E; Chavushyan, V; Dultzin, D; Krongold, Y; Georgantopoulos, I; Goudis, C

    2009-01-01

    We present a follow-up study of a series of papers concerning the role of close interactions as a possible triggering mechanism of the activity of AGN and starburst (SB) galaxies. We have already studied the close (<100 kpc) and the large scale (<1 Mpc) environment of Sy1, Sy2 and Bright IRAS galaxies and their respective control samples (Koulouridis et al.). The results led us to the conclusion that a close encounter appears capable of activating a sequence where a normal galaxy becomes first a starburst, then a Sy2 and finally a Sy1 galaxy. However since both galaxies of an interacting pair should be affected, we present here optical spectroscopy and X-ray imaging of the neighbouring galaxies around our Seyfert and BIRG galaxy samples. We find that more than 70% of all neighbouring galaxies exhibit thermal or/and nuclear activity (namely enhanced star formation, starbursting and/or AGN) and furthermore we discovered various trends regarding the type and strength of the neighbour's activity with respec...

  19. Near-infrared line imaging of the starburst galaxies NGC 520, NGC 1614 and NGC 7714

    CERN Document Server

    Kotilainen, J K; Laine, S; Ryder, S D

    2001-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution (0.6 arcsec) near-infrared broad-band JHK images and Br_gamma 2.1661 micron and H_2 1-0 S(1) 2.122 micron emission line images of the nuclear regions in the interacting starburst galaxies NGC 520, NGC 1614 and NGC 7714. The near-infrared emission line and radio morphologies are in general agreement, although there are differences in details. In NGC 1614, we detect a nuclear double structure in Br_gamma, in agreement with the radio double structure. We derive average extinctions of A(K) = 0.41 and A(K) = 0.18 toward the nuclear regions of NGC 1614 and NGC 7714, respectively. For NGC 520, the extinction is much higher, A(K) = 1.2 - 1.6. The observed H_2/Br_gamma ratios indicate that the main excitation mechanism of the molecular gas is fluorescence by intense UV radiation from clusters of hot young stars, while shock excitation can be ruled out. The starburst regions in all galaxies exhibit small Br_gamma equivalent widths. Assuming a constant star formation model, even with a...

  20. Sulfur chemistry and isotopic ratios in the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Martín, S; Mauersberger, R; Henkel, C; García-Burillo, S

    2004-01-01

    Based on observations of the most abundant sulfur-bearing molecules (H2S, CS, NS, SO, H2CS, OCS, and SO2) carried out with the IRAM 30m telescope and SEST, we present the first analysis of the sulfur chemistry of an extragalactic source, the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy NGC 253. This is the first time that H2S and, tentatively, H2CS are detected towards the nucleus of a starburst galaxy. Source averaged fractional abundances of these molecules are a few 10^-9, except for CS and OCS which are more abundant (10^-8). Sulfur isotopic ratios, 32S/34S~8+-2 and 34S/33S>9, are measured through observations of 13CS, C34S, and C33S. A comparison with the observed relative abundances towards different prototypical Galactic sources suggests that the chemical composition of NGC 253 is similar to that found towards the molecular clouds complexes like Sgr B2 in the nuclear region of the Milky Way. The large overabundance of OCS compared to the predictions of time-dependent sulfur chemistry models supports the idea...

  1. GMRT HI Imaging of the Ly-α Emitting Starburst Galaxy Tololo 1924-416

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Davila, Cesar I.; Perez Sarmiento, Karen; Cannon, John M.; Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Pardy, Stephen; LARS Team

    2017-01-01

    The Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS) and its extension (eLARS) form the most comprehensive effort to date to study the details of Lyman Alpha radiative transfer in galaxies. Direct imaging of Lyman Alpha emission from the Hubble Space Telescope is supplemented by a wealth of multi-wavelength observations designed to probe the complex processes that contribute to the escape or destruction of Lyman Alpha photons as they resonantly scatter in the neutral ISM. The 42 LARS+eLARS galaxies span a range of physical properties, including mass and star formation rate. In companion posters, we present results of HI imaging programs using the VLA and the GMRT. In this work, we present new HI imaging of the Lya-emitting starburst galaxy Tololo 1924-416; this source has a similar complement of HST imaging and spectroscopy as the LARS+eLARS galaxies. Tololo 1924-416 is known to be dramatically tidally interacting with ESO 338-IG04B; HI gas is strewn between the galaxies on scales of ~70 kpc. Our new data provide information on scales of ~2-10 kpc at the adopted distance of Tololo 1924-416 (37.5 Mpc). We study the HI morphology and dynamics of this interacting system.

  2. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. III. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001-Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We map the spatial distribution of recent star formation over a few Multiplication-Sign 100 Myr timescales in 15 starburst dwarf galaxies using the location of young blue helium burning stars identified from optically resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope observations. By comparing the star formation histories from both the high surface brightness central regions and the diffuse outer regions, we measure the degree to which the star formation has been centrally concentrated during the galaxies' starbursts, using three different metrics for the spatial concentration. We find that the galaxies span a full range in spatial concentration, from highly centralized to broadly distributed star formation. Since most starbursts have historically been identified by relatively short timescale star formation tracers (e.g., H{alpha} emission), there could be a strong bias toward classifying only those galaxies with recent, centralized star formation as starbursts, while missing starbursts that are spatially distributed.

  3. The Nature of Starbursts: III. The Spatial Distribution of Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Kristen B W; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Cannon, John M; Dolphin, Andrew E; Holtzman, Jon; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F

    2012-01-01

    We map the spatial distribution of recent star formation over a few x 100 Myr timescales in fifteen starburst dwarf galaxies using the location of young blue helium burning stars identified from optically resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope observations. By comparing the star formation histories from both the high surface brightness central regions and the diffuse outer regions, we measure the degree to which the star formation has been centrally concentrated during the galaxies' starbursts, using three different metrics for the spatial concentration. We find that the galaxies span a full range in spatial concentration, from highly centralized to broadly distributed star formation. Since most starbursts have historically been identified by relatively short timescale star formation tracers (e.g., Halpha emission), there could be a strong bias towards classifying only those galaxies with recent, centralized star formation as starbursts, while missing starbursts that are spatially dis...

  4. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, Coral; Bullock, James S; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Elbert, Oliver; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Hopkins, Philip F; Keres, Dusan

    2015-01-01

    We present FIRE/Gizmo hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations of isolated dark matter halos, two each at the mass of classical dwarf galaxies ($M_{\\rm vir} \\simeq 10^{10} M_{\\odot}$) and ultra-faint galaxies ($M_{\\rm vir} \\simeq 10^9 M_{\\odot}$), and with two feedback implementations. The resultant central galaxies lie on an extrapolated abundance matching relation from $M_{\\star} \\simeq 10^6$ to $10^4 M_{\\odot}$ without a break. Every host is filled with subhalos, many of which form stars. Our dwarfs with $M_{\\star} \\simeq 10^6 M_{\\odot}$ each have 1-2 well-resolved satellites with $M_{\\star} = 3-200 \\times 10^3 M_{\\odot}$. Even our isolated ultra-faint galaxies have star-forming subhalos. If this is representative, dwarf galaxies throughout the universe should commonly host tiny satellite galaxies of their own. We combine our results with the ELVIS simulations to show that targeting $\\sim 50~ \\rm kpc$ regions around nearby isolated dwarfs could increase the chances of discovering ultra-faint galaxies by $\\sim 35\\%...

  5. On the Metallicity of Star-forming Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Legrand, F; Silich, S A; Kunth, D; Cerviño, M; Legrand, Francois; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Kunth, Daniel; Cervino, Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We construct three extreme different scenarios of the star formation histories applicable to a sample of dwarf galaxies, based either on their present metallicity or their luminosity. The three possible scenarios imply different mechanical energy input rates and these we compare with the theoretical lower limits established for the ejection of processed matter out of dwarf galaxies. The comparison strongly points at the existence of extended gaseous haloes in these galaxies, acting as the barrier that allows galaxies to retain their metals and enhance their abundance. At the same time our findings strongly point at a continuous star-forming process, rather than to coeval bursts, as the main contributors to the overall metallicity in our galaxy sample.

  6. New Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies Detected Around Nearby Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Karachentsev, I D; Zilch, T; Blauensteiner, M; Elvov, M; Hochleitner, P; Hubl, B; Kerschhuber, G; Küppers, S; Neyer, F; Pölzl, R; Remmel, P; Schneider, O; Sparenberg, R; Trulson, U; Willems, G; Ziegler, H

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a survey of low surface brightness (LSB) satellite galaxies around the Local Volume massive spirals using long exposures with small amateur telescopes. We identified 27 low and very low surface brightness objects around the galaxies NGC,672, 891, 1156, 2683, 3344, 4258, 4618, 4631, and 5457 situated within 10 Mpc from us, and found nothing new around NGC,2903, 3239, 4214, and 5585. Assuming that the dwarf candidates are the satellites of the neighboring luminous galaxies, their absolute magnitudes are in the range of -8.6 > M_B > -13.3, their effective diameters are 0.4-4.7 kpc, and the average surface brightness is 26.1 mag/sq arcsec. The mean linear projected separation of the satellite candidates from the host galaxies is 73 kpc. Our spectroscopic observations of two LSB dwarfs with the Russian 6-meter telescope confirm their physical connection to the host galaxies NGC,891 and NGC,2683.

  7. Unveiling the Secret of a Virgo Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Dwarf galaxies may not be as impressive in appearance as their larger brethren, but they are at least as interesting from a scientific point of view. And sometimes they may have hidden properties that will only be found by means of careful observations, probing the signals of their stars at the faintest level. Such as the entirely unexpected, well developed spiral structure within an otherwise seemingly normal dwarf elliptical galaxy! This is the surprise result of a new study by a team of astronomers [1], headed by Helmut Jerjen from the Australian National University (Canberra) who obtained detailed observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the dwarf galaxy IC 3328 in the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies, some 50 million light-years away. Dwarf galaxies Dwarf galaxies are present in all major clusters of galaxies and dominate by numbers in the universe. They may contain a few (tens of) millions of stars, as compared to galaxies of normal size with hundreds of billions of stars. About two dozen dwarf galaxies are known in the "Local Group" of galaxies of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is also a member. The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are some of the best known dwarf galaxies - they are of the irregular type - while NGC 147 and NGC 205, two companions to the great Andromeda Galaxy, are of the elliptical type. Dwarf elliptical galaxies are characterized by their smooth appearance. From various studies, it is known that they are tri-axial ellipsoids of different degrees of elongation. Some are almost spherical while others are more pancake- or cigar-shaped. Like the elliptical galaxies of normal size, dwarf ellipticals are almost pure aggregates of stars. In contrast, spiral galaxies also contain clouds of gas and dust. The visible mass of spiral galaxies is in a rotating disk. Dwarf ellipticals generally keep their form because of the random motions of their stars. VLT observations of dwarf elliptical galaxies Using the FORS1 multi

  8. Stellar Populations of Highly Magnified Lensed Galaxies Young Starburst at Z to Approximately 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Eva; Rigby, Jane R.; Gladders, Michael D.; Gilbank, David G.; Sharon, Keren; Gralla, Megan B.; Bayliss, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the rest-frame UV to near-IR spectral energy distributions and rest-frame optical spectra of four of the brightest gravitationally lensed galaxies in the literature: RCSGA 032727-132609 at z = 170, MS1512-cB58 at z = 2.73, SGAS J152745.1+065219 at z = 2.76 and SGAS J12265L3+215220 at z = 2.92. This includes new Spitzer imaging for RCSGA0327 as well as new spectra, near-IR imaging and Spitzer imaging for SGAS1527 and SGAS1226. Lensing magnifications of 3-4 magnitudes allow a detailed study of the stellar populations and physical conditions. We compare star formation rates as measured from the SED fit, the Ha and [O II] .(lambda)3727 emission lines, and the UV+IR bolometric luminosity where 24micron photometry is available. The SFR estimate from the SED fit is consistently higher than the other indicators, which suggests that the Calzetti dust extinction law used in the SED fitting is too flat for young star-forming galaxies at z approx. 2. Our analysis finds similar stellar population parameters for all four lensed galaxies: stellar masses 3 - 7 x 10(exp 9) Stellar mass, young ages approx. 100 Myr, little dust content E(B - V)=0.10-0.25, and star formation rates around 20- 100 Stellar mass/y. Compared to typical values for the galaxy population at z approx. 2, this suggests we are looking at newly formed, starbursting systems that have only recently started the build-up of stellar mass. These results constitute the first detailed, uniform analysis of a sample of the growing number of strongly lensed galaxies known at z approx. 2. Subject headings: galaxies: high-redshift, strong gravitational lensing, infrared: galaxies

  9. On the formation of dwarf galaxies and stellar haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, J. I.; Pontzen, A. P.; Viel, M.

    2006-09-01

    Using analytic arguments and a suite of very high resolution (~103Msolar per particle) cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we argue that high-redshift, z ~ 10, M ~ 108Msolar haloes, form the smallest `baryonic building block' (BBB) for galaxy formation. These haloes are just massive enough to efficiently form stars through atomic line cooling and to hold on to their gas in the presence of supernova (SN) winds and reionization. These combined effects, in particular that of the SN feedback, create a sharp transition: over the mass range 3-10 × 107Msolar, the BBBs drop two orders of magnitude in stellar mass. Below ~2 × 107Msolar, galaxies will be dark with almost no stars and no gas. Above this scale is the smallest unit of galaxy formation: the BBB. We show that the BBBs have stellar distributions which are spheroidal, of low rotational velocity, old and metal poor: they resemble the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) of the Local Group (LG). Unlike the LG dSphs, however, they contain significant gas fractions. We connect these high-redshift BBBs to the smallest dwarf galaxies observed at z = 0 using linear theory. A small fraction (~100) of these gas-rich BBBs at high redshift fall in to a galaxy the size of the Milky Way (MW). We suggest that 10 per cent of these survive to become the observed LG dwarf galaxies at the present epoch. This is consistent with recent numerical estimates. Those infalling haloes on benign orbits which keep them far away from the MW or Andromeda manage to retain their gas and slowly form stars - these become the smallest dwarf irregular galaxies; those on more severe orbits lose their gas faster than they can form stars and become the dwarf spheroidals. The remaining 90 per cent of the BBBs will be accreted. We show that this gives a metallicity and total stellar mass consistent with the MW old stellar halo.

  10. Charting Unexplored Dwarf Galaxy Territory With RR Lyrae

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Mariah

    2015-01-01

    Observational bias against finding Milky Way (MW) dwarf galaxies at low Galactic latitudes (b 50 kpc in these unmined regions of parameter space, with only modest contamination from interloper groups when large halo structures are excluded. For example, a friends-of-friends (FOF) search with a linking length of 500 pc could reveal dwarf galaxies more luminous than M_V = -3.2 mag and with surface brightnesses as faint as 31 mag arcsec^-2 (or even fainter, depending on RR Lyrae specific frequency). Although existing public RR Lyrae catalogs are highly incomplete at d > 50 kpc and/or include 600 kpc, LSST is the only planned survey that will be both wide-field and deep enough to use RR Lyrae to definitively measure the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy census to extremely low surface brightnesses, and through the Galactic plane.

  11. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We constrain the parameters of a self-interacting massive dark matter scalar particle in a condensate using the kinematics of the eight brightest dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way. For the case of an attractive self-interaction the condensate develops a mass density profile with a characteristic scale radius that is closely related to the fundamental parameters of the theory. We find that the velocity dispersion of dwarf spheroidal galaxies suggests a scale radius of the order of 1 kpc, in tension with previous results found using the rotational curve of low-surface-brightness and dwarf galaxies. We discuss the implications of our findings for the particle dark matter model and argue that a single classical coherent state cannot play, in general, a relevant role for the description of dark matter in galaxies.

  12. A Massive, Cooling-Flow-Induced Starburst in the Core of a Highly Luminous Galaxy Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, M; Benson, B A; Foley, R J; Ruel, J; Sullivan, P; Veilleux, S; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bazin, G; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Egami, E; Forman, W R; Garmire, G P; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lieu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Rawle, T D; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Rex, M; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Simcoe, R; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; Suhada, R; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2012-01-01

    In the cores of some galaxy clusters the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous "cooling flows" of gas sinking towards the cluster center, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star formation rates and cool gas masses for these "cool core" clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by astrophysical feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical, and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (L_2-10 keV = 8.2 x 10^45 erg/s) galaxy cluster which hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (dM/dt = 3820 +/- 530 Msun/yr). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (740 +/- 160 Msun/yr), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool core clusters may not yet be fully establishe...

  13. Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Irregular Galaxies chemodynamical models and the effect of gas infall

    CERN Document Server

    Hensler, G; Köppen, J; Hensler, Gerhard; Rieschick, Andreas; K"oppen, Joachim

    1999-01-01

    Because of their low gravitational energies dwarf galaxies are greatly exposed to energetical influences by the interstellar medium, like e.g. stellar radiation, winds or explosions, or by their environment. While the metallicity depletion in dwarf galaxies can be explained in general by supernova-driven galactic winds, the reason for their low N/O ratios at low O abundance is not yet completely understood. Stellar yields enrich the different gas phases with elements that are characteristic for their stellar progenitors. Gas-phase transitions are necessary for a mixing of elements, but depend sensitively on the thermal and dynamical state of the interstellar medium. Models of chemical evolution start usually with a high N/O ratio at low O abundance according to a metal enrichment by ancient stellar populations with traditional yields, but can only reproduce the N/O-O peculiarity by the stepwise element release and mostly by the application of multiple starbursts in order to account also for a selective elemen...

  14. Kinematics of dwarf galaxies in gas-rich groups, and the survival and detectability of tidal dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sweet, Sarah M; Meurer, Gerhardt; Kilborn, Virginia; Audcent-Ross, Fiona; Baumgardt, Holger; Bekki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We present DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) of 22 star-forming dwarf galaxies located in four gas-rich groups, including six newly-discovered dwarfs. Two of the galaxies are strong tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates based on our luminosity-metallicity relation definition. We model the rotation curves of these galaxies. Our sample shows low mass-to-light ratios (M/L=0.73$\\pm0.39M_\\odot/L_\\odot$) as expected for young, star-forming dwarfs. One of the galaxies in our sample has an apparently strongly-falling rotation curve, reaching zero rotational velocity outside the turnover radius of $r_{turn}=1.2r_e$. This may be 1) a polar ring galaxy, with a tilted bar within a face-on disk; 2) a kinematic warp. These scenarios are indistinguishable with our current data due to limitations of slit alignment inherent to MOS-mode observations. We consider whether TDGs can be detected based on their tidal radius, beyond which tidal stripping removes kinematic tracers such as H$\\alpha$ emission. When the tidal radius i...

  15. Color, Structure, and Star Formation History of Dwarf Galaxies over the last ~3 Gyr with GEMS and SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Barazza, F D; Bell, E F; Caldwell, J A R; Jogee, S; McIntosh, D H; Meisenheimer, K; Peng, C Y; Rix, H W; Wolf, C; Barazza, Fabio D.; Barden, Marco; Bell, Eric F.; Caldwell, John A. R.; Intosh, Daniel H. Mc; Jogee, Shardha; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Peng, Chien Y.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Wolf, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the colors, structural properties, and star formation histories for a sample of ~1600 dwarfs over look-back times of ~3 Gyr (z=0.002-0.25). The sample consists of 401 distant dwarfs drawn from the Galaxy Evolution from Morphologies and SEDs (GEMS) survey, which provides high resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images and accurate redshifts, and of 1291 dwarfs at 10-90 Mpc compiled from the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey (SDSS). The sample is complete down to an effective surface brightness of 22 mag arcsec^-2 in z and includes dwarfs with M_g=-18.5 to -14 mag. Rest-frame luminosities in Johnson UBV and SDSS ugr filters are provided by the COMBO-17 survey and structural parameters have been determined by S\\'ersic fits. We find that the GEMS dwarfs are bluer than the SDSS dwarfs by ~0.13 mag in g-r, which is consistent with the color evolution over ~2 Gyr of star formation histories involving moderate starbursts and long periods of continuous star formatio...

  16. Infrared Observations of Star-Forming Dwarf Galaxies with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, J. L.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Salzer, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    We present a study of the infrared properties of a sample of actively star-forming dwarf galaxies (MB >-18) drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. Nearby actively star-forming dwarf galaxies are possible analogs to the high redshift star-forming systems that serve as galactic building blocks in hierarchical galaxy formation scenarios. These galaxies are gas-rich, metal-poor systems undergoing bursts of star formation in the local universe. A subset of such objects from the line-flux limited objective-prism survey of Salzer et al. (2001) lie in the NOAO Bootes field, and have therefore been observed by Spitzer as part of the IRAC Shallow Survey. We use the IRAC data to measure the stellar mass in these galaxies. In addition, we examine whether these metal-poor dwarf galaxies show warm dust emission, and examine whether it traces the star formation as it does in normal disk galaxies. J. L. Rosenberg would like to acknowledge the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellowship for support of this work. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407. Support for this work was provided by NASA.

  17. Spectropolarimetry of the Superwind Filaments of the Starburst Galaxy M 82: Kinematics of Dust Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Kawabata, , Koji S.; Ohyama, Youichi

    2011-03-01

    Spectropolarimetry results for the starburst galaxy M 82 are presented. The optical emission lines of the filaments in the energetic outflow (``superwind'') from the nuclear starburst region of M 82 are substantially polarized. The Hα polarization degrees and angles measured by our study are consistent with previous narrowband imaging polarimetry data. The polarized emission lines are redshifted with respect to the emission lines in the total light and systemic motion of the galaxy. The emission line intensity ratios [N II]/Hα and [S II]/ Hα in the polarized light are similar to those of the nuclear star-forming region. In addition, the electron density Ne derived from the [S II]λ6731/λ6717 line ratio of the polarized light is ˜600-1000 cm-3 at a distance of more than 1 kpc from the nucleus, whereas the Ne derived from the total light are less than 300 cm-3. These facts strongly suggest that the emission from the nuclear starburst of M 82 is scattered by dust grains entrained and transported outward by the superwind. A simple hollow biconical outflow model shows that the velocity of the outflowing dust grains, vd, ranges from 100 to 200 km s-1 near the nucleus, decreases monotonically with the distance from the nucleus, and reaches ˜10 km s-1 at around 1 kpc. The motion of the dust is substantially slower than that of both ionized gas (vHα ˜ 600 km s-1) and molecular gas (vCO ˜ 200 km s-1) at the same distance from the nucleus of M 82. This indicates that dust grains in the superwind are kinematically decoupled from both gas components at large radii. Since the dust velocity vd is much less than the escape velocity of M 82 (vesc ≍ 170 km s-1 at 1.5 kpc from the nucleus), most of the dust entrained by the superwind cannot escape to intergalactic space, and may fall back into the galaxy disk if there is no additional acceleration mechanism (such as radiation pressure).

  18. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF FOUR LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Saha, Abhijit [NOAO, 950 Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J., E-mail: rosst@nmsu.edu, E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu, E-mail: bjat@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color–color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color–color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%–50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution.

  19. ALMA Multi-line Imaging of the Nearby Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, David S; Bolatto, Alberto D; Leroy, Adam K; Ott, Jürgen; Rosolowsky, Erik; Veilleux, Sylvain; Warren, Steven R; Weiss, Axel; Zwaan, Martin A; Zschaechner, Laura K

    2015-01-01

    We present spatially resolved ($\\sim$50 pc) imaging of molecular gas species in the central kiloparsec of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253, based on observations taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). A total of 50 molecular lines are detected over a 13 GHz bandwidth imaged in the 3 mm band. Unambiguous identifications are assigned for 27 lines. Based on the measured high CO/C$^{17}$O isotopic line ratio ($\\gtrsim$350), we show that $^{12}$CO(1-0) has moderate optical depths. A comparison of the HCN and HCO$^{+}$ with their $^{13}$C-substituted isotopologues shows that the HCN(1-0) and HCO$^{+}$(1-0) lines have optical depths at least comparable to CO(1-0). H$^{13}$CN/H$^{13}$CO$^{+}$ (and H$^{13}$CN/HN$^{13}$C) line ratios provide tighter constraints on dense gas properties in this starburst. SiO has elevated abundances across the nucleus. HNCO has the most distinctive morphology of all the bright lines, with its global luminosity dominated by the outer parts of the central re...

  20. A Spitzer high resolution mid-infrared spectral atlas of starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard-Salas, J; Charmandaris, V; Lebouteiller, V; Farrah, D; Devost, D; Brandl, B R; Wu, Yanling; Armus, L; Hao, L; Sloan, G C; Weedman, D; Houck, J R

    2009-01-01

    We present an atlas of Spitzer/IRS high resolution (R~600) 10-37um spectra for 24 well known starburst galaxies. The spectra are dominated by fine-structure lines, molecular hydrogen lines, and emission bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Six out of the eight objects with a known AGN component show emission of the high excitation [NeV] line. This line is also seen in one other object (NGC4194) with, a priori, no known AGN component. In addition to strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission features in this wavelength range (11.3, 12.7, 16.4um), the spectra reveal other weak hydrocarbon features at 10.6, 13.5, 14.2um, and a previously unreported emission feature at 10.75um. An unidentified absorption feature at 13.7um is detected in many of the starbursts. We use the fine-structure lines to derive the abundance of neon and sulfur for 14 objects where the HI 7-6 line is detected. We further use the molecular hydrogen lines to sample the properties of the warm molecular gas. Several basic diagrams ch...

  1. Exploring the Interstellar Media of Optically Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Most, Hans P; Salzer, John J; Rosenberg, Jessica J; Engstrom, Eric; Fliss, Palmer

    2013-01-01

    We present new Very Large Array HI spectral line, archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and archival Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of eight star-forming blue compact dwarf galaxies that were selected to be optically compact (optical radii less than 1 kpc). These systems have faint blue absolute magnitudes (M_B >= -17), ongoing star formation (based on emission-line selection by the H alpha or [OIII] lines), and are nearby (mean velocity = 3315 km/s = 45 Mpc). One galaxy in the sample, ADBS 113845+2008, is found to have an HI halo that extends 58 r-band scale lengths from its stellar body. In contrast, the rest of the sample galaxies have HI radii to optical-scale-length ratios ranging from 9.3 to 26. The size of the HI disk in the "giant disk" dwarf galaxy ADBS 113845+2008 appears to be unusual as compared to similarly compact stellar populations.

  2. Infrared photometry of Young Massive Clusters in the starburst galaxy NGC 4214

    CERN Document Server

    Sollima, A; Carretta, E; Bragaglia, A; Lucatello, S

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of an infrared photometric survey performed with NICS@TNG in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 4214. We derived accurate integrated JK magnitudes of 10 young massive clusters and compared them with the already available Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet colors. These clusters are located in the combined ultraviolet-infrared colors planes on well defined sequences, whose shapes allow a precise determination of their age. By means of the comparison with suitable stellar evolution models we estimated ages, metallicities, reddening and masses of these clusters. All the analyzed clusters appear to be younger than log(t/yr)<8.4, moderately metal-rich and slightly less massive than present-day Galactic globular clusters. The derived ages for clusters belonging to the secondary HII star forming complex are significantly larger than those previously estimated in the literature. We also discuss the possibility of using the ultraviolet-infrared color-color diagram to select candidate young massi...

  3. Global Star Formation Rates in Disk Galaxies and Circumnuclear Starbursts from Cloud Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, J C

    1999-01-01

    We invoke star formation triggered by cloud-cloud collisions to explain global star formation rates of disk galaxies and circumnuclear starbursts. Previous theories based on the growth rate of gravitational perturbations ignore the dynamically important presence of magnetic fields. Theories based on triggering by spiral density waves fail to explain star formation in systems without such waves. Furthermore, observations suggest gas and stellar disk instabilities are decoupled. Following the numerical work of Gammie, Jog & Ostriker (1991), the cloud collision rate is set by the shear velocity of encounters with initial impact parameters of a few tidal radii, due to differential rotation in the disk. This enhances the collision rate above that calculated from simply considering the random velocities of clouds. We predict Sigma_{SFR}(R) is proportional to Sigma_{gas} Omega (1 - 0.7 beta). In the case of constant circular velocity (beta = 0), this is in agreement with recent observations (Kennicutt 1998). We ...

  4. An observer's guide to the (Local Group) dwarf galaxies: predictions for their own dwarf satellite populations

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Gregory A; Yang, Tianyi; Willman, Beth; Griffen, Brendan F; Frebel, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A recent surge in the discovery of new ultrafaint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way has inspired the idea of searching for faint satellites, $10^3\\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}99\\%$ chance that at least one satellite with stellar mass $M_*> 10^5 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$ exists around the combined five Local Group field dwarf galaxies with the largest stellar mass. When considering satellites with $M_*> 10^4 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$, we predict a combined $5-25$ satellites for the five largest field dwarfs, and $10-50$ for the whole Local Group field dwarf population. Because of the relatively small number of predicted dwarfs, and their extended spatial distribution, a large fraction each Local Group dwarf's virial volume will need to be surveyed to guarantee discoveries. We compute the predicted number of satellites in a given field of view of specific Local Group galaxies, as a function of minimum satellite luminosity, and explicitly obtain such values for the Solitary Local dwarfs survey. Uncertainties in abundance matc...

  5. Direct Detection of Lyman Continuum Escape from Local Starburst Galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Leitherer, Claus; Lee, Janice C; Oey, M S

    2016-01-01

    We report on the detection of Lyman continuum radiation in two nearby starburst galaxies. Tol 0440-381, Tol 1247-232 and Mrk 54 were observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescopes. The three galaxies have radial velocities of ~13,000 km/s, permitting a ~35 A window on the restframe Lyman continuum shortward of the Milky Way Lyman edge at 912 A. The chosen instrument configuration using the G140L grating covers the spectral range from 912 to 2,000 {\\AA}. We developed a dedicated background subtraction method to account for temporal and spatial background variations of the detector, which is crucial at the low flux levels around 912 A. This modified pipeline allowed us to significantly improve the statistical and systematic detector noise and will be made available to the community. We detect Lyman continuum in all three galaxies. However, we conservatively interpret the emission in Tol 0440-381 as an upper limit due to possible contamination by geocoronal Lyman series lines. ...

  6. Compact starbursts in z~3-6 submillimeter galaxies revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Ikarashi, Soh; Caputi, Karina I; Aretxaga, Itziar; Dunlop, James S; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, DavidH; Iono, Daisuke; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Lagos, ClaudiaD P; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Koichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tamura, Yoichi; Umehata, Hideki; Wilson, GrantG; Yabe, Kiyoto; Yun, Min S

    2014-01-01

    We report the source size distribution, as measured by ALMA millimetric continuum imaging, of a sample of 13 AzTEC-selected submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) believed to lie at z_photo ~ 3-6. Their infrared luminosities and star-formation rates (SFR) are L_IR ~ 2-6 x 10^12 L_sun and ~ 200-500 M_sun yr-1, respectively. The size of z ~ 3-6 SMGs ranges from 0''.10 to 0''.38 with a median of 0''.22 (FWHM), corresponding to a median effective radius (Re) of ~ 0.8 kpc, comparable to the typical size of the stellar component measured in compact quiescent galaxies at z ~ 2 (cQGs) --- R ~ 1 kpc. The surface SFR density of our z ~ 3-6 SMGs is 160+610-82 M_sun yr-1 kpc-2, comparable to that seen in local merger-driven (U)LIRGs, which implies that these SMGs are also likely to be merger-driven. The discovery of compact starbursts in z >~ 3 SMGs strongly supports a massive galaxy formation scenario wherein z ~ 3-6 SMGs evolve into the compact stellar components of z ~ 2 cQGs. These cQGs are then thought to evolve into the mos...

  7. Low-ionization Line Emission from Starburst Galaxies: A New Probe of Galactic-Scale Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Kate H R; Ménard, Brice; Murray, Norman; Kasen, Daniel; Koo, David C; Phillips, Andrew C

    2010-01-01

    We study the kinematically narrow, low-ionization line emission from a bright, starburst galaxy at z = 0.69 using slit spectroscopy obtained with Keck/LRIS. The spectrum reveals strong absorption in MgII and FeII resonance transitions with Doppler shifts of -200 to -300 km/s, indicating a cool gas outflow. Emission in MgII near and redward of systemic velocity, in concert with the observed absorption, yields a P Cygni-like line profile similar to those observed in the Ly alpha transition in Lyman Break Galaxies. Further, the MgII emission is spatially resolved, and extends significantly beyond the emission from stars and HII regions within the galaxy. Assuming the emission has a simple, symmetric surface brightness profile, we find that the gas extends to distances > ~7 kpc. We also detect several narrow FeII* fine-structure lines in emission near the systemic velocity, arising from energy levels which are radiatively excited directly from the ground state. We suggest that the MgII and FeII* emission is gener...

  8. Evidence of Nuclear Disks from the Radial Distribution of CCSNe in Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Illana, Rubén; Pérez-Torres, Miguel Ángel; Alberdi, Antxon

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions are expected to be responsible for triggering massive star formation and possibly accretion onto a supermassive black hole, by providing large amounts of dense molecular gas down to the central kiloparsec region. Several scenarios to drive the gas further down to the central ˜ 100 pc, have been proposed, including the formation of a nuclear disk around the black hole, where massive stars would produce supernovae. Here, we probe the radial distribution of supernovae and supernova remnants in the nuclear regions of the starburst galaxies M82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, by using high-angular resolution (≲ 0.'1) radio observations. We derived scale-length values for the putative nuclear disks, which range from ˜ 20-30 pc for Arp 299-A and Arp 220, up to ˜ 140 pc for M82. The radial distribution of SNe for the nuclear disks in Arp 299-A and Arp 220 is also consistent with a power-law surface density profile of exponent γ = 1, as expected from detailed hydrodynamical simulations of nuclear disks. This study is detailed in Herrero-Illana, Perez-Torres, and Alberdi [11].

  9. Probing the Circumnuclear Stellar Populations of Starburst Galaxies in the Near-infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Dametto, N Z; Pastoriza, M G; Rodríguez-Ardila, A; Hernandez-Jimenez, J A; Carvalho, E A

    2014-01-01

    We employ the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility's near-infrared spectrograph SpeX at 0.8-2.4$\\mu$m to investigate the spatial distribution of the stellar populations (SPs) in four well known Starburst galaxies: NGC34, NGC1614, NGC3310 and NGC7714. We use the STARLIGHT code updated with the synthetic simple stellar populations models computed by Maraston (2005, M05). Our main results are that the NIR light in the nuclear surroundings of the galaxies is dominated by young/intermediate age SPs ($t \\leq 2\\times10^9$yr), summing from $\\sim$40\\% up to 100\\% of the light contribution. In the nuclear aperture of two sources (NGC1614 and NGC3310) we detected a predominant old SP component ($t > 2\\times10^9$yr), while for NGC34 and NGC7714 the younger component prevails. Furthermore, we found evidence of a circumnuclear star formation ring-like structure and a secondary nucleus in NGC1614, in agreement with previous studies. We also suggest that the merger/interaction experienced by three of the galaxies studied, NGC161...

  10. The Metallicity of Void Dwarf Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreckel, K.; Croxall, K.; Groves, B.; van de Weygaert, R.; Pogge, R. W.

    2015-01-01

    The current ΛCDM cosmological model predicts that galaxy evolution proceeds more slowly in lower density environments, suggesting that voids are a prime location to search for relatively pristine galaxies that are representative of the building blocks of early massive galaxies. To test the assumptio

  11. Stellar Populations of Highly Magnified Lensed Galaxies: Young Starbursts at Z approximately 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Eva; Rigby, Jane R.; Gladders, Michael D.; Gilbank, David G.; Sharon, Keren; Gralla, Megan B.; Bayliss, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the rest-frame UV to near-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and rest-frame optical spectra of four of the brightest gravitationally lensed galaxies in the literature: RCSGA 032727-132609 at z = 1.70, MS1512-cB58 at z = 2.73, SGAS J152745.1+065219 at z = 2.76, and SGAS J122651.3+215220 at z = 2.92. This includes new Spitzer imaging for RCSGA0327 as well as new spectra, near-IR imaging and Spitzer imaging for SGAS1527 and SGAS1226. Lensing magnifications of 3-4 mag allow a detailed study of the stellar populations and physical conditions. We compare star formation rates (SFRs) as measured from the SED fit, the Ha and [O II] ?3727 emission lines, and the UV+IR bolometric luminosity where 24 micron photometry is available. The SFR estimate from the SED fit is consistently higher than the other indicators, which suggests that the Calzetti dust extinction law used in the SED fitting is too flat for young star-forming galaxies at z 2. Our analysis finds similar stellar population parameters for all four lensed galaxies: stellar masses (3-7) ? 10(exp 9)Solar M young ages approx 100 Myr, little dust content E(B - V) = 0.10-0.25, and SFRs around 20-100 solar M/ yr. Compared to typical values for the galaxy population at z approx. 2, this suggests we are looking at newly formed, starbursting systems that have only recently started the buildup of stellar mass. These results constitute the first detailed, uniform analysis of a sample of the growing number of strongly lensed galaxies known at z approx 2.

  12. The Dwarf Galaxy Population in Nearby Groups. The data

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, E R; Infante, L; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Oliveira, Claudia M. de; Infante, Leopoldo

    2006-01-01

    We used V and I CCD photometry to search for low-surface brightness dwarf galaxies (LSBD) in the central ( 22.5 V mag/arcsec^2, h > 1.5 arcsec, and diameters larger than 1.2 h^-1 kpc. Twenty of the eighty galaxies are extended LSB galaxies that were detected only on smoothed images, after masking all high surface brightness objects. The completeness in the detection is ~80% for galaxies with V<=20 and 22.5galaxies in smoothed images instead. The detected LSBD galaxies are highly concentrated towards the center of the four groups in the inner 250 h^-1 kpc. The best fit power-law slope of the surface density distribution is, on average, beta ~ -1.5 (R < 250 h^-1 kpc), in agreement with the values found for satellites dwarfs around isolated E/S0 galaxies and in X-ray groups. The LSBD galaxies in the Mv-mu0 plane does not show a clear c...

  13. The Horizontal Branch of the Sculptor Dwarf galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salaris, Maurizio; Boer, Thomas de; Tolstoy, Eline; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Cassisi, Santi

    2013-01-01

    We have performed the first detailed simulation of the horizontal branch of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy by means of synthetic modelling techniques, taking consistently into account the star formation history and metallicity evolution as determined from the main sequence and red giant branch

  14. Sulphur, zinc and carbon in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skúladóttir, Ása

    2016-01-01

    The Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is a Milky Way satellite with predominantly old stellar population, and therefore the ideal target to study early chemical evolution. The chemical abundances of photospheres of stars reveal the composition of their birth environment; studying stars of different a

  15. Fast radio burst tied to distant dwarf galaxy (Image 2)

    National Science Foundation

    2017-06-07

    Full Text Available Radio telescope at Arecibo only localized the fast radio burst to the area inside the two circles in this image, but the Very Large Array was able to pinpoint it as a dwarf galaxy within the square (shown at intersection of cross hairs in enlarged box)

  16. The environment of nearby Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R; van Eymeren, Janine; Esteban, Cesar; Popping, Attila; Hibbard, John

    2009-01-01

    We are obtaining deep multiwavelength data of a sample of nearby blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDGs) combining broad-band optical/NIR and H$\\alpha$ photometry, optical spectroscopy and 21-cm radio observations. Here we present HI results obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array for some BCDGs, all showing evident interaction features in their neutral gas component despite the environment in which they reside. Our analysis strongly suggests that interactions with or between low-luminosity dwarf galaxies or HI clouds are the main trigger mechanism of the star-forming bursts in BCDGs; however these dwarf objects are only detected when deep optical images and complementary HI observations are performed. Are therefore BCDGs real isolated systems?

  17. The Local Tully–Fisher Relation for Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.; Kashibadze (Nasonova, Olga G.

    2017-01-01

    We study different incarnations of the Tully–Fisher (TF) relation for the Local Volume (LV) galaxies taken from Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog. The UNGC sample contains 656 galaxies with W50 H i-line-width estimates, mostly belonging to low-mass dwarfs. Of them, 296 objects have distances measured with accuracies better than 10%. For the sample of 331 LV galaxies having baryonic masses {log}{M}{bar}> 5.8{log} {M}ȯ , we obtain a relation {log}{M}{bar}=2.49{log}{W}50+3.97 with an observed scatter of 0.38 dex. The largest factors affecting the scatter are observational errors in K-band magnitudes and W50 line widths for the tiny dwarfs, as well as uncertainty of their inclinations. We find that accounting for the surface brightness of the LV galaxies or their gas fraction, specific star-formation rate, or isolation index does not essentially reduce the observed scatter on the baryonic TF diagram. We also notice that a sample of 71 dSph satellites of the Milky Way and M31 with a known stellar velocity dispersion σ* tends to follow nearly the same bTF relation, having slightly lower masses than that of late-type dwarfs.

  18. THE PRIMEVAL POPULATIONS OF THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C., E-mail: tbrown@stsci.edu, E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu, E-mail: jkalirai@stsci.edu, E-mail: avila@stsci.edu, E-mail: ferguson@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, using deep photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A galaxy class recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the UFDs appear to be an extension of the classical dwarf spheroidals to low luminosities, offering a new front in efforts to understand the missing satellite problem. They are the least luminous, most dark-matter-dominated, and least chemically evolved galaxies known. Our HST survey of six UFDs seeks to determine if these galaxies are true fossils from the early universe. We present here the preliminary analysis of three UFD galaxies: Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Classical dwarf spheroidals of the Local Group exhibit extended star formation histories, but these three Milky Way satellites are at least as old as the ancient globular cluster M92, with no evidence for intermediate-age populations. Their ages also appear to be synchronized to within {approx}1 Gyr of each other, as might be expected if their star formation was truncated by a global event, such as reionization.

  19. Starburst galaxies in the COSMOS field: clumpy star-formation at redshift 0 < z < 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Hinojosa-Goñi, R; Méndez-Abreu, J

    2016-01-01

    At high redshift, starburst galaxies present irregular morphologies, with 10-20\\%\\ of their star formation occurring in giant clumps. These clumpy galaxies are considered to be the progenitors of local disk galaxies. To understand the properties of starbursts at intermediate and low redshift, it is fundamental to track their evolution and possible link with the systems at higher $z$. We present an extensive, systematic, and multi-band search and analysis of the starburst galaxies at redshift ($0 < z < 0.5$) in the COSMOS field, as well as detailed characteristics of their star-forming clumps by using Hubble Space Telescope/Advance Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) images. Their principal properties, sizes, masses, and star formation rates are provided. The individual star-forming knots in our sample follow the same L(H$\\alpha$) vs. size scaling relation than local giant HII regions (Fuentes-Masip et al. 2000). However, they slightly differ from the one provided using samples at high redshift. This result hig...

  20. Suppression of dwarf galaxy formation by cosmic reionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Loeb, Abraham

    2006-05-18

    A large number of faint galaxies, born less than a billion years after the Big Bang, have recently been discovered. Fluctuations in the distribution of these galaxies contributed to a scatter in the ionization fraction of cosmic hydrogen on scales of tens of megaparsecs, as observed along the lines of sight to the earliest known quasars. Theoretical simulations predict that the formation of dwarf galaxies should have been suppressed after cosmic hydrogen was reionized, leading to a drop in the cosmic star-formation rate. Here we report evidence for this suppression. We show that the post-reionization galaxies that produced most of the ionizing radiation at a redshift z approximately 5.5 must have had a mass in excess of approximately 10(10.9 +/- 0.5) solar masses (M(o)) or else the aforementioned scatter would have been smaller than observed. This limiting mass is two orders of magnitude larger than the galaxy mass that is thought to have dominated the reionization of cosmic hydrogen (approximately 10(8) M(o)). We predict that future surveys with space-based infrared telescopes will detect a population of smaller galaxies that reionized the Universe at an earlier time, before the epoch of dwarf galaxy suppression.

  1. Galaxies in turmoil the active and starburst galaxies and the black holes that drive them

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchin, C R

    2007-01-01

    Aimed at active amateur astronomers this book provides an up-to-date account of active galaxies. Lists and images of such objects are an important component of this book. The book makes sense of the chaotic and apparently innumerable types of violently active galaxies.

  2. An enhanced fraction of starbursting galaxies among high Eddington ratio AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, E.; Mullaney, J. R.; Daddi, E.; Ciesla, L.; Schreiber, C.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the star-forming properties of 1620 X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) host galaxies as a function of their specific X-ray luminosity (i.e. X-ray luminosity per unit host stellar mass) - a proxy of the Eddington ratio. Our motivation is to determine whether there is any evidence of a suppression of star formation at high Eddington ratios, which may hint towards `AGN feedback' effects. Star formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fits to Herschel-measured far-infrared spectral energy distributions, taking into account any contamination from the AGN. Herschel-undetected AGNs are included via stacking analyses to provide average SFRs in bins of redshift and specific X-ray luminosity (spanning 0.01 lesssim L_X/M_{ast } lesssim 100 L_{{⊙}} M_{{⊙}}^{-1}). After normalizing for the effects of mass and redshift arising from the evolving galaxy main sequence, we find that the SFRs of high specific luminosity AGNs are slightly enhanced compared to their lower specific luminosity counterparts. This suggests that the SFR distribution of AGN hosts changes with specific X-ray luminosity, a result reinforced by our finding of a significantly higher fraction of starbursting hosts among high specific luminosity AGNs compared to that of the general star-forming galaxy population (i.e. 8-10 per cent versus 3 per cent). Contrary to our original motivation, our findings suggest that high specific luminosity AGNs are more likely to reside in galaxies with enhanced levels of star formation.

  3. Spitzer Observations of MAMBO Galaxies: Weeding Out Active Nuclei in Starbursting Protoellipticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Serjeant, S.; Bertoldi, F.; Egami, E.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Barmby, P.; Bei, L.; Dole, H.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Fazio, G. G.; Frayer, D. T.; Gordon, K. D.; Hines, D. C.; Huang, J.-S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Misselt, K. A.; Miyazaki, S.; Morrison, J. E.; Papovich, C.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Rieke, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.; Rigby, J.; Rigopoulou, D.; Smail, I.; Wilson, G.; Willner, S. P.

    2004-09-01

    We present 3.6-24 μm Spitzer observations of an unbiased sample of nine luminous, dusty galaxies selected at 1200 μm by MAMBO on the IRAM 30 m telescope, a population akin to the well-known submillimeter or SCUBA galaxies (hereafter SMGs). Owing to the coarse resolution of submillimeter/millimeter cameras, SMGs have traditionally been difficult to identify at other wavelengths. We compare our multiwavelength catalogs to show that the overlap between 24 and 1200 μm must be close to complete at these flux levels. We find that all (4/4) of the most secure >=4 σ SMGs have >=4 σ counterparts at 1.4 GHz, while the fraction drops to 7/9 using all >=3 σ SMGs. We show that combining mid-infrared (MIR) and marginal (>=3 σ) radio detections provides plausible identifications in the remaining cases, enabling us to identify the complete sample. Accretion onto an obscured central engine is betrayed by the shape of the MIR continuum emission for several sources, confirming Spitzer's potential to weed out active galaxies. We demonstrate the power of an S24μm/S8μm versus S8μm/S4.5μm color-color plot as a diagnostic for this purpose. However, we conclude that the majority (~75%) of SMGs have rest-frame mid/far-IR spectral energy distributions commensurate with obscured starbursts. Sensitive 24 μm observations are clearly a useful route to identify and characterize reliable counterparts to high-redshift far-IR-bright galaxies, complementing what is possible via deep radio imaging.

  4. Cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxies with cosmic ray feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Bryan, Greg L.; Salem, Munier

    2016-08-01

    We perform zoom-in cosmological simulations of a suite of dwarf galaxies, examining the impact of cosmic rays (CRs) generated by supernovae, including the effect of diffusion. We first look at the effect of varying the uncertain CR parameters by repeatedly simulating a single galaxy. Then we fix the comic ray model and simulate five dwarf systems with virial masses range from 8 to 30 × 1010 M⊙. We find that including CR feedback (with diffusion) consistently leads to disc-dominated systems with relatively flat rotation curves and constant star formation rates. In contrast, our purely thermal feedback case results in a hot stellar system and bursty star formation. The CR simulations very well match the observed baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, but have a lower gas fraction than in real systems. We also find that the dark matter cores of the CR feedback galaxies are cuspy, while the purely thermal feedback case results in a substantial core.

  5. Cosmological Simulations of Dwarf Galaxies with Cosmic Ray Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jingjing; Salem, Munier

    2016-01-01

    We perform zoom-in cosmological simulations of a suite of dwarf galaxies, examining the impact of cosmic-rays generated by supernovae, including the effect of diffusion. We first look at the effect of varying the uncertain cosmic ray parameters by repeatedly simulating a single galaxy. Then we fix the comic ray model and simulate five dwarf systems with virial masses range from 8-30 $\\times 10^{10}$ Msun. We find that including cosmic ray feedback (with diffusion) consistently leads to disk dominated systems with relatively flat rotation curves and constant star formation rates. In contrast, our purely thermal feedback case results in a hot stellar system and bursty star formation. The CR simulations very well match the observed baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, but have a lower gas fraction than in real systems. We also find that the dark matter cores of the CR feedback galaxies are cuspy, while the purely thermal feedback case results in a substantial core.

  6. New Ultra-Compact Dwarf Galaxies in Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    How do ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) galaxies that are especially small and dense form and evolve? Scientists have recently examined distant galaxy clusters, searching for more UCDs to help us answer this question.Origins of DwarfsIn recent years we have discovered a growing sample of small, very dense galaxies. Galaxies that are tens to hundreds of light-years across, with masses between a million and a billion solar masses, fall into category of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs).An example of an unresolved compact object from the authors survey that is likely an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy. [Adapted from Zhang Bell 2017]How do these dense and compact galaxies form? Two possibilities are commonly suggested:An initially larger galaxy was tidally stripped during interactions with other galaxies in a cluster, leaving behind only its small, dense core as a UCD.UCDs formed as compact galaxies at very early cosmic times. The ones living in a massive dark matter halo may have been able to remain compact over time, evolving into the objectswe see today.To better understand which of these formation scenarios applies to which galaxies, we need a larger sample size! Our census of UCDs is fairly limited and because theyare small and dim, most of the ones weve discovered are in the nearby universe. To build a good sample, we need to find UCDs at higher redshifts as well.A New SampleIn a recent study, two scientists from University of Michigan have demonstrated how we might find more UCDs. Yuanyuan Zhang (also affiliated with Fermilab) and Eric Bell used the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble (CLASH) to search 17 galaxy clusters at intermediate redshifts of 0.2 z 0.6, looking for unresolved objects that might be UCDs.The mass and size distributions of the UCD candidates reported in this study, in the context of previously known nuclear star clusters, globular clusters (GCs), UCDs, compact elliptical galaxies (cEs), and dwarf galaxies. [Zhang Bell 2017]Zhang and

  7. Research Progress on E+A (Post-Starburst) Galaxies%E+A星系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金荣; 林宣滨; 潘治政; 孔旭

    2011-01-01

    E+A星系的光谱具有很强的巴耳末吸收线,缺乏与恒星形成相关的发射线,将典型的椭圆星系(E)和A型恒星的光谱进行线性组合就能够拟合出这类星系的光谱.它们的颜色、形态、星族年龄等参数介于典型的早型和晚型星系之间.E+A星系近期经历了星暴活动,在星系演化进程中,它们处于晚型到早型的过渡阶段,可能在演变过程中扮演着重要角色.介绍了E+A星系的基本观测特征,并讨论了它们的形成机制、演化去向、所处的环境以及它们与AGN的关系.%The most typical characteristics of E+A galaxies are that their spectra show strong Balmer absorption lines but no significant emission lines associated with ongoing star formation. The spectra can be roughly fitted by a combination of an old elliptical galaxy (E) and a young A-type star spectrum, so named E+A galaxies. The existence of strong Balmer absorption lines indicates that E+A galaxies have undergone starburst activities, and the shortage of emission lines implies that they have quenched their star formation recently.Therefore, E+A galaxies are also interpreted as post-starburst galaxies.On the evolutionary path of some galaxies from gas-rich, stax-forming, disk-dominated blue ones into gas-poor, quiescent, bulge-dominated red ones, E+A galaxies, which are in the intermediate phase, play an important role in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. E+A galaxies originate mainly from merging/interaction in low density regions , especially wet merging between gas-rich galaxies, but a few cluster-related physical mechanisms also play some role, such as ram pressure stripping star-forming gas by hightemperature and high-density intracluster media. Many physical parameters of E+A galaxies are between typical early-type and late type galaxies, or close to early-type, which suggest they will eventually evolve into elliptical galaxies. Although poor groups and field environment are

  8. Gas Dynamics and Outflow in the Barred Starburst Galaxy NGC 1808 Revealed with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Salak, Dragan; Hatakeyama, Takuya; Miyamoto, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    NGC 1808 is a nearby barred starburst galaxy with an outflow from the nuclear region. To study the inflow and outflow processes related to star formation and dynamical evolution of the galaxy, we have carried out \\(^{12}\\)CO (\\(J=1-0\\)) mapping observations of the central \\(r\\sim4\\) kpc of NGC 1808 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Four distinct components of molecular gas are revealed at high spatial resolution of 2\\arcsec (\\(\\sim100\\) pc): (1) a compact (\\(r<200\\) pc) circumnuclear disk (CND), (2) \\(r\\sim500\\) pc ring, (3) gas-rich galactic bar, and (4) spiral arms. Basic geometric and kinematic parameters are derived for the central 1-kpc region using tilted-ring modeling. The derived rotation curve reveals multiple mass components that include (1) a stellar bulge, (2) nuclear bar and molecular CND, and (3) unresolved massive (\\(\\sim10^7~M_\\sun\\)) core. Two systemic velocities, 998 km s\\(^{-1}\\) for the CND and 964 km s\\(^{-1}\\) for the 500-pc ring, are revealed, indicating ...

  9. Modelling CO emission from hydrodynamic simulations of nearby spirals, starbursting mergers, and high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, F; Weiss, A; Renaud, F; Mastropietro, C; Teyssier, R

    2014-01-01

    We model the intensity of emission lines from the CO molecule, based on hydrodynamic simulations of spirals, mergers, and high-redshift galaxies with very high resolutions (3pc and 10^3 Msun) and detailed models for the phase-space structure of the interstellar gas including shock heating, stellar feedback processes and galactic winds. The simulations are analyzed with a Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) model to compute the local emission in various molecular lines in each resolution element, radiation transfer and opacity effects, and the intensity emerging from galaxies, to generate synthetic spectra for various transitions of the CO molecule. This model reproduces the known properties of CO spectra and CO-to-H2 conversion factors in nearby spirals and starbursting major mergers. The high excitation of CO lines in mergers is dominated by an excess of high-density gas, and the high turbulent velocities and compression that create this dense gas excess result in broad linewidths and low CO intensity-to-H2 mass r...

  10. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A; Zandanel, F; Gomez, Mario E; Prada, F

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years, most of the attention in gamma-ray dark matter (DM) searches has been devoted to neutralino annihilations in nearby dwarf galaxies. However, massive galaxy clusters in the local Universe may constitute very good targets as well. The main aim of this work is to compare both dwarf galaxies and local galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters, and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman~1 appears as the best candidate in the sample and, given the morphology of its annihilation signal, it is also one of the objects more readily observable by IACTs. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the hi...

  11. UVES Abundances of Stars in Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Venn, Kim; Shetrone, Matt; Primas, Francesca; Hill, Vanessa; Kaufer, Andreas; Szeifert, Thomas

    2002-07-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a galaxy in possession of a good quantity of gas must want to form stars. It is the details of how and why that baffle us all. The simplest theories either would have this process a carefully self-regulated affair, or one that goes completely out of control and is capable of wrecking the galaxy which hosts it. Of course the majority of galaxies seem to amble along somewhere between these two extremes, and the mean properties tend to favour a quiescent self-regulated evolutionary scenario. But there area variety of observations which require us to invoke transitory ‘bursts’ of star-formation at one time or another in most galaxy types. Several nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies have clearly determined star-formation histories with apparent periods of zero star formation followed by periods of fairly active star formation. If we are able to understand what separated these bursts we would understand several important phenomena in galaxy evolution. Were these galaxies able to clear out their gas reservoir in a burst of star formation? How did this gas return? or did it? Have these galaxies receieved gas from the IGM instead? Could stars from these types of galaxy contribute significantly to the halo population in our Galaxy? To answer these questions we need to combine accurate stellar photometry and Colour-Magnitude Diagram interpretation with detailed metal abundances to combine a star-formation rate versus time with a range of element abundances with time. Different elements trace different evolutionary process (e.g., relative contributions of type I and II supernovae). We often aren't even sure of the abundance spread in these galaxies. We have collected detailed high resolution UVES spectra of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I & Carina) to begin to answer these questions. This is a precursor study to a more complete study with FLAMES. We presented at this meeting the initial results for

  12. The Evolution of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, E.; Koleva, M; Prugniel, P; Vauglin,

    2011-01-01

    Within the Local Universe galaxies can be studied in great detail star by star. The Colour-Magnitude Diagram synthesis analysis method is well established as the most accurate way to determine the detailed star formation history of galaxies going back to the earliest times. This approach has benefit

  13. Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Bruzual, GA; Charlot, S

    2010-01-01

    Within the Local Universe galaxies can be studied in great detail star by star. The Color-Magnitude Diagram synthesis analysis method is well established as the most accurate way to determine the detailed star formation history of galaxies going back to the earliest times. This approach received a s

  14. Gas, Stars and Star Formation in ALFALFA Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, S; Giovanelli, R; Brinchmann, J; Stierwalt, S; Neff, S G

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and HI components of 229 low HI mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with HI masses < 10^{7.7} M_sun and HI line widths < 80 km s^{-1}. SDSS data are combined with photometric properties derived from GALEX to derive stellar masses (M_*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs) and estimates of their SFRs and M_* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M_* < 10^8 M_sun is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of t...

  15. Spectral Analysis and Interpretation of the γ-Ray Emission from the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gast, H.; Gérard, L.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Göring, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hahn, J.; Hampf, D.; Harris, J.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Krayzel, F.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sheidaei, F.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    Very high energy (VHE; E >= 100 GeV) and high-energy (HE; 100 MeV <= E <= 100 GeV) data from γ-ray observations performed with the H.E.S.S. telescope array and the Fermi-LAT instrument, respectively, are analyzed in order to investigate the non-thermal processes in the starburst galaxy NGC 253. The VHE γ-ray data can be described by a power law in energy with differential photon index Γ = 2.14 ± 0.18stat ± 0.30sys and differential flux normalization at 1 TeV of F 0 = (9.6 ± 1.5stat(+ 5.7, -2.9)sys) × 10-14 TeV-1 cm-2 s-1. A power-law fit to the differential HE γ-ray spectrum reveals a photon index of Γ = 2.24 ± 0.14stat ± 0.03sys and an integral flux between 200 MeV and 200 GeV of F(0.2-200 GeV) = (4.9 ± 1.0stat ± 0.3sys) × 10-9 cm-2 s-1. No evidence for a spectral break or turnover is found over the dynamic range of both the LAT instrument and the H.E.S.S. experiment: a combined fit of a power law to the HE and VHE γ-ray data results in a differential photon index Γ = 2.34 ± 0.03 with a p-value of 30%. The γ-ray observations indicate that at least about 20% of the energy of the cosmic rays (CRs) capable of producing hadronic interactions is channeled into pion production. The smooth alignment between the spectra in the HE and VHE γ-ray domain suggests that the same transport processes dominate in the entire energy range. Advection is most likely responsible for charged particle removal from the starburst nucleus from GeV to multiple TeV energies. In a hadronic scenario for the γ-ray production, the single overall power-law spectrum observed would therefore correspond to the mean energy spectrum produced by the ensemble of CR sources in the starburst region. We dedicate this paper to the memory of our colleague Dalibor Nedbal, who died on 2012 May 15 at the age of 31. Dalibor was universally liked and respected as a scientist and colleague and will be greatly missed.

  16. The unexpected diversity of dwarf galaxy rotation curves

    CERN Document Server

    Oman, Kyle A; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S; Sawala, Till; White, Simon D M; Bower, Richard; Crain, Robert A; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We examine the circular velocity profiles of galaxies in {\\Lambda}CDM cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from the EAGLE and LOCAL GROUPS projects and compare them with a compilation of observed rotation curves of galaxies spanning a wide range in mass. The shape of the circular velocity profiles of simulated galaxies varies systematically as a function of galaxy mass, but shows remarkably little variation at fixed maximum circular velocity. This is especially true for low-mass dark matter-dominated systems, reflecting the expected similarity of the underlying cold dark matter haloes. This is at odds with observed dwarf galaxies, which show a large diversity of rotation curve shapes, even at fixed maximum rotation speed. Some dwarfs have rotation curves that agree well with simulations, others do not. The latter are systems where the inferred mass enclosed in the inner regions is much lower than expected for cold dark matter haloes and include many galaxies where previous work claims the presence of a con...

  17. Spatially Resolved Stellar Populations Of Nearby Post-Starburst Galaxies In SDSS-IV MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Charles; Betances, Ashley; Bonilla, Alaina Marie; Gonzalez, Andrea; Migliore, Christina; Goddard, Daniel; Masters, Karen; SDSS-IV MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    We have selected five galaxies in the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) project of the latest generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) identified as post-starburst (E+A) systems, in the transition between "blue cloud" and "red sequence" galaxies. We measure the equivalent widths of the Balmer series, D4000 break, and metal lines across each galaxy, and produce maps of the stellar age, stellar mass, and metallicities of each galaxy using FIREFLY, a full spectral analysis code. We have found that the measured properties of the galaxies overall generally matches well with single-aperture SDSS spectra from which the original post-starburst identifications were made. The variation in the spatial distributions of the stellar populations, in particular the A-stars, give us insight into the details of the transitional E+A quenching phase. This work was supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation via the SDSS-IV Faculty and Student Team (FAST) initiative, ARC Agreement No. SSP483 to the CUNY College of Staten Island.

  18. The distribution of alpha elements in Andromeda dwarf galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Luis C.; Geha, Marla C.; Tollerud, Erik J., E-mail: luis.vargas@yale.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    We present alpha to iron abundance ratios for 226 individual red giant branch stars in nine dwarf galaxies of the Andromeda (M31) satellite system. The abundances are measured from the combined signal of Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti lines in Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectra. This constitutes the first large sample of alpha abundance ratios measured in the M31 satellite system. The dwarf galaxies in our sample exhibit a variety of alpha abundance ratios, with the average values in each galaxy ranging from approximately solar ([α/Fe] ∼ + 0.0) to alpha-enhanced ([α/Fe] ∼ + 0.5). These variations do not show a correlation with internal kinematics, environment, or stellar density. We confirm radial gradients in the iron abundance of two galaxies out of the five with sufficient data (NGC 185 and And II). There is only tentative evidence for an alpha abundance radial gradient in NGC 185. We homogeneously compare our results to the Milky Way classical dwarf spheroidals, finding evidence for wider variation in average alpha abundance. In the absence of chemical abundances for the M31 stellar halo, we compare to the Milky Way stellar halo. A stellar halo comprised of disrupted M31 satellites is too metal-rich and inconsistent with the Milky Way halo alpha abundance distribution even if considering only satellites with predominantly old stellar populations. The M31 satellite population provides a second system in which to study chemical abundances of dwarf galaxies and reveals a wider variety of abundance patterns than the Milky Way.

  19. Constraints on the low-mass IMF in young super-star clusters in starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greissl, Julia Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    As evidence for variations in the initial mass function (IMF) in nearby star forming regions remains elusive we are forced to expand our search to more extreme regions of star formation. Starburst galaxies, which contain massive young clusters have in the past been reported to have IMFs different than that characterizing the field star IMF. In this thesis we use high signal-to-noise near-infrared spectra to place constraints on the shape of the IMF in extreme regions of extragalactic star formation and also try to understand the star formation history in these regions. Through high signal-to-noise near-infrared spectra it is possible to directly detect low-mass PMS stars in unresolved young super-star clusters, using absorption features that trace cool stars. Combining Starburst99 and available PMS tracks it is then possible to constrain the IMF in young super-star clusters using a combination of absorption lines each tracing different ranges of stellar masses and comparing observed spectra to models. Our technique can provide a direct test of the universality of the IMF compared to the Milky Way. We have obtained high signal-to-noise H- and K-band spectra of two young super-star clusters in the starburst galaxies NGC 4039/39 and NGC 253 in order to constrain the low-mass IMF and star formation history in the clusters. The cluster in NGC 4038/39 shows signs of youth such as thermal radio emission and strong hydrogen emission lines as well as late-type absorption lines indicative of cool stars. The strength and ratio of these absorption lines cannot be reproduced through either late-type pre-main sequence stars or red supergiants alone. We interpret the spectrum as a superposition of two star clusters of different ages over the physical region of 90 pc our spectrum represents. One cluster is young (≤ 3 Myr) and is responsible for part of the late-type absorption features, which are due to PMS stars in the cluster, and the hydrogen emission lines. The second

  20. Constraints on the presence of water megamaser emission in z~2.5 ultraluminous infrared starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wagg, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    We present Expanded Very Large Array and Arecibo observations of two lensed submm galaxies at z~2.5, in order to search for redshifted 22.235 GHz water megamaser emission. Both SMM J14011+0252 and SMM J16359+6612 have multi-wavelength characteristics consistent with ongoing starburst activity, as well as CO line emission indicating the presence of warm molecular gas. Our observations do not reveal any evidence for H2O megamaser emission in either target, while the lensing allows us to obtain deep limits to the H_2O line luminosities, L(H2O) < 7470 Lsun (3-sigma) in the case of SMM J14011+0252, and L(H2O) < 1893 Lsun for SMM J16359+6612, assuming linewidths of 80 km/s. Our search for, and subsequent non-detection of H2O megamaser emission in two strongly lensed starburst galaxies, rich in gas and dust, suggests that such megamaser emission is not likely to be common within the unlensed population of high-redshift starburst galaxies. We use the recent detection of strong H2O megamaser emission in the lens...

  1. The Mass Dependence of Dwarf Satellite Galaxy Quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Slater, Colin T

    2014-01-01

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic clouds. While almost all of the low mass ($M_\\star \\lesssim 10^7$ $M_\\odot$) dwarfs are quenched, at higher masses the quenched fraction decreases to approximately 40-50%. This change in the quenched fraction is large, and suggests a sudden change in the effectiveness of quenching that correlates with satellite mass. We combine this observation with models of satellite infall and ram pressure stripping to show that the low mass satellites must quench within 1-2 Gyr of pericenter passage to maintain a high quenched fraction, but that many more massive dwarfs must continue to form stars today even though they likely fell in to their host >5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to acco...

  2. K+a galaxies in the zCOSMOS Survey: Physical properties of systems in their post-starburst phase

    CERN Document Server

    Vergani, D; Lilly, S J; Lamareille, F; Halliday, C; Scodeggio, M; Vignali, C; Ciliegi, P; Bolzonella, M; Bondi, M; Kovac, K; Knobel, C; Zucca, E; Caputi, K; Pozzetti, L; Bardelli, S; Mignoli, M; Iovino, A; Carollo, C M; Contini, T; Kneib, J -P; Le Fèvre, O; Mainieri, V; Renzini, A; Bongiorno, A; Coppa, G; Cucciati, O; De la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Kampczyk, P; Le Borgne, J F; Le Brun, V; Maier, C; Pellò, R; Peng, Y; Montero, E Perez; Ricciardelli, E; Silverman, J D; Tanaka, M; Tasca, L; Tresse, L; Abbas, U; Bottini, D; Cappi, A; Cassata, P; Cimatti, A; Guzzo, L; Koekemoer, A M; Maccagni, A Leauthaud D; Marinoni, C; McCracken, H J; Memeo, P; Meneux, B; Oesch, P; Porciani, C; Scaramella, R; Capak, P; Sanders, D; Scoville, N; Taniguchi, Y

    2009-01-01

    The identities of the main processes triggering and quenching star-formation in galaxies remain unclear. A key stage in evolution, however, appears to be represented by post-starburst galaxies. To investigate their impact on galaxy evolution, we initiated a multiwavelength study of galaxies with k+a spectral features in the COSMOS field. We examine a mass-selected sample of k+a galaxies at z=0.48-1.2 using the spectroscopic zCOSMOS sample. K+a galaxies occupy the brightest tail of the luminosity distribution. They are as massive as quiescent galaxies and populate the green valley in the colour versus luminosity (or stellar mass) distribution. A small percentage (<8%) of these galaxies have radio and/or X-ray counterparts (implying an upper limit to the SFR of ~8Msun/yr). Over the entire redshift range explored, the class of k+a galaxies is morphologically a heterogeneous population with a similar incidence of bulge-dominated and disky galaxies. This distribution does not vary with the strength of the Hdelt...

  3. Dwarf galaxies in the dynamically evolved NGC 1407 Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentham, Neil; Tully, R. Brent; Mahdavi, Andisheh

    2006-07-01

    The NGC 1407 Group stands out among nearby structures by its properties that suggest it is massive and evolved. It shares properties with entities that have been called fossil groups: the 1.4m differential between the dominant elliptical galaxy and the second brightest galaxy comes close to satisfying the definition that has been used to define the fossil class. There are few intermediate-luminosity galaxies, but a large number of dwarfs in the group. We estimate there are 250 group members to the depth of our survey. The slope of the faint end of the luminosity function (reaching MR = -12) is α = -1.35. Velocities for 35 galaxies demonstrate that this group with one dominant galaxy has a mass of 7 × 1013Msolar and M/LR = 340Msolar/Lsolar. Two galaxies in close proximity to NGC 1407 have very large blueshifts. The most notable is the second brightest galaxy, NGC 1400, with a velocity of -1072 km s-1 with respect to the group mean. We report the detection of X-ray emission from this galaxy and from the group.

  4. Dwarf galaxies in the Dynamically Evolved NGC 1407 Group

    CERN Document Server

    Trentham, N; Tully, R B; Mahdavi, Andisheh; Trentham, Neil

    2006-01-01

    The NGC 1407 Group stands out among nearby structures by its properties that suggest it is massive and evolved. It shares properties with entities that have been called fossil groups: the 1.4 magnitude differential between the dominant elliptical galaxy and the second brightest galaxy comes close to satisfying the definition that has been used to define the fossil class. There are few intermediate luminosity galaxies, but a large number of dwarfs in the group. We estimate there are 250 group members to the depth of our survey. The slope of the faint end of the luminosity function (reaching M_R = -12) is alpha = -1.35. Velocities for 35 galaxies demonstrate that this group with one dominant galaxy has a mass of 7 X 10^13 M_sun and M/L_R = 340. Two galaxies in close proximity to NGC 1407 have very large blueshifts. The most notable is the second brightest galaxy, NGC 1400, with a velocity of -1072 km/s with respect to the group mean. We report the detection of X-ray emission from this galaxy and from the group.

  5. Dynamical mass modeling of dispersion-supported dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joseph

    The currently favored cold dark matter cosmology (LCDM) has had much success in reproducing the large scale structure of the universe. However, on smaller scales there are some possible discrepancies when attempting to match galactic observations with properties of halos in dissipationless LCDM simulations. One advantageous method to test small scale simulations with observations is through dynamical mass modeling of nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). The stellar tracers of dSphs are dispersion-supported, which poses a significant challenge in accurately deriving mass profiles. Unlike rotationally-supported galaxies, the dynamics of which can be well-approximated by one-dimensional physics, modeling dispersion-supported systems given only line-of-sight data results in a well-known degeneracy between the mass profile and the velocity dispersion anisotropy. The core of this dissertation is rooted in a new advancement which we have discovered: the range of solutions allowed by the mass-anisotropy degeneracy varies as a function of radius, with a considerable minimal near the deprojected half-light radius of almost all observed dispersion-supported galaxies. This finding allows for a wide range of applications in galaxy formation scenarios to be explored in an attempt to address, amongst other hypotheses, whether the LCDM framework needs to be modified in order to reproduce observations on the small scale. This thesis is comprised of both the derivation of this finding, and its applicability to all dispersion-supported systems, ranging from dwarfs galaxies consisting of a few hundred stars to systems of 'intracluster light', containing over a trillion stars. Rarely does one have the privilege of working with systems that span such a large range in luminosity (or any intrinsic property) in a short graduate career. Although the large applicability of this scale-free finding allows for discussion in many subfields, this thesis will mainly focus on one topic: dwarf

  6. Solo Dwarfs I: Survey introduction and first results for the Sagittarius Dwarf Irregular Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Higgs, C R; Irwin, M; Bate, N F; Lewis, G F; Walker, M G; Cote, P; Venn, K; Battaglia, G

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Solitary Local Dwarfs Survey (Solo), a wide field photometric study targeting every isolated dwarf galaxy within 3 Mpc of the Milky Way. Solo is based on (u)gi multi-band imaging from CFHT/MegaCam for northern targets, and Magellan/Megacam for southern targets. All galaxies fainter than Mv = -18 situated beyond the nominal virial radius of the Milky Way and M31 (>300 kpc) are included in this volume-limited sample, for a total of 42 targets. In addition to reviewing the survey goals and strategy, we present results for the Sagittarius Dwarf Irregular Galaxy (Sag DIG), one of the most isolated, low mass galaxies, located at the edge of the Local Group. We analyze its resolved stellar populations and their spatial distributions. We provide updated estimates of its central surface brightness and integrated luminosity, and trace its surface brightness profile to a level fainter than 30 mag./sq.arcsec. Sag DIG is well described by a highly elliptical (disk-like) system following a single component...

  7. Indirect dark matter detection for flattened dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jason L.; Evans, N. Wyn; Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Dehnen, Walter

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray experiments seeking to detect evidence of dark matter annihilation in dwarf spheroidal galaxies require knowledge of the distribution of dark matter within these systems. We analyze the effects of flattening on the annihilation (J) and decay (D) factors of dwarf spheroidal galaxies with both analytic and numerical methods. Flattening has two consequences: first, there is a geometric effect as the squeezing (or stretching) of the dark matter distribution enhances (or diminishes) the J-factor; second, the line of sight velocity dispersion of stars must hold up the flattened baryonic component in the flattened dark matter halo. We provide analytic formulas and a simple numerical approach to estimate the correction to the J- and D-factors required over simple spherical modeling. The formulas are validated with a series of equilibrium models of flattened stellar distributions embedded in flattened dark-matter distributions. We compute corrections to the J- and D-factors for the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies under the assumption that they are all prolate or all oblate and find that the hierarchy of J-factors for the dwarf spheroidals is slightly altered (typical correction factors for an ellipticity of 0.4 are 0.75 for the oblate case and 1.6 for the prolate case). We demonstrate that spherical estimates of the D-factors are very insensitive to the flattening and introduce uncertainties significantly less than the uncertainties in the D-factors from the other observables for all the dwarf spheroidals (for example, +10 per cent/-3 per cent for a typical ellipticity of 0.4). We conclude by investigating the spread in correction factors produced by triaxial figures and provide uncertainties in the J-factors for the dwarf spheroidals using different physically motivated assumptions for their intrinsic shape and axis alignments. We find that the uncertainty in the J-factors due to triaxiality increases with the observed ellipticity and, in general, introduces

  8. The far-infrared energy distributions of Seyfert and starburst galaxies in the Local Universe ISO photometry of the 12 micron active galaxy sample

    CERN Document Server

    Spinoglio, L; Malkan, M A; Spinoglio, Luigi; Andreani, Paola; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    New far-infrared photometry with ISOPHOT, onboard the Infrared Space Observatory, is presented for 58 galaxies with homogeneous published data for another 32 galaxies all belonging to the 12 micron galaxy sample. In total 29 Seyfert 1's, 35 Seyfert 2's and 12 starburst galaxies, about half of the 12 micron active galaxy sample, plus 14 normal galaxies for comparison. The ISO and the IRAS data are used to define color-color diagrams and spectral energy distributions (SED). Thermal dust emission at two temperatures (one cold at 15-30K and one warm at 50-70K) can fit the 60-200 micron SED, with a dust emissivity law proportional to the inverse square of the wavelength. Seyfert 1's and Seyfert 2's are indistinguishable longward of 100 micron, while, as already seen by IRAS, the former have flatter SEDs shortward of 60 micron. A mild anti-correlation is found between the [200 - 100] color and the "60 micron excess". We infer that this is due to the fact that galaxies with a strong starburst component, and thus a s...

  9. Dark Matter Identification with Gamma Rays from Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Perelstein, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    If the positron fraction and combined electron-positron flux excesses recently observed by PAMELA, FERMI and HESS are due to dark matter annihilation into lepton-rich final states, the accompanying final state radiation (FSR) photons may be detected by ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs). Satellite dwarf galaxies in the vicinity of the Milky Way are particularly promising targets for this search. We find that current and near-future ACTs have an excellent potential for discovering the FSR photons from dwarfs, although a discovery cannot be guaranteed due to large uncertainties in the fluxes resulting from lack of precise knowledge of dark matter distribution within the dwarfs. We also investigate the possibility of discriminating between different dark matter models based on the measured FSR photon spectrum. For typical parameters, we find that the ACTs can reliably distinguish models predicting dark matter annihilation into two-lepton final states from those favoring four-lepton final states...

  10. HST detection of spiral structure in two Coma Cluster dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, A W; Guzmán, R; Graham, Alister W.; Jerjen, Helmut; Guzman, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery of (stellar) spiral-like structure in Hubble Space Telescope images of two dwarf galaxies (GMP 3292 and GMP 3629) belonging to the Coma cluster. GMP 3629 is the faintest such galaxy detected in a cluster environment, and it is the first such galaxy observed in the dense Coma cluster. The large bulge and the faintness of the broad spiral-like pattern in GMP 3629 suggests that its disk may have been largely depleted. >We may therefore have found an example of the ``missing link'' in theories of galaxy evolution which have predicted that dwarf spiral galaxies, particularly in clusters, evolve into dwarf elliptical galaxies.

  11. Constraints on mass loss of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, S S; Brodie, J P

    2013-01-01

    The Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy is well known for its very high globular cluster specific frequency, SN=26. Furthermore, while the field star metallicity distribution peaks at [Fe/H]=-1, four of the five GCs have [Fe/H]<-2. Only about 5 percent of the field stars have such low metallicities. Hence, a very large fraction of about 1/5-1/4 of the most metal-poor stars belong to the four most metal-poor GCs. This implies that these clusters could, at most, have been a factor of 4-5 more massive initially. A second, even more extreme case may be the IKN dwarf galaxy where SN=124. Although metallicities are not accurately known, the GCs account for about 13 percent of the total V-band luminosity of IKN.

  12. The local Tully-Fisher relation for dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Karachentsev, Igor D; Kashibadze, Olga G

    2016-01-01

    We study different incarnations of the Tully-Fisher (TF) relation for the Local Volume (LV) galaxies taken from Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog. The UNGC sample contains 656 galaxies with $W_{50}$ HI-line-width estimates, mostly belonging to low mass dwarfs. Of them, 296 objects have distances measured with accuracy better than 10%. For the sample of 331 LV galaxies having baryonic masses $\\log M_{bar} > 5.8 \\log M_\\odot$ we obtain a relation $\\log M_{bar}= 2.49 \\log W_{50} + 3.97$ with observed scatter of 0.38 dex. The largest factors affecting the scatter are observational errors in $K$-band magnitudes and $W_{50}$ line widths for the tiny dwarfs, as well as uncertainty of their inclinations. We find that accounting for the surface brightness of the LV galaxies, or their gas fraction, or specific star formation rate, or the isolation index do not reduce essentially the observed scatter on the baryonic TF-diagram. We also notice that a sample of 71 dSph satellites of the Milky Way and M31 with known stellar ve...

  13. New dwarf galaxy candidates in the Centaurus group

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Oliver; Binggeli, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of the distribution and kinematics of the Milky Way and Andromeda satellite galaxy systems have confirmed the existence of coplanar, corotating structures of galaxies. In addition to the 'missing satellite problem', these structures pose a major challenge to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM scenario of structure formation. We complement the efforts made by the dwarf galaxy community to extend these studies to other nearby galaxy groups by systematically searching for faint, unresolved dwarf members with a low surface brightness in the Southern Centaurus group of galaxies. The aim is to determine whether these coplanar, corotating structures are a universal phenomenon. We imaged an area of 60 square degrees (0.3 Mpc$^2$) around the M83 subgroup with the wide-field Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope in $g$ and $r$ down to a limiting surface brightness of $\\mu_r\\approx 30$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$. Various image-filtering techniques were applied to the DECam data to enhance the visibili...

  14. Diagnostics of active galaxies - I. Modeling the infrared properties of dusty cores starburst galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loenen, A. F.; Baan, W. A.; Spaans, M.

    2006-01-01

    Aims. Despite extensive observations over the last decades, the central questions regarding the power source of the large IR luminosity of Ultra Luminous Infra Red Galaxies (ULIRGs), and their evolution, are still not fully answered. In this paper we will focus on massive star formation as a central

  15. Ultra-diffuse galaxies: the high-spin tail of the abundant dwarf galaxy population

    CERN Document Server

    Amorisco, N C

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of an abundant population of faint, low surface brightness (SB) galaxies, which appear to be numerous and ubiquitous in nearby galaxy clusters, including the Virgo, Coma and Fornax clusters. With median stellar masses of dwarf galaxies, these ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) have unexpectedly large sizes, corresponding to a mean SB of $24\\lesssim\\langle\\mu_e\\rangle_r\\ {\\rm mag}^{-1} {\\rm arcsec}^2\\lesssim27$ within the effective radius. We show that the UDG population represents the tail of galaxies formed in dwarf-sized haloes with higher-than-average angular momentum at collapse. By adopting the standard model of disk formation -- in which the size of galaxies is set by the spin of the halo -- we recover both the abundance of UDGs as a function of the host cluster mass and the distribution of sizes within the UDG population. According to this model, UDGs are not failed $L_*$ galaxies, but genuine dwarfs, and their low SB is not uniquely connected to the harsh clu...

  16. Dwarf galaxies: quantity and varietyÂ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellone, S. A.; Buzzoni, A.

    The structural properties and stellar populations of 79 low- and intermediate-luminosity galaxies in the NGC5044 Group are analized. The galaxies in the sample are re-classified into different morphological subgroups, with emphasis on the identification of objects showing a bulge+disk structure. The behaviour of their properties against their (projected) position within the group is addressed, looking for evidences for possible environmental effects. The observations were obtained at ESO (1999-2000) and CASLEO (1996-1999). Nearly 50% of the data presented here are new. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  17. Proceedings of the Bonn/Bochum-Graduiertenkolleg Workshop 'The Magellanic Clouds and Other Dwarf Galaxies'

    OpenAIRE

    Richtler, Tom; Braun, Jochen M.

    1998-01-01

    The Workshop 'The Magellanic Clouds and Other Dwarf Galaxies' was held at the Physikzentrum Bad Honnef in January 1998. The proceedings comprise 79 contributions. About 1/3 of the 352 pages contain the following Reviews: The Violent Interstellar Medium in Dwarf Galaxies: Atomic Gas (Elias Brinks and Fabian Walter), Hot Gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud (You-Hua Chu), Astrophysics of Dwarf Galaxies: Structures and Stellar Populations (John S. Gallagher), Star-forming regions and ionized gas in...

  18. Hyper Extremely Red Objects in the Subaru Deep Field Evidence for Primordial Elliptical Galaxies in the Dusty Starburst Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Totani, T; Iwamuro, F; Maihara, T; Motohara, K; Totani, Tomonori; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Maihara, Toshinori; Motohara, Kentaro

    2001-01-01

    We report observational analyses and theoretical interpretations of unusually red galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). A careful analysis of the SDF data revealed a population with unusually red near-infrared (NIR) colors of J - K >~ 3-4, with higher confidence than the previous SDF result. Their surface number density drastically increases at K >~ 22 and becomes roughly the same with that of dusty starburst galaxies detected by submillimeter observations in recent years. These colors are even redder than the known population of the extremely red objects (EROs), and too red to explain by passively evolving elliptical galaxies which are the largest population of EROs. Hence these hyper extremely red objects (HEROs) should be considered as a distinct population from EROs. We discuss several possible interpretations of these enigmatic objects, and we show that these red NIR colors, K-band and sub-mm flux, and surface number density are quantitatively best explained by primordial elliptical galaxies reddened ...

  19. VERITAS Deep Observations of the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Segue 1

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Decerprit, G; Dickherber, R; Dumm, J; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Ferrer, F; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lee, K; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Skole, C; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2012-01-01

    The VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes has carried out a deep observational program on the nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1. We report on the results of nearly 48 hours of good quality selected data, taken between January 2010 and May 2011. No significant $\\gamma$-ray emission is detected at the nominal position of Segue 1, and upper limits on the integrated flux are derived. According to recent studies, Segue 1 is the most dark matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal galaxy currently known. We derive stringent bounds on various annihilating and decaying dark matter particle models. The upper limits on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section are $\\mathrm{^{95% CL} \\lesssim 10^{-23} cm^{3} s^{-1}}$, improving our limits from previous observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies by at least a factor of two for dark matter particle masses $\\mathrm{m_{\\chi}\\gtrsim 300 GeV}$. The lower limits on the decay lifetime are at the level of $\\mathrm{\\tau^{95% CL} \\gtrsim 10^{24} s}$. Finally, we address the inte...

  20. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    CERN Document Server

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H; Muñoz, Roberto P; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W; Peng, Eric W; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range $0.7\\!\\lesssim\\! r_{\\rm eff}/{\\rm kpc}\\! \\lesssim\\! 1.5$ with luminosities of $-11.65\\!\\lesssim\\! M_U\\! \\lesssim\\! -9.42$ and $-12.79\\!\\lesssim\\! M_I\\! \\lesssim\\! -10.58$ mag, corresponding to a color range of $(U\\!-\\!I)_0\\!\\simeq\\!1.1\\!-\\!2.2$ mag and surface brightness levels of $\\mu_U\\!\\simeq\\!28.1\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$ and $\\mu_I\\!\\simeq\\!27.4\\,{\\rm mag/arcsec^2}$. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z$_\\odot$ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range $M_*|_{Z_\\odot} \\simeq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_*|_{0.02\\,Z_\\odot}\\!\\simeq\\!10^{6.3-8}\\,M_{\\odot}$. Three dwarfs are ol...

  1. Lyman alpha line formation in starbursting galaxies I. Moderately thick, dustless, and static HI media

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Lee, H M; Ahn, Sang-Hyeon; Lee, Hee-Won; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the Lyman alpha line transfer in nearby and high redshift starbursting galaxies, where the effect of high optical depths and the role of dust in the scattering medium are expected to be conspicuous and should be treated in a very careful manner. We present our first results in dustless, static, and uniform HI media with moderate optical depths \\tau_0=10^{3-7}, where \\tau_0 is the line center optical depth of Lyman alpha and temperatures T=10^{1-4}K using a Monte Carlo code. We investigate the basic physics of the line transfer and confirm the criterion of a\\tau_0>10^3 for the validity of diffusion approximation suggested by Neufeld in 1990, where $a$ is the Voigt parameter. Adopting the model suggested by Tenorio-Tagle et al. in 1999, we performed a detailed calculation on the Lyman alpha line formation for each evolutionary stage of an expanding supershell. The emergent Lyman alpha profiles are characterized by the double peaks and the absorption trough at the line center. It is found that the...

  2. A 2 mm spectral line survey of the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Martín, S; Henkel, C; Martín-Pintado, J; Mauersberger, R

    2006-01-01

    We present the first unbiased molecular line survey towards an extragalactic source, namely the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy NGC 253. The scan covers the frequency band from 129.1 to 175.2 GHz, i.e. most of the 2mm atmospheric window. We identify 111 spectral features as transitions from 25 different molecular species. Eight of which (three tentatively) are detected for the first time in the extragalactic interstellar medium. Among these newly detected species, we detected the rare isotopomers 34SO and HC18O+. Tentative detections of two deuterated species, DNC and N2D+, are reported for the first time from a target beyond the Magellanic Clouds. Additionally, three hydrogen recombination lines are identified, while no organic molecules larger than methanol are detected. Column densities and rotation temperatures are calculated for all the species, including an upper limit to the ethanol abundance. A comparison of the chemical composition of the nuclear environment of NGC 253 with those of selected n...

  3. ROSAT PSPC and HRI observations of the composite starburst/Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1672

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N; Iwasawa, K

    1996-01-01

    The nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672 is thought to have a weak Seyfert nucleus in addition to its strong starburst activity. Observations with the PSPC and HRI instruments on board the ROSAT X-ray satellite show that three X-ray sources with luminosities (1--2)\\times 10^{40} erg/s are clearly identified with NGC 1672. The strongest X-ray source lies at the nucleus, and the other two lie near the ends of the prominent bar, locations that are also bright in H-alpha and near-infrared images. The nuclear source is resolved by the HRI on about the scale of the recently identified nuclear ring, and one of the sources at the ends of the bar is also probably resolved. The X-ray spectrum of the nuclear source is quite soft, having a Raymond--Smith plasma temperature of about 0.7 keV and little evidence for intrinsic absorption. The ROSAT band X-ray flux of the nuclear source appears to be dominated not by X-ray binary emission but rather by diffuse gas emission. While the properties of the nuclear source are gener...

  4. The Diffuse and Compact X-ray Components of the Starburst Galaxy Henize~2-10

    CERN Document Server

    Kobulnicky, Henry A

    2010-01-01

    Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 reveals a strong nuclear point source and at least two fainter compact sources embedded within a more luminous diffuse thermal component. Spectral fits to the nuclear X-ray source imply an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L_x >10^40 erg/s for reasonable power law or blackbody models, consistent with accretion onto a >50 solar mass black hole behind a foreground absorbing column of N_H>10^23 /cm^2. Two of these point sources have L_x=2-5 x 10^38 erg/s, comparable to luminous X-ray binaries. These compact sources constitute a small fraction (<16%) of the total X-ray flux from He~2-10 in the 0.3--6.0 keV band and just 31% of the X-rays in the hard 1.1--6.0 keV band which is dominated by diffuse emission. Two-temperature solar-composition plasmas (kT~0.2 keV and kT~0.7 keV) fit the diffuse X-ray component as well as single-temperature plasmas with enhanced alpha/Fe ratios. Since the observed radial gradient of the X-ray surface brightness closel...

  5. Hubble Space Telescope ACS mosaic of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82

    CERN Document Server

    Mutchler, M; Christian, C A; Frattare, L M; Hamilton, F; Januszewski, W; Levay, Z G; Mountain, M; Noll, K S; Royle, P; Gallagher, J S; Puxley, P

    2006-01-01

    In March 2006, the Hubble Heritage Team obtained a large four-filter (B, V, I, and H-alpha) six-point mosaic dataset of the prototypical starburst galaxy NGC 3034 (M82), with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The resulting color composite Heritage image was released in April 2006, to celebrate Hubble's 16th anniversary. Cycle 15 HST proposers were encouraged to submit General Observer and Archival Research proposals to complement or analyze this unique dataset. Since our M82 mosaics represent a significant investment of expert processing beyond the standard archival products, we will also release our drizzle combined FITS data as a High Level Science Product via the Multimission Archive at STScI (MAST) on December 31, 2006. This paper documents the key aspects of the observing program and image processing: calibration, image registration and combination (drizzling), and the rejection of cosmic rays and detector artifacts. Our processed FITS mosaics and related inf...

  6. First Detection of A Sub-kpc Scale Molecular Outflow in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 3628

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, An-Li; Kong, Albert K H; Matsumoto, Hironori; Kohno, Kotaro

    2012-01-01

    We successfully detected a molecular outflow with a scale of 370-450 pc in the central region of the starburst galaxy NGC 3628 through deep CO(1-0) observations by using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array (NMA). The mass of the outflowing molecular gas is ~2.8x10^7 M_sun, and the outflow velocity is ~90(+/-10) km s^{-1}. The expansion timescale of the outflow is 3.3-6.8 Myr, and the molecular gas mass flow rate is 4.1-8.5 M_sun yr^{-1}. It requires mechanical energy of (1.8-2.8)x10^{54} erg to create this sub-kpc scale molecular outflow. In order to understand the evolution of the molecular outflow, we compare the physical properties between the molecular outflow observed from our NMA CO(1-0) data and the plasma gas from the soft X-ray emission of the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) archival data. We found that the distribution between the molecular outflow and the strong plasma outflow seems to be in a similar region. In this region, the ram pressure and the thermal pressure of the plasma outflow are 10^{-(8-10)}...

  7. A New Empirical Method to Infer the Starburst History of the Universe from Local Galaxy Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2009-01-01

    The centers of bulges are formed dissipationally via gas inflows over short timescales: the 'starburst' mode of star formation (SF). Recent work has shown that detailed observations can be used to separate the stellar mass profile of these 'burst relic' components in local systems. Together with the assumption that some Kennicutt-Schmidt law holds, and that the burst was indeed a dissipational gas-rich event, we show that the observed profiles can be inverted to obtain the time and space-dependent SF history of each burst. Performing this with a large sample of well-studied spheroids, we show that the implied bursts scale in magnitude, mass, peak SFR, and spatial extent with galaxy mass in simple manner, and provide fits to these correlations. Burst masses are ~10% the total spheroid mass; timescales a mass-independent ~10^8 yr; peak SFR ~M_burst/t_burst; and they decay in power-law fashion ~t^-2.4. Sizes are ~0.1 R_e(spheroid), but grow with time. Combined with measurements of the nuclear stellar population ...

  8. Gas Dynamics and Outflow in the Barred Starburst Galaxy NGC 1808 Revealed with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salak, Dragan; Nakai, Naomasa; Hatakeyama, Takuya; Miyamoto, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    NGC 1808 is a nearby barred starburst galaxy with an outflow from the nuclear region. To study the inflow and outflow processes related to star formation and dynamical evolution of the galaxy, we have carried out 12CO (J=1-0) mapping observations of the central r ˜ 4 kpc of NGC 1808 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Four distinct components of molecular gas are revealed at high spatial resolution of 2″ (˜100 pc): (1) a compact (r CND), (2) r ˜ 500 pc ring, (3) gas-rich galactic bar, and (4) spiral arms. Basic geometric and kinematic parameters are derived for the central 1 kpc region using tilted-ring modeling. The derived rotation curve reveals multiple mass components that include (1) a stellar bulge, (2) a nuclear bar and molecular CND, and (3) an unresolved massive (˜107 M ⊙) core. Two systemic velocities, 998 km s-1 for the CND and 964 km s-1 for the 500 pc ring, are revealed, indicating a kinematic offset. The pattern speed of the primary bar, derived by using a cloud-orbit model, is 56 ± 11 km s-1 kpc-1. Noncircular motions are detected associated with a nuclear spiral pattern and outflow in the central 1 kpc region. The ratio of the mass outflow rate to the star formation rate is {\\dot{M}}{out}/{SFR}˜ 0.2 in the case of optically thin CO (1-0) emission in the outflow, suggesting low efficiency of star formation quenching.

  9. Dwarf Galaxies, MOND, and Relativistic Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Kosowsky

    2010-01-01

    Certain limits of these theories can also give the accelerating expansion of the Universe. The standard dark matter cosmology boasts numerous manifest triumphs; however, alternatives should also be pursued as long as outstanding observational issues remain unresolved, including the empirical successes of MOND on galaxy scales and the phenomenology of dark energy.

  10. Relationship between star formation rate and black hole accretion at z=3: the different contributions in quiescent, normal, and starburst galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodighiero, G.; Franceschini, A.; Baronchelli, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Universita’ di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 3, I-35122 (Italy); Brusa, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Pozzi, F.; Cimatti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Daddi, E.; Strazzullo, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d’Astrophysique, Bât.709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Negrello, M.; Renzini, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Mullaney, J. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Lutz, D. [Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Gruppioni, C. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127, Bologna (Italy); Silverman, J., E-mail: giulia.rodighiero@unipd.it [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-02-10

    We investigate the co-evolution of the black hole accretion rate (BHAR) and the star formation rate (SFR) in 1.5galaxies displaying a greater diversity of star-forming properties compared to previous studies. We combine X-ray stacking and far-IR photometry of stellar mass-limited samples of normal star-forming, starburst, and quiescent/quenched galaxies in the COSMOS field. We corroborate the existence of a strong correlation between BHAR (i.e., the X-ray luminosity, L{sub X}) and stellar mass (M{sub *}) for normal star-forming galaxies, though we find a steeper relation than previously reported. We find that starbursts show a factor of three enhancement in BHAR compared to normal SF galaxies (against a factor of six excess in SFR), while quiescents show a deficit of a factor times 5.5 at a given mass. One possible interpretation of this is that the starburst phase does not coincide with cosmologically relevant BH growth, or that starburst-inducing mergers are more efficient at boosting SFR than BHAR. Contrary to studies based on smaller samples, we find that the BHAR/SFR ratio of main-sequence (MS) galaxies is not mass invariant, but scales weakly as M{sub ∗}{sup 0.43±0.09}, implying faster BH growth in more massive galaxies at z∼2. Furthermore, BHAR/SFR during the starburst is a factor of two lower than in MS galaxies, at odds with the predictions of hydrodynamical simulations of merger galaxies that foresee a sudden enhancement of L{sub X}/SFR during the merger. Finally, we estimate that the bulk of the accretion density of the universe at z∼2 is associated with normal star-forming systems, with only ∼6(±1)% and ∼11(±1)% associated with starburst and quiescent galaxies, respectively.

  11. Transformation of a Virgo Cluster Dwarf Irregular Galaxy by Ram Pressure Stripping: IC3418 and its Fireballs

    CERN Document Server

    Kenney, Jeffrey D P; Jachym, Pavel; Crowl, Hugh H; Dague, William; Chung, Aeree; van Gorkom, Jacqueline; Vollmer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    We present optical imaging and spectroscopy and HI imaging of the Virgo Cluster galaxy IC 3418, which is likely a "smoking gun" example of the transformation of a dwarf irregular into a dwarf elliptical galaxy by ram pressure stripping. IC 3418 has a spectacular 17 kpc length UV-bright tail comprised of knots, head-tail, and linear stellar features. The only H-alpha emission arises from a few HII regions in the tail, the brightest of which are at the heads of head-tail UV sources whose tails point toward the galaxy ("fireballs"). Several of the elongated tail sources have H-alpha peaks outwardly offset by 80-150 pc from the UV peaks, suggesting that gas clumps continue to accelerate through ram pressure, leaving behind streams of newly formed stars which have decoupled from the gas. Absorption line strengths, measured from Keck DEIMOS spectra, together with UV colors, show star formation stopped 300+/-100 Myr ago in the main body, and a strong starburst occurred prior to quenching. While neither H-alpha nor H...

  12. H2 Energetics in Galaxy-wide Shocks: Insights in Starburst Triggering and Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Guillard, P

    2008-01-01

    Spitzer space telescope observations led to the surprising detection of a diverse set of extragalactic sources whose infrared spectra are dominated by line emission of molecular hydrogen (H2). The absence or relative weakness of typical signs of star formation (like dust features, lines of ionized gas) suggest the presence of large quantities of H2 gas with no (or very little) associated star formation. We use the Stephan's Quintet (SQ) galaxy collision to define a physical framework to describe the H2 formation and emission in galaxy-wide shocks. SQ observations show that exceptionally turbulent H2 gas is coexisting with a hot, X-ray emitting plasma. The extreme mid-IR H2 emission from the shock exceeds that of the X-rays. These observations set a new light on the contribution of H2 to the cooling of the interstellar medium, on the relation between molecular gas and star formation, and on the energetics of galaxy formation. These observations can be interpreted by considering that the shock is moving through...

  13. Modeling IR Spectral Energy Distributions: A Pilot Study of Starburst Parameters and Silicate Absorption Curves for Some GOALS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, Michael A; Kewley, Lisa J; Rich, Jeff A; Sanders, Dave; Appleton, Phillip N; Chan, Ben H P; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Evans, Aaron S; Frayer, David T; Howell, Justin H; Inami, Hanae; Mazzarella, Joseph A; Petric, Andreea; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Surace, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study into the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting and the derivation of physical parameters for 19 galaxies observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) survey as observed with the \\emph{Spitzer Space Telescope}. For this we have used the pan-spectral fitting tools developed in a series of papers by Dopita and his co-workers. We show that the standard Lee and Draine `astronomical silicate' model cannot provide a good fit to the silicate absorption features as observed in the heavily dust-extinguished ($A_{\\rm V} \\sim 50$mag.) starbursts. We have derived an empirical fit to the `starburst silicate' absorption in these objects. This absorption curve is consistent with the silicate grains being systematically larger in starburst environments than in the local Galactic interstellar medium. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the SED fitting to each of the fitted parameters, and derive these parameters for those galaxies which do not have an embedded AG...

  14. Booms and Busts: the Burstiness of Star Formation in Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    In this review I summarise recent advances in our understanding of the importance of starburst events to the evolutionary histories of nearby galaxies. Ongoing bursts are easily diagnosed in emission-line surveys, but assessing the timing and intensity of fossil bursts requires more effort, usually demanding color-magnitude diagrams or spectroscopy of individual stars. For ages older than ~1 Gyr, this type of observation is currently limited to the Local Group and its immediate surroundings. However, if the Local Volume is representative of the Universe as a whole, then studies of the age and metallicity distributions of star clusters and resolved stellar populations should give statistical clues as to the frequency and importance of bursts to the histories of galaxies in general. Based on starburst statistics in the literature and synthetic colour-magnitude diagram studies of Local Group galaxies, I attempt to distinguish between systemic starbursts that strongly impact galaxy evolution and stochastic bursts...

  15. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Coral Rose

    2016-06-01

    The high dark matter content and the shallow potential wells of low mass galaxies (10^3 Msun 10 Gyr), having had their star formation shut down by reionization. Additionally, we show that the kinematics and ellipticities of isolated simulated dwarf centrals are consistent with observed dSphs satellites without the need for harassment from a massive host. We further show that most (but not all) observed *isolated* dIrrs in the Local Volume also have dispersion-supported stellar populations, contradicting the previous view that these objects are rotating. Finally, we investigate the stellar age gradients in dwarfs — showing that early mergers and strong feedback can create an inverted gradient, with the older stars occupying larger galactocentric radii.These results offer an interesting direction in testing models that attempt to solve dark matter problems via explosive feedback episodes. Can the same models that create large cores in simulated dwarfs preserve the mild stellar rotation that is seen in a minority of isolated dIrrs? Can the bursty star formation that created a dark matter core also match observed stellar gradients in low mass galaxies? Comparisons between our simulations and observed dwarfs should provide an important benchmark for this question going forward.

  16. HI Gas in Disk and Dwarf Galaxies in the Semi-analytic Models of Galaxy Formation†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Wang, Jing; Luo, Yu

    We construct the radially-resolved semi-analytic models of galaxy formation based on the L-Galaxies model framework, which include both atomic and molecular gas phase in ISM. The models run on the halo outputs of ΛCDM cosmology N-body simulation. Our models can reproduce varies observations of HI gas in nearby galaxies, e.g. the HI mass function, the HI-to-star ratio vs stellar mass and stellar surface density, universal HI radial surface density profile in outer disks etc. We also give the physical origin of HI size-mass relation. Based on our model results for local dwarf galaxies, we show that the ``missing satellite problem'' also exists in the HI component, i.e., the models over-predict dwarf galaxies with low HI mass around the Milky Way. That is a shortcoming of current ΛCDM cosmology framework. Future survey for HI gas in local dwarf galaxies (e.g. MeerKAT, SKA & FAST) can help to verify the nature of dark matter (cold or warm).

  17. A vast, thin plane of corotating dwarf galaxies orbiting the Andromeda galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A; Lewis, Geraint F; Conn, Anthony R; Irwin, Michael J; McConnachie, Alan W; Chapman, Scott C; Collins, Michelle L; Fardal, Mark; Ferguson, Annette M N; Ibata, Neil G; Mackey, A Dougal; Martin, Nicolas F; Navarro, Julio; Rich, R Michael; Valls-Gabaud, David; Widrow, Lawrence M

    2013-01-03

    Dwarf satellite galaxies are thought to be the remnants of the population of primordial structures that coalesced to form giant galaxies like the Milky Way. It has previously been suspected that dwarf galaxies may not be isotropically distributed around our Galaxy, because several are correlated with streams of H I emission, and may form coplanar groups. These suspicions are supported by recent analyses. It has been claimed that the apparently planar distribution of satellites is not predicted within standard cosmology, and cannot simply represent a memory of past coherent accretion. However, other studies dispute this conclusion. Here we report the existence of a planar subgroup of satellites in the Andromeda galaxy (M 31), comprising about half of the population. The structure is at least 400 kiloparsecs in diameter, but also extremely thin, with a perpendicular scatter of less than 14.1 kiloparsecs. Radial velocity measurements reveal that the satellites in this structure have the same sense of rotation about their host. This shows conclusively that substantial numbers of dwarf satellite galaxies share the same dynamical orbital properties and direction of angular momentum. Intriguingly, the plane we identify is approximately aligned with the pole of the Milky Way's disk and with the vector between the Milky Way and Andromeda.

  18. Andromeda IV, a solitary gas-rich dwarf galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Karachentsev, I D; Tully, R B; Makarova, L N; Sharina, M E; Begum, A; Rizzi, L

    2015-01-01

    Observations are presented of the isolated dwarf irregular galaxy And IV made with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope in the 21 cm HI line. We determine the galaxy distance of $7.17\\pm0.31$ Mpc using the Tip of Red Giant Branch method. The galaxy has a total blue absolute magnitude of -12.81 mag, linear Holmberg diameter of 1.88 kpc and an HI-disk extending to 8.4 times the optical Holmberg radius. The HI mass-to-blue luminosity ratio for And IV amounts $12.9~M_{\\odot}/L_{\\odot}$. From the GMRT data we derive the rotation curve for the HI and fit it with different mass models. We find that the data are significantly better fit with an iso-thermal dark matter halo, than by an NFW halo. We also find that MOND rotation curve provides a very poor fit to the data. The fact that the iso-thermal dark matter halo provides the best fit to the data supports models in which star formation feedback results in the formation of a dark matter core in dwarf galaxies...

  19. The universal rotation curve of dwarf disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Karukes, Ekaterina V

    2016-01-01

    We use the concept of the spiral rotation curves universality (see Parsic et al. 1996) to investigate the luminous and dark matter properties of the dwarf disk galaxies in the local volume (size $\\sim11$ Mpc). Our sample includes 36 objects with rotation curves carefully selected from the literature. We find that, despite the large variations of our sample in luminosities ($\\sim$ 2 of dex), the rotation curves in specifically normalized units, look all alike and lead to the lower-mass version of the universal rotation curve of spiral galaxies found in Parsic et al. 1996. We mass model $V(R/R_{opt})/V_{opt}$, the double normalized universal rotation curve of dwarf disk galaxies: the results show that these systems are totally dominated by dark matter whose density shows a core size between 2 and 3 stellar disk scale lengths. Similar to galaxies of different Hubble types and luminosities, the core radius $r_0$ and the central density $\\rho_0$ of the dark matter halo of these objects are related by $ \\rho_0 r_0 ...

  20. Structure and Kinematics of the Nearby Dwarf Galaxy UGCA 105

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Philip; Gentile, Gianfranco; Oh, Se-Heon; Schuberth, Ylva; Bekhti, Nadya Ben; Winkel, Benjamin; Klein, Uli

    2013-01-01

    Owing to their shallow stellar potential, dwarf galaxies possess thick gas disks, which makes them good candidates for studies of the galactic vertical kinematical structure. We present 21 cm line observations of the isolated nearby dwarf irregular galaxy UGCA 105, taken with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), and analyse the geometry of its neutral hydrogen (HI) disk and its kinematics. The galaxy shows a fragmented HI distribution. It is more extended than the optical disk, and hence allows one to determine its kinematics out to very large galacto-centric distances. The HI kinematics and morphology are well-ordered and symmetric for an irregular galaxy. The HI is sufficiently extended to observe a substantial amount of differential rotation. Moreover, UGCA 105 shows strong signatures for the presence of a kinematically anomalous gas component. Performing tilted-ring modelling by use of the least-squares fitting routine TiRiFiC, we found that the HI disk of UGCA 105 has a moderately warped and ...

  1. Structural analysis of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present wide-field g- and i-band stellar photometry of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its surrounding area out to four times its half-light radius (rh = 695 pc), based on images obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO. We find clear evidence of stellar substructure associated with the galaxy, extending to a distance of 82 arcmin (2 kpc) from its centre. We perform a statistical analysis of the overdensities and find three distinct features, as well as an extended halo-like structure, to be significant at the 99.7 per cent confidence level or higher. Unlike the extremely elongated and extended substructures surrounding the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the overdensities seen around Sextans are distributed evenly about its centre, and do not appear to form noticeable tidal tails. Fitting a King model to the radial distribution of Sextans stars yields a tidal radius rt = 83.2 arcmin ± 7.1 arcmin (2.08 ± 0.18 kpc), which implies the majority of detected substructure is gravitationally bound to the galaxy. This finding suggests that Sextans is not undergoing significant tidal disruption from the Milky Way, supporting the scenario in which the orbit of Sextans has a low eccentricity.

  2. How Typical Are The Local Group Dwarf Galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Weisz, Daniel R; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Skillman, Evan D; Holtzman, Jon; Williams, Benjamin F; Gilbert, Karoline M; Seth, Anil C; Cole, Andrew; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Rosema, Keith; Karachentsev, Igor D; McQuinn, Kristen B W; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    We compare the star formation histories (SFHs) of Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies with those in the volume-limited ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) sample (D~4Mpc). The SFHs were derived in a uniform manner from high quality optical color-magnitude diagrams constructed from HST imaging. The mean cumulative SFHs of the LG and ANGST dwarf galaxies are all very similar for the three different morphological types (dSph/dE, dI, dI/dSph). The star formation rates (SFRs) at earliest times are measurably higher than the average lifetime SFRs, while SFRs are lower at later times. We find that the systematic uncertainties, due to varying photometric depths and uncertainties in the stellar models, are similar to any differences between the mean cumulative SFHs of the LG and ANGST samples, indicating consistency between the samples. As for the ANGST galaxies alone, we find the combined LG and ANGST samples, are generally consistent with the cosmic SFH and that the mean cumulative SFHs are not well described by s...

  3. Comparison of Alternative Gravity Models in Dwarf Galaxy Rotation Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Justin; Saintable, Taylor; O'Brien, James

    2017-01-01

    Galactic rotation curves have proven to be the testing ground for dark matter bounds in spiral galaxies of all morphologies. Dwarf Galaxies serve as an increasingly interesting testing ground of rotation curve dynamics due to their increased stellar formation and typically rising rotation curve. These galaxies usually are not dominated by typical stellar structure and mostly terminate at small radial distances. This, coupled with the fact that Cold Dark Matter theories such as NFW (∧ CDM) struggle with the universality of galactic rotation curves, allow for exclusive features of alternative gravitational models to be analyzed. Here, we present a thorough application of alternative gravitational models (conformal gravity and MOND) to a 2010 dwarf galaxy sample from Swaters et al. An analysis and discussion of the results of the fitting procedure of the two alternative gravitational models are explored. We posit here that both the Conformal Gravity and MOND can provide an accurate description of the galactic dynamics without the need for copious dark matter.

  4. EXPLORING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIA OF OPTICALLY COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Most, Hans P.; Cannon, John M.; Engstrom, Eric; Fliss, Palmer [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Salzer, John J. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Rosenberg, Jessica L., E-mail: hmost@macalester.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: jrosenb4@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We present new Very Large Array H I spectral line, archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and archival Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of eight star-forming blue compact dwarf galaxies that were selected to be optically compact (optical radii <1 kpc). These systems have faint blue absolute magnitudes (M{sub B} {approx}> -17), ongoing star formation (based on emission-line selection by the H{alpha} or [O III] lines), and are nearby (mean velocity = 3315 km s{sup -1} {approx_equal} 45 Mpc). One galaxy in the sample, ADBS 113845+2008, is found to have an H I halo that extends 58 r-band scale lengths from its stellar body. In contrast, the rest of the sample galaxies have H I radii to optical-scale-length ratios ranging from 9.3 to 26. The size of the H I disk in the 'giant disk' dwarf galaxy ADBS 113845+2008 appears to be unusual as compared with similarly compact stellar populations.

  5. Another intermediate mass black hole in a starburst galaxy? The luminous X-ray source in NGC 3628 reappears

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, D K; Heckman, T M; Weaver, K A; Dahlem, M; Stevens, I R

    2001-01-01

    In a 52 ks-long Chandra ACIS-S observation of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 3628, obtained to study the starburst-driven outflow from this galaxy, we have detected a very luminous (L_X = 1.1e40 erg/s in the 0.3-8.0 keV energy band) point source located at least 20 arcsec (~970 pc) from the nucleus of the galaxy. No radio, optical or near-IR counterpart to this source has been found. This is most probably the reappearance of the strongly-variable X-ray-luminous source discovered by Dahlem et al (1995), which faded by a factor >27 between December 1991 and March 1994 (at which point it had faded below the detection limit in a ROSAT HRI observation). This source is clearly a member of an enigmatic class of X-ray sources that are considerably more luminous than conventional X-ray binaries but less luminous than AGN, and which are not found at the dynamical center of the host galaxy. The Chandra spectrum is best-fit by an absorbed power law model with a photon index of Gamma = 1.8+/-0.2, similar to that seen in ...

  6. The nature of dusty starburst galaxies in a rich cluster at z=0.4: the progenitors of lenticulars?

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, J E; Moran, Sean M; Treu, Tommaso; Ellis, Richard S

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) survey of 24um-selected luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L_IR > 10^11 L_sun) in the rich cluster Cl0024+16 at z=0.4. Optically, these LIRGs resemble unremarkable spiral galaxies with e(a)/e(c) spectral classifications and [Oii]-derived star formation rates (SFRs) of <2 M_sun/yr, generally indistinguishable from the 'quiescent' star forming population in the cluster. Our IRS spectra show that the majority of the 24um-detected galaxies exhibit polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission with implied SFRs ~30-60 M_sun/yr, with only one (<10%) of the sample displaying unambiguous evidence of an active galactic nucleus in the mid-infrared. This confirms the presence of a large population of obscured starburst galaxies in distant clusters, which comprise the bulk of the star formation occurring in these environments at z~0.5. We suggest that, although several mechanisms could be at play, these dusty starbursts could be the signature of an im...

  7. Chemical Abundance Patterns and the Early Environment of Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Corlies, Lauren; Tumlinson, Jason; Bryan, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that abundance pattern differences exist between low metallicity stars in the Milky Way stellar halo and those in the dwarf satellite galaxies. This paper takes a first look at what role the early environment for pre-galactic star formation might have played in shaping these stellar populations. In particular, we consider whether differences in cross-pollution between the progenitors of the stellar halo and the satellites could help to explain the differences in abundance patterns. Using an N-body simulation, we find that the progenitor halos of the main halo are primarily clustered together at z=10 while the progenitors of the satellite galaxies remain on the outskirts of this cluster. Next, analytically modeled supernova-driven winds show that main halo progenitors cross-pollute each other more effectively while satellite galaxy progenitors remain more isolated. Thus, inhomogeneous cross-pollution as a result of different high-z spatial locations of each system's progenitors can ...

  8. VLT/UVES abundances in four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies. II. Implications for understanding galaxy evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstoy, E; Venn, KA; Shetrone, M; Primas, F; Hill, [No Value; Kaufer, A; Szeifert, T

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Ultraviolet Visual-Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on Kueyen (UT2) of the Very Large Telescope to take spectra of 15 individual red giant stars in the centers of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph's) : Sculptor, Fornax, Carina, and Leo I. We measure the abundance variations of

  9. Indirect Dark Matter Detection for Flattened Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Jason L; Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Dehnen, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the effects of flattening on the annihilation (J) and decay (D) factors of dwarf spheroidal galaxies with both analytic and numerical methods. Flattening has two consequences: first, there is a geometric effect as the squeezing (or stretching) of the dark matter distribution enhances (or diminishes) the J-factor; second, the line of sight velocity dispersion of stars must hold up the flattened baryonic component in the flattened dark matter halo. We provide analytic formulae and a simple numerical approach to estimate the correction to the J- and D-factors required over simple spherical modeling. The formulae are validated with a series of equilibrium models of flattened stellar distributions embedded in flattened dark-matter distributions. We compute corrections to the J- and D-factors for the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies under the assumption that they are prolate or oblate and find that the hierarchy of J-factors for the dwarf spheroidals is slightly altered. We demonstrate that spherical ...

  10. Star and Dust Formation Activities in AzTEC-3: A Starburst Galaxy at z equals 5.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of of high-redshift ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies traditionally use the observed optical to submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) and estimates of the dynamical mass as observational constraints to derive the star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass, and age of these objects. In this lecture we add this constraint to the analysis of AzTEC-3, a starburst galaxy at z=5.3. We construct different stellar and chemical evolutionary scenarios, constrained to produce the inferred dust mass and observed luminosity before the associated stellar mass exceeds the observational limit. A robust result of our models is that all scenarios require most of the radiating dust mass to have been accreted in molecular clouds. Our new procedure highlights the importance of a multi wavelength approach, and of the use of dust evolution models in constraining the age and the star formation activity and history in galaxies.

  11. Star Dust Formation Activities in AzTEC-3: A Starburst Galaxy at z=5.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of of high-redshift ultraluminous infrared OR) galaxies traditionally use the observed optical to submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) and estimates of the dynamical mass as observational constraints to derive the star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass, and age of these objects. In this lecture we add this constraint to the analysis of AzTEC-3, a starburst galaxy at z=5.3. We construct different stellar and chemical evolutionary scenarios, constrained to produce the inferred dust mass and observed luminosity before the associated stellar mass exceeds the observational limit. A robust result of our models is that all scenarios require most of the radiating dust mass to have been accreted in molecular clouds. Our new procedure highlights the importance of a multi wavelength approach, and of the use of dust evolution models in constraining the age and the star formation activity and history in galaxies.

  12. Star and Dust Formation Activities in AzTEC-3: A Starburst Galaxy at z=5.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of of high-redshift ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies traditionally use the observed optical to submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) and estimates of the dynamical mass as observational constraints to derive the star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass, and age of these objects. In this lecture we add this constraint to the analysis of AzTEC-3, a starburst galaxy at z=5.3. We construct different stellar and chemical evolutionary scenarios, constrained to produce the inferred dust mass and observed luminosity before the associated stellar mass exceeds the observational limit. A robust result of our models is that all scenarios require most of the radiating dust mass to have been accreted in molecular clouds. Our new procedure highlights the importance of a multiwavelength approach, and of the use of dust evolution models in constraining the age and the star formation activity and history in galaxies.

  13. The Mid-IR Properties of Starburst Galaxies from Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brandl, B R; Spoon, H W W; Devost, D; Sloan, G C; Guilles, S; Wu, Y; Houck, J R; Armus, L; Weedman, D W; Charmandaris, V; Appleton, P N; Soifer, B T; Hao, L; Marshall, J A; Higdon, S J; Herter, T L

    2006-01-01

    We present 5-38um mid-infrared spectra at a spectral resolution of R~65-130 of a large sample of 22 starburst nuclei taken with the Infrared Spectrograph IRS on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra show a vast range in starburst SEDs. The silicate absorption ranges from essentially no absorption to heavily obscured systems with an optical depth of tau(9.8um)~5. The spectral slopes can be used to discriminate between starburst and AGN powered sources. The monochromatic continuum fluxes at 15um and 30um enable a remarkably accurate estimate of the total infrared luminosity of the starburst. We find that the PAH equivalent width is independent of the total starburst luminosity L_IR as both continuum and PAH feature scale proportionally. However, the luminosity of the 6.2um feature scales with L_IR and can be used to approximate the total infrared luminosity of the starburst. Although our starburst sample covers about a factor of ten difference in the [NeIII]/[NeII] ratio, we found no systematic correla...

  14. Spectral analysis and interpretation of the \\gamma-ray emission from the Starburst galaxy NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2012-01-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE; E >100 GeV) and high-energy (HE; 100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) data from \\gamma-ray observations performed with the H.E.S.S. telescope array and the Fermi-LAT instrument, respectively, are analysed in order to investigate the non-thermal processes in the starburst galaxy NGC 253. The VHE \\gamma-ray data can be described by a power law in energy with differential photon index \\Gamma=2.14 \\pm 0.18_stat \\pm 0.30_sys and differential flux normalisation at 1 TeV of F_0 = (9.6 \\pm 1.5_stat (+5.7,-2.9)_sys) x 10^{-14} TeV^{-1} cm^{-2} s^{-1}. A power-law fit to the differential HE \\gamma-ray spectrum reveals a photon index of \\Gamma=2.24 \\pm 0.14_stat \\pm 0.03_sys and an integral flux between 200 MeV and 200 GeV of F(0.2-200 GeV) = (4.9 \\pm 1.0_stat \\pm 0.3_sys) x 10^{-9} cm^{-2} s^{-1}. No evidence for a spectral break or turnover is found over the dynamic range of both the LAT instrument and the H.E.S.S. experiment: a combined fit of a power law to the HE and VHE \\gamma-ray data results in a ...

  15. Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife; Cannoni, Mirco; /Huelva U.; Zandanel, Fabio; /IAA, Granada; Gomez, Mario E.; /Huelva U.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  16. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Cannoni, Mirco; Gómez, Mario E. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Zandanel, Fabio; Prada, Francisco, E-mail: masc@stanford.edu, E-mail: mirco.cannoni@dfa.uhu.es, E-mail: fabio@iaa.es, E-mail: mario.gomez@dfa.uhu.es, E-mail: fprada@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), E-18008, Granada (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  17. Candidate tidal dwarf galaxies associated with the Stephan's Quintet

    CERN Document Server

    De Oliveira, C M; Amram, P; Balkowski, C; Bolte, M

    2001-01-01

    We present kinematic and photometric evidence for the presence of seven candidate tidal dwarf galaxies in Stephan's quintet. The central regions of the two most probable parent galaxies, N7319 and N7318B, contain little or no gas whereas the intragroup medium, and particularly the optical tails that seem to be associated with N7318B are rich in cold and ionized gas. Two tidal-dwarf candidates may be located at the edge of a tidal tail, one within a tail and for four others there is no obvious stellar/gaseous bridge between them and the parent galaxy. Two of the candidates are associated with HI clouds, one of which is, in addition, associated with a CO cloud. All seven regions have low continuum fluxes and high H$\\alpha$ luminosity densities (F(H$\\alpha$) = 1 -- 60 $\\times$ 10$^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$). Their magnitudes (M$_B =$ --16.1 to --12.6), sizes ($\\sim$ 3.5 h$_{75}^{-1}$ kpc), colors (typically $B-R = 0.7$) and gas velocity gradients ($\\sim$ 8 -- 26 h$_{75}$ km s$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-1}$) are typical f...

  18. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Four Local Group dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Teresa L; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, 1) matching stars to isochrones in color-color diagrams, and 2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color-color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter, and produces MDFs 30-50 % narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEM) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spher...

  19. CALIFA Spectroscopy of the Interacting Galaxy NGC 5394 (Arp 84): Starbursts, Enhanced [NII]6584 and Signs of Outflows and Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Roche, Nathan; Gomes, Jean Michel; Papaderos, Polychronis; Lagos, Patricio; Sanchez, Sebastian F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spiral galaxy NGC 5394, which is strongly interacting with the larger spiral NGC 5395 (the pair is Arp 84), using optical integral-field spectroscopy from the CALIFA survey. Spatially-resolved equivalent-widths, emission-line ratios and kinematics reveal many features related to the interaction, which has reshaped the galaxy. $\\rm H\\alpha$ maps (with other diagnostic emission lines) show a concentrated central ($r<1$ kpc) starburst and three less luminous star-forming regions (one knot far out in the northern arm), and we estimate the dust-corrected total star-formation rate as 3.39 $\\rm M_{\\odot}yr^{-1}$. However, much of the galaxy, especially the outer tidal arms, has a post-starburst spectrum, evidence of a more extensive episode of star-formation a few $\\times 10^8$ yr ago, triggered by the previous perigalacticon. The $\\rm [NII]6584/H\\alpha$ ratio is high in the nucleus, reaching 0.63 at the centre, which we interpret as related to high electron density ($n_e\\simeq 750$ $\\rm cm^{-3...

  20. Starbursting Brightest Cluster Galaxy: a Herschel view of the massive cluster MACS J1931.8-2634

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, J S; Tozzi, P; Altieri, B; Valtchanov, I; Mercurio, A; Nonino, M; Yu, Heng; Rosati, P; Grillo, C; Medezinski, E; Biviano, A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dust-obscured star formation properties of the massive, X-ray selected galaxy cluster MACS J1931.8-2634 at $z$=0.352. Using far-infrared (FIR) imaging in the range 100-500$\\mu$m obtained with the \\textit{Herschel} telescope, we extract 31 sources (2$\\sigma$) within $r\\sim$1 Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). Among these sources we identify six cluster members for which we perform an analysis of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We measure total infrared luminosity (L$_{IR}$), star formation rate (SFR) and dust temperature. The BCG, with L$_{IR}$=1.4$\\times$10$^{12}$L$_\\odot$ is an Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxy and hosts a type II AGN. We decompose its FIR SED into AGN and starburst components and find equal contributions from AGN and starburst. We also recompute the SFR of the BCG finding SFR=150$\\pm$15 M$_\\odot$yr$^{-1}$. We search for an isobaric cooling flow in the cool core using {\\sl Chandra} X-ray data, and find no evidence for gas colder than 1.8 keV in the inner...

  1. Dark Matter Identification using Gamma Rays from Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shakya, Bibhushan

    2010-01-01

    If the positron fraction and combined electron-positron flux excesses recently observed by PAMELA, Fermi and HESS have a dark matter origin, final state radiation (FSR) photons from dark matter annihilation into lepton-rich final states may be detected with observations of satellite dwarf galaxies of the Milky Way by ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs). We find that current and near-future ACTs have excellent potential for such detection, although a discovery cannot be guaranteed due to large uncertainties in the distribution of dark matter within the dwarfs. We find that models predicting dark matter annihilation into two-lepton final states and those favoring four-lepton final states (as in, for example, "axion portal" models) can be reliably distinguished using the FSR photon spectrum once measured, and the dark matter particle mass can also be accurately determined.

  2. A VIRIAL CORE IN THE SCULPTOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnello, A.; Evans, N. W., E-mail: aagnello@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: nwe@ast.cam.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    The projected virial theorem is applied to the case of multiple stellar populations in the nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies. As each population must reside in the same gravitational potential, this provides strong constraints on the nature of the dark matter halo. We derive necessary conditions for two populations with Plummer or exponential surface brightnesses to reside in a cusped Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo. We apply our methods to the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal, and show that there is no NFW halo compatible with the energetics of the two populations. The dark halo must possess a core radius of {approx}120 pc for the virial solutions for the two populations to be consistent. This conclusion remains true, even if the effects of flattening or self-gravity of the stellar populations are included.

  3. Stellar Populations in Galaxies: Progress on The Milky Way, on Dwarf Irregulars, and on Elliptical Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dante Minniti

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available I discuss specific topics of stellar populations where major progress is occurring. Large surveys like the MACHO Project are contributing to our understanding of the inner structure of our Galaxy. Towards these inner regions , different components (bulge, inner halo, and inner thin and thick disks overlap. We can learn much about these stellar populations using the MACHO database. We expect major progress in the study of the outer Milky Way halo in following years from the SDSS database. Very distant BHB stars located in the outskirts of the halo would be identified. I also describe recent observations of nearby dwarf irregular galaxies, and discuss what they tell us about their stellar content, and about the way these galaxies form. It is now possible to construct deep luminosity functions and color-magnitude diagrams for galaxies beyond the Local Group. I finally review recent work on the resolved stellar populations of the giant early type galaxy NGC~5128.

  4. Formation and evolution of dwarf early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster I. Internal kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toloba, E.; Boselli, A.; Cenarro, A. J.; Peletier, R. F.; Gorgas, J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Munoz-Mateos, J. C.

    We present new medium resolution kinematic data for a sample of 21 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) mainly in the Virgo cluster, obtained with the WHT and INT telescopes at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (La Palma, Spain). These data are used to study the origin of the dwarf elliptical galaxy

  5. Formation and evolution of dwarf early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster I. Internal kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toloba, E.; Boselli, A.; Cenarro, A. J.; Peletier, R. F.; Gorgas, J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Munoz-Mateos, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We present new medium resolution kinematic data for a sample of 21 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) mainly in the Virgo cluster, obtained with the WHT and INT telescopes at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (La Palma, Spain). These data are used to study the origin of the dwarf elliptical galaxy

  6. The self regulating star formation of gas rich dwarf galaxies in quiescent phase

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, M A R; Kobayashi, Masakazu A.R.; Kamaya, Hideyuki

    2004-01-01

    The expected episodic or intermittent star formation histories (SFHs) of gas rich dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs) are the longstanding puzzles to understand their whole evolutional history. Solving this puzzle, we should grasp what physical mechanism causes the quiescent phase of star formation under the very gas rich condition after the first starburst phase. We consider that this quiescent phase is kept by lack of H2, which can be important coolant to generate the next generation of stars in the low-metal environment like dIrrs. Furthermore, in dIrrs, H2 formation through gas-phase reactions may dominate the one on dust-grain surfaces because their interstellar medium (ISM) are very plentiful and the typical dust-to-gas ratio of dIrrs (D_dIrrs = 1.31 x 10^-2 D_MW, where D_MW is its value for the local ISM) is on the same order with a critical value D_cr ~ 10^-2 D_MW. We show that the lack of H2 is mainly led by H- destruction when gas-phase H2 formation dominates since H- is important intermediary of gas-p...

  7. Effects of Tides on Milky Way Dwarf Satellite Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Yu; Strigari, Louis; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S.; Cooper, Andrew; Lovell, Mark; Navarro, Julio F.; Sawala, Till; Zentner, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Using detailed observations of the Local Group to study wide-ranging questions in galaxy formation and dark matter physics - has become a rich field over the past decade. In this talk, I will present frameworks that address some of these questions by combining high-precision stellar kinematic measurements with state-of-art cosmological hydrodynamical N-body simulations. I will demonstrate that the properties of dark matter subhalo of individual satellite galaxies implied by stellar kinematic data can be linked to the galaxy evolution mechanisms such as infall time and the gravitational tidal interaction with Milky Way potential. In the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario, some dwarf galaxies explicitly require to be shaped under significant gravitational tidal forces, which will leave imprints on their stellar distribution and kinematics. I will discuss how these features could serve as a test to the nature of dark matter or stellar feedback strength. I will also discuss how we can study the tidally “disturbed” or even “destroyed” satellite galaxies as building blocks to our Milky Way stellar halo by understanding the properties of their progenitors and observation limit imposed by current and future surveys.

  8. Globular clusters indicate ultra diffuse galaxies are dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Beasley, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of archival {\\it HST/ACS} imaging in the F475W ($g_{475}$), F606W ($V_{606}$) and F814W ($I_{814}$) bands of the globular cluster (GC) system of a large (3.4 kpc effective radius) ultra-diffuse galaxy (DF17) believed located in the Coma Cluster of galaxies. We detect 11 GCs down to the 5$\\sigma$ completeness limit of the imaging ($I_{814}=$27 mag). Correcting for background and our detection limits yields a total population of GCs in this galaxy of $32\\pm6$ and a $V$-band specific frequency, $S_N=33\\pm6$. Based on comparisons to the GC systems of Local galaxies, we show that both the absolute number and the colors of the GC system of DF17 are consistent with the GC system of a dark-matter dominated dwarf galaxy with virial mass $\\sim1.0\\times10^{11}$~\\msun and a dark-to-stellar mass ratio, $M_{vir} / M_{ star}\\sim 1300$. Based on the stellar mass-growth of the Milky Way, we show that DF17 cannot be understood as a failed Milky Way-like system, but is more similar to quenched Large Magel...

  9. Black Holes at the Centers of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Edward C; Sugarman, Hannah R; Velez, Darik O; Eracleous, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Using a distance-limited portion of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, we have identified 28 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in nearby (d < 80 Mpc) low-mass, low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. The accreting objects at the galaxy centers are expected to be intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with M_BH < 1e6 M_sun. The AGNs were selected using several optical emission-line diagnostics after careful modeling of the continuum present in the spectra. We have limited our survey to objects with spectral characteristics similar to those of Seyfert nuclei, excluding emission-line galaxies with ambiguous spectra that could be powered by stellar processes. The host galaxies in our sample are thus the least massive objects in the very local universe certain to contain central black holes. Given our focus on the nearest objects included in the SDSS, our survey is more sensitive to low-luminosity emission than previous optical searches for AGNs in low-mass galaxies. The [O III] lambda5007 luminosities of...

  10. Dissipative dark matter and the rotation curves of dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, R.

    2016-07-01

    There is ample evidence from rotation curves that dark matter halos around disk galaxies have nontrivial dynamics. Of particular significance are: a) the cored dark matter profile of disk galaxies, b) correlations of the shape of rotation curves with baryonic properties, and c) Tully-Fisher relations. Dark matter halos around disk galaxies may have nontrivial dynamics if dark matter is strongly self interacting and dissipative. Multicomponent hidden sector dark matter featuring a massless `dark photon' (from an unbroken dark U(1) gauge interaction) which kinetically mixes with the ordinary photon provides a concrete example of such dark matter. The kinetic mixing interaction facilitates halo heating by enabling ordinary supernovae to be a source of these `dark photons'. Dark matter halos can expand and contract in response to the heating and cooling processes, but for a sufficiently isolated halo could have evolved to a steady state or `equilibrium' configuration where heating and cooling rates locally balance. This dynamics allows the dark matter density profile to be related to the distribution of ordinary supernovae in the disk of a given galaxy. In a previous paper a simple and predictive formula was derived encoding this relation. Here we improve on previous work by modelling the supernovae distribution via the measured UV and Hα fluxes, and compare the resulting dark matter halo profiles with the rotation curve data for each dwarf galaxy in the LITTLE THINGS sample. The dissipative dark matter concept is further developed and some conclusions drawn.

  11. The evolutionary history of low-luminosity local group dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, Sidney

    1994-06-01

    The stellar content of Local Group dwarfs fainter than MV = -14.0 is found to correlate with distance from the Galaxy (or M31). Dwarf spheroidals located close to the Galaxy, such as Ursa Minor and Draco, only experienced star formation early in their lifetimes. Dwarf spheroidals at intermediate distances, like Leo I, Fornax, and Carina, underwent significant star formation more recently. Finally, star formation is presently still going on in distant dwarfs such as DDO 210 and Phoenix. Leo II and Tucana are, however, dwarfs that do not conform to this pattern. It is tentatively suggested that ram pressure stripping, strong supernova-driven winds, or a high UV flux form the protoGalaxy (or proto-M31) might have removed gas from dwarf galaxies at small galactocentric distances.

  12. Chemical enrichment in Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Donatella

    2016-08-01

    Our view of the Milky Way's satellite population has radically changed after the discovery, ten years ago, of the first Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies (UFDs). These extremely faint, dark-matter dominated, scarcely evolved stellar systems are found in ever-increasing number in our cosmic neighbourhood and constitute a gold-mine for studies of early star formation conditions and early chemical enrichment pathways. Here we show what can be learned from the measurements of chemical abundances in UFD stars read through the lens of chemical evolution studies, point out the limitations of the classic approach, and discuss the way to go to improve the models.

  13. Chemical Evolution of Mn in Three Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Men-Quan Liu; Jie Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Based on an improved model, more reasonable nucleosyn-thesis and explosion rate of SNeIa and CCSNe, we studied Mn evolution for three local dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), considering the detailed SNe yield and explosion rates for different types of progenitors. The results can explain the main observation ofMn abundance for tens stars in those dSphs, and give some constraints to the nucleosynthesis and explosion ratio of different types of supernovae and Star Formation Rates (SFR) in those dSphs.

  14. Globular Clusters Indicate That Ultra-diffuse Galaxies Are Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Michael A.; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    We present an analysis of archival HST/ACS imaging in the F475W (g 475), F606W (V 606), and F814W (I 814) bands of the globular cluster (GC) system of a large (3.4 kpc effective radius) ultra-diffuse galaxy (DF17) believed to be located in the Coma Cluster of galaxies. We detect 11 GCs down to the 5σ completeness limit of the imaging (I 814 = 27 mag). Correcting for background and our detection limits yields a total population of GCs in this galaxy of 27 ± 5 and a V-band specific frequency S N = 28 ± 5. Based on comparisons to the GC systems of local galaxies, we show that both the absolute number and the colors of the GC system of DF17 are consistent with the GC system of a dark-matter-dominated dwarf galaxy with virial mass ˜9.0 × 1010 M ⊙ and a dark-to-stellar mass ratio M vir/M star ˜ 1000. Based on the stellar mass growth of the Milky Way, we show that DF17 cannot be understood as a failed Milky-Way-like system, but is more similar to quenched Large-Magellanic-Cloud-like systems. We find that the mean color of the GC population, g 475-I 814 = 0.91 ± 0.05 mag, coincides with the peak of the color distribution of intracluster GCs and is also similar to those of the blue GCs in the outer regions of massive galaxies. We suggest that both the intracluster GC population in Coma and the blue peak in the GC populations of massive galaxies may be fed—at least in part—by the disrupted equivalents of systems such as DF17.

  15. Abundances as Tracers of the Formation and Evolution of (Dwarf) Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstoy, E

    2004-01-01

    This aims to be an overview of what detailed observations of individual stars in nearby dwarf galaxies may teach us about galaxy evolution. This includes some early results from the DART (Dwarf Abundances and Radial velocity Team) Large Programme at ESO. This project has used 2.2m/WFI and VLT/FLAMES to obtain spectra of large samples of individual stars in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies and determine accurate abundances and kinematics. These results can be used to trace the formation and evolution of nearby galaxies from the earliest times to the present.

  16. The influence of binary stars on dwarf spheroidal galaxy kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, J C; Annan, J D

    1995-01-01

    We have completed a Monte-Carlo simulation to estimate the effect of binary star orbits on the measured velocity dispersion in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. This paper analyses previous attempts at this calculation, and explains the simulations which were performed with mass, period and ellipticity distributions similar to that measured for the solar neighbourhood. The conclusion is that with functions such as these, the contribution of binary stars to the velocity dispersion is small. The distributions are consistent with the percentage of binaries detected by observations, although this is quite dependent on the measuring errors and on the number of years over which measurements have been taken. For binaries to be making a significant contribution to the dispersion measured in dSph galaxies, the distributions of the orbital parameters would need to be very different from those of stars in the solar neighbourhood. In particular more smaller period orbits with higher mass secondaries would be required. The shape...

  17. The Horizontal Branch of the Sculptor Dwarf galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Salaris, Maurizio; Tolstoy, Eline; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Cassisi, Santi

    2013-01-01

    We have performed the first detailed simulation of the horizontal branch of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy by means of synthetic modelling techniques,taking consistently into account the star formation history and metallicity evolution as determined from the main sequence and red giant branch spectroscopic observations. The only free parameter in the whole analysis is the integrated mass loss of red giant branch stars. This is the first time that synthetic horizontal branch models, consistent with the complex star formation history of a galaxy, are calculated and matched to the observations. We find that the metallicity range covered by the star formation history, as constrained by observations, plus a simple mass loss law, enable us to cover both the full magnitude and colour range of HB stars. In addition the number count distribution along the observed horizontal branch, can be also reproduced, provided that the red giant branch mass loss is mildly metallicity dependent, with a very small dispersion ...

  18. Star formation rate in Holmberg IX dwarf galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use previously determined Hα fluxes for dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX (Arbutina et al. 2009 to calculate star formation rate (SFR in this galaxy. We discuss possible contaminations of Hα flux and, for the first time, we take into account optical emission from supernova remnants (SNRs as a possible source of contamination of Hα flux. Derived SFR for Holmberg IX is 3:4 x 10-4M.yr-1. Our value is lower then in previous studies, due to luminous shock-heated source M&H 9-10, possible hypernova remnant, which we excluded from the total Hα flux in our calculation of SFR.

  19. The dynamics of Andromeda's dwarf galaxies and stellar streams

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Michelle L M; Ibata, Rodrigo A; Martin, Nicolas F; Preston, Janet

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Z-PAndAS Keck II DEIMOS survey of resolved stars in our neighboring galaxy, Andromeda (M31), we have built up a unique data set of measured velocities and chemistries for thousands of stars in the Andromeda stellar halo, particularly probing its rich and complex substructure. In this contribution, we will discuss the structural, dynamical and chemical properties of Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and how there is no observational evidence for a difference in the evolutionary histories of those found on and off M31's vast plane of satellites. We will also discuss a possible extension to the most significant merger event in M31 - the Giant Southern Stream - and how we can use this feature to refine our understanding of M31's mass profile, and its complex evolution.

  20. Cusp-core transformations in dwarf galaxies: observational predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Teyssier, Romain; Dubois, Yohan; Read, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The presence of a dark matter core in the central kiloparsec of many dwarf galaxies has been a long standing problem in galaxy formation theories based on the standard cold dark matter paradigm. Recent cosmological simulations, based on Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics and rather strong feedback recipes have shown that it was indeed possible to form extended dark matter cores using baryonic processes related to a more realistic treatment of the interstellar medium. Using adaptive mesh refinement, together with a new, stronger supernovae feedback scheme that we have recently implemented in the RAMSES code, we show that it is also possible to form a prominent dark matter core within the well-controlled framework of an isolated, initially cuspy, 10 billion solar masses dark matter halo. Although our numerical experiment is idealized, it allows a clean and unambiguous identification of the dark matter core formation process. Our dark matter inner profile is well fitted by a pseudo-isothermal profile with a core radi...

  1. Dwarfs and Giants in the local flows of galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, A. D.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    We use recent Hubble Space Telescope data on nearby dwarf and giant galaxies to study the dynamical structure and evolutionary trends of the local expansion flows of galaxies. It is found that antigravity of dark energy dominates the force field of the flows and makes them expand with acceleration. It also cools the flows and introduces to them the nearly linear velocity-distance relation with the time-rate close to the global Hubble's factor. There are grounds to expect that this is the universal physical regularity that is common not only for the nearby flows we studied here, but also for all the expansion flows of various spatial scales from the 1 Mpc scale and up to the scale of the global cosmological expansion.

  2. The Mid-Infrared Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yanling Wu; Houck, J R; Bernasrd-Salas, J; Lebouteiller, V

    2008-01-01

    The unprecedented sensitivity of the Spitzer Space Telescope has enabled us for the first time to detect a large sample of Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies (BCDs), which are intrinsically faint in the infrared. In the present paper we present a summary of our findings which providing essential information on the presence/absence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon features in metal-poor environments. In addition, using Spitzer/IRS high-resolution spectroscopy, we study the elemental abundances of neon and sulfur in BCDs and compare with the results from optical studies. Finally, we present an analysis of the mid- and far-infrared to radio correlation in low luminosity low metallicity galaxies.

  3. Hunting for Infrared Signatures of Supermassive Black Hole Activity in Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Kevin; Reines, Amy; Greene, Jenny; Stern, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    In order to explore the origin of the relationship between the growth of a galaxy and its central supermassive black hole, evidence must be found for black holes in galaxies at a wide range in masses. Searching for supermassive black holes in dwarf galaxies is especially important as these objects have less complicated merger histories, and they may host black holes that are similar to early proposed ``seed'' black holes. However, this selection is complicated by the fact that star formation in these dwarf galaxies can often mask the optical signatures of supermassive black hole growth and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in these objects. The all-sky infrared coverage offered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has been used to great success to select AGNs in more massive galaxies, but great care must be used when using infrared selection techniques on samples of dwarf galaxies. In particular, compact, highly star-forming dwarf galaxies can have infrared colors that may lead them to be erroneously selected as AGNs. In this talk, I will discuss recent work exploring infrared selection of AGN candidates in dwarf galaxies, and present a set of potential IR dwarf-galaxy AGN candidates. I will also outline the importance in these results with respect to future selection of AGNs in low-metallicity galaxies at high-redshift.

  4. Delayed Star Formation in Isolated Dwarf Galaxies: HST Star Formation History of the Aquarius Dwarf Irregular

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Andrew A; Dolphin, Andrew E; Skillman, Evan D; McConnachie, Alan W; Brooks, Alyson M; Leaman, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ~10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ~10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ~2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ~6-8 Gyr ago (z ~ 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M(HI)/M(stellar), dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CD...

  5. A Study of Dwarf Galaxies in Five Rich Clusters I: Abell 1689 and Abell 1703

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruursema, Justice; Riley, S.; Ford, H. C.; Zekser, K. C.; Infante, L.; Postman, M.

    2008-05-01

    Dwarf galaxies play an important role in understanding galactic formation, cluster dynamics, and large scale structure. Although local dwarf populations have been well studied, dwarf galaxies outside the local supercluster remain relatively unexamined. Using ACS Investigation Definition Team data, we examine the dwarf galaxy populations of A1689 (z=0.1832), A1703 (z=0.2580), A2218 (z=0.1756), CL0024+16 (z=0.395), and MS1358+62 (z=0.328). We have modeled and subtracted the light from the brighter elliptical galaxies using the XVISTA subroutine SNUC. An assumption of concentric elliptical isophotes is made and the position angle, ellipticity, and brightness are fit using a nonlinear least-squares algorithm. The subtraction of the models reveals a population of dwarf galaxies usually hidden by the light of bright ellipticals. SExtractor and Bayesian Photometric Redshifts (BPZ) are used in order to identify cluster members. With the 0.05" per pixel resolution of ACS and a completeness of mF625 = 28 we are able to identify approximately 1000 dwarf galaxies candidates, defined as MF625 > -18, in all five clusters combined. We will discuss the results of this research including, but not limited to, dwarf galaxy luminosity functions, radial distribution, and the characteristics of dwarfs compared to those in other well studied clusters. ACS was developed under NASA contract NAS5-32865, and this research was supported by NASA grant NAG5-7697.

  6. At the heart of the matter: the origin of bulgeless dwarf galaxies and Dark Matter cores

    CERN Document Server

    Governato, Fabio; Mayer, Lucio; Brooks, Alyson; Rhee, George; Wadsley, James; Jonsson, Patrik; Willman, Beth; Stinson, Greg; Quinn, Thomas; Madau, Piero

    2009-01-01

    For almost two decades the properties of "dwarf" galaxies have challenged the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) paradigm of galaxy formation. Most observed dwarf galaxies consists of a rotating stellar disc embedded in a massive DM halo with a near constant-density core. Yet, models based on the CDM scenario invariably form galaxies with dense spheroidal stellar "bulges" and steep central DM profiles, as low angular momentum baryons and DM sink to the center of galaxies through accretion and repeated mergers. Processes that decrease the central density of CDM halos have been identified, but have not yet reconciled theory with observations of present day dwarfs. This failure is potentially catastrophic for the CDM model, possibly requiring a different DM particle candidate. This Letter presents new hydrodynamical simulations in a Lambda$CDM framework where analogues of dwarf galaxies, bulgeless and with a shallow central DM profile, are formed. This is achieved by resolving the inhomogeneous interstellar medium, resultin...

  7. A Forming Pair of Dwarf Galaxies and Its DM Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Brinks, E.; Thuan, T. X.; Izotov, Yu.; Lipovetsky, V.

    SBS 0335-052 and its companion 0335-052W are shown to be a unique pair of currently forming dwarf galaxies associated with a huge HI cloud (Izotov et al. 1997, Lipovetsky et al. 1997, Thuan et al. 1997, Pustilnik et al. 1997). We present the analysis of the velocity field of this HI cloud, obtained with the VLA, and the model of its rotation curve to derive the total mass distribution in this system. We argue that this gas cloud is rotationally supported in the gravitational potential of a massive DM halo, and discuss the implications of this fact for galaxy formation and evolution scenarios. This unique system apparently preserves the original unperturbed structure of its DM halo and is thus very valuable to confront halo properties with model predictions. The parameters of the DM halo and neutral gas set limits, based on observational evidence, to the range of physical conditions under which a pristine hydrogen cloud can survive as a stable object over cosmlogical time scales. We discuss the possible effect of the massive spiral galaxy at the projected distance of about 100/h kpc to these forming galaxies.

  8. The Correlation Dimension of Young Stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Odekon, M C

    2006-01-01

    We present the correlation dimension of resolved young stars in four actively star-forming dwarf galaxies that are sufficiently resolved and transparent to be modeled as projections of three-dimensional point distributions. We use data in the Hubble Space Telescope archive; photometry for one of them, UGCA 292, is presented here for the first time. We find that there are statistically distinguishable differences in the nature of stellar clustering among the sample galaxies. The young stars of VII Zw 403, the brightest galaxy in the sample, have the highest value for the correlation dimension and also the most dramatic decrease with logarithmic scale, falling from $1.68\\pm0.14$ to $0.10\\pm0.05$ over less than a factor of ten in $r$. This decrease is consistent with the edge effect produced by a projected Poisson distribution within a 2:2:1 ellipsoid. The young stars in UGC 4483, the faintest galaxy in the sample, exhibit very different behavior, with a constant value of about 0.5 over this same range in $r$, e...

  9. Integral Field Spectroscopy of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Lorenzo, Begona; Caon, Nicola; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Kehrig, Carolina

    2008-01-01

    We present results on integral-field optical spectroscopy of five luminous Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies. The data were obtained using the fiber system INTEGRAL attached at the William Herschel telescope. The galaxies Mrk 370, Mrk 35, Mrk 297, Mrk 314 and III Zw 102 were observed. The central 33"x29" regions of the galaxies were mapped with a spatial resolution of 2"/spaxel, except for Mrk 314, in which we observed the central 16"x12" region with a resolution of 0.9"/spaxel$. We use high-resolution optical images to isolate the star-forming knots in the objects; line ratios, electron densities and oxygen abundances in each of these regions are computed. We build continuum and emission-line intensity maps as well as maps of the most relevant line ratios: [OIII]5007\\Hb, [NII]6584\\Ha, and Ha\\Hb, which allow us to obtain spatial information on the ionization structure and mechanisms. We also derive the gas velocity field from the Ha and [OIII]5007 emission lines. We find that all the five galaxies are in the high e...

  10. Stellar Substructures Around the Hercules Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Mackey, A. D.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2015-05-01

    We present deep g and i band Dark Energy Camera stellar photometry of the Hercules Milky Way satellite galaxy, and its surrounding field, out to a radial distance of 5.4 times the tidal radius. We have identified nine extended stellar substructures associated with the dwarf; preferentially distributed along the major axis of the galaxy. Two significant over-densities lie outside the 95% confidence band for the likely orbital path of the galaxy and appear to be free-floating tidal debris. We estimate the luminosity of the new stellar substructures, and find that approximately the same amount of stellar flux is lying in these extended structures as inside the main body of Hercules. We also analyze the distribution of candidate blue-horizontal-branch stars and find agreement with the alignment of the substructures at a confidence level greater than 98%. Our analysis provides a quantitative demonstration that Hercules is a strongly tidally disrupted system, with noticeable stellar features at least 1.9 kpc away from the galaxy.

  11. On the unification of dwarf and giant elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Alister W

    2008-01-01

    The near orthogonal distributions of dwarf elliptical (dE) and giant elliptical (E) galaxies in the mu_e-Mag and mu_e-log(R_e) diagrams have been interpreted as evidence for two distinct galaxy formation processes. However, continuous, linear relationships across the alleged dE/E boundary at M_B = -18 mag - such as those between central surface brightness (mu_0) and (i) galaxy magnitude and (ii) light-profile shape (n) - suggest a similar, governing formation mechanism. Here we explain how these latter two linear trends necessitate a different behavior for dE and E galaxies, exactly as observed, in diagrams involving mu_e (and also _e). A natural consequence is that the distribution of dEs and Es in Fundamental Plane type analyses that use the associated intensity I_e, or _e, are expected to appear different. Together with other linear trends across the alleged dE/E boundary, such as those between luminosity and color, metallicity, and velocity dispersion, it appears that the dEs form a continuous extension t...

  12. Evolution of dwarf galaxies simulated in the cosmological LCDM scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Samaniego, Alejandro; Colin, Pedro; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Rodriguez-Puebla, Aldo; Valenzuela, Octavio

    2014-03-01

    We present results from numerical simulations of low-mass galaxies with the aim to explore the way their stellar masses are assembled. We analyze how the mass assembly histories of the parent halo determine the growth of their host galaxy and its implications on the current paradigm of formation and evolution of low-mass structures in the LCDM scenario. We have found that low-mass galaxies simulated in this scenario assemble their stellar masses following roughly the dark matter halo assembly, which seems to be in tension with the downsizing trend suggested by current observational inferences. We show that there is no more room to increase the strength of feedback from astrophysical processes in order to deviate strongly the stellar mass assembly from the dark halo one, as has been recently invoked to solve some of the potential issues faced by CDM-based simulations of dwarf galaxies. Alejandro González acknowledges finacial support from UNAM, Fundacion UNAM, and the APS to attend this meeting.

  13. The Origin of Dwarf Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Toloba, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Abridge. We have conducted a spectrophotometric study of dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in regions of lower density. We have found that these galaxies show many properties in common with late-type galaxies but not with more massive early-types (E/S0). The properties of the dEs in Virgo show gradients within the cluster. dEs in the outer parts of the Virgo cluster are kinematically supported by rotation, while those in the center are supported by the random motions of their stars (i.e. pressure supported). The rotationally supported dEs have disky isophotes and faint underlying spiral/irregular substructures, they also show younger ages than those pressure supported, which have boxy isophotes and are smooth and regular, without any substructure. We compare the position of these dEs with massive early-type galaxies in the Faber-Jackson and Fundamental Plane relations, and we find that, although there is no difference between the position of rotationally and pressure supported dEs, both...

  14. The Dearth of Neutral Hydrogen in Galactic Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Spekkens, K; Mason, B S; Willman, B; Aguirre, J E

    2014-01-01

    We present new upper limits on the neutral hydrogen (HI) content within the stellar half-light ellipses of 15 Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), derived from pointed observations with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as Arecibo L-band Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey and Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) data. All of the limits Mlim are more stringent than previously reported values, and those from the GBT improve upon contraints in the literature by a median factor of 23. Normalizing by V-band luminosity Lv and dynamical mass Mdyn, we find Mlim/Lv ~ 10^{-3} Mo/Lo and Mlim/Mdyn ~ 5 x 10^{-5}, irrespective of location in the Galactic halo. Comparing these relative HI contents to those of the Local Group and nearby neighbor dwarfs compiled by McConnachie, we find that the Galactic dSphs are extremely gas-poor. Our HI upper limits therefore provide the clearest picture yet of the environmental dependence of the HI content in Local Volume dwarfs. If ram pressure stripping explains the dearth of HI in these ...

  15. Metal Diffusion in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, David; Martel, Hugo; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-05-01

    We perform a series of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to compare different metal mixing models. In particular, we examine the role of diffusion in the production of enriched outflows and in determining the metallicity distributions of gas and stars. We investigate different diffusion strengths by changing the pre-factor of the diffusion coefficient, by varying how the diffusion coefficient is calculated from the local velocity distribution, and by varying whether the speed of sound is included as a velocity term. Stronger diffusion produces a tighter [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] distribution in the gas and cuts off the gas metallicity distribution function at lower metallicities. Diffusion suppresses the formation of low-metallicity stars, even with weak diffusion, and also strips metals from enriched outflows. This produces a remarkably tight correlation between “metal mass-loading” (mean metal outflow rate divided by mean metal production rate) and the strength of diffusion, even when the diffusion coefficient is calculated in different ways. The effectiveness of outflows at removing metals from dwarf galaxies and the metal distribution of the gas is thus dependent on the strength of diffusion. By contrast, we show that the metallicities of stars are not strongly dependent on the strength of diffusion, provided that some diffusion is present.

  16. PERSEUS I: A DISTANT SATELLITE DWARF GALAXY OF ANDROMEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Laevens, Benjamin P. M. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Schlafly, Edward F.; Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Finkbeiner, Douglas P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Tonry, John L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Price, Paul A., E-mail: nicolas.martin@astro.unistra.fr [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); and others

    2013-12-10

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Perseus I/Andromeda XXXIII, found in the vicinity of Andromeda (M31) in stacked imaging data from the Pan-STARRS1 3π survey. Located 27.°9 away from M31, Perseus I has a heliocentric distance of 785 ± 65 kpc, compatible with it being a satellite of M31 at 374{sub −10}{sup +14} kpc from its host. The properties of Perseus I are typical for a reasonably bright dwarf galaxy (M{sub V} = –10.3 ± 0.7), with an exponential half-light radius of r{sub h} = 1.7 ± 0.4 arcmin or r{sub h}=400{sub −85}{sup +105} pc at this distance, and a moderate ellipticity (ϵ=0.43{sub −0.17}{sup +0.15}). The late discovery of Perseus I is due to its fairly low surface brightness (μ{sub 0}=25.7{sub −0.9}{sup +1.0} mag arcsec{sup –2}), and to the previous lack of deep, high quality photometric data in this region. If confirmed to be a companion of M31, the location of Perseus I, far east from its host, could place interesting constraints on the bulk motion of the satellite system of M31.

  17. Using M Dwarfs to Map Extinction in the Local Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David; West, A. A.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    We use spectra of more than 56,000 M dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to create a high-latitude extinction map of the local Galaxy. Our technique compares spectra from low-extinction lines of sight as determined by Schlegel, Finkbeiner, & Davis to other SDSS spectra in order to derive improved distances and accurate extinctions for the stars in the SDSS data release 7 M dwarf sample. Unlike most previous studies, which have used a two-color method to determine extinction, we fit extinction curves to fluxes across the entire spectral range from 5700 to 9200 angstroms for every star in our sample. Our result is an extinction map that extends from a few tens of pc to approximately 2 kpc from the Sun. We also use a similar technique to create a map of Rv values within approximately 1 kpc of the Sun and find that they are roughly consistent with the widely accepted diffuse interstellar medium value of 3.1. Using our extinction data, we derive a dust scale height for the local galaxy of 176 ± 15 parsecs.

  18. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus group

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Oliver; Binggeli, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an extensive CCD search for faint, unresolved dwarf galaxies of very low surface brightness in the whole Centaurus group region encompassing the Cen A and M 83 subgroups lying at a distance of roughly 4 and 5 Mpc, respectively. The aim is to significantly increase the sample of known Centaurus group members down to a fainter level of completeness, serving as a basis for future studies of the 3D structure of the group. Following our previous survey of 60 square degrees covering the M 83 subgroup, we extended and completed our survey of the Centaurus group region by imaging another 500 square degrees area in the g and r bands with the wide-field Dark Energy Survey Camera at the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO. The limiting central surface brightness reached for suspected Centaurus members is $\\mu_r \\approx 29$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, corresponding to an absolute magnitude $M_r \\approx -9.5$. The images were enhanced using different filtering techniques. We found 41 new dwarf galaxy candidates, which togethe...

  19. Dwarf Galaxies in the Coma Cluster: I. Velocity Dispersion Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kourkchi, E; Carter, D; Karick, A M; Mármol-Queraltó, E; Chiboucas, K; Tully, R B; Mobasher, B; Guzmán, R; Matković, A; Gruel, N

    2011-01-01

    We present the study of a large sample of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster observed with DEIMOS on the Keck II to determine their internal velocity dispersion. We focus on a subsample of 41 member dwarf elliptical galaxies for which the velocity dispersion can be reliably measured, 26 of which were studied for the first time. The magnitude range of our sample is $-21

  20. Perseus I: A distant satellite dwarf galaxy of Andromeda

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Nicolas F; Slater, Colin T; Bernard, Edouard J; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F; Ferguson, Annette M N; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Laevens, Benjamin P M; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth C; Draper, Peter W; Hodapp, Klaus W; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S; Price, Paul A; Tonry, John L; Wainscoat, Richard J; Waters, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Perseus I/Andromeda XXXIII, found in the vicinity of Andromeda (M31) in stacked imaging data from the Pan-STARRS1 3{\\pi} survey. Located 27.9{\\deg} away from M31, Perseus I has a heliocentric distance of 785 +/- 65 kpc, compatible with it being a satellite of M31 at 374 +14/-10 kpc from its host. The properties of Perseus I are typical for a reasonably bright dwarf galaxy (M_V = -10.3 +/- 0.7), with an exponential half-light radius of r_h = 1.7 +/- 0.4 arcminutes or r_h = 400 +105/-85 pc at this distance, and a moderate ellipticity (\\epsilon = 0.43 +0.15/-0.17). The late discovery of Perseus I is due to its fairly low surface brightness (\\mu_0=25.7 +1.0/-0.9 mag/arcsec^2), and to the previous lack of deep, high quality photometric data in this region. If confirmed to be a companion of M31, the location of Perseus I, far east from its host, could place interesting constraints on the bulk motion of the satellite system of M31.

  1. XMM-Newton observation of the X-ray point source population of the starburst galaxy IC342

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of an XMM-Newton observation of the starburst galaxy IC342. Thirty-seven X-ray point sources were detected down to a luminosity limit of $\\sim 10^{37}$ \\lum. Most of the sources are located near the spiral arms. The X-ray point source luminosity function is consistent with a power-law shape with a slope of 0.55, typical of starburst galaxies. We also present the energy spectra of several ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), including the luminous X-ray source in the galactic nucleus. Except for the nucleus and a luminous supersoft X-ray source, other ULXs can generally be fit with a simple power-law spectral model. The nucleus is very luminous ($\\sim 10^{40}$\\lum in 0.2-12 keV) and requires disc blackbody and power-law components to describe the X-ray emission. The spectral fit reveals a cool accretion disc (kT=0.11 keV) and suggests that the source harbours either an intermediate-mass black hole or a stellar-mass black hole with outflow.

  2. A large sample of Kohonen selected E+A (post-starburst) galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Meusinger, H; der Au, P Schalldach and A in

    2016-01-01

    We aim to create a large sample of local post-starburst (PSB) galaxies to study their characteristic properties, particularly morphological features indicative of gravitational distortions and indications for active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The selection is based on a huge Kohonen self-organising map (SOM) of about one million SDSS spectra. The SOM is made fully available for the astronomical community, in combination with an interactive user interface. We compiled a catalogue of 2665 PSB galaxies with redshifts z < 0.4. In the colour-mass diagram, the PSB sample is found to be clearly concentrated towards the region between the red and the blue cloud, in agreement with the idea that PSB galaxies represent the transitioning phase between actively and passively evolving galaxies. The relative frequency of morphologically distorted PSB galaxies is at least 57%, significantly higher than in a comparison sample. The search for AGNs based on conventional selection criteria in the radio and MIR results in a low A...

  3. The Green Bank Telescope Maps the Dense, Star-Forming Gas in the Nearby Starburst Galaxy M82

    CERN Document Server

    Kepley, Amanda A; Frayer, David; Usero, Antonio; Marvil, Josh; Walter, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies show that dense molecular gas correlates with recent star formation, suggesting that the formation of this gas phase may help regulate star formation. A key test of this idea requires wide-area, high-resolution maps of dense molecular gas in galaxies to explore how local physical conditions drive dense gas formation, but these observations have been limited because of the faintness of dense gas tracers like HCN and HCO+. Here we demonstrate the power of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope -- the largest single-dish millimeter radio telescope -- for mapping dense gas in galaxies by presenting the most sensitive maps yet of HCN and HCO+ in the starburst galaxy M82. The HCN and HCO+ in the disk of this galaxy correlates with both recent star formation and more diffuse molecular gas and shows kinematics consistent with a rotating torus. The HCO+ emission extending to the north and south of the disk is coincident with the outflow previously identified in CO and...

  4. Physical Properties of Young Stellar Populations in 24 Starburst Galaxies Observed with FUSE

    CERN Document Server

    Pellerin, Anne

    2007-01-01

    We presents the main physical properties of very young stellar populations seen with FUSE in 24 individual starbursts. These characteristics have been obtained using the evolutionary spectral synthesis technique in the far-ultraviolet range with the LavalSB code. For each starburst, quantitative values for age, metallicity, initial mass function slope, stellar mass, and internal extinction have been obtained and discussed in details. Limits of the code have been tested. One main conclusion is that most starbursts (and probably all of them) cannot be represented by any continuous star formation burst in the far-ultraviolet. Also, quantitative values of various optical diagnostics related to these stellar populations have been predicted. Underlying stellar populations, dominated by B-type stars, have been detected in NGC 1140, NGC 4449, and possibly NGC 3991. We characterized the young stellar populations of less than 5 Myr in Seyfert 2 nuclei.

  5. Exploring AGN - starburst coexistence in galaxies at z$\\sim$ 0.8 by the [OIII]4959+5007/[OIII]4363 line ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Contini, M

    2016-01-01

    We analyze by detailed modelling the spectra observed from the sample galaxies at z$\\sim$0.8 presented by Ly et al (2015), constraining the models by the [OIII]5007+4959/[OIII]4363 line ratios. Composite models accounting for shock and photoionization by AGN or starburst are adopted. O/H are about solar for all the objects, except for a few AGN clouds with O/H= 0.3 -0.5 solar. Starburst models reproduce most of the data within the observational errors. About half of the object spectra are well fitted by an accreting AGN. Some galaxies show multiple radiation sources, such as starburst+AGN, or a double AGN.

  6. Early-type dwarf galaxies with multicomponent stellar structure: Are they remnants of disc galaxies strongly transformed by their environment?

    CERN Document Server

    Aguerri, J Alfonso L

    2016-01-01

    The surface brightness distribution of $\\sim$30-40$\\%$ of the early-type dwarf galaxies with $-18 \\leq M_{B} \\leq -15$ in the Virgo and the Coma clusters is fitted by models that include two structural components (S\\`ersic + exponential) as for bright disc galaxies.The goal of the present study is to determine whether early-type dwarf galaxies with a two-component stellar structure in the Virgo and the Coma clusters are low-luminosity copies of bright disc galaxies or are the remnants of bright galaxies strongly transformed by cluster environmental effects.I analysed the location of bright disc galaxies and early-type dwarfs in the $r_{b,e}/h$- $n$ plane. The location in this plane of the two-component dwarf galaxies was compared with the remnants of tidally disrupted disc galaxies reported by numerical simulations. Bright unbarred disc galaxies show a strong correlation in the $r_{b,e}/h$-$n$ plane. Galaxies with larger S\\`ersic shape parameters show a higher $r_{b,e}/h$ ratio. In contrast, two-component ear...

  7. The faint outer regions of the Pegasus Dwarf Irregular galaxy: a much larger and undisturbed galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kniazev, Alexei; Hoffman, G Lyle; Grebel, Eva K; Zucker, Daniel B; Pustilnik, Simon A

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the spatial extent and structure of the Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxy using deep, wide-field, multicolour CCD photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and new deep HI observations. We study an area of ~0.6 square degrees centred on the Pegasus dwarf that was imaged by SDSS. Using effective filtering in colour-magnitude space we reduce the contamination by foreground Galactic field stars and increase significantly the contrast in the outer regions of the Pegasus dwarf. Our extended surface photometry, reaches down to a surface brightness magnitude mu_r~32 mag/sq.arcsec. It reveals a stellar body with a diameter of ~8 kpc that follows a Sersic surface brightness distribution law, which is composed of a significantly older stellar population than that observed in the ~2 kpc main body. The galaxy is at least five times more extended than listed in NED. The faint extensions of the galaxy are not equally distributed around its circumference; the north-west end is more jagged than the sout...

  8. Cusp-core transformations in dwarf galaxies: observational predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssier, Romain; Pontzen, Andrew; Dubois, Yohan; Read, Justin I.

    2013-03-01

    The presence of a dark matter core in the central kiloparsec of many dwarf galaxies has been a long-standing problem in galaxy formation theories based on the standard cold dark matter paradigm. Recent simulations, based on smooth particle hydrodynamics and rather strong feedback recipes, have shown that it was indeed possible to form extended dark matter cores using baryonic processes related to a more realistic treatment of the interstellar medium. Using adaptive mesh refinement, together with a new, stronger supernova feedback scheme that we have recently implemented in the RAMSES code, we show that it is also possible to form a prominent dark matter core within the well-controlled framework of an isolated, initially cuspy, 1010 M⊙ dark matter halo. Although our numerical experiment is idealized, it allows a clean and unambiguous identification of the dark matter core formation process. Our dark matter inner profile is well fitted by a pseudo-isothermal profile with a core radius of 800 pc. The core formation mechanism is consistent with the one proposed by Pontzen & Governato. We highlight two key observational predictions of all simulations that find cusp-core transformations: (i) a bursty star formation history with a peak-to-trough ratio of 5 to 10 and a duty cycle comparable to the local dynamical time and (ii) a stellar distribution that is hot with v/σ ˜ 1. We compare the observational properties of our model galaxy with recent measurements of the isolated dwarf Wolf-Lundmark-Mellote (WLM). We show that the spatial and kinematical distribution of stars and H I gas are in striking agreement with observations, supporting the fundamental role played by stellar feedback in shaping both the stellar and dark matter distribution.

  9. The origin of prolate rotation in dwarf spheroidal galaxies formed by mergers of disky dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of prolate rotation of stars in Andromeda II, a dwarf spheroidal companion of M31, we study the origin of this type of streaming motion via mergers of disky dwarf galaxies. We simulate merger events between two identical dwarfs changing the initial inclination of their disks with respect to the orbit and the amount of orbital angular momentum. On radial orbits the amount of prolate rotation in the merger remnants correlates strongly with the inclination of the disks and is well understood as due to the conservation of the angular momentum component of the disks along the merger axis. For non-radial orbits prolate rotation may still be produced if the orbital angular momentum is initially not much larger than the intrinsic angular momentum of the disks. The orbital structure of the remnants with significant rotation is dominated by box orbits in the center and long-axis tubes in the outer parts. We also detect significant figure rotation resulting from the tidal distortion of the dis...

  10. Gas-Rich Local Dwarf Star-Forming Galaxies and their connection with the Distant Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kunth, D

    1998-01-01

    I discuss the properties of gas-rich forming galaxies. I particularly emphasize the latest results on Lyman alpha emission that are relevant to the search of distant young galaxies. The interdependance of the Lyman alpha escape with the properties of the ISM in starburst galaxies is outlined. A new model from G. Tenorio-Tagle and his collaborators explaining Lyman alpha profiles in starburst galaxies from the hydrodynamics of superbubbles powered by massive stars is presented. I stress again that since Lyman alpha is primarely a diagnostic of the ISM, it is mandatory to understand how the ISM and Lyman alpha are related to firmly relate Lyman alpha to the cosmic star-formation rate.

  11. Anomalous evolution of the dwarf galaxy HIPASS J1321-31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pritzl, BJ; Knezek, PM; Gallagher, JS; Grossi, M; Disney, MJ; Minchin, RF; Freeman, KC; Tolstoy, E; Saha, A

    2003-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 observations of the dwarf galaxy HIPASS J1321-31. This unusual galaxy lies in the direction of the Centaurus A group of galaxies and has a color-magnitude diagram with a distinctive red plume of luminous stars. This feature could arise from (1) a red giant bra

  12. Alignment of Red-Sequence Cluster Dwarf Galaxies: From the Frontier Fields to the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhouse, Wayne Alan; Archer, Haylee; Burgad, Jaford; Foote, Gregory; Rude, Cody; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest virialized structures in the universe. Due to their high density and mass, they are an excellent laboratory for studying the environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Numerical simulations have predicted that tidal torques acting on dwarf galaxies as they fall into the cluster environment will cause the major axis of the galaxies to align with their radial position vector (a line that extends from the cluster center to the galaxy's center). We have undertaken a study to measure the redshift evolution of the alignment of red-sequence cluster dwarf galaxies based on a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters imaged at KPNO using the 0.9-meter telescope, and 64 clusters from the WINGS dataset. To supplement our low-redshift sample, we have included galaxies selected from the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier fields. Leveraging the HST data allows us to look for evolutionary changes in the alignment of red-sequence cluster dwarf galaxies over a redshift range of 0 < z < 0.35. The alignment of the major axis of the dwarf galaxies is measured by fitting a Sersic function to each red-sequence galaxy using GALFIT. The quality of each model is checked visually after subtracting the model from the galaxy. The cluster sample is then combined by scaling each cluster by r200. We present our preliminary results based on the alignment of the red-sequence dwarf galaxies with: 1) the major axis of the brightest cluster galaxy, 2) the major axis of the cluster defined by the position of cluster members, and 3) a radius vector pointing from the cluster center to individual dwarf galaxies. Our combined cluster sample is sub-divided into different radial regions and redshift bins.

  13. The observed properties of dwarf galaxies in and around the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    McConnachie, Alan W

    2012-01-01

    Positional, structural and dynamical parameters for all dwarf galaxies in and around the Local Group are presented, and various aspects of our observational understanding of this volume-limited sample are discussed. Over 100 nearby galaxies that have distance estimates placing them within 3Mpc of the Sun are identified. This distance threshold samples dwarfs in a large range of environments, from the satellite systems of the MW and M31, to the dwarfs in the outer regions of the Local Group, to the numerous isolated galaxies found in its surroundings. It extends to, but does not include, the galaxies associated with the next nearest groups. Our basic knowledge of this important galactic subset and their resolved stellar populations will continue to improve dramatically over the coming years with existing and future observational capabilities, and they will continue to provide the most detailed information available on numerous aspects of dwarf galaxy formation and evolution. Basic observational parameters, suc...

  14. A large sample of Kohonen selected E+A (post-starburst) galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusinger, H.; Brünecke, J.; Schalldach, P.; in der Au, A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The galaxy population in the contemporary Universe is characterised by a clear bimodality, blue galaxies with significant ongoing star formation and red galaxies with only a little. The migration between the blue and the red cloud of galaxies is an issue of active research. Post starburst (PSB) galaxies are thought to be observed in the short-lived transition phase. Aims: We aim to create a large sample of local PSB galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study their characteristic properties, particularly morphological features indicative of gravitational distortions and indications for active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Another aim is to present a tool set for an efficient search in a large database of SDSS spectra based on Kohonen self-organising maps (SOMs). Methods: We computed a huge Kohonen SOM for 106 spectra from SDSS data release 7. The SOM is made fully available, in combination with an interactive user interface, for the astronomical community. We selected a large sample of PSB galaxies taking advantage of the clustering behaviour of the SOM. The morphologies of both PSB galaxies and randomly selected galaxies from a comparison sample in SDSS Stripe 82 (S82) were inspected on deep co-added SDSS images to search for indications of gravitational distortions. We used the Portsmouth galaxy property computations to study the evolutionary stage of the PSB galaxies and archival multi-wavelength data to search for hidden AGNs. Results: We compiled a catalogue of 2665 PSB galaxies with redshifts z 3 Å and z 5 Å, significantly higher than in the comparison sample. The search for AGNs based on conventional selection criteria in the radio and MIR results in a low AGN fraction of 2-3%. We confirm an MIR excess in the mean SED of the E+A sample that may indicate hidden AGNs, though other sources are also possible. The catalogue is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  15. Episodic model for star formation history and chemical abundances in giant and dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debsarma, Suma; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Das, Sukanta; Pfenniger, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    In search for a synthetic understanding, a scenario for the evolution of the star formation rate and the chemical abundances in galaxies is proposed, combining gas infall from galactic haloes, outflow of gas by supernova explosions, and an oscillatory star formation process. The oscillatory star formation model is a consequence of the modelling of the fractional masses changes of the hot, warm and cold components of the interstellar medium. The derived periods of oscillation vary in the range (0.1-3.0) × 107 yr depending on various parameters existing from giant to dwarf galaxies. The evolution of metallicity varies in giant and dwarf galaxies and depends on the outflow process. Observed abundances in dwarf galaxies can be reproduced under fast outflow together with slow evaporation of cold gases into hot gas whereas slow outflow and fast evaporation is preferred for giant galaxies. The variation of metallicities in dwarf galaxies supports the fact that low rate of SNII production in dwarf galaxies is responsible for variation in metallicity in dwarf galaxies of similar masses as suggested by various authors.

  16. Direct evidence of hierarchical assembly at low masses from isolated dwarf galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierwalt, S.; Liss, S. E.; Johnson, K. E.; Patton, D. R.; Privon, G. C.; Besla, G.; Kallivayalil, N.; Putman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The demographics of dwarf galaxy populations have long been in tension with predictions from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) paradigm 1-4 . If primordial density fluctuations were scale-free as predicted, dwarf galaxies should themselves host dark-matter subhaloes 5 , the most massive of which may have undergone star formation resulting in dwarf galaxy groups. Ensembles of dwarf galaxies are observed as sate­llites of more massive galaxies 6-9 , and there is observational 10 and theoretical 11 evidence to suggest that these satellites at redshift z = 0 were captured by the massive host halo as a group. However, the evolution of dwarf galaxies is highly susceptible to environment 12-14 , making these satellite groups imperfect probes of ΛCDM in the low-mass regime. Here we report one of the clearest examples yet of hierarchical structure formation at low masses: using deep multi-wavelength data, we identify seven isolated, spectroscopically confirmed groups of only dwarf galaxies. Each group hosts three to five known members, has a baryonic mass of ~4.4 × 109 to 2 × 1010 solar masses (M ⊙), and requires a mass-to-light ratio of <100 to be gravitationally bound. Such groups are predicted to be rare theoretically and found to be rare observationally at the current epoch, and thus provide a unique window into the possible formation mechanism of more massive, isolated galaxies.

  17. Relationship between star formation rate and black hole accretion at z=2: The different contributions in quiescent, normal and starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rodighiero, G; Daddi, E; Negrello, M; Mullaney, J R; Delvecchio, I; Lutz, D; Renzini, A; Franceschini, A; Baronchelli, I; Pozzi, F; Gruppioni, C; Strazzullo, V; Cimatti, A; Silverman, J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the co-evolution of black-hole-accretion-rate (BHAR) and star-formation-rate (SFR) in $1.5galaxies displaying a greater diversity of star-forming properties compared to previous studies. We combine X-ray stacking and far-IR photometry of stellar mass-limited samples of normal star-forming, starburst and quiescent/quenched galaxies in the COSMOS field. We corroborate the existence of a strong correlation between BHAR (i.e. the X-ray luminosity, L_X), and stellar mass (M*) for normal star-forming galaxies, although find a steeper relation than previously reported. We find that starbursts show a factor of 3 enhancement in BHAR compared to normal SF galaxies (against a factor of 6 excess in SFR), while quiescents show a deficit of a factor 5.5 at a given mass. One possible interpretation of this is that the starburst phase does not coincide with cosmologically relevant BH growth, or that starburst-inducing mergers are more efficient at boosting SFR than BHAR. Contrary to studies based...

  18. Radio continuum JVLA observations of the dwarf galaxy Sextans A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.; Powell, Devon; Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Bomans, Dominik; Bowman, Judd D.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2017-06-01

    We present 20-cm Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) observations of the star-forming dwarf galaxy Sextans A. Located at the outer edge of the Local Group, with an oxygen abundance of less than one-tenth of the Solar abundance (12+log O/H = 7.49), Sextans A provides a nearby laboratory for the study of low-metallicity star formation processes. This galaxy is a weak source in the infrared, but exhibits evidence for vigorous star formation-powered outflows in ionized gas, including large-scale H-alpha shells and filaments up to a kpc in length. Sextans A has not previously been detected in radio continuum. The upgraded JVLA and WIDAR correlator provide enhanced sensitivity over previous studies. We resolve a 3.0 mJy (+/- 0.3 mJy) continuum source centered on the brightest star formation region in Sextans A. Using two relatively interference-free windows at 1.4 GHz and 1.85 GHz, we are able to measure the spectral slope of the detected emission. We estimate the non-thermal contribution and the strength of the galaxy's magnetic field. We discuss the impact of low metallicity on the reliability of the IR/radio relation.

  19. The structure of Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    del Pino, Andrés; Hidalgo, Sebastian L; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We analyze in detail the spatial distribution and kinematic properties of two different stellar populations in Andromeda II (And II) dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We obtained their detailed surface density maps, together with their radial density profiles. The two populations differ not only in age and metallicity, but also in their spatial distribution and kinematics. Old stars ($\\gtrsim 11$ Gyr) follow a round distribution well fitted by truncated density profiles. These stars rotate around the projected optical major axis of the galaxy with line-of-sight velocities $v_{los}(r_h) = 16 \\pm 3$ km s$^{-1}$ and a velocity gradient of $2.06 \\pm 0.21$ km s$^{-1}$ arcmin$^{-1}$. Intermediate-age stars ($\\lesssim 9$ Gyr) concentrate in the centre of the galaxy and form an elongated structure extending along the projected optical major axis. This structure appears to rotate with a steeper velocity gradient, $2.24 \\pm 0.22$ km s$^{-1}$ arcmin$^{-1}$, and around the optical minor axis. The centres of rotation and kinetic p...

  20. Unbiased constraints on ultralight axion mass from dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzáles-Morales, Alma X; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Ureña-López, Luis

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that the internal dynamics of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can be used to test whether or not ultralight axions with $m_a\\sim 10^{-22}\\text{eV}$ are a preferred dark matter candidate. However, comparisons to theoretical predictions tend to be inconclusive for the simple reason that while most cosmological models consider only dark matter, one observes only baryons. Here we use realistic kinematic mock data catalogs of Milky Way dSph's to show that the "mass-anisotropy degeneracy" in the Jeans equations leads to biased bounds on the axion mass in galaxies with unknown dark matter halo profiles. In galaxies with multiple chemodynamical components this bias can be partly removed by modelling the mass enclosed within each subpopulation. However, analysis of the mock data reveals that the least-biased constraints on the axion mass result from fitting the luminosity-averaged velocity dispersion of the individual chemodynamical components directly. Applying our analysis to two dSph's with ...

  1. The Dynamical and Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Revaz, Y; Sawala, T; Hill, V; Letarte, B; Irwin, M; Battaglia, G; Helmi, A; Shetrone, M D; Tolstoy, E; Venn, K A

    2009-01-01

    We present a large sample of fully self-consistent hydrodynamical Nbody/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. The initial total mass (gas + dark matter) of these galaxies is the main driver of their evolution. Star formation (SF) occurs in series of short bursts. In massive systems, the very short intervals between the SF peaks mimic a continuous star formation rate, while less massive systems exhibit well separated SF bursts, as identified observationally. The delay between the SF events is controlled by the gas cooling time dependence on galaxy mass. The observed global scaling relations, luminosity-mass and luminosity-metallicity, are reproduced with low scatter. We take advantage of the unprecedentedly large sample size and data homogeneity of the ESO Large Programme DART, and add to it a few independent studies, to constrain the s...

  2. Dwarf galaxy formation with H2-regulated star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhlen, M; Madau, P; Smith, B; Wise, J

    2011-01-01

    We describe cosmological galaxy formation simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo that incorporate a star formation prescription regulated by the local abundance of molecular hydrogen. We show that this H2-regulated prescription leads to a suppression of star formation in low mass halos (M_h 4, alleviating some of the dwarf galaxy problems faced by theoretical galaxy formation models. H2 regulation modifies the efficiency of star formation of cold gas directly, rather than indirectly reducing the cold gas content with "supernova feedback". We determine the local H2 abundance in our most refined grid cells (76 proper parsec in size at z=4) by applying the model of Krumholz, McKee, & Tumlinson, which is based on idealized 1D radiative transfer calculations of H2 formation-dissociation balance in ~100 pc atomic--molecular complexes. Our H2-regulated simulations are able to reproduce the empirical (albeit lower z) Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, including the low Sigma_gas cutoff due to the transi...

  3. The Molecular ISM of Dwarf Galaxies on Kiloparsec Scales: A New Survey for CO in Northern, IRAS-detected Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, A; Simon, J D; Blitz, L; Leroy, Adam; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Simon, Joshua D.; Blitz, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We present a new survey for CO in dwarf galaxies using the Kitt Peak 12m telescope. We observed the central regions of 121 northern dwarfs with IRAS detections and no known CO emission. We detect CO in 28 of these galaxies and marginally detect another 16, increasing by about 50% the number of such galaxies known to have significant CO emission. The galaxies we detect are comparable in mass to the LMC, although somewhat brighter in CO and fainter in the FIR. Within dwarfs, we find that the CO luminosity, L_CO, is most strongly correlated with the K-band and the far infrared luminosities. There are also strong correlations with the radio continuum and B-band luminosities, and linear diameter. We suggest that L_CO and L_K correlate well because the stellar component of a galaxy dominates the midplane gravitational field and thus sets the pressure of the atomic gas, which controls the formation of H_2 from HI. We compare our sample with more massive galaxies and find that dwarfs and large galaxies obey the same ...

  4. The spatially resolved star formation relation in two HI-rich galaxies with central post-starburst signature

    CERN Document Server

    Klitsch, Anne; Kuntschner, Harald; Couch, Warrick J; Pracy, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    E+A galaxies are post-starburst systems that are identified from their optical spectra. These galaxies contain a substantial young A-type stellar component, but have only little ongoing star formation (SF). HI 21-cm line emission is found in approximately half of the nearby E+A galaxies, indicating that they contain a reservoir of gas that could fuel active SF. Here, we study two HI-rich galaxies, which show a typical E+A spectrum at the centre and SF at larger radii. We present new high spatial resolution radio interferometric observations of the HI 21-cm emission line using the VLA and of the CO(1-0) emission line using ALMA. We combine these data sets to predict the SFR and show that it does not correlate well with the SFR derived from H alpha on sub-kpc scales. We apply a recently developed statistical model for the small scale behaviour of the SF relation to predict and interpret the observed scatter. We find smoothly distributed, regularly rotating HI gas. The CO(1-0) emission line is not detected for b...

  5. The Origin of Dwarf Galaxies in Clusters: The Faint-End Slope of Abell 85 Galaxy Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrena, R.; Diaferio, A.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dwarf galaxies (Mb>-18) are important because of their cosmological interest as tests of hierarchical theories. The formation of these galaxies is still an open question but red dwarf galaxies are preferentially located in high density environments, indicating that they are end-products of galaxy transformations in clusters. Deep spectroscopic studies of galaxy clusters are needed to put some constraints on dwarf galaxy formation and evolution. We have observed and analyzed Abell 85, a nearby (z = 0.055) and massive cluster down to M*+6, using the MOS instruments VIMOS@VLT and AF2@WHT. The first and powerful tool to study the characteristics of galaxies and compare with different density environments is the galaxy luminosity function. The comparison of the results for Abell 85 with literature outcomes for clusters and field, allows us to conclude that, at least for this cluster, the environment plays a major role in the nature of the faint-end galaxies, transforming blue dwarfs in the field into red ones in the cluster, but not in the formation of the luminosity function slope.

  6. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey VIII : Discovery of an Isolated Dwarf Galaxy in the Local Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, R; Herbst, H; Smith, R

    2014-01-01

    The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES) has detected a nearby HI source at a heliocentric velocity of +363 km/s . The object was detected through its neutral hydrogen emission and has an obvious possible optical counterpart in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data (though it does not have an optical redshift measurement). We discuss three possible scenarios for the object : 1) It is within the Local Group, in which case its HI properties are comparable with recently discovered ultra-compact high velocity clouds; 2) It is just behind the Local Group, in which case its optical characteristics are similar to the newly discovered Leo P galaxy; 3) It is a blue compact dwarf galaxy within the local volume but not associated with the Local Group. We find the third possibility to be the most likely, based on distance estimates from the Tully-Fisher relation and its velocity relative to the Local Group.

  7. Gravitational wave radiation from a double white dwarf system inside our galaxy: a potential method for seeking strange dwarfs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan-Kui Lü; Shi-Wei Wu; Zhi-Cheng Zeng

    2009-01-01

    Like the investigation of double white dwarf (DWD) systems, strange dwarf (SD) - white dwarf (WD) system evolution in Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA)'s absolute amplitude-frequency diagram is investigated. Since there is a strange quark core inside an SD, SDs' radii are significantly smaller than the value predicted by the standard WD model, which may strongly affect the gravitational wave (GW) signal in the mass-transferring phases of binary systems. We study how an SD-WD binary evolves across LISA's absolute amplitude-frequency diagram. In principle, we provide an executable way to detect SDs in the Galaxy's DWD systems by radically new windows offered by GW detectors.

  8. Abundant Molecular Gas in Tidal Dwarf Galaxies On-going Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Braine, J; Lisenfeld, U; Charmandaris, V; Vallejo, O; Leon, S; Brinks, E

    2001-01-01

    [Abridged...] We investigate the process of galaxy formation as can be observed in the only currently forming galaxies -- the so-called Tidal Dwarf Galaxies, hereafter TDGs -- through observations of the molecular gas detected via its CO emission. These objects are formed of material torn off of the outer parts of a spiral disk due to tidal forces in a collision between two massive galaxies. Molecular gas is a key element in the galaxy formation process, providing the link between a cloud of gas and a bona fide galaxy. We have detected CO in 8 TDGs (two of them have already been published in Braine et al. 2000), with an overall detection rate of 80%, showing that molecular gas is abundant in TDGs, up to a few 10^8 M_sun. The CO emission coincides both spatially and kinematically with the HI emission, indicating that the molecular gas forms from the atomic hydrogen where the HI column density is high. A possible trend of more evolved TDGs having greater molecular gas masses is observed, in accord with the tran...

  9. Metal diffusion in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Williamson, David John; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We perform a series of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to compare different metal mixing models. In particular, we examine the role of diffusion in the production of enriched outflows, and in determining the metallicity distributions of gas and stars. We investigate different diffusion strengths, by changing the pre-factor of the diffusion coefficient, by varying how the diffusion coefficient is calculated from the local velocity distribution, and by varying whether the speed of sound is included as a velocity term. Stronger diffusion produces a tighter [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] distribution in the gas, and cuts off the gas metallicity distribution function at lower metallicities. Diffusion suppresses the formation of low-metallicity stars, even with weak diffusion, and also strips metals from enriched outflows. This produces a remarkably tight correlation between "metal mass-loading" (mean metal outflow rate divided by mean metal production rate) and the strength of diffusion, even...

  10. Dark Matter in $\\gamma$ lines: Galactic Center vs dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lefranc, Valentin; Panci, Paolo; Sala, Filippo; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We provide CTA sensitivities to Dark Matter (DM) annihilation in $\\gamma$-ray lines, from the observation of the Galactic Center (GC) as well as, for the first time, of dwarf Spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). We compare the GC reach with that of dSphs as a function of a putative core radius of the DM distribution, which is itself poorly known. We find that the currently best dSph candidates constitute a more promising target than the GC, for core radii of one to a few kpc. We use the most recent instrument response functions and background estimations by CTA, on top of which we add the diffuse photon component. Our analysis is of particular interest for TeV-scale electroweak multiplets as DM candidates, such as the supersymmetric Wino and the Minimal Dark Matter fiveplet, whose predictions we compare with our projected sensitivities.

  11. The Intrinsic Shapes of Low-Surface-Brightness Dwarf Irregular Galaxies and Comparison to Other Types of Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sung, E C; Ryden, S; Patterson, J; Chun, M S; Kim, H I; Lee, W B; Sung, Eon-Chang; Han, Cheongho; Chun, Moon-Suk; Kim, Ho-Il; Lee, Woo-Baik

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we measure the ellipticities of 30 LSB dI galaxies and compare the ellipticity distribution with that of 80 dEs (Ryden & Terndrup 1994; Ryden et al. 1998) and 62 BCDs (Sung et al. 1998). We find that the ellipticity distribution of LSB dIs is very similar to that of BCDs, and marginally different from that of dEs. We then determine the distribution of intrinsic shapes of dI galaxies and compare to those of other type dwarf galaxies under various assumptions. First, we assume that LSB dIs are either all oblate or all prolate, and use non-parametric analysis to find the best-fitting distribution of intrinsic shapes. With this assumption, we find that the scarcity of nearly circular LSB dIs implies, at the 99% confidence level, that they cannot be a population of randomly oriented oblate or prolate objects. Next, we assume that dIs are triaxial, and use parametric analysis to find permissible distributions of intrinsic shapes. We find that if the intrinsic axis ratios, $\\beta$ and parameters f...

  12. THE DEARTH OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN GALACTIC DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spekkens, Kristine; Urbancic, Natasha [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4 (Canada); Mason, Brian S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Willman, Beth [Haverford College, 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Aguirre, James E., E-mail: kristine.spekkens@rmc.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We present new upper limits on the neutral hydrogen (H I) content within the stellar half-light ellipses of 15 Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), derived from pointed observations with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as Arecibo L-band Fast ALFA survey and Galactic All-Sky Survey data. All of the limits M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim} are more stringent than previously reported values, and those from the GBT improve upon constraints in the literature by a median factor of 23. Normalizing by V-band luminosity L{sub V} and dynamical mass M {sub dyn}, we find M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim}/L{sub V}∼10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙}/L{sub ⊙} and M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim}/M{sub dyn}∼5×10{sup −5}, irrespective of location in the Galactic halo. Comparing these relative H I contents to those of the Local Group and nearby neighbor dwarfs compiled by McConnachie, we find that the Galactic dSphs are extremely gas-poor. Our H I upper limits therefore provide the clearest picture yet of the environmental dependence of the H I content in Local Volume dwarfs. If ram pressure stripping explains the dearth of H I in these systems, then orbits in a relatively massive Milky Way are favored for the outer halo dSph Leo I, while Leo II and Canes Venatici I have had a pericentric passage in the past. For Draco and Ursa Minor, the interstellar medium mass that should accumulate through stellar mass loss in between pericentric passages exceeds M{sub H} {sub I}{sup lim} by a factor of ∼30. In Ursa Minor, this implies that either this material is not in the atomic phase, or that another mechanism clears the recycled gas on shorter timescales.

  13. The same with less: The cosmic web of warm versus cold dark matter dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Darren S; Smith, Robert E; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2014-01-01

    We explore fundamental properties of the distribution of low mass dark matter halos within the cosmic web using warm dark matter (WDM) and cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological simulations. Using self abundance-matched mock galaxy catalogs, we show that the distribution of dwarf galaxies in a WDM universe, wherein low mass halo formation is heavily suppressed, is nearly indistinguishable to that of a CDM universe whose low mass halos are not seen because galaxy formation is suppressed below some threshold halo mass. However, if the scatter between dwarf galaxy luminosity and halo properties is large enough, low mass CDM halos would sometimes host relatively bright galaxies thereby populating CDM voids with the occasional isolated galaxy and reducing the numbers of completely empty voids. Otherwise, without high mass to light scatter, all mock galaxy clustering statistics that we consider--the auto-correlation function, the numbers and radial profiles of satellites, the numbers of isolated galaxies, and the PDF ...

  14. First Stellar Abundances in the Dwarf Irregular Galaxy IC 1613

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautvaišienė, Gražina; Geisler, Doug; Wallerstein, George; Borissova, Jura; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Pagel, Bernard E. J.; Charbonnel, Corinne; Smith, Verne

    2007-12-01

    Chemical abundances in three M supergiants in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 have been determined using high-resolution spectra obtained with the UVES spectrograph on the ESO 8.2 m Kueyen telescope. A detailed synthetic-spectrum analysis has been used to determine the atmospheric parameters and abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, La, and Eu. We find the overall metallicity of the stars to be [Fe/H] = -0.67 ± 0.09 and the age 9-13 Myr, which is in excellent agreement with the present-day values in the age-metallicity relationship model of IC 1613 by Skillman et al. We have found that the three supergiants investigated have a mean [α/Fe] equal to about -0.1, which is lower than seen in Galactic stars at the same metallicity and is in agreement with the results obtained in other dwarf irregular galaxies. The oxygen abundances are in agreement with the upper values of the nebular oxygen determinations in IC 1613. The abundance ratios of s- and r-process elements to iron are enhanced relative to solar by about 0.3 dex. The abundance pattern of the elements studied is similar to that of the Small Magellanic Cloud, except for Co and Ni, which are underabundant in the SMC. The observed elemental abundances are generally in very good agreement with the recent chemical evolution model of Yuk and Lee. Based on observations collected with the Very Large Telescope and the 2.2 m Telescope of the European Southern Observatory within the Observing Programs 70.B-0361(A) and 072.D-0113(D).

  15. The early days of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Jablonka, P; Mashonkina, L; Hill, V; Revaz, Y; Shetrone, M; Starkenburg, E; Irwin, M; Tolstoy, E; Battaglia, G; Venn, K; Helmi, A; Primas, F; Francois, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the high resolution spectroscopic study of five -3.9<=[Fe/H]<=-2.5 stars in the Local Group dwarf spheroidal, Sculptor, thereby doubling the number of stars with comparable observations in this metallicity range. We carry out a detailed analysis of the chemical abundances of alpha, iron peak, light and heavy elements, and draw comparisons with the Milky Way halo and the ultra faint dwarf stellar populations. We show that the bulk of the Sculptor metal-poor stars follows the same trends in abundance ratios versus metallicity as the Milky Way stars. This suggests similar early conditions of star formation and a high degree of homogeneity of the interstellar medium. We find an outlier to this main regime, which seems to miss the products of the most massive of the TypeII supernovae. In addition to its value to help refining galaxy formation models, this star provides clues to the production of cobalt and zinc. Two of our sample stars have low odd-to-even barium isotope abundance ratios, suggesti...

  16. Detection of Faint BLR Components in the Starburst/Seyfert Galaxy NGC 6221 and Measure of the Central BH Mass

    CERN Document Server

    La Franca, Fabio; Ricci, Federica; Bianchi, Stefano; Marconi, Alessandro; Sani, Eleonora; Vignali, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, using single epoch virial based techniques in the optical band, it has been possible to measure the central black hole mass on large AGN1 samples. However these measurements use the width of the broad line region as a proxy of the virial velocities and are therefore difficult to be carried out on those obscured (type 2) or low luminosity AGN where the nuclear component does not dominate in the optical. Here we present the optical and near infrared spectrum of the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221, observed with X-shooter/VLT. Previous observations of NGC 6221 in the X-ray band show an absorbed (N_H=8.5 +/- 0.4 x 10^21 cm^-2) spectrum typical of a type 2 AGN with luminosity log(L_14-195 keV) = 42.05 erg/s, while in the optical band its spectrum is typical of a reddened (A_V=3) starburst. Our deep X-shooter/VLT observations have allowed us to detect faint broad emission in the H_alpha, HeI and Pa_beta lines (FWHM ~1400-2300 km/s) confirming previous studies indicating that NGC 6221 is a redd...

  17. Star Cluster Luminosity Functions and Cluster Formation Efficiencies in LEGUS Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David O.; Lee, Janice C.; Adamo, Angela; Kim, Hwiyun; Ryon, Jenna E.; LEGUS Team

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary results of star cluster luminosity functions (LFs) and cluster formation efficiencies (Γ) in the LEGUS dwarf galaxy sub-sample. We have used a combination of automated and visual identification techniques to allow us to construct a more complete sample of clusters in these low-mass, low-SFR environments compared to previous studies of dwarf galaxies. Cluster properties are derived from fitting UV and optical (NUV-I) HST photometry to both deterministic and stochastic single-aged stellar populations models. We compare the cluster formation efficiencies and LF slopes to those of previous studies in both dwarf and massive spiral galaxy environments. Recent studies have found that both the LF slope and Γ form trends with galaxy environment. Our LF slope and Γ measurements in the LEGUS dwarfs will allow us to test these trends in the extreme, low-SFR regime and provide a better understanding of the star formation process.

  18. NGC 5044-N50: a link between blue compact galaxies and dwarf ellipticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellone, Sergio A.; Buzzoni, Alberto

    We present new optical observations of the dwarf galaxy N50 in the NGC 5044 Group, showing that this object is probably at an intermediate BCD→dE evolutionary stage, after a realtively recent burst of star formation.

  19. Ionization Parameter as a Diagnostic of Radiation and Wind Pressures in H II Regions and Starburst Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Sherry C C

    2012-01-01

    The ionization parameter U is potentially useful for measuring radiation pressure feedback from massive star clusters, as it reflects the radiation-to-gas-pressure ratio and is readily derived from mid-infrared line ratios. We consider several effects which determine the apparent value of U in HII regions and galaxies. An upper limit is set by the compression of gas by radiation pressure. The pressure from stellar winds and the presence of neutral clumps both reduce U for a given radiation intensity. The most intensely irradiated regions are selectively dimmed by internal dust absorption of ionizing photons, inducing observational bias on galactic scales. We explore these effects analytically and numerically, and use them to interpret previous observational results. We find that radiation confinement sets the upper limit log_10 U = -1 seen in individual regions. Unresolved starbursts display a maximum value of ~ -2.3. While lower, this is also consistent with a large portion of their HII regions being radiati...

  20. Distributions of molecules in the circumnuclear disk and surrounding starburst ring in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 observed with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Shuro; Kohno, Kotaro; Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric; Tamura, Yoichi; Izumi, Takuma; Taniguchi, Akio; Tosaki, Tomoka

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive observations with ALMA allow astronomers to observe the detailed distributions of molecules with relatively weak intensity in nearby galaxies. In particular, we report distributions of several molecular transitions including shock and dust related species ($^{13}$CO $J$ = 1--0, C$^{18}$O $J$ = 1--0, $^{13}$CN $N$ = 1--0, CS $J$ = 2--1, SO $J_N$ = 3$_2$--2$_1$, HNCO $J_{Ka,Kc}$ = 5$_{0,5}$--4$_{0,4}$, HC$_3$N $J$ = 11--10, 12--11, CH$_3$OH $J_K$ = 2$_K$--1$_K$, and CH$_3$CN $J_K$ = 6$_K$--5$_K$) in the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 observed with the ALMA early science program. The central $\\sim$1 arcmin ($\\sim$4.3 kpc) of this galaxy was observed in the 100 GHz region covering $\\sim$96--100 GHz and $\\sim$108--111 GHz with an angular resolution of $\\sim4"\\times2"$ (290 pc$\\times$140 pc) to study the effects of an active galactic nucleus and its surrounding starburst ring on molecular abundances. Here, we present images and report a classification of molecular distributions into three main categorie...

  1. The Buried Starburst in the Interacting Galaxy II Zw 096 as Revealed by the Spitzer Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Inami, Hanae; Surace, J A; Mazzarella, J M; Evans, A S; Sanders, D B; Howell, J H; Petric, A; Vavilkin, T; Iwasawa, K; Haan, S; Murphy, E J; Stierwalt, S; Appleton, P N; Barnes, J E; Bothun, G; Bridge, C R; Chan, B; Charmandaris, V; Frayer, D T; Kewley, L J; Kim, D C; Lord, S; Madore, B F; Marshall, J A; Matsuhara, H; Melbourne, J E; Rich, J; Schulz, B; Spoon, H W W; Sturm, E; U, V; Veilleux, S; Xu, K

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and ...

  2. The extremely low-metallicity tail of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starkenburg, E.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; François, P.; Irwin, M. J.; Boschman, L.; Venn, K. A.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Lemasle, B.; Jablonka, P.; Battaglia, G.; Groot, P.; Kaper, L.

    2013-01-01

    We present abundances for seven stars in the (extremely) low-metallicity tail of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, from spectra taken with X-shooter on the ESO VLT. Targets were selected from the Ca II triplet (CaT) survey of the dwarf abundances and radial velocities team (DART) using the lates

  3. Detection of faint BLR components in the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221 and measure of the central BH mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eLa Franca

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, using single epoch virial based techniques in the optical band, it has been possible to measure the central black hole mass on large type 1 Active Galactive Nuclei (AGN samples. However these measurements use the width of the broad line region as a proxy of the virial velocities and are therefore difficult to be carried out on those obscured (type 2 or low luminosity AGN where the nuclear component does not dominate in the optical. Here we present the optical and near infrared spectrum of the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221, observed with X-shooter/VLT. Previous observations of NGC 6221 in the X-ray band shows an absorbed (N_H=8.5 +/- 0.4 x 10^21 cm^-2 spectrum typical of a type 2 AGN with luminosity log(L_14-195/ erg s^-1 = 42.05, while in the optical band its spectrum is typical of a reddened (A_V=3 starburst. Our deep X-shooter/VLT observations have allowed us to detect faint broad emission in the H_alpha, HeI and Pa_beta lines (FWHM=1400-2300 km s^-1 confirming previous studies indicating that NGC 6221 is a reddened starbust galaxy which hosts an AGN. We use the measure of the broad components to provide a first estimate of its central black hole mass (M_BH = 10^6.6+/-0.3 Msol, lambda_Edd=0.01-0.03, obtained using recently calibrated virial relations suitable for moderately obscured (N_H<10^24 cm^-2 AGN.

  4. Detection of faint BLR components in the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221 and measure of the central BH mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Franca, Fabio; Onori, Francesca; Ricci, Federica; Bianchi, Stefano; Marconi, Alessandro; Sani, Eleonora; Vignali, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, using single epoch virial based techniques in the optical band, it has been possible to measure the central black hole mass on large type 1 Active Galactive Nuclei (AGN) samples. However these measurements use the width of the broad line region as a proxy of the virial velocities and are therefore difficult to be carried out on those obscured (type 2) or low luminosity AGN where the nuclear component does not dominate in the optical. Here we present the optical and near infrared spectrum of the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221, observed with X-shooter/VLT. Previous observations of NGC 6221 in the X-ray band shows an absorbed (N_H=8.5 +/- 0.4 x 10^21 cm^-2) spectrum typical of a type 2 AGN with luminosity log(L_14-195/ erg s^-1) = 42.05, while in the optical band its spectrum is typical of a reddened (A_V=3) starburst. Our deep X-shooter/VLT observations have allowed us to detect faint broad emission in the H_alpha, HeI and Pa_beta lines (FWHM=1400-2300 km s^-1) confirming previous studies indicating that NGC 6221 is a reddened starbust galaxy which hosts an AGN. We use the measure of the broad components to provide a first estimate of its central black hole mass (M_BH = 10^6.6+/-0.3 Msol, lambda_Edd=0.01-0.03), obtained using recently calibrated virial relations suitable for moderately obscured (N_H<10^24 cm^-2) AGN.

  5. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domcke, Valerie; Urbano, Alfredo, E-mail: valerie.domcke@sissa.it, E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it [SISSA - International School for Advanced Studies, via Bonomea 256, Trieste, 34136 Italy (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass m{sub f}. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable of forming a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting con figuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to m{sub f}. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the velocity dispersion of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit to the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that m{sub f}≅ 200 eV. Furthermore, we show that in this setup larger galaxies correspond to the non-degenerate limit of the gas. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance and the bound on the free-streaming length constrains the inflation model in terms of inflaton mass, its branching ratio into DM and the reheating temperature.

  6. The effect of tides on the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Giuseppina; Nipoti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of the mass distribution and dark-matter (DM) content of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are usually derived under the assumption that the effect of the tidal field of the host galaxy is negligible over the radial extent probed by kinematic data-sets. We assess the implications of this assumption in the specific case of the Fornax dSph by means of N-body simulations of a satellite orbiting around the Milky Way. We consider observationally-motivated orbits and we tailor the initial distributions of the satellite's stars and DM to match, at the end of the simulations, the observed structure and kinematics of Fornax. In all our simulations the present-day observable properties of Fornax are not significantly influenced by tidal effects. The DM component is altered by the interaction with the Galactic field (up to 20% of the DM mass within 1.6 kpc is lost), but the structure and kinematics of the stellar component are only mildly affected even in the more eccentric orbit (more than 99% of the stellar ...

  7. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies: Disc Formation at z=0

    CERN Document Server

    Lelli, Federico; Brinks, Elias; McGaugh, Stacy S

    2015-01-01

    Collisional debris around interacting and post-interacting galaxies often display condensations of gas and young stars that can potentially form gravitationally bound objects: Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs). We summarise recent results on TDGs, which are originally published in Lelli et al. (2015, A&A). We study a sample of six TDGs around three different interacting systems, using high-resolution HI observations from the Very Large Array. We find that the HI emission associated to TDGs can be described by rotating disc models. These discs, however, would have undergone less than one orbit since the time of the TDG formation, raising the question of whether they are in dynamical equilibrium. Assuming that TDGs are in dynamical equilibrium, we find that the ratio of dynamical mass to baryonic mass is consistent with one, implying that TDGs are devoid of dark matter. This is in line with the results of numerical simulations where tidal forces effectively segregate dark matter in the halo from baryonic matter i...

  8. The far-infrared - radio correlation in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2016-01-01

    The far-infrared - radio correlation connects star formation and magnetic fields in galaxies, and has been confirmed over a large range of far-infrared luminosities. Recent investigations indicate that it may even hold in the regime of local dwarf galaxies, and we explore here the expected behavior in the regime of star formation surface densities below 0.1 M_sun kpc^{-2} yr^{-1}. We derive two conditions that can be particularly relevant for inducing a change in the expected correlation: a critical star formation surface density to maintain the correlation between star formation rate and the magnetic field, and a critical star formation surface density below which cosmic ray diffusion losses dominate over their injection via supernova explosions. For rotation periods shorter than 1.5x10^7 (H/kpc)^2 yrs, with H the scale height of the disk, the first correlation will break down before diffusion losses are relevant, as higher star formation rates are required to maintain the correlation between star formation ...

  9. Metals Removed by Outflows from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, Evan N; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    The stars in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are significantly more metal-poor than would be expected from a closed box model of chemical evolution. Gas outflows likely carried away most of the metals produced by the dSphs. Based on previous Keck/DEIMOS observations and models, we calculate the mass in Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe expelled from each of eight dSphs. Essentially, these masses are the differences between the observed amount of metals present in the dSphs' stars today and the inferred amount of metals produced by supernovae. We conclude that the dSphs lost 96% to >99% of the metals their stars manufactured. We apply the observed mass function of Milky Way dSphs to the ejected mass function to determine that a single large dSph, like Fornax, lost more metals over 10 Gyr than all smaller dSphs combined. Therefore, small galaxies like dSphs are not significant contributors to the metal content of the intergalactic medium. Finally, we compare our ejected mass function to previo...

  10. Carbon and Oxygen Abundances in Low Metallicity Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, Danielle A; Henry, Richard B C; Erb, Dawn K; Carigi, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    The study of carbon and oxygen abundances yields information on the time evolution and nucleosynthetic origins of these elements, yet remains relatively unexplored. At low metallicities (12+log(O/H) < 8.0), nebular carbon measurements are limited to rest-frame UV collisionally excited emission lines. Therefore, we present UV spectrophotometry of 12 nearby, low-metallicity, high-ionization HII regions in dwarf galaxies obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We present the first analysis of the C/O ratio in local galaxies based solely on simultaneous significant detections of the UV O^+2 and C^+2 collisionally excited lines in seven of our targets and five objects from the literature, to create a final sample of 12 significant detections. Our sample is complemented by optical SDSS spectra, from which we measured the nebular physical conditions and oxygen abundances using the direct method. At low metallicity (12+log(O/H) < 8.0), no clear trend is evident in C/O vs. O/...

  11. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselquist, Sten; Shetrone, Matthew; Smith, Verne; Holtzman, Jon; McWilliam, Andrew; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Beers, Timothy C.; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Tang, Baitian; Tissera, Patricia B.; Fernández Alvar, Emma; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Anguiano, Borja; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Carigi, Leticia; Delgado Inglada, Gloria; Frinchaboy, Peter; García-Hernández, D. A.; Geisler, Doug; Minniti, Dante; Placco, Vinicius M.; Schultheis, Mathias; Sobeck, Jennifer; Villanova, Sandro

    2017-08-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze thechemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars with [Fe/H] ≳ -0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function.

  12. Jeans Analysis for Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies in Wave Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shu-Rong; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2016-01-01

    Observations suggest that dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies exhibit large constant-density cores in the centers, which can hardly be explained by dissipationless cold dark matter simulations. Wave dark matter (${\\psi {\\rm DM}}$), characterized by a single parameter, the dark matter particle mass $m_{\\psi}$, predicts a central soliton core in every galaxy arising from quantum pressure against gravity. Here we apply Jeans analysis to the kinematic data of eight classical dSphs so as to constrain $m_{\\psi}$, and obtain $m_{\\psi}=1.18_{-0.24}^{+0.28}\\times10^{-22}{\\,\\rm eV}$ and $m_{\\psi}=1.79_{-0.33}^{+0.35}\\times10^{-22}{\\,\\rm eV}~(2\\sigma)$ using the observational data sets of Walker et al. (2007) and Walker et al. (2009b), respectively. We show that the estimate of $m_{\\psi}$ is sensitive to the dSphs kinematic data sets and is robust to various models of stellar density profile. We also consider multiple stellar subpopulations in dSphs and find consistent results. This mass range of $m_{\\psi}$ is in good agre...

  13. A Star Formation Law for Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2015-01-01

    The radial profiles of gas, stars, and far ultraviolet radiation in 20 dwarf Irregular galaxies are converted to stability parameters and scale heights for a test of the importance of two-dimensional (2D) instabilities in promoting star formation. A detailed model of this instability involving gaseous and stellar fluids with self-consistent thicknesses and energy dissipation on a perturbation crossing time give the unstable growth rates. We find that all locations are effectively stable to 2D perturbations, mostly because the disks are thick. We then consider the average volume densities in the midplanes, evaluated from the observed HI surface densities and calculated scale heights. The radial profiles of the star formation rates are equal to about 1% of the HI surface densities divided by the free fall times at the average midplane densities. This 1% resembles the efficiency per unit free fall time commonly found in other cases. There is a further variation of this efficiency with radius in all of our galaxi...

  14. Multiple stellar population in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy?

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, M; Pancino, E

    2001-01-01

    We present wide field (33 X 34 arcmin^2) multiband (BVI) CCD photometry (down to I <= 20.5) of the very low surface brightness dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Sextans. In the derived Color Magnitude Diagrams we have found evidences suggesting the presence of multiple stellar populations in this dSph. In particular we discovered: {\\it (i)} a Blue Horizontal Branch (HB) tail that appears to lie on a brighter sequence with respect to the prominent Red HB and the RR Lyrae stars, very similar to what found by Majewski et al. (1999) for the Sculptor dSph; {\\it (ii)} hints of a bimodal distribution in color of the RGB stars; {\\it (iii)} a double RGB-bump. All these features suggest that (at least) two components are present in the old stellar population of this galaxy: a main one with [Fe/H]~ -1.8 and a minor component around [Fe/H]<~ -2.3. The similarity with the Sculptor case may indicate that multiple star formation episodes are common also in the most nearby dSphs that ceased their star formation activity a...

  15. Eight per cent leakage of Lyman continuum photons from a compact, star-forming dwarf galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y I; Orlitová, I; Schaerer, D; Thuan, T X; Verhamme, A; Guseva, N G; Worseck, G

    2016-01-14

    One of the key questions in observational cosmology is the identification of the sources responsible for ionization of the Universe after the cosmic 'Dark Ages', when the baryonic matter was neutral. The currently identified distant galaxies are insufficient to fully reionize the Universe by redshift z ≈ 6 (refs 1-3), but low-mass, star-forming galaxies are thought to be responsible for the bulk of the ionizing radiation. As direct observations at high redshift are difficult for a variety of reasons, one solution is to identify local proxies of this galaxy population. Starburst galaxies at low redshifts, however, generally are opaque to Lyman continuum photons. Small escape fractions of about 1 to 3 per cent, insufficient to ionize much surrounding gas, have been detected only in three low-redshift galaxies. Here we report far-ultraviolet observations of the nearby low-mass star-forming galaxy J0925+1403. The galaxy is leaking ionizing radiation with an escape fraction of about 8 per cent. The total number of photons emitted during the starburst phase is sufficient to ionize intergalactic medium material that is about 40 times as massive as the stellar mass of the galaxy.

  16. Study of the nature of dark matter in halos of dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Pradip; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar

    2015-08-01

    The kinematics of dwarf galaxies are strongly influenced by dark matter down to small galactocentric radii. So they are good candidates to investigate the nature of Dark Matter. In the present work we have carried out mass modeling of a number of recently observed dwarf galaxies Swaters et al. in Astron. Astrophys. 493:871, 2009. We have used a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) halo, Freeman disc along with a gaseous disc for modeling the observed rotation curves of those dwarf galaxies. For comparison we also used a Burkert halo, Freeman disc and gaseous disc. For both the scenario we have performed Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test between the observed and predicted rotational velocity profiles. The tests are rejected for NFW halo almost in 50 per cent cases but they are accepted almost for all cases for Burkert halo, preferring a Burkert halo model generally for dwarf galaxies. The above results reveal a constant density core of dark matter (DM) in the halos of dwarf galaxies compared to a cuspy nature of NFW halo and a possible challenge to -CDM scenario for the nature of dark matter in most of the dwarf galaxies.

  17. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The unimodal nature of the dwarf galaxy population

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Smriti; Driver, S; Kelvin, Lee S; Hopkins, A M; Baldry, I; Phillipps, S; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Loveday, J; Penny, Samantha J; Robotham, A S G

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we aim to (i) test the number of statistically distinct classes required to classify the local galaxy population, and, (ii) identify the differences in the physical and star formation properties of visually-distinct galaxies. To accomplish this, we analyse the structural parameters (effective radius r_e, effective surface brightness within r_e (mu_e), central surface brightness (mu_0), and S'ersic index (n)), obtained by fitting the light profile of 432 galaxies (0.002dwarf galaxies (irregulars, blue spheroids and low surface brightness galaxies) form a unimodal population in a parameter space mapped by mu_e, mu_0, n, r_e, SFR, sSFR, M*, M_{dust} and (g-i). The SFR and sSFR distribution of passively evolving ...

  18. Identifying old Tidal Dwarf Galaxies in Simulations and in the Nearby Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Duc, P A; Masset, F; Bournaud, Frederic; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Masset, Frederic

    2004-01-01

    Most Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs) so-far discussed in the literature may be considered as young ones or even newborns, as they are still physically linked to their parent galaxies by an umbilical cord: the tidal tail at the tip of which they are usually observed. Old Tidal Dwarf Galaxies, completely detached from their progenitors, are still to be found. Using N--body numerical simulations, we have shown that tidal objects as massive as 10^9 solar masses may be formed in interacting systems and survive for more than one Gyr. Old TDGs should hence exist in the Universe. They may be identified looking at a peculiarity of their "genetic identity card": a relatively high abundance in heavy elements, inherited from their parent galaxies. Finally, using this technique, we revisit the dwarf galaxies in the local Universe trying to find arguments pro and con a tidal origin.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Tucana dwarf galaxy VI photometry (Castellani+, 1996)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, M.; Marconi, G.; Buonanno, R.

    2000-11-01

    We present deep CCD photometry for the dwarf galaxy in Tucana (l=323, b=-47.4). The data indicate that the galaxy is dominated by an intermediate/old stellar population with metallicity similar to that of the galactic globular clusters NGC 6752 and NGC 7089 (M2) (we find [Fe/H]=~-1.56). The distance modulus we derived, (m-M)V=~24.72+/-0.2, makes clear that this galaxy belongs to the Local Gro up. Tucana is clearly different from other dwarf galaxies, such as Leo I (Lee et al., 1993AJ....106.1420L), or Phoenix (Ortolani and Gratton, 1988PASP..100.1405O), because there is no evidence of a young stellar population (t<=5Gyrs) We suggest that the Tucana Galaxy is a genuine dwarf spheroidal in which no recent burst of star formation occurred. (1 data file).

  20. Star Formation in NGC4532/DDO 137'S Tidal Dwarf Galaxies and 500 KPC HI Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Sarah

    Mergers and close-passages between gas rich galaxies can result in the formation of long HI/stellar streams. The tidally induced star formation and gas concentrations can result in the creation of tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs). TDGs may contribute significantly to the dwarf galaxy population, by far the most common galaxy type in the current epoch. We have discovered one of the longest known tidal streams (500 kpc) in the NGC 4535/DDO 137 system. We propose 3 ksec FUV/NUV images centered on the stream and its five TDGs. We will readily detect faint/low mass star forming regions (~2E-17 erg s-1 cm-2 A-1) to 5-sigma. The GALEX observations are a unique opportunity to undertake a sensitive and comprehensive study of tidally induced star formation, dwarf galaxy formation and inter-galactic enrichment in this system.

  1. TWO LOCAL VOLUME DWARF GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN 21 cm EMISSION: PISCES A AND B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Grcevich, Jana [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Putman, Mary E. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: erik.tollerud@yale.edu, E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu, E-mail: jgrcevich@amnh.org, E-mail: mputman@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: daniel.k.stern@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of two dwarf galaxies, Pisces A and B, from a blind 21 cm H I search. These were the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy of 22 H I clouds identified in the GALFA-H I survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. They have properties consistent with being in the Local Volume (<10 Mpc), and one has resolved stellar populations such that it may be on the outer edge of the Local Group (∼1 Mpc from M31). While the distance uncertainty makes interpretation ambiguous, these may be among the faintest star-forming galaxies known. Additionally, rough estimates comparing these galaxies to ΛCDM dark matter simulations suggest consistency in number density, implying that the dark matter halos likely to host these galaxies are primarily H I-rich. The galaxies may thus be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability that are comparable to the faint satellites of the Local Group. Because they are outside the influence of a large dark matter halo to alter their evolution, these galaxies can provide critical anchors to dwarf galaxy formation models.

  2. AGN and Starbursts in Dusty Galaxy Mergers: Insights from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Joseph M.

    2014-07-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is combining imaging and spectroscopic data from the Herschel, Spitzer, Hubble, GALEX, Chandra, and XMM-Newton space telescopes augmented with extensive ground-based observations in a multiwavelength study of approximately 180 Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) and 20 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that comprise a statistically complete subset of the 60μm-selected IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. The objects span the full range of galaxy environments (giant isolated spirals, wide and close pairs, minor and major mergers, merger remnants) and nuclear activity types (Seyfert 1, Seyfert 2, LINER, starburst/HII), with proportions that depend strongly on the total infrared luminosity. I will review the science motivations and present highlights of recent results selected from over 25 peer-reviewed journal articles published recently by the GOALS Team. Statistical investigations include detection of high-ionization Fe K emission indicative of deeply embedded AGN, comparison of UV and far-IR properties, investigations of the fraction of extended emission as a function of wavelength derived from mid-IR spectroscopy, mid-IR spectral diagnostics and spectral energy distributions revealing the relative contributions of AGN and starbursts to powering the bolometric luminosity, and quantitative structure analyses that delineate the evolution of stellar bars and nuclear stellar cusps during the merger process. Multiwavelength dissections of individual systems have unveiled large populations of young star clusters and heavily obscured AGN in early-stage (II Zw 96), intermediate-stage (Mrk 266, Mrk 273), and late-stage (NGC 2623, IC 883) mergers. A recently published study that matches numerical simulations to the observed morphology and gas kinematics in mergers has placed four systems on a timeline spanning 175-260 million years after their first passages, and modeling of additional (U)LIRGs is underway. A very

  3. Large-scale environmental dependence of gas-phase metallicity in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Douglass, Kelly A

    2016-01-01

    We study how the cosmic environment affects galaxy evolution in the Universe by comparing the metallicities of dwarf galaxies in voids with dwarf galaxies in more dense regions. Ratios of the fluxes of emission lines, particularly those of the forbidden [OIII] and [SII] transitions, provide estimates of a region's electron temperature and number density. From these two quantities and the emission line fluxes [OII] 3727, [OIII] 4363, and [OIII] 4959,5007, we estimate the abundance of oxygen with the Direct Te method. We estimate the metallicity of 37 void dwarf galaxies and 75 dwarf galaxies in more dense regions using spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, as re-processed in the MPA-JHU value-added catalog. We find very little difference between the two sets of galaxies, indicating little influence from the large-scale environment on their chemical evolution. Of particular interest are a number of extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies that are equally abundant in both voids...

  4. Episodic Model For Star Formation History and Chemical Abundances in Giant and Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Debsarma, Suma; Das, Sukanta; Pfenniger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In search for a synthetic understanding, a scenario for the evolution of the star formation rate and the chemical abundances in galaxies is proposed, combining gas infall from galactic halos, outflow of gas by supernova explosions, and an oscillatory star formation process. The oscillatory star formation model is a consequence of the modelling of the fractional masses changes of the hot, warm and cold components of the interstellar medium. The observed periods of oscillation vary in the range $(0.1-3.0)\\times10^{7}$\\,yr depending on various parameters existing from giant to dwarf galaxies. The evolution of metallicity varies in giant and dwarf galaxies and depends on the outflow process. Observed abundances in dwarf galaxies can be reproduced under fast outflow together with slow evaporation of cold gases into hot gas whereas slow outflow and fast evaporation is preferred for giant galaxies. The variation of metallicities in dwarf galaxies supports the fact that low rate of SNII production in dwarf galaxies i...

  5. Young tidal dwarf galaxies cannot be used to probe dark matter in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, H; Fouquet, S; Puech, M; Kroupa, P; Yang, Y; Pawlowski, M

    2015-01-01

    The location of dark-matter free, tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) in the baryonic Tully Fisher (bTF) diagram has been used to test cosmological scenarios, leading to various and controversial results. Using new high-resolution 3D spectroscopic data, we re-investigate the morpho-kinematics of these galaxies to verify whether or not they can be used for such a purpose. We find that the three observed TDGs are kinematically not virialized and show complex morphologies and kinematics, leading to considerable uncertainties about their intrinsic rotation velocities and their locations on the bTF. Only one TDG can be identify as a (perturbed) rotation disk that it is indeed a sub-component of NGC5291N and that lies at $<$1$\\sigma$ from the local bTF relation. It results that the presently studied TDGs are young, dynamically forming objects, which are not enough virialized to robustly challenge cosmological scenarios.

  6. WHAT DO THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES TELL US ABOUT THE STARBURST-AGN CONNECTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Torres-Papaqui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the normal star formation histories (SFHs for narrow emission line galaxies classified as star forming galaxies (SFGs, transition type objects (TOs, Seyfert 2s (Sy2s and LINERs. The SFH varied with the activity type, following the mass of the galaxies and the importance of their bulge: LINERs reside in massive early-type galaxies, Sy2s and TOs in intermediate mass galaxies with intermediate morphological types, and SFGs are hosted in lower mass late-type spirals. Also, the maximum star formation rate in the past was found to increase with the virial mass within the aperture (VMA. This correlation suggests that the bulges and the supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies grow in parallel, in good agreement with the MBH -σ∗ relation.

  7. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: I. The role of ISM pressure & the Molecular Cloud Dissipation Timescale

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; Kewley, L J; Reuland, M; Leitherer, C

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we combine the stellar spectral synthesis code STARBURST 99, the nebular modelling code MAPPINGS IIIq, a 1-D dynamical evolution model of \\HII regions around massive clusters of young stars and a simplified model of synchrotron emissivity to produce purely theoretical self-consistent synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for (solar metallicity) starbursts lasting some $10^8$ years. These SEDs extend from the Lyman Limit to beyond 21 cm. We find that two ISM parameters control the form of the SED; the pressure in the diffuse phase of the ISM (or, equivalently, its density), and the molecular cloud dissipation timescale. We present detailed SED fits to Arp 220 and NGC 6240, and we give the predicted colors for starburst galaxies derived from our models for the IRAS and the Spitzer Space Observatory MIPS and IRAC instruments. Our models reproduce the spread in observed colors of starburst galaxies. Finally, we present absolute calibrations to convert observed fluxes into star formation ra...

  8. New insights to the photometric structure of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies from deep Near-Infrared studies I. Observations, surface photometry and decomposition of surface brightness profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Noeske, K G; Cairos, L M; Fricke, K J

    2003-01-01

    (shortened) We analyze deep Near Infrared (NIR) broad band images for a sample of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies (BCDs), allowing for the quantitative study of their extended stellar low-surface brightness (LSB) host galaxies. NIR surface brightness profiles (SBPs) of the LSB hosts agree at large galactocentric radii with those from optical studies. At small to intermediate radii, however, the NIR data reveal for more than half of our sample a significant flattening of the exponential SBP of the LSB host. Such SBPs ("type V" SBPs, Binggeli & Cameron 1991) have rarely been detected in LSB hosts of BCDs at optical wavelengths, where the relative flux contribution of the starburst is stronger than in the NIR and can hide such central intensity depressions of the LSB host. The structural properties, frequency and physical origin of type V LSB SBPs in BCDs and other dwarf galaxies have not yet been systematically studied. Nevertheless, their occurrence in a significant fraction of BCDs would impose important new ...

  9. Disruption of a Dwarf Galaxy Under Strong Shocking: The Origin of omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuchiya, T; Dinescu, D I

    2004-01-01

    We perform N-body simulations of the dynamical evolution of a dwarf galaxy falling into the Milky Way galaxy in order to understand the formation scenario of the peculiar globular cluster $\\omega$ Centauri. We use self-consistent models of the bulge and the disc of the Milky Way, as well as of the dwarf galaxy, and explore a range of dwarf models with different density distributions. Namely, we use King (1966) and Hernquist (1990) density profiles to model the density distribution in the dwarf. The central region of our King model has a density profile approximately $\\propto r^{-2}$, while that of the Hernquist model is $\\propto r^{-1}$. The difference in the dwarf's density distributions leads to distinct evolutionary scenarios. The King model dwarf loses its mass exponentially as a function of apocentric distance, with the mass-loss rate depending on the initial mass and size of the dwarf. Regardless of the initial mass and size, the King model dwarf remains more massive than $10^8$ \\msun after a few Gyr of...

  10. Mass-to-Light versus Color Relations for Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Elmegreen, Bruce; LITTLE THINGS

    2017-01-01

    We have determined new relations between UBV colors and mass-to-light (M/L) ratios for dwarf irregular galaxies, as well as for transformed g‧ - r‧. These M/L to color relations (MLCRs) are based on stellar mass density profiles determined for 34 LITTLE THINGS dwarfs from spectral energy distribution fitting to multi-wavelength surface photometry in passbands from the FUV to the NIR. These relations can be used to determine stellar masses in dwarf irregular galaxies for situations where other determinations of stellar mass are not possible. Our MLCRs are shallower than comparable MLCRs in the literature determined for spiral galaxies. We divided our dwarf data into four metallicity bins and found indications of a steepening of the MLCR with increased oxygen abundance, perhaps due to more line blanketing occurring at higher metallicity.

  11. Unveiling a Rich System of Faint Dwarf Galaxies in the Next Generation Fornax Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz, Roberto P; Puzia, Thomas H; Taylor, Matthew A; Ordenes-Briceno, Yasna; Alamo-Martinez, Karla; Ribbeck, Karen X; Angel, Simon; Capaccioli, Massimo; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Galaz, Gaspar; Hempel, Maren; Hilker, Michael; Jordan, Andres; Lancon, Ariane; Mieske, Steffen; Paolillo, Maurizio; Richtler, Tom; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Zhang, Hongxin

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of 158 previously undetected dwarf galaxies in the Fornax cluster central regions using a deep coadded $u, g$ and $i$-band image obtained with the DECam wide-field camera mounted on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory as part of the {\\it Next Generation Fornax Survey} (NGFS). The new dwarf galaxies have quasi-exponential light profiles, effective radii $0.1\\!\\!75\\%$ at luminosities brighter than $M_i\\!\\simeq\\!-15.0$ mag to $0\\%$ at luminosities fainter than $M_i\\!\\simeq\\!-10.0$ mag. The two-point correlation function analysis of the NGFS dwarf sample shows an excess on length scales below $\\sim\\!100$ kpc, pointing to the clustering of dwarf galaxies in the Fornax cluster core.

  12. Surveying for Dwarf Galaxies Within Voids FN2 and FN8

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Stephen; Draper, Chris; Moody, J. Ward

    2016-10-01

    The presence or absence of dwarf galaxies with Mr' > -14 in low-density volumes correlates with dark matter halos and how they affect galaxy formation. We are conducting a redshifted Hα imaging survey for dwarf galaxies with Mr' > -13 in the heart of the well-defined voids FN2 and FN8 using the KPNO 4m Mayall telescope and Mosaic Imager. These data have furnished over 600 strong candidates in a four square degree area. Follow-up spectra finding none of these candidates to be within the void volumes will constrain the dwarf population there to be 2 to 8% of the cosmic mean. Conversely, finding even one Hα dwarf in the void heart will challenge several otherwise successful theories of large-scale structure formation.

  13. (Star)bursts of FIRE: observational signatures of bursty star formation in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparre, Martin; Hayward, Christopher C.; Feldmann, Robert; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Muratov, Alexander L.; Kereš, Dušan; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-04-01

    Galaxy formation models are now able to reproduce observed relations such as the relation between galaxies' star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (M*) and the stellar-mass-halo-mass relation. We demonstrate that comparisons of the short-time-scale variability in galaxy SFRs with observational data provide an additional useful constraint on the physics of galaxy formation feedback. We apply SFR indicators with different sensitivity time-scales to galaxies from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. We find that the SFR-M* relation has a significantly greater scatter when the Hα-derived SFR is considered compared with when the far-ultraviolet (FUV)-based SFR is used. This difference is a direct consequence of bursty star formation because the FIRE galaxies exhibit order-of-magnitude SFR variations over time-scales of a few Myr. We show that the difference in the scatter between the simulated Hα- and FUV-derived SFR-M* relations at z = 2 is consistent with observational constraints. We also find that the Hα/FUV ratios predicted by the simulations at z = 0 are similar to those observed for local galaxies except for a population of low-mass (M* ≲ 109.5 M⊙) simulated galaxies with lower Hα/FUV ratios than observed. We suggest that future cosmological simulations should compare the Hα/FUV ratios of their galaxies with observations to constrain the feedback models employed.

  14. VLT\\/UVES Abundances in Four Nearby Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies II. Implications for Understanding Galaxy Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstoy, E; Shetrone, M; Primas, F; Hill, V; Szeifert, A K T; Tolstoy, Eline

    2003-01-01

    We have used UVES on VLT-UT2 to take spectra of 15 individual red giant stars in the centers of four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Sculptor, Fornax, Carina and Leo I. We measure the abundance variations of numerous elements in these low mass stars with a range of ages (1-15Gyr old). This means that we can effectively measure the chemical evolution of these galaxies WITH TIME. Our results show a significant spread in metallicity with age, but an overall trend consistent with what might be expected from a closed (or perhaps leaky) box chemical evolution scenario over the last 10-15Gyr. We notice that each of these galaxies show broadly similar abundance patterns for all elements measured. This suggests a fairly uniform progression of chemical evolution with time, despite quite a large range of star formation histories. It seems likely that these galaxies had similar initial conditions, and evolve in a similar manner with star formation occurring at a uniformly low rate, even if at different times. With our ...

  15. Revealing a Ring-like Cluster Complex in a Tidal Tail of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 2146

    CERN Document Server

    Adamo, A; Gallagher, J S; Bastian, N; Ryon, J; Westmoquette, M S; Konstantopoulos, I S; Zackrisson, E; Larsen, S S; Silva-Villa, E; Charlton, J C; Weisz, D R

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of a ring-like cluster complex in the starburst galaxy NGC 2146. The Ruby Ring, so named due to its appearance, shows a clear ring-like distribution of star clusters around a central object. It is located in one of the tidal streams which surround the galaxy. NGC 2146 is part of the Snapshot Hubble U-band Cluster Survey (SHUCS). The WFC3/F336W data has added critical information to the available archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging set of NGC 2146, allowing us to determine ages, masses, and extinctions of the clusters in the Ruby Ring. These properties have then been used to investigate the formation of this extraordinary system. We find evidence of a spatial and temporal correlation between the central cluster and the clusters in the ring. The latter are about 4 Myr younger than the central cluster, which has an age of 7 Myr. This result is supported by the H alpha emission which is strongly coincident with the ring, and weaker at the position of the central cluster. From the deriv...

  16. MUSE Reveals a Recent Merger in the Post-starburst Host Galaxy of the TDE ASASSN-14li

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, J L; Anderson, J P; Galbany, L; Kochanek, C S; Aquino, E; Brown, J S; Dong, Subo; Förster, F; Holoien, T W -S; Kuncarayakti, H; Maureira, J C; Rosales-Ortega, F F; Sánchez, S F; Shappee, B J; Stanek, K Z

    2016-01-01

    We present MUSE integral field spectroscopic observations of the host galaxy (PGC 043234) of one of the closest ($z=0.0206$, $D\\simeq 90$ Mpc) and best-studied tidal disruption events (TDE), ASASSN-14li. The MUSE integral field data reveal asymmetric and filamentary structures that extend up to $\\gtrsim 10$ kpc from the post-starburst host galaxy of ASASSN-14li. The structures are traced only through the strong nebular [O III] $\\lambda$5007, [N II] $\\lambda$6584, and H$\\alpha$ emission lines. The total off nuclear [O III] $\\lambda$5007 luminosity is luminosity is $4.7\\times 10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and the ionized H mass is $\\rm \\sim 10^4(500/n_e)\\,M_{\\odot}$. Based on the BPT diagram, the nebular emission can be driven by either AGN photoionization or shock excitation, with AGN photoionization favored given the narrow intrinsic line widths. The emission line ratios and spatial distribution strongly resemble ionization nebulae around fading AGNs such as IC 2497 (Hanny's Voorwerp) and ionization "cones" around Se...

  17. On The GeV & TeV Detections of the Starburst Galaxies M82 & NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Lacki, Brian C; Quataert, Eliot; Loeb, Abraham; Waxman, Eli

    2010-01-01

    The observed GeV and TeV emission from M82 and NGC 253 by Fermi, HESS, and VERITAS constrains the physics of cosmic rays (CRs) in these dense star-forming environments. We discuss these constraints in detail, and present an independent analysis of the Fermi data for these starbursts. We argue the gamma-rays are predominantly hadronic in origin; in this case, the measured fluxes imply that both galaxies are consistent with being CR "proton calorimeters:" all of the energy injected in high energy primary CR protons is lost to inelastic proton-proton collisions (pion production) before escape, producing gamma-rays, neutrinos, and secondary electrons and positrons. The case for calorimetry is stronger for M82 than for NGC 253, and the latter may be only marginally calorimetric. We also consider leptonic contributions to the GeV-TeV emission, including the possibility of a "TeV Excess" analogous to that seen in the Galaxy. We show that the GeV-TeV detections of M82 and NGC 253, together with proton calorimetry, im...

  18. VIMOS Integral Field Spectroscopy of Gaseous Nebulae in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, E. V.; Gullieuszik, M.; Saviane, I.; Sabbadin, F.; Momany, Y.; Rizzi, L.; Bresolin, F.

    The study of very metal-poor dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies is fundamental to test the cosmological scenarios of galaxy formation. Among Local Group galaxies, Leo A and SagDIG are probably the most metal-poor dwarfs, as suggested by estimates of their nebular abundances based on the empirical method [I. Saviane, L. Rizzi, E.V. Held, F. Bresolin, Y. Momany in Astron. Astrophys. 390, 59 (2002); E.D. Skillman, R. Terlevich, J. Melnick in Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 240, 563 (1989); L. van Zee, E.D. Skillman, M.P. Haynes in Astrophys. J. 637, 269 (2006)].

  19. Suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxies by grain photoelectric feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, John C; Goldbaum, Nathan J; Dekel, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectric heating has long been recognized as the primary source of heating for the neutral interstellar medium. Simulations of spiral galaxies found some indication that photoelectric heating could suppress star formation. However, simulations that include photoelectric heating have typically found that it has little effect on the rate of star formation in either spiral galaxies or dwarfs suggesting that supernovae and not photoelectric heating are responsible for setting the star formation law in galaxies. This result is in tension with recent work indicating that a star formation law that depends on galaxy metallicity, as expected for photoelectric heating but not for supernovae, reproduces the present-day galaxy population better than a metallicity-independent one. Here we report a series of simulations of dwarf galaxies, where the effects of both photoelectric heating and supernovae are expected to be strongest. We simultaneously include space- and time-dependent photoelectric heating, and we resolve...

  20. Mid-infrared diagnostics of starburst galaxies: clumpy, dense structures in star-forming regions in the Antennae (NGC 4038/4039)

    CERN Document Server

    Snijders, Leonie; van der Werf, Paul P

    2007-01-01

    Recently, mid-infrared instruments have become available on several large ground-based telescopes, resulting in data sets with unprecedented spatial resolution at these long wavelengths. In this paper we examine 'ground-based-only' diagnostics, which can be used in the study of star-forming regions in starburst galaxies. By combining output from the stellar population synthesis code Starburst 99 with the photoionization code Mappings, we model stellar clusters and their surrounding interstellar medium, focusing on the evolution of emission lines in the N- and Q-band atmospheric windows (8-13 and 16.5-24.5 micron respectively) and those in the near-infrared. We address the detailed sensitivity of various emission line diagnostics to stellar population age, metallicity, nebular density, and ionization parameter. Using our model results, we analyze observations of two stellar clusters in the overlap region of the Antennae galaxies obtained with VLT Imager and Spectrometer for mid Infrared (VISIR). We find eviden...