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Sample records for dutch sdhb founder

  1. The first Dutch SDHB founder deletion in paraganglioma – pheochromocytoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devilee Peter

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor genes SDHB, SDHC and SDHD play a major role in hereditary paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma. These three genes encode subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme and complex II component of the electron transport chain. The majority of variants of the SDH genes are missense and nonsense mutations. To date few large deletions of the SDH genes have been described. Methods We carried out gene deletion scanning using MLPA in 126 patients negative for point mutations in the SDH genes. We then proceeded to the molecular characterization of deletions, mapping breakpoints in each patient and used haplotype analysis to determine whether the deletions are due to a mutation hotspot or if a common haplotype indicated a single founder mutation. Results A novel deletion of exon 3 of the SDHB gene was identified in nine apparently unrelated Dutch patients. An identical 7905 bp deletion, c.201-4429_287-933del, was found in all patients, resulting in a frameshift and a predicted truncated protein, p.Cys68HisfsX21. Haplotype analysis demonstrated a common haplotype at the SDHB locus. Index patients presented with pheochromocytoma, extra-adrenal PGL and HN-PGL. A lack of family history was seen in seven of the nine cases. Conclusion The identical exon 3 deletions and common haplotype in nine patients indicates that this mutation is the first Dutch SDHB founder mutation. The predominantly non-familial presentation of these patients strongly suggests reduced penetrance. In this small series HN-PGL occurs as frequently as pheochromocytoma and extra-adrenal PGL.

  2. 50 years of Dutch immunology--founders, institutions, highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmelig-Meyling, Frits H J; Meyaard, Linde; Mebius, Reina E

    2014-12-01

    At the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Dutch Society for Immunology (DSI, de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Immunologie), this contribution deals with some highlights of 50 years of Immunology in the Netherlands. It narrates about the founders and first board members of the DSI, their institutes, progeny and patrimony, describes major centers of immunological activities, mentions key persons in the field, and touches upon some events dear to the Society and its members. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Preconception carrier screening for multiple disorders: evaluation of a screening offer in a Dutch founder population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, Inge B.; Holtkamp, Kim C. A.; Ottenheim, Cecile P. E.; van Eeten-Nijman, Janneke M. C.; Lakeman, Phillis; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; van Maarle, Merel C.; Henneman, Lidewij

    2018-01-01

    Technological developments have enabled carrier screening for multiple disorders. This study evaluated experiences with a preconception carrier screening offer for four recessive disorders in a Dutch founder population. Questionnaires were completed by 182 attendees pretesting and posttesting and by

  4. A Dutch Fanconi Anemia FANCC Founder Mutation in Canadian Manitoba Mennonites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yne de Vries

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is a recessive DNA instability disorder associated with developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and a predisposition to cancer. Based on their sensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, FA cells have been assigned to 15 complementation groups, and the associated genes have been identified. Founder mutations have been found in different FA genes in several populations. The majority of Dutch FA patients belongs to complementation group FA-C. Here, we report 15 patients of Dutch ancestry and a large Canadian Manitoba Mennonite kindred carrying the FANCC c.67delG mutation. Genealogical investigation into the ancestors of the Dutch patients shows that these ancestors lived in four distinct areas in The Netherlands. We also show that the Dutch and Manitoba Mennonite FANCC c.67delG patients share the same haplotype surrounding this mutation, indicating a common founder.

  5. Haplotype study in Dutch SCA3 and SCA6 families : evidence for common founder mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Dineke S; Piersma, Sytse J; Hennekam, Eric F A M; Ippel, Elly F; Pearson, Peter L; Sinke, Richard J

    This pilot study was initiated to show the existence of founder effects in the Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) population. The ADCAs comprise a clinically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders and the estimated prevalence in the Netherlands is approximately 3:100 000

  6. Preconception carrier screening for multiple disorders: evaluation of a screening offer in a Dutch founder population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijssen, Inge B; Holtkamp, Kim C A; Ottenheim, Cecile P E; van Eeten-Nijman, Janneke M C; Lakeman, Phillis; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; van Maarle, Merel C; Henneman, Lidewij

    2018-02-01

    Technological developments have enabled carrier screening for multiple disorders. This study evaluated experiences with a preconception carrier screening offer for four recessive disorders in a Dutch founder population. Questionnaires were completed by 182 attendees pretesting and posttesting and by 137 non-attendees. Semistructured interviews were conducted with seven of the eight carrier couples. Attendees were mainly informed about the existence of screening by friends/colleagues (49%) and family members (44%). Familiarity with the genetic disorders was high. Knowledge after counseling increased (p influencers (family/friends) can be used to raise awareness of a screening offer. Our findings provide lessons for the implementation of expanded carrier screening panels in other communities and other settings.

  7. Gly118Asp is a SCA14 founder mutation in the Dutch ataxia population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, DS; van de Warrenburg, BPC; Hennekam, FAM; Dooijes, D; Ippel, PF; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, CC; Kremer, HPH; Sinke, RJ

    Missense mutations in the PRKCG gene have recently been identified in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 (SCA14) patients; these include the Gly118Asp mutation that we found in a large Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) family. We subsequently screened the current Dutch ataxia cohort

  8. Designing for a Living? Income Determinants Among Firm Founders in the Dutch Design Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vankan, A.; Frenken, K.; Castaldi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have analysed the role of the creative class in fostering regional development. The focus on regional development neglects the individual differences in success among members in the creative class and among firms within creative industries. We study firm founders in three design sectors

  9. Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit B (SDHB Is Expressed in Neurofibromatosis 1-Associated Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (Gists: Implications for the SDHB Expression Based Classification of Gists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny H. Wang, Jerzy Lasota, Markku Miettinen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the digestive tract. GISTs develop with relatively high incidence in patients with Neurofibromatosis-1 syndrome (NF1. Mutational activation of KIT or PDGFRA is believed to be a driving force in the pathogenesis of familial and sporadic GISTs. Unlike those tumors, NF1-associated GISTs do not have KIT or PGDFRA mutations. Similarly, no mutational activation of KIT or PDGFRA has been identified in pediatric GISTs and in GISTs associated with Carney Triad and Carney-Stratakis Syndrome. KIT and PDGFRA-wild type tumors are expected to have lesser response to imatinib treatment. Recently, Carney Triad and Carney-Stratakis Syndrome -associated GISTs and pediatric GISTs have been shown to have a loss of expression of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB, a Krebs cycle/electron transport chain interface protein. It was proposed that GISTs can be divided into SDHB- positive (type 1, and SDHB-negative (type 2 tumors because of similarities in clinical features and response to imatinib treatment. In this study, SDHB expression was examined immunohistochemically in 22 well-characterized NF1-associated GISTs. All analyzed tumors expressed SDHB. Based on SDHB-expression status, NF1-associated GISTs belong to type 1 category; however, similarly to SDHB type 2 tumors, they do not respond well to imatinib treatment. Therefore, a simple categorization of GISTs into SDHB-positive and-negative seems to be incomplete. A classification based on both SDHB expression status and KIT and PDGFRA mutation status characterize GISTs more accurately and allow subdivision of SDHB-positive tumors into different clinico-genetic categories.

  10. What Makes Entrepreneurs Happy? Determinants of Satisfaction Among Founders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Carree (Martin); I. Verheul (Ingrid)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis study empirically investigates factors influencing satisfaction levels of founders of new ventures, using a representative sample of 1,107 Dutch founders. We relate entrepreneurial satisfaction (with income, psychological burden and leisure time) to firm performance, motivation and

  11. Breast and ovarian cancer risks in a large series of clinically ascertained families with a high proportion of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Dutch founder mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohet, Richard M; Velthuizen, Maria E; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Seynaeve, Caroline; Collée, Margriet J; Verhoef, Senno; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J; Gómez García, Encarna; Menko, Fred; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Devilee, Peter; van't Veer, Laura J; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Easton, Douglas F; Rookus, Matti A; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2014-02-01

    BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations confer increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer, but risks have been found to vary across studies and populations. We ascertained pedigree data of 582 BRCA1 and 176 BRCA2 families and studied the variation in breast and ovarian cancer risks using a modified segregation analysis model. The average cumulative breast cancer risk by age 70 years was estimated to be 45% (95% CI 36 to 52%) for BRCA1 and 27% (95% CI 14 to 38%) for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The corresponding cumulative risks for ovarian cancer were 31% (95% CI 17 to 43%) for BRCA1 and 6% (95% CI 2 to 11%) for BRCA2 mutation carriers. In BRCA1 families, breast cancer relative risk (RR) increased with more recent birth cohort (p heterogeneity = 0.0006) and stronger family histories of breast cancer (p heterogeneity BRCA1, our data suggest a significant association between the location of the mutation and the ratio of breast to ovarian cancer (pBRCA2 families, no evidence was found for risk heterogeneity by birth cohort, family history or mutation location. BRCA1 mutation carriers conferred lower overall breast and ovarian cancer risks than reported so far, while the estimates of BRCA2 mutations were among the lowest. The low estimates for BRCA1 might be due to older birth cohorts, a moderate family history, or founder mutations located within specific regions of the gene. These results are important for a more accurate counselling of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  12. Leukoencephalopathy due to Complex II Deficiency and Bi-Allelic SDHB Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Sabine; Darin, Niklas; Miranda, Maria J

    2017-01-01

    described in heterozygous form in patients with familial paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and/or renal cell cancer. This is only the second example in the literature where one specific SDHx mutation is associated with both recessive mitochondrial disease in one patient and familial paraganglioma......Isolated complex II deficiency is a rare cause of mitochondrial disease and bi-allelic mutations in SDHB have been identified in only a few patients with complex II deficiency and a progressive neurological phenotype with onset in infancy. On the other hand, heterozygous SDHB mutations are a well......-known cause of familial paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and renal cell cancer. Here, we describe two additional patients with respiratory chain deficiency due to bi-allelic SDHB mutations. The patients' clinical, neuroradiological, and biochemical phenotype is discussed according to current knowledge...

  13. Tumor risks and genotype-phenotype-proteotype analysis in 358 patients with germline mutations in SDHB and SDHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Christopher J; Forman, Julia R; Rattenberry, Eleanor; Bradshaw, Nicola; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Cole, Trevor R; Armstrong, Ruth; Kumar, V K Ajith; Morrison, Patrick J; Atkinson, A Brew; Douglas, Fiona; Ball, Steve G; Cook, Jackie; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Killick, Pip; Kirby, Gail; Aylwin, Simon; Woodward, Emma R; Evans, D Gareth R; Hodgson, Shirley V; Murday, Vicky; Chew, Shern L; Connell, John M; Blundell, Tom L; Macdonald, Fiona; Maher, Eamonn R

    2010-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) and D (SDHD) subunit gene mutations predispose to adrenal and extraadrenal pheochromocytomas, head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGL), and other tumor types. We report tumor risks in 358 patients with SDHB (n=295) and SDHD (n=63) mutations. Risks of HNPGL and pheochromocytoma in SDHB mutation carriers were 29% and 52%, respectively, at age 60 years and 71% and 29%, respectively, in SDHD mutation carriers. Risks of malignant pheochromocytoma and renal tumors (14% at age 70 years) were higher in SDHB mutation carriers; 55 different mutations (including a novel recurrent exon 1 deletion) were identified. No clear genotype-phenotype correlations were detected for SDHB mutations. However, SDHD mutations predicted to result in loss of expression or a truncated or unstable protein were associated with a significantly increased risk of pheochromocytoma compared to missense mutations that were not predicted to impair protein stability (most such cases had the common p.Pro81Leu mutation). Analysis of the largest cohort of SDHB/D mutation carriers has enhanced estimates of penetrance and tumor risk and supports in silicon protein structure prediction analysis for functional assessment of mutations. The differing effect of the SDHD p.Pro81Leu on HNPGL and pheochromocytoma risks suggests differing mechanisms of tumorigenesis in SDH-associated HNPGL and pheochromocytoma.

  14. Do (Female) Founders Influence (Female) Joiners to Become Founders too?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam

    Female founders are scarce, certainly those employing personnel. Do (female) founders affect the likelihood of (female) joiners to become founders too? Recent research demonstrates that joiners are more sensitive to contextual influences than founders. Joining a startup could provide a context to...... a multiplier effect in reducing gender gaps in entrepreneurship rates.......-founder (gender) homophily affects the likelihood of female and male joiners to become founders themselves. We find a relatively large and robust positive effect among female joiners that can be attributed to the role modeling function of female founders. Female entrepreneurs hiring personnel may thus have...

  15. Do (Female) Founders Influence (Female) Joiners to Become Founders too?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam

    to experiment provisional founder identities, especially if the founder is perceived as a role model. Role models are more likely to be influential, the more similar they are to the focal person, especially if both are minorities, as is the case for women in entrepreneurial environments. We study how joiner......-founder (gender) homophily affects the likelihood of female and male joiners to become founders themselves. We find a relatively large and robust positive effect among female joiners that can be attributed to the role modeling function of female founders. Female entrepreneurs hiring personnel may thus have...

  16. Paraganglioma, neuroblastoma, and a SDHB mutation: Resolution of a 30-year-old mystery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimke, R Neil; Collins, Debra L; Stolle, Catherine A

    2010-06-01

    Familial paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma (PGL/PCC) is genetically heterogenous with mutations in three of the four subunits of the heterotetrameric mitochondrial complex II enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) being causally responsible for the majority of cases. In addition to PGL/PCC an array of non-paraganglial tumors have been described in affected individuals. We present a 30-year follow-up on the family of a deceased patient who synchronously developed malignant neuroblastoma (NBL), PCC, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Other family members with late onset disease have come to our attention, and molecular study revealed a mutation in the SDHB gene. Despite the embryologic relationship, NBL has been seen in only two previous patients with familial PGL/PCC, both with deletions of the SDHB gene. Review of the literature suggests the lack of a reported association between NBL and familial PGL/PCC may be an ascertainment bias. We further suggest that study of the SDH genes in NBL survivors who develop secondary solid tumors, particularly RCC, may correct this bias, and provide for more effective and comprehensive tumor screening in this patient population. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Risk of malignant paraganglioma in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulsteijn, L.T.; Dekkers, O.M.; Hes, F.J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the risk of developing malignant paraganglioma (PGL) in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier (2000-August 2011) and references of key

  18. Multiple Recurrent Paraganglioma in a Pediatric Patient with Germline SDH-B Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan McGowan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET are recognized approaches for locating paragangliomas. Recently, gallium-68 DOTA-octreotate (DOTATATE scans have shown promise detecting neuroendocrine tumors missed by FDG-PET and MRI. 13-year-old male with SDH-B mutation presented with symptoms of paraganglioma and elevated catecholamines. MRI did not demonstrate the T2 hyper intense signal typical of paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma; FDG-PET scan did not reveal increased foci of uptake. DOTATATE scan revealed a signal consistent only with residual adrenal tissue. Resection of the right adrenal bed revealed paraganglioma. Following surgery, no further symptoms were reported and biochemical tests normalized.

  19. An immunohistochemical procedure to detect patients with paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma with germline SDHB, SDHC, or SDHD gene mutations: a retrospective and prospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H. van Nederveen (Francien); J. Gaal (José); J. Favier (Judith); E. Korpershoek (Esther); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); E.M. de Bruyn (Elly); H.F. Sleddens (Hein); P. Derkx (Pieter); J. Rivière (Julie); H. Dannenberg (Hilde); B.J. Petri; P. Komminoth (Paul); K. Pacak (Karel); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); P.J. Pollard (Patrick); M. Mannelli (Massimo); J.P. Bayley; A. Perren (Aurel); S. Niemann (Stephan); A.A. Verhofstad (Albert); A.P. de Bruïne (Adriaan); E.R. Maher (Eamonn); F. Tissier (Frédérique); T. Méatchi (Tchao); C. Badoual (Cécile); J. Bertherat (Jerome); L. Amar (Laurence); D. Alataki (Despoina); E.A. van Marck (Eric); F. Ferrau (Francesco); J.F. François (Joseph); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); M.P.F.V. Peeters; A. van Linge (Anne); J.W. Lenders (Jacques); A.P. Gimenez-Roqueplo; R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas are neuro-endocrine tumours that occur sporadically and in several hereditary tumour syndromes, including the phaeochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndrome. This syndrome is caused by germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB), C

  20. miR-142-5p promotes development of colorectal cancer through targeting SDHB and facilitating generation of aerobic glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaojun; Xiao, Zhiming; Ai, Feiyan; Liu, Fen; Chen, Xiong; Cao, Ke; Ren, Weiguo; Zhang, Xuemei; Shu, Peng; Zhang, Decai

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant expression of miRNAs contributes to the development of human malignancies. A recent study revealed that miR-142-5p is increased in the serum of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients compared to health people. Using starBase v2.0, we found that succinate dehydrogenase-B (SDHB) is a potential target of miR-142-5p, while SDHB is negatively correlated to cancer development through regulating energetic metabolism. Based on these information, this study further examined the expression profiles of miR-142-5p and SDHB in CRC tissues and cell lines using PCR and Western blotting. Transfection experiment and luciferase assay were performed to identify relationship between miR-142-5p and SDHB. Oxygen intake, glucose consumption and production of lactic acid were used to evaluate the influence on energetic metabolism. CRC growth and proliferation were assessed by in vitro and in vivo studies. Results showed that miR-142-5p was up-regulated in CRC, but SDHB was down-regulated. SDHB was confirmed as a target of miR-142-5p, and decreased SDHB in CRC was result from the abnormal up-regulation of miR-142-5p. Lose of SDHB by miR-142-5p inhibited oxygen intake by CRC cells, but increased glucose consumption and lactate production. These suggest miR-142-5p up-regulation in CRC probably facilitates generation of aerobic glycolysis by reducing SDHB. miR-142-5p promoted proliferation and colony formation of CRC, but inhibited apoptosis. SDHB overexpression abrogated these effect of miR-142-5p, which indicates that SDHB depletion mediates tumor-promoting actions of miR-142-5p. This study added novel insight into the CRC development regulated by miR-142-5p. It may be a promising therapy target in the future molecular therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Origin and migration of an Afrikaner founder mutation FHAfrikaner-2 (V408M) causing familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defesche, J. C.; van Diermen, D. E.; Hayden, M. R.; Kastelein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Of the three major Afrikaner founder mutations, responsible for more than 95% of Familial Hypercholesterolemia cases among South African Afrikaners, one mutation called V408M or FHAfrikaner-2 was identified in the Netherlands. Subsequent analysis of a group of Canadian patients of Dutch origin with

  2. Plasma methoxytyramine: a novel biomarker of metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma in relation to established risk factors of tumour size, location and SDHB mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhofer, Graeme; Lenders, Jacques W M; Siegert, Gabriele; Bornstein, Stefan R; Friberg, Peter; Milosevic, Dragana; Mannelli, Massimo; Linehan, W Marston; Adams, Karen; Timmers, Henri J; Pacak, Karel

    2012-07-01

    There are currently no reliable biomarkers for malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs). This study examined whether measurements of catecholamines and their metabolites might offer utility for this purpose. Subjects included 365 patients with PPGLs, including 105 with metastases, and a reference population of 846 without the tumour. Eighteen catecholamine-related analytes were examined in relation to tumour location, size and mutations of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB). Receiver-operating characteristic curves indicated that plasma methoxytyramine, the O-methylated metabolite of dopamine, provided the most accurate biomarker for discriminating patients with and without metastases. Plasma methoxytyramine was 4.7-fold higher in patients with than without metastases, a difference independent of tumour burden and the associated 1.6- to 1.8-fold higher concentrations of norepinephrine and normetanephrine. Increased plasma methoxytyramine was associated with SDHB mutations and extra-adrenal disease, but was also present in patients with metastases without SDHB mutations or those with metastases secondary to adrenal tumours. High risk of malignancy associated with SDHB mutations reflected large size and extra-adrenal locations of tumours, both independent predictors of metastatic disease. A plasma methoxytyramine above 0.2nmol/L or a tumour diameter above 5cm indicated increased likelihood of metastatic spread, particularly when associated with an extra-adrenal location. Plasma methoxytyramine is a novel biomarker for metastatic PPGLs that together with SDHB mutation status, tumour size and location provide useful information to assess the likelihood of malignancy and manage affected patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasma methoxytyramine: A novel biomarker of metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma in relation to established risk factors of tumor size, location and SDHB mutation status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhofer, Graeme; Lenders, Jacques W.M.; Siegert, Gabriele; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Friberg, Peter; Milosevic, Dragana; Mannelli, Massimo; Linehan, W. Marston; Adams, Karen; Timmers, Henri J.; Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background There are currently no reliable biomarkers for malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs). This study examined whether measurements of catecholamines and their metabolites might offer utility for this purpose. Methods Subjects included 365 patients with PPGLs, including 105 with metastases, and a reference population of 846 without the tumor. Eighteen catecholamine-related analytes were examined in relation to tumor location, size and mutations of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB). Results Receiver-operating characteristic curves indicated that plasma methoxytyramine, the O-methylated metabolite of dopamine, provided the most accurate biomarker for discriminating patients with and without metastases. Plasma methoxytyramine was 4.7-fold higher in patients with than without metastases, a difference independent of tumor burden and the associated 1.6- to 1.8-fold higher concentrations of norepinephrine and normetanephrine. Increased plasma methoxytyramine was associated with SDHB mutations and extra-adrenal disease, but was also present in patients without SDHB mutations and metastases or those with metastases secondary to adrenal tumors. High risk of malignancy associated with SDHB mutations reflected large size and extra-adrenal locations of tumors, both independent predictors of metastatic disease. A plasma methoxytyramine above 0.2 nmol/L or a tumor diameter above 5 cm indicated increased likelihood of metastatic spread, particularly when associated with an extra-adrenal location. Interpretation Plasma methoxytyramine is a novel biomarker for metastatic PPGLs that together with SDHB mutation status, tumor size and location provide useful information to assess the likelihood of malignancy and manage affected patients. PMID:22036874

  4. Mutation analysis of SDHB and SDHC: novel germline mutations in sporadic head and neck paraganglioma and familial paraganglioma and/or pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Nora

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations of the SDHD, SDHB and SDHC genes, encoding three of the four subunits of succinate dehydrogenase, are a major cause of hereditary paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma, and demonstrate that these genes are classic tumor suppressors. Succinate dehydrogenase is a heterotetrameric protein complex and a component of both the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase or complex II. Methods Using conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE and direct DNA sequencing to analyse genomic DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes, here we describe the mutation analysis of the SDHB and SDHC genes in 37 patients with sporadic (i.e. no known family history head and neck paraganglioma and five pheochromocytoma and/or paraganglioma families. Results Two sporadic patients were found to have a SDHB splice site mutation in intron 4, c.423+1G>A, which produces a mis-spliced transcript with a 54 nucleotide deletion, resulting in an 18 amino acid in-frame deletion. A third patient was found to carry the c.214C>T (p.Arg72Cys missense mutation in exon 4 of SDHC, which is situated in a highly conserved protein motif that constitutes the quinone-binding site of the succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (SQR complex in E. coli. Together with our previous results, we found 27 germline mutations of SDH genes in 95 cases (28% of sporadic head and neck paraganglioma. In addition all index patients of five families showing hereditary pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma were found to carry germline mutations of SDHB: four of which were novel, c.343C>T (p.Arg115X, c.141G>A (p.Trp47X, c.281G>A (p.Arg94Lys, and c.653G>C (p.Trp218Ser, and one reported previously, c.136C>T, p.Arg46X. Conclusion In conclusion, these data indicate that germline mutations of SDHB and SDHC play a minor role in sporadic head and neck paraganglioma and further underline the importance of germline SDHB mutations in cases of

  5. ANALYSIS OF INDUSTRIAL INJURIES OF FOUNDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Lazarenkov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of occupational traumatism of founders is given. It is shown, that wastes connected with termination of work capacity due to illness or traumatism cause not only physical but economical damage as well.

  6. Colloquial Dutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard

    This course in colloquial Dutch was originally prepared for use by American Armed Forces personnel who needed to develop a working command of the spoken language in a short period of time. Thirty-one lessons, based on activities common to Dutch culture, are contained in the text. Each lesson provides three parallel columns of sentences: the…

  7. Max Planck-Founder of Quantum Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 2. Max Planck - Founder of Quantum Theory. N Mukunda. Article-in-a-Box Volume 13 Issue 2 February 2008 pp 103-105. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/013/02/0103-0105 ...

  8. New Firm Performance and the Replacement of Founder-CEOs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jing; Thompson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We study the causes and consequences of the replacement of founder-CEOs in a sample of 4,172 Danish start-ups. We propose that founder-CEO replacement is driven in part by mismatches between business quality and founder ability. Our framework suggests that replacements are more likely among...... the worst- and best-performing firms, with low (high)-ability founders replaced by manager with higher (lower) ability. Replacement is not unambiguously associated with better subsequent performance. Firms that replaced the founder were much more likely to fail, but the surviving firms among them grew...

  9. Founder of a scientific school on plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2003-01-01

    The academician Mikhail Aleksandrovitch Leontovitch is a physicist-theorist of a wide profile (physical optics, oscillation theory, acoustics, statistical physics, thermodynamics), who became the founder of the largest scientific schools on the radiophysics and plasma physics. Namely due to his effective leadership in developing the theory our theoretical studies on the controlled thermonuclear synthesis reached high level and facilitated the success of the experiment [ru

  10. Corporate Social Responsibility in Large Family and Founder Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Block (Jörn); M. Wagner (Marcus)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBased on arguments about long-term orientation and corporate reputation, we argue that family and founder firms differ from other firms with regard to corporate social responsibility. Using Bayesian analysis, we then show that family and founder ownership are associated with a lower

  11. The Effect of Founder Family Influence on Hedging and Speculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom; Kuhn, Jochen; Zanotti, Giovanna

    founder family firms and other firms in relation to their management of foreign exchange rate, interest rate, and commodity price exposures. Digging deeper into a subsample of users of foreign exchange derivatives and debt denominated in foreign currency, we find that founder family firms not only tend...

  12. Characterization of founder viruses in very early SIV rectal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhe; Ma, Fangrui; Demers, Andrew J; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jianqing; Lewis, Mark G; Li, Qingsheng

    2017-02-01

    A better understanding of HIV-1 transmission is critical for developing preventative strategies. To that end, we analyzed 524 full-length env sequences of SIVmac251 at 6 and 10 days post intrarectal infection of rhesus macaques. There was no tissue compartmentalization of founder viruses across plasma, rectal and distal lymphatic tissues for most animals; however one animal has evidence of virus tissue compartmentalization. Despite identical viral inoculums, founder viruses were animal-specific, primarily derived from rare variants in the inoculum, and have a founder virus signature that can distinguish dominant founder variants from minor founder or untransmitted variants in the inoculum. Importantly, the sequences of post-transmission defective viruses were phylogenetically associated with competent viral variants in the inoculum and were mainly converted from competent viral variants by frameshift rather than APOBEC mediated mutations, suggesting the converting the transmitted viruses into defective viruses through frameshift mutation is an important component of rectal transmission bottleneck. Anorectal receptive intercourse is a common route of HIV-1 transmission and a better understanding of the transmission mechanisms is critical for developing HIV-1 preventative strategies. Here, we report that there is no tissue compartmentalization of founder viruses during very early rectal transmission of SIV in the majority of rhesus macaques and founder viruses are preferentially derived from rare variant in the inoculum. We also found that founder viruses are animal-specific despite identical viral inoculums. After viruses cross the mucosal barriers, the host further reduces viral diversity by converting some of the transmitted functional viruses into defective viruses through frameshift rather than APOBEC derived mutations. To our knowledge, this is the first study of founder viruses at multiple tissue sites during very early rectal transmission. Copyright © 2016

  13. The Lublin Philosophical School: Founders, Motives, Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysław A. Krąpiec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the Lublin Philosophical School; it explains its name, presents its founders, reveals the causes of its rise, and introduce the specific character of the School’s philosophy.It starts with stating the fact that in the proper sense, the term “Lublin Philosophical School” describes a way of cultivating realistic (classical philosophy developed in the 1950s by a group of philosophers at the Catholic University of Lublin, Poland. The Lublin Philosophical School is characterized by cognitive realism (the object of cognition is really existing being, maximalism (taking up all existentially important questions, methodological autonomy (in relation to the natural-mathematical sciences and theology, transcendentalism in its assertions (its assertions refer to all reality, methodological-epistemological unity (the same method applied in objectively cultivated philosophical disciplines, coherence (which guarantees the objective unity of the object, and objectivity (achieved by the verifiability of assertions on their own terms, which is achieved by relating them in each instance to objective evidence. The term is the name of the Polish school of realistic (classical philosophy that arose as a response to the Marxism that was imposed administratively on Polish institutions of learning, and also as a response to other philosophical currents dominant at the time such as phenomenology, existentialism, and logical positivism.

  14. 'Burnout' among Dutch midwives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.H.C.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Jabaaij, L.; Meijer, W.; Sixma, H.; Veer, A. de

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to determine the effect of workload on 'burnout' having considered work capacity. DESIGN: cross-sectional study. SETTING: Dutch community midwives in independent practice. PARTICIPANTS: 200 Dutch community midwives. MEASUREMENTS: three-week diary recordings, a questionnaire on practice

  15. Founder Family Influence and Foreign Exchange Risk Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom; Kuhn, Jochen; Zanotti, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    , founder family firms tend not only to hedge but also to speculate more extensively than other firms. Research limitations/implications The findings are based on medium-sized, manufacturing firms in Denmark. Originality/value This study provides empirical evidence on the influence of founder families......Purpose    The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of founder families in medium-sized, manufacturing firms and to investigate the impact of such influence on risk management - more specifically foreign exchange hedging and speculation. Design/methodology/approach This empirical study...... in medium-sized firms (as opposed to large, listed firms in most other studies) and adds to the sparse literature on the impact of founder family influence on risk management.  ...

  16. Founders at work stories of startups'' early days

    CERN Document Server

    Livingston, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Livingston presents a collection of interviews with founders of famous technology companies about what happens in the very earliest days. Includes interviews with Steve Wozniak (Apple), Max Levchin (PayPal), and others.

  17. Pieter de Molijn (1597-1661) : a Dutch painter and the art market in the seventeenth century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, M.E.W.

    2017-01-01

    Pieter de Molijn is considered by present-day art historians to be one of the founders of what is referred to as the tonal phase of naturalistic Dutch landscape painting, a position largely attributable to his Landscape with Dunes painted in 1626. Nevertheless, art historians such as Wolfgang

  18. A Dutch Fanconi Anemia FANCC Founder Mutation in Canadian Manitoba Mennonites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Yne; Lwiwski, Nikki; Levitus, Marieke; Kuyt, Bertus; Israels, Sara J.; Arwert, Fré; Zwaan, Michel; Greenberg, Cheryl R.; Alter, Blanche P.; Joenje, Hans; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive DNA instability disorder associated with developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and a predisposition to cancer. Based on their sensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, FA cells have been assigned to 15 complementation groups, and the associated genes

  19. Medical mall founders' satisfaction and integrated management requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary Medical malls help provide integrated medical services and the effective and efficient independent management of multiple clinics, pharmacies and other medical facilities. Primary care in an aging society is a key issue worldwide and the establishment of a new model for primary care in Japanese medical malls is needed. Understanding the requirements of integrated management that contribute to the improvement of medical mall founders' satisfaction levels will help provide better services. We conducted a questionnaire survey targeting 1840 medical facilities nationwide; 351 facilities responded (19.1%). We performed comparative analyses on founders' satisfaction levels according to years in business, department/area, founder's relationship, decision‐making system and presence/absence of liaison role. A total of 70% of medical malls in Japan have adjacent relationships with no liaison role in most cases; however, 60% of founders are satisfied. Integrated management requirements involve establishing the mall with peers from the same medical office unit or hospital, and establishing a system in which all founders can participate in decision‐making (council system) or one where each general practitioner (GP) independently runs a clinic without communicating with others. The council system can ensure the capability of general practitioners to treat many primary care patients in the future. © 2016 The Authors. The International Journal of Health Planning and Management Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd PMID:27218206

  20. MSR Founders Narrative and Content Analysis of Scholarly Papers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tackney, Charles T.; Chappell, Stacie F.; Sato, Toyoko

    2017-01-01

    the Interest Group. The founders interviewed were identified through preliminary inquiry and from archival sources. As complement and extension, we concurrently conducted a content analysis of the 15 years of MSR Best Papers and Carolyn Dexter Award MSR nominated papers for Academy internationalization...... of spirituality in management practices that infuse MSR with its enduring organizational vitality....

  1. What founders in developing countries learn about organizing microenterprise growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pötz, Katharina Anna; Hjortsø, Carsten Nico Portefée

    of microenterprise growth in Tanzania, this study therefore investigates what microenterprise founders learn about effective resource orchestration (RO) from organizational process experience. Our findings suggest that they first learn to orchestrate relatively simple and informal ‘micro-programs’ for gathering...

  2. Utilization of founder lines for improved Citrus biotechnology via RMCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    On October 1st 2011 the CRB chose to fund a unique research project, the development of citrus cultivars specifically for genetic engineering (GE). The objective of this research was to develop GE citrus ‘Founder Lines’ containing DNA sequences that will allow the precise insertion of genes for de...

  3. Founders of share companies under the Ethiopian share company ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article explores the Commercial Code and other laws of Ethiopia regarding founders – who they are, liabilities and benefits - who are also called 'promoters' by many other company laws. To some extent, it also looks into the business practice based on documents like memorandum of associations, articles of ...

  4. Founder effect in 20 Afrikaner kindreds with pseudoxanthoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is suggested that these two groups are the founder groups of present-day PXE patients. Similar genealogical studies have been performed on kindreds with familial polyposis, familial heart block and familial hyper. cholesterolaemia, among other disorders. Due to geographical isolation, political developments and cultural ...

  5. The Dutch nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering Services Ltd. has, in fulfillment of its contractual commitment to the Dutch Industrial Council for Energy and Environment Technology (IREM), investigated the broad capability of the Dutch industry in playing a major role in the supply of goods and services for the construction of nuclear plants in the Netherlands. The findings are summarized in this document. 5 tabs

  6. A founder BRCA2 mutation in non-Afrikaner breast cancer patients of the Western Cape of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, N C; Hamel, N; Schneider, S-R; Apffelstaedt, J P; Wijnen, J T; Foulkes, W D

    2012-02-01

    Founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in many different populations. We studied 105 Coloured and 16 Black Xhosa women residing in the Western Cape of South Africa diagnosed with breast cancer. We screened these patients using our standard panel of six previously reported SA Afrikaner and Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1/2 mutations and identified only two Afrikaner mutations. Further screening by the protein truncation test (BRCA1 exon 11, and BRCA2 exons 10 and 11) revealed an additional four deleterious mutations (BRCA1 c.1504_ 1508del,p.Leu502AlafsX2, BRCA2 c.2826_2829del,p.Ile943LysfsX16, c.6447_6448dup,p.Lys2150IlefsX19 and c.5771_5774del,p.Ile1924Argfs X38). The latter, also known in Breast Cancer Information Core nomenclature as 5999del4, was identified in 4 of 105 (3.8%) Coloureds and 4 of 16 (25%) Xhosa women, which makes it a frequent founder mutation in the Western Cape Province. Although this mutation was previously reported to occur in the Netherlands, haplotype analysis indicated two distinct origins for the Dutch and South African mutations, excluding the possibility of a common Dutch ancestor and suggesting gene flow from the indigenous tribes such as the Xhosa to the Coloured population instead. Further studies to determine the carrier rate of this variant in the Xhosa and other SA populations are warranted. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. MOOC Introduction to Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hollander, Franciscus; Piersma, Kristien

    Interview met Margriet Hidding, Birgit Lijmbach en Jeroen van Engen, medewerkers van het Talencentrum en de makers van de Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Introduction to Dutch over het grote succes van deze cursus

  8. The Dutch Economy 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    In the series 'The Dutch Economy' the Dutch Statistical Office describes and analyzes annual developments in enterprises, households and governments, and with respect to employment and the environment. One of the subjects is 'Economy and Environment' with the sub-topics 'Resources and Energy', 'Emissions' and 'Environmental Taxes'. Furthermore, in articles on specific themes current economic issues are discussed. One of those themes has the title 'Share of renewable energy in the Netherlands is still small'. [nl

  9. Splicing landscape of the eight collaborative cross founder strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Christina L; Wilmot, Beth; Walter, Nicole Ar; Oberbeck, Denesa; Kawane, Sunita; Searles, Robert P; McWeeney, Shannon K; Hitzemann, Robert

    2015-02-05

    The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a large panel of genetically diverse recombinant inbred mouse strains specifically designed to provide a systems genetics resource for the study of complex traits. In part, the utility of the CC stems from the extensive genome-wide annotations of founder strain sequence and structural variation. Still missing, however, are transcriptome-specific annotations of the CC founder strains that could further enhance the utility of this resource. We provide a comprehensive survey of the splicing landscape of the 8 CC founder strains by leveraging the high level of alternative splicing within the brain. Using deep transcriptome sequencing, we found that a majority of the splicing landscape is conserved among the 8 strains, with ~65% of junctions being shared by at least 2 strains. We, however, found a large number of potential strain-specific splicing events as well, with an average of ~3000 and ~500 with ≥3 and ≥10 sequence read coverage, respectively, within each strain. To better understand strain-specific splicing within the CC founder strains, we defined criteria for and identified high-confidence strain-specific splicing events. These splicing events were defined as exon-exon junctions 1) found within only one strain, 2) with a read coverage ≥10, and 3) defined by a canonical splice site. With these criteria, a total of 1509 high-confidence strain-specific splicing events were identified, with the majority found within two of the wild-derived strains, CAST and PWK. Strikingly, the overwhelming majority, 94%, of these strain-specific splicing events are not yet annotated. Strain-specific splicing was also located within genomic regions recently reported to be over- and under-represented within CC populations. Phenotypic characterization of CC populations is increasing; thus these results will not only aid in further elucidating the transcriptomic architecture of the individual CC founder strains, but they will also help in guiding

  10. DutchParl: A corpus of parliamentary documents in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marx, M.; Schuth, A.

    2010-01-01

    A corpus called DutchParl is created which aims to contain all digitally available parliamentary documents written in the Dutch language. The first version of DutchParl contains documents from the parliaments of The Netherlands, Flanders and Belgium. The corpus is divided along three dimensions: per

  11. Dutch School in Geneva

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch School in Geneva organizes Dutch education for children in the primary and secondary school. For the school year 2011-2012 the Dutch School in Geneva is looking for qualified part time teachers Dutch for the primary and secondary school. If you are interested, please send your application and curriculum vitae in Dutch by email to the NTC coordinator, Mrs. Anne Saeys (anne.saeys@free.fr). More info : www.ntcgeneve.info De vereniging Nederlandse Taal en Cultuur De Taalfontein, kortweg NTC Genève, is een oudervereniging, die tot doel heeft de Nederlandse taal en de Nederlandse en Vlaamse cultuur in de regio Genève te stimuleren. Dit geschiedt d.m.v. het organiseren van Nederlandse les voor leerlingen zowel in het basisonderwijs als het voortgezet onderwijs. Voor het volgende schooljaar zoekt NTC parttime docenten (M/V) vanaf 2 uur per week, zowel voor het Primair Onderwijs als voor het Voortgezet Onderwijs, met name voor de IB-opleiding. Voor het Primair Onderwijs dienen ge&...

  12. Native American admixture in the Quebec founder population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Moreau

    Full Text Available For years, studies of founder populations and genetic isolates represented the mainstream of genetic mapping in the effort to target genetic defects causing Mendelian disorders. The genetic homogeneity of such populations as well as relatively homogeneous environmental exposures were also seen as primary advantages in studies of genetic susceptibility loci that underlie complex diseases. European colonization of the St-Lawrence Valley by a small number of settlers, mainly from France, resulted in a founder effect reflected by the appearance of a number of population-specific disease-causing mutations in Quebec. The purported genetic homogeneity of this population was recently challenged by genealogical and genetic analyses. We studied one of the contributing factors to genetic heterogeneity, early Native American admixture that was never investigated in this population before. Consistent admixture estimates, in the order of one per cent, were obtained from genome-wide autosomal data using the ADMIXTURE and HAPMIX software, as well as with the fastIBD software evaluating the degree of the identity-by-descent between Quebec individuals and Native American populations. These genomic results correlated well with the genealogical estimates. Correlations are imperfect most likely because of incomplete records of Native founders' origin in genealogical data. Although the overall degree of admixture is modest, it contributed to the enrichment of the population diversity and to its demographic stratification. Because admixture greatly varies among regions of Quebec and among individuals, it could have significantly affected the homogeneity of the population, which is of importance in mapping studies, especially when rare genetic susceptibility variants are in play.

  13. The Dutch Census 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Schulte Nordholt

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Dutch 2011 Census tables were produced by combining existing register and sample survey data. Since the last census based on a complete enumeration was held in 1971, the willingness of the population to participace has fallen sharply. Statistics Netherlands no longer uses census questionnaires and has found an alternative in the register-based census, using only existing data. The register-based census is cheaper and more socially acceptable. The table results of the Netherlands are not only comparable with earlier Dutch censuses, but also with those of the other countries in the 2011 European Census Round.

  14. A Test of Founder Effect Speciation Using Multiple Loci in the Auklets (Aethia spp.)

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, H. E.; Jones, I. L.; Friesen, V. L.

    2005-01-01

    Whether speciation results more frequently from the genetic consequences of founder events or from gradual genetic divergence of large populations is a matter of debate. In this study, multiple analyses were applied to data from three loci (cytochrome b, α-enolase intron VIII, and MHC class II B) to test for founder effects associated with speciation in Aethia (Aves: Alcidae), a genus of seabirds thought to have undergone a rapid founder-induced radiation. Effective population sizes (Ne) were...

  15. BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations and cancer risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nilbert, Mef; Petersen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes significantly contribute to hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but the phenotypic effect from different mutations is insufficiently recognized. We used a western Danish clinic-based cohort of 299 BRCA families to study the female cancer risk...... in mutation carriers and their untested first-degree relatives. Founder mutations were characterized and the risk of cancer was assessed in relation to the specific mutations. In BRCA1, the cumulative cancer risk at age 70 was 35 % for breast cancer and 29 % for ovarian cancer. In BRCA2, the cumulative risk...... was 44 % for breast cancer and 15 % for ovarian cancer. We identified 47 distinct BRCA1 mutations and 48 distinct mutations in BRCA2. Among these, 8 founder mutations [BRCA1 c.81-?_4986+?del, c.3319G>T (p.Glu1107*), c.3874delT and c.5213G>A (p.Gly1738Glu) and BRCA2 c.6373delA, c.7008-1G>A, c.7617+1G...

  16. The Dutch Grey Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2008-01-01

    When-issued trading concerns transactions in securities that have not yet been issued. This type of trade often takes place in a so-called 'grey market', in which all contracts are conditional on the issuance of the security. In this paper, we investigate the Dutch grey market for when-issued shares

  17. The Dutch Grey Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2008-01-01

    When-issued trading concerns transactions in securities that have not yet been issued. This type of trade often takes place in a so-called ‘grey market’, in which all contracts are conditional on the issuance of the security. In this paper, we investigate the Dutch grey market for when-issued shares

  18. Dutch economists top 40

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbring, J.H.; Bronnenberg, B.J.J.A.M.; Gautier, P.A.; van Ours, J.C.

    There is a tradition in the Netherlands to publish an annual ranking of economic and business researchers working in Dutch universities. The most recent such ranking, published in 2013, emphasizes research quantity over research quality. We propose an alternative ranking based on quality. Important

  19. Revisiting the Dutch hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Dirkje S.; Weiss, Scott T.; van den Berge, Maarten; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    The Dutch hypothesis was first articulated in 1961, when many novel and advanced scientific techniques were not available, such as genomics techniques for pinpointing genes, gene expression, lipid and protein profiles, and the microbiome. In addition, computed tomographic scans and advanced analysis

  20. The Fine Dutch Tradition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooimeijer, F.L.

    2012-01-01

    Publication of the exhibition and symposium on water adaptive urban planning and architecture in Bangkok. The Urban Fine Dutch Tradition is a dynamic tradition of making urban designs using the parameters of the natural system – incorperating in an efficient way the hydrological cycle, the soil and

  1. Dutch Building Decree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, N.P.M.

    2000-01-01

    On the 1 October 1992 a change in the Dutch building legislation took effect: the revised Housing Act, the Building Decree and the technical documents related to this legislation came into force. This publication contains an English translation of the Building Decree. In order to give an idea of the

  2. The New Dutch Waterline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuure, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, heritage is shifting towards a more structural approach, focusing on the urban landscape in which the intangible or the narrative of the place is used more often. The New Dutch Waterline is an example of this changing focus. This national transformation process (1999-now) led to high

  3. Survival of Dutch heathlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemont, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES OF THE THESIS

    Heathlands in The Netherlands are vanishing due to the invasion of trees. The transition from heathland to woodland in Dutch heathlands may either proceed directly or is preceded by the development of an intermediate grass heath. These changes are due to natural

  4. Dutch surgery in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulik, Thomas M.; Nimura, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    An isolation policy was adopted in feudal Japan from 1639 to 1853 owing to the fear of foreign influence. During those 200 years of isolation, all foreigners were withheld from the country with the exception of the Dutch, who were permitted to establish a trading post on a small island in the Bay of

  5. Dutch Risk Assessment tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, A.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Risico- Inventarisatie- en Evaluatie-instrumenten’ is the name for the Dutch risk assessment (RA) tools. A RA tool can be used to perform a risk assessment including an evaluation of the identified risks. These tools were among the first online risk assessment tools developed in Europe. The

  6. The Dutch Open Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.; Hammerschlag, R.H.; Bettonvil, F.C.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is now being installed at La Palma. It is intended for optical solar observations with high spatial resolution. Its open design aims to minimize disturbances of the local air ow and so re- duce the locally-generated component of the atmospheric seeing. This paper brie y

  7. A common Greenlandic Inuit BRCA1 RING domain founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.v.O.; Ejlertsen, B.; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. We examined 32 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients from Greenland for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Whereas no mutations were identified in 19 families, 13 families exhibited a BRCA1...... exon 3 nucleotide 234 T > G mutation, which has not previously been reported in the breast cancer information core (BIC) database. The mutation changes a conserved cysteine 39 to a glycine in the Zn(2+) site II of the RING domain, which is essential for BRCA1 ubiquitin ligase activity. Eight...... of the families had members with ovarian cancer, suggesting that the RING domain may be an ovarian cancer hotspot. By SNP array analysis, we find that all 13 families share a 4.5 Mb genomic fragment containing the BRCA1 gene, showing that the mutation originates from a founder. Finally, analysis of 1152 Inuit...

  8. [Identification and characterization of HIV-1 transmitted /founder viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-yuan; Ding, Ji-wei; Mi, Ze-yun; Wei, Tao; Cen, Shan

    2015-05-01

    During the spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the mucosa, the entire genetic diversity of the viruses is significantly reduced. The vast majority of HIV-1 mucosal infections are established by one or a few viruses and ultimately develop into systemic infections, thus the initial virus is called transmitted/founder virus (T/F virus). The study of T/F virus will benefit understanding its key characteristics resulting in successful viral replication in the new host body, which may provide novel strategies for the development of AIDS vaccines, pre-exposure prophylaxis and other therapeutic interventions. In this review, we summarize the discovery and evolutionary characteristics of T/F virus as well as early immune response after HIV-1 infection, which will establish the basis to explore the features of T/F viruses.

  9. Y chromosome evidence for a founder effect in Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Almut; Filon, Dvora; Faerman, Marina; Soodyall, Himla; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2005-03-01

    Recent genetic studies, based on Y chromosome polymorphic markers, showed that Ashkenazi Jews are more closely related to other Jewish and Middle Eastern groups than to their host populations in Europe. However, Ashkenazim have an elevated frequency of R-M17, the dominant Y chromosome haplogroup in Eastern Europeans, suggesting possible gene flow. In the present study of 495 Y chromosomes of Ashkenazim, 57 (11.5%) were found to belong to R-M17. Detailed analyses of haplotype structure, diversity and geographic distribution suggest a founder effect for this haplogroup, introduced at an early stage into the evolving Ashkenazi community in Europe. R-M17 chromosomes in Ashkenazim may represent vestiges of the mysterious Khazars.

  10. Dutch ministerial visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science R. Plasterk (third from left) in the ATLAS cavern with NIKHEF Director F. Linde, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen, Ambassador J. van Eenennaam, ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Mission Representative G. Vrielink and ATLAS Magnet Project Leader H. ten Kate.Minister of Education, Culture and Science from the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Ronald Plasterk, visited CERN on 25th October. With Jos Engelen, CERN Scientific Director, as his guide he visited Point 1 of the LHC tunnel and ATLAS, where Nikhef (the national institute for subatomic physics, a Dutch government and university collaboration) constructed all 96 of the largest muon drift chambers in the barrel as well as parts of the magnet system, the inner detector, the DAQ and triggering. Overall the Netherlands contribute 4.5% to the annual CERN budget and the minister’s visit celebrated the contributions of the 79 ...

  11. Multiculturalism and acculturation : Views of Dutch and Turkish-Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends-Tóth, J.V.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.

    2003-01-01

    The psychological component of immigration in the Netherlands was studied by comparing views on multiculturalism and acculturation orientation of Turkish migrants between Dutch majority (N=1565) and Turkish-Dutch minority (N=185) members. Multiculturalism was measured with an adaptation of the

  12. Dutch myotonic dystrophy type 2 patients and a North-African DM2 family carry the common European founder haplotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, M.J.H.; Tieleman, A.A.; Schijvenaars, M.M.V.A.P.; Leferink, M.; Ranum, L.P.; Scheffer, H.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a progressive multisystem disease with muscle weakness and myotonia as main characteristics. The disease is caused by a repeat expansion in the zinc-finger protein 9 (ZNF9) gene on chromosome 3q21. Several reports show that patients from European ancestry share an

  13. Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD): Taking Advantage from Founder Mutations in Genetics Diagnosis, Genetic Diversity and Migration History of the Mediterranean Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoute, Hicham; Bakhchane, Amina; Benrahma, Houda; Romdhane, Lilia; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Abdelhak, Sonia; Lenaers, Guy; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2015-11-01

    The Mediterranean basin has been the theater of migration crossroads followed by settlement of several societies and cultures in prehistoric and historical times, with important consequences on genetic and genomic determinisms. Here, we present the Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD), established to offer web-based access to founder mutation information in the Mediterranean population. Mutation data were collected from the literature and other online resources and systematically reviewed and assembled into this database. The information provided for each founder mutation includes DNA change, amino-acid change, mutation type and mutation effect, as well as mutation frequency and coalescence time when available. Currently, the database contains 383 founder mutations found in 210 genes related to 219 diseases. We believe that MFMD will help scientists and physicians to design more rapid and less expensive genetic diagnostic tests. Moreover, the coalescence time of founder mutations gives an overview about the migration history of the Mediterranean population. MFMD can be publicly accessed from http://mfmd.pasteur.ma. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. The Dutch surgical colorectal audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leersum, N. J.; Snijders, H. S.; Henneman, D.; Kolfschoten, N. E.; Gooiker, G. A.; ten Berge, M. G.; Eddes, E. H.; Wouters, M. W. J. M.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Bemelman, W. A.; van Dam, R. M.; Elferink, M. A.; Karsten, Th M.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; Lemmens, V. E. P. P.; Rutten, H. J. T.; Manusama, E. R.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Meijerink, W. J. H. J.; Wiggers, Th; van der Harst, E.; Dekker, J. W. T.; Boerma, D.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the nationwide Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) was initiated by the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands (ASN) to monitor, evaluate and improve colorectal cancer care. The DSCA is currently widely used as a blueprint for the initiation of other audits, coordinated by the Dutch

  15. Dutch Colonial Nostalgia Across Decolonisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that nostalgia for colonialism in the Netherlands, the so called tempo doeloe culture, is not a specifically postcolonial phenomenon caused by the collapse of the Dutch empire in Asia. In fact, nostalgia for the Dutch East Indies can be traced back to the nineteenth century, when

  16. Dutch radiodiagnostics viewed internationally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valois, J.C. de

    1990-01-01

    Dutch radiodiagnostics viewed internationally. - A quantitative description of diagnostic radiology is given in terms of radiological density (the number of radiological examinations per 1000 inhibitants), consumptions of roentgen film and contrast media. The data concerning examinations were recorded by a yearly inquiry system addressing all Dutch radiologists. The consumption of film and contrast media were derived from the data banks of the industries. In comparing these data with the data for Western Europe, Japan and the United States it is remarkable that diagnostic radiology scores lowest in regard to density, film consumption and use of contrast media. Only in the use of 35 mm cinefilm (coronary angiography) is The Netherlands number 2 on the list preceded by the United States. As a consequence radiation exposure of the population caused by diagnostic radiology is low in The Netherlands. Although the technical condition of the equipment is good due to regular and preventive service the life-span of the radiological equipment is gradually increasing beyond the limits of the normal economic depreciation. Growing arrears are found in the application of new technology: ultrasound, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The substitution of high osmolar contrast media by low osmolar media is also laggin gbehind. (author). 10 refs.; 1 fig.; 4 tab

  17. Drosophila Heartless acts with Heartbroken/Dof in muscle founder differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devkanya Dutta

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of a multi-nucleate myofibre is directed, in Drosophila, by a founder cell. In the embryo, founders are selected by Notch-mediated lateral inhibition, while during adult myogenesis this mechanism of selection does not appear to operate. We show, in the muscles of the adult abdomen, that the Fibroblast growth factor pathway mediates founder cell choice in a novel manner. We suggest that the developmental patterns of Heartbroken/Dof and Sprouty result in defining the domain and timing of activation of the Fibroblast growth factor receptor Heartless in specific myoblasts, thereby converting them into founder cells. Our results point to a way in which muscle differentiation could be initiated and define a critical developmental function for Heartbroken/Dof in myogenesis.

  18. Aristarchus Lewkowski — the founder of Saratov's Neurology (the 150th anniversary of his birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolov O.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the information about the life, career and scientific work of Aristarchus Lewkowski — the founder of Saratov'sNeurological science school and the creator of outpatient neurological services.

  19. Founder mutations in Tunisia: implications for diagnosis in North Africa and Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Tunisia is a North African country of 10 million inhabitants. The native background population is Berber. However, throughout its history, Tunisia has been the site of invasions and migratory waves of allogenic populations and ethnic groups such as Phoenicians, Romans, Vandals, Arabs, Ottomans and French. Like neighbouring and Middle Eastern countries, the Tunisian population shows a relatively high rate of consanguinity and endogamy that favor expression of recessive genetic disorders at relatively high rates. Many factors could contribute to the recurrence of monogenic morbid trait expression. Among them, founder mutations that arise in one ancestral individual and diffuse through generations in isolated communities. Method We report here on founder mutations in the Tunisian population by a systematic review of all available data from PubMed, other sources of the scientific literature as well as unpublished data from our research laboratory. Results We identified two different classes of founder mutations. The first includes founder mutations so far reported only among Tunisians that are responsible for 30 genetic diseases. The second group represents founder haplotypes described in 51 inherited conditions that occur among Tunisians and are also shared with other North African and Middle Eastern countries. Several heavily disabilitating diseases are caused by recessive founder mutations. They include, among others, neuromuscular diseases such as congenital muscular dystrophy and spastic paraglegia and also severe genodermatoses such as dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and xeroderma pigmentosa. Conclusion This report provides informations on founder mutations for 73 genetic diseases either specific to Tunisians or shared by other populations. Taking into account the relatively high number and frequency of genetic diseases in the region and the limited resources, screening for these founder mutations should provide a rapid and cost effective tool for

  20. The Slavic NBN Founder Mutation: A Role for Reproductive Fitness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Seemanova

    Full Text Available The vast majority of patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS are of Slavic origin and carry a deleterious deletion (c.657del5; rs587776650 in the NBN gene on chromosome 8q21. This mutation is essentially confined to Slavic populations and may thus be considered a Slavic founder mutation. Notably, not a single parenthood of a homozygous c.657del5 carrier has been reported to date, while heterozygous carriers do reproduce but have an increased cancer risk. These observations seem to conflict with the considerable carrier frequency of c.657del5 of 0.5% to 1% as observed in different Slavic populations because deleterious mutations would be eliminated quite rapidly by purifying selection. Therefore, we propose that heterozygous c.657del5 carriers have increased reproductive success, i.e., that the mutation confers heterozygote advantage. In fact, in our cohort study of the reproductive history of 24 NBS pedigrees from the Czech Republic, we observed that female carriers gave birth to more children on average than female non-carriers, while no such reproductive differences were observed for males. We also estimate that c.657del5 likely occurred less than 300 generations ago, thus supporting the view that the original mutation predated the historic split and subsequent spread of the 'Slavic people'. We surmise that the higher fertility of female c.657del5 carriers reflects a lower miscarriage rate in these women, thereby reflecting the role of the NBN gene product, nibrin, in the repair of DNA double strand breaks and their processing in immune gene rearrangements, telomere maintenance, and meiotic recombination, akin to the previously described role of the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2.

  1. N.A. Bernstein, the founder of modern biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazha M. Devishvili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with three major periods of scientific work of Nikolai Alexandrovich Bernstein, the outstanding Russian scientist, the founder the motor activity theory of human and animal. In 2016 is the 120th anniversary of Bernstein´s birth. The first period of his scientific activity, from 1922 when Bernstein started his research at the Central Institute of Labour Protection until the middle of the 30s of the 20th century. By this time, he formulated and published the basic principles and ideas of the annular motion control and sensor correction movements of varying complexity and various performance. The second period ends with the fundamental scientific work «On the Construction of Movements» awarded by the USSR State Prize in 1948. The book sums up Bernstein´s more than twenty years of research in the field of biomechanics and physiology of movement. The paper briefly describes the main assumptions of the three chapters of the book. The first chapter «Movements» reveals the evolutionary ideas about the origin of motor function and shaped the principle of the equation of building movements. The second chapter describes five levels with different functionality in varying degrees involved in the implementation of motor actions. The third chapter of the «Development and Decay» deals with the general laws of occurrence and levels of building movements being signs of confirming the level structure of motion in pathology and standards. In 1950-60-ies of the 20th century Bernstein greatly expanded representation of the functional content and neural substrate levels of building movements, detailed the stages and phases of shaping and improvement of motor skills. The author shows the importance of scientific achievements of N.A. Bernstein for modern research in the psychophysiology of movements.

  2. Legacy of mutiny on the Bounty: founder effect and admixture on Norfolk Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, Stuart; Bellis, Claire; Lea, Rod A; Cox, Hannah; Dyer, Tom; Blangero, John; Visscher, Peter M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2010-01-01

    The population of Norfolk Island, located off the eastern coast of Australia, possesses an unusual and fascinating history. Most present-day islanders are related to a small number of the 'Bounty' mutineer founders. These founders consisted of Caucasian males and Polynesian females and led to an admixed present-day population. By examining a single large pedigree of 5742 individuals, spanning >200 years, we analyzed the influence of admixture and founder effect on various cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related traits. On account of the relative isolation of the population, on average one-third of the genomes of present-day islanders (single large pedigree individuals) is derived from 17 initial founders. The proportion of Polynesian ancestry in the present-day individuals was found to significantly influence total triglycerides, body mass index, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. For various cholesterol traits, the influence of ancestry was less marked but overall the direction of effect for all CVD-related traits was consistent with Polynesian ancestry conferring greater CVD risk. Marker-derived homozygosity was computed and agreed with measures of inbreeding derived from pedigree information. Founder effect (inbreeding and marker-derived homozygosity) significantly influenced height. In conclusion, both founder effect and extreme admixture have substantially influenced the genetic architecture of a variety of CVD-related traits in this population.

  3. Business strategy versus human resources strategy: the influence of the founder in small business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Popp Barbosa Lima

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small and medium-sized businesses with familiar characteristics have been object of study in recent years, especially about the succession process, considering it is extremely critical to the longevity and sustainability of the organization. However, the figure of the founder and its impact in these organizations is less explored in academia. Thus, this article seeks to fill this gap, addressing the influences of the founder in the dissemination of business and HR strategies in these companies. Through a qualitative and quantitative research, there was a case of a single organization study seeking further analysis of the subject. The collection of qualitative data was given through an interview with semi-structured interview with the founder of the organization and the qualitative by applying a questionnaire with closed questions with officials of various hierarchical levels. It was observed that the personal values and the founding principles are permeated the organization, reflected in the mission and values of the company, as well as how the founder treats topics such as business strategy and the role of people management are decisive for inclusion and driving these topics within family-based organizations. The purpose of analyzing the spread of business strategies and human resources of the Founder has been reached. It was found that, in general, strategies portray the way of the Founder, however, the spread of these to the various hierarchical levels, demonstrates a more complex, as in the HRM.

  4. On foundering lithosphere and volatile migration: Upside-down melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins-Tanton, L.

    2007-12-01

    On Earth magmatism occurs on continents in the absence of subduction, often producing volatile-rich magmas such as those in the Leucite Hills, the Sierra Nevada, and Peru's Altiplano. The primary hypothesis to explain this volcanism is foundering of the lower lithosphere into the mantle. Here loss of the lower lithosphere is hypothesized to occur in a ductile manner in response to a density contrast such as would be caused by intruding mantle melts that freeze as eclogites. This mechanism requires no specific structural weakness beyond a dense region in the lithosphere that is gravitationally unstable with respect to the underlying mantle and that possesses a rheology conducive to flow. Density contrasts of as little as 1% are fully sufficient to drive gravitational instabilities. A gravitational instability forms when a perturbation in a boundary grows through lateral flow, causing the perturbation to grow. The growing instability begins to sink into the underlying mantle material as a drip, exactly analogous to but reversed in the sense of growth from an ascending plume head. The unstable material will sink more rapidly than lateral flow in the lower lithosphere can continue to add material to it, resulting in an annulus of thinned lithosphere centered on the instability. Thus the lithosphere is thinned slightly in the region around the drip, but no dome forms in the lower lithosphere during ductile delamination. Traditionally magmatism associated with instabilities has been attributed to return flow of the asthenosphere into such a dome, but maintaining a dome in the lithosphere requires unusual rheological conditions not expected in such a setting. Any volatile content in the sinking material may act in petrologically significant ways. The sinking lower lithosphere may contain 0.1 to 0.2 mass% of water if only nominally anhydrous minerals are present, and up to several weight percent of water if phlogopite or amphibole are present. The sinking lithospheric

  5. Prevalence and impact of founder mutations in hereditary breast cancer in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ashton-Prolla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of all cancers are considered hereditary and are primarily caused by germline, high penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes. Although most cancer predisposition genes are considered molecularly heterogeneous, displaying hundreds of different disease-causing sequence alterations, founder mutations have been identified in certain populations. In some Latin American countries, founder mutations associated with increased risk of breast and other cancers have been described. This is particularly interesting considering that in most of these countries, populations are highly admixed with genetic contributions from native populations and from the influx of several distinct populations of immigrants. In this article, we present a review of the scientific literature on the subject and describe current data available on founder mutations described in the most common breast cancer predisposition genes: BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53.

  6. Teaching the Dutch how to pronounce English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Frans; Sloep, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The Dutch overestimate their English speaking skills. Their pronunciation is not always convincing, and certain pronunciation mistakes are easily recognised as being typical for Dutch speakers of English. Although intelligibility cannot exist without adequate pronunciation, teaching English

  7. Teaching the Dutch how to pronounce English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frans Hermans; Peter Sloep

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch overestimate their English speaking skills. Their pronunciation is not always convincing and certain pronunciation mistakes are easily recognised as being typical for Dutch speakers of English. Although intelligibility cannot exist without adequate pronunciation, teaching English

  8. The role of women on Dutch farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, van der H.A.B.; Terluin, I.J.; Matser, I.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper an analysis is made of the contribution of women to labour input and management on Dutch farms. We used a written survey among the participants of the Dutch Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN), in-depth interviews and a group discussion with farm women. Over half of the women on Dutch

  9. Dutch Batik Motifs: The Role of The Ruler and The Dutch Bussinesman

    OpenAIRE

    Asidigisianti Surya Patria

    2017-01-01

    Dutch Batik is the referent of batik which is made by European-Indo woman industry. It can be identified by the European pattern which is a bouquet. This research is aimed to describe the correlation between the development of Dutch Batik with the role of the Dutch government and the Dutch merchant. The library research was used during analyzing the role of the government and the merchant using the Talcott Parsons’ functional structure theory. The batik Dutch companies were commercial oriente...

  10. Interpreting The Chinese Wall knowing Dutch and ‘Dutchness'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forceville, C.

    2015-01-01

    Many film scholars equate "film" with "moving images." But, along with sound and music, language is often no less important for a film’s interpretation. This paper discusses how comprehension of the original Dutch affords subtle aspects of meaning unavailable to viewers who have to rely exclusively

  11. The impact of founder effects, gene flow, and European admixture on native American genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunley, Keith; Healy, Meghan

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have concluded that the global pattern of neutral genetic diversity in humans reflects a series of founder effects and population movements associated with our recent expansion out of Africa. In contrast, regional studies tend to emphasize the significance of more complex patterns of colonization, gene flow, and secondary population movements in shaping patterns of diversity. Our objective in this study is to examine how founder effects, gene flow, and European admixture have molded patterns of neutral genetic diversity in the Americas. Our strategy is to test the fit of a serial founder effects process to the pattern of neutral autosomal genetic variation and to examine the contribution of gene flow and European admixture to departures from fit. The genetic data consist of 678 autosomal microsatellite loci assayed by Wang and colleagues in 530 individuals in 29 widely distributed Native American populations. We find that previous evidence for serial founder effects in the Americas may be driven in part by high levels of European admixture in northern North America, intermediate levels in Central America, and low levels in eastern South America. Geographically patterned admixture may also account for previously reported genetic differences between Andean and Amazonian groups. Though admixture has obscured the precise details of precontact evolutionary processes, we find that genetic diversity is still largely hierarchically structured and that gene flow between neighboring groups has had surprisingly little impact on macrogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in the Americas. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Brief life history and views of Ted Rogers, founder of social work ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This brief communication shares notes from a 2012 meeting of Zimbabwean social workers in the United Kingdom with Ted Rogers, founder of social work education in Zimbabwe. It gives a brief of his work whilst he was still in Zimbabwe and shares his thinking about the current state of affairs in social work education in ...

  13. Clovis Vincent (1879-1947): founder of French neurosurgery and promoter of oncologic neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanou, M; Androutsos, G; Lymperi, M; Stamboulis, E; Liappas, I; Lykouras, E

    2012-01-01

    The eminent neurologist Clovis Vincent decided to become neurosurgeon at an advanced age. His is considered the founder of French neurosurgery and the Europe's first neurosurgeon. He was mainly interested in pituitary tumors and his work on oncologic neurosurgery remains valuable.

  14. How Lead Founder Personality Affects New Venture Performance: The Mediating Role of Team Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Ad; Song, Michael; Song, Lisa Z.

    2013-01-01

    This empirical study of 323 new ventures examines how task and relationship conflict in the founding top management team mediates the effect of lead founder personality on new venture performance. The results reveal that (1) openness and agreeableness increase task conflict, whereas

  15. Genome-wide patterns of identity-by-descent sharing in the French Canadian founder population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, Héloïse; Moreau, Claudia; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Laprise, Catherine; Vézina, Hélène; Labuda, Damian; Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène

    2014-06-01

    In genetics the ability to accurately describe the familial relationships among a group of individuals can be very useful. Recent statistical tools succeeded in assessing the degree of relatedness up to 6-7 generations with good power using dense genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data to estimate the extent of identity-by-descent (IBD) sharing. It is therefore important to describe genome-wide patterns of IBD sharing for more remote and complex relatedness between individuals, such as that observed in a founder population like Quebec, Canada. Taking advantage of the extended genealogical records of the French Canadian founder population, we first compared different tools to identify regions of IBD in order to best describe genome-wide IBD sharing and its correlation with genealogical characteristics. Results showed that the extent of IBD sharing identified with FastIBD correlates best with relatedness measured using genealogical data. Total length of IBD sharing explained 85% of the genealogical kinship's variance. In addition, we observed significantly higher sharing in pairs of individuals with at least one inbred ancestor compared with those without any. Furthermore, patterns of IBD sharing and average sharing were different across regional populations, consistent with the settlement history of Quebec. Our results suggest that, as expected, the complex relatedness present in founder populations is reflected in patterns of IBD sharing. Using these patterns, it is thus possible to gain insight on the types of distant relationships in a sample from a founder population like Quebec.

  16. The impact of founder events on chromosomal variability in multiply mating species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, John E; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    size reductions and recent bottlenecks leading to decreased X/A diversity ratios. Here we use theory and simulation to investigate a separate demographic effect-that of founder events involving multiply mated females-and find that it leads to much stronger reductions in X/A diversity ratios than...

  17. The Timeless Legacy of Robert Koch-Founder of Medical Microbiology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. The Timeless Legacy of Robert Koch - Founder of Medical Microbiology. Jaya S Tyagi. General Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 20-28. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Dutch museum marks Einstein anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Calmthout, Matijn

    2016-01-01

    A new painting of Albert Einstein's field equation from his 1915 general theory of relativity was unveiled in a ceremony in November 2015 by the Dutch physicist Robbert Dijkgraaf, who is director of the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study in the US.

  19. Sustainable innovations in Dutch SMEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertens, C.; Snoei, J.

    2011-11-01

    The 'Dutch Monitor Determinanten Bedrijfsprestaties in het MKB' (Determinants Company Performance Monitoring SMEs) has consulted almost 3.500 persons in SMEs on a number of questions, including on innovations. 40% of these persons perceive market opportunities for sustainable products, whereas only 25% of these businesses actually tries to capitalize on these opportunities. [nl

  20. The dutch surgical colorectal audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leersum, N.J. van; Snijders, H.S.; Henneman, D.; Kolfschoten, N.E.; Gooiker, G.A.; Berge, M.G. Ten; Eddes, E.H.; Wouters, M.W.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Bemelman, W.A.; Dam, R.M. van; Elferink, M.A.; Karsten, T.M.; Krieken, J.H. van; Lemmens, V.E.; Rutten, H.J.; Manusama, E.R.; Velde, C.J. van de; Meijerink, W.J.H.J.; Wiggers, T.; Harst, E. van der; Dekker, J.W.T.; Boerma, D.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2009, the nationwide Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) was initiated by the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands (ASN) to monitor, evaluate and improve colorectal cancer care. The DSCA is currently widely used as a blueprint for the initiation of other audits, coordinated

  1. Prescription in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L. van

    2006-01-01

    The second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (DNSGP-2) has combined registration data on morbidity and prescription, making it possible to unravel diagnosis-specific prescription behaviour of general practitioners(GPs). Prescription rates for different disorders vary considerably, especially

  2. Dutch Architecture with Landscape Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrami, F.; Bijster, J.; Bitarafan, N.; Cao, Z.; Cui, Y.; Liu, Y.; Ruan, L.; Maas, M.; Mayr, R.; Rozenmuller, M.; Toriano, L.; Yoshitake, M.; Jauslin, D.

    2009-01-01

    14 Project Documentations and Analysis of Dutch Architecture with Landscape Methods. MVRDV Villa VPRO, Powerhouse Company Villa 1, Herman Herzberger Coda Museum, NL Architects Basket Ba, SeARCH Posbank Pavillion, Wiel Arets Hedge House, OMA Kunsthal and Educatorium, Maaskant Johnson Wax, Diller &

  3. The Dutch Banking Chipcard Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. de Vries (Henk); G.W.J. Hendrikse (George)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe banks in the Dutch chipcard market initially agreed on one chipcard system. One system is attractive for companies as well as consumers. Companies, banks and retailers, prevent costs of duplication, while consumers enjoy the benefits of a widespread acceptance of one card and do not

  4. Nitrification in Dutch heathland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de W.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis is the result of a study on the production of nitrate in Dutch heathland soils. Most of the heathlands are located on acid, sandy soils. Therefore , it has dealt mainly with the occurrence, nature and mechanisms of nitrification in acid soils. In the Netherlands, the production

  5. Dutch-Chinese virtual cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, Y.; de Boer, S.J.; Stegwee, R.A.; Chen, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Technology advances in ICT have permitted an increased flow of information across borders, and increasingly companies are moving to so-called virtual alliances. The business relationships between Dutch and Chinese companies are becoming closer by ways of outsourcing, new market development and so

  6. Remembering Dutch-Moluccan radicalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    This article examines memory politics in relation to radical actions of young Dutch-Moluccans, more specifically a train hijacking in 1977 at the village of De Punt in the Netherlands. The article examines how these historical events were remembered in the drama-documentary television film, De Punt...

  7. The Dutch Interbank Computer Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michiels, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    At the end of 1980, a strategic decision was made by the Dutch banks and savings banks to commence the development of a Data Communications Infrastructure (DCI), to be used for a number of forthcoming interbank applications. It was agreed that this new data communications infrastructure should be

  8. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: Possibility of founder mutation in CYP27A1 gene (c.526delG) in Eastern Indian and Surinamese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Atanu Kumar; Danda, Sumita; Muthusamy, Karthik; Alexander, Mathew; Sudhakar, Sniya Valsa; Hansdak, Samuel; Bandyopadhyay, Rini; Bakhya Shree, G B; Rekha, L

    2015-06-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a lipid storage disease characterized by diarrhea, cataract, tendon xanthoma and neurological regression if untreated. CYP27A1 is the only gene in which mutations are known to cause Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis. We report two Indian families from different regions of India who underwent molecular testing of CYP27A1. The first family from Eastern India consisting of two affected individuals was found to have the c.526delG homozygous mutation in exon 3, previously reported from our laboratory, also in a patient from Eastern India. However the second affected individual from Southern India that we studied and two previously reported cases from Northern India have different mutations. Interestingly the only previous report of c.526delG mutation was in a Surinamese individual from the Netherlands. To date most of the pathogenic mutations for Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis have been confined to single population except for R362C mutation which was reported from the Netherlands and the USA (Black). To our knowledge this is the second causal mutation for Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis which has been reported in two different populations. As human trading was prevalent from Eastern India to Surinam by the Dutch settlers this mutation might suggest a common founder mutation in these populations.

  9. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: Possibility of founder mutation in CYP27A1 gene (c.526delG in Eastern Indian and Surinamese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu Kumar Dutta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a lipid storage disease characterized by diarrhea, cataract, tendon xanthoma and neurological regression if untreated. CYP27A1 is the only gene in which mutations are known to cause Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis. We report two Indian families from different regions of India who underwent molecular testing of CYP27A1. The first family from Eastern India consisting of two affected individuals was found to have the c.526delG homozygous mutation in exon 3, previously reported from our laboratory, also in a patient from Eastern India. However the second affected individual from Southern India that we studied and two previously reported cases from Northern India have different mutations. Interestingly the only previous report of c.526delG mutation was in a Surinamese individual from the Netherlands. To date most of the pathogenic mutations for Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis have been confined to single population except for R362C mutation which was reported from the Netherlands and the USA (Black. To our knowledge this is the second causal mutation for Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis which has been reported in two different populations. As human trading was prevalent from Eastern India to Surinam by the Dutch settlers this mutation might suggest a common founder mutation in these populations.

  10. Design methodology of Dutch banknotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heij, Hans A. M.

    2000-04-01

    Since the introduction of a design methodology for Dutch banknotes, the quality of Dutch paper currency has improved in more than one way. The methodology is question provides for (i) a design policy, which helps fix clear objectives; (ii) design management, to ensure a smooth cooperation between the graphic designer, printer, papermaker an central bank, (iii) a program of requirements, a banknote development guideline for all parties involved. This systematic approach enables an objective selection of design proposals, including security features. Furthermore, the project manager obtains regular feedback from the public by conducting market surveys. Each new design of a Netherlands Guilder banknote issued by the Nederlandsche Bank of the past 50 years has been an improvement on its predecessor in terms of value recognition, security and durability.

  11. A high frequent BRCA1 founder mutation identified in the Greenlandic population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Theresa Larriba; Eiberg, Hans; Kern, Peder

    2009-01-01

    occurring mutations, but founder mutations have been described. In this study we describe a founder mutation with wide spread presence in the Inuit population. We have screened 2,869 persons from Greenland for the presence of a BRCA1 mutation (p.Cys39Gly) only found in the Inuit population. The overall...... carrier frequency was 1.6% in the general population, but the frequency differs geographically from 0.6% on the West coast to 9.7% in the previously isolated population of the East coast. This is to our knowledge the highest population frequency of a BRCA1 mutation ever to be described. To determine...... the clinical relevance of the mutation, we have examined ten breast cancer patients and nine ovarian cancer patients from Greenland for the presence of the p.Cys39Gly mutation. We found three ovarian cancer patients (33%) and one breast cancer patient (10%) carrying the mutation. The high number of women...

  12. Momir H. Polenakovic - Founder of the Nephrology Associations in the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasovski, Goce; Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera

    2015-01-01

    Acad. Momir Polenakovic has devoted his life and work in the diagnosis and treatment of kidney patients, as well as in research of kidney disease. The great experience he has acquired in the work with kidney patients, and after the visit to the most renowned nephrology centers in Europe and the world, he has transferred it to his colleagues through the work in the medical and nephrology associations. The work of the associations was in fact a successful education of young doctors and specialists. Among his most distinguished positions, we can mention: President of the Macedonian Medical Association, founder and President of the MSNDTAO, President of the Yugoslav Society of Nephrology, founder and President of BANTAO, as well as member of the Boards of ESAO and ERA-EDTA. He has received a lot of recognitions for his work achievements.

  13. Corporate Governance in Brazilian Companies: The Influence of the Founder in the Financial Decisions.

    OpenAIRE

    Segura, Liliane; Formigoni, Henrique; Abreu, Rute; David, Fátima

    2017-01-01

    All over the world, corporate governance is adopting a new process of leadership and simultaneously propagating responsible governance for the welfare of stakeholders. This research has allowed us to identify new directions for future research. It examines the influence of several contextual factors in the framework of the financial decisions, where company has the right to have a transparent accountability, based on the influence of the founder, dispersion and type of ownershi...

  14. A serial founder effect model for human settlement out of Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande, Omkar; Batzoglou, Serafim; Feldman, Marcus W.; Luca Cavalli-Sforza, L.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing abundance of human genetic data has shown that the geographical patterns of worldwide genetic diversity are best explained by human expansion out of Africa. This expansion is modelled well by prolonged migration from a single origin in Africa with multiple subsequent serial founding events. We discuss a new simulation model for the serial founder effect out of Africa and compare it with results from previous studies. Unlike previous models, we distinguish colonization events fr...

  15. Mitochondrial Genome Diversity of Native Americans Supports a Single Early Entry of Founder Populations into America

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Jr., Wilson A.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Holanda, Adriano J.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea K.; Paixão, Beatriz M.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Abe-Sandes, Kiyoko; Rodriguez-Delfin, Luis; Barbosa, Marcela; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luiza; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Valente, Valeria; Santos, Sidney E. B.; Zago, Marco A.

    2002-01-01

    There is general agreement that the Native American founder populations migrated from Asia into America through Beringia sometime during the Pleistocene, but the hypotheses concerning the ages and the number of these migrations and the size of the ancestral populations are surrounded by controversy. DNA sequence variations of several regions of the genome of Native Americans, especially in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region, have been studied as a tool to help answer these questions...

  16. Ancient founder mutation is responsible for Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome among diverse ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Cameron M; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Shah, Nidhi P; Sturm, Amy C; Sadiq, May F; de la Chapelle, Albert; Tanner, Stephan M

    2011-11-13

    Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) was described just over 50 years ago by Olga Imerslund and Ralph Gräsbeck and colleagues. IGS is caused by specific malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) due to bi-allelic mutations in either the cubilin gene (CUBN) or the human amnionless homolog (AMN). Mutations in the two genes are commonly seen in founder populations or in societies with a high degree of consanguineous marriages. One particular mutation in AMN, c.208-2A>G, causing an out-of-frame loss of exon 4 in the mRNA, is responsible for some 15% of IGS cases globally. We present evidence that this founder mutation causes a substantial percentage of cases among diverse ethnicities and that the mutation is as old as human civilization. Partial genotyping indicated a founder event but its presence in diverse peoples of Arabic, Turkish, Jewish, and Hispanic ancestry suggested that the mutation might be recurrent. We therefore studied the flanking sequence spanning 3.5 Mb to elucidate the origin of the haplotype and estimate the age of the mutation using a Bayesian inference method based on observed linkage disequilibrium. The mutation's distribution, the size of the shared haplotype, and estimates of growth rate and carrier frequency indicated that the mutation was a single prehistoric event. Dating back to the ancient Middle East around 11,600 BC, the mutation predates the advent of writing, farming, and the monotheistic religions of the region. This mutation causes over 50% of the IGS cases among Arabic, Turkish, and Sephardic Jewish families, making it a primary target for genetic screening among diverse IGS cases originating from the Middle East. Thus, rare founder mutations may cause a substantial number of cases, even among diverse ethnicities not usually thought to be related.

  17. Beyond the Dutch Miracle? Challenges to and Responses of the Dutch Welfare System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gerven-Haanpää, Minna Marja-Leena; Schubert, Klaus; de Villota, Paloma; Kuhlmann, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores how the Dutch welfare system has evolved in the last decade(s). It shows that the economic crisis and the process of demographic change have put the Dutch welfare system to the test. The surmounting pressures from 2007 onwards have revealed structural problems of the Dutch

  18. Deconstructing the Dutch multicultural model: a frame perspective on Dutch immigrant integration policymaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyvendak, J.W.; Scholten, P.

    2012-01-01

    Dutch immigrant integration policies have often been labelled ‘multiculturalist’. This article empirically and conceptually challenges the idea of a Dutch multicultural model. First, it deconstructs the image that Dutch policies would have been driven by a single, coherent and consistent model, by

  19. The Dutch Euthanasia Act and related issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legemaate, Johan

    2004-02-01

    In 2002 the Dutch Euthanasia Act came into force. This Act is the result of a lengthy developmental process. It codifies the requirements that have evolved in case law and medical ethics since 1973. Empirical data indicate that the Dutch euthanasia practice is stabilising. Euthanasia and assisted suicide occur in 2.7% of all deaths. Now that the Act has been passed, the focus is on improving the quality of medical decision-making. From an international perspective, the Dutch legislation is exceptional. However, it appears that other countries and international organisations are considering euthanasia legislation as well. It remains to be seen how influential the Dutch model will prove to be.

  20. [High prevalence of specific language impairment in Robinson Crusoe Island. A possible founder effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Pía; de Barbieri, Zulema; Palomino, Hernán M; Palomino, Hernán

    2008-02-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) occurs in 2% to 8% of preschool children. Major and candidate genes are probably involved. Genetic drift is a cause for the presence of high frequencies of deleterious alíeles of a specific disease and the founder effect is one of its forms. Robinson Crusoe Island has 633 inhabitants and its actual population began with 8 families that repopulated the island at the end of XIXth century. To assess the frequency of specific language impairment among children living in Robinson Crusoe Island. All 66 children aged between 3 and 9 years living in the island, were studied. Parents were interviewed and in children, non verbal intelligence, audiometric parameters, comprehension and expression of oral language were assessed. Extended genealogies were also performed. Forty children had at least one parent that was descending of founder families. Among these, 35% had SLI. Eighth five percent of SLI affected children came from the same colonizer family. The prevalence of SLI in Robinson Crusoe Island is higher than that reported in mainland Chile and abroad. This high prevalence, associated to a high frequency of consanguinity, supports the influence of genetic mechanisms in SLI transmission, based on a founder effect.

  1. The scribe of the founder's inscription of Saint Sava in Studenica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špadijer Irena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The founder's inscription situated at the foot of the tambour in the Church of the Virgin in Studenica originating from 1208/9, is one of the oldest dated specimens of Serbian literacy. It was uncovered in 1951, during the conservation works in the monastery. Former research (conducted by Dj. Trifunović, has ascertained that inscriptions on the scrolls, books and frescoes in the monastery were written by the Greek artists who decorated the church. Scribal errors indicate beyond any doubt that Slavic was not the mother tongue of the scribes, and that they were not, or at least not sufficiently, familiar with the orthography of this language. In this paper the main focus has been directed at the founder's inscription, which has been put under detailed orthographic and palaeographic scrutiny. The morphology of some letters — the Greek "K", non-distinguishing between ižica (ippsilon and the Cyrillic "Č" — clearly indicates that in all probability the author of the inscription was a Greek, perhaps the very painter who signed his name in the Greek language on the Mandelion beneath the large founder's inscription.

  2. FKRP mutations, including a founder mutation, cause phenotype variability in Chinese patients with dystroglycanopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaona; Yang, Haipo; Wei, Cuijie; Jiao, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Yanling; Han, Chunxi; Wu, Xiru; Xiong, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene have been associated with dystroglycanopathies, which are common in Europe but rare in Asia. Our study aimed to retrospectively analyze and characterize the clinical, myopathological and genetic features of 12 Chinese patients with FKRP mutations. Three patients were diagnosed with congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C (MDC1C) and nine patients were diagnosed with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I). Three muscle biopsy specimens had dystrophic changes and reduced glycosylated α-dystroglycan staining, and two showed reduced expression of laminin α2. Two known and 13 novel mutations were identified in our single center cohort. Interestingly, the c.545A>G mutation was found in eight of the nine LGMD2I patients as a founder mutation and this founder mutation in Chinese patients differs from the one seen in European patients. Moreover, patients homozygous for the c.545A>G mutation were clinically asymptomatic, a less severe phenotype than in compound heterozygous patients with the c.545A>G mutation. The 13 novel mutations of FKRP significantly expanded the mutation spectrum of MDC1C and LGMD2I, and the different founder mutations indicate the ethnic difference in FKRP mutations.

  3. Clinical applications and implications of common and founder mutations in Indian subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankala, Arunkanth; Tamhankar, Parag M; Valencia, C Alexander; Rayam, Krishna K; Kumar, Manisha M; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2015-01-01

    South Asian Indians represent a sixth of the world's population and are a racially, geographically, and genetically diverse people. Their unique anthropological structure, prevailing caste system, and ancient religious practices have all impacted the genetic composition of most of the current-day Indian population. With the evolving socio-religious and economic activities of the subsects and castes, endogamous and consanguineous marriages became a commonplace. Consequently, the frequency of founder mutations and the burden of heritable genetic disorders rose significantly. Specifically, the incidence of certain autosomal-recessive disorders is relatively high in select Indian subpopulations and communities that share common recent ancestry. Although today clinical genetics and molecular diagnostic services are making inroads in India, the high costs associated with the technology and the tests often keep patients from an exact molecular diagnosis, making more customized and tailored tests, such as those interrogating the most common and founder mutations or those that cater to select sects within the population, highly attractive. These tests offer a quick first-hand affordable diagnostic and carrier screening tool. Here, we provide a comprehensive catalog of known common mutations and founder mutations in the Indian population and discuss them from a molecular, clinical, and historical perspective. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  4. Differences in the Selection Bottleneck between Modes of Sexual Transmission Influence the Genetic Composition of the HIV-1 Founder Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien C Tully

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the stringent population bottleneck that occurs during sexual HIV-1 transmission, systemic infection is typically established by a limited number of founder viruses. Elucidation of the precise forces influencing the selection of founder viruses may reveal key vulnerabilities that could aid in the development of a vaccine or other clinical interventions. Here, we utilize deep sequencing data and apply a genetic distance-based method to investigate whether the mode of sexual transmission shapes the nascent founder viral genome. Analysis of 74 acute and early HIV-1 infected subjects revealed that 83% of men who have sex with men (MSM exhibit a single founder virus, levels similar to those previously observed in heterosexual (HSX transmission. In a metadata analysis of a total of 354 subjects, including HSX, MSM and injecting drug users (IDU, we also observed no significant differences in the frequency of single founder virus infections between HSX and MSM transmissions. However, comparison of HIV-1 envelope sequences revealed that HSX founder viruses exhibited a greater number of codon sites under positive selection, as well as stronger transmission indices possibly reflective of higher fitness variants. Moreover, specific genetic "signatures" within MSM and HSX founder viruses were identified, with single polymorphisms within gp41 enriched among HSX viruses while more complex patterns, including clustered polymorphisms surrounding the CD4 binding site, were enriched in MSM viruses. While our findings do not support an influence of the mode of sexual transmission on the number of founder viruses, they do demonstrate that there are marked differences in the selection bottleneck that can significantly shape their genetic composition. This study illustrates the complex dynamics of the transmission bottleneck and reveals that distinct genetic bottleneck processes exist dependent upon the mode of HIV-1 transmission.

  5. Differences in the Selection Bottleneck between Modes of Sexual Transmission Influence the Genetic Composition of the HIV-1 Founder Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Damien C; Ogilvie, Colin B; Batorsky, Rebecca E; Bean, David J; Power, Karen A; Ghebremichael, Musie; Bedard, Hunter E; Gladden, Adrianne D; Seese, Aaron M; Amero, Molly A; Lane, Kimberly; McGrath, Graham; Bazner, Suzane B; Tinsley, Jake; Lennon, Niall J; Henn, Matthew R; Brumme, Zabrina L; Norris, Philip J; Rosenberg, Eric S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Jessen, Heiko; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Walker, Bruce D; Altfeld, Marcus; Carlson, Jonathan M; Allen, Todd M

    2016-05-01

    Due to the stringent population bottleneck that occurs during sexual HIV-1 transmission, systemic infection is typically established by a limited number of founder viruses. Elucidation of the precise forces influencing the selection of founder viruses may reveal key vulnerabilities that could aid in the development of a vaccine or other clinical interventions. Here, we utilize deep sequencing data and apply a genetic distance-based method to investigate whether the mode of sexual transmission shapes the nascent founder viral genome. Analysis of 74 acute and early HIV-1 infected subjects revealed that 83% of men who have sex with men (MSM) exhibit a single founder virus, levels similar to those previously observed in heterosexual (HSX) transmission. In a metadata analysis of a total of 354 subjects, including HSX, MSM and injecting drug users (IDU), we also observed no significant differences in the frequency of single founder virus infections between HSX and MSM transmissions. However, comparison of HIV-1 envelope sequences revealed that HSX founder viruses exhibited a greater number of codon sites under positive selection, as well as stronger transmission indices possibly reflective of higher fitness variants. Moreover, specific genetic "signatures" within MSM and HSX founder viruses were identified, with single polymorphisms within gp41 enriched among HSX viruses while more complex patterns, including clustered polymorphisms surrounding the CD4 binding site, were enriched in MSM viruses. While our findings do not support an influence of the mode of sexual transmission on the number of founder viruses, they do demonstrate that there are marked differences in the selection bottleneck that can significantly shape their genetic composition. This study illustrates the complex dynamics of the transmission bottleneck and reveals that distinct genetic bottleneck processes exist dependent upon the mode of HIV-1 transmission.

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF THE COMPETENCES OF THE MANAGER: FOUNDER ON THE SUCCESS OF THE ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ace Milenkovski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The environment, where the changes are everyday occurrence and the competition continuous threat, forces the leading people in the organizations to look after everything that goes on inside the organizations, as well as everything that goes on outside of them. Thus, depending on the founder’s capability, respectively the manager of the organization, the success of the organization can go up or down. The individuals that have entrepreneurial spirit, that know how to combine their knowledge, education and work experience with the successful guiding of the employees toward the goal, strengthen their business and open possibilities for its expansion.If under competence we imply to the knowledge of business, working experience and skills necessary for effective performance at the workplace, then undoubtedly the entrepreneur–founder in order to obtain the optimum knowledge for the business that he starts, previously has to build his competences through appropriate education and work experience.Herein we present working research conducted in order to prove the connection of the organization’s success with the knowledge, skills and competences for the corresponding business of the organization’s founder, particularly if the founder is also general manager of the organization. This research is conducted within the frames of the scientific and research activity of the University of Tourism and Management in Skopje, FYRO Macedonia.As a research sample 271 respondents – employees and 10 leaders of the companies included in the research. The leaders are managers and founders of the private companies. As a research technique questionnaire is used. Practical aim of the research was to use the results in order to create a basis for improving the performance of companies by developing the competencies of the management teams in them. One of the main conclusions of the research is: The manager-founder who starts up a business, needs to have optimum

  7. Dutch Batik Motifs: The Role of The Ruler and The Dutch Bussinesman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asidigisianti Surya Patria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dutch Batik is the referent of batik which is made by European-Indo woman industry. It can be identified by the European pattern which is a bouquet. This research is aimed to describe the correlation between the development of Dutch Batik with the role of the Dutch government and the Dutch merchant. The library research was used during analyzing the role of the government and the merchant using the Talcott Parsons’ functional structure theory. The batik Dutch companies were commercial oriented. It is different from real Javanese batik which had a purpose to be worn by themselves. Dutch Batik was the expression of the idea and behavior of the Dutch who lived in Indonesia. They expressed their western by using the patterns that were shown in their batik.

  8. Economic capital for Dutch retail banking goods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mullem, T.P.G.

    2004-01-01

    Economic capital for Dutch retail banking booksA study on the effects of embedded options in Dutch retail banking books on interest rate risk and economic capitalIn dit proefschrift bestuderen we de effecten van embedded options in het retail bankboek op renterisico en economisch vermogen. In

  9. Dutch health care performance report 2008.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westert, G.P.; Berg, M.J. van den; Koolman, X.; Verkleij, H.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second national report on the performance of the Dutch health care system. Its focus is on quality, access and costs in 2006/7. The Dutch Health Care Performance Report presents a broad picture based on 110 indicators. Where possible, comparisons in time and between countries are

  10. The Dutch Female Board Index 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Dutch Female Board Index 2010 shows for the fourth year a survey of female representation on the Executive Boards and Supervisory Boards of 99 Dutch NVs listed on Euronext Amsterdam. The companies were classified by the percentage of women in their joint Executive Board and Supervisory Board.

  11. Responses to Dutch-accented English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nejjari, W.; Gerritsen, M.; Haagen, M.J. van der; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a study into the reactions of ‘native’ speakers of British English to Dutch-English pronunciations in the onset of a telephone sales talk. In an experiment 144 highly educated British professionals who were either familiar or not familiar with Dutch-accented English responded

  12. Fourth Dutch Process Security Control Event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.; Zielstra, A.

    2010-01-01

    On December 1st, 2009, the fourth Dutch Process Control Security Event took place in Baarn, The Netherlands. The security event with the title ‘Manage IT!’ was organised by the Dutch National Infrastructure against Cybercrime (NICC). Mid of November, a group of over thirty people participated in the

  13. Management of the Dutch development cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Lodevicus Johannes Henricus

    2009-01-01

    There is reason for concern about the Dutch development cooperation. A survey of some aid evaluations of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) showed that the aid results are limited and that the goals of the programs are not achieved. Management concerns using an organisation's resources to

  14. Ethnic disparities in Dutch juvenile justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komen, M.; van Schooten, E.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, ethnic minority boys are heavily overrepresented in prisons and secure judicial institutions for juveniles. In a sample of 324 juveniles of both native Dutch and ethnic minority origin who have come into contact with the Dutch criminal justice authorities, we compared the number

  15. The Dutch Euthanasia Act and related issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legemaate, Johan

    2004-01-01

    In 2002 the Dutch Euthanasia Act came into force. This Act is the result of a lengthy developmental process. It codifies the requirements that have evolved in case law and medical ethics since 1973. Empirical data indicate that the Dutch euthanasia practice is stabilising. Euthanasia and assisted

  16. Dutch Ships and Sailors Linked Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Victor; Leinenga, Jurjen; Hoekstra, F.G.; van Rossum, Matthias; Mika, Peter; Tudorache, Tadia; Bernstein, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    We present the Dutch Ships and Sailors Linked Data Cloud. This heterogeneous dataset brings together four curated datasets on Dutch Maritime history as five-star linked data. The individual datasets use separate datamodels, designed in close collaboration with maritime historical researchers. The

  17. Rewarding peak avoidance: the Dutch 'Spitsmijden' projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knockaert, J.; Bakens, J.; Ettema, D.F.; Verhoef, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch road network is becoming increasingly congested. In late 2006, a group of companies, universities and government institutions established the Spitsmijden project. ‘Spitsmijden’ is the Dutch term for ‘avoiding the peak’. This joint initiative aimed to identify and assess a short-term

  18. Water Law and Organization (Dutch version)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, E.

    2012-01-01

    Lecture notes in DUTCH for course CIE5500, providing a detailed overview of Dutch and European water law concerning surface and groundwater, the North Sea and the Wadden Sea, water services, flood protection, spatial planning, nature protection, water management organizations (e.g. the water

  19. Why are Dutch GPs so much happier?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damoiseaux, Roger; McCartney, Margaret; Arie, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    General practice is similar in the Netherlands and the UK yet it appeals far more to young Dutch doctors than to their British counterparts. In collaboration with the Dutch medical journal Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde, Roger Damoiseaux, professor of general practice, and Margaret

  20. The Dutch private company: successfully relaunched?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, C.F.; Vermeulen, E.P.M.; De Cordt, Y.; Navez, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    This Chapter in a comparative book on private limited liability companies starts with an illustration of the former success of the Dutch limited liability company (BV). Next it addresses the competitive European legal environment within which the Dutch BV has to operate. The study shows how the

  1. Building infrastructure for Dutch question answering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jijkoun, V.; Mishne, G.A.; de Rijke, M.; de Vries, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the construction of the first-ever open domainquestion answering system for the Dutch language. In additionto providing experimental results based on the CLEF2003 QA test set for Dutch, we also identify a number ofkey natural language processing resources that are neededto further

  2. Emphatic multiple negative expressions in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijlstra, H.

    2010-01-01

    Double Negation languages like Dutch and German still exhibit constructions, such as Dutch 'niemand niet' ‘nobody not’ or 'nooit geen' ‘nothing no’, that seem to have a Negative Concord reading. Since these constructions normally have an emphatic reading, they are called Emphatic Multiple Negative

  3. Dutch Alternatives to Imprisonment and Fines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Laura; Hilgendorf, Eric; Valerius, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The modern Dutch sanctioning system started to develop as from 1886 with the introduction of the Wetboek van Strafrecht (Dutch Penal Code). With its primary focus on imprisonment and fines, this Code only included three principal penalties. However, it has undergone a statutory evolution, both in

  4. Veterans' narratives of the Dutch decolonisation war

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groten, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    From 1946 to 1949, the Netherlands fought a bloody decolonisation war with the newly proclaimed Republic of Indonesia. The official narrative of the Dutch government and military was that Dutch troops were restoring order and peace in a colony which the Republic had plunged into chaos and violence.

  5. Sustainable entrepreneurship in the Dutch construction industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Woolthuis, R.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the strategies that sustainable entrepreneurs use to interact with their environment in the Dutch construction industry. The Dutch construction industry is under great pressure to move towards sustainability, and entrepreneurs are believed to be able to play a large role in

  6. Sustainable Entrepreneurship in the Dutch Construction Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Woolthuis, R.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the strategies that sustainable entrepreneurs use to interact with their environment in the Dutch construction industry. The Dutch construction industry is under great pressure to move towards sustainability, and entrepreneurs are believed to be able to play a large role in

  7. Oersetter: Frisian-Dutch statistical machine translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gompel, M. van; Bosch, A.P.J. van den; Dijkstra, Anne; Dijkstra, A.; Boersma, P.; Brand, H.; Spoelstra, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a statistical machine translation (SMT) system for Frisian to Dutch and Dutch to Frisian. A parallel training corpus has been established, which has subsequently been used to automatically learn a phrase-based SMT model. The translation system is built around the open-source

  8. Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Israel: High Proportion of Founder Mutations in MMR Genes and Consanguinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N; Barnes-Kedar, Inbal; Toledano, Helen; Halpern, Marisa; Hershkovitz, Dov; Lossos, Alexander; Lerer, Israela; Peretz, Tamar; Kariv, Revital; Cohen, Shlomi; Half, Elizabeth E; Magal, Nurit; Drasinover, Valerie; Wimmer, Katharina; Goldberg, Yael; Bercovich, Dani; Levi, Zohar

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in any of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, cause Lynch syndrome (LS), an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome conferring a high risk of colorectal, endometrial, and other cancers in adulthood. Offspring of couples where both spouses have LS have a 1:4 risk of inheriting biallelic MMR gene mutations. These cause constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome, a severe recessively inherited cancer syndrome with a broad tumor spectrum including mainly hematological malignancies, brain tumors, and colon cancer in childhood and adolescence. Many CMMRD children also present with café au lait spots and axillary freckling mimicking neurofibromatosis type 1. We describe our experience in seven CMMRD families demonstrating the role and importance of founder mutations and consanguinity on its prevalence. Clinical presentations included brain tumors, colon cancer, lymphoma, and small bowel cancer. In children from two nonconsanguineous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families, the common Ashkenazi founder mutations were detected; these were homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in the other. In four consanguineous families of various ancestries, different homozygous mutations were identified. In a nonconsanguineous Caucasus/AJ family, lack of PMS2 was demonstrated in tumor and normal tissues; however, mutations were not identified. CMMRD is rare, but, especially in areas where founder mutations for LS and consanguinity are common, pediatricians should be aware of it since they are the first to encounter these children. Early diagnosis will enable tailored cancer surveillance in the entire family and a discussion regarding prenatal genetic diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Expression-guided in silico evaluation of candidate cis regulatory codes for Drosophila muscle founder cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A Philippakis

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available While combinatorial models of transcriptional regulation can be inferred for metazoan systems from a priori biological knowledge, validation requires extensive and time-consuming experimental work. Thus, there is a need for computational methods that can evaluate hypothesized cis regulatory codes before the difficult task of experimental verification is undertaken. We have developed a novel computational framework (termed "CodeFinder" that integrates transcription factor binding site and gene expression information to evaluate whether a hypothesized transcriptional regulatory model (TRM; i.e., a set of co-regulating transcription factors is likely to target a given set of co-expressed genes. Our basic approach is to simultaneously predict cis regulatory modules (CRMs associated with a given gene set and quantify the enrichment for combinatorial subsets of transcription factor binding site motifs comprising the hypothesized TRM within these predicted CRMs. As a model system, we have examined a TRM experimentally demonstrated to drive the expression of two genes in a sub-population of cells in the developing Drosophila mesoderm, the somatic muscle founder cells. This TRM was previously hypothesized to be a general mode of regulation for genes expressed in this cell population. In contrast, the present analyses suggest that a modified form of this cis regulatory code applies to only a subset of founder cell genes, those whose gene expression responds to specific genetic perturbations in a similar manner to the gene on which the original model was based. We have confirmed this hypothesis by experimentally discovering six (out of 12 tested new CRMs driving expression in the embryonic mesoderm, four of which drive expression in founder cells.

  10. Muir-Torre Syndrome and founder mismatch repair gene mutations: A long gone historical genetic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G; Manfredini, M; Tomasi, A; Pellacani, G

    2016-09-10

    A "cancer predisposing syndrome" later labeled as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch Syndrome, was firstly described by Warthin, about one century ago. An increased predisposition to the development of multiple familial tumors is described as characteristic of this syndrome where visceral and cutaneous malignancies may appear at an early age namely endometrial, gastric, small bowel, ureteral and renal pelvis, ovarian, hepatobiliary tract, pancreatic, brain (Turcot Syndrome) and sebaceous glands (Muir-Torre Syndrome). The latter, a variant of Lynch Syndrome, is characterized by the presence of sebaceous skin adenomas, carcinomas and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Both Lynch Syndrome and Muir-Torre Syndrome have been recognized due to germline mutations in mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. To date, 56 Lynch Syndrome founder mutations dependent on MLH1, MSH2 and, although less frequently found, MSH6 and PMS2 are described. Some of these founder mutations, principally of MSH2 gene, have been described to cause Muir-Torre phenotype and have been traced in large and outbreed Muir-Torre Syndrome families living in different US and European territories. Due to the evidences of highly specific Muir-Torre phenotypes related to the presence of widespread MSH2 founder mutations, preliminary search for these MSH2 common mutations in individuals carrying sebaceous tumors and/or keratoacanthomas, at early age or in association to visceral and familial tumors, permits cost-effective and time-saving diagnostic strategies for Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndromes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Shear wave anisotropy beneath the Sierra Nevada range: Implications for lithospheric foundering and upper mantle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, N. B.; Bastow, I. D.; Owens, T. J.; Zandt, G.; Jones, C. H.; Gilbert, H.

    2007-12-01

    Recent work asserts that the garnet-rich Sierra Nevada batholith root has undergone foundering since the early Cenozoic. The Sierra Nevada EarthScope Project (SNEP), undertaken to gain a better understanding of this phenomena, consists of a network of ~80 broadband seismometers spaced at ~25 km from ~37.0N to 40.5N. We use the Silver and Chan method to determine shear wave splitting parameters (dt and φ) for teleseismic SKS phases recorded at SNEP and US Array Transportable Array stations in the region. We find dt>1.1s and φ approximately in the E-NE direction over most of the batholith. Splitting of this magnitude cannot be accounted for solely in the crust, and our results, therefore, have significant implications for upper mantle flow beneath the region. At latitude ~39N to 40N, from the western Sierra Nevada range across our study area to central Nevada, we observe dtGorda-Juan de Fuca Plate. Such a flow pattern is also consistent with the circular pattern of splitting measurements that exist in the broader California and Western Nevada region. We observe subtle variations in splitting parameters as a function of backazimuth primarily at stations situated on the western foothills of the Sierra Nevada. These complexities may be indicative of either a two-layer or dipping layer structure beneath the batholith that may be associated with on- going lithospheric foundering beneath the Sierran range. Additionally, in the southern part of our study area, we note a reduction in dt for arrivals that sample the high Vp Isabella anomaly - an upper mantle downwelling thought to be a result of recent lithospheric foundering.

  12. Rayleigh and S wave tomography constraints on subduction termination and lithospheric foundering in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengxin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steven M.; Dougherty, Sara L.; Clayton, Robert W.; Farrell, Jamie; Lin, Fan-Chi

    2018-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle structure of central California have been modified by subduction termination, growth of the San Andreas plate boundary fault system, and small-scale upper mantle convection since the early Miocene. Here we investigate the contributions of these processes to the creation of the Isabella Anomaly, which is a high seismic velocity volume in the upper mantle. There are two types of hypotheses for its origin. One is that it is the foundered mafic lower crust and mantle lithosphere of the southern Sierra Nevada batholith. The alternative suggests that it is a fossil slab connected to the Monterey microplate. A dense broadband seismic transect was deployed from the coast to the western Sierra Nevada to fill in the least sampled areas above the Isabella Anomaly, and regional-scale Rayleigh and S wave tomography are used to evaluate the two hypotheses. New shear velocity (Vs) tomography images a high-velocity anomaly beneath coastal California that is sub-horizontal at depths of ∼40–80 km. East of the San Andreas Fault a continuous extension of the high-velocity anomaly dips east and is located beneath the Sierra Nevada at ∼150–200 km depth. The western position of the Isabella Anomaly in the uppermost mantle is inconsistent with earlier interpretations that the Isabella Anomaly is connected to actively foundering foothills lower crust. Based on the new Vs images, we interpret that the Isabella Anomaly is not the dense destabilized root of the Sierra Nevada, but rather a remnant of Miocene subduction termination that is translating north beneath the central San Andreas Fault. Our results support the occurrence of localized lithospheric foundering beneath the high elevation eastern Sierra Nevada, where we find a lower crustal low Vs layer consistent with a small amount of partial melt. The high elevations relative to crust thickness and lower crustal low Vs zone are consistent with geological inferences that lithospheric foundering drove

  13. Rayleigh and S wave tomography constraints on subduction termination and lithospheric foundering in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengxin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steven M.; Dougherty, Sara L.; Clayton, Robert W.; Farrell, Jamie; Lin, Fan-Chi

    2018-04-01

    The crust and upper mantle structure of central California have been modified by subduction termination, growth of the San Andreas plate boundary fault system, and small-scale upper mantle convection since the early Miocene. Here we investigate the contributions of these processes to the creation of the Isabella Anomaly, which is a high seismic velocity volume in the upper mantle. There are two types of hypotheses for its origin. One is that it is the foundered mafic lower crust and mantle lithosphere of the southern Sierra Nevada batholith. The alternative suggests that it is a fossil slab connected to the Monterey microplate. A dense broadband seismic transect was deployed from the coast to the western Sierra Nevada to fill in the least sampled areas above the Isabella Anomaly, and regional-scale Rayleigh and S wave tomography are used to evaluate the two hypotheses. New shear velocity (Vs) tomography images a high-velocity anomaly beneath coastal California that is sub-horizontal at depths of ∼40-80 km. East of the San Andreas Fault a continuous extension of the high-velocity anomaly dips east and is located beneath the Sierra Nevada at ∼150-200 km depth. The western position of the Isabella Anomaly in the uppermost mantle is inconsistent with earlier interpretations that the Isabella Anomaly is connected to actively foundering foothills lower crust. Based on the new Vs images, we interpret that the Isabella Anomaly is not the dense destabilized root of the Sierra Nevada, but rather a remnant of Miocene subduction termination that is translating north beneath the central San Andreas Fault. Our results support the occurrence of localized lithospheric foundering beneath the high elevation eastern Sierra Nevada, where we find a lower crustal low Vs layer consistent with a small amount of partial melt. The high elevations relative to crust thickness and lower crustal low Vs zone are consistent with geological inferences that lithospheric foundering drove uplift

  14. Relative resistance of HIV-1 founder viruses to control by interferon-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton-May, Angharad E; Dibben, Oliver; Emmerich, Tanja; Ding, Haitao; Pfafferott, Katja; Aasa-Chapman, Marlen M; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Cohen, Myron S; Gao, Feng; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Borrow, Persephone

    2013-12-03

    Following mucosal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission, type 1 interferons (IFNs) are rapidly induced at sites of initial virus replication in the mucosa and draining lymph nodes. However, the role played by IFN-stimulated antiviral activity in restricting HIV-1 replication during the initial stages of infection is not clear. We hypothesized that if type 1 IFNs exert selective pressure on HIV-1 replication in the earliest stages of infection, the founder viruses that succeed in establishing systemic infection would be more IFN-resistant than viruses replicating during chronic infection, when type 1 IFNs are produced at much lower levels. To address this hypothesis, the relative resistance of virus isolates derived from HIV-1-infected individuals during acute and chronic infection to control by type 1 IFNs was analysed. The replication of plasma virus isolates generated from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 and molecularly cloned founder HIV-1 strains could be reduced but not fully suppressed by type 1 IFNs in vitro. The mean IC50 value for IFNα2 (22 U/ml) was lower than that for IFNβ (346 U/ml), although at maximally-inhibitory concentrations both IFN subtypes inhibited virus replication to similar extents. Individual virus isolates exhibited differential susceptibility to inhibition by IFNα2 and IFNβ, likely reflecting variation in resistance to differentially up-regulated IFN-stimulated genes. Virus isolates from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 were significantly more resistant to in vitro control by IFNα than virus isolates generated from the same individuals during chronic, asymptomatic infection. Viral IFN resistance declined rapidly after the acute phase of infection: in five subjects, viruses derived from six-month consensus molecular clones were significantly more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFNs than the corresponding founder viruses. The establishment of systemic HIV-1 infection by relatively IFN

  15. Bottlenecks in HIV-1 transmission: insights from the study of founder viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sarah B.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection typically results from the transmission of a single viral variant, the transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Studies of these HIV-1 variants provide critical information about the transmission bottlenecks and the selective pressures acting on the virus in the transmission fluid and in the recipient tissues. These studies reveal that T/F virus phenotypes are shaped by stochastic and selective forces that restrict transmission and may be targets for prevention strategies. In this Review, we highlight how studies of T/F viruses contribute to a better understanding of the biology of HIV-1 transmission and discuss how these findings affect HIV-1 prevention strategies. PMID:26052661

  16. The contribution of founder mutations to early-onset breast cancer in French-Canadian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadirian, P; Robidoux, A; Zhang, P; Royer, R; Akbari, M; Zhang, S; Fafard, E; Costa, M; Martin, G; Potvin, C; Patocskai, E; Larouche, N; Younan, R; Nassif, E; Giroux, S; Narod, S A; Rousseau, F; Foulkes, W D

    2009-11-01

    In an ethnically-homogeneous population, it is valuable to identify founder mutations in cancer-predisposing genes. Founder mutations have been found in four breast-cancer-predisposing genes in French-Canadian breast cancer families. The frequencies of the mutant alleles have been measured neither in a large series of unselected breast cancer patients from Quebec, nor in healthy controls. These estimates are necessary to measure their contribution to the hereditary burden of breast cancer in Quebec and to help develop genetic screening policies which are appropriate for the province. We studied 564 French-Canadian women with early-onset invasive breast cancer who were treated at a single Montreal hospital. Patients had been diagnosed at age 50 or less, and were ascertained between 2004 and 2008. We screened all 564 patients for nine founder mutations: four in BRCA1, three in BRCA2 and one each in PALB2 and CHEK2. We also studied 6433 DNA samples from newborn infants from the Quebec City area to estimate the frequency of the nine variant alleles in the French-Canadian population. We identified a mutation in 36 of the 564 breast cancer cases (6.4%) and in 35 of 6443 controls (0.5%). In the breast cancer patients, the majority of mutations were in BRCA2 (54%). However, in the general population (newborn infants), the majority of mutations were in CHEK2 (54%). The odds ratio for breast cancer to age 50, given a BRCA1 mutation, was 10.1 (95% CI: 3.7-28) and given a BRCA2 mutation was 29.5 (95% CI: 12.9-67). The odds ratio for breast cancer to age 50, given a CHEK2 mutation, was 3.6 (95% CI: 1.4-9.1). One-half of the women with a mutation had a first- or second-degree relative diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. Thus, it can be concluded that a predisposing mutation in BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 or PALB2 is present in approximately 6% of French-Canadian women with early-onset breast cancer. It is reasonable to offer screening for founder mutations to all French

  17. Subjective oral health in Dutch adults

    OpenAIRE

    Verrips, G.H.W.; Schuller, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the subjective oral health (SOH) of the Dutch adult population was associated with clinical and demographic variables. Methods: A clinical examination was conducted in a sample of 1,018 people from the Dutch city of ‘s-Hertogenbosch. SOH was measured using the Dutch translation of the short form of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-NL14). Results: The average score on the OHIP-NL14 was 2.8 ± 5.9 and 51% of the respondents had a score of 0. Dental status was the mo...

  18. Association of yield-related traits in founder genotypes and derivatives of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Guo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yield improvement is an ever-important objective of wheat breeding. Studying and understanding the phenotypes and genotypes of yield-related traits has potential for genetic improvement of crops. Results The genotypes of 215 wheat cultivars including 11 founder parents and 106 derivatives were analyzed by the 9 K wheat SNP iSelect assay. A total of 4138 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP loci were detected on 21 chromosomes, of which 3792 were mapped to single chromosome locations. All genotypes were phenotyped for six yield-related traits including plant height (PH, spike length (SL, spikelet number per spike (SNPS, kernel number per spike (KNPS, kernel weight per spike (KWPS, and thousand kernel weight (TKW in six irrigated environments. Genome-wide association analysis detected 117 significant associations of 76 SNPs on 15 chromosomes with phenotypic explanation rates (R 2 ranging from 2.03 to 12.76%. In comparing allelic variation between founder parents and their derivatives (106 and other cultivars (98 using the 76 associated SNPs, we found that the region 116.0–133.2 cM on chromosome 5A in founder parents and derivatives carried alleles positively influencing kernel weight per spike (KWPS, rarely found in other cultivars. Conclusion The identified favorable alleles could mark important chromosome regions in derivatives that were inherited from founder parents. Our results unravel the genetic of yield in founder genotypes, and provide tools for marker-assisted selection for yield improvement.

  19. Birth of scientific surgery. John Hunter versus Joseph Lister as the father or founder of scientific surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2010-02-01

    John Hunter (1728-1793) has frequently been considered the "Father or Founder of Scientific Surgery". His inscription at Westminster Abbey presents him as "a gifted interpreter of the Divine Power and wisdom at work in the laws of organic life and the Founder of Scientific Surgery." I take issue with Hunter being considered the father or founder of scientific surgery and propose Joseph Lister (1827-1912) as the one who should receive this consideration. Hunter was a skilled surgeon, an inquisitive innovator, keen observer, great naturalist, and astute thinker, who made no surgical discoveries of any transcendence to the discipline. His scientific observations were not in the field of surgery. Therefore, he should not be considered the "Father or Founder of Scientific Surgery." On the contrary, Lister became a revolutionary scientific innovator by explaining the pervasive role of microorganisms in surgical wounds. His work directly affected surgery and its role in medicine. Lister, therefore, should be considered the "Father or Founder of Scientific Surgery."

  20. [Max Josef von Pettenkofer--founder of modern hygiene (1818-1901)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunović, Katarina; Maksimović, Milos; Davidović, Dragana; Milenković, Sanja; Slepcević, Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Max Josef von Pettenkofer was one of the leading personalities in the world of medicine in the 19th century. He was the founder of the modern science of hygiene. In his experimental work, he was involved in the research of problems dealing with the relationship between human beings and the environment, including such topics as soil and air pollution, water supply, sewage water management, room ventilation and heating, as well as the function of clothing and the cleanliness of homes and streets. Pettenkofer also studied the onset, the course, and the consequences of infectious diseases, such as cholera and typhus. He realised the great economic value of public health and emphasised that personal preventive measures should be supplemented with the improvement of factors in communal and work environments. His efforts lead to hygiene becoming a part of medical studies in 1865. The Institute for Hygiene at the School of Medicine in Munich was established in 1879. It was constructed according to his drawings and was considered to be the most modern institute for hygiene in the world. Since hygiene was a subject on the school curriculum in the German Empire in 1882, Pettenkofer became the Chairman of Hygiene in Berlin in 1885. Research institutions established by Pettenkofer and the fact that many of his students became professors of hygiene speak about the importance of his work. One of his students was professor Milan Jovanović Batut, founder of the Institute for Hygiene at the School of Medicine in Belgrade.

  1. Can a linguistic serial founder effect originating in Africa explain the worldwide phonemic cline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Joaquim; Pérez-Losada, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that a serial founder effect could have caused the present observed pattern of global phonemic diversity. Here we present a model that simulates the human range expansion out of Africa and the subsequent spatial linguistic dynamics until today. It does not assume copying errors, Darwinian competition, reduced contrastive possibilities or any other specific linguistic mechanism. We show that the decrease of linguistic diversity with distance (from the presumed origin of the expansion) arises under three assumptions, previously introduced by other authors: (i) an accumulation rate for phonemes; (ii) small phonemic inventories for the languages spoken before the out-of-Africa dispersal; (iii) an increase in the phonemic accumulation rate with the number of speakers per unit area. Numerical simulations show that the predictions of the model agree with the observed decrease of linguistic diversity with increasing distance from the most likely origin of the out-of-Africa dispersal. Thus, the proposal that a serial founder effect could have caused the present observed pattern of global phonemic diversity is viable, if three strong assumptions are satisfied. © 2016 The Authors.

  2. Haplotype variation in founders of the Mauremys annamensis population kept in European Zoos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Somerova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The critically endangered Annam leaf turtle Mauremys annamensis faces extinction in nature. Because of that, the conservation value of the population kept in European zoos becomes substantial for reintroduction programmes. We sampled 39 specimens of M. annamensis from European zoos and other collections (mainly founders, imports and putatively unrelated individuals, and also four specimens of Mauremys mutica for comparison. In each animal, we sequenced 817 bp of the mitochondrial ND4 gene and 940 bp of the nuclear R35 intron that were used as phylogenetic markers for Mauremys mutica-annamensis group by previous authors. The sequences of the R35 intron, which are characteristic for M. annamensis and which clearly differ from those characteristic for M. mutica and/or other Mauremys species, were mutually shared by all of the examined M. annamensis. They also possessed mitochondrial haplotypes belonging to the annamensis subclades I and II, distinctness of which was clearly confirmed by phylogenetic analyses. Thus, both nuclear and mitochondrial markers agreed in the unequivocal assignment of the examined individuals to M. annamensis. Although no obvious hybrids were detected within the founders of the captive population, further careful genetic evaluation using genom-wide markers is required to unequivocally confirm this result.

  3. Mutation analysis in Norwegian families with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: founder mutations in ACVRL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimdal, K; Dalhus, B; Rødningen, O K; Kroken, M; Eiklid, K; Dheyauldeen, S; Røysland, T; Andersen, R; Kulseth, M A

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease defined by the presence of epistaxis and mucocutaneous telangiectasias and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in internal organs. In most families (~85%), HHT is caused by mutations in the ENG (HHT1) or the ACVRL1 (HHT2) genes. Here, we report the results of genetic testing of 113 Norwegian families with suspected or definite HHT. Variants in ENG and ACVRL1 were found in 105 families (42 ENG, 63 ACVRL1), including six novel variants of uncertain pathogenic significance. Mutation types were similar to previous reports with more missense variants in ACVRL1 and more nonsense, frameshift and splice-site mutations in ENG. Thirty-two variants were novel in this study. The preponderance of ACVRL1 mutations was due to founder mutations, specifically, c.830C>A (p.Thr277Lys), which was found in 24 families from the same geographical area of Norway. We discuss the importance of founder mutations and present a thorough evaluation of missense and splice-site variants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. High prevalence of BRCA1 founder mutations in Greek breast/ovarian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulou, I; Tsitlaidou, M; Fostira, F; Pertesi, M; Stavropoulou, A-V; Triantafyllidou, O; Tsotra, E; Tsiftsoglou, A P; Tsionou, C; Droufakou, S; Dimitrakakis, C; Fountzilas, G; Yannoukakos, D

    2014-01-01

    We have screened 473 breast/ovarian cancer patients with family history, aiming to define the prevalence and enrich the spectrum of BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations occurring in the Greek population. An overall mutation prevalence of 32% was observed. Six BRCA1 recurrent/founder mutations dominate the observed spectrum (58.5% of all mutations found). These include three mutations in exon 20 and three large genomic deletions. Of the 44 different deleterious mutations found in both genes, 16 are novel and reported here for the first time. Correlation with available histopathology data showed that 80% of BRCA1 carriers presented a triple-negative breast cancer phenotype while 82% of BRCA2 carriers had oestrogen receptor positive tumours. This study provides a comprehensive view of the frequency, type and distribution of BRCA1/2 mutations in the Greek population as well as an insight of the screening strategy of choice for patients of Greek origin. We conclude that the Greek population has a diverse mutation spectrum influenced by strong founder effects. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. PRIMAL: Fast and accurate pedigree-based imputation from sequence data in a founder population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren E Livne

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Founder populations and large pedigrees offer many well-known advantages for genetic mapping studies, including cost-efficient study designs. Here, we describe PRIMAL (PedigRee IMputation ALgorithm, a fast and accurate pedigree-based phasing and imputation algorithm for founder populations. PRIMAL incorporates both existing and original ideas, such as a novel indexing strategy of Identity-By-Descent (IBD segments based on clique graphs. We were able to impute the genomes of 1,317 South Dakota Hutterites, who had genome-wide genotypes for ~300,000 common single nucleotide variants (SNVs, from 98 whole genome sequences. Using a combination of pedigree-based and LD-based imputation, we were able to assign 87% of genotypes with >99% accuracy over the full range of allele frequencies. Using the IBD cliques we were also able to infer the parental origin of 83% of alleles, and genotypes of deceased recent ancestors for whom no genotype information was available. This imputed data set will enable us to better study the relative contribution of rare and common variants on human phenotypes, as well as parental origin effect of disease risk alleles in >1,000 individuals at minimal cost.

  6. Improved Dutch Roll Approximation for Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Liang Yin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An improved dutch roll approximation for hypersonic vehicle is presented. From the new approximations, the dutch roll frequency is shown to be a function of the stability axis yaw stability and the dutch roll damping is mainly effected by the roll damping ratio. In additional, an important parameter called roll-to-yaw ratio is obtained to describe the dutch roll mode. Solution shows that large-roll-to-yaw ratio is the generate character of hypersonic vehicle, which results the large error for the practical approximation. Predictions from the literal approximations derived in this paper are compared with actual numerical values for s example hypersonic vehicle, results show the approximations work well and the error is below 10 %.

  7. Dutch Commerce and Chinese Merchants in Java

    OpenAIRE

    Claver, A.

    2014-01-01

    Dutch Commerce and Chinese Merchants in Java describes the vanished commercial world of colonial Java. Alexander Claver shows the challenges of a demanding business environment by highlighting trade and finance mechanisms, and the relationships between the participants involved.

  8. Clinical practice: neonatal resuscitation. A Dutch consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, F.A.M.; van Veenendaal, M.B.; Mulder, A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    The updated Dutch guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation assimilate the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the 2004 guidelines and controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed, and recommendations for daily practice are provided and

  9. Management Development from a Dutch Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paauwe, Jaap, Ed.; Williams, Roger, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Includes "Seven Key Issues for Management Development" (Paauwe, Williams); "Typology of Management Development" (Jansen, van der Velde, Mul); "Management Development at Royal Dutch/Shell" (Mahieu); "Management Development in Unilever" (Reitsma); "International Co-ordination and Management…

  10. The Southern Dutch dialect dictionaries | Kruijsen | Lexikos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: lexicography, onomasiology, dialect geography, language variation, phonology, historical linguistics, dictionary, regional dictionary, word atlas, cartography, general vocabulary, agrarian terminology, terminology of traditional crafts, dialect, traditional dialect, flemish, brabant dialect, limburg dialect, dutch, the ...

  11. Dutch research reforms cause a stir

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Calmthout, Martijn

    2015-02-01

    All 69 winners of the Spinoza prize - the highest award in Dutch science - have signed a petition against proposed reforms to the country's leading funding agency, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  12. Subjective Oral Health in Dutch Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijsbert H.W. Verrips

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine whether the subjective oral health (SOH of the Dutch adult population was associated with clinical and demographic variables. Methods: A clinical examination was conducted in a sample of 1,018 people from the Dutch city of ‘s-Hertogenbosch. SOH was measured using the Dutch translation of the short form of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-NL14. Results: The average score on the OHIP-NL14 was 2.8 ± 5.9 and 51% of the respondents had a score of 0. Dental status was the most important predictor of SOH. Conclusions:  The SOH in the Dutch adult population was much better than in groups of adults in Australia, the United Kingdom and New Zealand. Nevertheless, there were important variations in SOH related to dental and socio-economic status.

  13. Dutch Open Telescope: Status and Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.; Hammerschlag, R.H.; Bettonvil, F.C.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope represents a new solar telescope concept. Being open rather than evacuated, it leads the way to large- aperture high resolution telescopes. It is now being installed on La Palma.

  14. Opinion on Salt intake of Dutch children

    OpenAIRE

    Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority

    2009-01-01

    The amount of salt in many, especially commercially prepared, food is too high. Reducing salt intake can contribute positively to public health. A reduction in salt intake at a young age reduces the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in later life. The salt intake of 2-6 year old Dutch children was estimated using the Dutch Food Consumption Survey, which was aimed at children in 2005/2006. The foods that contributed most to the total salt intake were determined.

  15. Breast and ovarian cancer risks in a large series of clinically ascertained families with a high proportion of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Dutch founder mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brohet, R.M.; Velthuizen, M.E.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Seynaeve, C.; Collee, M.J.; Verhoef, S.; Ausems, M.G.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Asperen, C.J. van; Garcia, E.; Menko, F.; Oosterwijk, J.C; Devilee, P.; Veer, L.J. van 't; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Easton, D.F.; Rookus, M.A.; Antoniou, A.C.; Resource, H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations confer increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer, but risks have been found to vary across studies and populations. METHODS: We ascertained pedigree data of 582 BRCA1 and 176 BRCA2 families and studied the variation in breast and ovarian cancer risks using a

  16. Breast and ovarian cancer risks in a large series of clinically ascertained families with a high proportion of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Dutch founder mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brohet, Richard M.; Velthuizen, Maria E.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Collee, Margriet J.; Verhoef, Senno; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Menko, Fred; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Devilee, Peter; van't Veer, Laura J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Easton, Douglas F.; Rookus, Matti A.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    Background BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations confer increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer, but risks have been found to vary across studies and populations. Methods We ascertained pedigree data of 582 BRCA1 and 176 BRCA2 families and studied the variation in breast and ovarian cancer risks using a

  17. Clinal patterns of human Y chromosomal diversity in continental Italy and Greece are dominated by drift and founder effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, F; Luca, F; Anagnou, N; Ciavarella, G; Corbo, R M; Cresta, M; Cucci, F; Di Stasi, L; Agostiano, V; Giparaki, M; Loutradis, A; Mammi', C; Michalodimitrakis, E N; Papola, F; Pedicini, G; Plata, E; Terrenato, L; Tofanelli, S; Malaspina, P; Novelletto, A

    2003-09-01

    We explored the spatial distribution of human Y chromosomal diversity on a microgeographic scale, by typing 30 population samples from closely spaced locations in Italy and Greece for 9 haplogroups and their internal microsatellite variation. We confirm a significant difference in the composition of the Y chromosomal gene pools of the two countries. However, within each country, heterogeneity is not organized along the lines of clinal variation deduced from studies on larger spatial scales. Microsatellite data indicate that local increases of haplogroup frequencies can be often explained by a limited number of founders. We conclude that local founder or drift effects are the main determinants in shaping the microgeographic Y chromosomal diversity.

  18. PedHunter 2.0 and its usage to characterize the founder structure of the Old Order Amish of Lancaster County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwala Richa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because they are a closed founder population, the Old Order Amish (OOA of Lancaster County have been the subject of many medical genetics studies. We constructed four versions of Anabaptist Genealogy Database (AGDB using three sources of genealogies and multiple updates. In addition, we developed PedHunter, a suite of query software that can solve pedigree-related problems automatically and systematically. Methods We report on how we have used new features in PedHunter to quantify the number and expected genetic contribution of founders to the OOA. The queries and utility of PedHunter programs are illustrated by examples using AGDB in this paper. For example, we calculated the number of founders expected to be contributing genetic material to the present-day living OOA and estimated the mean relative founder representation for each founder. New features in PedHunter also include pedigree trimming and pedigree renumbering, which should prove useful for studying large pedigrees. Results With PedHunter version 2.0 querying AGDB version 4.0, we identified 34,160 presumed living OOA individuals and connected them into a 14-generation pedigree descending from 554 founders (332 females and 222 males after trimming. From the analysis of cumulative mean relative founder representation, 128 founders (78 females and 50 males accounted for over 95% of the mean relative founder contribution among living OOA descendants. Discussion/Conclusions The OOA are a closed founder population in which a modest number of founders account for the genetic variation present in the current OOA population. Improvements to the PedHunter software will be useful in future studies of both the OOA and other populations with large and computerized genealogies.

  19. Perceived antecedents of marital satisfaction among Turkish, Turkish-Dutch, and Dutch couples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celenk, O.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    We studied mainstream couples in The Netherlands and Turkey as well as Turkish-Dutch immigrant couples to address cultural factors associated with marital satisfaction. A total of 13 Turkish (mainstream couples living in Turkey), 19 Turkish-Dutch (Turkish immigrant couples living in The

  20. Marxism and the 'Dutch miracle': the Dutch Republic and the transition-debate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandon, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch Republic holds a marginal position in the debate on the transition from feudalism to capitalism, despite its significance in the early stage of the development of global capitalism. While the positions of those Marxists who did consider the Dutch case range from seeing it as the first

  1. Dutch voices: exploring the role of oral history in Dutch secondary history teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, Tim; Holthuis, Paul; Trškan, Danijela

    2016-01-01

    Oral history may enhance students’ historical content knowledge, historical reasoning competencies, and motivation to learn history. However, little is known regarding the role of oral history in Dutch history education. This study therefore explores the role of oral history in Dutch history

  2. The founder of the church of Saint George at Pološko

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper seeks to establish who was the founder of the church of Saint George at Pološko and revise the conclusions of previous researchers regarding this issue. According to the opinion commonly adopted in the scholarly literature, Jovan Dragušin, a cousin of King Dušan, had merely undertaken the construction of church at Pološko, whereas his mother was responsible for the completion of construction and painting of frescoes in the church. Through an analysis of written and visual sources the conclusion is reached that the sole person responsible for the construction and painting of the church at Pološko was the nun Maria, the mother of Jovan Dragušin. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177036: Srpska srednjovekovna umetnost i njen evropski kontekst

  3. The first independent pharmacognosy institute in the world and its founder Julije Domac (1853-1928).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inić, S; Kujundzić, N

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the foundation and development of the first distinct Institute of Pharmacognosy in the world and to provide a biography of its founder Julije Domac. The Institute was founded in 1896 as a separate institution at the University of Zagreb, Croatia, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the time. In other European university centers, pharmacognosy institutes were founded together with pharmacology, botany, pharmaceutical or general chemistry. Julije Domac (1853-1928) graduated pharmacy from the University of Vienna (1874) and received his Ph.D. from the University of Graz (1880) with a paper elucidating the structure of hexene and mannitol obtained from manna. He lectured pharmacognosy at the University of Zagreb (1887-1924), wrote chemistry and pharmacognosy textbooks, and co-wrote the Croatian-Slavonian Pharmacopoeia.

  4. A few words about the founder of the Macedonian modern sculpture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Kamenko M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the life and work of Dima Todorovski, the founder of the Macedonian modern sculpture. Dimo Todorovski was born in Thessaloniki in 1910. He finished the Art School, the sculpture department, in Belgrade in 1935. He lived and worked in Skopje from 1942 until his death in 1983. During his career, he made an impressive number of sculptures among which are portraits, lovely female nudes, figures of men in motion, and other pieces related to the WWII. His best pieces include: The Portrait of the Artist's Mother, A Peasant Woman Portrait, The Pit, The Macedonian Pieta, A Girl, A monument in honour of Koco Racin, The Miladinov Brothers, St. Kliment Ohridski.

  5. Eduard Strasburger (1844-1912): founder of modern plant cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Dieter; Baluška, František; Menzel, Diedrik

    2012-10-01

    Eduard Strasburger, director of the Botany Institute and the Botanical Garden at the University of Bonn from 1881 to 1912, was one of the most admirable scientists in the field of plant biology, not just as the founder of modern plant cell biology but in addition as an excellent teacher who strongly believed in "education through science." He contributed to plant cell biology by discovering the discrete stages of karyokinesis and cytokinesis in algae and higher plants, describing cytoplasmic streaming in different systems, and reporting on the growth of the pollen tube into the embryo sac and guidance of the tube by synergides. Strasburger raised many problems which are hot spots in recent plant cell biology, e.g., structure and function of the plasmodesmata in relation to phloem loading (Strasburger cells) and signaling, mechanisms of cell plate formation, vesicle trafficking as a basis for most important developmental processes, and signaling related to fertilization.

  6. Tests of two methods for identifying founder effects in metapopulations reveal substantial type II error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R Graham; Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M

    2013-03-01

    Genetic analysis has been promoted as a way to reconstruct recent historical dynamics ("historical demography") by screening for signatures of events, such as bottlenecks, that disrupt equilibrium patterns of variation. Such analyses might also identify "metapopulation" processes like extinction and recolonization or source-sink dynamics, but this potential remains largely unrealized. Here we use simulations to test the ability of two currently used strategies to distinguish between a set of interconnected subpopulations (demes) that have undergone bottlenecks or extinction and recolonization events (metapopulation dynamics) from a set of static demes. The first strategy, decomposed pairwise regression, provides a holistic test for heterogeneity among demes in their patterns of isolation-by-distance. This method suffered from a type II error rate of 59-100 %, depending on parameter conditions. The second strategy tests for deviations from mutation-drift equilibrium on a deme-by-deme basis to identify sites likely to have experienced recent bottlenecks or founder effects. Although bottleneck tests have good statistical power for single populations with recent population declines, their validity in structured populations has been called into question, and they have not been tested in a metapopulation context with immigration (or colonization) and population recovery. Our simulations of hypothetical metapopulations show that population recovery can rapidly eliminate the statistical signature of a bottleneck, and that moderate levels of gene flow can generate a false signal of recent population growth for demes in equilibrium. Although we did not cover all possible metapopulation scenarios, the performance of the tests was disappointing. Our results indicate that these methods might often fail to identify population bottlenecks and founder effects if population recovery and/or gene flow are influential demographic features of the study system.

  7. Brief communication: human cranial variation fits iterative founder effect model with African origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen; Lycett, Stephen J

    2008-05-01

    Recent studies comparing craniometric and neutral genetic affinity matrices have concluded that, on average, human cranial variation fits a model of neutral expectation. While human craniometric and genetic data fit a model of isolation by geographic distance, it is not yet clear whether this is due to geographically mediated gene flow or human dispersal events. Recently, human genetic data have been shown to fit an iterative founder effect model of dispersal with an African origin, in line with the out-of-Africa replacement model for modern human origins, and Manica et al. (Nature 448 (2007) 346-349) have demonstrated that human craniometric data also fit this model. However, in contrast with the neutral model of cranial evolution suggested by previous studies, Manica et al. (2007) made the a priori assumption that cranial form has been subject to climatically driven natural selection and therefore correct for climate prior to conducting their analyses. Here we employ a modified theoretical and methodological approach to test whether human cranial variability fits the iterative founder effect model. In contrast with Manica et al. (2007) we employ size-adjusted craniometric variables, since climatic factors such as temperature have been shown to correlate with aspects of cranial size. Despite these differences, we obtain similar results to those of Manica et al. (2007), with up to 26% of global within-population craniometric variation being explained by geographic distance from sub-Saharan Africa. Comparative analyses using non-African origins do not yield significant results. The implications of these results are discussed in the light of the modern human origins debate. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Mitochondrial Genome Diversity of Native Americans Supports a Single Early Entry of Founder Populations into America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Jr., Wilson A.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Holanda, Adriano J.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea K.; Paixão, Beatriz M.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Abe-Sandes, Kiyoko; Rodriguez-Delfin, Luis; Barbosa, Marcela; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luiza; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Valente, Valeria; Santos, Sidney E. B.; Zago, Marco A.

    2002-01-01

    There is general agreement that the Native American founder populations migrated from Asia into America through Beringia sometime during the Pleistocene, but the hypotheses concerning the ages and the number of these migrations and the size of the ancestral populations are surrounded by controversy. DNA sequence variations of several regions of the genome of Native Americans, especially in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region, have been studied as a tool to help answer these questions. However, the small number of nucleotides studied and the nonclocklike rate of mtDNA control-region evolution impose several limitations to these results. Here we provide the sequence analysis of a continuous region of 8.8 kb of the mtDNA outside the D-loop for 40 individuals, 30 of whom are Native Americans whose mtDNA belongs to the four founder haplogroups. Haplogroups A, B, and C form monophyletic clades, but the five haplogroup D sequences have unstable positions and usually do not group together. The high degree of similarity in the nucleotide diversity and time of differentiation (i.e., ∼21,000 years before present) of these four haplogroups support a common origin for these sequences and suggest that the populations who harbor them may also have a common history. Additional evidence supports the idea that this age of differentiation coincides with the process of colonization of the New World and supports the hypothesis of a single and early entry of the ancestral Asian population into the Americas. PMID:12022039

  9. A genetic cluster of patients with variant xeroderma pigmentosum with two different founder mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munford, V; Castro, L P; Souto, R; Lerner, L K; Vilar, J B; Quayle, C; Asif, H; Schuch, A P; de Souza, T A; Ienne, S; Alves, F I A; Moura, L M S; Galante, P A F; Camargo, A A; Liboredo, R; Pena, S D J; Sarasin, A; Chaibub, S C; Menck, C F M

    2017-05-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare human syndrome associated with hypersensitivity to sunlight and a high frequency of skin tumours at an early age. We identified a community in the state of Goias (central Brazil), a sunny and tropical region, with a high incidence of XP (17 patients among approximately 1000 inhabitants). To identify gene mutations in the affected community and map the distribution of the affected alleles, correlating the mutations with clinical phenotypes. Functional analyses of DNA repair capacity and cell-cycle responses after ultraviolet exposure were investigated in cells from local patients with XP, allowing the identification of the mutated gene, which was then sequenced to locate the mutations. A specific assay was designed for mapping the distribution of these mutations in the community. Skin primary fibroblasts showed normal DNA damage removal but abnormal DNA synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation and deficient expression of the Polη protein, which is encoded by POLH. We detected two different POLH mutations: one at the splice donor site of intron 6 (c.764 +1 G>A), and the other in exon 8 (c.907 C>T, p.Arg303X). The mutation at intron 6 is novel, whereas the mutation at exon 8 has been previously described in Europe. Thus, these mutations were likely brought to the community long ago, suggesting two founder effects for this rare disease. This work describes a genetic cluster involving POLH, and, particularly unexpected, with two independent founder mutations, including one that likely originated in Europe. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Nationwide study on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Iceland: evidence of a MYBPC3 founder mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalsteinsdottir, Berglind; Teekakirikul, Polakit; Maron, Barry J; Burke, Michael A; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; DePalma, Steven R; Mazaika, Erica; McDonough, Barbara; Danielsen, Ragnar; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E; Gunnarsson, Gunnar T

    2014-09-30

    The geographic isolation and homogeneous population of Iceland are ideally suited to ascertain clinical and genetic characteristics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) at the population level. Medical records and cardiac imaging studies obtained between 1997 and 2010 were reviewed to identify Icelandic patients with HCM. Surviving patients were recruited for clinical and genetic studies. A previously identified Icelandic mutation, MYBPC3 c.927-2A>G, was genotyped, and mutation-negative samples were sequenced for HCM genes and other hypertrophic genes. Record review identified 180 patients with HCM. Genetic analyses of 151 patients defined pathogenic mutations in 101 (67%), including MYBPC3 c.927-2A>G (88 patients, 58%), 4 other MYBPC3 or MYH7 mutations (5 patients, 3.3%), and 2 GLA mutations (8 patients, 5.3%). Haplotype and genetic genealogical data defined MYBPC3 c.927-2A>G as a founder mutation, introduced into the Icelandic population in the 15th century, with a current population prevalence of 0.36%. MYBPC3 c.927-2A>G mutation carriers exhibited phenotypic diversity but were younger at diagnosis (42 versus 49 years; P=0.001) and sustained more adverse events (15% versus 2%; P=0.02) than mutation-negative patients. All-cause mortality for patients with HCM was similar to that of an age-matched Icelandic population (hazard ratio, 0.98; P=0.9). HCM-related mortality (0.78%/y) occurred at a mean age of 68 compared with 81 years for non-HCM-related mortality (P=0.02). A founder MYBPC3 mutation that arose >550 years ago is the predominant cause of HCM in Iceland. The MYBPC3 c.927-2A>G mutation is associated with low adverse event rates but earlier cardiovascular mortality, illustrating the impact of genotype on outcomes in HCM. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. An Ashkenazi founder mutation in the MSH6 gene leading to HNPCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Yael; Porat, Rinnat M; Kedar, Inbal; Shochat, Chen; Galinsky, Daliah; Hamburger, Tamar; Hubert, Ayala; Strul, Hana; Kariiv, Revital; Ben-Avi, Liat; Savion, Moran; Pikarsky, Eli; Abeliovich, Dvorah; Bercovich, Dani; Lerer, Israela; Peretz, Tamar

    2010-06-01

    Mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes underlie lynch syndrome (HNPCC). Lynch syndrome resulting from mutations in MSH6 is considered to be attenuated in comparison to that caused by mutations in MLH1 and MSH2, thus more likely to be under diagnosed. In this study we report of a common mutation in the MSH6 gene in Ashkenazi Jews. Genetic counseling and diagnostic work-up for HNPCC was conducted in families who attended the high risk clinic for inherited cancer. We identified the mutation c.3984_3987dup in the MSH6 gene in 19 members of four unrelated Ashkenazi families. This mutation results in truncation of the transcript and in loss of expression of the MSH6 protein in tumors. Tumor spectrum among carriers included colon, endometrial, gastric, ovarian, urinary, and breast cancer. All but one family qualified for the Bethesda guidelines and none fulfilled the Amsterdam Criteria. Members of one family also co-inherited the c.6174delT mutation in the BRCA2 gene. The c.3984_3987dup in the MSH6 gene is a mutation leading to HNPCC among Ashkenazi Jews. This is most probably a founder mutation. In contrast to the c.1906G>C founder mutation in the MSH2 gene, tumors tend to occur later in life, and none of the families qualified for the Amsterdam criteria. c.3984_3987dup is responsible for 1/6 of the mutations identified among Ashkenazi HNPCC families in our cohort. Both mutations: c.3984_3987dup and c.1906G>C account for 61% of HNPCC Ashkenazi families in this cohort. These findings are of great importance for counseling, diagnosis, management and surveillance for Ashkenazi families with Lynch syndrome.

  12. Genome-wide association studies in an isolated founder population from the Pacific Island of Kosrae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K Lowe

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that the limited genetic diversity and reduced allelic heterogeneity observed in isolated founder populations facilitates discovery of loci contributing to both Mendelian and complex disease. A strong founder effect, severe isolation, and substantial inbreeding have dramatically reduced genetic diversity in natives from the island of Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia, who exhibit a high prevalence of obesity and other metabolic disorders. We hypothesized that genetic drift and possibly natural selection on Kosrae might have increased the frequency of previously rare genetic variants with relatively large effects, making these alleles readily detectable in genome-wide association analysis. However, mapping in large, inbred cohorts introduces analytic challenges, as extensive relatedness between subjects violates the assumptions of independence upon which traditional association test statistics are based. We performed genome-wide association analysis for 15 quantitative traits in 2,906 members of the Kosrae population, using novel approaches to manage the extreme relatedness in the sample. As positive controls, we observe association to known loci for plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein and to a compelling candidate loci for thyroid stimulating hormone and fasting plasma glucose. We show that our study is well powered to detect common alleles explaining >/=5% phenotypic variance. However, no such large effects were observed with genome-wide significance, arguing that even in such a severely inbred population, common alleles typically have modest effects. Finally, we show that a majority of common variants discovered in Caucasians have indistinguishable effect sizes on Kosrae, despite the major differences in population genetics and environment.

  13. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine T Lim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5-5% variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10⁻⁸ including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a levels (P = 1.5×10⁻¹¹⁷. Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.84, P = 3×10⁻⁴, demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health

  14. Radioactivity in Dutch consumer products

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, M P M

    2002-01-01

    This study took place within the framework of a general update of the average radiation dose for the Dutch population. It focuses on consumer products in which radionuclides have been intentionally incorporated and on radiation-emitting devices that can be supplied to members of the public without special surveillance. Eleven consumer products were studied in more detail. The radiation from these products determined 90% of the total collective dose due to consumer products in the Netherlands in 1988. Individual and collective doses are presented here for each product. The total collective dose has decreased from 130 personSv in 1988 to 4.6 personSv at present. This reduction was attributed to: a decrease in the number of radioactive products (gas mantles), lower estimates of the number of radioactive products present in the Netherlands thanks to new information (camera lenses, smoke detectors containing Ra-226), replacement of radioactive by non-radioactive products (gas mantles, dental protheses), and a lowe...

  15. The Emergence of a Myth : In search of the origins of the life story of Shenrab Miwo, the founder of Bon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurung, Kalsang Norbu

    2011-01-01

    In this dissertation, I have focused on the construction of the life account of the founder of Bon Religion, Shenrab Miwo. I try to answer some key questions such as, who was Shenrab Miwo and why is he considered to have been the founder of Bon? How did the hagiography of Shenrab Miwo emerge and how

  16. Achievement Motivation, Strategic Orientations, and Business Performance in Entrepreneurial Firms: How Different are Japanese and Americans Founders?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, R.; Grinstein, A.; Sang-Hoon, K.; Ofek, E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of research on the link between the personal disposition of an entrepreneurial firm's founder, the firm's strategic orientation and its performance outcomes. Also, there is a lack of cross-national research on entrepreneurial firms' strategic orientations. This paper seeks

  17. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    individuals requesting predictive testing living in France and in the USA, all being Portuguese immigrants. After performing an extensive haplotype study in carrier families, we estimate that this founder mutation occurred 558 ± 215 years ago. We further demonstrate significant quantitative differences...

  18. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    individuals requesting predictive testing living in France and in the USA, all being Portuguese immigrants. After performing an extensive haplotype study in carrier families, we estimate that this founder mutation occurred 558 +/- 215 years ago. We further demonstrate significant quantitative differences...

  19. 76 FR 35263 - Founders Equity SBIC I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [License No. 02/72-0625] Founders Equity SBIC I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is... 107.730, Financings Which Constitute Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business Administration (``SBA...

  20. 77 FR 76586 - Founders Equity SBIC I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [License No. 02/72-0625] Founders Equity SBIC I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is... 107.730, Financings which Constitute Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business Administration (``SBA...

  1. TGfU--Would You Know It if You Saw It? Benchmarks from the Tacit Knowledge of the Founders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Joy

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the tacit expert knowledge and understanding about games curriculum and pedagogy of three men, Len Almond, David Bunker, and Rod Thorpe, credited as the founders of the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) model. The model emerged from teacher practice in the late 1970s and was little theorized at the time, apart from a…

  2. Impact on electroencephalography of Adolf Beck, a prominent Polish scientist and founder of the Lviv School of Physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachkivska, O.; Gzhegotsky, M.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Adolf Beck (1863–1942) can be regarded as the co-founder of electroencephalography. His studies on the cerebral cortex of animals have facilitated the introduction of the electroencephalogram (EEG) as a main tool for studying the brain. The localization of senses on the cortex with evoked potentials

  3. Elon Musk, founder of SpaceX and PayPal, to speak on campus Feb. 21

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2006-01-01

    Elon Musk, founder and chief executive officer of Space Exploration Technologies Co. (SpaceX), will speak on his company's Falcon rocket series and the future of university space research on Tuesday, Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. in Virginia Tech's Burruss Hall Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

  4. Perceived antecedents of marital satisfaction among Turkish, Turkish-Dutch, and Dutch couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celenk, Ozgur; van de Vijver, Fons J R

    2013-01-01

    We studied mainstream couples in The Netherlands and Turkey as well as Turkish-Dutch immigrant couples to address cultural factors associated with marital satisfaction. A total of 13 Turkish (mainstream couples living in Turkey), 19 Turkish-Dutch (Turkish immigrant couples living in The Netherlands), and 17 Dutch (mainstream couples living in The Netherlands) married dyads (total of 98 individuals) were independently interviewed about positive and negative characteristics of marriages, determinants of general marital satisfaction and dissatisfaction, spousal communication, marital conflict, and marital roles. Multivariate tests revealed ethnic group differences on all marriage-related domains except the conflict resolution strategies. However, univariate analyses showed differences in few themes within domains; main differences were assessed between the Turkish/Turkish-Dutch (who put more emphasis on children and economical aspects) and Dutch couples (who put more emphasis on behavior, and personality of the spouse, reciprocity, emotional sharing, and psychological roles). Turkish-Dutch couples were more similar to Turkish than to Dutch couples. Results were discussed in light of the socioeconomic development and cultural value theories, which are believed to provide a useful framework for understanding the role of culture in marital satisfaction.

  5. Home Bias and Dutch Pension Funds’ Investment behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschoor, W.F.C.; Rubbaniy, G.; Lelyveld van, I.P.P.

    2014-01-01

    Using a panel data set of more than 600 Dutch pension funds (PFs) between 1992 and 2006, we investigate asset allocation behavior of Dutch PFs across multiple asset classes. We find that domestic investments, also known as home bias, in portfolio choices of Dutch institutional investors have fallen.

  6. A memory-based shallow parser for spoken Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canisius, S.V.M.; van den Bosch, A.; Decadt, B.; Hoste, V.; De Pauw, G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the development of a Dutch memory-based shallow parser. The availability of large treebanks for Dutch, such as the one provided by the Spoken Dutch Corpus, allows memory-based learners to be trained on examples of shallow parsing taken from the treebank, and act as a shallow parser after

  7. Eumedion in the Dutch Corporate Governance and Sustainability Landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, Niels; Hooghiemstra, Reggy; van Veen, Kees

    2016-01-01

    Eumedion is a Dutch foundation representing the interests of Dutch and foreign institutional investors with investments in Dutch listed companies. In particular, it represents the interests of these participants in the field of corporate governance and sustainability. The foundation was established

  8. TwNC: a Multifaceted Dutch News Corpus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; de Jong, Franciska M.G.; van Hessen, Adrianus J.; Hondorp, G.H.W.

    2007-01-01

    This contribution describes the Twente News Corpus (TwNC), a multifaceted corpus for Dutch that is being deployed in a number of NLP research projects among which tracks within the Dutch national research programme MultimediaN, the NWO programme CATCH, and the Dutch-Flemish programme STEVIN. The

  9. Liquidity in the Dutch wholesale electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newbery, D.; Von der Fehr, N.H.; Van Damme, E.

    2003-05-01

    Industry concerns over perceived reductions in the liquidity of the Dutch wholesale electricity market led the DTe to ask the Market Surveillance Committee (MSC) to examine recent developments. This report starts with a generic examination of wholesale power markets and liquidity and its measurement. An overview of the Dutch wholesale electricity market and its constituent segments follows together with a summary of events and opinions connected to liquidity that have been reported in the trade press. Sources of information on market liquidity are then reviewed. Participation in the market is analysed before examining each market segment and this analysis and the earlier sections are then drawn together in conclusions and recommendations

  10. Royal Dutch Petroleum Company annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Petroleum Company has no operations of its own and virtually the whole of its income derives from its 60% interest in the companies known collectively as the Royal Dutch/Shell Group of Companies; the other 40% is owned by the Shell Transport and Trading Company, p.l.c. The company is engaged in the oil, natural gas, chemicals, coal and metals businesses throughout the world. The annual report summarises the year's results and analyses earnings in each industry segment. Financial statements for the year ended 31 December 1992 are presented. The Group companies' estimated net quantities of crude oil, natural gas and coal are given

  11. All that glitters is not gold - founder effects complicate associations of flu mutations to disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenhaber Frank

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent 2009 (H1N1 influenza A pandemic saw a rapid spread of the virus to essentially all parts of the world. In the course of its evolution, the virus acquired many mutations, some of which have been investigated in the context of increased severity due to high occurrences in fatal cases. For example, statements such as: "42.9% of individuals who died from laboratory-confirmed cases of the pandemic (H1N1 were infected with the hemagglutinin (HA Q310 H mutant virus." give the impression that HA-Q310 H would be highly dangerous or important, while careful consideration of all available data suggests that this is unlikely to be the case. Results We compare the mutations HA-Q310 H, PB2-K340N, HA-D239N and HA-D239G using whole genome phylogenetic trees, structural modeling in their 3 D context and complete epidemiological data from sequences to clinical outcomes. HA-Q310 H and PB2-K340N appear as isolated subtrees in the phylogenetic analysis pointing to founder effects which is consistent with their clustered temporal appearance as well as the lack of an immediate structural basis that could explain a change of phenotypes. Considering the prevailing viral genomic background, shared origin of samples (all from the city of Sao Paulo and narrow temporal window (all death case samples within 1 month, it becomes clear that HA-Q310 H was actually a generally common mutation in the region at that time which could readily explain its increased occurrence among the few analyzed fatal cases without requiring necessarily an association with severity. In further support of this, we highlight 3 mild cases with the HA-Q310 H mutation. Conclusions We argue that claims of severity of any current and future flu mutation need to be critically considered in the light of phylogenetic, structural and detailed epidemiological data to distinguish increased occurrence due to possible founder effects rather than real phenotypic changes.

  12. The Dutch 'Female Board Index 2009 : Female executive and non-executive directors on corporate boards of Dutch listed companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Dutch ‘Female Board Index 2009’ provides for the third year an overview of female representation on the Executive Boards and Supervisory Boards of 107 Dutch NV companies listed on Euronext Amsterdam. The study showed that in September 2009, 38 listed Dutch companies have one or more women on

  13. Patterns of transition. Female native Dutch and ethnic minority employment patterns in the Dutch labour market, 1991 and 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevelander, P.; Groeneveld, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    This study analyses female native Dutch and ethnic minority employment patterns in the Dutch labour market. Focusing on life-course employment patterns, it aims to find out if native Dutch and ethnic minority women in the Netherlands have undergone a transition towards more labour market

  14. Nukuleka as a founder colony for West Polynesian settlement : new insights from recent excavations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burley, D.V.; Barton, A.; Dickinson, W.R.; Connaughton, S.P.; Tache, K.

    2010-01-01

    Previous archaeological studies in the village of Nukuleka, Tongatapu, Kingdom of Tonga proposed it as a founder colony for Polynesia. Additional excavation and survey were undertaken in 2007 to evaluate this status further and to gain new insight into the nature of the occupation and its role in the subsequent peopling of west Polynesia. A review of this project and its findings are presented. Decorated ceramics of western Lapita style, the presence of tan paste ceramics foreign to Tonga, and new radiocarbon dates support Nukuleka as a site of first landfall in the interval 2850 to 2900 cal BP. The ceramic assemblage is distinct from west and central Fiji, and an independent origin for Fijian and Polynesian colonizers is argued. The settlement quickly expanded on the Nukuleka Peninsula to 20 ha or more in size, forming a central place for the eastern Lapita province in Tonga, Samoa and the Lau islands of Fiji. Nukuleka, we believe, provides insight into the cultural if not biological base from which ancestral Polynesian society emerged. (author). 35 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Religion and Science in the Works of the Founder of the First Wave of Positivism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiy Korsakov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to deal with the last phase of the life and work of Auguste Conte, the founder of the philosophy of positivism. The appearance and development of this type of philosophy were conditioned by the new waves of thought which dominated European philosophy during the nineteenth century. It was believed that faith in a scientific method would guarantee the success of any kind of scientific endeavor. Conte developed his idea of a three level intellectual evolution from notions which had already been posited by Saint-Simon. According to this ideology, man begins to mature when he begins to abandon his childish and immature notions about the world, or in other words, his religious-mystical preoccupations. Eventually he becomes an adult and begins to discover a type of God in himself. But in this way, positivism itself begins to develop its own religious and mystical traits while at the same time conducting a fierce battle with a religious conception of the world. These ideas come especially to the fore in the later works of Conte. In these works, the philosopher stipulates that although sociology is at the absolute pinnacle of the sciences, there is yet another level, still higher than all these - and that is the domain of the so-called religion of mankind

  16. [HUGO STEINHAUS--CO-FOUNDER OF THE LWÓW SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wócik, Wiesław

    2014-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the presentation of professor Hugo Steinhaus--co-founder of the Lwów School of Mathematics. It is indicated that had it not been for the scholar, the founding and development of the Lwów School of Mathematics would have been almost impossible. The analyses focus on his undertakings during the Lvov period in the early 1920s and those events that preceded the founding of the school (namely Steinhaus's education at the Göttingen University, various meetings and gatherings, discussions, first fascinations and mathematical dissertations). This paper, however, does not look into the scientific output of Steinhaus, only presents his method of scientific work and highlights the strategy that he chose in order to create the scientific community. An attempt has been also made to justify the effectiveness of the adopted strategy by describing the scientific atmosphere of Lvov and intellectual potential of the students of the school. Steinhaus's activities in the 1930s will be only marginally presented with an impact on particularly interesting cooperation with the alumni of the Lwów School of Mathematics--Marek Kac, Stefan Kaczmarz, Paweł Nikliborec and scholars from other fields of science (as part of the process of the application of mathematics).

  17. A serial founder effect model for human settlement out of Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Omkar; Batzoglou, Serafim; Feldman, Marcus W; Cavalli-Sforza, L Luca

    2009-01-22

    The increasing abundance of human genetic data has shown that the geographical patterns of worldwide genetic diversity are best explained by human expansion out of Africa. This expansion is modelled well by prolonged migration from a single origin in Africa with multiple subsequent serial founding events. We discuss a new simulation model for the serial founder effect out of Africa and compare it with results from previous studies. Unlike previous models, we distinguish colonization events from the continued exchange of people between occupied territories as a result of mating. We conduct a search through parameter space to estimate the range of parameter values that best explain key statistics from published data on worldwide variation in microsatellites. The range of parameters we use is chosen to be compatible with an out-of-Africa migration at 50-60Kyr ago and archaeo-ethno-demographic information. In addition to a colonization rate of 0.09-0.18, for an acceptable fit to the published microsatellite data, incorporation into existing models of exchange between neighbouring populations is essential, but at a very low rate. A linear decay of genetic diversity with geographical distance from the origin of expansion could apply to any species, especially if it moved recently into new geographical niches.

  18. Rejection of a serial founder effects model of genetic and linguistic coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunley, Keith; Bowern, Claire; Healy, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    Recent genetic studies attribute the negative correlation between population genetic diversity and distance from Africa to a serial founder effects (SFE) evolutionary process. A recent linguistic study concluded that a similar decay in phoneme inventories in human languages was also the product of the SFE process. However, the SFE process makes additional predictions for patterns of neutral genetic diversity, both within and between groups, that have not yet been tested on phonemic data. In this study, we describe these predictions and test them on linguistic and genetic samples. The linguistic sample consists of 725 widespread languages, which together contain 908 distinct phonemes. The genetic sample consists of 614 autosomal microsatellite loci in 100 widespread populations. All aspects of the genetic pattern are consistent with the predictions of SFE. In contrast, most of the predictions of SFE are violated for the phonemic data. We show that phoneme inventories provide information about recent contacts between languages. However, because phonemes change rapidly, they cannot provide information about more ancient evolutionary processes. PMID:22298843

  19. Founder effect uncovers a new axis in polyethylene succinate bioremediation during biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribedi, Prosun; Sil, Alok K

    2013-09-01

    Biostimulation is a method of in situ bioremediation wherein native soil microbes are stimulated by nutrient supplementation. In a previous report, we showed considerable polyethylene succinate (PES) degradation by biostimulation. To gain an insight into this, this study was undertaken to investigate the different facets of the microbial population present in both soil and PES-films during biostimulation-mediated PES degradation. It was observed that addition of PES-films to both nutrient-treated and untreated soil resulted in significant reduction of soil microbial counts compared with the corresponding control. It was observed that a small microbial population containing both PES degraders and non-degraders translocated to PES surface. Over time, the population adhering to PES films changed from having both PES degraders and non-degraders to being mainly PES degraders. This newly developed microbial community on PES-films exhibited low diversity with a distinct cluster of metabolic fingerprinting and higher evenness compared with parent soil microbial population. Thus the establishment of a new community on the PES surface is an exhibition of founder effect, which subsequently resulted in the emergence of a more efficient PES-degrading population and subsequently led to considerable PES degradation. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of Dried Blood Spots to Elucidate Full-Length Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus F. Salazar-Gonzalez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identification of HIV-1 genomes responsible for establishing clinical infection in newly infected individuals is fundamental to prevention and pathogenesis research. Processing, storage, and transportation of the clinical samples required to perform these virologic assays in resource-limited settings requires challenging venipuncture and cold chain logistics. Here, we validate the use of dried-blood spots (DBS as a simple and convenient alternative to collecting and storing frozen plasma. Methods: We performed parallel nucleic acid extraction, single genome amplification (SGA, next generation sequencing (NGS, and phylogenetic analyses on plasma and DBS. Results: We demonstrated the capacity to extract viral RNA from DBS and perform SGA to infer the complete nucleotide sequence of the transmitted/founder (TF HIV-1 envelope gene and full-length genome in two acutely infected individuals. Using both SGA and NGS methodologies, we showed that sequences generated from DBS and plasma display comparable phylogenetic patterns in both acute and chronic infection. SGA was successful on samples with a range of plasma viremia, including samples as low as 1,700 copies/ml and an estimated ~50 viral copies per blood spot. Further, we demonstrated reproducible efficiency in gp160 env sequencing in DBS stored at ambient temperature for up to three weeks or at -20ºC for up to five months. Conclusions: These findings support the use of DBS as a practical and cost-effective alternative to frozen plasma for clinical trials and translational research conducted in resource-limited settings.

  1. Ocular biometry and determinants of refractive error in a founder population of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkert, Sarah M; Parness-Yossifon, Reut; Mets-Halgrimson, Rebecca; Mets, Marilyn B

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of myopia is increasing worldwide. Previous studies have found a positive association between myopia, education, and near activities, while others have noted a negative association with outdoor exposure. This study reports refractive error and biometry in a founder population of European ancestry, the Hutterites, and discusses risk factors contributing to myopia. Cross-sectional study, including complete eye exams with retinoscopy and biometry. 939 study participants, ages 6 to 89, were examined. Females were significantly more myopic than males (SE -0.87 ± 2.07 and -0.40 ± 1.49 in females and males, respectively, p refractive error among the Hutterites. As a genetically isolated population with a communal lifestyle, the Hutterites present a unique opportunity to study risk factors for myopia. Hutterite females are more myopic than males, a finding which has only been reported in a few other populations. Hutterite children complete compulsory education through the 8th grade, after which women and men assume gender-specific occupational tasks. Men often work outside on the farm, while women engage in more domestic activities inside. These occupational differences likely contribute to the increased myopia comparing females to males, and their uniform lifestyle reduces the impact of potential confounding factors, such as education and income. The Hutterites are more myopic than most other North American and European populations. Greater time spent doing near work and less time spent outdoors likely explain the increased myopia comparing females to males.

  2. Founder effect of a prevalent phenylketonuria mutation in the Oriental population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tao (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States) Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)); Okano, Yoshiyuki; Eisensmith, R.C.; Harvey, M.L.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Lo, W.H.Y.; Yuan, Lifang (Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)); Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao (Shanghai Children' s Hospital (China)); Furuyama, Junichi (Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan)); Oura, Toshiaki (Osaka Municipal Rehabilitation Center for the Disabled, Osaka (Japan)); Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1991-03-15

    A missense mutation has been identified in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase Chinese patient with classic phenylketonuria (PKU). A G-to-C transition at the second base of codon 413 in exon 12 of the gene results in the substitution of Pro{sup 413} for Arg{sup 413} in the mutant protein. This mutation (R413P) results in negligible enzymatic activity when expressed in heterologous mammalian cells and is compatible with a classic PKU phenotype in the patient. Population genetic studies reveal that this mutation is tightly linked to restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotype 4, which is the predominant haplotype of the PAH locus in the Oriental population. It accounts for 13.8% of northern Chinese and 27% of Japanese PKU alleles, but it is rare in southern Chinese (2.2%) and is absent in the Caucasian population. The data demonstrate unambiguously that the mutation occurred after racial divergence of Orientals and Caucasians and suggest that the allele has spread throughout the Orient by a founder effect. Previous protein polymorphism studies in eastern Asia have led to the hypothesis that northern Mongoloids represented a founding population in Asia. The results are compatible with this hypothesis in that the PKU mutation might have occurred in northern Mongoloids and subsequently spread to the Chinese and Japanese populations.

  3. Founder effect of a prevalent phenylketonuria mutation in the Oriental population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tao; Okano, Yoshiyuki; Eisensmith, R.C.; Harvey, M.L.; Woo, S.L.C.; Lo, W.H.Y.; Yuan, Lifang; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao; Furuyama, Junichi; Oura, Toshiaki; Sommer, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    A missense mutation has been identified in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase Chinese patient with classic phenylketonuria (PKU). A G-to-C transition at the second base of codon 413 in exon 12 of the gene results in the substitution of Pro 413 for Arg 413 in the mutant protein. This mutation (R413P) results in negligible enzymatic activity when expressed in heterologous mammalian cells and is compatible with a classic PKU phenotype in the patient. Population genetic studies reveal that this mutation is tightly linked to restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotype 4, which is the predominant haplotype of the PAH locus in the Oriental population. It accounts for 13.8% of northern Chinese and 27% of Japanese PKU alleles, but it is rare in southern Chinese (2.2%) and is absent in the Caucasian population. The data demonstrate unambiguously that the mutation occurred after racial divergence of Orientals and Caucasians and suggest that the allele has spread throughout the Orient by a founder effect. Previous protein polymorphism studies in eastern Asia have led to the hypothesis that northern Mongoloids represented a founding population in Asia. The results are compatible with this hypothesis in that the PKU mutation might have occurred in northern Mongoloids and subsequently spread to the Chinese and Japanese populations

  4. Genome-wide association study of pre-harvest sprouting resistance in Chinese wheat founder parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pre-harvest sprouting (PHS is a major abiotic factor affecting grain weight and quality, and is caused by an early break in seed dormancy. Association mapping (AM is used to detect correlations between phenotypes and genotypes based on linkage disequilibrium (LD in wheat breeding programs. We evaluated seed dormancy in 80 Chinese wheat founder parents in five environments and performed a genome-wide association study using 6,057 markers, including 93 simple sequence repeat (SSR, 1,472 diversity array technology (DArT, and 4,492 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers. The general linear model (GLM and the mixed linear model (MLM were used in this study, and two significant markers (tPt-7980 and wPt-6457 were identified. Both markers were located on Chromosome 1B, with wPt-6457 having been identified in a previously reported chromosomal position. The significantly associated loci contain essential information for cloning genes related to resistance to PHS and can be used in wheat breeding programs.

  5. [THE FOUNDERS OF FIRST CHAIRS OF HISTORY OF MEDICINE AND SOCIAL HYGIENE IN THE USSR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelova, L E; Kasimovskaia, N A

    2015-01-01

    The USSR academy of medical sciences was organized in 1944. At the same year, the institute of health care organization, medical statistics and social hygiene was included in its structure. Before the institute global tasks in area of research and pedagogic activities were stated. They were implemented in accordance with actual national demands. The institute became a leading research center of studying problems of population health, social hygiene, organization and management of health care and history of medicine. In 2003, the institute was renamed in the The RAMS national research institute of public health, and in 2013 was handed over the Federal agency of research organizations (FANO) of Russia. The directors of the institute were well-known scientists in the field of social hygiene health care organization and history of medicine. They made a significant input into development of medical education, combining scientific, managerial and pedagogic activities. The founders of the first chairs of history of medicine and social hygiene were the directors of the institute I.D. Strashun and N.A. Semashko.

  6. Willet M. Hays, great benefactor to plant breeding and the founder of our association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, A F; Stoehr, H

    2003-01-01

    Willet M. Hays was a great benefactor to plant breeding and the founder of the American Genetic Association (AGA). We commemorate the AGA's centennial. We mined university archives, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) yearbooks, plant breeding textbooks, scientific periodicals, and descendants for information. Willet Hays first recognized the individual plant as the unit of selection and started systematic pure-line selection and progeny tests in 1888. He developed useful plant breeding methods. He selected superior flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), wheat (Triticum vulgare L.), corn (Zea mays L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and oat (Avena sativa L.) varieties, and discovered Grimm alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.); all became commercially important. He initiated branch stations for better performance testing. Willet Hays befriended colleagues in other universities, in federal stations, in a London conference, and in Europe. He gathered and spread the scientific plant breeding gospel. He also improved rural roads and initiated animal breeding records and agricultural economics records. He started the AGA in 1903, serving as secretary for 10 years. He became assistant secretary of agriculture in 1904. He introduced the project system for agricultural research. He authored or coauthored the Nelson Amendment, the Smith-Lever Act, the Smith-Hughes Act, and the protocol leading to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization-all involved teaching agricultural practices that improved the world.

  7. Founders Energy Ltd. 1998 annual report : fiscally prudent, value driven balanced growth strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Founders Energy Ltd is a growth-oriented junior resource company engaged in the acquisition and development of oil and natural gas properties in Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan. The annual review provides details of the company's operations and relevant financial performance during the 1998 fiscal year. In brief, the company realized significant increases in production and reserves, top quartile findings and development costs. It reported significant increases in leverage to natural gas through exploration success at Pouce Coupe and the acquisition of Opal Energy Inc.. It established new core areas in west-central Alberta, Peace River Arch and west-central Saskatchewan. It achieved a better balanced risk profile through geographical diversification and better balance to exploration and development. It increased undeveloped land area to 160,268 net acres and added 11.5 million barrels of established reserves at a finding cost of $ 6.28 per barrel. Financial highlights include increased gross revenue, increased net income per share, and increased shareholders' equity. tabs., figs

  8. Characterization of a novel founder MSH6 mutation causing Lynch syndrome in the French Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellsagué, E; Liu, J; Volenik, A; Giroux, S; Gagné, R; Maranda, B; Roussel-Jobin, A; Latreille, J; Laframboise, R; Palma, L; Kasprzak, L; Marcus, V A; Breguet, M; Nolet, S; El-Haffaf, Z; Australie, K; Gologan, A; Aleynikova, O; Oros-Klein, K; Greenwood, C; Mes-Masson, A M; Provencher, D; Tischkowitz, M; Chong, G; Rousseau, F; Foulkes, W D

    2015-06-01

    We identified an MSH6 mutation (c.10C>T, p.Gln4*) causing Lynch syndrome (LS) in 11 French Canadian (FC) families from the Canadian province of Quebec. We aimed to investigate the molecular and clinical implications of this mutation among FC carriers and to assess its putative founder origin. We studied 11 probands and 27 family members. Additionally 6433 newborns, 187 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 381 endometrial cancer (EC) cases and 179 additional controls, all of them from Quebec, were used. Found in approximately 1 of 400 newborns, the mutation is one of the most common LS mutations described. We have found that this mutation confers a greater risk for EC than for CRC, both in the 11 studied families and in the unselected cases: EC [odds ratio (OR) = 7.5, p French settlers. Application of the results of this study could significantly improve the molecular testing and clinical management of LS families in Quebec. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Gynecologic malignancies in Ashkenazi families with the MSH2 A636P founder mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Ofer; Gruber, Stephen B; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Dishon, Sara; Rennert, Gad

    2008-08-01

    A founder mutation A636P in the MSH2 gene was found to be related to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in Ashkenazi Jews. Although the incidence of colorectal cancer in carriers is relatively well established, the frequency of other tumors is less clear. We studied a consecutive series of 19 carrier families that were cared for by the Clalit Health Studies National Familial Cancer Consultation Service, most of whom were identified through a population-based case-control study of colorectal cancer in northern Israel. Gynecologic cancers, 88% of which (28 cases) were endometrial cancers, were diagnosed in 78.9% of the carrier families and in 26.2% of the women who were at risk, with a mean age at diagnosis of 51.2 years. Forty-six percent of the women with endometrial cancer reported at least 1 other primary tumor. Genetic counseling and testing for the MSH2 A636P mutation is indicated for Ashkenazi Jewish women with an endometrial cancer, especially if the cancer is detected before the age of 70 years in women with a personal or family history of colorectal cancer.

  10. Marie Sklodowska-Curie: teacher, mentor, research center founder, and '' la Patronne ''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    This year (2011) marks the 100 th Anniversary of the award of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Marie Sklodowska-Curie for her discoveries of radium and polonium and her studies of their properties. The United Nations has proclaimed 2011 as the '' International Year of Chemistry '', partly in recognition of this 100 th anniversary. A resolution of the Sejm of the Republic of Poland has also established 2011 as the Year of Maria Sklodowska-Curie. Marie Curie has been celebrated this year by a host of prestigious societies and in many countries all around the world for winning Nobel Prizes in both Physics (1903), for the discovery of radioactivity together with husband Pierre Curie and Henri Becquerel, and Chemistry (1911). She was the first woman to win Nobel Prizes in both Physics and Chemistry and the only one to date to win prizes in both physics and chemistry. Also remarkable was that after Pierre Curie's tragic and untimely death in 1906, she was put in charge of his lectures and laboratory, thus marking the first time in France that a woman occupied such a prestigious academic position, and opening the way for other women to follow. The current article will focus on some of the other notable accomplishments of Marie Curie that are not as commonly recognized, including her organizational and persuasive abilities, and her unique contributions as a teacher, mentor, research center founder, and laboratory '' la Patronne ''. (author)

  11. [On the founders of the Institute of Mathematics and Physics, University of Bahia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, A L

    The reduced number of female students of mathematics at the University of Bahia School of Philosophy (Faculdade de Filosofia, Universidade da Bahia - FF/UBa) is quite surprising. To date, they are concentrated in areas traditionally viewed as feminine whereas men predominate in the mathematical fields. I have examined interview data from a few women who graduated in mathematics and went on to teach at the University of Bahia School of Mathematics (Faculdade de Filosofia - FF) and at the Institute of Mathematics and Physics (Instituto de Matemática e Física - IMF), where they were soon to outnumber men and constitute the majority of the mathematics teaching staff. In this study, I have investigated the course of their careers over time: from their early student days, through their time as teaching assistants and professors, and finally as founders of the Institute of Mathematics and Physics, in 1960. Special reference is made to Martha Maria de Souza Dantas, organizer of the I Brazilian Conference on Mathematics Teaching, an event which has provided the groundwork for what was to become the Institute (IMF); and to Arlete Cerqueira Lima, the mastermind behind its creation.

  12. Practical Work in Dutch School Physics Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerk, G.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated what abilities and objectives can be measured on practical tests. Results suggest that these tests be composed of separate parts which measure the ability to perform an experiment and the ability to interpret and analyze an experiment. A brief description of the Dutch school system is included. (JN)

  13. Governmental filtering of websites: The Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stol, W.PH.; Kaspersen, H.W.K.; Kerstens, J.; Leukfeldt, E.R.; Lodder, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Following the example of Norway and other European Countries, such as Sweden and Denmark, in April 2007 the Dutch government started filtering and blocking web pages with child pornographic content. In this paper we present a research into the technological, legal and practical possibilities of this

  14. Optimal Redesign of the Dutch Road Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Snelder; A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert); J.M. Schrijver; H.J. van Zuylen (Henk); L.H. Immers (Lambertus)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch national road network has been developed over several decades. In the past, roads were constructed according to the then current spatial and transportation planning philosophies. Because the existing road network is a result of a long process of successive developments, the

  15. Changing Balances in Dutch Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedegebuure, Leo C. J.; Westerheijden, Don F.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of recent changes in Dutch higher education provides an overview of the educational system and recent retrenchment and restructuring efforts, and formulates a framework for policy analysis that treats the system as a policy network. Basic processes influencing the outcomes of government policies promoting change are examined.…

  16. The Dutch 'Female Board Index' 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.

    2009-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the presence of women in the Executive Board and Supervisory Board (together: 'the Board') of Dutch listed companies per September 2009. The companies have been ranked by the percentage women in the Board. A difference analysis has been made at personal level

  17. The Dutch Open Telescope: History, Status, Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    After many years of persistent telescope design and telescope construction, R.H. Hammerschlag has installed his Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on La Palma. I brie y review its history and design. The future of optical solar physics at Utrecht hinges on a recently-funded three- year DOT science

  18. Proxy magnetometry with the Dutch Open Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.; Hammerschlag, R.H.; Sütterlin, P.; Bettonvil, F.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Superb movies from the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on La Palma have proven the validity of the open concept of this innovative telescope for high-resolution imaging of the solar atmosphere. A five- camera speckle-burst registration system is being installed that should permit consistent and

  19. Creating sport consumers in Dutch sport policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roest, Jan Willem; Vermeulen, Jeroen; van Bottenburg, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the tension between the association logic and the market logic that appears in the domain of voluntary sport clubs (VSCs). We present a qualitative analysis of sport policy texts of fifteen Dutch national sport organizations (NSOs) and the national umbrella organization to

  20. Creating sport consumers in Dutch sport policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roest, Jan Willem; Vermeulen, Jeroen; van Bottenburg, Maarten; LS Sportontw. & Managing Social Issues; UU LEG Research USG Public Matters Managing Social Issues; LS Management van Cultuur en Zingeving

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the tension between the association logic and the market logic that appears in the domain of voluntary sport clubs (VSCs). We present a qualitative analysis of sport policy texts of fifteen Dutch national sport organizations (NSOs) and the national umbrella organization to

  1. Determining authority of Dutch case law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.; de Ruyter, J.; Kroese, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of two studies to see whether the analysis of the network of citations between cases can be used as an indication of the relevance and authority in the Dutch legal system. Fowler e.a. have shown such results for the US common law system, but given the different

  2. Partial word order freezing in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, G.J.; Hendriks, P.

    2012-01-01

    Dutch allows for variation as to whether the first position in the sentence is occupied by the subject or by some other constituent, such as the direct object. In particular situations, however, this commonly observed variation in word order is ‘frozen’ and only the subject appears in first

  3. Dutch diabetes prevalence estimates (DUDE-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefstra, Nanne; Landman, Gijsw. D.; Van Hateren, Kornelis J. J.; Meulepas, Marianne; Romeijnders, Arnold; Rutten, Guy E. H.; Klomp, Maarten; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent decades have seen a constant upward projection in the prevalence of diabetes. Attempts to estimate diabetes prevalence rates based on relatively small population samples quite often result in underestimation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the Dutch

  4. 200 years of Dutch transport policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, J.A.; De Wee, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper eight stories are told about Dutch passenger transport history. The first story is from 1814 about building the first national paved road network suitable for stagecoaches; the last is from 1997 and is about the decision to construct a high speed rail link from Amsterdam to the

  5. The Dutch Healthcare System in International Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikkers, Misja

    2016-01-01

    In this address, important aspects of the Dutch system of managed competition are discussed from the economic perspective, highlighting both its merits and the major challenges posed by the development of this system. Reasons for government intervention in healthcare markets are provided, and the

  6. Reforming Dutch substance abuse treatment services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Gerard M.; Schramade, Mark; Walburg, Jan A.

    2002-01-01

    The Dutch substance abuse treatment system is in the middle of a major reorganization. The goal is to improve outcomes by redesigning all major primary treatment processes and by implementing a system of regular monitoring and feedback of clinical outcome data. The new program includes implementing

  7. Collectivism versus individualism in Dutch employment relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leede, Jan; Looise, Jan C.; van Riemsdijk, Maarten

    2004-01-01

    From a very centralistic and collectivistic tradition after World War Two, Dutch employment relations now show a trend towards radical decentralisation and individualisation. What might be the consequences of this trend for labour relations? Do developments still fit within a movement towards

  8. [Dutch language area definition of chronic fatigue].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korenromp, I.H.; Meeus, M.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic fatigue is a frequent but unspecific characteristic of many diseases. However, a clear definition of 'chronic fatigue' is still lacking. The Flemish-Dutch Research Group - Chronic Fatigue (VNO-CHROVER) has taken the opportunity to formulate such a definition that can be widely applied. This

  9. Institutional developments in the Dutch waste market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradus, R.H.J.M.; Dijkgraaf, E.

    2008-01-01

    We analyse the Dutch waste-collection market for 1998-2005. We show that municipalities with unit-based pricing (UBP) or waste collection by private companies have lower costs. However, this cost advantage decreases over time as competition decreases, because of the introduction of the

  10. Dutch aid to education and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes Cardozo, M.T.A.; Novelli, M.

    2010-01-01

    This report focuses on developments in Dutch aid to education in conflict affected areas in the last decade, with a focus on the period 2007‐2010, when ex‐Minister for International Development, Koenders was in office. In this relatively brief time frame, Koenders prioritised development cooperation

  11. Modelling radon transport in Dutch dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen MPM; Vries L de; Phaff JC; Graaf ER van der; Blaauboer RO; Stoop P; Lembrechts J; TNO-Bouw; KVI; LSO

    1998-01-01

    Radon concentrations and external exposure by nuclides of the U-238 decay chain were quantified for a typical Dutch townhouse using a series of interconnected computer models. The effect is studied of changes in parameter values which have simulated changes in building practices over the past

  12. Infrastructure protection in the Dutch financial sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oers, M.H.M.; Strous, L.; Berndsen, R.J.; Butts, J.; Shenoi, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of critical infrastructure protection in the Dutch financial sector. The organizational structures are examined to discern the roles and functions that facilitate public-private cooperation. An assessment of the organizational structures is provided along with a

  13. The Dutch economy and the environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ierland, van E.C.

    1986-01-01

    On initiative of the Dutch Parliament a scenario study took place on economics, energy and the environment, to analyse the need of building additional nuclear power plants in the Netherlands in the coming decades. Characteristic for the study is the application of empirical models that describe the

  14. The Dutch parallel reduction machine project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, H.P.; Eekelen, M.C.J.D.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Hertzberger, L.O.; Plasmeijer, M.J.; Vree, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    In November 1984 three research groups at the universities of Amsterdam, Nijmegen and Utrecht started a cooperative project sponsored by the Dutch Ministry of Science and Education (Science Council). The first phase lasting until the end of 1987 is a pilot study and has as aim to answer the

  15. Performance Persistence of Dutch Pension Funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Xiaohong; Mahieu, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the investment performance of pension funds with a focus on their ability in implementing their intended investment strategy. We use a sample of Dutch industry-wide pension funds, which are obliged by law to report their investment performance according to the so-called z-score.

  16. The Essential Guide to Dutch Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klis, van der Jolande

    2000-01-01

    Of all the composers produced by the Netherlands, only two have achieved world renown: Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck in the early seventeenth century and Louis Andriessen today. Nonetheless, so much more Dutch music is worthy of attention. For the first time ever, four centuries of composition in the

  17. The Dutch vocational education and training system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, A.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch educational system is highly stratified from secondary education onwards3, and this also applies to MBO. Each MBO course can be followed in two different learning pathways, called the vocationally educating learning pathway (beroepsopleidende leerweg: BOL) and the vocationally guiding

  18. Processing subject-object ambiguities in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaan, Edith

    1997-01-01

    Various clause types in Dutch and German are at least temporarily ambiguous with respect to the order of subject and object. A number of previous studies regarding the processing of such subject-object ambiguities have reported a preference for a subject-object interpretation. This order preference

  19. Dissolved carbon dioxide in Dutch coastal waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D.C E; de Baar, H.J.W.; de Wilde, H.P.J.

    1996-01-01

    The role of shelf seas in global carbon cycling is poorly understood. The dissolved inorganic carbon system and air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) are described for the Dutch coastal zone in September 1993. The inorganic carbon chemistry was affected by tidal mixing, wind speed, wind

  20. Direct speech constructions in aphasic Dutch narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewold, Rimke; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Huiskes, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that individuals with aphasia are usually able to produce direct reported speech constructions. So far these studies have mainly been conducted in English. The results show that direct speech is beneficial for aphasic speakers for various reasons. In Dutch the

  1. Lyme borreliosis in Dutch forestry workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, H.; de Jongh, B. M.; Nauta, A. P.; Houweling, H.; Wiessing, L. G.; van Charante, A. W.; Spanjaard, L.

    1991-01-01

    Serum samples from 127 Dutch forestry workers and 127 matched controls were tested for antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi in an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Those of the forestry workers were also tested by Western blotting. The forestry workers were examined clinically for evidence

  2. Dutch musculoskeletal questionnaire: description and basic qualities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildebrandt, V.H.; Bongers, P.M.; Dijk, F.J. van; Kempers, H.C.G.; Dul, J.

    2001-01-01

    The article describes the Dutch Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (DMQ) for the analysis of musculoskeletal workload and associated potential hazardous working conditions as well as musculoskeletal symptoms in worker populations. Its qualities are explored using a database of 1,575 workers in various

  3. Cancer incidence in Dutch Balkan veterans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogers, R.P.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Grievink, L.; Schouten, L.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Schram-Bijkerk, D.

    2013-01-01

    Suspicion has been raised about an increased cancer risk among Balkan veterans because of alleged exposure to depleted uranium. The authors conducted a historical cohort study to examine cancer incidence among Dutch Balkan veterans. Male military personnel (n=18,175, median follow-up 11 years) of

  4. Dutch politicians' coping with terrorist threat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijdam, Mirjam J.; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Olff, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    The psychosocial effects of terrorist threat and close protection have never been studied systematically in political leaders. We conducted a study among 12 Dutch politicians and their partners who were living under terrorist threat and close protection in the aftermath of two political murders.

  5. Dutch Journalism in the Digital Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Kemman (Max); M. Kleppe (Martijn); B. Nieman; H.J.G. Beunders (Henri)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWith an ever-growing supply of online sources, information to produce news stories seems to be one mouse click away. But in what way do Dutch journalists actually use computer-aided research tools? This article provides an inventory of the ways journalists use digital (re)sources and

  6. Crossing the chasm in Dutch greenhouse horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, J.S.; Smit, P.X.

    2016-01-01

    Dutch greenhouse horticulture has an innovation and development programme called 'Kas als Energiebron' (Greenhouse as Energy Producer). The objective of this programme is reducing the carbon footprint and improving the energy efficiency of greenhouse horticulture, and developing a climate neutral

  7. Balance in competition in Dutch soccer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Ruud H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate an ordered probit model for soccer results in The Netherlands. The result of a game is assumed to be determined by home advantage and quality differences of the opposing teams. The parameters of the model are used to assess whether competitive balance in Dutch professional

  8. Delinquent Behavior of Dutch Rural Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, D.

    2011-01-01

    This article compares Dutch rural and non-rural adolescents’ delinquent behavior and examines two social correlates of rural delinquency: communal social control and traditional rural culture. The analyses are based on cross-sectional data, containing 3,797 participants aged 13–18 (48.7% females).

  9. Dutch elm disease control: performance and costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    William N., Jr. Cannon; David P. Worley

    1976-01-01

    Municipal programs to suppress Dutch elm disease have had highly variable results. Performance as measured by tree mortality was unrelated to control strategies. Costs for control programs were 37 to 76 percent less than costs without control programs in the 15-year time-span of the study. Only those municipalities that conducted a high-performance program could be...

  10. Competition in the Dutch consumer credit market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the degree of competitiveness of the Dutch consumer credit market. We use the well-known Bresnahan-Lau method that estimates a structural model consisting of a demand relation and a supply relation, based on aggregate data. The level of competition is derived from the estimated

  11. Competition in the Dutch consumer credit market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers the degree of competitiveness of the Dutch consumer credit market. We use the well-known I Bresnahan-Lau method that estimates it structural model consisting of a demand relation and a supply relation, based on aggregate data. The level of compelition is derived from the

  12. Phonological Acquisition and Dutch Word Prosody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohuis-Weber, Heleen; Zonneveld, Wim

    1996-01-01

    Presents the results of an investigation into the acquisition of syllable structure and stress by a preschool Dutch child. Shows how the structure of the child's output approaches the adult models in stages and discusses a phenomenon called "mutation," in which all continuants are consistently replaced with "n-" in onsets. (51…

  13. Dutch dairy farms after milk quota abolition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klootwijk, C.W.; Middelaar, van C.E.; Berentsen, P.B.M.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The abolition of the Dutch milk quota system has been accompanied by the introduction of a new manure policy to limit phosphate production (i.e., excretion via manure) on expanding dairy farms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of these recent policy changes on the farm

  14. Drug utilisation in Dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, KN; de Vries, CS; van den Berg, PB; Brouwers, JRBJ; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    Objective: To quantify and evaluate drug utilisation in a sample of Dutch nursing homes. Methods: A retrospective analysis of computerised medication data of 2355 residents aged 65 years and over from six nursing homes in the Netherlands was performed. For each therapeutic drug group, the number of

  15. Competition in the Dutch Health Care Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.T. Schut (Erik)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractFor more than two decades, Dutch health policy has been marked by a search for a suitable market order in health care. Suitable in the sense of maintaining universal access, containing the growth of health care expenditure and improving the technical and allocative efficiency of

  16. Flexible benefit plans in Dutch organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrink, C.

    2006-01-01

    Flexible benefit plans give employees a greater say over the composition of their benefits than traditional Dutch benefit plans. These arrangements developed in a time of further individualisation, increasing flexibility in the workplace, and a tight labour market in the Netherlands. By giving

  17. Workshops in Dutch sustainable building design practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeiler, W.; Quanjel, E.M.C.J.; Borsboom, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    Within the present context of the Dutch Sustainable Building Practice it is hard for the different involved building design disciplines to give a good answer to sustainability. Especially this is the case for the application solar energy either in passive or active form. As traditional methods did

  18. Performance management in Dutch central government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Nico P.; de Kruijf, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    This article investigates how and to what extent performance indicators in Dutch central government are actually embedded in performance management. In a case study encompassing 12 government organizations, the relevance of the indicators presented is analysed in three stages: (1) with respect to

  19. Missionary history of the Dutch Reformed Church

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Being missionary, being human is a must, especially for those with an interest in missiology. It not only provides a fresh perspective on the missionary history of the Dutch Reformed Church (DRC) in South Africa, it also provides a clear description of the interactive relationship between context and mission. The author is a ...

  20. Preprocessing documents to answer Dutch questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jijkoun, V.; Mishne, G.A.; de Rijke, M.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a framework for offline extraction of certain types of information from a document collection, and discuss its usage for answering factoid questions. We implemented this approach as a part of the Dutch Question Answering System developed at the University of Amsterdam. The evaluation of

  1. Crisis, Inequality and Consumption - a Dutch Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahlen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Inequalities have been exacerbating in the Netherlands since the economic crisis hit ground in 2008, with poverty increasing substantially. The amount of the Dutch population living under the poverty line increased from 7,4 % in 2010 to 10,3 % in 2013. Different types of household are affected:

  2. Browsing for the National Dutch Video Archive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulders, A.W.M.; van Gemert, J.C.; Geusebroek, J.M.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Worring, M.

    2006-01-01

    Pictures have always been a prime carrier of Dutch culture. But pictures take a new form. We live in times of broad- and narrowcasting through Internet, of passive and active viewers, of direct or delayed broadcast, and of digital pictures being delivered in the museum or at home. At the same time,

  3. FIRM HOUSEHOLD INTERRELATIONSHIPS ON DUTCH DAIRY FARMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ELHORST, JP

    1994-01-01

    In this article an agricultural household model is developed in which production and consumption decisions are non-separable. On the basis of this model the importance of coupling production and consumption decisions is investigated for the Dutch dairy sector both before and after the introduction

  4. Dutch hi-tech companies exhibit at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-seven Dutch companies will present the state of the art of their technological developments at the industrial exhibition Holland @ CERN from 8 to 11 November. The exhibition is designed to help strengthen the ties between fundamental science and Dutch industry.   The exhibition, supported by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and organised by the Netherlands National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), in cooperation with the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, and Dutch Scientific, an association of manufacturers of scientific equipment, will be held in the Main Building from 8 to11 November. “The last Holland @ CERN exhibition took place fifteen years ago”, says Robert Klöpping from Nikhef, Dutch Industrial Liaison Officer for CERN and Purchasing Advisor for Grenoble ESRF. “This kind of event is very important for Dutch industry as it allows us to show what Dutch companies c...

  5. Founder effect of the RET C611Y mutation in multiple endocrine neoplasia 2A in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Kroustrup, Jens Peter; Vestergaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A and 2B are caused by REarranged during Transfection (RET) germline mutations. In a recent nationwide study we reported of an unusually high prevalence (33%) of families with the C611Y mutation and hypothesized that this might be due to a founder...... effect. We conducted the first nationwide study of haplotypes in MEN2A families aiming to investigate the relatedness and occurrence of de novo mutations among Danish families carrying similar mutations. METHODS: The study included 21 apparently unrelated MEN2A families identified from a nationwide...... Danish RET cohort from 1994 to 2014. Twelve, two, two, three and two families carried the C611Y, C618F, C618Y, C620R and C634R mutation, respectively. Single nucleotide polymorphism chip data and identity by descent analysis were used to assess relatedness. RESULTS: A common founder mutation was found...

  6. 13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  7. Genetic consequences of a century of protection: serial founder events and survival of the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramstad, Kristina M.; Colbourne, Rogan M.; Robertson, Hugh A.; Allendorf, Fred W.; Daugherty, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    We present the outcome of a century of post-bottleneck isolation of a long-lived species, the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii, LSK) and demonstrate that profound genetic consequences can result from protecting few individuals in isolation. LSK were saved from extinction by translocation of five birds from South Island, New Zealand to Kapiti Island 100 years ago. The Kapiti population now numbers some 1200 birds and provides founders for new populations. We used 15 microsatellite loci to c...

  8. Molecular and genealogical evidence for a founder effect in Fanconi anemia families of the Afrikaner population of South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Tipping, A. J.; Pearson, T.; Morgan, N. V.; Gibson, R. A.; Kuyt, L. P.; Havenga, C.; Gluckman, E.; Joenje, H.; de Ravel, T.; Jansen, S.; Mathew, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder associated with progressive aplastic anemia, congenital abnormalities, and cancer. FA has a very high incidence in the Afrikaner population of South Africa, possibly due to a founder effect. Previously we observed allelic association between polymorphic markers flanking the FA group A gene (FANCA) and disease chromosomes in Afrikaners. We genotyped 26 FA families with microsatelli...

  9. Gerald J. Marks, M.D., FACS (1925-), founder of the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Theresa P; Cowan, Scott W; Yeo, Charles J

    2018-03-01

    This historical vignette describes the professional career of Gerald J. Marks, the founder of the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons and the International Federation of Societies of Endoscopic Surgeons. Dr. Marks is also the founding Associate Editor of Surgical Endoscopy, which celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2017. Dr. Marks is a renowned colorectal surgeon, an accomplished watercolor artist, and a fascinating personality.

  10. KT seminar on entrepreneurship | "From CERN engineer to company founder: my journey" by Julio Lucas | 26 September

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Europe needs its economy to be boosted by the ideas of its most talented scientists and engineers. One of the best ways in which these ideas may contribute to society is by creating a new business. In this Knowledge Transfer seminar, Julio Lucas, Technical Director and co-founder of Elytt Energy and former CERN engineer gives a personal view on how to make your first steps in entrepreneurship.    

  11. Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hraber, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giorgi, Elena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bhattacharya, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

  12. Prevalence of founder mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes among unaffected women from the Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottier, M; Lunn, J; Butler, R; Curling, D; Turnquest, T; Francis, W; Halliday, D; Royer, R; Zhang, S; Li, S; Thompson, I; Donenberg, T; Hurley, J; Akbari, M R; Narod, S A

    2016-03-01

    Population-based testing for BRCA1/2 mutations detects a high proportion of carriers not identified by cancer family history-based testing. We sought to determine whether population-based testing is an effective approach to genetic testing in the Bahamas, where 23% of women with breast cancer carry one of seven founder mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. We determined the prevalence of founder BRCA mutations in 1847 Bahamian women without a personal history of breast or ovarian cancer, unselected for age or family history. We found that 2.8% (20/705) of unaffected women with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer and 0.09% (1/1089) of unaffected women without a family history carry a BRCA mutation. A total of 38% of unaffected women with a known mutation in the family were found to carry the familial mutation. We previously suggested that all Bahamian women with breast or ovarian cancer be offered genetic testing. These current data suggest that additionally all unaffected Bahamian women with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer should be offered genetic testing for the founder BRCA mutations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Linkage disequilibrium analysis in young populations: Pseudo-vitamin D-deficiency rickets and the founder effect in French Canadians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labuda, M.; Glorieux, F.H. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada); Labuda, D.; Korab-Laskowska, M. [Universite de Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Pseudo-vitamin D-deficiency rickets (PDDR) was mapped close to D12S90 and between proximal D12S312 and distal (D12S305, D12S104) microsatellites that were subsequently found on a single YAC clone. Analysis of a complex haplotype in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the disease discriminated among distinct founder effects in French Canadian populations in Acadia and in Charlevoix-Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (Ch-SLSJ), as well as an earlier one in precolonial Europe. A simple demographic model suggested the historical age of the founder effect in Ch-SLSJ to be {approximately}12 generations. The corresponding LD data are consistent with this figure when they are analyzed within the framework of Luria-Delbruck model, which takes into account the population growth. Population sampling due to a limited number of first settlers and the rapid demographic expansion appear to have played a major role in the founding of PDDR in Ch-SLSJ and, presumably, other genetic disorders endemic to French Canada. Similarly, the founder effect in Ashkenazim, coinciding with their early settlement in medieval Poland and subsequent expansion eastward, could explain the origin of frequent genetic diseases in this population. 48 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Testing founder effect speciation: Divergence population genetics of the Spoonbills Platalea regia and Pl. minor (Threskiornithidae, Aves)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Carol K.L.; Tsai, Pi-Wen; Chesser, R. Terry; Lin, Rong-Chien; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Although founder effect speciation has been a popular theoretical model for the speciation of geographically isolated taxa, its empirical importance has remained difficult to evaluate due to the intractability of past demography, which in a founder effect speciation scenario would involve a speciational bottleneck in the emergent species and the complete cessation of gene flow following divergence. Using regression-weighted approximate Bayesian computation, we tested the validity of these two fundamental conditions of founder effect speciation in a pair of sister species with disjunct distributions: the royal spoonbill Platalea regia in Australasia and the black-faced spoonbill Pl. minor in eastern Asia. When compared with genetic polymorphism observed at 20 nuclear loci in the two species, simulations showed that the founder effect speciation model had an extremely low posterior probability (1.55 × 10-8) of producing the extant genetic pattern. In contrast, speciation models that allowed for postdivergence gene flow were much more probable (posterior probabilities were 0.37 and 0.50 for the bottleneck with gene flow and the gene flow models, respectively) and postdivergence gene flow persisted for a considerable period of time (more than 80% of the divergence history in both models) following initial divergence (median = 197,000 generations, 95% credible interval [CI]: 50,000-478,000, for the bottleneck with gene flow model; and 186,000 generations, 95% CI: 45,000-477,000, for the gene flow model). Furthermore, the estimated population size reduction in Pl. regia to 7,000 individuals (median, 95% CI: 487-12,000, according to the bottleneck with gene flow model) was unlikely to have been severe enough to be considered a bottleneck. Therefore, these results do not support founder effect speciation in Pl. regia but indicate instead that the divergence between Pl. regia and Pl. minor was probably driven by selection despite continuous gene flow. In this light, we

  15. Identification of Unequally Represented Founder Viruses Among Tissues in Very Early SIV Rectal Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the transmitted/founder (T/F viruses of multi-variant SIV infection may shed new light on the understanding of mucosal transmission. We intrarectally inoculated six Chinese rhesus macaques with a single high dose of SIVmac251 (3.1 × 104 TCID50 and obtained 985 full-length env sequences from multiple tissues at 6 and 10 days post-infection by single genome amplification (SGA. All 6 monkeys were infected with a range of 2 to 8 T/F viruses and the dominant variants from the inoculum were still dominant in different tissues from each monkey. Interestingly, our data showed that a cluster of rare T/F viruses was unequally represented in different tissues. This cluster of rare T/F viruses phylogenetically related to the non-dominant SIV variants in the inoculum and was not detected in any rectum tissues, but could be identified in the descending colon, jejunum, spleen, or plasma. In 2 out of 6 macaques, identical SIVmac251 variants belonging to this cluster were detected simultaneously in descending colon/jejunum and the inoculum. We also demonstrated that the average CG dinucleotide frequency of these rare T/F viruses found in tissues, as well as non-dominant variants in the inoculum, was significantly higher than the dominant T/F viruses in tissues and the inoculum. Collectively, these findings suggest that descending colon/jejunum might be more susceptible than rectum to SIV in the very early phase of infection. And host CG suppression, which was previously shown to inhibit HIV replication in vitro, may also contribute to the bottleneck selection during in vivo transmission.

  16. Master John of Arderne (1307-1380): a founder of modern surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, John

    2012-01-01

    John of Arderne (1307-1380) was one founder of surgery as the profession is known today. He was the first English surgeon of whom biographic details survive. Born on the Arderne Estates at Newark, England, he served as a military surgeon in France in campaigns where gunpowder was used in combat for the first time. His best-known work, the Practica (De Arte Phisicali et de Cirurgia), formed the basis of practical surgical teaching in the medical schools of medieval Europe. Biographic research of primary and secondary archives and documents. John of Arderne's surgical practice was undertaken against a background of turbulent political, military and medical events. He survived the Black Death (1347) and its cyclical recurrences. He lived through the turbulent reigns of Edward II and Edward III and practised in London in the decades preceding the simmering unrest which preceded the Peasant's Revolt of 1381. Surgical and medical practice in the late Middle Ages was enmeshed in astrological beliefs. It was greatly influenced by church doctrine of disease causation. In this paper, the known details of John of Arderne's life are placed in the perspective of these societal and professional influences. He is one of several pre-Renaissance European doctors who were the first to challenge the received medical lore of Galen and later Arabic surgeons. Writing when he was 70 years of age, John of Arderne was the first to advocate that surgeons should trust their own clinical experience 'Wele ymagynyng subtile things' rather than following the directions of others, even including those advocated by himself. © 2011 The Author. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. Teleseismic Travel-Time Tomography of the Sierra Nevada and its Foundering Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeg, H.; Jones, C. H.; Gilbert, H.; Owens, T.; Zandt, G.

    2007-12-01

    Inferences of foundering lithosphere under the southern Sierra have mostly been based upon xenolith petrology and seismic tomography. To better evaluate the extent and geometry of any such unstable lithosphere, we timed teleseismic bodywave arrivals from approximately 500 teleseisms at 75 stations occupied for 1 or 2 years by the Sierra Nevada Earthscope Project (SNEP) and about 15 Earthscope Transportable Array (TA) stations in the region of the Sierra. With the SNEP footprint, stations are spaced about 25 km apart and extend roughly 400 km along the range and 150 km normal to the range. Additional TA stations extend the aperture of the array to about 600 km. Events were chosen to get the best signal-to-noise ratio while optimizing the backazimuthal coverage. P- wave arrival times were determined simultaneously across all stations for each event using a waveform correlation technique developed by G. Pavlis (dbxcor). Initial examination of the travel-time residuals indicates that no substantial lithospheric downwelling exists between the previously recognized "Isabella anomaly" at the southern end of the range and the approximate position of the south edge of the Gorda plate. Residuals in the Basin and Range are generally small but consistently late compared to stations to the west, but large differences in residuals (>1 s) in the western Sierran foothills can occur over short (~50 km) distances, suggesting substantial heterogeneity in the crust or uppermost mantle. Results of a 3-D isotropic inversion will be presented, and any systematic residual patterns remaining will be evaluated with an eye towards identifying any anisotropy.

  18. Counting the founders: the matrilineal genetic ancestry of the Jewish Diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Doron M; Metspalu, Ene; Kivisild, Toomas; Rosset, Saharon; Tzur, Shay; Hadid, Yarin; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Rosengarten, Dror; Pereira, Luisa; Amorim, Antonio; Kutuev, Ildus; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Villems, Richard; Skorecki, Karl

    2008-04-30

    The history of the Jewish Diaspora dates back to the Assyrian and Babylonian conquests in the Levant, followed by complex demographic and migratory trajectories over the ensuing millennia which pose a serious challenge to unraveling population genetic patterns. Here we ask whether phylogenetic analysis, based on highly resolved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenies can discern among maternal ancestries of the Diaspora. Accordingly, 1,142 samples from 14 different non-Ashkenazi Jewish communities were analyzed. A list of complete mtDNA sequences was established for all variants present at high frequency in the communities studied, along with high-resolution genotyping of all samples. Unlike the previously reported pattern observed among Ashkenazi Jews, the numerically major portion of the non-Ashkenazi Jews, currently estimated at 5 million people and comprised of the Moroccan, Iraqi, Iranian and Iberian Exile Jewish communities showed no evidence for a narrow founder effect, which did however characterize the smaller and more remote Belmonte, Indian and the two Caucasus communities. The Indian and Ethiopian Jewish sample sets suggested local female introgression, while mtDNAs in all other communities studied belong to a well-characterized West Eurasian pool of maternal lineages. Absence of sub-Saharan African mtDNA lineages among the North African Jewish communities suggests negligible or low level of admixture with females of the host populations among whom the African haplogroup (Hg) L0-L3 sub-clades variants are common. In contrast, the North African and Iberian Exile Jewish communities show influence of putative Iberian admixture as documented by mtDNA Hg HV0 variants. These findings highlight striking differences in the demographic history of the widespread Jewish Diaspora.

  19. HIV competition dynamics over sexual networks: first comer advantage conserves founder effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandy, Bence; Mones, Enys; Vicsek, Tamás; Müller, Viktor

    2015-02-01

    Outside Africa, the global phylogeography of HIV is characterized by compartmentalized local epidemics that are typically dominated by a single subtype, which indicates strong founder effects. We hypothesized that the competition of viral strains at the epidemic level may involve an advantage of the resident strain that was the first to colonize a population. Such an effect would slow down the invasion of new strains, and thus also the diversification of the epidemic. We developed a stochastic modelling framework to simulate HIV epidemics over dynamic contact networks. We simulated epidemics in which the second strain was introduced into a population where the first strain had established a steady-state epidemic, and assessed whether, and on what time scale, the second strain was able to spread in the population. Simulations were parameterized based on empirical data; we tested scenarios with varying levels of overall prevalence. The spread of the second strain occurred on a much slower time scale compared with the initial expansion of the first strain. With strains of equal transmission efficiency, the second strain was unable to invade on a time scale relevant for the history of the HIV pandemic. To become dominant over a time scale of decades, the second strain needed considerable (>25%) advantage in transmission efficiency over the resident strain. The inhibition effect was weaker if the second strain was introduced while the first strain was still in its growth phase. We also tested how possible mechanisms of interference (inhibition of superinfection, depletion of highly connected hubs in the network, one-time acute peak of infectiousness) contribute to the inhibition effect. Our simulations confirmed a strong first comer advantage in the competition dynamics of HIV at the population level, which may explain the global phylogeography of the virus and may influence the future evolution of the pandemic.

  20. HIV competition dynamics over sexual networks: first comer advantage conserves founder effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bence Ferdinandy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Outside Africa, the global phylogeography of HIV is characterized by compartmentalized local epidemics that are typically dominated by a single subtype, which indicates strong founder effects. We hypothesized that the competition of viral strains at the epidemic level may involve an advantage of the resident strain that was the first to colonize a population. Such an effect would slow down the invasion of new strains, and thus also the diversification of the epidemic. We developed a stochastic modelling framework to simulate HIV epidemics over dynamic contact networks. We simulated epidemics in which the second strain was introduced into a population where the first strain had established a steady-state epidemic, and assessed whether, and on what time scale, the second strain was able to spread in the population. Simulations were parameterized based on empirical data; we tested scenarios with varying levels of overall prevalence. The spread of the second strain occurred on a much slower time scale compared with the initial expansion of the first strain. With strains of equal transmission efficiency, the second strain was unable to invade on a time scale relevant for the history of the HIV pandemic. To become dominant over a time scale of decades, the second strain needed considerable (>25% advantage in transmission efficiency over the resident strain. The inhibition effect was weaker if the second strain was introduced while the first strain was still in its growth phase. We also tested how possible mechanisms of interference (inhibition of superinfection, depletion of highly connected hubs in the network, one-time acute peak of infectiousness contribute to the inhibition effect. Our simulations confirmed a strong first comer advantage in the competition dynamics of HIV at the population level, which may explain the global phylogeography of the virus and may influence the future evolution of the pandemic.

  1. Tissue-specific responses to the LRPPRC founder mutation in French Canadian Leigh Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasarman, Florin; Nishimura, Tamiko; Antonicka, Hana; Weraarpachai, Woranontee; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2015-01-15

    French Canadian Leigh Syndrome (LSFC) is an early-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a distinct pattern of tissue involvement. Most cases are caused by a founder missense mutation in LRPPRC. LRPPRC forms a ribonucleoprotein complex with SLIRP, another RNA-binding protein, and this stabilizes polyadenylated mitochondrial mRNAs. LSFC fibroblasts have reduced levels of LRPPRC and a specific complex IV assembly defect; however, further depletion of mutant LRPPRC results in a complete failure to assemble a functional oxidative phosphorylation system, suggesting that LRPPRC levels determine the nature of the biochemical phenotype. We tested this hypothesis in cultured muscle cells and tissues from LSFC patients. LRPPRC levels were reduced in LSFC muscle cells, resulting in combined complex I and IV deficiencies. A similar combined deficiency was observed in skeletal muscle. Complex IV was only moderately reduced in LSFC heart, but was almost undetectable in liver. Both of these tissues showed elevated levels of complexes I and III. Despite the marked biochemical differences, the steady-state levels of LRPPRC and mitochondrial mRNAs were extremely low, LRPPRC was largely detergent-insoluble, and SLIRP was undetectable in all LSFC tissues. The level of the LRPPRC/SLIRP complex appeared much reduced in control tissues by the first dimension blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) analysis compared with fibroblasts, and even by second dimension analysis it was virtually undetectable in control heart. These results point to tissue-specific pathways for the post-transcriptional handling of mitochondrial mRNAs and suggest that the biochemical defects in LSFC reflect the differential ability of tissues to adapt to the mutation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Founder effects and the evolution of asymmetrical sexual isolation in a rapidly-speciating clade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P. OH, Gina L. CONTE, Kerry L. SHAW

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sexual isolation resulting from differences in mate choice behaviors is a hallmark of rapidly-speciating lineages. When present, asymmetrical sexual isolation may provide insights into the mechanisms responsible for the evolutionary change in mate signaling traits. In particular, Kaneshiro’s hypothesis suggests that divergence in sexual characters between populations may arise in allopatry when ‘derived’ founding populations are subject to severe population bottlenecks, accompanied by a relaxation of sexual selection relative to ‘ancestral’ source populations. In the present study, we tested predictions of asymmetrical sexual isolation between two allopatric species of Hawaiian Laupala crickets, representing ‘ancestral’ (L. makaio and ‘derived’ (L. nigra taxa. While crickets in this genus are notable for rapid divergence of male courtship songs, these species share similar song types, thus suggesting that patterns of sexual isolation are likely due to other mating cues. Analysis of behavioral responses in conspecific and heterospecific ‘no-choice’ mating trials revealed pronounced asymmetrical isolation in the direction predicted by Kaneshiro’s hypothesis, wherein we observed a significant reduction in mating success for crosses involving ‘derived’ males paired with ‘ancestral’ females, compared to the reciprocal heterospecific and both conspecific pairings. Further dissection of courtship behaviors suggested this difference did not reflect male mate choice, but rather, marked reduced spermatophore acceptance rates by ‘ancestral’ females paired with ‘derived’ males. The results are discussed with respect to founder effect models of speciation and the potential role of chemosensory signals in mate choice in these species [Current Zoology 59 (2: 230-238, 2013].

  3. More on Dutch English ... please? : a study of request performance by Dutch native speakers, English native speakers and Dutch learners of English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, B.C.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate similarities and differences in the use of politeness strategies in formulating requests between Dutch learners of English, native speakers of Dutch and native speakers of English. A second objective was to gain more insights into the influence of

  4. Investing in Climate Change. Dutch Banks Compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buurgaard Nielsen, J.; Pols, D.; Van Gelder, J.W.; Denie, S.; Scheire, C.

    2007-06-01

    This report is the first comparison of the climate change performance of Dutch banks that analyses the actual investments of these banks. It reviews a substantial share of each bank's portfolio, according to three criteria: how much they invest in the main cause of climate change, fossil fuels; how much they invest in the main alternative to fossil fuels, renewable energy; the bank's plans and policies to limit their contribution to climate change

  5. Competition in the Dutch consumer credit market

    OpenAIRE

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers the degree of competitiveness of the Dutch consumer credit market. We use the well-known I Bresnahan-Lau method that estimates it structural model consisting of a demand relation and a supply relation, based on aggregate data. The level of compelition is derived from the estimated conjectural variation elasticity. Our empirical results show that there is no evidence of market power.

  6. The Dutch xAPI Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Alan; Scheffel, Maren; Drachsler, Hendrik; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    We present the collected experiences since 2012 of the Dutch Special Interest Group (SIG) for Learning Analytics in the application of the xAPI standard. We have been experimenting and exchanging best practices around the application of xAPI in various contexts. The practices include di fferent design patterns centered around Learning Record Stores. We present three projects that apply xAPI in very diff erent ways and publish a consistent set of xAPI recipes.

  7. The Dutch Claustrophobia Questionnaire: psychometric properties and predictive validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Diest, Ilse; Smits, Dirk; Decremer, Davina; Maes, Lori; Claes, Laurence

    2010-10-01

    Fear of suffocation and fear of restriction are thought to underlie claustrophobia and can be assessed with the Claustrophobia Questionnaire (CLQ; Radomsky et al., 2001). A first study tested the psychometric properties of a Dutch version of the CLQ. Students (N=363) completed a Dutch translation of the CLQ and a set of other questionnaires assessing other specific fears, anxiety or depression. Results confirmed the two-factor structure and showed that the Dutch version of the CLQ has good psychometric properties. A second study tested the predictive validity of the Dutch CLQ. Participants (N=23) were exposed each to nine claustrophobic situations with elements of suffocation, restriction or both. The Dutch CLQ was found to be a significant predictor of fear and respiratory reactivity during claustrophobic exposure. It can be concluded that the Dutch version of the CLQ is a reliable and valid instrument to assess claustrophobic fear. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dutch chemical producers pledge emissions cuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chynoweth, E.; Schoenmakers, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dutch chemical producers have negotiated a long-term agreement with government ministries to reduce emissions of a wide range of chemicals. Industry association Vereniging van de Nederlandse Chemische Industrie (VNCI; Leidschendam) says implementing the commitment will cost companies Dfl 10 billion ($5.4 billion) between 1993 and 2000. VNCI technical director Wim Quik welcomes the accord, which he describes as a management contract, saying, Rather than have legislation, there is a certain adjustment available. Peter Santen, managing director of midsized chemicals player Cindu Chemicals (Uithoorn, the Netherlands) voices some concern about the details of the accord, but adds, we are flexible in trying to agree with the contents of the covenant [it] is better than having new rules from law. The Dutch government, traditionally eager for consensus, has struck a number of such deals with Dutch industries - including packaging, metal, and tire - to reduce emissions and set up environmental management programs. The effort is based on the government's National Environmental Policy Plans - NMP and NMP Plus. Targets for emissions reduction by the chemical industry were provided by a government-funded environmental research institute

  9. The Dutch ‘Female Board Index’ 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Dutch ‘Female Board Index 2008’ provides for the second year an overview of female representation on the Board of Directors and Supervisory Boards of 113 Dutch NV companies listed on Euronext Amsterdam. The companies are ranked according to the percentage of women present on their combined Board of Directors and Supervisory Boards. The Dutch ‘Female Board Index’ also analyses the differences between male and female executive directors and supervisors ('non-executive directors') and betwee...

  10. Metrical segmentation in Dutch: vowel quality or stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quené, H; Koster, M L

    1998-01-01

    Previous experiments using a word-spotting task suggest that English listeners use metrically strong syllables to segment continuous speech into discrete words (Cutler & Norris, 1988). The present study is concerned with this metrical segmentation strategy in Dutch. Although Dutch and English share general metrical properties, they differ in ways that may affect segmentation. First, the acoustic cues for metrically strong syllables are less salient in Dutch than in English; hence a metrical segmentation strategy is less likely to be applied by Dutch listeners. Second, vowel quality depends less on metrical structure in Dutch than in English; hence segmentation in Dutch is presumably triggered by other acoustic cues, namely, those related to stress. Experiment 1 shows that stress strongly affects Dutch listeners' ability and speed in spotting Dutch monosyllabic words in disyllabic nonwords. Experiment 2, however, finds the same stress effect when only the target words are presented, without a subsequent syllable triggering segmentation. A third experiment shows a small effect of vowel quality on error scores, but not on latencies. These results suggest that Dutch listeners do not apply a metrical segmentation strategy. The discrepancy between the two languages suggests that segmentation strategies may depend on language-specific regularities in the phonology and in the lexicon.

  11. Tradeable emission permits in Dutch environmental policy. A utopia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuurman, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the lack of experience with permits in the Netherlands, and in view of the similarities between various other tradeable permit systems, the functioning of Dutch systems of tradeable fish, milk and manure quotas is discussed. Evaluation of these systems is based on criteria of effectiveness, target-group efficiency and government efficiency. These systems of tradeable permits appear to constitute a successful addition to the Dutch policy of direct regulation. Considering this, and the favorable American experience with the Emissions Trading Program, tradeable emission permits deserve a chance to be implemented in Dutch environmental policy. The question remains, however, whether the Dutch government is ready for such a step. 28 refs

  12. Nature of the basement of the East Anatolian plateau: Implications for the lithospheric foundering processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topuz, G.; Candan, O.; Zack, T.; Yılmaz, A.

    2017-12-01

    Anatolian plateau have resulted from other processes of lithospheric foundering, rather than just slab steepening and break-off. This research is funded by a research grant (#114Y228) from TÜBİTAK.

  13. The Dutch 'Female Board Index' 2008: Feamle executive and non-executive directors on corporate boards of Dutch listed companies

    OpenAIRE

    Lückerath-Rovers, Mijntje

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch ‘Female Board Index 2008’ provides for the second year an overview of female representation on the Board of Directors and Supervisory Boards of 113 Dutch NV companies1 listed on Euronext Amsterdam. The companies were classified according to the percentage of women present on their combined Board of Directors and Supervisory Boards. The Dutch ‘Female Board Index’ also analyses the differences between male and female executive directors and supervisors ('non-executive dire...

  14. "Founder crops" v. wild plants: Assessing the plant-based diet of the last hunter-gatherers in southwest Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz-Otaegui, Amaia; González Carretero, Lara; Roe, Joe; Richter, Tobias

    2018-04-01

    The Natufian culture (c. 14.6-11.5 ka cal. BP) represents the last hunter-gatherer society that inhabited southwest Asia before the development of plant food production. It has long been suggested that Natufians based their economy on the exploitation of the wild ancestors of the Neolithic "founder crops", and that these hunter-gatherers were therefore on the "threshold to agriculture". In this work we review the available data on Natufian plant exploitation and we report new archaeobotanical evidence from Shubayqa 1, a Natufian site located in northeastern Jordan (14.6-11.5 ka cal. BP). Shubayqa 1 has produced an exceptionally large plant assemblage, including direct evidence for the continuous exploitation of club-rush tubers (often regarded as "missing foods") and other wild plants, which were probably used as food, fuel and building materials. Taking together this data we evaluate the composition of archaeobotanical assemblages (plant macroremains) from the Natufian to the Early Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (EPPNB). Natufian assemblages comprise large proportions of non-founder plant species (>90% on average), amongst which sedges, small-seeded grasses and legumes, and fruits and nuts predominate. During the Pre-Pottery Neolithic, in particular the EPPNB, the presence of "founder crops" increases dramatically and constitute up to c. 42% of the archaeobotanical assemblages on average. Our results suggest that plant exploitation strategies during the Natufian were very different from those attested during subsequent Neolithic periods. We argue that historically driven interpretations of the archaeological record have over-emphasized the role of the wild ancestors of domesticated crops previous to the emergence of agriculture.

  15. [Shestov V I--the founder of the Department of Organisation and tactics of the naval medical services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikov, O G; Chernyĭ, V S; Mishin, Iu A; Soshkin, P A

    2014-11-01

    Vasilii Ivanovich Shestov during the Great Patriotic War performed various tasks concerning the organization of medical support in the Leningrad naval base, consulted on an issue of production and use of hospital and medical transport ships, worked on the organization of medical support in Schliessburg and etc. Shestov performed a considerable amount of research and methodological works concerning the establishment of the discipline "Organisation of naval medical support". He is considered as one of the founders of the theory of naval medical evacuation support.

  16. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation has so far only been reported in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families of Portuguese origin. Since this mutation is not detectable using the commonly used screening methodologies and must be specifically sought, we screened for this rearrangement...... individuals requesting predictive testing living in France and in the USA, all being Portuguese immigrants. After performing an extensive haplotype study in carrier families, we estimate that this founder mutation occurred 558 ± 215 years ago. We further demonstrate significant quantitative differences...... HBOC families from Portugal or with Portuguese ancestry are specifically tested for this rearrangement....

  17. A Dutch mass army? Dutch liberal ideas and practices to enlarge the army, 1914-1922

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    In August 1914, the Dutch government called up its citizens to enlist voluntarily in the army. This call-up failed. In 1915, the government tried to enlarge the army significantly by law. This attempt succeeded partially. At the end of the war, under threat of a leftwing revolution, the Netherlands

  18. Compliance of Dutch orthopedic departments with national guidelines on thromboprophylaxis. A survey of Dutch orthopedic thromboprohylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Harmen B.; Hoppener, Marnix R.; Henny, Christiaan P.; Büller, Harry R.; Verheyen, Cees C. P. M.

    2005-01-01

    All 110 Dutch orthopedic departments were sent a survey on perioperative thromboprophylaxis protocols, and 79% responded. After hip and knee replacements, all used pharmacological thromboprophylaxis: a low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in 87% of departments, which was most often combined with

  19. Sustainable Entrepreneurship in the Dutch Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalinde J.A. Klein Woolthuis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the strategies that sustainable entrepreneurs use to interact with their environment in the Dutch construction industry. The Dutch construction industry is under great pressure to move towards sustainability, and entrepreneurs are believed to be able to play a large role in this transition by introducing new products and new business practices. But how can entrepreneurs prosper in an environment that is not geared up towards such a change? And which strategies do they use to bend conditions in their favor? In this article we make use of the Market and System Failure Framework to analyze the pressures that entrepreneurs are confronted with when introducing sustainable innovations. We recognize that these pressures can be seen as bottlenecks, but that market and system failures can also create entrepreneurial opportunities. We interviewed 16 entrepreneurs in the Dutch construction industry to determine the influences they experienced from their environment and the strategies they use to deal with these. We conclude that we can distinguish between system building and following entrepreneurs, where the former aims to build a new system to challenge the old one, whereas the latter rather makes use of existing structures to build a business. We find that both strategies can be successful and that overall, the entrepreneurs confirm the belief that sustainability on people, planet and transparency aspects, can contribute very well to the long term profitability of the businesses the entrepreneurs are running. These in-depth insights into the influences from the context on the one hand, and the entrepreneurs’ strategic reactions on the other hand, contribute to our understanding of the interactions between entrepreneurs and the system context. This can help us to more effectively stimulate and support innovating entrepreneurs to contribute to the transition towards sustainability.

  20. Ethnic inequalities in patient safety in Dutch hospital care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rosse, F.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis shows the first results of Dutch studies on the relation between ethnicity and patient safety. We used mixed methods to identify patient safety outcomes and patient safety risks in a cohort study in 4 urban hospitals among 763 Dutch patients and 576 ethnic minority patients. In a record

  1. Management of Tracheostomy: A Survey of Dutch Intensive Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veelo, Denise P.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Phoa, Kai Y. N.; Dongelmans, Dave A.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine tracheostomy-management practices in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs) and post-ICU step-down facilities. METHODS: We surveyed the physician medical directors of all Dutch nonpediatric ICUs that have : 5 beds suitable for mechanical ventilation. The survey asked for

  2. The South African War, Dutch Observers and Military Memory

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1900, the Dutch Ministry of War sent four military observers to South Africa, in an attempt to come to terms with the latest developments in the military field. Once in South Africa, the promising young Dutch officers selected for the mission remained focused strongly on decisive battles Jominian style, which they considered ...

  3. Socialized choices: Labour market behaviour of Dutch mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenberg, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Dutch mothers display diverse labour market behaviour, though typically they work part-time, making modest use of childcare. It is generally assumed that Dutch women are free to make their own choices regarding employment. This narrative of 'choice' finds fertile ground in an era of general

  4. Dutch Agribusiness in Russia: a review of enterpreneurs' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, J.C.; Berkum, van S.; Roza, P.

    2007-01-01

    Russia¿s economy is booming; that¿s no news. Certainly not for Dutch agribusiness, looking at the steady increase of Dutch exports and investments in Russia. Not only our bigger agro-industries are involved, also medium size companies have found their way to access a market of 143 million consumers.

  5. Euthanasia in the Broader Framework of Dutch Penal Policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenhuijsen, M.S.; van Laanen, F.; Groenhuijsen, M.S.; van Laanen, F.

    2006-01-01

    The authors have regarded euthanasia in the broader framework of Dutch penal policies. They present euthanasia as a typical example of the pragmatic - rather than dogmatic - way the Dutch try to tackle difficult moral problems in connection with the criminal justice system. Definitions, statutory

  6. The Dutch ‘Female Board Index’ 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Dutch ‘Female Board Index 2008’ provides for the second year an overview of female representation on the Board of Directors and Supervisory Boards of 113 Dutch NV companies listed on Euronext Amsterdam. The companies are ranked according to the percentage of women present on their combined Board

  7. The impact of microgeneration upon the Dutch balancing market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Veen, R.A.C.; De Vries, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    The share of microgeneration (power generation at the level of households and small businesses) in the Dutch electricity system continues to grow. Over time, this development may pose a threat to the reliability and efficiency of the Dutch electricity balancing market. We investigated possible

  8. Collusion in the Dutch construction industry: an industrial organization perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doree, Andries G.

    2004-01-01

    Several investigations by parliament, cabinet, justice and antitrust authorities have shown a widespread use of cartels and structural bid rigging within the Dutch construction industry. The reputation of the Dutch construction industry has been dented with both the general public and clients. As a

  9. Regulating the Dutch pharmaceutical market: improving efficiency or controlling costs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, de P.; Brouwer, W.B.F.; Rutten, F.H.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the Dutch pharmaceutical market, which is heavily regulated by the government. Through the regulation of prices and promoting prudent use, the Dutch government tries to bring down the cost of pharmaceuticals, which increases every year at a higher rate than total health

  10. The Batavian Revolution: typical French, typical Dutch or typical Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jourdan, A.

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of Simon Schama's monograph on Dutch Patriots and French 'Liberators', the Batavian Revolution (1795-1806) has usually been interpreted as French-inspired and thus as 'alien' to the Netherlands. The original Dutch revolutionary achievements are underestimated as are those in the

  11. Perspectives on Salutogenesis of Scholars Writing in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaandrager, L.; Koelen, M.; Dieleman, F.

    2017-01-01

    It is quite uncommon in The Netherlands to publish in Dutch so most publications about salutogenesis are in English. However, we identified 19 publications written in Dutch. These are publications in the field of development psychology, workplace health, mental health, medicine, care for people with

  12. Speech Recognition Issues for Dutch Spoken Document Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; van Hessen, Adrianus J.; de Jong, Franciska M.G.; Matousek, Vaclav; Mautner, Pavel; Moucek, Roman; Tauser, Karel

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, ongoing work on the development of the speech recognition modules of a multimedia retrieval environment for Dutch is described. The work on the generation of acoustic models and language models along with their current performance is presented. Some characteristics of the Dutch

  13. EFL Academic writing. What should Dutch business communication students learn?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Frank van; Hendriks, B.C.; Planken, B.C.; Barasa, S.N.; Groot, E.B. de; Nederstigt, U.; Arnhem, M. van; Smakman, D.

    2016-01-01

    Many Dutch university students are expected to read and write academic research papers in English. In this article, we discuss a number of areas of EFL academic writing that are relevant for first-year Dutch business communication students. These students need to become familiar with quantitative

  14. Mainstream and alternative sources of finance in Dutch agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, van der H.A.B.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper mainstream and alternative sources of finance in
    Dutch agriculture is analysed. Dutch farmers make use of
    different sources of finance whereby bank loans continue to
    serve as the major source of debt financing. The average bank
    loan was approximately 740,000 euro per

  15. E-survey on venous leg ulcer among Dutch dermatologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan); K.P. de Roos; R.J.M. Vogels (R. J M); H.A.M. Neumann (Martino)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAim: To get insight into the frequency of venous leg ulceration in the Dutch dermatologic practice, and into how this profession treats this disease. Design: Material and Methods: An e-survey was conducted. To all Dutch dermatologists and residents dermatology an email was sent with an

  16. Decreasing the overall environmental impact of the Dutch diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Gerard F.H.; Tyszler, Marcelo; Veer, van 't Pieter; Blonk, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To find diets optimised on nutrition and environmental impact close to the current Dutch diet and to identify the most effective and acceptable options for mitigating environmental impact. Design: Linear programming was used to optimise diets of Dutch men and women aged 9–69 years,

  17. Proceedings of the 17th Dutch Testing Day: Testing Evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; Timmer, Mark; Unknown, [Unknown

    These are the postproceedings of 17th Dutch Testing Day, held on the 29th of November 2011 at the - recently completely renovated - campus of the University of Twente. These postproceedings cover a selection of the material presented during the Dutch Testing Day. The synergy between academic and

  18. Labour Market Segmentation: An Investigation into the Dutch Hospitality Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bispo

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAlmost 42,000 establishments, over 310,000 employees and approximately 13 billion Euro annual turnover (including VAT). This, in a nutshell, captures the Dutch hospitality industry in 2005. The aim of this study is to examine the functioning of the labour market in the Dutch hospitality

  19. The making of Dutch flower culture: Auctions, networks, and aesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebhardt, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Centered around five inquiries, this thesis uses several concepts to analyze Dutch horticulture and FloraHolland Aalsmeer: moral economy, commodity, world system, networks, horticulture, aesthetics, masculinity, cooperative, and the market. It explores how Dutch horticulture was and is embedded in

  20. Creating an Information Retrieval test corpus for Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; van Leeuwen, D.A.; Theune, M.; Theune, Mariet; Nijholt, Antinus; Nijholt, A.; Hondorp, G.H.W.; Hondorp, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the first large-scale evaluation of information retrieval systems using Dutch documents and queries. We describe in detail the characteristics of the Dutch test data, which is part of the official CLEF multilingual test corpus, and give an overview of the experimental results of

  1. Cod avoidance techniques for the Dutch and Belgian fishing fleets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marlen, van B.; Polet, H.; Quirijns, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Fisheries managers go to great lengths to reduce cod catches in the North Sea, aiming for recovery of the cod stock. The Dutch government asked IMARES to provide an overview of all measures that are in place in various countries around the North Sea for reducing cod catches. The Dutch fisheries

  2. Physical activity among Dutch workers-differences between occupations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proper, K.I.; Hildebrandt, V.H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective.: This study describes the total physical activity and the contribution of work to total physical activity among Dutch workers. The study was conducted in the Netherlands in the years 2000-2002. Methods.: 2,417 respondents of a cross-sectional survey representing the Dutch adult working

  3. A Neural Network Based Dutch Part of Speech Tagger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, E.; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Nijholt, A.; Nijholt, Antinus; Pantic, Maja; Pantic, M.; Poel, M.; Poel, Mannes; Hondorp, G.H.W.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a Neural Network is designed for Part-of-Speech Tagging of Dutch text. Our approach uses the Corpus Gesproken Nederlands (CGN) consisting of almost 9 million transcribed words of spoken Dutch, divided into 15 different categories. The outcome of the design is a Neural Network with an

  4. English spelling performance of Dutch grammar school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeijmakers, M.; de Bree, E.; Keijzer, M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates English spelling performance of Dutch grammar school students to establish whether Dutch grammar school students are able to spell words differing in complexity, as well as whether they are sensitive to the information available in the spellings (phonological,

  5. Religious denomination and depression in older Dutch citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, A.W.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Knipscheer, C.P.M.; Deeg, D.J.H.; van den Eeden, P.

    1998-01-01

    This study describes the distribution of depressive symptoms in older Dutch citizens (N = 3,020) across religious denominations. Reformed Calvinists had the lowest depressive scores (CES-D); Protestants from liberal denominations the highest; Roman Catholics, Dutch Reformed, and nonchurch members

  6. Evaluation of the Dutch subsurface geoportal: What lies beneath?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lance, K.T.; Georgiadou, Y.; Bregt, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on a geoportal from a “what lies beneath” perspective. It analyses processes of budgeting, planning, monitoring, performance measurement, and reporting of the national initiative titled Digital Information of the Dutch Subsurface (known by its Dutch acronym, DINO). The study is

  7. Enhancing historical reasoning: a key topic in Dutch history education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, C.; van Drie, J.

    2009-01-01

    The number of Dutch studies on the learning and teaching of history has increased substantially in the last ten years. Enhancing historical reasoning is a key topic in Dutch research on history education. This paper discusses recent and current empirical studies in the Netherlands on methods to

  8. Sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waals, F.W. van der; Mohrs, J.; Foets, M.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To analyse sex differences among recipients of benzodiazepines in Dutch general practice. Design-Study of consultations and associated interventions as recorded in the Dutch national survey of general practice. Setting: Practices of 45 general practitioners monitored during 1 April to 30

  9. Knowledge Externalities, Agglomeration Economies, and Employment Growth in Dutch Cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, D.P.; Gerking, S.D.; van Oort, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper extends the work of Glaeser et al.(1992) by looking at effects of agglomeration economies on employment growth in Dutch city-industries and in very small (postal) zip code-industries in the Dutch province of South-Holland. At both levels of geographic detail, findings are broadly

  10. Dutch City Network feeds the Innovation of Urban Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J.E.; Veen, E.J.; Kop, van de P.J.; Eijk, van O.N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, the Dutch City Network on Urban Agriculture (Stedennetwerk in Dutch), has linked up civil servants of fourteen cities in order to see opportunities, share knowledge and solve issues on urban agriculture in their cities. Though it started as an internally focused network for civil

  11. Dutch space; interview with Arnaud de Jong, CEO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, A.; Wink, J.; Sabbapathy, R.

    2014-01-01

    Dutch Space, the largest space company in the Netherlands and part of Airbus Defence and Space, appointed a new CEO last year. The Leonardo Times sat down with the CEO Arnaud de Jong for an interview. We discuss his career, developments in Dutch Space, his take on competition in the commercial space

  12. Between prohibition and legalization : The Dutch experiment in drug policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuw, Ed.; Haen Marshall, I.

    1994-01-01

    This book gives an account of the national Dutch drug control strategy. Many researches in this field are described. Most of the chapters touch, in one way or another, on one of three key questions: (1) how is Dutch drug policy different from that of other countries; (2) how is the increasing

  13. Quantifying fishers' and citizens' support for Dutch flatfish management policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Fisheries policy is most effective when supported by fishers and the general public. Dutch citizens' and fishers' support for a selection of policy alternatives to enhance the sustainability of the Dutch North Sea cutter fleet is estimated, and the same groups' support for policy alternatives is

  14. Development and evaluation of the Dutch Healthy Diet index 2015.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looman, Moniek; Feskens, Edith Jm; de Rijk, Mariëlle; Meijboom, Saskia; Biesbroek, Sander; Temme, Elisabeth Hm; de Vries, Jeanne; Geelen, Anouk

    To update the Dutch Healthy Diet index, a measure of diet quality, to reflect adherence to the Dutch dietary guidelines 2015 and to evaluate against participants' characteristics and nutrient intakes with the score based on 24 h recall (24 hR) data and FFQ data.

  15. CESAM: The CCSO annual model of the Dutch economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, Benjamin W.A.; Kuipers, S.K.; Kuper, G.H.; Sterken, E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents CESAM, a macroeconometric model of the Dutch economy based on annual data. CESAM can be characterized as a Keynesian expenditure model including a neoclassical production model and a post-Keynesian financial model. This characterization holds for most of the Dutch

  16. Landscape painting adding a cultural value to the Dutch countryside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that cultural values should be included in policy making for the Dutch countryside. Since the sixteenth century the Dutch landscape has been a valued subject for art painters. This inheritance offers our rural areas a unique cultural value. This article focuses on the region

  17. Lion and dragon: four centuries of Dutch-Vietnamese relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinen, J.; van der Zwan, B.; Moors, H.; van Zeeland, T.

    2008-01-01

    Dutch-Vietnamese relations go back as far as the beginning of the seventeenth century. For a long time, relations between the Dutch lion and the Vietnamese dragon have been fragile and even violent. Although the relations were not continuously bad, they remained distant rather than warm. Today

  18. One Probe - Two Goals : Aspects of agreement in Dutch dialects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, Marjo van

    2005-01-01

    In Dutch dialects, verbs and complementizers can bear different morphological affixes depending on which nominal element they agree with in their local syntactic domain. For instance, in a dialect such as tegelen Dutch, the complementizer agrees with the first conjunct of a coordinated subject,

  19. Rational pharmacotherapy in The Netherlands : formulary management in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW; Brouwers, JRBJ

    A survey regarding the management of rational pharmacotherapy was conducted among all Dutch general hospitals in 1998. The response was 99% (n = 120). The presence of a drugs and therapeutics committee and antibiotic policies in Dutch general hospitals appears independent of hospital

  20. Dutch Private International Law – Overview 1998-August 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X.E. Kramer (Xandra)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis article provides an overview of the most important developments in Dutch private international law during the period January 1998-August 2002. The stormy codification of Dutch pri-vate international law in separate acts during the 1990’s was in a slower pace continued in the year

  1. The end of the Dutch car tax?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besseling, P.J.; Lebouille, R.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the project 'Paying differently for mobility' an option that is considered is to switch the Dutch Tax on Motor cars and Vehicles (BPM) to a higher tariff for the future road pricing system. Due to some special characteristics of the BPM, this will be a highly complex financial operation. In this article, we explore three variants for their effect on the vehicle market and on the budget. We also explain the advantages and disadvantages for several groups of car owners. [nl

  2. Major changes ahead for Dutch energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kort, C.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Dutch energy distribution companies are again facing important adaptations to current market forces. The operational activities of the conventional energy distribution companies are split into monopoly tasks and commercial activities. By separation of functions and by further technological developments and market trends quite different types of companies will emerge, such as grid operators, energy-telecommunications-environment concerns and energy sellers. Some companies will focus on grid operation, while others will clearly opt for more commercial enterprising. Just like other private companies energy companies will develop new activities in other markets based on their own corporate strategies. Grid operation may then become only a mirror element or be abandoned altogether. 5 figs

  3. The Unseen Founders Of Quaternary Science - The Men Of Glasgow, Scotland (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, J.

    2010-12-01

    Louis Agassiz (1807-1873) and Charles Lyell (1797-1875) are widely regarded as the founders of Quaternary Science, and there is no doubt that they played their part: Agassiz in 1840 presented and promoted his case for the wide-scale fluctuations of glaciers, and Lyell, through his books and contacts, did much to introduce the subject which we now know as climate change. However there are a number of individuals who contributed to the founding of Quaternary Science who are not so readily recognised and a remarkable fact is that a significant proportion were men without academic training or background who come from, or worked in Glasgow or the adjacent region of central Scotland. First amongst the Glaswegians was James Smith (1782-1867) who, in 1836 presented a paper to the Geological Society of London (where it was duly ignored) in which he suggested, on the basis of fossils dredged from the bed of the Clyde and experience of sailing around Iceland, that the climate of Scotland had been as cold as that of Iceland in the recent past. In 1841, Charles Maclaren (1782-1866) a journalist from Edinburgh, but using information based on raised shorelines near Glasgow proposed what we now know as the glacio-eustatic theory in which the variations in glacier extent control the level of the sea. Perhaps the most important of all was James Croll (1821- 1890) who worked on the theory of ice ages, based on orbital forcing, while janitor at the Andersonian Institute and Museum in Glasgow between 1859-1867. This work was the true precursor to the Milankovitch theory which provides the explanation for the major predictable elements of climate change. Robert Jack (1845-1921) from Irvine, southwest of Glasgow, while doing fieldwork for the British Geological Survey near Loch Lomond close to Glasgow, described in 1874 evidence for non-glacial conditions between tills and clearly recognised that climate could change from glacial to temperate and then glacial climate, before returning to

  4. A Founder Large Deletion Mutation in Xeroderma Pigmentosum-Variant Form in Tunisia: Implication for Molecular Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariem Ben Rekaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum Variant (XP-V form is characterized by a late onset of skin symptoms. Our aim is the clinical and genetic investigations of XP-V Tunisian patients in order to develop a simple tool for early diagnosis. We investigated 16 suspected XP patients belonging to ten consanguineous families. Analysis of the POLH gene was performed by linkage analysis, long range PCR, and sequencing. Genetic analysis showed linkage to the POLH gene with a founder haplotype in all affected patients. Long range PCR of exon 9 to exon 11 showed a 3926 bp deletion compared to control individuals. Sequence analysis demonstrates that this deletion has occurred between two Alu-Sq2 repetitive sequences in the same orientation, respectively, in introns 9 and 10. We suggest that this mutation POLH NG_009252.1: g.36847_40771del3925 is caused by an equal crossover event that occurred between two homologous chromosomes at meiosis. These results allowed us to develop a simple test based on a simple PCR in order to screen suspected XP-V patients. In Tunisia, the prevalence of XP-V group seems to be underestimated and clinical diagnosis is usually later. Cascade screening of this founder mutation by PCR in regions with high frequency of XP provides a rapid and cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of XP-V in Tunisia and North Africa.

  5. A founder large deletion mutation in Xeroderma pigmentosum-Variant form in Tunisia: implication for molecular diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Rekaya, Mariem; Laroussi, Nadia; Messaoud, Olfa; Jones, Mariem; Jerbi, Manel; Naouali, Chokri; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Chargui, Mariem; Kefi, Rym; Fazaa, Becima; Boubaker, Mohamed Samir; Boussen, Hamouda; Mokni, Mourad; Abdelhak, Sonia; Zghal, Mohamed; Khaled, Aida; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum Variant (XP-V) form is characterized by a late onset of skin symptoms. Our aim is the clinical and genetic investigations of XP-V Tunisian patients in order to develop a simple tool for early diagnosis. We investigated 16 suspected XP patients belonging to ten consanguineous families. Analysis of the POLH gene was performed by linkage analysis, long range PCR, and sequencing. Genetic analysis showed linkage to the POLH gene with a founder haplotype in all affected patients. Long range PCR of exon 9 to exon 11 showed a 3926 bp deletion compared to control individuals. Sequence analysis demonstrates that this deletion has occurred between two Alu-Sq2 repetitive sequences in the same orientation, respectively, in introns 9 and 10. We suggest that this mutation POLH NG_009252.1: g.36847_40771del3925 is caused by an equal crossover event that occurred between two homologous chromosomes at meiosis. These results allowed us to develop a simple test based on a simple PCR in order to screen suspected XP-V patients. In Tunisia, the prevalence of XP-V group seems to be underestimated and clinical diagnosis is usually later. Cascade screening of this founder mutation by PCR in regions with high frequency of XP provides a rapid and cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of XP-V in Tunisia and North Africa.

  6. Molecular and genealogical evidence for a founder effect in Fanconi anemia families of the Afrikaner population of South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipping, A. J.; Pearson, T.; Morgan, N. V.; Gibson, R. A.; Kuyt, L. P.; Havenga, C.; Gluckman, E.; Joenje, H.; de Ravel, T.; Jansen, S.; Mathew, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder associated with progressive aplastic anemia, congenital abnormalities, and cancer. FA has a very high incidence in the Afrikaner population of South Africa, possibly due to a founder effect. Previously we observed allelic association between polymorphic markers flanking the FA group A gene (FANCA) and disease chromosomes in Afrikaners. We genotyped 26 FA families with microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphic markers and detected five FANCA haplotypes. Mutation scanning of the FANCA gene revealed association of these haplotypes with four different mutations. The most common was an intragenic deletion of exons 12–31, accounting for 60% of FA chromosomes in 46 unrelated Afrikaner FA patients, while two other mutations accounted for an additional 20%. Screening for these mutations in the European populations ancestral to the Afrikaners detected one patient from the Western Ruhr region of Germany who was heterozygous for the major deletion. The mutation was associated with the same unique FANCA haplotype as in Afrikaner patients. Genealogical investigation of 12 Afrikaner families with FA revealed that all were descended from a French Huguenot couple who arrived at the Cape on June 5, 1688, whereas mutation analysis showed that the carriers of the major mutation were descendants of this same couple. The molecular and genealogical evidence is consistent with transmission of the major mutation to Western Germany and the Cape near the end of the 17th century, confirming the existence of a founder effect for FA in South Africa. PMID:11344308

  7. A novel founder MYO15A frameshift duplication is the major cause of genetic hearing loss in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, Flavia; Al-Wardy, Nadia; Ruscone, Guido Alberto Gnecchi; Oppo, Manuela; Kindi, Mohammed Nasser Al; Angius, Andrea; Al Lamki, Khalsa; Girotto, Giorgia; Giangregorio, Tania; Benelli, Matteo; Magi, Alberto; Seri, Marco; Gasparini, Paolo; Cucca, Francesco; Sazzini, Marco; Al Khabori, Mazin; Pippucci, Tommaso; Romeo, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    The increased risk for autosomal recessive disorders is one of the most well-known medical implications of consanguinity. In the Sultanate of Oman, a country characterized by one of the highest rates of consanguineous marriages worldwide, prevalence of genetic hearing loss (GHL) is estimated to be 6/10 000. Families of GHL patients have higher consanguinity rates than the general Omani population, indicating a major role for recessive forms. Mutations in GJB2, the most commonly mutated GHL gene, have been sporadically described. We collected 97 DNA samples of GHL probands, affected/unaffected siblings and parents from 26 Omani consanguineous families. Analyzing a first family by whole-exome sequencing, we identified a novel homozygous frameshift duplication (c.1171_1177dupGCCATCT) in MYO15A, the gene linked to the deafness locus DFNB3. This duplication was then found in a total of 8/26 (28%) families, within a 849 kb founder haplotype. Reconstruction of haplotype structure at MYO15A surrounding genomic regions indicated that the founder haplotype branched out in the past two to three centuries from a haplotype present worldwide. The MYO15A duplication emerges as the major cause of GHL in Oman. These findings have major implications for the design of GHL diagnosis and prevention policies in Oman.

  8. Between local governments and communities : Knowledge exchange and mutual learning in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Turkish municipal partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ewijk, E.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on mutual learning processes of governmental and non-governmental actors involved in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Turkish municipal partnerships in the period 2007-2011. These partnerships aim at strengthening local governance in Morocco and Turkey as well as in the

  9. Nutritional status and food consumption in 10-11 year old Dutch boys (Dutch Nutrition Surveillance System)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppel, G.van.; Schneijder, P.; Löwik, M.R.H.; Schrijver, J.; Kok, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the Dutch Nutrition Surveillance System, cardiovascular risk factors and food consumption (24 h recall) as well as haematological, Fe and vitamin status (A, B6, C) were assessed in 126 Dutch boys aged 10-11 years (response 71%). Body mass index (BMI) and the sum of four skinfolds were

  10. Learning styles of Chinese and Dutch students compared within the context of Dutch higher education in life sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, H.J.A.; Mil, van M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which the learning styles of Chinese students differ from those of Dutch students. The study was conducted within the context of Englishlanguage Bachelor of Science programmes thatWageningen University offers together with China Agricultural University to Dutch

  11. The Dutch 'Female Board Index' 2008 : Feamle executive and non-executive directors on corporate boards of Dutch listed companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Lückerath-Rovers (Mijntje)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch ‘Female Board Index 2008’ provides for the second year an overview of female representation on the Board of Directors and Supervisory Boards of 113 Dutch NV companies1 listed on Euronext Amsterdam. The companies were classified according to the percentage of women present on

  12. Gerontology and geriatrics in Dutch medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tersmette, W; van Bodegom, D; van Heemst, D; Stott, D; Westendorp, R

    2013-01-01

    The world population is ageing and healthcare services require trained staff who can address the needs of older patients. In this study we determined how current medical education prepares Dutch students of medicine in the field of Gerontology and Geriatrics (G&G). Using a checklist of the essentials of G&G, we assessed Dutch medical education on three levels. On the national level we analysed the latest National Blueprint for higher medical education (Raamplan artsopleiding 2009). On the faculty level we reviewed medical curricula on the basis of interviews with program directors and inspection of course materials. On the student level we assessed the topics addressed in the questions of the cross-institutional progress test (CIPT). The National Bluepr int contains few specific G&G objectives. Obligatory G&G courses in medical schools on average amount to 2.2% of the total curriculum measured as European Credit Transfer System units (ECTS). Only two out of eight medical schools have practical training during the Master phase in the form of a clerkship in G&G. In the CIPT, on average 1.5% of questions cover G&G. Geriatric education in the Netherlands does not seem to be in line with current demographic trends. The National Blueprint falls short of providing sufficiently detailed objectives for education on the care of older people. The geriatric content offered by medical schools is varied and incomplete, and students are only marginally tested on their knowledge of G&G in the CIPT.

  13. The Dutch Empire in Intellectual History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fitzmaurice

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the ways in which ideas of greatness, reason of state, and state formation were employed in the creation of the Dutch empire. It focuses, in particular, on the role of corporations, including the Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie or Dutch East India Company, in providing a platform for the implementation of those ideas. It then shows how the state moved to appropriate the entire domain of political thought from such corporations in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, while noting the revival of their political role in the twentieth century. The paper then turns to the question of the impact of this history on the present and therefore to a consideration of the methodological issues involved in that question. Het Nederlandse 'empire' in de intellectuele geschiedenisDit artikel onderzoekt de manieren waarop ideeën over grootheid, raison d’État, en staatsvorming gebruikt werden in de vorming van een Nederlands ‘empire’. Het focust in het bijzonder op de rol van handelsondernemingen, inclusief de Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie, in het bieden van een platform voor de implementatie van deze ideeën. Vervolgens laat het zien hoe de staat zich het politieke denken van dit soort ondernemingen toe-eigende in de achttiende en negentiende eeuw, terwijl de politieke rol van ondernemingen een revival kende in de twintigste eeuw. Tenslotte zal de vraag naar de invloed van deze geschiedenis op het heden, en de methodologische kwesties die daarmee gepaard gaan, aan bod komen.

  14. Procedural Justice in Dutch Administrative Court Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Verburg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss recent developments in administrative court proceedings in the Netherlands, called the New Approach. Along with developments leading to the New Approach, it became clear that the insights from research on procedural justice deserve particular attention. The goals of the judge's actions in this respect are both that the proceedings are fair and just and that parties perceive the way they are being treated during proceedings as fair and just.Within the New Approach we discern five procedural justice elements: (1 respect, (2 voice and due consideration, (3 some influence on how proceedings will continue, (4 an explanation of how the proceedings will continue and (5 direct interpersonal contact.The introduction of the New Approach shows two important bottlenecks in Dutch administrative court proceedings, which are (i the possible or supposed collision between legally right outcomes and  procedural justice and (ii the lack of uniformity and predictability.Although what we describe and discuss in this paper focuses on the Dutch situation, many of these considerations apply to administrative court proceedings in other countries. The themes and difficulties that face the administrative law judge seem to be common to many countries.

  15. Rhythms and Rhymes of Life. Music and Identification processes of Dutch-Moroccan youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazzah, M.

    2008-01-01

    Rhythms and Rhymes of Life: Music and Identification Processes of Dutch-Moroccan Youth is a comprehensive anthropological study of the social significance of music among Dutch-Moroccan youth. In the Netherlands, a Dutch-Moroccan music scene has emerged, including events and websites. Dutch-Moroccan

  16. Rhythms and rhymes of life : music and identification processes of Dutch-Moroccan youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazzah, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    Rhythms and Rhymes of Life: Music and Identification Processes of Dutch-Moroccan Youth is a comprehensive anthropological study of the social significance of music among Dutch-Moroccan youth. In the Netherlands, a Dutch-Moroccan music scene has emerged, including events and websites. Dutch-Moroccan

  17. Genotype and Phenotype Studies in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP) of the French Canadian Founder Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coussa, Razek Georges; Chakarova, Christina; Ajlan, Radwan; Taha, Mohammed; Kavalec, Conrad; Gomolin, Julius; Khan, Ayesha; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Waseem, Naushin; Kamenarova, Kunka; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Koenekoop, Robert K

    2015-12-01

    The French Canadian population of Quebec is a unique, well-known founder population with religious, linguistic, and geographic isolation. The genetics of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in Quebec is not well studied thus far. The purpose of our study was to establish the genetic architecture of autosomal dominant RP (adRP) and to characterize the phenotypes associated with new adRP mutations in Quebec. Sanger sequencing of the commonly mutated currently known adRP genes was performed in a clinically well-characterized cohort of 60 adRP French Canadian families. Phenotypes were analyzed by projected visual acuity (best corrected), Goldmann visual fields, optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and ERG. The potential effect of the novel mutations was assessed using in silico bioinformatic tools. The pathogenicity of all variants was then confirmed by segregation analysis within the families, when available. We identified the causal mutation/gene in 24 of our adRP families, as 24 (40%) of 60 patients had adRP mutations in six known adRP genes. Eleven (46%) of these mutations were in RHO, four mutations (17%) were found in SNRNP200, three mutations (12.5%) in PRPH2/RDS, three mutations (12.5%) in TOPORS, two mutations (8%) in PRPF31, and one mutation (4%) in IMPDH1. Four mutations were novel. We identified new mutations in RHO (p.S270I), PRPF31 (p.R288W), IMPDH1 (p.Q318H), and TOPORS (p.H889R); the rest were previously reported. We present the genotype-phenotype characteristics of the four novel missense mutations. This is the first large screening of adRP genes in the founder population of Quebec. Our prevalence of known adRP genes is 40% in the French Canadian population, which is lower than in other adRP populations around the world, illustrating the uniqueness of the French Canadian population. Our findings are crucial in expanding the current understanding of the genotypic-phenotypic spectrum of RP and documenting the genetic architecture of

  18. Investigation of Lifetime Performance in Dutch Large White × Dutch Landrace Crossbred Sows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Soltesz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to show the main production parameters of sows based on 4359 crossbred Dutch Large White and Dutch Landrace pigs. The data were collected from 2004 to 2010 from Hungarian nucleus farms to analyze the lifetime performance of removed sows. The paper has studied the frequency of different culling reasons, the average lifespan of removed sows and the number of piglets born alive according to the parity. The result showed that the most frequent reasons for sow removal were the different fertility problems (29.5% and productivity problems (26.8%. In additional, it was detectable that the 35% of culling occured after the first farrowing or before this and there were removed 95% of the examined sows after the 8th parity. The highest litter size was observed at the 6th parity when the mean of lifespan of sows was 1210 days.

  19. Differential relationships between language skills and working memory in Turkish-Dutch and native-Dutch first-graders from low-income families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Anna M T; Janssen, Marije

    2017-01-01

    In the Netherlands, Turkish-Dutch children constitute a substantial group of children who learn to speak Dutch at the age of four after they learned to speak Turkish. These children are generally academically less successful. Academic success appears to be affected by both language proficiency and working memory skill. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between language skills and working memory in Turkish-Dutch and native-Dutch children from low-income families. The findings revealed reduced Dutch language and Dutch working-memory skills for Turkish-Dutch children compared to native-Dutch children. Working memory in native-Dutch children was unrelated to their language skills, whereas in Turkish-Dutch children strong correlations were found both between Turkish language skills and Turkish working-memory performance and between Dutch language skills and Dutch working-memory performance. Reduced language proficiencies and reduced working-memory skills appear to manifest itself in strong relationships between working memory and language skills in Turkish-Dutch children. The findings seem to indicate that limited verbal working-memory and language deficiencies in bilingual children may have reciprocal effects that strongly warrants adequate language education.

  20. Dutch Wholesale Power Market Review 2002. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollebregt, T.; Rusch, H.

    2002-01-01

    Chapter 1 provides a background to the Dutch power market, covering generation, transmission, distribution, supply, and laws and regulations. Chapter 2 reviews the key market events during 2001 and early 2002, providing analysis and background on an important and tumultuous period in the Dutch market. Chapter 3 explains the structure and timing of the key market mechanisms (Amsterdam Power Exchange, interconnector capacity auctions, TenneT 15-minute balancing market). Chapter 4 briefly reviews fuel price developments and discusses their impact on the costs of generation. Chapter 5 contains a detailed review of the traded Dutch power markets (APX, OTC, interconnection), including the linkages between these markets and an analysis of arbitrage opportunities

  1. Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Franck

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in self-esteem has been fuelled by the suggestion that level of self-esteem is associated with psychological well-being. In the present study, we translated the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES into the Dutch language and evaluated its psychometric properties in a sample of 442 adults. The results of both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed that a single-factor solution provides the best fit. In addition, the Dutch RSES showed high internal consistency as well as high congruent validity. Overall, these findings support the usefulness of the Dutch RSES as a measure for global self-esteem.

  2. Young Asian Dutch constructing Asianness: Understanding the role of Asian popular culture

    OpenAIRE

    Kartosen, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is about young Asian Dutch, panethnic Asian identities and identifications, and Asian/Asian Dutch popular culture. It addresses several pressing questions, including: why do young Asian Dutch, who were born and/or raised in the Netherlands, identify as Asian and construct Asian identities? What is the content or meaning of these Asian identities and identifications young Asian Dutch imagine? And how do these relate to young Asian Dutch’ Dutch and homeland identities and i...

  3. Fragile X founder effect and distribution of CGG repeats among the mentally retarded population of Andalusia, South Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda de Diego

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. We investigated the prevalence of the Fragile X syndrome in the population with mental retardation of unknown etiology in Andalusia, South Spain. We analyzed 322 unrelated patients (280 males and 42 females, and found a fragile X syndrome frequency of 6.5%. Among the non-fragile X chromosomes, the 29 CGG repeat was the most common allele. At the linked microsatellite DXS548 locus, we found a new allele which we called "allele 10" (17 CA. Similar to other south European populations, allele 2 (25 CA at the DXS548 locus and the fragile X allele were in linkage disequilibrium supporting the idea of a common founder chromosome predisposing to the CGG expansion.

  4. Jean-Alfred Fournier - the founder of the European venereology and dermatology (on the one hundredth death anniversary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Kisteneva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a life story of a great French dermatologist and venereologist, one of the founders of the theory of syphilis Jean-Alfred Fournier (1832-1914. It provides data on the published works by Jean-Alfred Fournier, some of which earned him a doctoral degree. It also provides data on Fournier’s election as a member of the French Academy of Medicine in 1879 as well as on the founding of the French Society of Dermatology and Syphiligraphy by Fournier and other French dermatologists in 1889. The article defines the contribution made by Fournier to the development of venereology and practical medicine in the second half of the 19th century and early 20th century.

  5. [Max Isserlin, Kantian orientation at Königsberg, psychotherapist with Kraepelin, founder of child psychiatry at Munich, emigrant to Britain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, U H

    2002-01-01

    This account of the life and work of Max Isserlin (1879 - 1941) wants to be a reminder of a German-Jewish fate next to Kraepelin and as a forced emigrant. Immediately after his studies at Königsberg Isserlin in 1903 came to Kraepelin at Heidelberg, later he followed him to Munich. All his life he kept a Kantian orientation and defended Kraepelin's positions out of this background. Kraepelin entrusted to him all of psychotherapy, theory and practice, which Isserlin for at least 18 years gave courses of in Kraepelin's department. His textbook of psychotherapy thus transmissions Kraepelins convictions about this topic also. During World War I Isserlin was the head of a field-hospital for brain damaged soldiers and continued working this way after the end of the war. Finally he became the founder of child psychiatry in Munich, until he was forced to leave Germany for Britain with a heavy heart.

  6. Afrikaans and Dutch as closely-related languages: A comparison to West Germanic languages and Dutch dialects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbert Heeringa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Following Den Besten’s (2009 desiderata for historical linguistics of Afrikaans, this article aims to contribute some modern evidence to the debate regarding the founding dialects of Afrikaans. From an applied perspective (i.e. human language technology, we aim to determine which West Germanic language(s and/or dialect(s would be best suited for the purposes of recycling speech resources for the benefit of developing speech technologies for Afrikaans. Being recognised as a West Germanic language, Afrikaans is first compared to Standard Dutch, Standard Frisian and Standard German. Pronunciation distances are measured by means of Levenshtein distances. Afrikaans is found to be closest to Standard Dutch. Secondly, Afrikaans is compared to 361 Dutch dialectal varieties in the Netherlands and North-Belgium, using material from the Reeks Nederlandse Dialectatlassen, a series of dialect atlases compiled by Blancquaert and Pée in the period 1925-1982 which cover the Dutch dialect area. Afrikaans is found to be closest to the South-Holland dialectal variety of Zoetermeer; this largely agrees with the findings of Kloeke (1950. No speech resources are available for Zoetermeer, but such resources are available for Standard Dutch. Although the dialect of Zoetermeer is significantly closer to Afrikaans than Standard Dutch is, Standard Dutch speech resources might be a good substitute.

  7. The Dutch debate on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldenkamp, F.; Biesiot, W.; Geerts, H.M.; Nienhuys, K.; Soppe, W.

    1986-06-01

    A survey is presented of the discussion on location sites for nuclear power plants in the Netherlands and the USA. It consists of two parts (A and B). This part (B) goes farther into the American reports already introduced briefly in part A. They are the reports of the IDCOR (nuclear power industry), ANS (American Nuclear Society), APS (American Physical Society), NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) and UCS (Union of Concerned Scientists). Of each report a summary in English and an extended summary in Dutch is presented. Parts of the text of chapter 3 of the report 'Reactor accidents: the source term discussion' of the Technical University Twente (BC8501, 1985) are presented. 65 refs.; 15 figs.; 32 tabs

  8. Molecular evidence for recent founder populations and human-mediated migration in the barley scald pathogen Rhynchosporium secalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, C C; Zala, M; McDonald, B A

    2009-06-01

    Rhynchosporium secalis is an important pathogen of barley globally. Fourteen polymorphic microsatellites were analyzed for 1664 R. secalis isolates sampled from 37 field populations to infer their demographic history. The results falsified the hypothesis that R. secalis co-evolved with its barley host in the Middle East. Populations from Scandinavia had significantly higher allelic diversities, the greatest number of private alleles and the highest genotypic diversities. All but three of the analyzed populations had an excess of gene diversity compared to the number of alleles, consistent with a recent population bottleneck. The remaining populations had a gene diversity deficit consistent with a population expansion following a recent population bottleneck in the last +/-100 years. A coalescent analysis revealed that the effective population sizes based on theta, of the analyzed populations were small relative to their ancestral population sizes, indicating that only a fraction of the diversity present in the ancestral populations was transmitted into current populations. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the pathogen population on barley experienced a selection bottleneck imposed by the host and/or are founder populations. The mean estimate of migration rates was 2.2 (avg 90% confidence interval=1.3-3.1). Major migration routes were identified among populations separated by long distances, eg between South Africa and Australia, as well as among North Africa, the Middle East and California, suggesting contemporary exchange of infected barley seed. In contrast with earlier findings, most populations exhibited significant gametic disequilibrium, probably as a result of genetic drift. We conclude that the majority of R. secalis populations have experienced human-mediated migration that led to numerous and relatively recent founder events around the world.

  9. Inbred Strain Variant Database (ISVdb: A Repository for Probabilistically Informed Sequence Differences Among the Collaborative Cross Strains and Their Founders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Oreper

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Collaborative Cross (CC is a panel of recently established multiparental recombinant inbred mouse strains. For the CC, as for any multiparental population (MPP, effective experimental design and analysis benefit from detailed knowledge of the genetic differences between strains. Such differences can be directly determined by sequencing, but until now whole-genome sequencing was not publicly available for individual CC strains. An alternative and complementary approach is to infer genetic differences by combining two pieces of information: probabilistic estimates of the CC haplotype mosaic from a custom genotyping array, and probabilistic variant calls from sequencing of the CC founders. The computation for this inference, especially when performed genome-wide, can be intricate and time-consuming, requiring the researcher to generate nontrivial and potentially error-prone scripts. To provide standardized, easy-to-access CC sequence information, we have developed the Inbred Strain Variant Database (ISVdb. The ISVdb provides, for all the exonic variants from the Sanger Institute mouse sequencing dataset, direct sequence information for CC founders and, critically, the imputed sequence information for CC strains. Notably, the ISVdb also: (1 provides predicted variant consequence metadata; (2 allows rapid simulation of F1 populations; and (3 preserves imputation uncertainty, which will allow imputed data to be refined in the future as additional sequencing and genotyping data are collected. The ISVdb information is housed in an SQL database and is easily accessible through a custom online interface (http://isvdb.unc.edu, reducing the analytic burden on any researcher using the CC.

  10. The CHEK2 del5395 is a founder mutation without direct effects for cancer risk in the latvian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plonis J

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine: 1 whether the checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2 del5395 (g.27417113-27422508 del, NC_000022.11 is a founder mutation in the Latvian population, 2 if there is an association between CHEK2 del5395 mutation and cancer risk, and 3 and whether the CHEK2 del5395 mutation impacts cancer predisposition in Chernobyl disaster liquidators (the civil and military personnel who were called upon to deal with consequences of the 1986 nuclear disaster as well as geriatric populations. We recruited 438 breast cancer patients, 568 colorectal cancer patients, 399 ovarian cancer patients, 419 prostate cancer patients, 526 healthy blood donors, 480 Chernobyl disaster liquidators and 444 geriatric cancer-free participants. DNA samples were isolated from blood samples and subjected to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The truncation of del5395 was estimated by fragment size of the multiplex PCR.All groups were compared to the healthy blood donors using Fisher’s exact test. All p values were two-sided and the odds ratios (OR calculated by two-by-two table. In cancer groups, the del5395 mutation was most frequently observed in the ovarian cancer group (1.00%, OR = 1.32. In control groups, the del5395 mutation was most frequent (0.76% in the healthy donors, which exceeded its frequency in the Chernobyl liquidators group and the geriatric group by 0.01 and 0.08%, respectively. For all groups, the OR appeared to be >1 only in ovarian cancer patients. However, OR rates showed no statistical significance in either cancer or control groups, with the p value fluctuating within the range of 0.39-1.00. The CHEK2 gene del5395 is a founder mutation in the Latvian population, which, however, does not have a direct impact on genetic predisposition toward colorectal, breast, ovarian and prostate cancer.

  11. Genetic evidence of multiple invasions and a small number of founders of Asian Palmyra palm (Borassus flabellifer) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipatchartlearnwong, Kwanjai; Swatdipong, Akarapong; Vuttipongchaikij, Supachai; Apisitwanich, Somsak

    2017-10-12

    Borassus flabellifer or Asian Palmyra palm is an important crop for local economies in the South and Southeast Asia for its fruit and palm sugar production. Archeological and historical evidence indicated the presence of this species in Southeast Asia dating back at least 1500 years. B. flabellifer is believed to be originated in Africa, spread to South Asia and introduced into Southeast Asia through commercial routes and dissemination of cultures, however, the nature of its invasion and settlement in Thailand is unclear. Here, we analyzed genetic data of 230 B. flabellifer accessions across Thailand using 17 EST-SSR and 12 gSSR polymorphic markers. Clustering analysis revealed that the population consisted of two genetic clusters (STRUCTURE K = 2). Cluster I is found mainly in southern Thailand, while Cluster II is found mainly in the northeastern. Those found in the central are of an extensive mix between the two. These two clusters are in moderate differentiation (F ST  = 0.066 and N M  = 3.532) and have low genetic diversity (H O  = 0.371 and 0.416; A R  = 2.99 and 3.19, for the cluster I and II respectively). The minimum numbers of founders for each genetic group varies from 3 to 4 individuals, based on simulation using different allele frequency assumptions. These numbers coincide with that B. flabellifer is dioecious, and a number of seeds had to be simultaneously introduced for obtaining both male and female founders. From these data and geographical and historical evidence, we hypothesize that there were at least two different invasive events of B. flabellifer in Thailand. B. flabellifer was likely brought through the Straits of Malacca to be propagated in the southern Thailand as one of the invasive events before spreading to the central Thailand. The second event likely occurred in Khmer Empire, currently Cambodia, before spreading to the northeastern Thailand.

  12. Dutch National Plan combat nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This document presents the Dutch National Plan combat nuclear accidents (NPK). Ch. 2 discusses some important starting points which are determining for the framework and the performance of the NPK, in particular the accident typology which underlies the plan. Also the new accident-classification system for the Dutch nuclear power plants, the standardization for the measures to be taken and the staging around nuclear power plants are pursued. In ch. 3 the legal framework of the combat nuclear accidents is described. In particular the Nuclear-power law, the Accident law and the Municipality law are pursued. Also the role of province and municipality are described. Ch. 4 deals with the role of the owner/licensee of the object where the accident occurs, in the combat of accident. In ch. 5 the structure of the nuclear-accident combat at national level is outlined, subdivided in alarm phase, combat phase and the winding-up phase. In ch.'s 6-12 these phases are elaborated more in detail. In ch.'s 10-13 the measures to be taken in nuclear accidents, are described. These measures are distinguished with regard to: protection of the population and medical aspects, water economy, drinking-water supply, agriculture and food supply. Ch. 14 describes the responsibility of the burgomaster. Ch.'s 15 and 16 present an overview of the personnel, material, procedural and juridical modifications and supplements of existing structures which are necessary with regard to the new and modified parts of the structure. Ch. 17 indicates how by means of the appropriate education and exercise it can be achieved that all personnel, services and institutes concerned possess the knowledge and experience necessary for the activities from the NKP to be executed as has been described. Ch. 18 contains a survey of activities to be performed and a proposal how these can be realized. (H.W.). figs.; tabs

  13. The Dutch Approach to Local Climate Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellekens, R.

    2008-01-01

    In the Netherlands we are working with municipalities on the subjects of RES and RUE for over 15 years now. Over the last 4 years we worked with 250 out of 430 municipalities on setting up and executing their local climate policies. For this there was a national climate covenant between the national government, the association of municipalities and the association of provinces. The municipalities and provinces were supported through a subsidy scheme and the help of SenterNovem. Products like the climate menu, the climate scan and an organisational assessment were developed to aid the municipalities in their process. Through involvement of different stake holders within the municipality or a region concerning the climate policy and the execution thereof, production of RES is stimulated and goals on energy saving are more likely to be reached. Through the involvement of stake holders and by making climate change an integral part of the municipal organisation an irreversible process is started. Thus economic competitiveness and innovations are stimulated. The municipality and the region will gain economic strength through this. Results in the Netherlands on a municipal level are inspiring. More and more municipalities are developing long-term strategies at the moment. Goals like energy neutrality, climate neutrality and CO 2 neutrality in a set year are usually the basis of these strategies. Through these strategies Dutch municipalities become increasingly less dependent on energy sources outside their boarders. On a European level the Dutch approach ties in with the Covenant of Mayors which is launched by the EU.(author)

  14. HealthSouth's most wanted. Founder and former chairman and CEO Richard Scrushy is indicted for 85 counts of conspiracy, fraud and money laundering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Julie

    2003-11-10

    Wake-up call for the industry or an isolated case of corporate chicanery? Healthcare experts are divided on the import of Richard Scrushy's indictment on 85 counts last week in connection with the financial scandal at HealthSouth Corp. The indictment alleges the company founder relied on electronic and telephone surveillance, threats and intimidation to control his accomplices.

  15. Adolescent alcohol intoxication in the dutch hospital Departments of Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, J.J. van; Lely, N. van der; Pereira, R.R.; Dalen, W.E. van

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate the number and characteristics of adolescent alcohol intoxication cases in hospital Departments of Pediatrics. The study also analyzes drinking patterns and intoxication characteristics. Method: Data were collected using the Dutch Pediatric

  16. Developmental prediction model for early alcohol initiation in Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geels, L.M.; Vink, J.M.; Beijsterveldt, C.E.M. van; Bartels, M.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Multiple factors predict early alcohol initiation in teenagers. Among these are genetic risk factors, childhood behavioral problems, life events, lifestyle, and family environment. We constructed a developmental prediction model for alcohol initiation below the Dutch legal drinking age

  17. Explaining purchases of organic meat by Dutch consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, PC

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of economic and marketing variables ( quality, price, and distribution), emotions ( fear, empathy, and guilt), social norms, and environment-related variables ( environmental concern, green behaviour, and perceived consumer effectiveness) on Dutch consumers'

  18. Contested evidence : A Dutch reimbursement decision taken to court

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, F.; Houwaart, E.; Delnoij, D.; Horstman, K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines a remarkable lawsuit in health care rationing. The Patients Association for Interstitial Cystitis sued the Dutch National Health Care Institute for alleged misconduct against Interstitial Cystitis patients, as the Institute decided that bladder instillations with chondroitin

  19. Chiropractic in the Netherlands : A survey of Dutch chiropractors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assendelft, W. J.J.; Pfeifle, C. E.; Bouter, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, there is increasing public and political interest in chiropractic treatment. There is, however, very little descriptive information available in the Netherlands on the chiropractic profession. Therefore, a survey was conducted among all Dutch chiropractors. Methods: A

  20. Book Review: Qualitative-Quantitative Analyses of Dutch and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Book Title: Qualitative-Quantitative Analyses of Dutch and Afrikaans Grammar and Lexicon. Book Author: Robert S. Kirsner. 2014. John Benjamins Publishing Company ISBN 9789027215772, price ZAR481.00. 239 pages ...

  1. Lifetimes of Machinery and Equipment. Evidence from Dutch Manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erumban, Abdul Azeez

    2006-01-01

    This paper estimates service lifetimes for capital assets in Dutch manufacturing industries, using information on asset retirement patterns. A Weibull distribution function is estimated using a nonlinear regression technique to derive service lifetimes for three selected asset types: transport

  2. How the gothic reared its head in Dutch literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Andeweg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2012n62p127   It was not until the twentieth century, and especially the 1980s, that Dutch Gothic fiction began to flourish. This article gives an overview of the history of the Gothic in Dutch literature, and discusses the explanations given for the absence of a Dutch Gothic tradition. It then examines six Gothic novels from the 1980s in more depth to determine what kind of “cultural work” the Gothic does in late-twentieth century Dutch novels. In those novels, the Gothic is a way of expressing the ambivalences accompanying new societal relations following the 1960s, when constructs of the self in terms of gender and sexuality were reformulated.

  3. The Impact of Learning Analytics on the Dutch Education System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Stoyanov, Slavi; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Drachsler, H., Stoyanov, S. & Specht, M. (2014, March). The Impact of Learning Analytics on the Dutch Education System. Paper presented at The 4th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

  4. Suicide Mortality, Suicidal Ideation and Psychological Problems in Dutch Anaesthesiologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, M.C.A.; Liem, A.L.; Dongen, van E.P.A.; Carels, I.C.; Egmond, van M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies reveal an elevated suicide rate for anaesthesiologists. We sought to examine anaesthesiologist suicide mortality and its underlying explanatory factors. Two studies were conducted in order to establish the suicide mortality figures among Dutch anaesthesiologists and to investigate

  5. Aspirations and occupational achievements of Dutch fathers and mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, Mariska; van der Lippe, Tanja; Kluwer, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - To investigate how work and family aspirations relate to occupational achievements and gender differences herein. Design/methodology/approach - Using data from 2009 we examined the relationship between career and childrearing aspirations and occupational achievements of Dutch parents.

  6. A critical view on the new Dutch Natural Gas Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the opinions of several players in the market for natural gas on the new Dutch Natural Gas Law, which is drafted within the framework of the liberalization of the European market for natural gas

  7. Differential relationships between language skills and working memory in Turkish–Dutch and native-Dutch first-graders from low-income families

    OpenAIRE

    Bosman, Anna M. T.; Janssen, Marije

    2017-01-01

    In the Netherlands, Turkish–Dutch children constitute a substantial group of children who learn to speak Dutch at the age of four after they learned to speak Turkish. These children are generally academically less successful. Academic success appears to be affected by both language proficiency and working memory skill. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between language skills and working memory in Turkish–Dutch and native-Dutch children from low-income families. The f...

  8. HOW to Differentiate Dutch Elm Disease from Elm Phloem Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester Paul Gibson; Arthur R. Hastings; Leon A. LeMadeliene

    1981-01-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED) and elm phloem necrosis are the two most serious diseases of elm in the United States (Figs. 1 and 2). Most native species of elm are susceptible to both diseases. Dutch elm disease is caused by a fungus, Ceratocystis u1mi (Buisman) C. Moreau, and is transmitted by two species of elm bark beetles-the smaller European elm bark beetle, Scolytus...

  9. Bringing History Home. Postcolonial Immigrants and the Dutch Cultural Arena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Legêne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bringing History Home: Postcolonial Immigrants and the Dutch Cultural ArenaThree Dutch-language monographs published in 2008-2009 by Ulbe Bosma, Lizzy van Leeuwen and Gert Oostindie in the context of the interdisciplinary research programme Bringing History Home, present a history of identity politics in relation to ‘postcolonial immigrants’. This term refers to some 500,000 people who since 1945 arrived in the Netherlands from Indonesia and the former Dutch New Guinea, Suriname or the Antillean islands in the Caribbean. Bosma traces the development of postcolonial immigrant organizations. In interaction with government policies, these organizations moved from mere socioeconomic emancipation struggles to mere cultural identity politics. Van Leeuwen takes such cultural identity politics as the starting point for her analysis of Indo-Dutch and Dutch Indies cultural initiatives and the competing interests at stake in the Indies heritage discourse. Oostindie discusses these developments in terms of community development and change within Dutch society at large. He introduces the notion of a ‘postcolonial bonus’. In postcolonial Netherlands, this bonus was available to immigrants on the grounds of a shared colonial past. Today, this bonus is (almost spent. The review discusses the three monographs, as well as the coherence of Bringing History Home as a research programme. Legêne argues, that notwithstanding valuable research outcomes, the very category of postcolonial immigrants does not constitute a convincing category of analysis.

  10. Dutch word stress as pronounced by Indonesian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilie M. Roosman

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the way in which the Dutch monophthongal vowels are pronounced by Indonesian students. To investigate whether Indonesian students realize the Dutch vowels correctly, especially when they are stressed, I analysed duration and quality of stressed and unstressed Dutch vowels. Measurements were done on the duration and the formant frequencies of the vowels spoken by Indonesian students and by native speakers of Dutch as well. Statistical analysis showed that in general the differences in duration between vowels spoken by the Indonesian students and by the native speakers were not significant. However, the effect of stress on the lengthening of the vowels was stronger for the Indonesian students than for the native speakers. In addition, statistical analysis of the formant frequencies confirmed that the non-native speakers realized the Dutch vowels slightly differently from the Dutch native speakers. The Indonesian students pronounced the stressed vowels more clearly than their unstressed counterparts; yet their vowel diagram is smaller than the vowel diagram of the native speakers.

  11. The Dutch gas policy: 'Dutch disease' or imaginary disease. CERI Studies Nr 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, John

    1998-04-01

    The Netherlands are the first European gas producer and exporter. The author proposes an analysis of the gas policy of this country. He first recalls some elements of context: peculiarities of energy as a domain of public policy, and characteristics of the Dutch political system. He recalls the historical development of the Dutch gas industry from the 1960's: political economics of natural gas and of competing fuels, development of the Groningen site as the keystone of the Dutch gas policy, and regulation of the industrial sector. In the next part, the author comments the emergence of energy as a topic of public debate from 1995, and how the Dutch gas policy has been put into question again: actors and interaction dynamics, stakes, present policy and perspectives

  12. Between local governments and communities: Knowledge exchange and mutual learning in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Turkish municipal partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    van Ewijk, E.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on mutual learning processes of governmental and non-governmental actors involved in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Turkish municipal partnerships in the period 2007-2011. These partnerships aim at strengthening local governance in Morocco and Turkey as well as in the Netherlands. The research focuses on five case studies and indicate the partnerships lead to important forms of learning at both sides, including strengthening service delivery and working in multi-actor ...

  13. Persistent Identifiers for Dutch cultural heritage institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ras, Marcel; Kruithof, Gijsbert

    2016-04-01

    Over the past years, more and more collections belonging to archives, libraries, media, museums, and knowledge institutes are being digitised and made available online. These are exciting times for ALM institutions. They are realising that, in the information society, their collections are goldmines. Unfortunately most heritage institutions in the Netherlands do not yet meet the basic preconditions for long-term availability of their collections. The digital objects often have no long lasting fixed reference yet. URL's and web addresses change. Some digital objects that were referenced in Europeana and other portals can no longer be found. References in scientific articles have a very short life span, which is damaging for scholarly research. In 2015, the Dutch Digital Heritage Network (NDE) has started a two-year work program to co-ordinate existing initiatives in order to improve the (long-term) accessibility of the Dutch digital heritage for a wide range of users, anytime, anyplace. The Digital Heritage Network is a partnership established on the initiative of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science. The members of the NDE are large, national institutions that strive to professionally preserve and manage digital data, e.g. the National Library, The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision, the Netherlands Cultural Heritage Agency, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Archive of the Netherlands and the DEN Foundation, and a growing number of associations and individuals both within and outside the heritage sector. By means of three work programmes the goals of the Network should be accomplished and improve the visibility, the usability and the sustainability of digital heritage. Each programme contains of a set of projects. Within the sustainability program a project on creating a model for persistent identifiers is taking place. The main goals of the project are (1) raise awareness among cultural heritage institutions on the

  14. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stattin Eva-Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52% index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the

  15. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stattin, Eva-Lena; Boström, Ida Maria; Winbo, Annika; Cederquist, Kristina; Jonasson, Jenni; Jonsson, Björn-Anders; Diamant, Ulla-Britt; Jensen, Steen M; Rydberg, Annika; Norberg, Anna

    2012-10-25

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52%) index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%), whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the mutations and 3 of 36 selected cases (8%) harboured a mutation in the

  16. Investigation of CYP21A2 mutations in Turkish patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and a novel founder mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraman, Bayram; Ökten, Ayşenur; Kalay, Ersan; Karagüzel, Gülay; Dinçer, Tuba; Açıkgöz, Emel Gül; Karagüzel, Ahmet

    2013-01-15

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessively inherited disorders characterized by impaired production of adrenal steroids. Approximately 95% of all CAH are caused by mutations of the CYP21A2 that encodes 21-hydroxylase. In this study, mutation analyses of CYP21A2 were performed in 48 CAH patients from 45 Turkish families with the clinical diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). While in 39 (86.7%) of 21OHD patients, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were identified in both alleles, in two 21OHD patients CYP21A2 mutations were identified only in one allele. In four patients, mutation was not detected at all. In total, seventeen known and one novel, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were observed. Among identified mutations, previously described c.293-13C/A>G, large rearrangements and p.Q319X mutations were the most common mutations accounting for 33.3%, 14.4% and 12.2% of all evaluated chromosomes, respectively. In six families (13.3%) a novel founder mutation, c.2T>C (p.M1?), inactivating the translation initiation codon was found. This mutation is not present in pseudogene CYP21A1P and causes the classical form of the disease in six patients. In addition, depending on the nature of the rearrangements CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras were further classified as CH(c/d), and CH-1(c) was shown to be the most prominent chimera in our study group. In conclusion, with this study we identified a novel founder CYP21A2 mutation and suggest a further classification for CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras depending on the combination of junction site position and whether it is occurred as a result of deletion or conversion. Absence of disease causing mutation of CYP21A2 in ten of screened ninety chromosomes suggests the contribution of regulatory elements in occurrences of CAH due to the 21OHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Modelling radon transport in Dutch dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, M.P.M.; De Vries, L.; Phaff, J.C.; Van der Graaf, E.R.; Blaauboer, R.O.; Stoop, P.; Lembrechts, J

    1998-07-01

    Radon concentrations and external exposure by nuclides of the U-238 decay chain were quantified for a typical Dutch townhouse using a series of interconnected computer models. The effect is studied of changes in parameter values which have simulated changes in building practices over the past decades. Three groups of parameters were distinguished: (1) the air-tightness of the building shell and the distribution of leaks over outer walls and ground floor, (2) the radon-relevant characteristics of the building materials, and 3) those characterising 'habits of the occupant', such as changing mechanical ventilation rate and opening of air inlets or doors. The relative importance of increased air-tightness and of substitution of concrete by other building materials in new dwellings is illustrated. On average changes in building practices clearly enhanced the radon concentration in the living room without affecting external exposure. In new, airtight dwellings the relative effect of occupant behaviour is demonstrated as considerably larger than in old ones.

  18. Job resources in Dutch dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, R C; te Brake, J H M; Eijkman, M A J; Hoogstraten, Joh

    2006-02-01

    To develop an instrument measuring job resources among dentists, and to assess the relative importance of these resources and relate them to job satisfaction. 848 Dutch general dental practitioners (GDPs) received a questionnaire to monitor work experiences, including the Dentists' Experienced Job Resources Scale (DEJRS, 46 items, score range: 1 (not satisfying) to 5 (very satisfying), and the Dentist Job Satisfaction Scale (DJSS, 5 items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.85). A total of 497 (58.6%) dentists responded. Factor analysis (PCA) on the DEJRS resulted in 8 factors (Cronbach's alpha: 0.75 > alpha Entrepreneurship (M = 3.55, sd = 0.9); Material Benefits (M = 3.05, sd = 0.7); and Professional Contacts (M = 3.03, sd = 0.7). MANOVA indicated gender differences on: (Long-term) Patient Results (F(1,548) = 10.428, p = .001), and Patient Care (F(1,548) = 11.036, p r < 0.88. All subscales show a positive correlation with the DJSS. The DEJRS is a valuable and psychometrically sound instrument to monitor job resources as experienced by GDPs. Dentists report immediate results and aesthetics, and long-term results of working with patients to be the most rewarding aspects. All job resources showed a positive correlation with job satisfaction. The discussion includes conjecture that stimulating a greater awareness of job resources serves a major role in burnout prevention.

  19. Genetic consequences of a century of protection: serial founder events and survival of the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstad, Kristina M; Colbourne, Rogan M; Robertson, Hugh A; Allendorf, Fred W; Daugherty, Charles H

    2013-07-07

    We present the outcome of a century of post-bottleneck isolation of a long-lived species, the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii, LSK) and demonstrate that profound genetic consequences can result from protecting few individuals in isolation. LSK were saved from extinction by translocation of five birds from South Island, New Zealand to Kapiti Island 100 years ago. The Kapiti population now numbers some 1200 birds and provides founders for new populations. We used 15 microsatellite loci to compare genetic variation among Kapiti LSK and the populations of Red Mercury, Tiritiri Matangi and Long Islands that were founded with birds from Kapiti. Two LSK native to D'Urville Island were also placed on Long Island. We found extremely low genetic variation and signatures of acute and recent genetic bottleneck effects in all four populations, indicating that LSK have survived multiple genetic bottlenecks. The Long Island population appears to have arisen from a single mating pair from Kapiti, suggesting there is no genetic contribution from D'Urville birds among extant LSK. The Ne/NC ratio of Kapiti Island LSK (0.03) is exceptionally low for terrestrial vertebrates and suggests that genetic diversity might still be eroding in this population, despite its large census size.

  20. The role of bZIP transcription factors in green plant evolution: adaptive features emerging from four founder genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo Guedes Corrêa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP family control important processes in all eukaryotes. In plants, bZIPs are regulators of many central developmental and physiological processes including photomorphogenesis, leaf and seed formation, energy homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. Here we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bZIP genes from algae, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 13 groups of bZIP homologues in angiosperms, three more than known before, that represent 34 Possible Groups of Orthologues (PoGOs. The 34 PoGOs may correspond to the complete set of ancestral angiosperm bZIP genes that participated in the diversification of flowering plants. Homologous genes dedicated to seed-related processes and ABA-mediated stress responses originated in the common ancestor of seed plants, and three groups of homologues emerged in the angiosperm lineage, of which one group plays a role in optimizing the use of energy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that the ancestor of green plants possessed four bZIP genes functionally involved in oxidative stress and unfolded protein responses that are bZIP-mediated processes in all eukaryotes, but also in light-dependent regulations. The four founder genes amplified and diverged significantly, generating traits that benefited the colonization of new environments.

  1. Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913): the forgotten co-founder of the Neo-Darwinian theory of biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Hossfeld, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    The British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), who had to leave school aged 14 and never attended university, did extensive fieldwork, first in the Amazon River basin (1848-1852) and then in Southeast Asia (1854-1862). Based on this experience, and after reading the corresponding scientific literature, Wallace postulated that species were not created, but are modified descendants of pre-existing varieties (Sarawak Law paper, 1855). Evolution is brought about by a struggle for existence via natural selection, which results in the adaptation of those individuals in variable populations who survive and reproduce (Ternate essay, 1858). In his monograph Darwinism (1889), and in subsequent publications, Wallace extended the contents of Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) into the Neo-Darwinian theory of biological evolution, with reference to the work of August Weismann (1834-1914). Wallace also became the (co)-founder of biogeography, biodiversity research, astrobiology and evolutionary anthropology. Moreover, he envisioned what was later called the anthropocene (i.e., the age of human environmental destructiveness). However, since Wallace believed in atheistic spiritualism and mixed up scientific facts and supernatural speculations in some of his writings, he remains a controversial figure in the history of biology.

  2. The end of capitalism and its future: Hegel as founder of the concept of a welfare state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieweg Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A key part of Hegel’s practical philosophy is his theory of civil society and the idea of a rational regulation of the market. This is the foundation of Hegel’s theory of a social state. The copyright on the notion of a modern society of freedom and a rational, social state belongs to Hegel. Hegel proves himself to be the thinker who until now has provided the most convincing foundation for freedom in modernity. The theoretical foundation and at the same time bone of contention of Hegel’s political thought is to be found in his concept of ethical life (Sittlichkeit, in particular in his theory of civil society. The current shipwreck of deregulated capitalism does not mean the foundering of our journey towards a free society. Nevertheless the deficiencies and unsustainability of both traditional models - socialist collective ownership and market fundamentalism - exhibit two contradictory claims to a share of the wealth of nations. To take up Hegel’s project is, in essence, to aim at a new conception of an environmentally and socially sustainable and just society, and a corresponding world order. It is to further Hegel’s philosophy of freedom.

  3. Infection of monkeys by simian-human immunodeficiency viruses with transmitted/founder clade C HIV-1 envelopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmal, Mohammed; Luedemann, Corinne; Lavine, Christy L; Mach, Linh V; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N; Lewis, Mark G; Anderson, Hanne; Pal, Ranajit; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Pauthner, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Seaman, Michael S; Letvin, Norman L; Burton, Dennis R; Sodroski, Joseph G; Haynes, Barton F; Santra, Sampa

    2015-01-15

    Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that mirror natural transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in man are needed for evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates. Currently available SHIVs contain HIV-1 env genes from chronically-infected individuals and do not reflect the characteristics of biologically relevant HIV-1 strains that mediate human transmission. We chose to develop clade C SHIVs, as clade C is the major infecting subtype of HIV-1 in the world. We constructed 10 clade C SHIVs expressing Env proteins from T/F viruses. Three of these ten clade C SHIVs (SHIV KB9 C3, SHIV KB9 C4 and SHIV KB9 C5) replicated in naïve rhesus monkeys. These three SHIVs are mucosally transmissible and are neutralized by sCD4 and several HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies. However, like natural T/F viruses, they exhibit low Env reactivity and a Tier 2 neutralization sensitivity. Of note, none of the clade C T/F SHIVs elicited detectable autologous neutralizing antibodies in the infected monkeys, even though antibodies that neutralized a heterologous Tier 1 HIV-1 were generated. Challenge with these three new clade C SHIVs will provide biologically relevant tests for vaccine protection in rhesus macaques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dr John Thomson (1847-1909). Pioneer surgeon, military surgeon and a founder of St John Ambulance in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, J; Wales, M

    Surgeon John Thomson (1847-1909), a Scot who made his life's work in Queensland, was a pioneer surgeon, radiologist and bacteriologist, and one of the founders of the St John Ambulance movement in Australia and the Railway Ambulance Corps. He was variously President of the British Medical Association (Queensland Branch), the Medical Board of Queensland, the Medico-Ethical Association, and the Intercolonial Medical Congress, which was held in Brisbane in 1899. A pioneer military surgeon in this country, he was the foundation Principal Medical Officer (as Surgeon-Major) of the Queensland Ambulance Corps within the Queensland Defence Force. His advocacy for a university north of Sydney was one of the factors which led to the foundation of the University of Queensland, a body which honoured him by the establishment of the John Thomson Lectureship, which for half a century was its most prestigious public oration. The life and times of this singular doctor exemplify one small class of pre-Federation medical pioneers whose professional outreach established a number of voluntary organisations which have blossomed in Australian society to the present day.

  5. The history of the German Cardiac Society and the American College of Cardiology and their two founders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, Berndt; Holmes, David R; Harold, John

    2013-02-26

    The German Cardiac Society is the oldest national cardiac society in Europe, founded on June 3, 1927, in Bad Nauheim by Dr. Bruno Kisch and Professor Arthur Weber. They were actively supported by Dr. Franz Groedel, who together with Kisch became co-founders of the American College of Cardiology in 1949. Both Groedel and Kisch would be proud to see the fulfillment of their visions and dreams, which was commemorated at the joint session of the two societies held during the 78th annual meeting of the German Cardiac Society in Mannheim, Germany. "It is ironic that their dreadful years in Germany and their loss to German Cardiology helped to contribute to advances in American and international Cardiology," said Dr. Simon Dack, American College of Cardiology president in 1956 and 1957. The legacy of Groedel might be reflected by his own words: "We will meet the future not merely by dreams but by concerned action and inextinguishable enthusiasm". Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic variation of the Turnip mosaic virus population of Vietnam: a case study of founder, regional and local influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy Duc; Tran, Hoa Thi Nhu; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2013-01-01

    Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) is one of the most important viruses infecting a wide range of plant species, primarily from the family Brassicaceae. Thirty TuMV isolates were collected from Brassica and Raphanus plants in Vietnam during 2006-2008. Host reaction studies showed that many of the isolates belonged to Brassica/Raphanus (BR) host-infecting type. Sequence-based phylogenetic and population genetic analyses were made of the complete polyprotein gene sequences, and of four non-recombinogenic regions of those sequences (i.e. genes of the helper-component proteinase protein, protein 3, nuclear inclusion b protein and coat protein). These were used to assess the subpopulation differentiation and divergence between Vietnamese TuMV populations and those of nearby Asian countries. Nine inter- and intralineage recombination type patterns were identified in the genomes of the Vietnamese isolates, of which seven were novel. All the Vietnamese non-recombinant isolates fell into the world-B group of TuMV and clustered with Chinese isolates. The estimates of genetic differentiation and gene flow reveal that the TuMV populations of Vietnam, China and Japan are genetically linked but have clear local founder effects. This, the first population genetic study of a TuMV population in Southeast Asia, indicates the importance of such studies for providing the scientific basis of control strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypothermia and acute alcohol intoxication in Dutch adolescents : The relationship between core and outdoor temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, Claire J.; Van Hoof, Joris J.; van der Lely, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypothermia and its potential association with core and outdoor temperatures in adolescents suffering from acute alcohol intoxication. Methods: Data were derived from the Dutch Pediatric Surveillance System, which monitors alcohol intoxication among all Dutch adolescents.

  8. Dutch pediatricians' views on the use of neuromuscular blockers for dying neonates: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, K.; van de Vathorst, S.

    2015-01-01

    To assess Dutch pediatricians' views on neuromuscular blockers for dying neonates. Qualitative study involving in-depth interviews with 10 Dutch pediatricians working with severely ill neonates. Data were analyzed using appropriate qualitative research techniques. Participants explained their view

  9. Case note to report of Dutch Ombudsman regarding information disclosure on wind energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Case note to a report of of the Dutch Ombudsman concerning a complaint on the information disclosure by the Dutch Social and Economic Council concerning the advantages and disadvantages of windtubrines

  10. Dutch health websites and their ability to inform people with low health literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, C.S.; van Weert, J.C.M.; Brosius, A.; Smit, E.G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether Dutch online health information (OHI) generally reflects message elements that support information processing and understanding among people with low health literacy. Methods We content-analyzed one hundred Dutch webpages about Ebola, fibromyalgia, ALS, losing weight,

  11. Adolescent alcohol intoxication in the dutch hospital departments of pediatrics: A 2-year comparison study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, J.J. van; Lely, N. van der; Bouthoorn, S.H.; Dalen, W.E. van; Pereira, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the prevalence of, and the circumstances leading to, adolescent alcohol intoxication admissions in Dutch hospital departments of pediatrics. Methods: Data were collected in 2007 and 2008, using the Dutch Pediatric Surveillance System, in which pediatricians received

  12. Liberalisation of the Dutch energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cace, J.; Zijlstra, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    The process of liberalisation of the Dutch energy market started in 1998 and will be completed in 2004 by opening the energy market to households and small enterprises. The fundaments of the open market are determined by the Electricity Law from 1998 and the Gas Law from 2000. The green electricity market was opened in July 2001 as a part of the environment protection package. A number of additional legal regulations, codes, procedures and agreements were developed in order to guarantee equal opportunities for all participants, create the market transparency, guarantee the continuity of supply and protect the consumer. These documents were developed by the 'Platform Versnelling Energieliberalisering', PVE (Platform for the acceleration of the liberalisation process). All relevant players from the energy market, including the major consumers, are represented in this advisory body. In the new market situation, the grid operators carry the essential responsibilities within the energy supply system. They are providing the technical security, registering the energy exchange through their grid and are generating the billing and the balance control information for suppliers and transport system operators respectively. The suppliers are the primary contact for the consumers. The complexity of the energy market liberalisation is aggravated by the difference in fundamental choices for the electricity and gas market. Electricity market is based on regulated third party access (TPA) and gas market is based on negotiated TPA. A lack of awareness of the necessity of an adequate information system appeared to be the most the most significant hurdle in establishing the open energy market. (author)

  13. Armadillos exhibit less genetic polymorphism in North America than in South America: nuclear and mitochondrial data confirm a founder effect in Dasypus novemcinctus (Xenarthra).

    OpenAIRE

    Huchon, Dorothée; Delsuc, Frédéric; Catzeflis, François,; Douzery, Emmanuel,

    1999-01-01

    International audience; Heterozygosity at eight nuclear enzymatic loci and mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop) sequence polymorphism was compared between North and South American nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus: Xenarthra, Dasypodidae). All markers revealed a striking genetic homogeneity amongst Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi individuals, vs. the usual level of polymorphism for the French Guiana population. This may reflect a founder effect during colonization of North A...

  14. AmericaPlex26: A SNaPshot Multiplex System for Genotyping the Main Human Mitochondrial Founder Lineages of the Americas

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho, Alexandra; Valverde, Guido; Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Cooper, Alan; Barreto Romero, Maria Inés; Espinoza, Isabel Flores; Llamas, Bastien; Haak, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies have described a reduced genetic diversity in Native American populations, indicative of one or more bottleneck events during the peopling and prehistory of the Americas. Classical sequencing approaches targeting the mitochondrial diversity have reported the presence of five major haplogroups, namely A, B, C, D and X, whereas the advent of complete mitochondrial genome sequencing has recently refined the number of founder lineages within the given diversity to 15 sub-h...

  15. A Venture with Stanger: An Exploratory Research to the Using of Online Co-founder Matchup Platforms in Entrepreneurial Team Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Chih-Chung

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory research looks into the new emerging method of entrepreneurial team formation by using the online co-founder matching platforms that not yet receive much attention from the scholars. By applying the current theoretical to the recognised four-step process of the internet-intermediated venture team formation from the interview with entrepreneurs who have the experience of using the platforms, this research discovers the support to the existence of the resource-seeking approach ...

  16. Molecular identification, cloning and characterization of transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, D and A/D infectious molecular clones

    OpenAIRE

    Baalwa, Joshua; Wang, Shuyi; Parrish, Nicholas; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Yue, Ling; Ruzagira, Eugene; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Kamali, Anatoli; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Price, Matt A.; Kappes, John C.; Karita, Etienne; Kaleebu, Pontiano

    2012-01-01

    We report the molecular identification, cloning and initial biological characterization of 12 full-length HIV-1 subtype A, D and A/D recombinant transmitted/founder (T/F) genomes. T/F genomes contained intact canonical open reading frames and all T/F viruses were replication competent in primary human T-cells, although subtype D virus replication was more efficient (p

  17. Articulations of identity and distinction: The meanings of language in Dutch popular music

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeven, Arno; Janssen, Susanne; Driessen, Simone

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractOn the basis of interviews with music audiences, heritage practitioners, and cultural industry workers, this article explores how language use in Dutch popular music relates to local and historically situated taste patterns and music practices. Most popular music in the Netherlands is sung in English, Dutch, or dialects of the Dutch language. We discuss how these languages are used in Dutch popular music as an expression of cultural taste, cultural identities, and local herita...

  18. Shocked materials from the Dutch Peak diamictite, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerz, F.; Bunch, T. E.; Oberbeck, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence of shock metamorphism in the Dutch Peak diamictite in the Sheeprock Mountains, Utah, is reported. The Dutch Peak diamictite is of Proterozoic age and is a minor part of the Dutch Peak formation. A shocked sample, specimen A250, was collected during a brief visit of the Harker Canyon area of the Sheeprock Mountains. This sample consists of equant, anhedral grains of quartz, K-feldspar, and plagioclase. The crystallographic orientation of 244 lamellae systems in 106 grains was measured. It is presently difficult to evaluate the significance of this single specimen. Without additional and substantial field work, and petrographic characterization of this formation, a number of scenarios for the presence of a shocked clast and the emplacement of the entire formation remain viable.

  19. Portuguese c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 founder mutation: gastrointestinal and tongue neoplasias may be part of the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Miguel A M; Bobrovnitchaia, Irina G; Lima, Maria Angélica F D; Santos, Anna Cláudia E; Ramos, Jesus P; Souza, Kelly R L; Peixoto, Ana; Teixeira, Manuel R; Vargas, Fernando R

    2012-12-01

    We have screened BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation in a cohort of 168 women with diagnosis of breast cancer referred for genetic counseling because of risk of being carriers of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Portuguese founder mutation BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu was identified in three unrelated breast cancer probands. Genotyping identified a common haplotype between markers D13S260 and D13S171, and allele sizes were compatible to those described in the Portuguese families. Allele sizes of marker D13S1246, however, were concordant in two families, suggesting that the haplotype may be larger in a subset of families. Tumor phenotypes in Brazilian families seem to reinforce the high prevalence of breast cancer among affected males. However, an apparent excess of gastrointestinal and tongue neoplasias were also observed in these families. Although these tumors are not part of the phenotypic spectrum of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, they might be accounted for by other risk alleles contained in the founder haplotype region.

  20. The effects of the Dutch museum pass on museum visits and museum revenues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werff, S.; Koopmans, C.; Boyer, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch museum pass gives unlimited access for a year to most major Dutch museums and around the half of all Dutch museums for a fixed fee. The fee revenues are distributed among participating museums in proportion to the amount of visits by pass holders and their ticket prices. In this paper, it

  1. The Standford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, form C: Normative data of a Dutch student sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Näring, G.W.B.; Roelofs, K.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.

    2001-01-01

    Norms for the Dutch language version of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C; Weitzenhoffer & Hilgard, 1962) are presented. These norms are based upon a sample of 135 students at a Dutch university. Generally, the psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the SHSS:C are

  2. Do Dutch nutrition and dietetics students meet nutritional requirements during education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos M.B. Nieweg; Dr. C.P. van der Schans; Dr Harriët Jager-Wittenaar; Joke J. van de Kruk

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the dietary intakes of Dutch nutrition and dietetics students with the Dutch RDA and the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS), and to assess whether dietary intake changes during education. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and longitudinal research (2004-2010). SETTING:

  3. Acquiring reading and vocabulary in Dutch and English: the effect of concurrent instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, A.; Bekebrede, J.; Kotterink, M.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of concurrent instruction in Dutch and English on reading acquisition in both languages, 23 pupils were selected from a school with bilingual education, and 23 from a school with education in Dutch only. The pupils had a Dutch majority language background and were

  4. N-best: The Northern- and Southern-Dutch Benchmark Evaluation of Speech recognition Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessens, J.M.; Leeuwen, D.A. van

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe N-best 2008, the first Large Vocabulary Speech Recognition (LVCSR) benchmark evaluation held for the Dutch language. Both the accent as spoken in the Netherlands (Northern-Dutch) and in Belgium (Southern-Dutch or Flemish), will be evaluated. The evaluation tasks are

  5. Evaluation of 280,000 cases in Dutch midwifery practices: a descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink-Verburg, M. P.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. P.; Hakkenberg, R. M. A.; Veldhuijzen, I. M. E.; Bennebroek Gravenhorst, J.; Buitendijk, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the nature and outcome of intrapartum referrals from primary to secondary care within the Dutch obstetric system. DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Dutch midwifery database (LVR1), covering 95% of all midwifery care and 80% of all Dutch pregnancies (2001-03). POPULATION:

  6. Young Asian Dutch constructing Asianness: Understanding the role of Asian popular culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartosen, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is about young Asian Dutch, panethnic Asian identities and identifications, and Asian/Asian Dutch popular culture. It addresses several pressing questions, including: why do young Asian Dutch, who were born and/or raised in the Netherlands, identify as Asian and construct Asian

  7. Comparing migrants to non-migrants: the case of Dutch migration to New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, J.; Winkelmann, R.

    2003-01-01

    We analyse post-war Dutch migration to New Zealand. We document that history, reflect on analytical and econometric modelling and then combine a sample of Dutch migrants in New Zealand with a representative sample of Dutch in The Netherlands to estimate wage equations and the determinants of the

  8. Survival of stroke patients after introduction of the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol TIA/CVA'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd, Leonie; Groenhof, Feikje; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; van der Meer, Klaas

    2013-01-01

    Background: Earlier research showed that healthcare in stroke could be better organized, aiming for improved survival and less comorbidity. Therefore, in 2004 the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG) and the Dutch Association of Neurology (NVN) introduced the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol

  9. Basso continuo sources from the Dutch Republic c. 1620-c1790

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cok, Kathryn Meriel

    2011-01-01

    The results presented in this dissertation demonstrate the generous contribution that the Dutch Republic has made to the genre of basso continuo, including a survey of twenty-six Dutch sources from the 17th and 18th centuries. Focus has been made on the written record of the practice in the Dutch

  10. Acquiring Reading and Vocabulary in Dutch and English: The Effect of Concurrent Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Leij, Aryan; Bekebrede, Judith; Kotterink, Mieke

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of concurrent instruction in Dutch and English on reading acquisition in both languages, 23 pupils were selected from a school with bilingual education, and 23 from a school with education in Dutch only. The pupils had a Dutch majority language background and were comparable with regard to social-economic status (SES).…

  11. Gendered Remembrance : Women in the Dutch Calvinist Mission and its Historiography, c. 1900-1942

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busschers, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This article reassesses women’s acknowledgement in Dutch Calvinist mission history by looking at women’s imagined place in the Dutch Calvinist missionary community between 1900 and 1942. It does so by looking at women’s position in the NZG’s (Dutch Missionary Society) mission to East Java and the

  12. Generating generosity. Financing poor relief through charitable collections in Dutch towns, c. 1600-1800

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuwen, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    The early modern Dutch welfare system has often been described as relatively generous and efficient. Not only foreigners visiting the Dutch Republic, but also present-day historians have asserted that the Dutch, together with their English neighbours, stood out in early modern Europe in terms of

  13. Cumulative risk assessment of the exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides in the dutch diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, P.E.; Voet, van der H.; Raaij, van M.T.M.; Klaveren, van J.D.

    2008-01-01

    We report the acute cumulative exposure to organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) and carbamates in the Dutch population and young children (1-6 years) via the diet. Residue data were derived from Dutch monitoring programmes performed during 2003-2005, and food consumption levels from the Dutch

  14. Variation in the realization of /εi/ by Dutch youngsters : from local urban dialects to emerging ethnolects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinskens, F.L.M.P.; van Meel, Linda; van Hout, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    How do speakers of current Turkish and Moroccan ethnolects of Dutch deal with phonemes that do not exist in their heritage languages and that are at the same time subject to pronounced regional and social variation in the Dutch speech community at large, such as the Dutch diphthong /εi/? This

  15. Post-MSc technological design (PDEng) traineeships by Dutch universities of technology catalyse industrial innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, P.L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The two-year post-MSc technological design traineeships organized by the Dutch Universities of Technology, and leading to the Professional Doctorate in Engineering (PDEng) degree, are still going strong after 28 years of existence. In 1986 the Dutch government and the Dutch industry - both aiming to

  16. Impact of the EU-Ukraine Free trade Agreement on the Dutch Economy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomes, N.; Appelman, R.; Witteman, J.

    2017-01-01

    We predict the impact of the EU-Ukraine DCFTA on the Dutch economy using an international trade model. We find that, in the long run, the DCFTA could nearly triple Dutch exports to Ukraine and nearly double Dutch imports from Ukraine. These effects are not yet clearly visible in recent trade

  17. Challenging Dutch Holocaust Education: Towards a Curriculum Based on Moral Choices and Empathetic Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersema, Jacob R.; Schimmel, Noam

    2008-01-01

    We analyse the way in which the Holocaust is taught in The Netherlands, with an emphasis on critically examining the content of secondary school textbooks used to teach Dutch students about the history of the Holocaust. We also interview Dutch educators, government officials and academics about the state of Dutch Holocaust education. Our findings…

  18. Price asymmetry in the Dutch retail gasoline market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettendorf, L.; Van der Geest, S.A.; Varkevisser, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses retail price adjustments in the Dutch gasoline market. We estimate an asymmetric error correction model on weekly price changes for the years 1996 to 2001. We construct five datasets, one for each working day. The conclusions on asymmetric pricing are shown to differ over these datasets, suggesting that the choice of the day for which prices are observed matters more than commonly believed. In our view, the insufficient robustness of outcomes might explain the mixed conclusions found in the literature. Using two approaches, we also show that the effect of asymmetry on Dutch consumer costs is negligible

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Franck, Erik; De Raedt, Rudi; Barbez, Catherine; Rosseel, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Interest in self-esteem has been fuelled by the suggestion that level of self-esteem is associated with psychological well-being. In the present study, we translated the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) into the Dutch language and evaluated its psychometric properties in a sample of 442 adults. The results of both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed that a single-factor solution provides the best fit. In addition, the Dutch RSES showed high internal consistency as well as...

  20. Identification, molecular cloning, and analysis of full-length hepatitis C virus transmitted/founder genotypes 1, 3, and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Mark B; Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Saeed, Mohsan; Andrus, Linda; Ding, Wenge; Jiang, Xinpei; Learn, Gerald H; von Schaewen, Markus; Wen, Jessica; Goepfert, Paul A; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M; Shaw, George M

    2015-02-24

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by persistent replication of a complex mixture of viruses termed a "quasispecies." Transmission is generally associated with a stringent population bottleneck characterized by infection by limited numbers of "transmitted/founder" (T/F) viruses. Characterization of T/F genomes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been integral to studies of transmission, immunopathogenesis, and vaccine development. Here, we describe the identification of complete T/F genomes of HCV by single-genome sequencing of plasma viral RNA from acutely infected subjects. A total of 2,739 single-genome-derived amplicons comprising 10,966,507 bp from 18 acute-phase and 11 chronically infected subjects were analyzed. Acute-phase sequences diversified essentially randomly, except for the poly(U/UC) tract, which was subject to polymerase slippage. Fourteen acute-phase subjects were productively infected by more than one genetically distinct virus, permitting assessment of recombination between replicating genomes. No evidence of recombination was found among 1,589 sequences analyzed. Envelope sequences of T/F genomes lacked transmission signatures that could distinguish them from chronic infection viruses. Among chronically infected subjects, higher nucleotide substitution rates were observed in the poly(U/UC) tract than in envelope hypervariable region 1. Fourteen full-length molecular clones with variable poly(U/UC) sequences corresponding to seven genotype 1a, 1b, 3a, and 4a T/F viruses were generated. Like most unadapted HCV clones, T/F genomes did not replicate efficiently in Huh 7.5 cells, indicating that additional cellular factors or viral adaptations are necessary for in vitro replication. Full-length T/F HCV genomes and their progeny provide unique insights into virus transmission, virus evolution, and virus-host interactions associated with immunopathogenesis. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 2% to 3% of the world

  1. Concordance of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers in detecting a founder event in Lake Clark sockeye salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstad, Kristina M.; Woody, Carol Ann; Habicht, Chris; Sage, G. Kevin; Seeb, James E.; Allendorf, Fred W.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic bottleneck effects can reduce genetic variation, persistence probability, and evolutionary potential of populations. Previous microsatellite analysis suggested a bottleneck associated with a common founding of sock-eye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka populations of Lake Clark, Alaska, about 100 to 400 generations ago. The common foundingevent occurred after the last glacial recession and resulted in reduced allelic diversity and strong divergence of Lake Clarksockeye salmon relative to neighboring Six Mile Lake and LakeIliamna populations. Here we used two additional genetic marker types (allozymes and mtDNA) to examine these patterns further. Allozyme and mtDNA results were congruent with the microsatellite data in suggesting a common founder event in LakeClark sockeye salmon and confirmed the divergence of Lake Clarkpopulations from neighboring Six Mile Lake and Lake Iliamna populations. The use of multiple marker types provided better understanding of the bottleneck in Lake Clark. For example, the Sucker Bay Lake population had an exceptionally severe reduction in allelic diversity at microsatellite loci, but not at mtDNA. This suggests that the reduced microsatellite variation in Sucker Bay Lake fish is due to consistently smaller effective population size than other Lake Clark populations, rather than a more acute or additional bottleneck since founding. Caution is urged in using reduced heterozygosity as a measure of genetic bottleneck effects because stochastic variance among loci resulted in an overall increase in allozyme heterozygosity within bottlenecked Lake Clark populations. However, heterozygosity excess, which assesses heterozygosity relative to allelic variation, detected genetic bottleneck effects in both allozyme and microsatellite loci. 

  2. Recurrent missense mutations in TMEM43 (ARVD5) due to founder effects cause arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies in the UK and Canada

    KAUST Repository

    Haywood, Annika

    2012-11-15

    AimsAutosomal dominant arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) (in the group of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies) is a common cause of sudden cardiac death in young adults. It is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with 12 loci (ARVC/D1-12) and eight genes identified, the majority of which encode structural proteins of cardiac desmosomes. The most recent gene identified, TMEM43, causes disease due to a missense mutation in a non-desmosomal gene (p.S358L) in 15 extended families from Newfoundland, Canada. To determine whether mutations in TMEM43 cause ARVC/D and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in other populations, we fully re-sequenced TMEM43 on 143 ARVC/D probands (families) from the UK and 55 probands (from 55 families) from Newfoundland.Methods and resultsBidirectional sequencing of TMEM43 including intron-exon boundaries revealed 33 variants, the majority located in non-coding regions of TMEM43. For the purpose of validation, families of probands with rare, potentially deleterious coding variants were subjected to clinical and molecular follow-up. Three missense variants of uncertain significance (p.R28W, p.E142K, p.R312W) were located in highly conserved regions of the TMEM43 protein. One variant (p.R312W) also co-segregated with relatives showing clinical signs of disease. Genotyping and expansion of the disease-associated haplotype in subjects with the p.R312W variant from Newfoundland, Canada, and the UK suggest common ancestry.ConclusionAlthough the p.R312W variant was found in controls (3/378), identification of an ancestral disease p R312W haplotype suggests that the p.R312W variant is a pathogenic founder mutation. © 2012 The Author.

  3. Impact of immune escape mutations on HIV-1 fitness in the context of the cognate transmitted/founder genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Hongshuo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modest change in HIV-1 fitness can have a significant impact on viral quasispecies evolution and viral pathogenesis, transmission and disease progression. To determine the impact of immune escape mutations selected by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL on viral fitness in the context of the cognate transmitted/founder (T/F genome, we developed a new competitive fitness assay using molecular clones of T/F genomes lacking exogenous genetic markers and a highly sensitive and precise parallel allele-specific sequencing (PASS method. Results The T/F and mutant viruses were competed in CD4+ T-cell enriched cultures, relative proportions of viruses were assayed after repeated cell-free passage, and fitness costs were estimated by mathematical modeling. Naturally occurring HLA B57-restricted mutations involving the TW10 epitope in Gag and two epitopes in Tat/Rev and Env were assessed independently and together. Compensatory mutations which restored viral replication fitness were also assessed. A principal TW10 escape mutation, T242N, led to a 42% reduction in replication fitness but V247I and G248A mutations in the same epitope restored fitness to wild-type levels. No fitness difference was observed between the T/F and a naturally selected variant carrying the early CTL escape mutation (R355K in Env and a reversion mutation in the Tat/Rev overlapping region. Conclusions These findings reveal a broad spectrum of fitness costs to CTL escape mutations in T/F viral genomes, similar to recent findings reported for neutralizing antibody escape mutations, and highlight the extraordinary plasticity and adaptive potential of the HIV-1 genome. Analysis of T/F genomes and their evolved progeny is a powerful approach for assessing the impact of composite mutational events on viral fitness.

  4. A common founder mutation of CERKL underlies autosomal recessive retinal degeneration with early macular involvement among Yemenite Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auslender, Noa; Sharon, Dror; Abbasi, Anan H; Garzozi, Hanna J; Banin, Eyal; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the genetic basis and clinical manifestations of a characteristic form of retinal degeneration in the Yemenite Jewish population. Haplotype analysis for all known genes and loci underlying autosomal recessive nonsyndromic retinal degeneration was performed in a Yemenite Jewish family segregating autosomal recessive severe retinal degeneration. The causative mutation was detected by direct sequencing of the underlying gene, and its prevalence in additional affected and unaffected Yemenite Jews was determined. Patients who were homozygous for this mutation underwent ophthalmic evaluation, including funduscopy, electroretinography, electro-oculography, perimetry, and color vision testing. In the studied Yemenite Jewish family, we found evidence for linkage to the CERKL gene. Direct sequencing revealed a novel homozygous splice-site mutation, c.238+1G>A. An in vitro splicing assay demonstrated that this mutation leads to incorrect splicing. c.238+1G>A was found to cause retinal degeneration in six additional Yemenite Jewish families. The carrier frequency of this mutation in the Yemenite Jewish population is 4.4%. All c.238+1G>A homozygotes manifest widespread progressive impairment of rod and cone function with early macular involvement. c.238+1G>A is the second reported mutation of CERKL and is a prevalent founder mutation that underlies approximately 33% of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration cases in the Yemenite Jewish population. It is associated with a characteristic retinal degeneration phenotype with early macular involvement, concomitant progression of rod and cone impairment, and characteristic fundus findings. The identification of this mutation and phenotype will facilitate molecular diagnosis, carrier screening, and genetic counseling in the Yemenite Jewish population.

  5. Founder representation and effective population size in old versus young breeds-genetic diversity of Finnish and Nordic Spitz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpulainen, M; Anderson, H; Svevar, T; Kangasvuo, I; Donner, J; Pohjoismäki, J

    2017-10-01

    Finnish Spitz is 130-year-old breed and has been highly popular in Finland throughout its history. Nordic Spitz is very similar to Finnish Spitz by origin and use, but is a relatively recent breed with much smaller population size. To see how breed age and breeding history have influenced the current population, we performed comprehensive population genetic analysis using pedigree data of 28,119 Finnish and 9,009 Nordic Spitzes combined with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from 135 Finnish and 110 Nordic Spitzes. We found that the Finnish Spitz has undergone repeated male bottlenecks resulting in dramatic loss of genetic diversity, reflected by 20 effective founders (f a ) and mean heterozygosity (Hz) of 0.313. The realized effective population size in the breed based on pedigree analysis (N¯ec) is 168, whereas the genetic effective population size (N eg ) computed the decay of linkage disequilibrium (r 2 ) is only 57 individuals. Nordic Spitz, although once been near extinction, has not been exposed to similar repeated bottlenecks than Finnish Spitz and had f a of 27 individuals. However, due to the smaller total population size, the breed has also smaller effective population size than Finnish Spitz (N¯ec = 98 and N eg  = 49). Interestingly, the r 2 data show that the effective population size has contracted dramatically since the establishment of the breed, emphasizing the role of breed standards as constrains for the breeding population. Despite the small population size, Nordic Spitz still maintains SNP heterozygosity levels similar to mixed breed dogs (mean Hz = 0.409). Our study demonstrates that although pedigree analyses cannot provide estimates of the present diversity within a breed, the effective population sizes inferred from them correlate with the genotyping results. The genetic relationships of the northern Spitz breeds and the benefits of the open breed registry are discussed. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Mitogenomic and microsatellite variation in descendants of the founder population of Newfoundland: high genetic diversity in an historically isolated population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A M; Carr, S M; Smith, K N; Marshall, H D

    2011-02-01

    The island of Newfoundland, the first of England's overseas colonies, was settled from the 17th century onward by restricted numbers of English, Irish, and French immigrants, in small "outport" communities that have maintained geographic, religious, and linguistic isolation to the latest generations. To measure the extent of modification and loss of genetic variation through founder effect, drift, and inbreeding in this historically isolated population, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes and 14 microsatellite loci from each of 27 individuals with matrilineal ancestries extending to the colonial period. Every individual has a unique mtDNA genome sequence. All but one of these genomes are assignable to one of five major (H,J,K,T, and U) or minor (I) European haplogroups. The possibility of homoplasy at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites that define subtypes within the H haplogroup is discussed. Observed haplogroup proportions do not differ significantly from those of western Europeans or between English and Irish Newfoundlanders. The exceptional individual is a member of haplogroup A2, who appears to be the descendant of a Mi'kmaq First Nations mother and a French father, a common marriage pattern in the early settlement of Newfoundland. Microsatellite diversity is high (HE = 0.763), unstructured with respect to mtDNA haplotype or ethnicity, and there is no evidence of linkage disequilibrium. There is a small but significant degree of inbreeding (FIS = 0.0174). Collection of whole mtDNA genome data was facilitated by the use of microarray sequencing, and we describe a simple algorithm that is 99.67% efficient for sequence recovery.

  7. Transmitted/Founder and Chronic HIV-1 Envelope Proteins Are Distinguished by Differential Utilization of CCR5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Zahra F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Wilen, Craig B.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Chikere, Kelechi C.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Didigu, Chuka A.; Berro, Reem; Klasse, Per Johan; Lee, Benhur; Moore, John P.; Shaw, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Infection by HIV-1 most often results from the successful transmission and propagation of a single virus variant, termed the transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Here, we compared the attachment and entry properties of envelope (Env) glycoproteins from T/F and chronic control (CC) viruses. Using a panel of 40 T/F and 47 CC Envs, all derived by single genome amplification, we found that 52% of clade C and B CC Envs exhibited partial resistance to the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc (MVC) on cells expressing high levels of CCR5, while only 15% of T/F Envs exhibited this same property. Moreover, subtle differences in the magnitude with which MVC inhibited infection on cells expressing low levels of CCR5, including primary CD4+ T cells, were highly predictive of MVC resistance when CCR5 expression levels were high. These results are consistent with previous observations showing a greater sensitivity of T/F Envs to MVC inhibition on cells expressing very high levels of CCR5 and indicate that CC Envs are often capable of recognizing MVC-bound CCR5, albeit inefficiently on cells expressing physiologic levels of CCR5. When CCR5 expression levels are high, this phenotype becomes readily detectable. The utilization of drug-bound CCR5 conformations by many CC Envs was seen with other CCR5 antagonists, with replication-competent viruses, and did not obviously correlate with other phenotypic traits. The striking ability of clade C and B CC Envs to use MVC-bound CCR5 relative to T/F Envs argues that the more promiscuous use of CCR5 by these Env proteins is selected against at the level of virus transmission and is selected for during chronic infection. PMID:23269796

  8. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Carlos Andrés; Torres, Diana

    2016-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9-12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed like other population groups without taking

  9. Dutch food bank recipients have poorer dietary intakes than the general and low-socioeconomic status Dutch adult population.

    OpenAIRE

    Neter, J E; Dijkstra, S C; Dekkers, A L M; Ocké, M C; Visser, M; Brouwer, I A

    2017-01-01

    Food-assistance program users are a specific group of nutritional concern, as they are often food insufficient and have poorer diet quality compared to non-food-assistance program users. The aim of our study was to assess dietary intake of Dutch food bank recipients (n = 167) and to compare this with dietary intake of a representative sample of the general population (Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS-all): n = 1933), including a low-socioeconomic status (SES) sample (DNFCS-low SE...

  10. Spains Dramatic Conquest of the Dutch Republic. Rodenburgh as a Literary Mediator of Spanish Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Vergeer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Theodore Rodenburgh was in an exceptional position to become a literary mediator of Spanish poetics. He introduced the comedia nueva in the Dutch Republic at the beginning of the seventeenth century. This article investigates specifically how Rodenburgh dealt with Lope de Vega’s poetics, transforming them to make them fit the Dutch literary tradition. Through translation, adaptation and acculturation, the Iberian comedias became Dutch tragicomedies, plays that would become most popular in the Dutch Republic. Rodenburgh’s endeavours mark the initial phase of the transfer of the comedia nueva to the Dutch Republic.

  11. Sexual harassment during clinical clerkships in Dutch medical schools.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Muijsenbergh, M.E.T.C. van den; Slappendel, G.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Borleffs, J.C.C.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Sexual harassment of medical students has been the focus of many international studies. Prevalence rates from 18% to over 60% have been reported. However, a Dutch study at Nijmegen Medical School found the prevalence rate to be lower (13.3% in the total group; 20% among female students

  12. Asset management strategies and sustainability in Dutch social housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, N.E.T.

    2004-01-01

    With 35% of the total housing stock in the Netherlands (Ministry of VROM, 2004), the social rented sector plays an important role in Dutch housing, and its management can be of great importance to the success or failure of sustainability programs. Although sustainable building has been high on the

  13. Genetically distinct Dutch-domesticated Clarias gariepinus used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because of its potential as an aquaculture species it has been widely used in aquaculture ventures in South Africa, specifically a stock known as Dutch catfish, a domesticated strain developed in the Netherlands. Mitochondrial DNA markers indicate that this stock is genetically distinct from the natural populations of C.

  14. Literary celebrity and the discourse on authorship in Dutch literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Literary celebrity results from a clash between two discursive configurations: literary authorship and popular celebrity. In order to gain an understanding of the contradictions that lie at the heart of literary celebrity, the authorial subjectivity of two Dutch authors are analyzed: Menno ter Braak

  15. Turkish and Moroccan Dutch professionals in social work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans van Ewijk; Peter Hendriks; dr Lia van Doorn

    2015-01-01

    Fulltext via link. This article describes the perspective of newly started female Turkish and Moroccan Dutch professionals in social work and explores how they connect to the social work profession. Social work in the Netherlands attracts many of these young ‘new’ professionals. These

  16. Experience of collaboration between a Dutch surgical team in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teams from a Dutch hospital and local teams of an orthopaedic hospital in Effiduase-Koforidua, Ghana. ... quality of care through education, management advice, and performing surgical interventions together with Ghanaian physicians/ surgeons. St. Joseph's Hospital ..... is mainly due to financial constraints with the result of.

  17. Performance-based maintenance procurement by Dutch housing associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straub, A.

    2004-01-01

    OTB Research institute has established a long-term research program to performance-based maintenance procurement in the technical management of housing stock. Stakeholders: housing associations, contractors and the Dutch Building Research Foundation are directly involved in this research program.

  18. The Dutch sociology of education: Its origins, significance and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, A.

    1996-01-01

    As in many other countries the Dutch sociology of education has blossomed into a fully-fledged specialised branch of sociology since the beginning of the 1970s. A tradition of policy-oriented research has also consolidated the position of the sociology of education at the universities. The strength

  19. END-OF-LIFE DECISIONS IN DUTCH NEONATOLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moratti, Sofia

    2010-01-01

    This contribution describes the regulation of end-of-life decisions in neonatology in the Netherlands. An account is given of the process of formulating rules, which includes a report by the Dutch Association for Paediatrics, two Court rulings, a report by a Consultation Group appointed by the

  20. Assessing peak aerobic capacity in Dutch law enforcement officers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittink, H.; Takken, T.; Groot, J.F. de; Reneman, M.; Peters, R.; Vanhees, L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To cross-validate the existing peak rate of oxygen consumption (VO2peak) prediction equations in Dutch law enforcement officers and to determine whether these prediction equations can be used to predict VO2peak for groups and in a single individual. A further objective was to report

  1. Elms and Dutch elm disease: a quick overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael. Marcotrigiano

    2017-01-01

    In the 1930s Dutch elm disease (DED) was accidentally introduced from Europe into the United States. It had a devastating impact on American elm (Ulmus americana) and its relatives in urban and riparian environments. In the United States, the three-part pathosystem for DED is unique in that the affected elm species are North American, the pathogen originated in Asia,...

  2. Tackling the problem of overweight and obesity : the Dutch approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renders, Carry M; Halberstadt, Jutka; Frenkel, Carolien S; Rosenmöller, Paul; Seidell, Jacob C; Hirasing, Remy A

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to share the Dutch experience of a nation-wide approach to reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity. This is an practice example of national health policy. METHODS: The Ministry of Health facilitates three complementary initiatives to tackle overweight

  3. Narcissistic Personality Inventory : Structure of the adapted Dutch version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    The present study examined the structure of a Dutch adaptation of the 40-item Narcissistic Personality Inventory (Raskin & Terry, 1988) in a community sample (n = 460) and a student sample (n = 515). Altering the response format of the NPI to a Likert-scale had no apparent effect on the responses.

  4. Exploring EFL Literature Approaches in Dutch Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemert, Jasmijn; Jansen, Ellen; van de Grift, Wim

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the inclusion of literature in foreign language (FL) curricula can be beneficial to language learners. Especially, the move towards integrated language and literature curricula is gaining ground. In this study we investigated the way English as a foreign language (EFL) is approached in Dutch secondary…

  5. Polyunsaturated fatty acid status of Dutch vegans and omnivores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, M R; Brouwer, D A; Hasperhoven, M B; Hettema, Y; Bemelmans, W J; Muskiet, F A

    2000-01-01

    We compared the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status of Dutch vegans and omnivores to investigate whether disparities can be explained by different diets and long chain PUFA (LCP) synthesis rates. Dietary intakes and fatty acid compositions of erythrocytes (RBC), platelets (PLT), plasma

  6. Organisational Factors and Teachers' Professional Development in Dutch Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Arnoud T.; van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Kreijns, Karel; Gerrichhauzen, John T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study that investigates the relationship between organisational factors, Teachers' Professional Development (TPD) and occupational expertise. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was administered among 152 Dutch teachers in secondary education. Findings: Analysis of the data revealed that of…

  7. The Dutch sentinel practice network: relevance for public health policy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelds, A.I.M.; Fracheboud, J.; Zee, J. van der

    1989-01-01

    The Dutch sentinal practice network: relevance for public health policy, considers the now 20-year history of the Continuous Morbidity Registration Sentinel Stations the Netherlands. The book consists of two parts. In the first part general aspects are discussed: the origin of the project at the end

  8. Purchase of Catastrophe Insurance by Dutch Dairy and Arable Farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogurtsov, V.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzed the impact of risk perception, risk attitude, and other farmer personal and farm characteristics on the actual purchase of catastrophe insurance by Dutch dairy and arable farmers. The specific catastrophe insurance types considered were hail–fire–storm insurance for buildings,

  9. An empirical analysis of capital structure decisions in Dutch firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A.

    1999-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis investigates capital structure decisions in Dutch firms. Firms are faced with the choice from a variety of sources of financing for the funding of their activities. These choices determine the firms' capital structures. Building on the well known theorems of Modigliani and Miller,

  10. Finding Vredo: the Dutch Supreme Court decision on escitalopram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoutsanis, A.

    2014-01-01

    This article is about the pharma patent litigation sparked by Lundbeck's blockbuster drug for escitalopram. The article focuses on the trials and tribulations before the Dutch Patent Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court, while also briefly contrasting and comparing this with the decisions in

  11. Dutch Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Broiler Welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Machiel; Zomer, Sigourney

    2017-01-01

    This article analyzes Dutch consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for the welfare of broiler chickens and the consequences for nonhuman animal welfare policies. Using data from a discrete-choice experiment and a random parameter logit model, this study showed that consumers particularly value

  12. The validity of the Dutch Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweere, Y.; Kerkhof, G.A.; de Weerd, A.W.; Kamphuisen, H.A.C.; Kemp, B.; Schimsheimer, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ) is a 176-item questionnaire designed to diagnose the presence of common sleep disorders. This study set out to assess the validity of a Dutch translation of the SDQ. 125 physician-referred patients (aged 16-82 yrs) with several sleep complaints and 20 controls

  13. Improved Collaborative Transport Planning at Dutch Logistics Service Provider Fritom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Paul; Lopez Alvarez, Jose Alejandro; Veenstra, Marjolein; Roodbergen, Kees Jan

    2016-01-01

    We study the collaborative transport planning for two autonomous business units of Fritom, a Dutch logistics service provider. This difficult planning problem does not fit any existing type of vehicle routing problem proposed in the academic literature; therefore, we define a new problem class, the

  14. Hepatitis C infection and viremia in Dutch hemophilia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauser-Bunschoten, E. P.; Bresters, D.; van Drimmelen, A. A.; Roosendaal, G.; Cuypers, H. T.; Reesink, H. W.; van der Poel, C. L.; van den Berg, H. M.; Lelie, P. N.

    1995-01-01

    Serum samples from 316 patients visiting the Dutch National Hemophilia Center were collected from 1979 to 1993 and stored at -30 degrees C. Patients were placed into three different groups: 1) patients ever treated with large pool non-hepatitis C virus (HCV)-safe concentrate (n = 179); 2) patients

  15. Nursing home and nursing home physician: the Dutch experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, J.M.G.A.; Crebolder, H.F.J.M.; Weel, C. van

    2004-01-01

    Dutch nursing home care today includes a broad range of institutional and outreaching care functions. Medical care is an essential part of this care. Nursing home medicine in The Netherlands has developed as an officially acknowledged medical specialty. This is unique because The Netherlands is the

  16. Photographs in Dutch History Textbooks: Quantity, type and educational use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kleppe (Martijn)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis article demonstrates a media scientific approach by studying the use of photographs in Dutch History textbooks for High School pupils in the period 1970 – 2000. The quantity of photos has been determined as well as the types of pictures and its use as educational tool. Results show

  17. Changes in the professional domain of Dutch dental hygienists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jerkovic, K.; van Offenbeek, M.A.; Slot, D.E.; van der Schans, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective:  This study’s purpose was to compare the scope of practice of Dutch dental hygienists educated through a two- or three-year curriculum (‘old curriculum dental hygienists’ [OCDHs]) with that of hygienists educated through a new extended four-year curriculum leading to a bachelor’s degree

  18. Changes in the professional domain of Dutch dental hygienists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jerkovic, K.; van Offenbeek, M. A. G.; Slot, D. E.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study's purpose was to compare the scope of practice of Dutch dental hygienists educated through a two- or three-year curriculum ('old curriculum dental hygienists' [OCDHs]) with that of hygienists educated through a new extended four-year curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree

  19. Effect of Dutch waste policy on methane emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    For various reasons, Dutch waste policy has been dramatically changed in the last decade. Prevention of soil and groundwater pollution and a reduced occupation of the scarce space were important reasons for this change. An important effect of this policy is a reduction of the amount of organic

  20. Measuring structural (un)safety in the Dutch building industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwel, K.C.; Waarts, P; E Rademaeker, de

    2010-01-01

    The last 10 years the Dutch Building Industry was shocked by several major accidents. In 2001 the steel structure of a theatre in Hoorn collapsed during erection. No one was hurt, because it collapsed during the night. In 2002 part of the parking deck of a hotel collapsed just some time after a