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Sample records for dutch hospital pharmacies

  1. Detection and correct handling of prescribing errors in Dutch hospital pharmacies using test patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beex-Oosterhuis, Marieke M; de Vogel, Ed M; van der Sijs, Heleen; Dieleman, Hetty G; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A

    2013-12-01

    Hospital pharmacists and pharmacy technicians play a major role in detecting prescribing errors by medication surveillance. At present the frequency of detected and correctly handled prescribing errors is unclear, as are factors associated with correct handling. To examine the frequency of detection of prescribing errors and the frequency of correct handling, as well as factors associated with correct handling of prescribing errors by hospital pharmacists and pharmacy technicians. This study was conducted in 57 Dutch hospital pharmacies. Prospective observational study with test patients, using a case-control design to identify factors associated with correct handling. A questionnaire was used to collect the potential factors. Test patients containing prescribing errors were developed by an expert panel of hospital pharmacists (a total of 40 errors in nine medication records divided among three test patients; each test patient was used in 3 rounds; on average 4.5 prescribing error per patient per round). Prescribing errors were defined as dosing errors or therapeutic errors (contra-indication, drug-drug interaction, (pseudo)duplicate medication). The errors were selected on relevance and unequivocalness. The panel also defined how the errors should be handled in practice using national guidelines and this was defined as 'correct handling'. The test patients had to be treated as real patients while conducting medication surveillance. The pharmacists and technicians were asked to report detected errors to the investigator. The percentages of detected and correctly handled prescribing errors were the main outcome measures. Factors associated with correct handling were determined, using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Fifty-nine percent of the total number of intentionally added prescribing errors were detected and 57 % were handled correctly by the hospital pharmacists and technicians. The use of a computer system for medication surveillance compared to no

  2. Designing a modern hospital pharmacy.

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    Kay, B G; Boyar, R L; Raspante, P S

    1986-02-01

    Cooperation between the pharmacy director and the hospital's architects in planning a modern hospital pharmacy is described. The pharmacy director at an 870-bed voluntary nonprofit institution and the hospital's architects planned the design for a new 3250-square foot pharmacy department. They developed a preliminary floor plan based on the following functions that the pharmacy would perform: centralized unit dose drug distribution; compounding; bulk and unit dose prepackaging; preparation of sterile products; controlled substance storage; outpatient and employee prescription dispensing; reserve stock storage; purchasing, receiving, and inventory control; drug information services; and administrative services. A final floor plan was designed that incorporated these functions with structural and utility requirements, such as placement of the computer system and dispensing and lighting fixtures. By integrating modern material management concepts with contemporary hospital pharmacy practice, the pharmacy director and the hospital's architects were able to plan and construct a pharmacy that receives, processes, and dispenses medication efficiently.

  3. Sisters in Dutch hospitals.

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    van den Bergh-Braam, A H

    1985-11-01

    This study focuses on hospital sisters in 30 Dutch hospitals. The so-called role-set approach has been adopted. In this approach the sisters are the focal persons. Direct superiors, specialists, registered nurses and student nurses acted as role-senders. The possible number of respondents is 600 (120 of each group). The response of hospital sisters is 100%, that of role-senders 88%. The study started out as an attempt to collect background information on the causes of wastage of sisters. High wastage rates are generally regarded as an indication of an unfavourable working environment. Since hospital sisters occupy a key position in hospitals, the ward problems will be studied from their angle. Although wastage rates have dropped recently, it does not necessarily follow that the working environment has improved. Wastage is known to act as a safety valve, thus allowing tensions to resolve. The threat of unemployment clogs this outlet, which increases the tensions on the hospital ward. Data from the study show that work overload is one of the major stress factors for sisters. Analyses demonstrated that there exists a relationship between work overload and tensions with the management and direct superiors, tensions in job execution, irritableness on the ward, low self-esteem, health complaints and psychological condition. Sisters with an excessive job involvement refer to work overload more often than their moderate colleagues. There is a relationship between an unfavourable working environment and irritableness of sisters.

  4. Diversification strategies for hospital pharmacies.

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    Smith, J E; Phillips, D J; Meyer, G E

    1984-09-01

    Several ways used by the pharmacy department of a large university hospital to generate revenue through diversification are described. The department offers its facilities and staff as a resource in training medical service representatives for several pharmaceutical manufacturers, which is projected to provide $85,000 in net income for fiscal year (FY) 1983-84. The pharmacy department also conducts a six-month program for training pharmacy technicians, which yields a small net profit. The pharmacy department actively participates in educational programs such as college courses and clerkships earning extra income. An apothecary-style outpatient pharmacy was set up under a for-profit corporation. Services have been expanded to include the preparation of i.v. solutions that support home care. A durable medical equipment (DME) business is planned. The ambulatory and home-care programs are expected to generate approximately $165,000 in net profit next year. Contract pharmaceutical services are provided to another hospital. The net income generated through diversification in this pharmacy department will exceed $250,000 in FY 1983-84.

  5. Changes in antibiotic use in Dutch hospitals over a six-year period: 1997 to 2002.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, T.B.; Filius, F.M.; Linden, P.D. van der; Janknegt, R.; Natsch, S.S.; Vulto, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse trends in antibiotic use in Dutch hospitals over the period 1997 to 2002. METHODS: Data on the use of antibiotics and hospital resource indicators were obtained by distributing a questionnaire to all Dutch hospital pharmacies. Antibiotic use was expressed as the number of defin

  6. Changes in antibiotic use in Dutch hospitals over a six-year period: 1997 to 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.B. Liem; P.D. van der Linden; R. Janknegt; S. Natsch; A.G. Vulto (Arnold); P.M.G. Filius (Margreet)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To analyse trends in antibiotic use in Dutch hospitals over the period 1997 to 2002. METHODS: Data on the use of antibiotics and hospital resource indicators were obtained by distributing a questionnaire to all Dutch hospital pharmacies. Antibiotic use was ex

  7. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF HOSPITAL PHARMACY MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Paradis, Johanne; Gauthier, Jacques-Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The lack of interest of researchers in relation to question of hospital pharmacy management, and the status quo of existing managerial practices serving the reforms, justifies analysis of theoretical foundations of hospital pharmacy management. The objective is twofold. First, provide an overview of the socio-historical eras of the organizational theories in order to position the hospital pharmacy management on the axis of the changing ways of thinking about the organization and management. S...

  8. Parenteral nutrition in hospital pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram Gamal; Al-Taweel, Dalal; Matar, Kamal Mohamed; Kombian, Samuel B

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this service. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive, qualitative study about PN practices was conducted from June 2012 to February 2013 in Kuwait. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews with the head total parenteral nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at seven hospitals using a developed questionnaire. The questionnaire obtained information about the PN service at each hospital including the existence of nutritional support teams (NSTs), PN preparation practices, quality controls and guidelines/protocols. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for content. Findings - Seven hospitals in Kuwait provided PN preparation service through TPN units within hospital pharmacies. Functional NSTs did not exist in any of these hospitals. All TPN units used paper-based standard PN order forms for requesting PN. The content of PN order forms and PN formulas labeling information were inconsistent across hospitals. Most of the prepared PN formulas were tailor-made and packed in single compartment bags. Quality controls used included gravimetric analysis and visual inspection of PN formulations, and less consistently reported periodic evaluation of the aseptic techniques. Six TPN units independently developed PN guidelines/protocols. Originality/value - This study revealed variations in many aspects of PN practices among the hospitals in Kuwait and provided recommendations to improve this service. Standardization of PN practices would enhance the quality of care provided to patients receiving PN and facilitate national monitoring. This can be accomplished through the involvement of healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition support working within proactive NSTs.

  9. Motivational theory applied to hospital pharmacy practice.

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    Grace, M

    1980-12-01

    In recent years a great deal of attention has been paid to motivation and job satisfaction among hospital pharmacy practitioners. Institutional pharmacy managers should become more aware of ways in which they can motivate members of their staff. Specifically, Frederick Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory is discussed in reference to its origination, major tenets, and practical applications in institutional pharmacy practice settings. Principally, Herzberg's theory explains needs of workers in terms of extrinsic factors called "hygienes" and intrinsic factors called "motivators." The theory suggests that job satisfaction and dissatisfaction are not opposites but two separate dimensions. According to this theory, an employee will be motivated if the task allows for the following: 1)actual achievement, 2) recognition for achievement, 3) increased responsibility, 4) opportunity for growth (professionally), and 5) chance for advancement. It is concluded that some of these suggested applications can be useful to managers who are faced with low morale among the members of their staff.

  10. An Evaluation of the Education of Hospital Pharmacy Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Robert S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hospital pharmacy directors ranked their academic needs as: personnel and financial management (greatest), computers, hospital organization, clinical pharmacy practice, traditional pharmacy practice, and statistics. Those with MBAs perceived themselves stronger in these areas than did those with other degrees. Only MBAs and MSs felt adequately…

  11. A Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy Management Leading to an MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA and Residency.

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    Blair, Jan N.; Lipman, Arthur G.

    1981-01-01

    A combined program leading to the MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA, and Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy established at the University of Utah in 1978 is described. The program provides coursework in both hospital pharmacy and management plus practical experience in hospital pharmacy practice management. (Author/MLW)

  12. A Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy Management Leading to an MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA and Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jan N.; Lipman, Arthur G.

    1981-01-01

    A combined program leading to the MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA, and Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy established at the University of Utah in 1978 is described. The program provides coursework in both hospital pharmacy and management plus practical experience in hospital pharmacy practice management. (Author/MLW)

  13. SOME ASPECTS OF DEVELOPMENT OF HOSPITAL PHARMACY ABROAD

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    Y. V. Miroshnichenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We considered a number of aspects of the development of hospital pharmacy abroad. It is revealed that the focus of professional pharmaceutical associations in the information and educational fields creates the basis for creation of strategy of development of hospital pharmacy. The analysis of population dynamics of pharmaceutical staff in hospital pharmaciesis held, and the detailed characteristics of activities of certain categories of specialists of hospital pharmacies is presented.

  14. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

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    Oliver W. Holmes III, Pharm.D. Candidate 2013

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages.Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used.Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals.Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.

  15. Use of pharmacy informatics resources by clinical pharmacy services in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Gregory T; Weeks, Douglas L

    2009-11-01

    The use of pharmacy informatics resources by clinical pharmacy services and the presence of a pharmacy informatics specialist in acute care hospitals were evaluated. Two hundred randomly selected pharmacies in general medical and surgical hospitals in the United States with at least 100 acute care beds were surveyed via mail. Survey items gathered information regarding facility attributes, opinions about staff pharmacists' understanding of information technology, and departmental utilization of pharmacy informatics. Of the 200 surveys mailed, 114 (57%) were returned completed. When asked to rate their departments' use of pharmacy informatics, 82% indicated that pharmacy informatics use was good or fair, while 12% considered information use to be optimized. A majority of respondents (60%) indicated that a pharmacy informatics specialist was employed within the pharmacy, with 47% indicating that the specialist was a pharmacist. An overwhelming percentage of these pharmacists received informatics training on the job, and roughly half had specialty positions integrated into their pharmacist job description. No significant association existed between the use of pharmacy informatics and facility teaching status (teaching versus nonteaching), geographic location (urban versus rural), or use of computerized prescriber order entry. Employment of a pharmacy informatics specialist was significantly associated with the use of such informatics applications as database mining, renal-dosing-rules engines, antibiotic-pathogen matching-rules engines, and pharmacokinetic-monitoring rules engines. The use of clinical pharmacy informatics in patient care in acute care hospitals with at least 100 beds was significantly more likely when a pharmacy informatics specialist was present in the pharmacy. However, 4 in 10 hospital pharmacies did not employ a pharmacy informatics specialist.

  16. Hospital diversification: how to involve the pharmacy.

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    Smith, J E; Black, B L

    1987-05-01

    Participation by hospital pharmacy departments in planning and development of diversified services is described. Diversification requires market planning. Seven basic marketing steps are identification of mission, goals, and objectives; identification of growth strategies (market penetration, market development, product development, and diversification); market analysis of external factors (size, growth, and logistics; reimbursement and financial considerations; competition; regulatory issues; and legal issues); market analysis of internal factors (departmental organization and reporting lines, demographics of the institution, and costs and productivity associated with the new service); program development and design; implementation; and evaluation. Hospitals can diversify by expanding acute-care services through management contracts and mergers; developing new services to include long-term-care, ambulatory-care, occupational-health, and wellness programs; starting other health-care ventures, such as consulting, continuing medical education, and continuing education for nurses; and expanding into non-health-care businesses. Vertical diversification is finding new markets for existing services; horizontal diversification is development of new services for new markets. To diversify, an institution may need to change its corporate structure; it may form a family of corporations that includes a university, nonprofit hospitals, holding companies, for-profit corporations, joint ventures, and service organizations. Through diversification, institutions and pharmacy departments can create alternative sources of funding and offer more comprehensive services to patients.

  17. Pharmacy practice in small and rural hospitals in Illinois--2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumock, Glen T; Ursan, Iulia D; Crawford, Stephanie Y; Walton, Surrey M; Donnelly, Andrew J

    2013-07-01

    The results of a 2011 survey evaluating pharmacy services at small and rural Illinois hospitals are presented and compared with data from similar surveys in 2001 and 1991. A questionnaire modeled on the previous survey instruments but updated to reflect contemporary pharmacy practice was mailed to pharmacy directors at 86 small hospitals (i.e., hospitals (i.e., located outside metropolitan areas). The response rate was 46.5%. The survey data indicated that 57.5% of hospitals represented in the 2011 survey had a centralized drug distribution system, 35.0% had a hybrid system, and 7.5% had a decentralized system. The most commonly reported form of technology was automated dispensing cabinets, which were in use at 75.0% of hospitals in 2011, compared with 34.8% of hospitals represented in the 2001 survey. Barcode verification of medication doses before dispensing and at the time of administration was performed at 50% and 70% of hospitals, respectively. While the provision of clinical pharmacy services has risen sharply since 1991, substantial changes were not observed between 2001 and 2011 except in the provision of compliance and drug histories (67.6% of hospitals in 2011 versus 46.8% in 2001) and pharmacist participation in medical emergency responses (54.0% versus 34.0%). A 2011 survey of pharmacy departments in small and rural Illinois hospitals provided information on the use of automation and health information technologies and showed changes in the provision of many clinical pharmacy services since 1991.

  18. The art of governance of Dutch hospitals.

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    Hoek, H

    1999-01-01

    Hospitals in The Netherlands are governed by two boards: The Board of Directors, the legal representative of the hospital, responsible for strategic and operational business activities; and the Supervisory Board, made up of co-opted volunteers and responsible for checking and approving of the major decisions of the Board of Directors. The question which arises is whether the system of governance is able to function appropriately and guarantee enough concern about general health problems, moral and ethical questions and the interest of the patients. This paper investigate the successes and shortfalls of such a system of governance in Dutch hospitals. The results and conclusions determine that although copied from the corporate governance model, it does not function well in an environment where the influence of patients and the inhabitants of the region are of great importance and shareholders do not exist.

  19. A Comparison of Community and Hospital Pharmacy Preceptors.

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    Brown, Charles H.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study that seeks to determine, quantitatively and qualitatively, the effectiveness of externship preceptors in training Purdue University students to practice pharmacy in community and hospital environments is described. Variables that can effect externships are appended. (JMD)

  20. Labour Market Segmentation: An Investigation into the Dutch Hospitality Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bispo

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAlmost 42,000 establishments, over 310,000 employees and approximately 13 billion Euro annual turnover (including VAT). This, in a nutshell, captures the Dutch hospitality industry in 2005. The aim of this study is to examine the functioning of the labour market in the Dutch hospitality

  1. Labour Market Segmentation: An Investigation into the Dutch Hospitality Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bispo

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAlmost 42,000 establishments, over 310,000 employees and approximately 13 billion Euro annual turnover (including VAT). This, in a nutshell, captures the Dutch hospitality industry in 2005. The aim of this study is to examine the functioning of the labour market in the Dutch hospitality

  2. Medication Incidents Related to Automated Dose Dispensing in Community Pharmacies and Hospitals - A Reporting System Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A. G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. Methods The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR) reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. Main Outcome Measures Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. Results From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4%) incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6%) incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8%) were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2%) were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%). The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. Conclusion A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an incident

  3. Quality indicators for pharmaceutical care: a comprehensive set with national scores for Dutch community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Martina; Schoenmakers, Tim; Kylstra, Nico; Mosk, Berend; Bouvy, Marcel L; van de Vaart, Frans; De Smet, Peter A G M; Wensing, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Background The quality of pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies in the Netherlands has been assessed annually since 2008. The initial set has been further developed with pharmacists and patient organizations, the healthcare inspectorate, the government and health insurance companies. The set over 2012 was the first set of quality indicators for community pharmacies which was validated and supported by all major stakeholders. The aims of this study were to describe the validated set of quality indicators for community pharmacies and to report their scores over 2012. In subanalyses the score development over 5 years was described for those indicators, that have been surveyed before and remained unchanged. Methods Community pharmacists in the Netherlands were invited in 2013 to provide information for the set of 2012. Quality indicators were mapped by categories relevant for pharmaceutical care and defined for structures, processes and dispensing outcomes. Scores for categorically-measured quality indicators were presented as the percentage of pharmacies reporting the presence of a quality aspect. For numerical quality indicators, the mean of all reported scores was expressed. In subanalyses for those indicators that had been questioned previously, scores were collected from earlier measurements for pharmacies providing their scores in 2012. Multilevel analysis was used to assess the consistency of scores within one pharmacy over time by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Results For the set in 2012, 1739 Dutch community pharmacies (88 % of the total) provided information for 66 quality indicators in 10 categories. Indicator scores on the presence of quality structures showed relatively high quality levels. Scores for processes and dispensing outcomes were lower. Subanalyses showed that overall indicators scores improved within pharmacies, but this development differed between pharmacies. Conclusions A set of validated quality indicators provided

  4. Offering Clinical Pharmacy Clerkship in Hospital for Pharmacy Student: A Successful Cooperation between Medical and Pharmacy Schools

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    Kaveh Eslami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacy education has been changed in recent years. Pharmacy students need more practical and clinical skills which come from direct interaction with patients and other health care providers. To achieve this, students need more effective courses and clerkships. In this paper we describe our method to design and evaluate clinical pharmacy clerkship for the first time in Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (AJUMS.Methods: To  determine  the  most  beneficial way  of  education  we  designed  a  pilot  study  in educational hospital of AJUMS. After analyzing the conclusions from pilot study, 40 fifth year pharmacy student divided in ten groups and each group had a six week rotation in three different wards under supervision of medical residents. Each student was asked to provide evaluations during six total weeks of three different rotation sites.Results and Discussion: Clinical pharmacy clerkship led to successfully improved clinical skills for students such as being familiar with different practice environments, direct communication whit patients and medical team and participation in direct patient care activities. All the students participate in the course could pass the final exam and 85% of students believed this would be a necessary education course in their clerkship programs. Although there were some problems but pharmacy students benefited from this course and it gives them advantages in clinical knowledge and professional communication skills.

  5. Ethnic inequalities in patient safety in Dutch hospital care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rosse, F.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis shows the first results of Dutch studies on the relation between ethnicity and patient safety. We used mixed methods to identify patient safety outcomes and patient safety risks in a cohort study in 4 urban hospitals among 763 Dutch patients and 576 ethnic minority patients. In a record

  6. Development of a supervisory skills course for hospital pharmacy workplaces.

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    Woloschuk, Donna M M; Raymond, Colette B

    2010-07-01

    Many Canadian hospital pharmacies are experiencing difficulties recruiting supervisory personnel. It was expected that, through a "learning-by-doing" course, pharmacy staff would learn to apply basic skills in the day-to-day supervision of pharmacy operations and human resources and to apply the principles of supervisory documentation. A supervisory skills course targeted to pharmacy staff members was developed and implemented by the pharmacy department of a large urban health region. The course was initially offered to practising pharmacy technicians. The course design emphasized a constructivist framework incorporating authentic learning and reflective practice during seminars, with experiential and self-directed learning in the workplace. Preceptors assisted learners to achieve the course goals. Learners and preceptors provided feedback about hours spent (as the course progressed) and about their satisfaction with the course itself (at the end of the course). Learners and preceptors completed a post-program evaluation 2 months after completing the course to help in the assessment of the transfer of learning (lasting impact) associated with the course. Overall performance in the course was assessed on a pass/fail basis. Eighteen pharmacy technicians were admitted to the program, but one withdrew because of a job change. All learners successfully completed the course. Two months after the course, learners and preceptors described enhanced organization, time management, leadership, communication, and conflict-resolution skills on the part of learners, as well as their increased confidence, maturity, and ability to supervise staff. Learners' evaluations revealed a broadened perspective of pharmacy. The preceptors valued the enhancement of learners' skills and their increased enthusiasm. At the time of writing, 6 of the participants had secured supervisory positions. Creating formal instruction that engages pharmacy staff to pursue management positions is challenging

  7. Lack of Pharmacy Access May Send Some Seniors Back to Hospital

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    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160255.html Lack of Pharmacy Access May Send Some Seniors Back to Hospital ... Aug. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Limited access to pharmacies may be one reason hospital readmission is more ...

  8. Acute intoxications: differences in management between six Dutch hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duineveld, C.; Vroegop, M.; Schouren, L.; Hoedemaekers, A.; Schouten, J.A.; Moret-Hartman, M.; Kramers, C.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acute intoxications are frequently seen in Dutch hospitals. Based on single-centre studies and the fact that there are no clear guidelines, we hypothesised that hospital admission of acute intoxications may vary. Furthermore, decontamination treatment of poisonings may differ between hospit

  9. Acute intoxications: differences in management between six Dutch hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duineveld, C.; Vroegop, M.; Schouren, L.; Hoedemaekers, A.; Schouten, J.A.; Moret-Hartman, M.; Kramers, C.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acute intoxications are frequently seen in Dutch hospitals. Based on single-centre studies and the fact that there are no clear guidelines, we hypothesised that hospital admission of acute intoxications may vary. Furthermore, decontamination treatment of poisonings may differ between hospit

  10. Evolution of Hospital-based Pharmacy Teaching Programs from 1989-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raehl, Cynthia; Bond, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Analyzed databases from four U.S. National Clinical Pharmacy Services Studies and the American Hospital Association for trends in hospital involvement in pharmacy education. Detailed findings indicated that clinical pharmacy services within the nation's teaching hospitals are not standardized and that financial pressures impede a full, consistent…

  11. Pharmacy Students' Self-Identified Interests in a Hospital Pharmacy Internship Course in Iran

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    Fatemeh Ranjbar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: After revision of pharmacy curriculum by, Iranian Health and Education Ministry reviewed in 2005, it was decided that pharmacy students need extra internship courses such as hospital internship course. Hospital internship course could provide students with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and master the skills required for current pharmacy practices in community and hospital setting. The aim of this study was to identify and analyze pharmacy students’ experiences during hospital internship. Methods: Each student attended in 3 wards and provided a logbook for each ward. Students were asked to document at least one topic interesting for them on each day. The collected information was divided into sections and analyzed using SPSS ver 14. Results: Seventeen students enrolled in the course. Endocrinology and nephrology wards had the highest and neurology the lowest number of attended students. Seven hundred and one reported learning subjects were divided into 24 areas. The highest numbers of reported topics were the drugs indications, adverse drug reactions and diagnosis of diseases while the lowest number was pretreatment laboratory tests, pharmacoeconomy, counseling medical staffs and off label use of medications. Gastroenterology and endocrinology wards with 210 reports had the highest and neurology ward with 12 had the lowest number of reports. Conclusion: Completing the logbooks was an encouragement for students to seek and document and learn new topics and also a major feature of the clinical assessment scheme of the course. The majority of the reported topics were learning objectives but not the interventional ones. The present study showed us some areas of pharmacy education which need further attention.

  12. Status of IT in Dutch Hospitals in 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, Irene; Goossen, William

    2013-01-01

    The IT-monitor gives an overview on the use and implementation of information technology (IT) in general and university hospitals in the Netherlands. Using the questionnaire, earlier applied in Germany and Austria, all Dutch hospitals were requested to participate, of which 20% responded. The result

  13. Acute intoxications: differences in management between six Dutch hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duineveld, C.; Vroegop, M.; Schouren, L.; Hoedemaekers, A.; Schouten, J.A.; Moret-Hartman, M.; Kramers, C.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acute intoxications are frequently seen in Dutch hospitals. Based on single-centre studies and the fact that there are no clear guidelines, we hypothesised that hospital admission of acute intoxications may vary. Furthermore, decontamination treatment of poisonings may differ between

  14. Application of Kanban System on a hospital pharmacy.

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    Mitka, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief overview of principles, views and methods, of the Kanban System for the pharmacy of a general hospital. The main goal is the reduction of stores managed by the pharmacy, as well as improvement of the mode of operation. Solutions to problems, such as inadequate storage space, the delay in serving patients or clinics and the expiration of various pharmaceutical formulations, stored for so long time, are provided. The philosophy behind the Kanban procurement System and specifically its applicability to a pharmacy underperforming in terms of efficiency, in Greece, are described. Based on the analysis of stock requirement, item stock prices and demand, it is concluded that a significant percentage of the stocked drugs can be procured using the Kanban System. Significant cost savings and operational advantages following the Kanban System will take place. The challenging endeavor is the analysis, design and application of a system that supports the proposed procurement method. Hospital pharmacies in Greece and in other countries that face an economic crisis may largely benefit after using the Kanban System.

  15. The Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research: a network of community and hospital pharmacies in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ellen S; Blom, Lyda; Philbert, Daphne; Rump, Willem; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2014-08-01

    Practice-based networks can serve as effective mechanisms for the development of the profession of pharmacists, on the one hand by supporting student internships and on the other hand by collection of research data and implementation of research outcomes among public health practice settings. This paper presents the characteristics and benefits of the Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research, a practice based research network affiliated with the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Utrecht University. Yearly, this network is used to realize approximately 600 student internships (in hospital and community pharmacies) and 20 research projects. To date, most research has been performed in community pharmacy and research questions frequently concerned prescribing behavior or adherence and subjects related to uptake of regulations in the pharmacy setting. Researchers gain access to different types of data from daily practice, pharmacists receive feedback on the functioning of their own pharmacy and students get in depth insight into pharmacy practice.

  16. Availability of snacks, candy and beverages in hospital, community clinic and commercial pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Anne; Simon, Anna; French, Simone A; Wolfson, Julian

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure the availability of energy-dense foods and sugar-sweetened beverages in pharmacies and to examine differences by pharmacy type and presence of a food policy. Trained research staff visited pharmacies (n 37) to measure shelf space and variety of snacks, candy and sugar-sweetened beverages available within 10 ft (3·05 m) of the pharmacy register. Community clinic, hospital and commercial pharmacies in Minneapolis, MN, USA. Employees were interviewed regarding pharmacy food policies. Approximately 60 % of pharmacies had foods and/or sugar-sweetened beverages available for purchase within 10 ft (3·05 m) of the pharmacy register. Total shelf space (P = 0·02) and variety (P = 0·0003) differed significantly by pharmacy type and were greatest among community clinic pharmacies. Over half of pharmacies had no food policy (58·3 %). Pharmacies with food policies were less likely to have foods/beverages available within 10 ft (3·05 m) of the pharmacy register than pharmacies with no food policies (P = 0·03). Candy, snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages are highly available in the pharmacy environment. Presence of a policy is associated with less food availability within 10 ft (3·05 m) of the pharmacy register and represents an important potential intervention strategy.

  17. Medication incidents related to automated dose dispensing in community pharmacies and hospitals--a reporting system study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Bouvy, Marcel L; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A G M

    2014-01-01

    Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR) reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4%) incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6%) incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8%) were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2%) were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%). The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an incident.

  18. Human resources management for a hospital pharmacy department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, P A

    1989-06-01

    The concepts of human resources management (HRM) are presented, and the application of HRM concepts to a hospital pharmacy department is described. Low salaries and poor working conditions had precipitated a mass exodus of pharmacists from a 650-bed, tertiary-care medical center. The newly hired director of pharmacy sought to rebuild the department by developing a three-stage HRM model consisting of needs forecasting, performance management, and advanced management systems. In the needs-forecasting stage, the strengths and weaknesses of departmental programs were determined through analysis of existing standards of practice, situational analysis, and financial analyses; the strengths and weaknesses of departmental employees were determined through the use of talent inventories, turnover analysis, analysis of time and leave records, reevaluation of the department's job classifications, performance and productivity evaluations, and productivity evaluations, and development of a philosophy of practice and mission statement. Needs and problems were addressed by examining each existing program and developing new policies and procedures, performance standards, quality assurance mechanisms, and productivity expectations. Personnel needs and problems were addressed by designing a system of differentiated career ladders, contracting with pharmacists for career moves, developing the skills of currently employed pharmacists, and implementing a succession planning model. The model has been in place for approximately three years and is beginning to yield the desired results. Application of HRM concepts to a hospital pharmacy department appears to have been successful in improving employee morale and in helping the department to meet goals of expanded and improved services.

  19. Costs and effects of MRSA control in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenberg, M.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the Netherlands the prevalence of MRSA among S. aureus bloodstream isolates was as low as 0.7% in 2008. This low prevalence is maintained by a nationwide MRSA policy (also called search and destroy), that has been employed in Dutch hospitals since 1984. In the last years we have witnessed major c

  20. Attitude of Dutch hospital personnel towards influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Dool, C; Van Strien, A M; den Akker, I Looijmans-Van; Bonten, M J M; Sanders, E A; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the Dutch Health Council recommended influenza vaccination of all institutional healthcare workers (HCWs). In this questionnaire study largely based on the health belief model we assessed the attitude and intentions of hospital personnel towards such vaccination. We sent out 220 questionnai

  1. Direct medical costs of adverse events in Dutch hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhout, L.H.F.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Wagner, C.; Zegers, M.; Waaijman, R.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Asscheman, H.; Wal, G. van der; Tulder, M.W. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Up to now, costs attributable to adverse events (AEs) and preventable AEs in the Netherlands were unknown. We assessed the total direct medical costs associated with AEs and preventable AEs in Dutch hospitals to gain insight in opportunities for cost savings. METHODS: Trained nurses and

  2. Comparison of pharmacy services at critical access hospitals and other rural and small hospitals in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Stephanie Y; Schumock, Glen T; Ursan, Iulia D; Ursan, Julia D; Walton, Surrey M; Donnelly, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    The results of a survey evaluating pharmacy services and technology use at critical access hospitals (CAHs) and other small and rural hospitals in Illinois are reported. A mail survey was sent to pharmacy directors at 86 CAHs and other rural and small hospitals in Illinois not designated as CAHs. Independent sample t tests and chi-square statistics were used to compare CAHs and non-CAHs in areas such as pharmacy services, staffing, use of technology, and sterile compounding practices. The survey response rate was 46.5%, with usable data received from 40 hospitals. Analysis of the survey data indicated that hospitals designated as CAHs were significantly less likely than non-CAHs to have automatic therapeutic interchange policies (p = 0.012) and more likely to conduct pharmacist-provided educational programs on medication costs for physicians and other health care personnel (p = 0.037). Relative to non-CAHs, CAHs were significantly less likely to have automated dispensing cabinets (p = 0.016) and to out-source the preparation of sterile products to offsite vendors (p = 0.012); pharmacy directors at CAHs were less likely to report the use of technology for remote medication order entry or review (p = 0.038). At both types of facilities, pharmacists typically have both distributive and clinical responsibilities, and patient-specific clinical pharmacy services (e.g., patient education or counseling, other drug therapy monitoring, medication reconciliation, pharmacokinetic consultations) are offered at similar frequencies. A survey of pharmacy departments at small and rural hospitals in Illinois determined that there were more similarities than differences between CAHs and non-CAHs. The survey indicated significant differences in dispensing processes, the use of technology and drug policy tools, and outsourcing of sterile product preparation.

  3. Pharmacies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Pharmacies in the United States and Territories A pharmacy is a facility whose primary function is to store, prepare and legally dispense prescription drugs under...

  4. Quality indicators for technologies applied to the hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro Vega, Eva; Álvarez Díaz, Ana María; Queralt Gorgas, María; Encinas Barrios, Carmen; De la Rubia Nieto, Amelia

    2017-07-01

    The TECNO group of the Sociedad Española de Farmacia Hospitalaria (Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy) has addressed the definition of a catalogue of indicators for performance, quality and safety in the use of technologies applied to the logistic activity of Hospital Pharmacy Units.The project was developed with a methodology of qualitative techniques by consensus, with the members of the TECNO Group participating as experts. Once indicators had been defined, a validation phase was conducted, and standards were established based on the result of the sampling carried out in the hospitals of the group members.A total of 28 indicators were obtained, with their corresponding quality standards applied to the use of technologies in the processed for medication storage, dispensing and preparation.The definition of quality indicators and their standards for measuring technologies in the use of medication represents a step forward in the improvement of their safety. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Quality indicators for the hospital transfusion chain : A national survey conducted in 100 dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlker-Jansen, Pauline Y.; Janssen, M. P.; van Tilborgh-de Jong, A. J W; Schipperus, M. R.; Wiersum-Osselton, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2011 Dutch Blood Transfusion Guideline for hospitals incorporates seven internal quality indicators for evaluation of the hospital transfusion chain. The indicators aim to measure guideline compliance as shown by the instatement of a hospital transfusion committee and transfusion saf

  6. Clinical pharmacy services, pharmacy staffing, and adverse drug reactions in United States hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, C A; Raehl, Cynthia L

    2006-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were examined in 1,960,059 hospitalized Medicare patients in 584 United States hospitals in 1998. A database was constructed from the MedPAR database and the National Clinical Pharmacy Services survey. The 584 hospitals were selected because they provided specific information on 14 clinical pharmacy services and on pharmacy staffing; they also had functional ADR reporting systems. The study population consisted of 35,193 Medicare patients who experienced an ADR (rate of 1.8%). Of the 14 clinical pharmacy services, 12 were associated with reduced ADR rates. The most significant reductions occurred in hospitals offering pharmacist-provided admission drug histories (odds ratio [OR] 1.864, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.765-1.968), drug protocol management (OR 1.365, 95% CI 1.335-1.395), and ADR management (OR 1.360, 95% CI 1.328-1.392). Multivariate analysis, performed to further evaluate these findings, showed that nine variables were associated with ADR rate: pharmacist-provided in-service education (slope -0.469, p=0.018), drug information (slope -0.488, p=0.005), ADR management (slope -0.424, p=0.021), drug protocol management (slope -0.732, p=0.002), participation on the total parenteral nutrition team (slope 0.384, p=0.04), participation on the cardiopulmonary resuscitation team (slope -0.506, p=0.008), medical round participation (slope -0.422, p=0.037), admission drug histories (slope -0.712, p=0.008), and increased clinical pharmacist staffing (slope -4.345, p=0.009). As clinical pharmacist staffing increased from the 20th to the 100th percentile (from 0.93+/-0.77/100 to 5.16+/-4.11/100 occupied beds), ADRs decreased by 47.88%. In hospitals without pharmacist-provided ADR management, the following increases were noted: mean number of ADRs/100 admissions by 34.90% (OR 1.360, 95% CI 1.328-1.392), length of stay 13.64% (Mann-Whitney U test [U]=11047367, p=0.017), death rate 53.64% (OR 1.574, 95% CI 1.423-1.731), total Medicare

  7. Premixed intravenous admixtures: a positive development for hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H E

    1983-06-01

    The development of premixed intravenous admixtures is reviewed in a historical context, and its effects on hospital pharmacy practice are discussed. As pharmaceutical manufacturers introduce more i.v. medications in ready-to-use containers, the same complaints that were voiced by pharmacists about unit dose packaging and ready-to-dispense tablets and capsules are being aired. But premixed i.v. admixtures are a logical extension of the basic unit dose principle of providing a readily identifiable and ready-to-administer dose. The time and cost savings these products offer are needed in hospital pharmacies. Some of the disadvantages of these products--including storage and freezer space and multiplicity of administration systems--are overcome by proper planning and education of personnel. If fewer personnel are now needed to prepare i.v. admixtures, then those personnel should be used to improve patient care in other ways. The use of premixed i.v. admixtures is a positive technological advance in drug packaging. Its advantages outweight its disadvantages, and it will soon be become the universally accepted form of i.v. drug packaging.

  8. Adolescent alcohol intoxication in the dutch hospital departments of pediatrics: A 2-year comparison study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, J.J. van; Lely, N. van der; Bouthoorn, S.H.; Dalen, W.E. van; Pereira, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the prevalence of, and the circumstances leading to, adolescent alcohol intoxication admissions in Dutch hospital departments of pediatrics. Methods: Data were collected in 2007 and 2008, using the Dutch Pediatric Surveillance System, in which pediatricians received questionnaire

  9. Use of closed systems in the Hospital Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Forte Pérez-Minayo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the setting of the increasing use of closed systems for reconstitution and preparation of these drugs, we intend to analyze the correct use of these systems in the Hospital Pharmacy, with the objective to minimize the risks of exposure not only for those professionals directly involved, but also for all the staff in the unit, taking also into account efficiency criteria. Method: Since some systems protect against aerosol formation but not from vapours, we decided to review which cytostatics should be prepared using an awl with an air inlet valve, in order to implement a new working procedure. We reviewed the formulations available in our hospital, with the following criteria: method of administration, excipients, and potential hazard for the staff handling them. We measured the diameters of the vials. We selected drugs with Level 1 Risk and also those including alcohol-based excipients, which could generate vapours. Outcomes: Out of the 66 reviewed formulations, we concluded that 11 drugs should be reconstituted with this type of awl: busulfan, cabazitaxel, carmustine, cyclophosphamide, eribulin, etoposide, fotemustine, melphalan, paclitaxel, temsirolimus and thiotepa; these represented an 18% of the total volume of formulations. Conclusions: The selection of healthcare products must be done at the Hospital Pharmacy, because the use of a system with an air valve inlet only for those drugs selected led to an outcome of savings and a more efficient use of materials. In our experience, we confirmed that the use of the needle could only be avoided when the awl could adapt to the different formulations of cytostatics, and this is only possible when different types of awls are available. Besides, connections were only really closed when a single awl was used for each vial. The change in working methodology when handling these drugs, as a result of this study, will allow us to start different studies about environmental contamination as a

  10. Op weg naar een accreditatiesysteem van Nederlandse ziekenhuizen [Towards an accreditation system of Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennip, E.M.S.J. van; Linnebank, F.; Sillevis Smitt, P.A.E.; Geldof, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the Netherlands system for accreditation of hospitals started in 1989 in the Pilotproject Accreditation (PACE). This resulted in the establishment of the Netherlands Institute for Accreditation of Hospitals (NIAH) early 1999, by the Dutch Association of Hospitals, the Dutch Associ

  11. Evaluation of the performance of drug-drug interaction screening software in community and hospital pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, Jacob; Colon, Lisa R; Wang, Victoria S; Malone, Daniel C; Murphy, John E; Armstrong, Edward P

    2006-06-01

    Computerized drug-drug interaction (DDI) screening is widely used to identify potentially harmful drug combinations in the inpatient and outpatient setting. To evaluate the performance of drug-drug interaction (DDI) screening software in identifying select clinically significant DDIs in pharmacy computer systems in community and hospital pharmacies. Ten community pharmacies and 10 hospital pharmacies in the Tucson metropolitan area were invited to participate in the study in 2004. To test the performance of each of the systems used by the pharmacies, 25 medications were used to create 6 mock patient profiles containing 37 drug-drug pairs, 16 of which are clinically meaningful DDIs that pose a potential risk to patient safety. Each profile was entered into the computer pharmacy system, and the system response in terms of the presence or absence of a DDI alert was recorded for each drug pair. The percentage of correct responses and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of each system to correctly classify each drug pair as a DDI or not was calculated. Summary statistics of these measures were calculated separately for community and hospital pharmacies. Eight community pharmacies and 5 hospital pharmacies in the Tucson metropolitan area agreed to participate in the study. The median sensitivity and median specificity for community pharmacies was 0.88 (range, 0.81-0.94) and 0.91 (range, 0.67-1.00), respectively. For hospital pharmacies, the median sensitivity and median specificity was 0.38 (range, 0.15-0.94) and 0.95 (range, 0.81-0.95), respectively. Based on this convenience sample of 8 community pharmacies and 5 hospital pharmacies in 1 metropolitan area, the performance of community pharmacy computer systems in screening DDIs appears to have improved over the last several years compared with research published previously in 2001. However, significant variation remains in the performance of hospital pharmacy computer

  12. Survey of pharmacy involvement in hospital medication reconciliation programs across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Stein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to conduct a review of pertinent literature, assess pharmacy involvement in medication reconciliation, and offer insight into best practices for hospitals to implement and enhance their medication reconciliation programs. Method: Pharmacists in hospitals nationwide were asked to complete an anonymous survey via the American College of Clinical Pharmacy online database. The multiple choice survey analyzed the roles that healthcare professionals play in medication reconciliation programs at hospitals. Results: Of the survey responses received, 32/91 (35% came from pharmacists at hospitals with a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program. Of these pharmacy-led programs, 17/32 (53% have a dedicated pharmacist or pharmacy staff to perform medication reconciliation. Conclusion: A comprehensive review of literature suggests that pharmacy involvement has the potential to reduce medication reconciliation errors and may improve patient satisfaction. Focused, full-time medication reconciliation pharmacists can help hospitals save time and money, improve outcomes, and meet higher standards issued by the Joint Commission. Data obtained in this study show the extent to which pharmacists contribute to achieving these goals in healthcare systems nationwide. This baseline study provides a strong case for hospitals to implement a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program.

  13. Clinical and conventional pharmacy services in Polish hospitals: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Iga; Pawłowski, Leszek; Kocić, Ivan; Krzyżaniak, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacist-led care services within the hospital pharmacy setting have a significant impact on efficient drug management processes. The work of pharmacists is directly associated with the provision of drugs and medical supplies along with additional clinical, administrative, organizational and educational duties. Depending on the country, these practice roles may differ to a significant extent. The aim of this research was to explore the role of the hospital pharmacist and the provision of both clinical and traditional pharmaceutical services for patients and medical staff in Polish general hospitals. Hospital pharmacies from all general hospitals in Poland. A cross-sectional study was conducted, utilizing an anonymous questionnaire as the research instrument. Heads of hospital pharmacies were requested to participate in this study and complete the questionnaire. The survey was initially piloted to improve the research method. The types of pharmaceutical services performed in Polish general hospitals. 166 hospital pharmacies took part in this survey. The overall response rate was 60.8 %. The total number of full-time equivalent (FTE) professionals employed within the surveyed hospital pharmacies was approximately 833. The procurement and distribution of drugs were identified as pharmaceutical services performed by most of the participants. The significant majority of pharmacists were also involved in compounding, adverse drug reaction monitoring and rational drug management services. Eleven (7 %) of the responding pharmacists had direct contact with patients and 7 (4 %) pharmacists took part in ward rounds. More precise legal regulations regarding hospital pharmacy practice were measures indicated by most pharmacists as necessary changes required in the hospital pharmacy system. Polish hospital pharmacists provide various pharmaceutical services. Their work is closely related with direct provision of drugs. There is an observed inadequate level of clinical services

  14. Student Pharmacists’ Clinical Interventions in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences at a Community Nonteaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Shogbon, Angela O.; Lundquist, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess student pharmacists’ clinical interventions in advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) at a community nonteaching hospital and evaluate completed interventions based on the type of documentation method used.

  15. Barriers to the implementation of advanced clinical pharmacy services at Portuguese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazinha, Isabel; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    In some countries, such as Portugal, clinical pharmacy services in the hospital setting may be implemented to a lower extent than desirable. Several studies have analysed the perceived barriers to pharmacy service implementation in community pharmacy. To identify the barriers towards the implementation of advanced clinical pharmacy services at a hospital level in Portugal, using medication follow-up as an example. Hospital pharmacies in Portugal. A qualitative study based on 20 face-to-face semi-structured interviews of strategists and hospital pharmacists. The interview guide was based on two theoretical frameworks, the Borum's theory of organisational change and the Social Network Theory, and then adapted for the Portuguese reality and hospital environments. A constant comparison process with previously analysed interviews, using an inductive approach, was carried out to allow themes to emerge. Themes were organised following the Leavitt's Organizational Model: functions and objectives; hospital pharmacist; structure of pharmacy services; environment; technology; and medication follow-up based on the study topic. Barriers towards practice change. Medication follow-up appeared not to be a well-known service in Portuguese hospital pharmacies. The major barriers at the pharmacist level were their mind-set, resistance to change, and lack of readiness. Lack of time, excessive bureaucratic and administrative workload, reduced workforce, and lack of support from the head of the service and other colleagues were identified as structural barriers. Lack of access to patients' clinical records and cumbersome procedures to implement medication follow-up were recognised as technological barriers. Poor communication with other healthcare professionals, and lack of support from professional associations were the major environmental barriers. Few of the barriers identified by Portuguese hospital pharmacists were consistent with previous reports from community pharmacy. The mind

  16. A comparison of radiation doses of radiology procedures to Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geert de Vries; Harmen Bijwaard

    2015-01-01

    De ECR 2015 vond plaats van 4 tot 8 maart in Wenen A study of the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) showed in 2013 that many Dutch hospitals were still struggling with the practical implementation of DRLs. To promote their use, to help hospitals with their impleme

  17. Professional Nursing Duties in the Central Services: Hospital Pharmacy Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Gómez-Villegas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The new demands of a fast changing world necessitate expanding the traditional concepts of nursing, extending the classical aspects to cover new areas. Purpose. Based on their professional duties, the nursing team in the pharmacy of a second-level hospital aimed to establish a theoretical and situational framework for nurses working in the central services. Material and Methods. Application of the nursing process to nursing work in an area with no direct contact with patients. Results and Discussion. The application of the NANDA diagnoses to professional practice enabled the establishment of a nursing diagnosis with the implementation of measures designed to overcome a stressful situation with a risk of becoming unmotivated. Main Conclusion. The capacity to adapt the nursing profession to undertake new roles in the field of healthcare and the power of nursing own methodological resources permit the indirect care of “faceless” patients to be complemented with the inclusion of nurses from other services as clients, forming the focus of care, who can thus be helped with their daily care work.

  18. Robotized compounding of oncology drugs in a hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Elisabetta; Bufarini, Celestino

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, the Pharmacy Department of the University Hospital of Ancona began collaboration with the engineers of the Loccioni group in order to realize a fully automated system for the preparation of cytostatic drugs, which could be safe for both healthcare workers and patients. At present, the cytotoxic laboratory of Ancona is equipped with two robots and one Class II biological-safety cabinet. The introduction of the robots in the cytotoxic laboratory has increased both efficiency and safety of the working process. The drug-preparation process begins when the pharmacist confirms the medical prescription (exact posology, modalities of reconstitution), and starts the preparation cycle. The sterility of the preparations is monthly tested in collaboration to the local microbiology laboratory. All preparations' results were germ-free even after storage at room temperature for two weeks. The dose accuracy is verified by visual and gravimetric independent systems. Drug concentration errors exceeding the limit of 10% fixed by the Italian Pharmacopeia were found only in 1.1% of the preparations. The average dose error was 0.8% (standard deviation 1.7%).

  19. The psychometric properties of the 'Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture' in Dutch hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cordula

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many different countries the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS is used to assess the safety culture in hospitals. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Dutch for application in the Netherlands. The aim of this study was to examine the underlying dimensions and psychometric properties of the questionnaire in Dutch hospital settings, and to compare these results with the original questionnaire used in USA hospital settings. Methods The HSOPS was completed by 583 staff members of four general hospitals, three teaching hospitals, and one university hospital in the Netherlands. Confirmatory factor analyses were performed to examine the applicability of the factor structure of the American questionnaire to the Dutch data. Explorative factor analyses were performed to examine whether another composition of items and factors would fit the data better. Supplementary psychometric analyses were performed, including internal consistency and construct validity. Results The confirmatory factor analyses were based on the 12-factor model of the original questionnaire and resulted in a few low reliability scores. 11 Factors were drawn with explorative factor analyses, with acceptable reliability scores and a good construct validity. Two items were removed from the questionnaire. The composition of the factors was very similar to that of the original questionnaire. A few items moved to another factor and two factors turned out to combine into a six-item dimension. All other dimensions consisted of two to five items. Conclusion The Dutch translation of the HSOPS consists of 11 factors with acceptable reliability and good construct validity. and is similar to the original HSOPS factor structure.

  20. Hospital pharmacy practice in Saudi Arabia: Dispensing and administration in the Riyadh region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsultan, Mohammed S.; Khurshid, Fowad; Mayet, Ahmed Y.; Al-jedai, Ahmed H.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is very little published data assessing hospital pharmacy practice in Saudi Arabia. Hence, a comprehensive survey has been undertaken to evaluate hospital pharmacy services of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Recently, we published the survey results on the prescribing and transcribing steps of the medication use process. This paper focuses on dispensing and administration. Methods A modified-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) survey questionnaire was personally delivered to the pharmacy directors of 48 hospitals in the Riyadh region. Three attempted follow-ups were made within 3 months to non-responders and the surveys were collected upon completion. The survey was conducted using similar methods to those of the ASHP surveys. Results Twenty-nine hospitals participated in the survey with a response rate of 60.4%. Centralized distribution (74%) is the most commonly used model for inpatient pharmacies. Overall, 21% of hospitals routinely use bar coding technology in medication dispensing. None of the hospitals are using a robotic distribution system to automate the dispensing of unit doses. Automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs) are used by 21% of hospitals as part of their decentralized distribution model. Sixty-one percent of hospital pharmacies have IV admixture preparation area in their facility. In the use of safety technology for medication administration, only one third of hospitals are using electronic medication administration records (eMARs), 7.4% had bar-code-assisted medication administration (BCMA) and 12% had smart infusion pumps. Conclusion Hospital pharmacies in the Riyadh region are fairly well developed in providing dispensing and administration services. Further improvement can be achieved by increasing the use of new technologies such as bar-code technology, unit dose drug distribution systems, pharmacy-based IV admixture services, smart infusion pumps, and automated medication distribution. PMID:23960805

  1. Pharmacy services at admission and discharge in adult, acute, public hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe hospital pharmacy involvement in medication management in Ireland, both generally and at points of transfer of care, and to gain a broad perspective of the hospital pharmacy workforce. METHODS: a survey of all adult, acute, public hospitals with an accident and emergency (A&E) department (n = 36), using a semi-structured telephone interview. KEY FINDINGS: there was a 97% (n = 35) response rate. The majority (n = 25, 71.4%) of hospitals reported delivery of a clinical pharmacy service. On admission, pharmacists were involved in taking or verifying medication histories in a minority (n = 15, 42.9%) of hospitals, while few (n = 6,17.1%) deployed staff to the A&E\\/acute medical admissions unit. On discharge, the majority (n = 30,85.7%) did not supply any take-out medication, a minority (n =5,14.3%) checked the discharge prescription, 51.4% (n = 18) counselled patients, 42.9% (n = 15) provided medication compliance charts and one hospital (2.9%) communicated with the patient\\'s community pharmacy. The number of staff employed in the pharmacy department in each hospital was not proportionate to the number of inpatient beds, nor the volume of admissions from A&E. There were differences identified in service delivery between hospitals of different type: urban hospitals with a high volume of admissions from A&E were more likely to deliver clinical pharmacy. CONCLUSIONS: the frequency and consistency of delivering pharmacy services to facilitate medication reconciliation at admission and discharge could be improved. Workforce constraints may inhibit service expansion. Development of national standards of practice may help to eliminate variation between hospitals and support service development.

  2. How to plan workflow changes: a practical quality improvement tool used in an outpatient hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Christine; Chau, Connie; Giridharan, Neha; Huh, Youchin; Cooley, Janet; Warholak, Terri L

    2013-06-01

    A quality improvement tool is provided to improve pharmacy workflow with the goal of minimizing errors caused by workflow issues. This study involved workflow evaluation and reorganization, and staff opinions of these proposed changes. The study pharmacy was an outpatient pharmacy in the Tucson area. However, the quality improvement tool may be applied in all pharmacy settings, including but not limited to community, hospital, and independent pharmacies. This tool can help the user to identify potential workflow problem spots, such as high-traffic areas through the creation of current and proposed workflow diagrams. Creating a visual representation can help the user to identify problem spots and to propose changes to optimize workflow. It may also be helpful to assess employees' opinions of these changes. The workflow improvement tool can be used to assess where improvements are needed in a pharmacy's floor plan and workflow. Suggestions for improvements in the study pharmacy included increasing the number of verification points and decreasing high traffic areas in the workflow. The employees of the study pharmacy felt that the proposed changes displayed greater continuity, sufficiency, accessibility, and space within the pharmacy.

  3. Implementation of product-line management in a hospital pharmacy department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio-Feinberg, G J; Sheinman, C H

    1990-09-01

    The development and implementation of product-line management (PLM) in a pharmacy department is reviewed. The PLM system of hospital organization shifts the emphasis from function to product. The pharmacy department at a 737-bed nonprofit hospital adopted PLM in an effort to reach more directly the physician and patient markets, enhance the image of pharmacy, and help meet requirements of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. The department surveyed physicians and administrators to identify their product and service needs and surveyed pharmacy staff members to identify the perceived benefits and risks of a PLM system. A strategic-planning session was held to decide how best to match the pharmacy department's product lines with market needs. The team leaders were renamed clinical supervisors and were no longer responsible for defined physical areas but rather for clinical matters relating to patients in the product line assigned. Pharmacy's chosen product lines were oncology services, neuropsychiatry, maternal and child care, cardiovascular, operating room-anesthesia-pain clinic, and general medical. The transition is being accomplished one product line at a time; interested team leaders transfer into clinical supervisor positions by achieving clinical expertise within the relevant product lines. Despite some initial confusion, PLM contributed to job satisfaction and morale and allowed the pharmacy department to provide increased clinical consultation and intervention services. PLM enhanced the clinical pharmacy program and focused clinical services on the physician and ultimately the patient.

  4. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: monitoring and patient education--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2013-05-01

    The results of the 2012 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists national survey of pharmacy practice in U.S. hospital settings are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1413 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals were surveyed by mail. SDI Health supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn from SDI's hospital database. In this national probability sample survey, the response rate was 34.0%. The rate of pharmacist monitoring of most patients (i.e., >75%) in hospitals has increased, from 20.3% in 2000 to 46.5% in 2012. Therapeutic drug monitoring programs are in place at most hospitals; at more than 80% of hospitals, pharmacists have the authority to order laboratory tests and adjust medication dosages. A safety culture assessment has been conducted at 72.4% of hospitals. Pharmacists routinely perform discharge counseling in 24.7% of hospitals. At most hospitals, nurses are primarily responsible for medication reconciliation, but 65.9% of pharmacy directors would like pharmacy to have this responsibility. Computerized prescriber order entry is now used in 54.4% of hospitals, with barcode-assisted medication administration used in 65.5% and smart pumps used in 77% of hospitals. The majority of hospitals have fully or partially implemented electronic health records. An increase in the use of remote pharmacist review of medication orders has reduced the percentage of hospitals where orders are not reviewed before a dose is administered to 32%. Pharmacists continue to improve medication use in U.S. hospitals through patient monitoring and education, safety initiatives, collaborative practices with other health care professionals, assisting in the adoption of technologies, and the provision of pharmacy services to outpatients.

  5. A Multidisciplinary Hospital-based Antimicrobial Use Program: Impact on Hospital Pharmacy Expenditures and Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Salama

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors’ hospital embarked on a three-component, multidisciplinary, hospital-based antimicrobial use program to cut costs and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use. Initially, antimicrobial use patterns and costs were monitored for 12 months. For the next two years, an antimicrobial use program was implemented consisting of three strategies: automatic therapeutic interchanges; antimicrobial restriction policies; and parenteral to oral conversion. The program resulted in a reduction in the antimicrobial portion of the total pharmacy drug budget from 41.6% to 28.2%. Simultaneously, the average cost per dose per patient day dropped from $11.88 in 1991 to $10.16 in 1994. Overall, mean monthly acquisition cost savings rose from $6,810 in 1992 to $27,590 in 1994. This study demonstrates that a multidisciplinary antimicrobial use program in a Canadian hospital can effect dramatic cost savings and serve as a quality assurance activity of physician antimicrobial prescribing behaviour.

  6. A Transaction Cost Analysis of Dutch Hospital Care Contracting between hospitals and health insurance companies in a deregulated environment

    OpenAIRE

    Brandenburg, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch government has started a process of reformation in the Dutch healthcare. The goal of this reformation is cost efficient healthcare in the Netherlands. Hospitals and health insurance companies in the Netherlands experience changes in regulations and funding. They are expected to negotiate about the price and quantities of hospital care. A product-price system for hospital care, called DBC, has been introduced by the government to support these negotiations. This study sho...

  7. Net Income of Pharmacy Faculty Compared to Community and Hospital Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Gatwood, Justin; Spivey, Christina A; Dickey, Susan E

    2016-09-25

    Objective. To compare the net cumulative income of community pharmacists, hospital pharmacists, and full-time pharmacy faculty members (residency-trained or with a PhD after obtaining a PharmD) in pharmacy practice, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, pharmacology, and social and administrative sciences. Methods. Markov modeling was conducted to calculate net projected cumulative earnings of career paths by estimating the costs of education, including the costs of obtaining degrees and student loans. Results. The economic model spanned 49 years, from ages 18 to 67 years. Earning a PharmD and pursuing an academic career resulted in projected net cumulative lifetime earnings ranging from approximately $4.7 million to $6.3 million. A pharmacy practice faculty position following public pharmacy school and one year of residency resulted in higher net cumulative income than community pharmacy. Faculty members with postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) training also had higher net income than other faculty and hospital pharmacy career paths, given similar years of prepharmacy education and type of pharmacy school attended. Faculty members with either a PharmD or PhD in the pharmacology discipline may net as much as $5.9 million and outpace all other PhD graduates by at least $75 000 in lifetime earnings. Projected career earnings of postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) trained faculty and PharmD/PhD faculty members were lower than those of community pharmacists. Findings were more variable when comparing pharmacy faculty members and hospital pharmacists. Conclusion. With the exception of PGY1 trained academic pharmacists, faculty projected net cumulative incomes generally lagged behind community pharmacists, likely because of delayed entry into the job market as a result of advanced training/education. However, nonsalary benefits such as greater flexibility and autonomy may enhance the desirability of academic pharmacy as a career path.

  8. Net Income of Pharmacy Faculty Compared to Community and Hospital Pharmacists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatwood, Justin; Spivey, Christina A.; Dickey, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare the net cumulative income of community pharmacists, hospital pharmacists, and full-time pharmacy faculty members (residency-trained or with a PhD after obtaining a PharmD) in pharmacy practice, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, pharmacology, and social and administrative sciences. Methods. Markov modeling was conducted to calculate net projected cumulative earnings of career paths by estimating the costs of education, including the costs of obtaining degrees and student loans. Results. The economic model spanned 49 years, from ages 18 to 67 years. Earning a PharmD and pursuing an academic career resulted in projected net cumulative lifetime earnings ranging from approximately $4.7 million to $6.3 million. A pharmacy practice faculty position following public pharmacy school and one year of residency resulted in higher net cumulative income than community pharmacy. Faculty members with postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) training also had higher net income than other faculty and hospital pharmacy career paths, given similar years of prepharmacy education and type of pharmacy school attended. Faculty members with either a PharmD or PhD in the pharmacology discipline may net as much as $5.9 million and outpace all other PhD graduates by at least $75 000 in lifetime earnings. Projected career earnings of postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) trained faculty and PharmD/PhD faculty members were lower than those of community pharmacists. Findings were more variable when comparing pharmacy faculty members and hospital pharmacists. Conclusion. With the exception of PGY1 trained academic pharmacists, faculty projected net cumulative incomes generally lagged behind community pharmacists, likely because of delayed entry into the job market as a result of advanced training/education. However, nonsalary benefits such as greater flexibility and autonomy may enhance the desirability of academic pharmacy as a career path. PMID:27756925

  9. Current status, challenges and the way forward for clinical pharmacy service in Ethiopian public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Arebu Issa; Tilahun, Zelalem; Gebretekle, Gebremedhin Beedemariam; Ayalneh, Belete; Hailemeskel, Bisrat; Engidawork, Ephrem

    2017-05-19

    Clinical pharmacy service has evolved steadily over the past few decades and is now contributing to the 'patient care journey' at all stages. It is improving the safety and effectiveness of medicines and has made a significant contribution to the avoidance of medication errors. In Ethiopia, clinical pharmacy service is in its initial phase, being started in July 2013. This study therefore aimed at assessing the status, challenges and way forward of clinical pharmacy service in the country. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in six regional states and one city- administration in September 2014. A total of 51 hospitals were included in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were employed for data collection. A total of 160 pharmacy graduates, and 51 pharmacy heads participated in the study. Internal Medicine and Pediatric wards were the major wards where the graduates provide clinical pharmacy service. Almost 94% of the new graduates were found to be involved in clinical pharmacy service, but 47% of them rated their service as poor. The overall satisfaction of the graduates was close to 36%. Thirteen hospitals discontinued and two hospitals not even initiated the service largely due to shortage of pharmacists and lack of management support. About 44% of the surveyed hospitals documented the clinical pharmacy service provided using either developed or adopted formats. Lack of awareness by the medical fraternity, high attrition rate, lack of support from the management as well as from the health care team, readiness of the graduates to deliver the service, and shortage of pharmacists were identified by the key informants as the major stumbling block to deliver clinical pharmacy service. Clinical pharmacy service is initiated in most of the surveyed hospitals and a large proportion of the graduates were involved in the service. Although there is a great enthusiasm to promote clinical pharmacy service in the surveyed hospitals, efforts made to

  10. Assessment of Pharmacy Information System Performance in Three Hospitals in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mahalli, Azza; El-Khafif, Sahar H; Yamani, Wid

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacy information system is one of the central pillars of a hospital information system. This research evaluated a pharmacy information system according to six aspects of the medication process in three hospitals in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. System administrators were interviewed to determine availability of functionalities. Then, system users within the hospital were targeted to evaluate their level of usage of these functionalities. The study was cross-sectional. Two structured surveys were designed. The overall response rate of hospital users was 31.7 percent. In all three hospitals studied, the electronic health record is hybrid, implementation has been completed and the system is running, and the systems have computerized provider order entry and clinical decision support. Also, the pharmacy information systems are integrated with the electronic health record, and computerized provider order entry and almost all prescribing and transcription functionalities are available; however, drug dispensing is a mostly manual process. However, the study hospitals do not use barcode-assisted medication administration systems to verify patient identity and electronically check dose administration, and none of them have computerized adverse drug event monitoring that uses the electronic health record. The numbers of users who used different functionalities most or all of the time was generally low. The highest frequency of utilization was for patient administration records (56.8 percent), and the lowest was for linkage of the pharmacy information system to pharmacy stock (9.1 percent). Encouraging users to use different functionalities was highly recommended.

  11. A Transaction Cost Analysis of Dutch Hospital Care Contracting between hospitals and health insurance companies in a deregulated environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Brandenburg (Claudia)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch government has started a process of reformation in the Dutch healthcare. The goal of this reformation is cost efficient healthcare in the Netherlands. Hospitals and health insurance companies in the Netherlands experience changes in regulations and funding. They are expected

  12. Implementation of a pharmacy automation system (robotics) to ensure medication safety at Norwalk hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bepko, Robert J; Moore, John R; Coleman, John R

    2009-01-01

    This article reports an intervention to improve the quality and safety of hospital patient care by introducing the use of pharmacy robotics into the medication distribution process. Medication safety is vitally important. The integration of pharmacy robotics with computerized practitioner order entry and bedside medication bar coding produces a significant reduction in medication errors. The creation of a safe medication-from initial ordering to bedside administration-provides enormous benefits to patients, to health care providers, and to the organization as well.

  13. [Current status of "hospital-clinic" and "hospital-pharmacy" cooperation for inhalation therapy -based on hospital surveys throughout Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Chie; Momose, Yasuyuki; Horie, Takeo; Komase, Yuko; Niimi, Akio; Dobashi, Kunio; Fujimoto, Keisaku; Tohda, Yuuji; Ohta, Ken; Adachi, Mitsuru

    2014-02-01

    The "zero death from asthma strategy" in the medical treatment for bronchial asthma has been promoted by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare from 2006, and it indicates that medical and non-medical specialists, as well as pharmacists, should cooperate, and strives to build cooperation which is suited the actual conditions of an area. It is also important for COPD. Although hospitals in some areas cooperate with clinics and pharmacies, the overall concept of cooperation appears to be absent in most Japanese hospitals. A questionnaire was administered in early March, 2012 to 477 allergology institutions, and was authorized by an educational establishment. Among 246 replies from the institutions, cooperation between hospitals and clinics was carried out by 98 institutions (39.8%) specializing in bronchial asthma, and in 64 institutions (37.2%) specializing in COPD. However, cooperation tools were used in only 37 of these institutions (15.0%). The ability to fill prescriptions outside the hospital was available in 209 institutions (85.0%). One-hundred and seventeen institutions (47.6%) replied that they have no tools for hospital-pharmacy cooperation. Direct indications were written in prescriptions by 82 institutions (33.3). In order to build inter-regional association and to equalize medical treatment, we suggest that developing tools and organization for cooperation between health professionals who treat patients with bronchial asthma and COPD is necessary.

  14. The role of microbiology and pharmacy departments in the stewardship of antibiotic prescribing in European hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Fiona M; Gould, Ian M; Bruce, Julie; Mollison, Jill; Monnet, Dominique L; Krcmery, Vladimir; Cookson, Barry; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2007-06-01

    This observational, cross-sectional study describes the role played by clinical microbiology and pharmacy departments in the stewardship of antibiotic prescribing in European hospitals. A total of 170 acute care hospitals from 32 European countries returned a questionnaire on antibiotic policies and practices implemented in 2001. Data on antibiotic use, expressed as Defined Daily Doses per 100 occupied bed-days (DDD/100 BD) were provided by 139 hospitals from 30 countries. A total of 124 hospitals provided both datasets. 121 (71%) of Clinical Microbiology departments and 66 (41%) of Pharmacy departments provided out of hours clinical advice. 70 (41%) of microbiology/infectious disease specialists and 28 (16%) of pharmacists visited wards on a daily basis. The majority of laboratories provided monitoring of blood cultures more than once per day and summary data of antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) for empiric prescribing (86% and 73% respectively). Most of the key laboratory and pharmacy-led initiatives examined did not vary significantly by geographical location. Hospitals from the North and West of Europe were more likely to examine blood cultures more than once daily compared with other regions (p Hospitals in the North were least likely routinely to report susceptibility results for restricted antibiotics compared to those in the South-East and Central/Eastern Europe (p Hospital wards in the North were more likely to hold antibiotic stocks (100%) compared with hospitals in the South-East which were least likely (39%) (p hospital pharmacies in the North were least likely to dispense antibiotics on an individual patient basis (16%) compared with hospital pharmacies from Southern Europe (60%) (p = 0.01). Hospitals that routinely reported susceptibility results for restricted antibiotics had significantly lower median total antibiotic use in 2001 (p Hospitals that provided prescribing advice outside normal working hours had significantly higher antibiotic use

  15. Assessment of pharmacy information system performance in selected hospitals in isfahan city during 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqaeian Nejad Isfahani, Sakineh; Mirzaeian, Razieh; Habibi, Mahbobe

    2013-01-01

    In supporting a therapeutic approach and medication therapy management, pharmacy information system acts as one of the central pillars of information system. This ensures that medication therapy is being supported and evaluated with an optimal level of safety and quality similar to other treatments and services. This research aims to evaluate the performance of pharmacy information system in three types of teaching, private and social affiliated hospitals. The present study is an applied, descriptive and analytical study which was conducted on the pharmacy information system in use in the selected hospitals. The research population included all the users of pharmacy information systems in the selected hospitals. The research sample is the same as the research population. Researchers collected data using a self-designed checklist developed following the guidelines of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Australia pharmaceutical Society and Therapeutic guidelines of the Drug Commission of the German Medical Association. The checklist validity was assessed by research supervisors and pharmacy information system pharmacists and users. To collect data besides observation, the questionnaires were distributed among pharmacy information system pharmacists and users. Finally, the analysis of the data was performed using the SPSS software. Pharmacy information system was found to be semi-automated in 16 hospitals and automated in 3 ones. Regarding the standards in the guidelines issued by the Society of Pharmacists, the highest rank in observing the input standards belonged to the Social Services associated hospitals with a mean score of 32.75. While teaching hospitals gained the highest score both in processing standards with a mean score of 29.15 and output standards with a mean score of 43.95, and the private hospitals had the lowest mean scores of 23.32, 17.78, 24.25 in input, process and output standards respectively. Based on the findings, the studied

  16. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Monitoring and patient education--2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2010-04-01

    Results of the 2009 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to monitoring and patient education are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1364 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. SDI Health supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn from SDI's hospital database. The response rate was 40.5%. Virtually all hospitals (97.3%) had pharmacists regularly monitor medication therapy in some capacity; nearly half monitored 75% or more of their patients. Over 92% had pharmacists routinely monitor serum medication concentrations or their surrogate markers, and most hospitals allowed pharmacists to order initial serum concentrations (80.1%) and adjust dosages (79.2%). Interdisciplinary committees reviewed adverse drug events in 89.3% of hospitals. Prospective analysis was conducted by 66.2% of hospitals, and retrospective analysis was performed by 73.6%. An assessment of safety culture had been conducted by 62.8% of hospitals. Most hospitals assigned oversight for patient medication education to nursing (89.0%), but many hospitals (68.9%) reported that pharmacists provided medication education to 1-25% of patients. Computerized prescriber-order-entry systems with clinical decision support were in place in 15.4%, bar-code-assisted medication administration systems were used by 27.9%, smart infusion pumps were used in 56.2%, and complete electronic medical record systems were in place in 8.8% of hospitals. The majority of hospitals (64.7%) used an integrated pharmacy practice model using clinical generalists. Pharmacists were significantly involved in monitoring medication therapy. Pharmacists were less involved in medication education activities. Technologies to improve the use of medications were used in an increasing percentage of hospitals. Hospital pharmacy practice was increasingly integrated, with pharmacists having both

  17. The Diffusion Process of Patient Education in Dutch Community Pharmacy: An Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, M. C. M.; Blom, A. Th. G.; Van Burg, A.; Jonkers, R.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies barriers and facilitators to the implementation of patient education in community pharmacies and classifies these barriers and facilitators into the diffusion stages of Rogers'"Innovations in Organizations" model. Discusses the implementation of patient education activities that require individual and organizational change in…

  18. Radiation burden to paediatric patients due to micturating cystourethrography examinations in a Dutch children's hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, F.W.; Geleijns, J.; Holscher, H.C.; Weststrate, J.; Zonderland, H.M.; Zoetelief, J.

    1999-01-01

    Micturating cystourethrography (MCU) examinations of paediatric patients in a major Dutch children's hospital (JKZ) were evaluated to generate quantitative information on effective dose (E). A standard examination involves three radiographs plus fluoroscopy. Observed total dose-area product (DAP) fo

  19. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  20. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  1. [Questionnaires for pharmacies and pharmacists working in the hospitals built during the Meiji and Taisho periods in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Jun; Yamakawa, Koji

    2008-01-01

    In the previous paper, information about questionnaires for pharmacies and pharmacists in the 86 hospitals built during the Meiji and Taisho periods in Japan was reported. The histories of old pharmacies and pharmacists of the remaining 10 old hospitals were also reported in this paper.

  2. Medication Safety: Experiential Learning for Pharmacy Students and Staff in a Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda V. Graudins

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Medication Safety has been an established pharmacy specialty in Australian hospitals since the early 2000s and is now one of the ten Australian hospital accreditation standards. Although advances have occurred, medication-related patient harm has not been eradicated. Victorian undergraduate pharmacy programs include some aspects of medication safety, however clinical pharmacy experience, along with interpersonal and project management skills, are required to prepare pharmacists to be confident medication safety practitioners. This article outlines the range of medication safety-related training offered at an Australian tertiary teaching hospital, including; on-site tutorial for undergraduate students, experiential placement for pharmacy interns, orientation for pharmacy staff and resources for credentialing pharmacists for extended roles. Improvements continue to be made, such as electronic medication management systems, which increase the safe use of medications and facilitate patient care. Implementation and evaluation of these systems require medication safety expertise. Patients’ engaging in their own care is an acknowledged safety improvement strategy and is enhanced by pharmacist facilitation. Building educator skills and integrating experiential teaching with university curricula should ensure pharmacists have both the knowledge and experience early in their careers, in order to have a leading role in future medication management.

  3. Evaluation of a survey tool to measure safety climate in Australian hospital pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Chen, Timothy F; Fois, Romano A; Ashcroft, Darren M; Lalor, Daniel J

    Safety climate evaluation is increasingly used by hospitals as part of quality improvement initiatives. Consequently, it is necessary to have validated tools to measure changes. To evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency of a survey tool to measure Australian hospital pharmacy patient safety climate. A 42 item cross-sectional survey was used to evaluate the patient safety climate of 607 Australian hospital pharmacy staff. Survey responses were initially mapped to the factor structure previously identified in European community pharmacy. However, as the data did not adequately fit the community pharmacy model, participants were randomly split into two groups with exploratory factor analysis performed on the first group (n = 302) and confirmatory factor analyses performed on the second group (n = 305). Following exploratory factor analysis (59.3% variance explained) and confirmatory factor analysis, a 6-factor model containing 28 items was obtained with satisfactory model fit (χ(2) (335) = 664.61 p  0.643) and model nesting between the groups (Δχ(2) (22) = 30.87, p = 0.10). Three factors (blame culture, organisational learning and working conditions) were similar to those identified in European community pharmacy and labelled identically. Three additional factors (preoccupation with improvement; comfort to question authority; and safety issues being swept under the carpet) highlight hierarchical issues present in hospital settings. This study has demonstrated the validity of a survey to evaluate patient safety climate of Australian hospital pharmacy staff. Importantly, this validated factor structure may be used to evaluate changes in safety climate over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Process prediction in noisy data sets: a case study in a Dutch hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoel, van der Sjoerd; Keulen, van Maurice; Amrit, Chintan; Cudre-Mauroux, Philippe; Ceravolo, Paolo; Gašević, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the amount of money that can be claimed is critical to the effective running of an Hospital. In this paper we describe a case study of a Dutch Hospital where we use process mining to predict the cash flow of the Hospital. In order to predict the cost of a treatment, we use different data

  5. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Prescribing and transcribing-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2017-09-01

    The results of the 2016 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1,315 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed using a mixed-mode method offering a choice of completing a paper survey or an online survey. IMS Health supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn from IMS's hospital database. The survey response rate was 29.8%. Drug policy development by pharmacy and therapeutics committees continues to be an important strategy for improving prescribing. Strict formulary systems are maintained in 63.0% of hospitals, and 89.7% of hospitals use clinical practice guidelines that include medications. Pharmacists have the authority to order laboratory tests in 89.9% of hospitals and order medications in 86.8% of hospitals. Therapeutic interchange policies are used in 89.2% of hospitals. Electronic health records (EHRs) have been implemented partially or completely in most hospitals (99.1%). Computerized prescriber-order-entry systems with clinical decision support are used in 95.6% of hospitals, and 92.6% of hospitals have barcode-assisted medication administration systems. Transitions-of-care programs are increasing in number, with 34.6% of hospitals now offering discharge prescription services. Pharmacists practice in 39.5% of hospital ambulatory or primary care clinics. The most common service offered by pharmacists to outpatients is anticoagulation management (26.0%). When pharmacists practice in ambulatory care clinics, 64.5% have prescribing authority through collaborative practice agreements. Pharmacists continue to expand their role in improving the prescribing of medications in both hospital and outpatient settings. The adoption of EHRs and medication-use technologies has contributed to this growth. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients and nurses determine variation in adherence to guidelines at Dutch hospitals more than internists or settings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, R.F.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Huijsmans, Z.; Peters, S.M.A.; Ballegooie, E. van; Have, P. ten; Casparie, A.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To measure adherence to recently developed diabetes guidelines at Dutch hospital outpatient clinics and distinguish determinants for variations in care on hospital, internist and patient levels. METHODS: Thirteen general hospitals with 58 internists recruited 1950 diabetic patients. Data were

  7. [Review of legislation regarding clinical research in the Spanish health care system and hospital pharmacy services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna-Goya, Noa; Serrano, M Antonia; Gómez-Chacón, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The call for public funding for the Spanish Health Care System clinical research with drugs for human use projects Subprogramme highlights the need for hospital pharmacy services to include the manufacture of investigational drugs which are the subject of a clinical trial, developed by either a researcher or a group of researchers, within its activities. This article discusses the legislation concerning the manufacture of investigational drugs and the requirements that the pharmacy services must meet in order to develop, distribute, or conceal an investigational drug in a clinical trial sponsored by a professional from the SHS.

  8. [An evaluation of the services of state hospital pharmacies in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Mario Jorge Sobreira; Magarinos-Torres, Rachel; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa

    2013-12-01

    This article presents an evaluation of state-run hospital pharmacies in Rio de Janeiro. For the regulatory evaluation, 62 indicators of structure and procedures were used in order to establish the adequacy of the activities of the hospital pharmacy. The services were then stratified by level of complexity of the hospital. A scaled rating algorithm was applied to each stratum in accordance with the activities carried out. The hospitals were then hierarchically grouped for each stratum and the best and worst services at each level of complexity were chosen for the multiple case study, resulting in a total of six units. In these units 16 result indicators were applied and analysis of the resulting data was conducted by cross-case synthesis. The performance evaluation revealed that only one unit performed management and forecasting activities satisfactorily. Four units administered medication procurement inadequately. The worst results in terms of performance in the six hospitals studied were related to stock management and the best to distribution activities. The data are a cause for concern, since these are considered the core activities of the hospital pharmacy.

  9. Transmissibility of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST398) in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Bootsma, M. C. J.; Troelstra, A.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Bonten, M. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    P>We quantified nosocomial transmission rates of sequence type (ST) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (an emerging livestock-associated MRSA clone) and non-ST398 MRSA isolates in patients hospitalized without infection control measures in 51 Dutch hospitals. Identification of 17

  10. Utilization of market research in managing hospital pharmacy resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, L; McNamara, E J

    1984-10-01

    A market research survey of staff physicians and nurses was completed to obtain information on customer preference to be used in making planning and development decisions about the allocation of the pharmacy department's resources. Survey questionnaires were mailed to representative samples of each professional group and included the optimum mix of open-ended and closed-ended questions that would result in the highest response rate. The survey responses identified differences in wants and needs between the nurses and physicians that demonstrate the value of market research. Data obtained from the survey are being used by a staff advisory committee and management to develop departmental goals and objectives that will reduce costs and increase profit margins under the ever-increasing restrictions of prospective reimbursement.

  11. Using hospital pharmacy technicians to check unit dose carts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, S H; Emerson, P K

    1994-05-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of technicians checking unit dose carts as compared with pharmacists checking unit dose carts. The final (after check) fill in both arms of the study was evaluated for accuracy on the same five criteria: 1) correct drug, 2) correct dose, 3) correct dosage form, 4) correct quantity, and 5) expiration date. In the technician arm, 7571 doses were checked with 10 errors, giving a 99.76% (1 error in 420) accuracy. In the pharmacist arm of the study, 3116 doses were checked with 34 total errors, giving a 98.91% (1 error in 92) accuracy. The results of this study indicate that technicians would have as high if not a higher accuracy rate than pharmacists. Using pharmacy technicians in this role should continue the same level of care by maintaining a high accuracy in medication dispensing and provide greater economic benefit to the organization by using technical rather than professional personnel.

  12. Assessment of surveys for the management of hospital clinical pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čufar, Andreja; Mrhar, Aleš; Robnik-Šikonja, Marko

    2015-06-01

    Survey data sets are important sources of data, and their successful exploitation is of key importance for informed policy decision-making. We present how a survey analysis approach initially developed for customer satisfaction research in marketing can be adapted for an introduction of clinical pharmacy services into a hospital. We use a data mining analytical approach to extract relevant managerial consequences. We evaluate the importance of competences for users of a clinical pharmacy with the OrdEval algorithm and determine their nature according to the users' expectations. For this, we need substantially fewer questions than are required by the Kano approach. From 52 clinical pharmacy activities we were able to identify seven activities with a substantial negative impact (i.e., negative reinforcement) on the overall satisfaction of clinical pharmacy services, and two activities with a strong positive impact (upward reinforcement). Using analysis of individual feature values, we identified six performance, 10 excitement, and one basic clinical pharmacists' activity. We show how the OrdEval algorithm can exploit the information hidden in the ordering of class and attribute values, and their inherent correlation using a small sample of highly relevant respondents. The visualization of the outputs turns out highly useful in our clinical pharmacy research case study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Availability of antidotes, antivenoms, and antitoxins in New Zealand hospital pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, John S; Sly, Brendon; Holt, Alec; MacDonell, Stephen

    2015-03-27

    To assess the adequacy of the types and quantities of antidotes, antivenoms and antitoxins held by New Zealand hospital pharmacies. A list of 61 antidotes, antivenoms, antitoxins and their various forms was developed following literature review and consideration of national pharmaceutical listings. An Internet-accessible survey was then developed, validated and, during the period 28 February to 7 April 2014, sent to 24 hospital pharmacies nationally for completion. Results were assessed and compared with published guidelines for adequate stocking of antidotes in hospitals that provide emergency care. The response rate for the survey was 100%. Wide variation in stock levels were reported with only N- acetylcysteine and octreotide held in adequate quantities by all hospitals to manage a single patient for 24 hours. While archaic compounds were still stocked, newer and more effective pharmaceuticals were not. The national replacement cost for expiring drugs was estimated at $171,024, with smaller, more isolated facilities facing the greatest expense and difficulty in achieving timely resupply. Shortcomings in the types and quantities of antidotes, antivenoms and antitoxins held by New Zealand hospital pharmacies were recognised. This situation may be improved through national rationalisation of pharmaceutical storage and supply, and implementation of a national antidote database.

  14. A simulated hospital pharmacy module using an electronic medical record in a pharmaceutical care skills laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwin, Jennifer L; DiVall, Margarita V; Guerra, Christina; Brown, Todd

    2013-04-12

    OBJECTIVES. To implement and evaluate the effects of a simulated hospital pharmacy module using an electronic medical record on student confidence and abilities to perform hospital pharmacist duties. DESIGN. A module was developed that simulated typical hospital pharmacist tasks. Learning activities were modified based upon student feedback and instructor assessment. ASSESSMENTS. Ninety-seven percent of respondents reported full-time hospital internship experience and 72% had electronic medical record experience prior to completing the module. Mean scores on confidence with performing typical hospital pharmacist tasks significantly increased from the pre-module survey to the post-module survey from 1.5-2.9 (low comfort/confidence) to 2.0-3.4 (moderate comfort/confidence). Course assessments confirmed student achievement of covered competencies. CONCLUSIONS. A simulated hospital pharmacy module improved pharmacy students' hospital practice skills and their perceived comfort and confidence in completing the typical duties of a hospital pharmacist.

  15. Accreditation status of hospital pharmacies and their challenges of medication management: A case of south Iranian largest university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Omid; Dorosti, Hesam; Talebzadeh, Alireza; Bastani, Peivand

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of accreditation for hospital pharmacies, this study was to determine the challenges of medication management in hospital pharmacies affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study was a mix-method research conducted in two qualitative and quantitative phases during the years 2014-2015 in Shiraz, Iran. National Accreditation Standard checklist for hospitals was used for data collection in the first phase, and Delphi method was applied in three rounds to achieve the most challenges of medication management and the related solutions. Results indicated a medium status of accreditation for all three dimensions in the above hospital pharmacies (3.53, 42.15 and 7, respectively). Lack of clinical pharmacists, nonparticipation of the pharmacy director in annual budgeting, lack of access to patient information, discontinuity of pharmaceutical care for patients discharged, defects in pharmacy staff training, lack of legislation in support of pharmacists and lack of adequate access to physicians' prescriptions, shortages in reporting medication errors, and lack of evidence related to microbial contamination are the most challenges extracted from the second phase. It seems that the studied hospital pharmacies encounter numerous problems regarding accreditation, pharmaceutical care as well as appropriate medication management and supply chain. Attempts to solve these problems can play an important role in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of pharmacies in Iran.

  16. Accreditation status of hospital pharmacies and their challenges of medication management: A case of south Iranian largest university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Barati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of accreditation for hospital pharmacies, this study was to determine the challenges of medication management in hospital pharmacies affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study was a mix-method research conducted in two qualitative and quantitative phases during the years 2014–2015 in Shiraz, Iran. National Accreditation Standard checklist for hospitals was used for data collection in the first phase, and Delphi method was applied in three rounds to achieve the most challenges of medication management and the related solutions. Results indicated a medium status of accreditation for all three dimensions in the above hospital pharmacies (3.53, 42.15 and 7, respectively. Lack of clinical pharmacists, nonparticipation of the pharmacy director in annual budgeting, lack of access to patient information, discontinuity of pharmaceutical care for patients discharged, defects in pharmacy staff training, lack of legislation in support of pharmacists and lack of adequate access to physicians' prescriptions, shortages in reporting medication errors, and lack of evidence related to microbial contamination are the most challenges extracted from the second phase. It seems that the studied hospital pharmacies encounter numerous problems regarding accreditation, pharmaceutical care as well as appropriate medication management and supply chain. Attempts to solve these problems can play an important role in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of pharmacies in Iran.

  17. The influence of job characteristics on job outcomes of pharmacists in hospital, clinic, and community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Yeh, Ying-Chen; Lin, Wen-Hung

    2007-06-01

    This study examines the relationship between job characteristics and job outcomes of pharmacists in hospital, clinic, and community pharmacies in Taiwan. The structured questionnaires covered the items of job characteristics, job outcomes, and demographics of pharmacists, and were distributed between Feb 2004 and April 2004. Two hundred and ninety-eight pharmacists responded. Data were analyzed descriptively, and univariate analyses, factor analysis, and multiple regression analyses were used. It found the more enriched the job, the greater the job satisfaction and less intention to leave. And community pharmacists reported greater job enrichment and job satisfaction and less intention to leave than did hospital and clinic pharmacists. It suggests pharmacy managers could recognize the needs of pharmacists to redesign and enrich their work arrangements.

  18. Using Queuing Theory and Simulation Model to Optimize Hospital Pharmacy Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Mohammadnejhad, Seyed Mohsen; Ravangard, Ramin; Teymourzadeh, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hospital pharmacy is responsible for controlling and monitoring the medication use process and ensures the timely access to safe, effective and economical use of drugs and medicines for patients and hospital staff. Objectives: This study aimed to optimize the management of studied outpatient pharmacy by developing suitable queuing theory and simulation technique. Patients and Methods: A descriptive-analytical study conducted in a military hospital in Iran, Tehran in 2013. A sample of 220 patients referred to the outpatient pharmacy of the hospital in two shifts, morning and evening, was selected to collect the necessary data to determine the arrival rate, service rate, and other data needed to calculate the patients flow and queuing network performance variables. After the initial analysis of collected data using the software SPSS 18, the pharmacy queuing network performance indicators were calculated for both shifts. Then, based on collected data and to provide appropriate solutions, the queuing system of current situation for both shifts was modeled and simulated using the software ARENA 12 and 4 scenarios were explored. Results: Results showed that the queue characteristics of the studied pharmacy during the situation analysis were very undesirable in both morning and evening shifts. The average numbers of patients in the pharmacy were 19.21 and 14.66 in the morning and evening, respectively. The average times spent in the system by clients were 39 minutes in the morning and 35 minutes in the evening. The system utilization in the morning and evening were, respectively, 25% and 21%. The simulation results showed that reducing the staff in the morning from 2 to 1 in the receiving prescriptions stage didn't change the queue performance indicators. Increasing one staff in filling prescription drugs could cause a decrease of 10 persons in the average queue length and 18 minutes and 14 seconds in the average waiting time. On the other hand, simulation

  19. Using queuing theory and simulation model to optimize hospital pharmacy performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Mohammadnejhad, Seyed Mohsen; Ravangard, Ramin; Teymourzadeh, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    Hospital pharmacy is responsible for controlling and monitoring the medication use process and ensures the timely access to safe, effective and economical use of drugs and medicines for patients and hospital staff. This study aimed to optimize the management of studied outpatient pharmacy by developing suitable queuing theory and simulation technique. A descriptive-analytical study conducted in a military hospital in Iran, Tehran in 2013. A sample of 220 patients referred to the outpatient pharmacy of the hospital in two shifts, morning and evening, was selected to collect the necessary data to determine the arrival rate, service rate, and other data needed to calculate the patients flow and queuing network performance variables. After the initial analysis of collected data using the software SPSS 18, the pharmacy queuing network performance indicators were calculated for both shifts. Then, based on collected data and to provide appropriate solutions, the queuing system of current situation for both shifts was modeled and simulated using the software ARENA 12 and 4 scenarios were explored. Results showed that the queue characteristics of the studied pharmacy during the situation analysis were very undesirable in both morning and evening shifts. The average numbers of patients in the pharmacy were 19.21 and 14.66 in the morning and evening, respectively. The average times spent in the system by clients were 39 minutes in the morning and 35 minutes in the evening. The system utilization in the morning and evening were, respectively, 25% and 21%. The simulation results showed that reducing the staff in the morning from 2 to 1 in the receiving prescriptions stage didn't change the queue performance indicators. Increasing one staff in filling prescription drugs could cause a decrease of 10 persons in the average queue length and 18 minutes and 14 seconds in the average waiting time. On the other hand, simulation results showed that in the evening, decreasing the staff

  20. WORK ANALYSIS OF DRUG-DISPENSING PROCESS IN A HOSPITAL EMERGENCY PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Brum Rosso

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The work organization performs a crucial role in activities that involves problem resolution and decision making. A hospital emergency pharmacy consists in an example where the work environment has several kinds of demands that might be inconsistent and influenced by overcrowding – common situation in Brazilian hospitals – causing harm to work organization and suitability of workload. The objective of this study is to evaluate labor conditions of professionals that work in the emergency pharmacy of a university public hospital, seeking opportunities of improvement. A transversal study was developed with a descriptive character to analyze the work conditions. An ergonomic work analysis was conducted and, for the fulfillment of its steps, observations in loco were performed and methods Deparis, RULA and ABC analysis were used, pursuing to analyze data collected and rearranging the work situation. The findings allowed propositions of improvement, related mainly to the process of drug dispensation, organization and arrangement of the work environment. The ABC analysis presented itself as a valuable method for improving drugs organization in the pharmacy and might be useful in other work situations where accessibility of items is necessary, but many items must be positioned.

  1. Dutch hospitals provide reliable "one click" patient information using a Quality Window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooy, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the Dutch Association of Hospitals (Nederlandse Vereniging van Ziekenhuizen, NVZ) launched the "Quality Window" at general hospitals across the Netherlands. The Quality Window is an online platform for patients which shares a hospital's current and previous scores on ten quality indicators, from patient experience to employee satisfaction. The Quality Window therefore responds to the growing demand for information and transparency when it comes to hospital care and performance. Not only can patients access helpful information about a hospital's quality through the Quality Window, they can also compare results with other hospitals, the national average, and more. Many hospitals also take the opportunity to expand on how indicators work in practice and the actions being taken towards improvement. The Quality Window was developed with the help of hospitals and patients. Over the coming years it will be expanded to university hospitals across the country. General hospitals will also begin developing Quality Windows for specific patient groups, such as cancer patients.

  2. Productive innovations in hospitals: an empirical research on the relation between technology and productivity in the Dutch hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jos L T; Van Hulst, Bart L

    2009-06-01

    This paper studies the relationship between technology and productivity in Dutch hospitals. In most studies technical change is measured by a proxy, namely a time trend. In practice however, innovations slowly spread over all hospitals and so different hospitals are operating under different technologies at the same point in time. In this study we explicitly inventory specific and well-known innovations in the Dutch hospital industry in the past ten years. These innovations are aggregated into a limited number of homogenous innovation clusters, which are measured by a set of technology index numbers. The index numbers are included in the cost function specification and estimation. The results indicate that technical change is non-neutral and output- biased and that some technologies affect cost in beneficial ways.

  3. Characterization of drug-related problems identified by clinical pharmacy staff at Danish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Birkholm, Trine; Fischer, Hanne; Graabæk, Trine; Kibsdal, Karina Porsborg; Ravn-Nielsen, Lene Vestergaard; Truelshøj, Tania Holtum

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, a database of drug related problems (DRPs) was implemented to assist clinical pharmacy staff in documenting clinical pharmacy activities locally. A study of quality, reliability and generalisability showed that national analyses of the data could be conducted. Analyses at the national level may help identify and prevent DRPs by performing national interventions. The aim of the study was to explore the DRP characteristics as documented by clinical pharmacy staff at hospital pharmacies in the Danish DRP-database during a 3-year period. Danish hospital pharmacies. Data documented in the DRP-database during the initial 3 years after implementation were analyzed retrospectively. The DRP-database contains DRPs reported at hospitals by clinical pharmacy staff. The analyses focused on DRP categories, implementation rates and drugs associated with the DRPs. Characteristics of DRPs. In total, 72,044 DRPs were documented in the DRP-database during the first 3 years of implementation, and the number of documented DRPs increased every year. An overall stable implementation rate of approximately 58 % was identified. The DRPs identified were multi-facetted, however evenly distributed for each of the 3 years. The most frequently identified DRP categories were: "Dose", followed by "Nonadherence to guidelines" and "Supplement to treatment". The highest implementation rates were found for the following DRP categories: "Non-adherence to guidelines" (79 %) followed by "Therapeutic duplication" (73 %) and "Dosing time and interval" (70 %). Even though the top 25 drugs were involved in 58 % of all DRPs, multiple drugs were associated with DRPs. The drugs most frequently involved in DRPs were paracetamol (4.6 % of all DRPs), simvastatin (3.0 %), lansoprazole (2.7 %), morphine (2.6 %) and alendronic acid (2.4 %). The study found that a national database on DRPs contained multi-facetted DRPs, however evenly distributed for each of the 3 years. Even though the top 25 drugs were

  4. Measuring innovation in a 'low-tech' service industry: the case of the Dutch hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, P.; Gallouj, F.; Segers, J.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a survey among 613 firms in the Dutch hospitality industry adopting a demarcation perspective. The paper illustrates that innovation in this service industry is much higher and more varied than regularly reported. It further indicates that innovation activities

  5. Occurrence of yeast bloodstream infections between 1987 and 1995 in five Dutch university hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Voss (Andreas); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); J.G. Koeleman; L. Spanjaard (Lodewijk); C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); M.C. Vos (Margreet); A.Y.L. Weersink (A. Y L); J.A.A. Hoogkamp-Korstanje (J. A A); J.F. Meis

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to identify retrospectively trends in fungal bloodstream infections in The Netherlands in the period from 1987 to 1995. Results of over 395,000 blood cultures from five Dutch university hospitals were evaluated. Overall, there were more than 12 million patient

  6. Measuring innovation in a 'low-tech' service industry: the case of the Dutch hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, P.; Gallouj, F.; Segers, J.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a survey among 613 firms in the Dutch hospitality industry adopting a demarcation perspective. The paper illustrates that innovation in this service industry is much higher and more varied than regularly reported. It further indicates that innovation activities

  7. Excess length of stay and economic consequences of adverse events in Dutch hospital patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogervorst-Schilp, J.; Langelaan, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the average and extrapolated excess length of stay and direct costs of adverse events (AEs) and preventable AEs in Dutch hospitals, and to evaluate patient characteristics associated with excess length of stay and costs. Methods: Data of a large retrospective patient recor

  8. [Medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals: essential for safe patient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, M J M

    2008-12-06

    The Netherlands Health Care Inspectorate investigated the quality of medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals. By and large the laboratories fulfilled the requirements for appropriate care, although some processes were unsatisfactory and some were insufficiently formalised. In the Netherlands, laboratories for medical microbiology are integrated within hospitals and medical microbiologists are responsible for the diagnostic processes as well as for co-treatment of patients, infection prevention and research. This integrated model contrasts to the more industrialised model in many other countries, where such laboratories are physically distinct from hospitals with a strong focus on diagnostics. The Inspectorate also concludes that the current position of medical microbiology in Dutch hospitals is necessary for patient safety and that outsourcing of these facilities is considered unacceptable.

  9. Guidelines for safe handling of cytotoxic drugs in pharmacy departments and hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The Specialty Practice Committee on Parenteral Services is one of a number of subcommittees of the Federal Council of The Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia (SHPA) having responsibility for development of professional practice in particular areas, such as drug distribution, drug information, clinical pharmacy, radiopharmaceuticals, and a number of others. Parenteral Services has been, perhaps, the major area of growth in Australian hospital pharmacy over the last three years. The pattern of growth of Australia has deviated somewhat from that which has emerged in the United States. Whereas the typical I.V. admixture service is relatively uncommon in Australian hospitals, the emphasis is towards specialization into Parenteral Nutrition and Oncology Support Services. Developments in Oncology Support have been particularly rapid, with many pharmacists becoming exclusively involved in this specialty. Concern is felt that operators intensively reconstituting and preparing cytotoxic drugs may be at risk from a variety of factors. Australian hospital pharmacists share the growing international opinion that this work is potentially hazardous and that safety guidelines governing every aspect of handling these substances are urgently required. The Specialty Practice Committee on Parenteral Services has conducted a study of safety aspects of this work as its major project for 1980 and has produced the document presented below. This is an official statement of the Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia.

  10. Attitudes of First-Year Pharmacy Students and Preceptors to a "Mini-Externship" in Hospital and Community Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Michael P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The University of Montana School of Pharmacy has included a miniexternship experience in a required introductory course. Goals of a survey of 67 first year students and 17 preceptors included students' demographic profile and prior exposure to pharmacy practice, assessment of the influence of the externship on career goals, etc. (MLW)

  11. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical pharmacists in medical teams. Within the current Hospital Pharmacy organisation in the Netherlands, such on-ward service is less feasible and therefore not yet established. However, given the substantial incidence of preventable ADEs in Dutch hospitals found in recent studies, appears warranted. Therefore, "Ward-Oriented Pharmacy", an on-ward service tailored to the Dutch hospital setting, will be developed. This service will consist of multifaceted interventions implemented in the Internal Medicine wards by hospital pharmacists. The effect of this service on preventable ADEs in elderly inpatients will be measured. Elderly patients are at high risk for ADEs due to multi-morbidity, concomitant disabilities and polypharmacy. Most studies on the incidence and preventability of ADEs in elderly patients have been conducted in the outpatient setting or on admission to a hospital, and fewer in the inpatient setting. Moreover, recognition of ADEs by the treating physicians is challenging in elderly patients because their disease presentation is often atypical and complex. Detailed information about the performance of the treating physicians in ADE recognition is scarce. Methods/Design The design is a multi-centre, interrupted time series study. Patients of 65 years or older, consecutively admitted to Internal Medicine wards will be included. After a pre-measurement, a Ward-Oriented Pharmacy service will be introduced and the effect of this service will be assessed during a post-measurement. The primary outcome measures are the ADE prevalence on admission and ADE incidence during hospital stay. These outcomes will be assessed using structured

  12. Use of closed systems in the Hospital Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte Pérez-Minayo, María; Castillo Bazán, Eva; Hernández Segurado, Marta; Arias Moya, María Ángeles; Pelegrín Torres, Paloma; Bécares Martínez, Francisco Javier

    2016-03-01

    Objetivo: En el contexto del auge de los sistemas cerrados para la reconstitución y preparación de estos fármacos, se propone analizar el uso correcto de estos sistemas en el servicio de farmacia, con el objetivo de minimizar los riesgos de exposición no solo de los trabajadores expuestos, sino de todos los trabajadores del servicio, atendiendo también a criterios de eficiencia. Método: Puesto que algunos sistemas protegen frente a la formación de aerosoles pero no frente a vapores, decidimos revisar qué citostáticos debían prepararse con un punzón que constase de una válvula de admisión de aire para implementar un nuevo procedimiento de trabajo. Se revisaron las presentaciones disponibles en nuestro hospital atendiendo a: vía de administración, excipientes y riesgo para el personal manipulador, y se midieron los diámetros de los viales. Se seleccionaron tanto los fármacos de riesgo 1 como aquellos cuyos excipientes incluyesen vehículos alcohólicos, susceptibles de formar vapores. Resultados: De las 66 presentaciones revisadas, un total de 11 fármacos debían reconstituirse con este tipo de punzón: busulfán, cabazitaxel, carmustina, ciclofosfamida, eribulina, etopósido, fotemustina, melfalán, paclitaxel, temsirolimús y tiotepa; representando un 18% respecto al volumen total de presentaciones. Conclusiones: La selección de los productos sanitarios debe realizarse desde los servicios de farmacia, ya que la utilización de un sistema con válvula de admisión de aire para tan solo los fármacos seleccionados supuso un ahorro y un empleo más eficiente del material. Desde nuestra experiencia comprobamos que el uso de la aguja solo podía relegarse si el punzón se adaptaba a las diferentes presentaciones de citostáticos, y esto solo se consigue disponiendo de varios tipos de punzones. Además, las conexiones solo estaban realmente cerradas si se utilizaba un punzón por cada vial. Con el cambio en la metodología de trabajo a la hora de

  13. A quantitative comparison of ward-based clinical pharmacy activities in 7 acute UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onatade, Raliat; Miller, Gavin; Sanghera, Inderjit

    2016-12-01

    Background Several clinical pharmacy activities are common to UK hospitals. It is not clear whether these are provided at similar levels, and whether they take similar amounts of time to carry out. Objective To quantify and compare clinical pharmacist ward activities between different UK hospitals. Setting Seven acute hospitals in the Greater London area (UK). Methods A list of common ward activities was developed. On five consecutive days, pharmacists visiting hospital wards documented total time spent and how many of each activity they undertook. Results were analysed by hospital. The range and number of activities per 100 occupied bed days, and per 24 beds were compared. Main outcome measure Time spent on wards and numbers of each activity undertaken. Results Pharmacists logged a total of 2291 h carrying out 40,000 activities. 4250 changes to prescriptions were made or recommended. 5901 individual medication orders were annotated for clarity or safety. For every 24 beds visited, mean time spent was 230 min-seeing 6.2 new patients, carrying out 3.9 calculations and 1.3 patient consultations, checking and authorising 1.8 discharge prescriptions, and providing staff with information twice. Other activities varied significantly, not all could be explained by differences in hospital specialties or Information Technology systems. Conclusion This is the first detailed comparison of clinical pharmacy ward activities between different hospitals. There are some typical levels of activities carried out. Wide variations in other activities could not always be explained. Despite a large number of contacts, pharmacists reported very few consultation sessions with patients.

  14. Reducing wait time in a hospital pharmacy to promote customer service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowiak, Julie M; Huitema, Bradley E; Dickinson, Alyce M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 2 different interventions on wait times at a hospital outpatient pharmacy: (1) giving feedback to employees about customer satisfaction with wait times and (2) giving a combined intervention package that included giving more specific feedback about actual wait times and goal setting for wait time reduction in addition to the customer satisfaction feedback. The relationship between customer satisfaction ratings and wait times was examined to determine whether wait times affected customer service satisfaction. Participants were 10 employees (4 pharmacists and 6 technicians) of an outpatient pharmacy. Wait times and customer satisfaction ratings were collected for "waiting customers." An ABCBA' within-subjects design was used to assess the effects of the interventions on both wait time and customer satisfaction, where A was the baseline (no feedback and no goal setting); B was the customer satisfaction feedback; C was the customer satisfaction feedback, the wait time feedback, and the goal setting for wait time reduction; and A' was a follow-up condition that was similar to the original baseline condition. Wait times were reduced by approximately 20%, and there was concomitant increased shift in levels of customer satisfaction, as indicated by the correlation between these variables (r = -0.57 and P customer's wait time. Data from this study may provide useful preliminary benchmarking data for standard pharmacy wait times.

  15. A survey of rotational use of biocides in hospital pharmacy aseptic units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtough, S M; Hiom, S J; Palmer, M; Russell, A D

    2002-03-01

    A postal survey of biocide rotation in UK hospital pharmacy aseptic units was carried out. Seventy per cent of respondents stated that biocides were rotated, most frequently in areas outside critical work zones. High-level disinfection was employed when 'aseptic' conditions were required. Decisions on frequency of rotation were most often based on in-house validation or consultation with colleagues. Toxicity and corrosiveness were the criteria rated most important in a rotation policy. Microbiological monitoring was carried out most frequently in critical work zones but less often for handwashing. Most QC hospital pharmacists supported rotation and would prefer a standard period for all applications (monthly). Guidelines need to be clarified to assist staff in decisions regarding biocide rotation. Copyright 2002 The Hospital Infection Society.

  16. Trends in opioid analgesics sales to community pharmacies and hospitals in Italy (2000-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraceni, A T; Brunelli, C; Rocco, P; Minghetti, P

    2013-08-01

    Opioid consumption data in Italy have been widely studied. However, only aggregate data can be found in the published literature, and differences are expected by distribution setting (community pharmacies and hospitals). The aim of our paper is to analyse opioids sales trends in Italy in the decade 2000-2010, in an effort to explore such differences. Quarterly sales data of opioid medicinal products sold by wholesalers to both community pharmacies (retail) and to hospitals (non-retail) during the time period 2000-2010 were supplied by IMS Italy. Data were standardized using the Defined Daily Doses per day per 1000 inhabitants (DDDd/1000). Opioid sales have steadily increased during the time period considered going from 1.04 DDDd/1000 in 2000 to 4.9 in 2010 (+292%). Nonetheless relevant differences can be found both by distribution setting and drug type. In particular retail sales have increased by 286 % for WHO Step II opioids and by 575% for WHO Step III drugs, while non-retail sales have increased by 48% and 263%, respectively. In 2010, fentanyl and buprenorphine transdermal patches and oxycodone are more widely prescribed than morphine, in the retail setting, with fentanyl at large in the first position. In hospitals morphine and fentanyl almost equally share the 75% of the market. Data suggest that morphine is no more the opioid of first choice for severe pain in Italy, at least for outpatients. This is contradicting most international guidelines available in the 2000-2010 decade.

  17. [Process management in the hospital pharmacy for the improvement of the patient safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, R; Perelló-Juncá, A; Parès-Marimòn, R M; Serrais-Benavente, J; Ferrandez-Martí, D; Sala-Robinat, R; Camacho-Calvente, A; Campabanal-Prats, C; Solà-Anderiu, I; Sanchez-Caparrós, S; Gonzalez-Estrada, J; Martinez-Olalla, P; Colomer-Palomo, J; Perez-Mañosas, R; Rodríguez-Gallego, D

    2013-01-01

    To define a process management model for a hospital pharmacy in order to measure, analyse and make continuous improvements in patient safety and healthcare quality. In order to implement process management, Igualada Hospital was divided into different processes, one of which was the Hospital Pharmacy. A multidisciplinary management team was given responsibility for each process. For each sub-process one person was identified to be responsible, and a working group was formed under his/her leadership. With the help of each working group, a risk analysis using failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was performed, and the corresponding improvement actions were implemented. Sub-process indicators were also identified, and different process management mechanisms were introduced. The first risk analysis with FMEA produced more than thirty preventive actions to improve patient safety. Later, the weekly analysis of errors, as well as the monthly analysis of key process indicators, permitted us to monitor process results and, as each sub-process manager participated in these meetings, also to assume accountability and responsibility, thus consolidating the culture of excellence. The introduction of different process management mechanisms, with the participation of people responsible for each sub-process, introduces a participative management tool for the continuous improvement of patient safety and healthcare quality. Copyright © 2012 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of the new handling recommendations for hazardous drugs in a hospital pharmacy service

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    Beatriz G García-Alcántara

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the actions taken by the Pharmacy Unit in a tertiary hospital in order to adapt to the recommendations established by NIOSH 2014 for handling Hazardous Drugs. Method: A retrospective observational study. A list was prepared including all hazardous drugs according to NIOSH 2014 that were available at the hospital as marketed or foreign drugs, or used in clinical trials, and there was a review of the processes of acquisition, repackaging, preparation, circuits, organizational, dispensing and identification. Results: After the analysis, a report including all needs was prepared and sent to the Hospital Management. Any relevant information about the handling and administration of hazardous drugs was included in the prescription computer program. There were changes in the acquisition process of two drugs, in order to avoid splitting and multi-dose formulations. An alternative or improvement was found for 35 253 of the 75 779 units of hazardous drugs repackaged in one year. The Pharmacy Unit took over the preparation of four non-sterile medications, as well as the preparation of all sterile parenteral medications included in Lists 1 and 2 that were not previously prepared there, as well as one from List 3. Information was also included about the preparation processes of Magistral Formulations that involved hazardous drugs from Lists 2 or 3. Conclusion: The adaptation to the recommendations by NIOSH 2014 has represented a change, but also a significant reduction in the handling process of hazardous drugs by the healthcare staff, therefore reducing the risk of occupational exposure.

  19. [Radical formation by grinding of commercial tablets according to hospital and pharmacy prescription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Masayuki; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Ishikawa, Takaaki; Furuta, Youji; Aramaki, Hideki; Sasai, Yasushi; Yamauchi, Yukinori

    2005-04-01

    We examined mechanoradical formation in the grinding process of commercial tablets using electron spin resonance (ESR). Mechanoradicals were detected in all tested samples (23 types of commercial tablets) when the ball-milling of tablets was conducted under anaerobic conditions and some were fairly stable even in air. Thus the grinding may cause changes in the physicochemical properties of ingredients included in commercial tablets. Because high quality is demanded in pharmaceuticals, these results suggest more caution should be taken in the grinding of commercial tablets in hospitals and pharmacies.

  20. An Ambient Intelligence Framework for End-User Service Provisioning in a Hospital Pharmacy: a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Diego; Alcarria, Ramón; Sánchez-Picot, Álvaro; Robles, Tomás

    2015-10-01

    End-user development is a new trend to provide tailored services to dynamic environments such as hospitals. These services not only facilitate daily work for pharmacy personnel but also improve self-care in elder people that are still related to hospital, such as discharged patients. This paper presents an ambient intelligence (AmI) environment for End-user service provisioning in the pharmacy department of Gregorio Marañón Hospital in Madrid, composed of a drug traceability infrastructure (DP-TraIN) and a ubiquitous application for enabling the pharmacy staff to create and execute their own services for facilitating drug management and dispensing. The authors carried out a case study with various experiments where different roles from the pharmacy department of Gregorio Marañón Hospital were involved in activities such as drug identification, dispensing and medication administering. The authors analyzed the effort required to create services by pharmacy staff, the discharged patients' perception of the AmI environment and the quantifiable benefits in reducing patient waiting time for drug dispensing.

  1. Medication supply chain management through implementation of a hospital pharmacy computerized inventory program in Haiti

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    Michelle R. Holm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, St. Luke Hospital was built to help manage the mass casualties and subsequent cholera epidemic. A major problem faced by the hospital system was the lack of an available and sustainable supply of medications. Long-term viability of the hospital system depended largely on developing an uninterrupted medication supply chain. Objective: We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages. Design: We conducted the research by examining how medications were being utilized and distributed before and after the implementation of PCIP. We measured the number of documented medication transactions in both Phase 1 and Phase 2 as well as user logins to determine if a computerized inventory system would be beneficial in providing a sustainable, long-term solution to their medication management needs. Results: The PCIP incorporated drug ordering, filling the drug requests, distribution, and dispensing of the medications in multiple settings; inventory of currently shelved medications; and graphic reporting of ‘real-time’ medication usage. During the PCIP initiation and establishment periods, the number of medication transactions increased from 219.6 to 359.5 (p=0.055, respectively, and the mean logins per day increased from 24.3 to 31.5, p<0.0001, respectively. The PCIP allows the hospital staff to identify and order medications with a critically low supply as well as track usage for future medication needs. The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization. Conclusions: An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital.

  2. FACTORS INFLUENCING WAITING TIME IN OUTPATIENT PHARMACY OF LAGOS UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL

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    Ndukwe Henry C.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Time, money and expertise are resources that are indispensable to productivity, performance, efficiency, success and growth of any health institution. This research was aimed at identifying and measuring some of the factors influencing patient waiting time in an outpatient pharmacy. The study employed the use of time monitoring card and time study analysis to volunteered participants. A situation analysis conducted revealed an average of 167 minutes of waiting time. The dispensing time averaged 17.65 minutes, and 67.97% of total waiting time by the patient was due to delay components. The major delay components included patient queues for billing of prescription sheets, payment to the cashier and subsequent time wait before drugs are dispensed. The total waiting time for the dispensing process averaged 55.11 minutes. Generally, there were undue delays caused by the dispensing procedure with a 32.03% lag of processing components and operations in the pharmacy. Factors indentified to influence the outpatient waiting time included, queuing and queuing characteristics-type and integrity of queue, adherence to hospital visits and medication for special disease programs, dispensing time, average waiting time (service time plus queuing time, nature of illness or disease presentation, admission status of patient(s, accrued time from other health services provided to the patient prior to services provided by the pharmacist, incentives for providing efficient services, management structures and operational procedures of outpatient hospital pharmacy, implementation of legal rights on waiting time, inadequate treatment or dispensing facilities, technological innovations of automation and computerization , service efficiency and internal operational factors.

  3. Self-directed learning of hospital pharmacy residents in western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchuk, J W

    1983-01-01

    The extent of self-directed learning among hospital pharmacy residents in western Canada was studied. A preresidency questionnaire and a postresidency group interview with a set of questionnaires were used. The residents were asked to list learning projects conducted in their residency programs; these learning projects were categorized as self-directed, mutual-agreement, and preceptor-directed. A postinterview questionnaire was used to obtain postresidency measurements of self-directedness and resident autonomy. Twenty-four residents provided data on 164 learning projects. Projects with the most meaningfulness, high achievement contribution, positive motivation, and relevance corresponded with the self-directed approach. Residents who had more meaningful learning entered their residencies with no more self-directedness than other residents, but they did have more autonomy in their residencies. No particular type of project, with respect to learner autonomy, was found to be more problematic than the others. Facilitation of learner autonomy in a hospital pharmacy residency may increase the value of self-directed learning projects in general and improve the resident's self-directedness. Self-directed learning should continue to be part of residency programs.

  4. Stock management in hospital pharmacy using chance-constrained model predictive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, I; Maestre, J M; Velarde, P; Ocampo-Martinez, C; Fernández, I; Tejera, B Isla; Prado, J R Del

    2016-05-01

    One of the most important problems in the pharmacy department of a hospital is stock management. The clinical need for drugs must be satisfied with limited work labor while minimizing the use of economic resources. The complexity of the problem resides in the random nature of the drug demand and the multiple constraints that must be taken into account in every decision. In this article, chance-constrained model predictive control is proposed to deal with this problem. The flexibility of model predictive control allows taking into account explicitly the different objectives and constraints involved in the problem while the use of chance constraints provides a trade-off between conservativeness and efficiency. The solution proposed is assessed to study its implementation in two Spanish hospitals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Medication supply chain management through implementation of a hospital pharmacy computerized inventory program in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Michelle R; Rudis, Maria I; Wilson, John W

    2015-01-01

    Background In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, St. Luke Hospital was built to help manage the mass casualties and subsequent cholera epidemic. A major problem faced by the hospital system was the lack of an available and sustainable supply of medications. Long-term viability of the hospital system depended largely on developing an uninterrupted medication supply chain. Objective We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP) would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages. Design We conducted the research by examining how medications were being utilized and distributed before and after the implementation of PCIP. We measured the number of documented medication transactions in both Phase 1 and Phase 2 as well as user logins to determine if a computerized inventory system would be beneficial in providing a sustainable, long-term solution to their medication management needs. Results The PCIP incorporated drug ordering, filling the drug requests, distribution, and dispensing of the medications in multiple settings; inventory of currently shelved medications; and graphic reporting of 'real-time' medication usage. During the PCIP initiation and establishment periods, the number of medication transactions increased from 219.6 to 359.5 (p=0.055), respectively, and the mean logins per day increased from 24.3 to 31.5, psupply as well as track usage for future medication needs. The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization. Conclusions An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital.

  6. Medication supply chain management through implementation of a hospital pharmacy computerized inventory program in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Michelle R; Rudis, Maria I; Wilson, John W

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, St. Luke Hospital was built to help manage the mass casualties and subsequent cholera epidemic. A major problem faced by the hospital system was the lack of an available and sustainable supply of medications. Long-term viability of the hospital system depended largely on developing an uninterrupted medication supply chain. We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP) would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages. We conducted the research by examining how medications were being utilized and distributed before and after the implementation of PCIP. We measured the number of documented medication transactions in both Phase 1 and Phase 2 as well as user logins to determine if a computerized inventory system would be beneficial in providing a sustainable, long-term solution to their medication management needs. The PCIP incorporated drug ordering, filling the drug requests, distribution, and dispensing of the medications in multiple settings; inventory of currently shelved medications; and graphic reporting of 'real-time' medication usage. During the PCIP initiation and establishment periods, the number of medication transactions increased from 219.6 to 359.5 (p=0.055), respectively, and the mean logins per day increased from 24.3 to 31.5, psupply as well as track usage for future medication needs. The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization. An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital.

  7. Variability in activity and results from drug assessments by pharmacy and therapeutics committees in Spanish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigventós Latorre, F; Santos-Ramos, B; Ortega Eslava, A; Durán-García, M E

    2011-01-01

    To quantify the Spanish Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committees (P&TC) activity with regard to assessing and selecting drugs and describing variability in decisions made to include them. Descriptive, cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire aimed to 513 hospitals with more than 75 beds. We included questions referring to the P&TC resolutions, the therapeutic positioning and assessment reports. Recruitment was carried out between November 2007 and January 2008. Variability among P&TC conclusions were presented in five categories or levels of coincidence. One hundred and seventy-five hospitals participated, with a response rate of 34% (54% of beds). The mean (SD) number of drug-indications assessed per hospital was 10.35 (7.45). The proportion of assessments that conclude with drug inclusion or rejection was 75.3 and 21.4%, respectively. 16.2% concluded with therapeutic equivalence. Conditions for use were established for 64% of them, and 33% were included in a clinical guide. With regard to variability, 81.0% of assessments coincided with the conclusion to include or reject the drug. A contradictory decision was made for 19.0%. Drug assessment and selection activity in hospitals involve an amount of work. The proportion of drugs approved is similar in different types of hospitals. There is extensive variability as regards deciding upon inclusion and is similar to studies conducted in other countries. They indicate that a standardising methodology would be recommendable. Copyright © 2010 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. [Need for collaboration between community pharmacies and hospitals or clinics in providing medical treatment for patients with headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yuika; Ishii, Masakazu; Sakairi, Yuki; Kawana, Keiji; Shimizu, Shunichi; Kiuchi, Yuji

    2009-06-01

    It is often noted that the collaboration of hospital-to-hospital, hospital-to-clinic and clinic-to-clinic in medical care for patients with headache is important. However, the role of community pharmacies in the medical network for consultation of patients with headache is not clear. Here, we investigated the role of pharmacists in a community pharmacy in encouraging patients with headache to undergo medical examination and elucidated their future needs using a questionnaire intended for doctors and pharmacists. About 70% of pharmacists had experience with recommending that patients with headache consult a hospital. However, only 17% of doctors had experience with referral of patients with headache by pharmacists in a community pharmacy. About 22% of pharmacists had experiences in which the patient with headache refused to consult a hospital despite the recommendation, suggesting that many patients did not think that their headache symptoms were severe. In addition, 90% of doctors and 84% of pharmacists felt the need for collaboration between hospitals or clinics and community pharmacies. Doctors needed information from pharmacists on the "current state of drugs" taken by patients. However, pharmacists considered that they needed to provide not only "current state of drugs being taken" but also "symptoms of headache" to doctors. Although 67% of doctors considered the medication notebook to be useful for pharmacists to provide patient information to doctors, pharmacists preferred to provide the information by telephone. Moreover, 56% of pharmacists did not know how to search a website for medical specialists in headache. A medical network including not only hospitals or clinics but also community pharmacies might be useful for patients with headache.

  9. Stability investigation of total parenteral nutrition admixture prepared in a hospital pharmacy

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    Mirković Dušica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In the cases when nutrition of patients can not be orally nor enterally performed, parenteral nutrition is a method of the therapy that provides more successful and rapid recovery. In that way, hospitalization can be significantly shorter, healing costs reduced and mortality minimized. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN admixtures are the most complex systems which contain amino acids, carbohydrates, lipid emulsion, macroelectrolytes (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, SO42-, PO43-, oligoelements, hydro- and liposoluble vitamines, heparin, insulin and water. Concerning the mentioned complexity, special attention should be payed to physicochemical and microbiological stability of a mixture, because of interactions among components, that can be very hard to analyze. The aim of this study was to investigate the problem of stability of TPN admixtures prepared in a hospital pharmacy. Methods. Admixture TPN was aseptically prepared in laminar air - flow environment on the basis of the specified order in supplementing components and additives to basic solutions. Solutions were kept in sterile multicompartment ethylene-vinyl-acetate bags. After preparation and slow homogenization, TPN admixtures were submitted to physicochemical and microbiological stability analyses in various period of time. The assessment of physical stability of TPN admixture was done on the basis of visual inspection, determination of pH value and measuring of particle size. The investigation of sterility and pyrogenic test were performed according to Ph. Yug. V regulations. Results. Physico-chemical and microbiological analyses were applied and no significant changes in visual sense, pH value and droplet size stability of the TPN admixture were observed during the period of 60 hours. The lipid droplets were smaller in size than 5 μm, that is the most common pharmacopoeia requirement. Conclusion. The results of our study confirmed that a TPN admixture prepared in a hospital

  10. Exploring improvements in patient logistics in Dutch hospitals with a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Research showed that promising approaches such as benchmarking, operations research, lean management and six sigma, could be adopted to improve patient logistics in healthcare. To our knowledge, little research has been conducted to obtain an overview on the use, combination and effects of approaches to improve patient logistics in hospitals. We therefore examined the approaches and tools used to improve patient logistics in Dutch hospitals, the reported effects of these approaches on performance, the applied support structure and the methods used to evaluate the effects. Methods A survey among experts on patient logistics in 94 Dutch hospitals. The survey data were analysed using cross tables. Results Forty-eight percent of all hospitals participated. Ninety-eight percent reported to have used multiple approaches, 39% of them used five or more approaches. Care pathways were the preferred approach by 43% of the hospitals, followed by business process re-engineering and lean six sigma (both 13%). Flowcharts were the most commonly used tool, they were used on a regular basis by 94% of the hospitals. Less than 10% of the hospitals used data envelopment analysis and critical path analysis on a regular basis. Most hospitals (68%) relied on external support for process analyses and education on patient logistics, only 24% had permanent internal training programs on patient logistics. Approximately 50% of the hospitals that evaluated the effects of approaches on efficiency, throughput times and financial results, reported that they had accomplished their goals. Goal accomplishment in general hospitals ranged from 63% to 67%, in academic teaching hospitals from 0% to 50%, and in teaching hospitals from 25% to 44%. More than 86% performed an evaluation, 53% performed a post-intervention measurement. Conclusions Patient logistics appeared to be a rather new subject as most hospitals had not selected a single approach, they relied on external support and they did

  11. Exploring improvements in patient logistics in Dutch hospitals with a survey

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    van Lent Wineke AM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research showed that promising approaches such as benchmarking, operations research, lean management and six sigma, could be adopted to improve patient logistics in healthcare. To our knowledge, little research has been conducted to obtain an overview on the use, combination and effects of approaches to improve patient logistics in hospitals. We therefore examined the approaches and tools used to improve patient logistics in Dutch hospitals, the reported effects of these approaches on performance, the applied support structure and the methods used to evaluate the effects. Methods A survey among experts on patient logistics in 94 Dutch hospitals. The survey data were analysed using cross tables. Results Forty-eight percent of all hospitals participated. Ninety-eight percent reported to have used multiple approaches, 39% of them used five or more approaches. Care pathways were the preferred approach by 43% of the hospitals, followed by business process re-engineering and lean six sigma (both 13%. Flowcharts were the most commonly used tool, they were used on a regular basis by 94% of the hospitals. Less than 10% of the hospitals used data envelopment analysis and critical path analysis on a regular basis. Most hospitals (68% relied on external support for process analyses and education on patient logistics, only 24% had permanent internal training programs on patient logistics. Approximately 50% of the hospitals that evaluated the effects of approaches on efficiency, throughput times and financial results, reported that they had accomplished their goals. Goal accomplishment in general hospitals ranged from 63% to 67%, in academic teaching hospitals from 0% to 50%, and in teaching hospitals from 25% to 44%. More than 86% performed an evaluation, 53% performed a post-intervention measurement. Conclusions Patient logistics appeared to be a rather new subject as most hospitals had not selected a single approach, they relied on

  12. Quality Service Analysis and Improvement of Pharmacy Unit of XYZ Hospital Using Value Stream Analysis Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonny; Nasution, Januar

    2013-06-01

    Value stream mapping is a tool which is needed to let the business leader of XYZ Hospital to see what is actually happening in its business process that have caused longer lead time for self-produced medicines in its pharmacy unit. This problem has triggered many complaints filed by patients. After deploying this tool, the team has come up with the fact that in processing the medicine, pharmacy unit does not have any storage and capsule packing tool and this condition has caused many wasting times in its process. Therefore, the team has proposed to the business leader to procure the required tools in order to shorten its process. This research has resulted in shortened lead time from 45 minutes to 30 minutes as required by the government through Indonesian health ministry with increased %VA (valued added activity) or Process Cycle Efficiency (PCE) from 66% to 68% (considered lean because it is upper than required 30%). This result has proved that the process effectiveness has been increase by the improvement.

  13. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector: empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, R R; Krabbe-Alkemade, Y J F M; Mikkers, M C

    2017-01-03

    There is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be characterized as a system involving managed competition and mandatory healthcare insurance. Information about the quality of care provided by hospitals has been publicly available since 2008. In this paper, we evaluate the relationship between quality scores for three diagnosis groups and the market power indicators of hospitals. We estimate the impact of competition on quality in an environment of liberalized pricing. For this research, we used unique price and production data relating to three diagnosis groups (cataract, adenoid and tonsils, bladder tumor) produced by Dutch hospitals in the period 2008-2011. We also used the quality indicators relating to these diagnosis groups. We reveal a negative relationship between market share and quality score for two of the three diagnosis groups studied, meaning that hospitals in competitive markets have better quality scores than those in concentrated markets. We therefore conclude that more competition is associated with higher quality scores.

  14. Laboratory tests in the clinical risk management of potential drug-drug interactions: a cross-sectional study using drug-dispensing data from 100 Dutch community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Arjen F J; De Koning, Fred H P; De Smet, Peter A G M; Van Solinge, Wouter W; Egberts, Toine C G

    2009-01-01

    Patient safety and the life cycle of a drug are negatively influenced by the still increasing occurrence of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Clinical risk management of potential DDIs is required in patients using drugs to influence the benefit-risk profile positively. Information about laboratory test results, in particular, may be useful in the assessment of potential DDIs for the individual patient. The objective of this study was to examine the frequency and nature of laboratory tests required for the assessment of the clinical relevance of potential DDIs in Dutch community pharmacies. In addition, the nature and clinical relevance of these potential DDIs is analysed. All patients from 100 Dutch community pharmacies using, according to dispensing information, two or more drugs concomitantly on a specified date (Wednesday, 4 April 2007), were included (n = 223,019). The anonymous dispensing data of the included patients were analysed against a list of DDIs requiring laboratory tests for the assessment of their clinical relevance. The number of patients at risk for these potential DDIs with severe adverse reactions was calculated. The frequency of potential DDIs requiring laboratory tests were stratified by age, sex and degree of polypharmacy. Of the included patients, 24.4% had one or more potential DDIs (n = 54,427). In 9.0% of the included patients, one or more laboratory tests for the assessment of clinical relevance of the potential DDI were required (n = 19,968). The frequency of DDIs requiring laboratory tests increased with increasing age and number of drugs, but was not related to sex. The most commonly required laboratory tests were for renal function (42.2%), electrolytes (20.1%) and coagulation (13.1%). The percentage of patients at risk for potential DDIs requiring laboratory tests with adverse reaction category F (serious, irrecoverable disablement or death) was 2.5%; category E (increased risk of failure of life-saving therapy) was 0

  15. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

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    Mekonnen AB

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods: The study was carried out in the internal medicine ward from March to April, 2011 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The study design was a prospective observational study where pharmaceutical care services provided by clinical pharmacists for inpatients were documented over a period of two months. Interventions like optimization of rational drug use and physician acceptance of these recommendations were documented. Clinical significance of interventions was evaluated by an independent team (1 internist, 1 clinical pharmacologist using a standardized method for categorizing drug related problems (DRPs. Results: A total of 149 drug related interventions conducted for 48 patients were documented; among which 133(89.3% were clinical pharmacists initiated interventions and 16(10.7% interventions were initiated by other health care professionals. The most frequent DRPs underlying interventions were unnecessary drug therapy, 36(24.2%; needs additional drug therapy, 34(22.8% and noncompliance, 29(19.5%. The most frequent intervention type was change of dosage/instruction for use, 23(15.4%. Acceptance rate by physicians was 68.4%. Among the interventions that were rated as clinically significant, 46(48.9% and 25(26.6% had major and moderate clinical importance respectively. Conclusion: Involving trained clinical pharmacists in the healthcare team leads to clinically relevant and well accepted optimization of medicine use in a resource limited settings. This

  16. Oseltamivir compounding in the hospital pharmacy during the (H1N1 influenza pandemic

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    Márcia Lúcia de Mário Marin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Pandemics impose large demands on the health care system. The supply of appropriate chemotherapeutic agents, namely oseltamivir solution, presented a serious challenge in the recent influenza pandemic. This study reports on the rational series of pharmacotechnical steps that were followed to appropriately handle bulk oseltamivir powder to meet the increased demand. METHODS: During a six-week period in August and September of 2009, a task force was created in the Central Pharmacy of Hospital das Clínicas to convert imported oseltamivir phosphate into ready-to-use solution for utilization by physicians and public health authorities. The protocol included dissolution, physico-chemical tests and the bottling of a liquid microdose formulation for emergency room and outpatient dispensing with adequate quality control during all phases. RESULTS: The successful production routine was based on a specially designed flowchart according to which a batch of 33210 g of oseltamivir powder was converted into 32175 solution units during the aforementioned period with a net loss of only 2.6%. The end products were bottles containing 50 ml of 15 mg/mL oseltamivir solution. The measured concentration was stable and accurate (97.5% - 102.0% of the nominal value. The drug was prescribed as both a prophylactic and therapeutic agent. DISCUSSION: Hospital pharmacies are conventionally engaged in the manipulation of medical prescriptions and specialty drugs. They are generally responsible for only small-scale equipment used for manufacturing and quality-control procedures. The compounding of oseltamivir was a unique effort dictated by exceptional circumstances. CONCLUSION: The shortage of oseltamivir solution for clinical use was solved by emergency operationalization of a semi-industrial process in which bulk powder was converted into practical vials for prompt delivery.

  17. Results of a survey on the implementation of diagnostic reference levels for X-rays among Dutch hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijwaard, Harmen; Valk, Doreth; de Waard-Schalkx, Ischa

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for medical x-ray procedures are being implemented currently in the Netherlands. By order of the Dutch Healthcare Inspectorate, a survey has been conducted among 20 Dutch hospitals to investigate the level of implementation of the Dutch DRLs in current radiological practice. It turns out that hospitals are either well underway in implementing the DRLs or have already done so. However, the DRLs have usually not yet been incorporated in the QA system of the department nor in the treatment protocols. It was shown that the amount of radiation used, as far as it was indicated by the hospitals, usually remains below the DRLs. A procedure for comparing dose levels to the DRLs has been prescribed but is not always followed in practice. This is especially difficult in the case of children, as most general hospitals receive few children.

  18. Potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions dispensed in community and hospital pharmacies in East of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Dirin, Mandana Moradi; Mousavi, Sarah; Afshari, Amir Reza; Tabrizian, Kaveh; Ashrafi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aim to evaluate and compare type and prevalence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in prescriptions dispensed in both community and hospital setting in Zabol, Iran. Methods: A total of 2796 prescriptions were collected from community and inpatient and outpatient pharmacy of Amir-al-momenin only current acting hospital in Zabol, Iran. The prescriptions were processed using Lexi-Comp drug interaction software. The identified DDIs were categorized into five classes (A, B, C, ...

  19. Evaluation of pharmacy information system in teaching, private and social services Hospitals in 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Mirzaeian, Razieh; Jannesari, Hasan; Ehteshami, Asghar; Feizi, Awat; Raeisi, Ahmadreza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Supporting a therapeutic approach and medication therapy management, the pharmacy information system (PIS) acts as one of the pillars of hospital information system. This ensures that medication therapy is being supported with an optimal level of safety and quality similar to other treatments and services. Materials and Methods: The present study is an applied, cross-sectional study conducted on the PIS in use in selected hospitals. The research population included all users of PIS. The research sample is the same as the research population. The data collection instrument was the self-designed checklist developed from the guidelines of the American Society of Health System Pharmacists, Australia pharmaceutical Society and Therapeutic guidelines of the Drug Commission of the German Medical Association. The checklist validity was assessed by research supervisors and PIS users and pharmacists. Findings: The findings of this study were revealed that regarding the degree of meeting the standards given in the guidelines issued by the Society of Pharmacists, the highest rank in observing input standards belonged to Social Services hospitals with a mean score of 32.75. Although teaching hospitals gained the highest score both in process standards with a mean score of 29.15 and output standards with a mean score of 43.95, the private hospitals had the lowest mean score of 23.32, 17.78, 24.25 in input, process and output standards, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the findings, it can be claimed that the studied hospitals had a minimal compliance with the input, output and processing standards related to the PIS. PMID:25013832

  20. CONTINUING EDUCATION: VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN THE CONTEXT OF HOSPITAL PHARMACY AS A STRATEGY FOR INTEGRATION IN A MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAM OF SPECIALIZED HOSPITAL SERGIPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Adriano Santos Souza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The current reality of hospitals increasingly require professionals qualified to assume roles that require high levels of technical and scientific knowledge. The supervised internship in hospital pharmacy aims to train future professionals with critical awareness and ability to understand the reality and act on it. This study consists of an report of the experience of students supervised III internship of the graduate course in Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe. Initially the students made visits in the fields of pharmacy, warehouse, intensive care unit (ICU, emergency care to make the diagnosis of both situational and physical aspects of the information relating to medicines by nursing professionals. Later lectures were held, they were directed to health professionals and administrative staff of the pharmacy. From the results we observed that implement continuing education was of great importance to the quality of pharmacy professionals / warehouse and nursing staff, in which participants were able to actively interact with pharmacists and interns. This interaction reflected in increased communication and more concrete understanding of the multidisciplinary team.

  1. Continuing education: vocational training in the context of hospital pharmacy as a strategy for integration in a multidisciplinary team of specialized hospital Sergipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Adriano Santos Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current reality of hospitals increasingly require professionals qualified to assume roles that require high levels of technical and scientific knowledge. The supervised internship in hospital pharmacy aims to train future professionals with critical awareness and ability to understand the reality and act on it. This study consists of an report of the experience of students supervised III internship of the graduate course in Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe. Initially the students made visits in the fields of pharmacy, warehouse, intensive care unit (ICU, emergency care to make the diagnosis of both situational and physical aspects of the information relating to medicines by nursing professionals. Later lectures were held, they were directed to health professionals and administrative staff of the pharmacy. From the results we observed that implement continuing education was of great importance to the quality of pharmacy professionals / warehouse and nursing staff, in which participants were able to actively interact with pharmacists and interns. This interaction reflected in increased communication and more concrete understanding of the multidisciplinary team.

  2. ASHP national survey on informatics: assessment of the adoption and use of pharmacy informatics in U.S. hospitals--2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Gumpper, Karl F

    2008-12-01

    Results of the 2007 ASHP national survey on informatics are presented. All types and sizes of hospitals in the United States were included in the sample of 4112 pharmacy directors surveyed using an online data collection tool. The survey included over 300 data elements and was designed to assess the adoption and use of pharmacy informatics and technology within the medication-use process. In this national probability sample survey, the response rate was 25.9%. Hospitals appear to be moving toward an enterprise approach to information technology adoption and away from a best-of-breed approach. Although nearly half of hospitals have components of an electronic medical record (EMR), a complete digital hospital with a fully implemented EMR is far in the future, with only 5.9% of hospitals being fully digital (without paper records). An estimated 12.0% of hospitals use computerized prescriber-order-entry systems with decision support, 24.1% use bar-code medication administration, and 44.0% use intelligent infusion devices (smart pumps). Many of these technologies were not optimally configured, and significant advances must be made for hospitals to fully realize the benefits of these technologies. Hospitals have implemented many technologies in drug distribution, with 82.8% of hospitals having automated dispensing cabinets, 10.1% having robots, and 12.7% having carousel systems to manage inventory. Finally, most hospitals reported plans to adopt most of these technologies. This survey found that informatics and medication-use system technologies are widely present in all steps of the medication-use process. These technologies touch all health care professionals in the hospital and demonstrate the significant responsibility the pharmacy department holds for these technologies.

  3. Refer-To-Pharmacy: Pharmacy for the Next Generation Now! A Short Communication for Pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Alistair Gray

    2015-01-01

    Refer-to-Pharmacy is the first fully integrated hospital to community pharmacy referral system. This article explains the importance of these referrals for patients and health economies to improve medicines optimisation, and how Refer-to-Pharmacy works in both hospital and community pharmacies.

  4. The role of the hospital pharmacy in the storage and supply of antidotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Lombardo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cases of poisoning have been analyzed with the aim of estimating both the incidence and the seriousness of such xenobiotic effects, the major determinant agents, and the related antidotes used in hospital departments. From 2009 to November 2012, a survey of the availability of antidotes in the emergency room services was carried out in all hospital pharmacies under the Palermo Health Authority: Policlinico Paolo Giaccone, ARNAS Civico di Cristina Benefratelli, Azienda Ospedaliera Ospedali Riuniti Villa Sofia-Cervello. Figures show that the majority of poisoning events were caused by the use/abuse of drugs, especially psychopharmaceuticals, alcohol and narcotic substances. This overdose of medical drugs and its various causes is a cause for concern and highlights the fact that this tendency has not regressed over the years. Doctors and pharmacists should raise patients’ awareness about how to use drugs correctly, and make adequate information available to all patients in order to, first, reduce the risks, and second, reduce the cost of treatment for intoxication.

  5. The Combination of Lecture-Based Education and Computer-Assisted learning (CAL in the Preliminary Hospital Pharmacy Internship Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Charkhpour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Developments in the field of information technology has profoundly affected our educational system. The efficacy of Computer-Assisted Learning (CAL has already been evaluated in medical education, but in this study, we examined the efficacy of CAL in combination with Lecture-Based Education.Methods: This quasi-experimental before and after study included 33 senior-year pharmacy students who had passed the preliminary hospital pharmacy internship course. Pre-test questionnaires were given to the students in order to examine their knowledge and attitudes. Then, three chemotherapy prescriptions were given to them. Pharmacology recourses also were available virtually. At the end, students were asked to answer post-test questionnaires with questions based upon knowledge and attitude.Results: The mean score of their knowledge was 3.48±2.04 of 20 before intervention and 17.82±2.31 of 20 after intervention. There was a statistically significant difference between the pre-test and post-testing scores (p<0.001. The mean attitude score of students before intervention was 42.48±15.59 (medium and their score after intervention was 75.97±21.03 (high. There was a statistically significant difference between pre-test and post-test results (p<0.000.Conclusion: The combination of Lecture-Based Education and Computer-Assisted Learning improved senior pharmacy students’ knowledge and attitude in hospital pharmacy internship course.

  6. Clinical Presentation of General Paralysis of the Insane in a Dutch Psychiatric Hospital, 1924-1954.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daey Ouwens, Ingrid M; Lens, C Elisabeth; Fiolet, Aernoud T L; Ott, Alewijn; Koehler, Peter J; Verhoeven, Willem M A

    2015-01-01

    General paralysis of the insane (GPI) or dementia paralytica was once a fatal complication of syphilitic infection and a major reason for psychiatric hospitalization. Nowadays, physicians consider GPI to be exceptional. It should be noted, however, that syphilis re-emerged worldwide at the turn of the 20th to 21st century and a revival of GPI can, therefore, be expected. Advanced diagnosis is crucial in that treatment in the early, inflammatory phase is warranted before irreversible tissue damage occurs. Therefore, a renewed clinical awareness of the broad spectrum of psychiatric and neurologic signs and symptoms of GPI is needed. In this historical cohort study, comprising 105 patients with GPI admitted to the Dutch Vincent van Gogh Psychiatric Hospital in the period 1924-1954, the clinical presentation of this invalidating disorder is investigated and described in detail.

  7. To explore the standardization of the hospital pharmacy management%医院药房的规范化管理探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐姞

    2015-01-01

    医院药房主要负责审核调配处方和提供药学咨询服务,是医院的重要职能部门,是直接面对患者的窗口,如何保证药房质量管理、改变服务理念、提升服务层次、为患者提供高品质的药学服务,本文对此谈几点粗浅的认识。%With the development of the society, pharmacy management mechanism, the system will inevitably to the scientific management, standardized management, legal management transformation, truly for the masses to provide efficient, safe and cheap drugs. Outpatient pharmacy, ward pharmacy, pharmacy department of hospital pharmacy, such as integrating technology, management, management of comprehensive institutions. The stand or fall of pharmacy management not only affect their own work, also directly affect the curative effect of drugs, the patients' medical security, the hospital's image, and each patient's vital interest, relates to the reputation of the hospital in the community and the long-term development of hospital. The pharmacy is an important part of the work floor management, pharmacy staff sense of responsibility is the premise of providing high quality pharmaceutical care for patients, standardization, institutionalization, modernization and scientific management is the important guarantee to improve the quality of pharmaceutical care. Therefore, the standardized management of the hospital pharmacy has very important significance. The author combines the actual conditions of their own work, talk to a pharmacy management point of view.

  8. [Decreased hospital spending as a result of antibiotic prescriptions dispensed in community pharmacies. Results from the Midi-Pyrenees region.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallini, Adeline; Taboulet, Florence

    2010-01-01

    A contract between French hospitals and national health authorities was signed in early 2006 to improve the rational use of antibiotics in hospitals. The contract offers a financial reward in the event of decreased spending as a result of hospital prescriptions dispensed in community pharmacies compared to the previous year. The article describes the limitations relating to the financial rewards defined by the contract, particularly those concerning the measurement and relevance of the chosen indicator. Since no national data are currently available, quantitative results drawn from the Midi-Pyrénées region are used to illustrate the analysis.

  9. Cross-sectional study on factors hampering implementation of measles pre- and postexposure measures in Dutch hospitals during the 2013-2014 measles outbreak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fievez, L.C.R.; Wong, A.; Ruijs, W.L.M.; Meerstadt-Rombach, F.S.; Timen, A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study examined adherence to national recommendations on measles pre- and postexposure measures, including immunization of health care workers (HCWs) in Dutch hospitals, during a national outbreak of measles in The Netherlands. This study also investigated which hospital

  10. The Utilization of Computers in Community and Hospital Practice: The Role of the Colleges of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, Alan E.; Travers, Terry J.

    1981-01-01

    The approach taken by an Australian college of pharmacy to provide its students with a working knowledge of pharmacy computer systems is described. Hands-on experience with a microcomputer and a program developed within the college are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  11. A Survey of Practices in Hospital Pharmacies. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Thomas D.; Henrich, Robert R.

    A survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine what procedures are used in health care facility pharmacies for the performance of tasks previously selected for inclusion in a proposed curriculum for pharmacy technicians. Questionnaires were distributed to a national sample of 48 health care facilities,…

  12. Hospital Pharmacy Technician Project; Development and Validation of the Task Inventory. Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Robert R.; Goldsmith, Katherine L.

    Evaluations of existing pharmacy personnel programs and personal interviews with leaders in the field were conducted to develop a pharmacist and technician task list. Using the survey instrument developed for other occupations, the National Technical Advisory Committee for Pharmacy analyzed and validated the task list. The final organization of…

  13. HospitalPharmacyManagementExperience%浅议住院药房管理的若干经验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雯; 刘益玲; 宋阳; 茅建辉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To summarize the experience in hospital pharmacy management. Methods The analysis of this paper can be divided into two aspects, that is employees management and drug management. Results The professional quality and professional quality are the most important in hospital pharmacy. Employees management, and drug administration should be segmentation categories. Conclusion The quality of employees is the key and foundation of good drug management, and the drug classiifcation management is the core of hospital pharmacy management.%  目的总结住院药房管理经验。方法从人员管理和药品管理两方面入手,并兼顾二者之间的内在关联。结果住院药房人员管理以业务素质和职业素质两方面最为重要,药品管理应细分门类,兼顾请领和验收等环节。结论人员素质是实现药品良好管理的关键和基础,药品分类管理是住院药房管理的核心。

  14. Competition in the Dutch hospital sector: an analysis of health care volume and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbe-Alkemade, Y J F M; Groot, T L C M; Lindeboom, M

    2017-03-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of market competition on health care volume and cost. At the start of 2005, the financing system of Dutch hospitals started to be gradually changed from a closed-end budgeting system to a non-regulated price competitive prospective reimbursement system. The gradual implementation of price competition is a 'natural experiment' that provides a unique opportunity to analyze the effects of market competition on hospital behavior. We have access to a unique database, which contains hospital discharge data of diagnosis treatment combinations (DBCs) of individual patients, including detailed care activities. Difference-in-difference estimates show that the implementation of market-based competition leads to relatively lower total costs, production volume and number of activities overall. Difference-in-difference estimates on treatment level show that the average costs for outpatient DBCs decreased due to a decrease in the number of activities per DBC. The introduction of market competition led to an increase of average costs of inpatient DBCs. Since both volume and number of activities have not changed significantly, we conclude that the cost increase is likely the result of more expensive activities. A possible explanation for our finding is that hospitals look for possible efficiency improvements in predominantly outpatient care products that are relatively straightforward, using easily analyzable technologies. The effects of competition on average cost and the relative shares of inpatient and outpatient treatments on specialty level are significant but contrary for cardiology and orthopedics, suggesting that specialties react differently to competitive incentives.

  15. ABC inventory analysis and economic order quantity concept in hospital pharmacy purchasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballentine, R; Ravin, R L; Gilbert, J R

    1976-06-01

    ABC inventory analysis and the economic order quantity (EOQ) concept were studied as alternatives to the cyclical ordering system used by the pharmacy in a 558-bed general hospital. The inventory was divided into A, B or C groups according to the annual dollar value of the items. Two samples were selected to be studied (the first consisting of 10% of the total inventory and the second consisting of 10% of the A, or high cost, items). For each item in both samples the EOQ was calculated to estimate the proposed annual inventory cost as compared to the actual cost as determined from past inventory records. In the first sample, there was a statistically significant mean annual savings of $4.13 +/- $0.36 (S.E.) using the proposed annual cost. In the second sample there was a mean savings of $2.42 +/- $0.60 (S.E.) using the proposed method, which was not statistically significant. Most of the savings with the proposed ABC-EOQ system would occur with the low dollar value items (B and C items) which were being purchased too frequently.

  16. Prevalence, risk factors and molecular epidemiology of highly resistant gram negative rods in hospitalized patients in the Dutch region Kennemerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souverein, Dennis; Euser, Sjoerd M; Herpers, Bjorn L; Diederen, Bram; Houtman, Patricia; van Seventer, Marina; van Ess, Ingeborg; Kluytmans, Jan; Rossen, John W A; Den Boer, Jeroen W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper describes (1) the Highly Resistant Gram Negative Rod (HR-GNR) prevalence rate, (2) their genotypes, acquired resistance genes and (3) associated risk factors of HR-GNR colonization among the hospitalized population in the Dutch region Kennemerland. METHODS: Between 1 October 2

  17. Prevalence, risk factors and molecular epidemiology of highly resistant gram negative rods in hospitalized patients in the Dutch region Kennemerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souverein, Dennis; Euser, Sjoerd M.; Herpers, Bjorn L.; Diederen, Bram; Houtman, Patricia; van Seventer, Marina; van Ess, Ingeborg; Kluytmans, Jan; Rossen, John W. A.; Den Boer, Jeroen W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This paper describes (1) the Highly Resistant Gram Negative Rod (HR-GNR) prevalence rate, (2) their genotypes, acquired resistance genes and (3) associated risk factors of HR-GNR colonization among the hospitalized population in the Dutch region Kennemerland. Methods: Between 1 October 2

  18. Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the hospital-level consumer assessment of health plans survey (R) instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Arah; A.H.A. ten Asbroek; D.M.J. Delnoij; J.S. de Koning; P.J.A. Stam; A.H. Poll; B. Vriens; P.F. Schmidt; N.S. Klazinga

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the reliability and validity of a translated version of the American Hospital-level Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (R) (H-CAHPS) instrument for use in Dutch health care. Data Sources/Study Setting. Primary survey data from adults aged 18 years or more who were recen

  19. Coping styles relate to health and work environment of Norwegian and Dutch hospital nurses : A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, Jolanda A. H.; Roelen, Corne A. M.; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Mageroy, Nils; Pallesen, Stale; Bjorvatn, Bjorn; Moen, Bente E.

    2012-01-01

    Nurses exposed to high nursing stress report no health complaints as long as they have high coping abilities. The purpose of this study was to investigate coping styles in relation to the health status and work environment of Norwegian and Dutch hospital nurses. This comparative study included a ran

  20. What Can TA Learn from Patient Narratives : Using Narrative Methodology to Assess the Role of Patients in Dutch Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerings, M.; van Egmond, Stans; Sools, Anneke; van Duijvenbooden, Lisa; Drossaert, Stans; Michalek, Tomáš; Hebáková, Lenka; Hennen, Leonhard; Scherz, Constanze; Nierling, Linda; Hahn, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Using narrative methodology, we assess the feasibility of the active and independent patient, an image portrayed in Dutch government papers and contested by patient organizations, medical occupational groups and political parties. 109 stories about hospital care from 103 patients were collected

  1. Delirium subtype identification and the validation of the Delirium Rating Scale - Revised-98 (Dutch version) in hospitalized elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. de Rooij; B.C. Munster; J.C. Korevaar; G. Casteelen; M.J. Schuurmans; R.C. van der Mast; M. Levi

    2006-01-01

    Background Delirium is the most common acute neuropsychiatric disorder in hospitalized elderly. The Dutch version of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98) appears to be a reliable method to classify delirium. The aim of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of the DRS-R-

  2. The general pharmacy work explored in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, M. P.

    Objective To determine the frequency and nature of general pharmacy work at three Dutch community pharmacies. Methods In a purposive and convenience sample of three Dutch community pharmacies the general work was investigated. Multi-dimensional work sampling (MDWS) was used. The study took six

  3. The general pharmacy work explored in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency and nature of general pharmacy work at three Dutch community pharmacies. Methods In a purposive and convenience sample of three Dutch community pharmacies the general work was investigated. Multi-dimensional work sampling (MDWS) was used. The study took six weeks

  4. Application of Process Mining in Healthcare - A Case Study in a Dutch Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, R. S.; Schonenberg, M. H.; Song, M.; van der Aalst, W. M. P.; Bakker, P. J. M.

    To gain competitive advantage, hospitals try to streamline their processes. In order to do so, it is essential to have an accurate view of the "careflows" under consideration. In this paper, we apply process mining techniques to obtain meaningful knowledge about these flows, e.g., to discover typical paths followed by particular groups of patients. This is a non-trivial task given the dynamic nature of healthcare processes. The paper demonstrates the applicability of process mining using a real case of a gynecological oncology process in a Dutch hospital. Using a variety of process mining techniques, we analyzed the healthcare process from three different perspectives: (1) the control flow perspective, (2) the organizational perspective and (3) the performance perspective. In order to do so we extracted relevant event logs from the hospital's information system and analyzed these logs using the ProM framework. The results show that process mining can be used to provide new insights that facilitate the improvement of existing careflows.

  5. Costs and benefits of the MRSA Search and Destroy policy in a Dutch hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijen, M M L; Kluytmans, J A J W

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the costs and benefits of the MRSA Search and Destroy policy in a Dutch hospital during 2001 through 2006. Variable costs included costs for isolation, contact tracing, treatment of carriers and closure of wards. Fixed costs were the costs for the building of isolation rooms and the salary of one full-time infection control practitioner. To determine the benefits of the Search and Destroy policy, the transmission rate during the study period was calculated. Furthermore, the number of cases of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia prevented was estimated, as well as its associated prevented costs and patient lives. The costs of the MRSA policy were estimated to be euro 215,559 a year, which equals euro 5.54 per admission. The daily isolation costs for MRSA-suspected and -positive hospitalised patients were euro 95.59 and euro 436.62, respectively. Application of the Search and Destroy policy resulted in a transmission rate of 0.30 and was estimated to prevent 36 cases of MRSA bacteraemia per year, resulting in annual savings of euro 427,356 for the hospital and ten lives per year (95% confidence interval [CI] 8-14). In conclusion, application of the MRSA Search and Destroy policy in a hospital in a country with a low endemic MRSA incidence saves money and lives.

  6. Evaluation Management of Drugs and Relations with Quality of Outpatient Pharmacy Services in One of Hospital Pontianak City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enggy Erwansani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays government policy which embodies the National Social Security System (SJSN where the presence of this system that every Indonesian people entitled to social security to be able to meet the basic needs of living. This study aims to describe the pharmaceutical drug outpatient management Hospital X Pontianak City and analyze the relationship management with the quality of pharmaceutical care medicine outpatient Hospital X Pontianak. This medication management including planning, organizing, directing, and monitoring. This study uses a quantitative approach which is an observational analytic research using cross sectional study with a sample of outpatient pharmacy customer research in Hospital X Pontianak. Collecting data using questionnaires from 100 customers outpatient with consecutive sampling method. The results using Pearson Correlation analysis showed the drug management relationship with the quality of outpatient pharmacy services which means the value of aspects planning (r=0.626; p<0,001, organizing (r=0.409; p<0,001, directing (r=0.359; p<0,001, and controlling (r=0.426; p<0,001 with R2 multiple 66.80%. The description of pharmaceutical drug management in outpatient Hospital X produce an average value 96.90% so as to be in very good category, there by proving the existence of a strong relationship between the four functions of management of the quality of pharmaceutical care medicine outpatient Hospital X.

  7. Lead-time reduction utilizing lean tools applied to healthcare: the inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Araidah, Omar; Momani, Amer; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Momani, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The healthcare arena, much like the manufacturing industry, benefits from many aspects of the Toyota lean principles. Lean thinking contributes to reducing or eliminating nonvalue-added time, money, and energy in healthcare. In this paper, we apply selected principles of lean management aiming at reducing the wasted time associated with drug dispensing at an inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital. Thorough investigation of the drug dispensing process revealed unnecessary complexities that contribute to delays in delivering medications to patients. We utilize DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) and 5S (Sort, Set-in-order, Shine, Standardize, Sustain) principles to identify and reduce wastes that contribute to increasing the lead-time in healthcare operations at the pharmacy understudy. The results obtained from the study revealed potential savings of > 45% in the drug dispensing cycle time.

  8. A norm utilisation for scarce hospital resources: Evidence from operating rooms in a Dutch university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houdenhoven, Mark; Hans, Elias W.; Klein, Jan; Wullink, Gerhard; Kazemier, Geert

    2007-01-01

    Background: Utilisation of operating rooms is high on the agenda of hospital managers and researchers. Many efforts in the area of maximising the utilisation have been focussed on finding the holy grail of 100% utilisation. The utilisation that can be realised, however, depends on the patient mix an

  9. Computer-assisted inventory control utilizing ABC inventory analysis and EOQ in a hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J; Yemen, S

    1986-12-01

    In this paper, a project whose purpose was to develop and implement a workable inventory control system is discussed. Specific objectives of the project included the avoidance of out-of-stock situations, minimization of total inventory costs, and increased efficiency of the purchasing power. The initial step in the project was the determination of both fixed and variable ordering and carrying costs. Then a micro-computer was enlisted to print an inventory listing according to the total cost based on usage of the item for the past year and the inventory was subsequently classified into A, B and C categories. The economic order quantity (EOQ) was calculated for items in class A, while B and C items were purchased on a min/max basis. Also, a weekly ordering schedule for class A items was developed based on frequency of ordering. Following this schedule, all items to be ordered on a particular week are printed by the computer. The computer maintains a perpetual inventory, and a list of B and C items below minimum quantity is printed upon request. The efficiency of the inventory control increased dramatically (50%) after project implementation. Although cost savings were found, they were not substantial compared to our previous system (less than $5,000). Out-of-stock situations for B and C items occurred almost as frequently as before project implementation. This study demonstrated that the EOQ concept in conjunction with ABC inventory analysis may be an effective inventory control system in hospital pharmacy. Increased efficiency and cost savings were achieved. Protection against unpredictable demand and avoidance of out-of-stock situations can be achieved by closer adherence to stated ordering procedures for B and C items.

  10. Medication Errors Among Geriatrics at the Outpatient Pharmacy in a Teaching Hospital in Kelantan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Dellemin Che; Ibrahim, Noor Shufiza; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed

    2004-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the medication errors among geriatrics at the outpatient pharmacy in a teaching hospital in Kelantan and the strategies to minimize the prevalence. A retrospective study was conducted that involved screening of prescription for a one-month period (March 2001). Only 15.35% (1601 prescription) of a total 10,429 prescriptions were for geriatrics. The prescriptions that were found to have medication errors was 403. Therefore, the prevalence of medication errors per day was approximately 20 cases. Generally, the errors between both genders were found to be comparable and to be the highest for Malays and at the age of 60–64 years old. Administrative errors was recorded to be the highest which included patient’s particulars and validity of the prescriptions (70.22%) and drugs that available in HUSM (16.13%). Whereas the total of prescribing errors were low. Under prescribing errors were pharmaceutical error (0.99%) and clinical error (8.68%). Sixteen cases or 3.98% had more than 1 error. The highest prevalence went to geriatrics who received more than nine drugs (32.16%), geriatrics with more than 3 clinical diagnosis (10.06%), geriatrics who visited specialist clinics (37.52%) and treated by the specialists (31.07%). The estimated cost for the 403 medication errors in March was RM9,327 or RM301 per day that included the cost of drugs and humanistic cost. The projected cost of medication errors per year was RM 111,924. In conclusion, it is very clear that the role of pharmacist is very great in preventing and minimizing the medication errors beside the needs of correct prescription writing and other strategies by all of the heath care components. PMID:22973127

  11. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haug Jon B

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. Methods During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics - that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones - in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification. Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Results Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01 used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks, whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4

  12. Euthanasia and assisted suicide in Dutch hospitals: the role of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruchem-van de Scheur, G G; van der Arend, Arie J G; Huijer Abu-Saad, Huda; van Wijmen, Frans C B; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Ter Meulen, Ruud H J

    2008-06-01

    To report a study on the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in hospitals, conducted as part of a wider study on the role of nurses in medical end-of-life decisions. Issues concerning legislation and regulation with respect to the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide gave the Dutch Minister for Health reason to commission a study on the role of nurses in medical end-of-life decisions in hospitals, homecare and nursing homes. A questionnaire was sent in 2003 to 692 nurses employed in 73 hospital locations. The response suitable for analysis was from 532 (76.9%) nurses. Data were quantitatively analysed using spss version 11.5 for Windows. In almost half of the cases (45.1%), the nurse was the first with whom patients discussed their request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. Consultations between physicians and nurses quite often took place (78.8%). In several cases (15.4%), nurses themselves administered the euthanatics with or without a physician. It is not self-evident that hospitals have guidelines concerning euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide. In the decision-making process, the consultation between the physician and the nurse needs improvement. In administering the euthanatics, physicians should take responsibility and should not leave these actions to nurses. Guidelines may play an important role to improve the collaboration between physicians and nurses and to prevent procedural, ethical and legal misunderstandings. Nurses in clinical practice are often closely involved in the last stage of a person's life. Consequently, they are often confronted with caring for patients requesting euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. The results provide relevant information and may help nurses in defining their role in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, especially in case these practices should become legalised.

  13. [Follow-up of patients treated by VKA: Interest of a pharmaceutical link between the hospital and the retail pharmacies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidon, D; Lecoeur, A; Segui, E; Seguette, N; Le Mercier, F; Bauler, S

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are used by 1,7% of the French population. Patient education and monitoring can decrease the number of iatrogenic hospitalizations due to VKA. We assessed the impact of a communication between hospital and retail pharmacists about patient's knowledge on VKA. The aim of our study has been to evaluate the value added by the link between the hospital pharmacist and the community pharmacist on the follow-up of patients treated by vitamin K antagonist. Patient information about VKA treatment is offered to inpatients in our hospital. An information form is filled for each patient treated by VKA. Patient's knowledge is assessed on the document (Name of VKA, cause of treatment, monitoring, risks of overdose, compliance…). This form is sent to the community pharmacist after the training when the patient leaves the hospital (by fax or by email). The form is sent back by the community pharmacist after the second training. Sixty-eight patients received the training, 48 forms have been sent to the retail pharmacists and 43 forms have been sent back to the hospital. Seven retail pharmacists replied spontaneously. Twenty-eight patients increased their knowledge (in average+21%) and 12 patients stabilized their knowledge. The best-known concepts were the INR target, the time of drug intake, the risks of overdose and the information of the family. The improvement of knowledge is significant for the name of VKA, the cause of treatment, efficacy assessment and signs of overdose. The implementation of a communication between the hospital and the retail pharmacies is time-consuming but the follow-up of those patients seems essential to keep a good knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: reducing misdiagnosis via collaboration between an inpatient anticoagulation pharmacy service and hospital reference laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Allison E; Bowles, Harmony; Borrego, Matthew E; Montoya, Tiffany N; Garcia, David A; Mahan, Charles

    2016-11-01

    Misdiagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is common and exposes patients to high-risk therapies and potentially serious adverse events. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of collaboration between an inpatient pharmacy-driven anticoagulation management service (AMS) and hospital reference laboratory to reduce inappropriate HIT antibody testing via pharmacist intervention and use of the 4T pre-test probability score. Secondary objectives included clinical outcomes and cost-savings realized through reduced laboratory testing and decreased unnecessary treatment of HIT. This was a single center, pre-post, observational study. The hospital reference laboratory contacted the AMS when they received a blood sample for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent HIT antibody (HIT Ab). Trained pharmacists prospectively scored each HIT Ab ordered by using the 4T score with subsequent communication to physicians recommending for or against processing and reporting of lab results. Utilizing retrospective chart review and a database for all patients with a HIT Ab ordered during the study period, we compared the incidence of HIT Ab testing before and after implementation of the pharmacy-driven 4T score intervention. Our intervention significantly reduced the number of inappropriate HIT Ab tests processed (176 vs. 63, p < 0.0001), with no increase in thrombotic or hemorrhagic events. Overall incidence of suspected and confirmed HIT was <3 and <0.005 %, respectively. Overall cost savings were $75,754 (US) or 62 % per patient exposed to heparin between the pre and post intervention groups. Collaboration between inpatient pharmacy AMS and hospital reference laboratories can result in reduction of misdiagnosis of HIT and significant cost savings with similar safety.

  15. Evaluation of the in vitro ocular toxicity of the fortified antibiotic eye drops prepared at the Hospital Pharmacy Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anxo Fernández-Ferreiro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of parenteral antibiotic eye drop formulations with non-marketed compositions or concentrations, commonly called fortified antibiotic eye drops, is a common practice in Ophthalmology in the hospital setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro ocular toxicity of the main fortified antibiotic eye drops prepared in the Hospital Pharmacy Departments. We have conducted an in vitro experimental study in order to test the toxicity of gentamicin, amikacin, cefazolin, ceftazidime, vancomycin, colistimethate sodium and imipenem-cilastatin eye drops; their cytotoxicity and acute tissue irritation have been evaluated. Cell-based assays were performed on human stromal keratocytes, using a cell-based impedance biosensor system [xCELLigence Real-Time System Cell Analyzer (RTCA], and the Hen’s Egg Test for the ocular irritation tests. All the eye drops, except for vancomycin and imipenem, have shown a cytotoxic effect dependent on concentration and time; higher concentrations and longer exposure times will cause a steeper decline in the population of stromal keratocytes. Vancomycin showed a major initial cytotoxic effect, which was reverted over time; and imipenem appeared as a non-toxic compound for stromal cells. The eye drops with the highest irritating effect on the ocular surface were gentamicin and vancomycin. Those antibiotic eye drops prepared at the Hospital Pharmacy Departments included in this study were considered as compounds potentially cytotoxic for the ocular surface; this toxicity was dependent on the concentration used

  16. Evaluation of the in vitro ocular toxicity of the fortified antibiotic eye drops prepared at the Hospital Pharmacy Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; González-Barcia, Miguel; Gil-Martínez, María; Santiago Varela, María; Pardo, María; Blanco-Méndez, José; Piñeiro-Ces, Antonio; Lamas Díaz, María Jesús; Otero-Espinar, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    The use of parenteral antibiotic eye drop formulations with non-marketed compositions or concentrations, commonly called fortified antibiotic eye drops, is a common practice in Ophthalmology in the hospital setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro ocular toxicity of the main fortified antibiotic eye drops prepared in the Hospital Pharmacy Departments. We have conducted an in vitro experimental study in order to test the toxicity of gentamicin, amikacin, cefazolin, ceftazidime, vancomycin, colistimethate sodium and imipenem-cilastatin eye drops; their cytotoxicity and acute tissue irritation have been evaluated. Cell-based assays were performed on human stromal keratocytes, using a cell-based impedance biosensor system [xCELLigence Real-Time System Cell Analyzer (RTCA)], and the Hen's Egg Test for the ocular irritation tests. All the eye drops, except for vancomycin and imipenem, have shown a cytotoxic effect dependent on concentration and time; higher concentrations and longer exposure times will cause a steeper decline in the population of stromal keratocytes. Vancomycin showed a major initial cytotoxic effect, which was reverted over time; and imipenem appeared as a non-toxic compound for stromal cells. The eye drops with the highest irritating effect on the ocular surface were gentamicin and vancomycin. Those antibiotic eye drops prepared at the Hospital Pharmacy Departments included in this study were considered as compounds potentially cytotoxic for the ocular surface; this toxicity was dependent on the concentration used.

  17. Protocols for treating the postoperative pain of fractures in Dutch hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossendorp R

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Rikkert Ossendorp,1 Tymour Forouzanfar,2 Claire E Ashton-James,2,3 Frank Bloemers11Department of Surgery, VU University Medical Center, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, VU University Medical Center, 3Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, VU University, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsIntroduction: Every year, over 260,000 patients in the Netherlands are diagnosed with a traumatic fracture. Many patients are treated surgically and need postoperative treatment of pain. Research suggests postoperative pain is often under-treated, leaving a significant proportion of patients in moderate to severe postoperative pain. Specialized, evidence-based pain-management protocols offer patients the best possible pain management, and significantly reduce the risk of pain-related health complications.Objective: Our objective was to review the range of postoperative pain protocols that are currently being used to treat postoperative fracture pain within the Netherlands, and investigate whether a specialized, evidence-based protocol for treating postoperative fracture pain exists within this sample.Methods: A written request for the protocol currently being used for the treatment of postoperative pain following the surgical treatment of a fracture was sent to 101 Dutch hospital departments. The administration and dosage of pain medications used during postoperative pain management were then identified and summarized.Results: Of the contacted hospitals, 57% sent in protocols; 45% of these were eligible for analysis. All of the departments sent a general or acute pain protocol rather than a specialized protocol for the treatment of postoperative pain associated with the surgical treatment of fractures. A total of 22 different analgesics were used for pain management in 135 different administration schemes. Paracetamol, diclofenac, and morphine were used in the majority of protocols. Medication was given via oral, rectal, intravenous

  18. Long-run effects of gestation during the Dutch Hunger Winter famine on labor market and hospitalization outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholte, Robert S; van den Berg, Gerard J; Lindeboom, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch Hunger Winter (1944/45) is the most-studied famine in the literature on long-run effects of malnutrition in utero. Its temporal and spatial demarcations are clear, it was severe, it was not anticipated, and nutritional conditions in society were favorable and stable before and after the famine. This is the first study to analyze effects of in utero exposure on labor market outcomes and hospitalization late in life, and the first to use register data covering the full Dutch population to examine long-run effects of this famine. We provide results of famine exposure by sub-interval of gestation. We find a significantly negative effect of exposure during the first trimester of gestation on employment outcomes 53 or more years after birth. Hospitalization rates in the years before retirement are higher after middle or late gestational exposure.

  19. Teaching Human Values in Pharmacy Education: Case Studies from the Classroom and the Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    It is proposed that literature can contribute to the teaching of human values in pharmaceutical education. Two texts illustrating pertinent issues are examined, and the process and relevance of literature instruction in humanistic education are discussed. Where, when, and why to integrate literature into the pharmacy curriculum are also addressed.…

  20. A Modular Pharmacy Practice Laboratory Course Integrating Role-Playing Scenarios with Community and Hospital Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, John W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evolution of a modular pharmacy practice course that uses practitioners as role-model instructors in prepared and impromptu scenarios. The course reviews the top 200 drug products while introducing students to both community and institutional practice settings. Appendices include a summary of the…

  1. How much do Blantyre dispensers in hospital and community pharmacies know about the new malaria treatment guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minyaliwa, Collins; Bandawe, Chiwoza; Mwale, Richman James

    2012-03-01

    To determine the knowledge of dispensers in hospital and community pharmacies within Blantyre on new malaria treatment guidelines. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used for data collection and the questions focused on the knowledge of dispensers on the new malaria treatment guidelines and whether the subjects were involved in the preparation or implementation of the guidelines or had undertaken any training on how to dispense the new anti-malarial medicines. None of the participants had been involved in the preparation of the treatment guidelines and only 45.5% of the participants had undertaken the pre-implementation training. Ninety percent of the interviewees had knowledge concerning the appropriate treatment of malaria in pregnancy. However, as many as 90.9% of the interviewed participants could not mention any possible five or more side-effects of LA and only 13.6% knew how to properly manage the possible effects. Only 27.3% knew the correct dose regimen of LA and none of them knew the condition of taking LA with a fatty meal for improved absorption. Lack of involvement of the pharmaceutical personnel working in hospital and community pharmacies, from the preparation of new malaria treatment guidelines to their implementation, inadequate training and qualifications of the dispensing personnel contributed to their lack of knowledge and skill on how to rationally dispense the medicines. Pharmaceutical personnel dispensing in the pharmacies need to be involved from the beginning in the preparation of treatment guidelines. Adequate training should be provided and followed by continuous professional education.

  2. [Survey on Information Sharing and Approaches to Cooperation between Hospitals and Community Pharmacies in the Care of Outpatients Receiving Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Chika; Ogata, Kentaro; Nishida, Emi; Kakimoto, Hideki; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Fukuda, Mahiru; Oda, Mayumi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Kamimura, Hidetoshi

    2016-11-01

    Outpatients undergoing chemotherapy receive oral anticancer drugs, supportive care medicine, and drugs for complications from health insurance pharmacies(ie, drugstores). Therefore, drugstore personnel and patients were surveyed using a questionnaire to ascertain the current conditions of information sharing between drugstores and hospitals. Only 31% of the patients surveyed responded that they received cancer chemotherapy via the drugstores, while a few of them understood the need for information sharing with the drugstore. We also found that the drugstores required a considerable amount of patient information including prescribed therapeutic drugs, treatment regimens, disease conditions, and test value. Therefore, we held a study session and clinical conference to facilitate the creation of an information-sharing system. In conclusion, it is imperative for drugstores and hospitals to cooperate and establish a strategy for information sharing in the future.

  3. Implementation of patient education at first and second dispensing of statins in Dutch community pharmacies: the sequel of a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Steeg-van Gompel, Caroline H P A; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A G M

    2011-11-16

    As a result of the previous part of this trial, many patients with cardiovascular disease were expected to receive a statin for the first time. In order to provide these patients with comprehensive information on statins, as recommended by professional guidance, education at first and second dispensing of statins had to be implemented. This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of an intensive implementation program targeted at pharmacy project assistants on the frequency of providing education at first dispensing (EAFD) and education at second dispensing (EASD) of statins in community pharmacies. The participating community pharmacies were clustered on the basis of local collaboration, were numbered by a research assistant and subsequently an independent statistician performed a block randomization, in which the cluster size (number of pharmacies in each cluster) was balanced. The pharmacies in the control group received a written manual on the implementation of EAFD and EASD; the pharmacies in the intervention group received intensive support for the implementation. The impact of the intensive implementation program on the implementation process and on the primary outcomes was examined in a random coefficient logistic regression model, which took into account that patients were grouped within pharmacy clusters. Of the 37 pharmacies in the intervention group, 17 pharmacies (50%) provided EAFD and 12 pharmacies (35.3%) provided EASD compared to 14 pharmacies (45.2%, P = 0.715) and 12 pharmacies (38.7%, P = 0.899), respectively, of the 34 pharmacies in the control group. In the intervention group a total of 72 of 469 new statin users (15.4%) received education and 49 of 393 patients with a second statin prescription (12.5%) compared to 78 of 402 new users (19.4%, P = 0.944) and 35 of 342 patients with a second prescription (10.2%, P = 0.579) in the control group. The intensive implementation program did not increase the frequency of providing EAFD and EASD

  4. Implementation of patient education at first and second dispensing of statins in Dutch community pharmacies: the sequel of a cluster randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background As a result of the previous part of this trial, many patients with cardiovascular disease were expected to receive a statin for the first time. In order to provide these patients with comprehensive information on statins, as recommended by professional guidance, education at first and second dispensing of statins had to be implemented. This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of an intensive implementation program targeted at pharmacy project assistants on the frequency of providing education at first dispensing (EAFD) and education at second dispensing (EASD) of statins in community pharmacies. Methods The participating community pharmacies were clustered on the basis of local collaboration, were numbered by a research assistant and subsequently an independent statistician performed a block randomization, in which the cluster size (number of pharmacies in each cluster) was balanced. The pharmacies in the control group received a written manual on the implementation of EAFD and EASD; the pharmacies in the intervention group received intensive support for the implementation. The impact of the intensive implementation program on the implementation process and on the primary outcomes was examined in a random coefficient logistic regression model, which took into account that patients were grouped within pharmacy clusters. Results Of the 37 pharmacies in the intervention group, 17 pharmacies (50%) provided EAFD and 12 pharmacies (35.3%) provided EASD compared to 14 pharmacies (45.2%, P = 0.715) and 12 pharmacies (38.7%, P = 0.899), respectively, of the 34 pharmacies in the control group. In the intervention group a total of 72 of 469 new statin users (15.4%) received education and 49 of 393 patients with a second statin prescription (12.5%) compared to 78 of 402 new users (19.4%, P = 0.944) and 35 of 342 patients with a second prescription (10.2%, P = 0.579) in the control group. Conclusion The intensive implementation program did not increase the

  5. Implementation of patient education at first and second dispensing of statins in Dutch community pharmacies: the sequel of a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van de Steeg-van Gompel Caroline HPA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of the previous part of this trial, many patients with cardiovascular disease were expected to receive a statin for the first time. In order to provide these patients with comprehensive information on statins, as recommended by professional guidance, education at first and second dispensing of statins had to be implemented. This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of an intensive implementation program targeted at pharmacy project assistants on the frequency of providing education at first dispensing (EAFD and education at second dispensing (EASD of statins in community pharmacies. Methods The participating community pharmacies were clustered on the basis of local collaboration, were numbered by a research assistant and subsequently an independent statistician performed a block randomization, in which the cluster size (number of pharmacies in each cluster was balanced. The pharmacies in the control group received a written manual on the implementation of EAFD and EASD; the pharmacies in the intervention group received intensive support for the implementation. The impact of the intensive implementation program on the implementation process and on the primary outcomes was examined in a random coefficient logistic regression model, which took into account that patients were grouped within pharmacy clusters. Results Of the 37 pharmacies in the intervention group, 17 pharmacies (50% provided EAFD and 12 pharmacies (35.3% provided EASD compared to 14 pharmacies (45.2%, P = 0.715 and 12 pharmacies (38.7%, P = 0.899, respectively, of the 34 pharmacies in the control group. In the intervention group a total of 72 of 469 new statin users (15.4% received education and 49 of 393 patients with a second statin prescription (12.5% compared to 78 of 402 new users (19.4%, P = 0.944 and 35 of 342 patients with a second prescription (10.2%, P = 0.579 in the control group. Conclusion The intensive implementation program

  6. Attitude of fourth year Doctor of Pharmacy students towards pharmacy profession and their career preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Saad

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Fourth year students believed that pharmacy education and practice affect the health care system. Their favorite career areas were clinical pharmacy, industrial pharmacy, and hospital pharmacy. Personal interest was the most important factor involved in this selection. Most of them were interested in pharmacy-related research activities.

  7. [Differences between Dutch provinces in perinatal mortality and travel time to hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelli, Anita C J; Rijninks-van Driel, Greta C; Erwich, Jan Jaap H M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Brouwers, Hens A A; Abu Hanna, Ameen; Eskes, Martine

    2011-01-01

    To investigate differences in perinatal mortality between Dutch provinces and to determine the significance of risk factors including travel time from home to the hospital during labour. Cohort study. The study was based on 1,242,725 singleton births in 2000-2006 as recorded in the Netherlands Perinatal Registry. The influence of province on perinatal mortality was estimated, with logistic regression analysis adjusting for risk factors (age, parity, ethnicity, socioeconomic status) and care factors such as start of antenatal care and travel time. The perinatal mortality rate in the Netherlands was 9.9 per 1000 births. The provinces with the highest mortality rates were Friesland (11.3‰), Groningen (11.1‰), Zeeland (10.6‰) and Flevoland (10.4‰). Noord-Brabant (9.2‰) and Limburg (9.2‰) had the lowest mortality rates. These differences were significantly higher for Friesland (odds ratio: 1.16; 95%-CI: 1.05-1.28) and Groningen (odds ratio: 1.13; 95%-CI: 1.02-1.26). Starting late with perinatal care, at 18 weeks of gestation or later was an important risk factor (adjusted odds ratio 1.8; 95%-CI: 1.7-1.8). Low socio-economic status could partly be associated with the higher mortality risk in Groningen. Longer travel time (≥ 20 minutes) was an independent risk factor associated with perinatal mortality. On average 19% of the women travelled ≥ 20 minutes to the hospital. In the provinces Groningen, Friesland, Flevoland and Zeeland these percentages ranged between 32 and 36%. The adjusted odds ratio of travel time was 1.7 (95%-CI 1.6-1.7). The perinatal mortality differs per province. This can be explained by longer travel time to the hospital during labour. Late start of perinatal care and low socio-economic status also affect the mortality rate. These risk factors need to be taken into account during registration, investigation, audit and obstetric policy.

  8. Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum-containing drugs in two hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Bettina; Crauste-Manciet, Sylvie; Guibert, Agnès; Mourier, Wilhelmine; Guerrault-Moro, Marie-Noelle; Ferrari, Sylvie; Jomier, Jean-Yves; Brossard, Denis; Schierl, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum containing drugs was implemented in two French hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators and having similar working procedures when preparing antineoplastic drugs. Wipe sampling of surfaces, gloves, and vials was performed in the preparation room and in storage areas. All employees involved in the preparation of antineoplastic drugs were tested for urinary platinum on Monday before work and Friday after shift. Only traces of platinum were detected on surfaces in the preparation room outside the isolators (less than 1.61 pg cm(-2)). However, in one center, significant contamination was found in the storage area of the drug vials, which can most likely be linked to the rupture of a platinum vial and due to inefficient cleaning procedures. Surfaces inside the isolators were found to be contaminated (maximum: 198.4 pg cm(-2)). A higher level of contamination was detected in one pharmacy and could be explained by the lack of overgloving with regular changes during the preparation process. Nitrile gloves used during drug handling outside the isolator showed the highest platinum concentration (maximum: 5.86 ng per pair). With regards to platinum urine concentration, no significant difference was found between exposed and unexposed pharmacy personnel. Isolator technology combined with individual protective measures seems to be efficient to protect workers from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, whereas specific individual protective procedures implemented were focussing on the risk of handling vials outside the isolator (e.g. high frequency of glove changing). Moreover, overgloving inside the isolator would contribute to substantially decrease inner surface contamination and should be recommended in order to limit the transfer of chemical contamination to the end products.

  9. Immediately and with all available means: the Dutch Red Cross and the field hospital on behalf of the Netherlands Voluntary Legion in WWII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, Leo

    2009-01-01

    Medical neutrality is one of the main principles of medical-humanitarian aid, and certainly of Red Cross aid. But how does this work in times of foreign occupation? Is it even possible then, or does it almost automatically lead to collaboration? The Dutch example of 1940-1945 gives some insight into this problem. Abandoning its post would end the aid the Dutch Red Cross (DRC) gave, so it was decided to stay in business. This, however, led to adherence to German orders, given not for humanitarian, but for military-political reasons. Amongst other things, the DRC helped to equip a field hospital for Dutch volunteers to the Waffen-SS on the eastern front, so directly strengthening the German war effort. It was clear that the doctors and nurses of this field hospital would do next to nothing to help save Russian sick or wounded, and that, if necessary, they would have to fight alongside German and Dutch soldiers.

  10. Benefit of hospital pharmacy intervention on the current status of dry powder inhaler technique in patients with asthma and COPD: a study from the Central Development Region, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poudel RS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ramesh Sharma Poudel,1 Rano Mal Piryani,2 Shakti Shrestha,3 Aastha Prajapati1 1Hospital Pharmacy, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Chitwan Medical College Teaching Hospital, 3Department of Pharmacy, Shree Medical and Technical College, Chitwan, Nepal Background: The majority of patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have been known to perform inhaler technique inadequately. We aimed to evaluate the benefit of hospital pharmacy intervention on the current status of dry powder inhaler (Rotahaler® technique in such patients and the factors associated with the correct use. Methods: A pre–post interventional study was conducted at the outpatient pharmacy in a teaching hospital of the Central Development Region, Nepal, in patients with asthma and COPD currently using a Rotahaler device. Patients’ demographics and Rotahaler technique were assessed before intervention. Those who failed to demonstrate the correct technique were educated and trained by the pharmacist, and their technique was reassessed after 2 weeks of intervention. Descriptive statistics, including Wilcoxon signed rank test, Mann–Whitney U test, Spearman’s correlations and Kruskal–Wallis test, were performed for statistical analysis. Results: Before intervention, only 5.7% (10 of 174 of the patients demonstrated the correct Rotahaler technique and the most common errors observed were failure to breathe out gently before inhalation (98.8% and failure to hold breath for about 10 seconds after inhalation (84.8%. After the intervention (n=164, 67.1% of the patients showed their technique correctly (p≤0.001 and failure to breathe out gently before inhalation was the most common error (27.44%. Age (p=0.003, previous instruction (p=0.007, patient’s education level (p=0.013 and source of instruction (p<0.001 were associated with an appropriate technique before intervention, while age (p=0.024, duration of therapy (p=0.010 and gender (p=0.008 were

  11. 我院药学信息系统建设和应用体会%Construction and application experience of pharmacy information system in our Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单清; 蔡萍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To provide ideas and methods for constructing hospital pharmacy information system. Methods The construction and application practices of hospital pharmacy information system in our hospital were described. Results The unified drug information database was established through the personnel in pharmacy department early participating in the research and design of system software. The real inventory management was implemented. The drug management process was effectively optimized. The drug losses were reduced,and the service efficiency was improved. Conclusion The pharmacy information systems were established and improved to meet the needs of the construction of hospital information. The process is the only way for the development of hospital pharmacy.%目的 为医院药学信息系统建设提供值得借鉴的思路和做法.方法 详细阐述我院药学信息系统建设和应用的实践情况.结果 通过药学人员早期参与系统软件的研发设计,建立集团统一化的药品基本信息数据库,实行实库存管理,切实优化了药品管理流程,减少药品损耗,提高了服务效能.结论 建立并完善符合医院信息化建设需要的药学信息系统,是适应未来医院药学领域发展变化、推动医院药学发展的必由之路.

  12. 自动摆药机差错风险防控%Risk Control of Medication Errors of Automatic Oral Drug Dispensing System in Hospital Pharmacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莹; 蔡爽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate effective management mode of the automatic oral drug dispensing sys-tem in hospital pharmacy .Methods The application of automatic drug dispensing system were analyzed in our hospital pharmacy and the problems and solving methods were summarized .Results Using effective management mode can reduce the risk of medication errors .Conclusions Automation is the inevitable trend of hospital phar-macy management .Automatic drug dispensing system is suitable for hospital pharmacy development and applica -tion, the use of which is helpful to improve the hospital pharmacy service level .The effective management can de-crease the risk of errors .%目的:分析自动口服药品摆药机在医院使用时存在的问题,探讨通过加强管理降低发生差错的方法。方法对本院自动摆药机的使用情况、遇到的问题及解决方法进行总结分析。结果通过建立有效的管理模式可以降低自动摆药机发生差错的风险。结论自动化操作是医院药局发展的必然趋势,自动摆药机适合医院药局发展应用,通过有效管理可降低发生差错的风险,有助于提高医院的药学服务水平。

  13. KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS AND ITS VACCINE AMONG PHARMACY STUDENTS OF TERTIARY TEACHING UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghupathi Mahitha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cervical cancer in women can be effectively prevented by HPV vaccine. Healthcare professionals including pharmacists have a role in creating awareness about this vaccine to public. In this context, it was decided to study awareness level about HPV among pharmacy students. The aim of the study is to study the knowledge and attitude towards human papilloma virus and it’s vaccine among pharmacy students of tertiary teaching university hospital in South India. MATERIALS AND METHODS Cross sectional, questionnaire-based study among pharmacy students. RESULTS 229 pharmacy students participated in the study. The mean total knowledge score among participants was 2.69 (SD=2.260 out of the possible maximum of 11 and the mean total attitude score was 2.67 (SD=2.437 out of the possible maximum of 10. Lack of knowledge about vaccine was the main reason for not taking the vaccine. Knowledge about the vaccines improves the attitude towards it (p<0.0001. CONCLUSION There is a need to design education program for pharmacy students to increase awareness about HPV, which in turn will increase the awareness among public positively.

  14. Prevalence of BRCA1 in a hospital-based population of Dutch breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papelard, H; de Bock, GH; van Eijk, R; Vlieland, TPMV; Cornelisse, CJ; Devilee, P; Tollenaar, RAEM

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of disease-related BRCA1 mutations was investigated in 642 Dutch breast cancer patients not selected for family history or age at diagnosis. They were tested for germline mutations in the BRCA1 gene using an assay which detects small deletions and insertions (DSDI), as well as the two

  15. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector : Empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Ramsis; Krabbe, Yvonne; Mikkers, Misja

    2017-01-01

    There is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be characterized as a

  16. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector: empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, R.R.; Krabbe-Alkemade, Y.J.F.M.; Mikkers, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThere is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be

  17. PCL-R Psychopathy Predicts Disruptive Behavior Among Male Offenders in a Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Martin; De Ruiter, Corine; Nijman, Henk

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between psychopathy, according to the Dutch language version of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and various types of disruptive behavior during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment is investigated. Ninety-two male participants were administered the PCL-R following admission to an inpatient forensic…

  18. Improving medication information transfer between hospitals, skilled-nursing facilities, and long-term-care pharmacies for hospital discharge transitions of care: A targeted needs assessment using the Intervention Mapping framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstenetzky, Luiza; Birschbach, Matthew J; Beach, Katherine F; Hager, David R; Kennelty, Korey A

    2017-04-07

    Patients transitioning from the hospital to a skilled nursing home (SNF) are susceptible to medication-related errors resulting from fragmented communication between facilities. Through continuous process improvement efforts at the hospital, a targeted needs assessment was performed to understand the extent of medication-related issues when patients transition from the hospital into a SNF, and the gaps between the hospital's discharge process, and the needs of the SNF and long-term care (LTC) pharmacy. We report on the development of a logic model that will be used to explore methods for minimizing patient care medication delays and errors while further improving handoff communication to SNF and LTC pharmacy staff. Applying the Intervention Mapping (IM) framework, a targeted needs assessment was performed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Using the hospital discharge medication list as reference, medication discrepancies in the SNF and LTC pharmacy lists were identified. SNF and LTC pharmacy staffs were also interviewed regarding the continuity of medication information post-discharge from the hospital. At least one medication discrepancy was discovered in 77.6% (n = 45/58) of SNF and 76.0% (n = 19/25) of LTC pharmacy medication lists. A total of 191 medication discrepancies were identified across all SNF and LTC pharmacy records. Of the 69 SNF staff interviewed, 20.3% (n = 14) reported patient care delays due to omitted documents during the hospital-to-SNF transition. During interviews, communication between the SNF/LTC pharmacy and the discharging hospital was described by facility staff as unidirectional with little opportunity for feedback on patient care concerns. The targeted needs assessment guided by the IM framework has lent to several planned process improvements initiatives to help reduce medication discrepancies during the hospital-to-SNF transition as well as improve communication between healthcare entities. Opening lines of

  19. Discrepancies between Patients' Preferences and Educational Programs on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Survey in Community Pharmacies and Hospital Consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquart de Terline, Diane; Hejblum, Gilles; Fernandez, Christine; Cohen, Ariel; Antignac, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy is increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic complications in various clinical situations. Nowadays, education programs for patients treated with anticoagulants constitute an integrated component of their management. However, such programs are usually based on the healthcare providers' perceptions of what patients should know, rather than on patients' preferences. To investigate patients' viewpoints on educational needs and preferred modalities of information delivery. We conducted an observational study based on a self-administered questionnaire. To explore several profiles of patients, the study was designed for enrolling patients in two settings: during outpatient consultations in a cardiology department (Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France) and in community pharmacies throughout France. Of the 371 patients who completed the questionnaire, 187 (50.4%) were recruited during an outpatient consultation and 184 (49.6%) were recruited in community pharmacies. 84.1% of patients were receiving a vitamin K antagonist and 15.6% a direct oral anticoagulant. Patients ranked 16 of 21 (76.2%) questionnaire items on information about their treatment as important or essential; information on adverse effects of treatment was the highest ranked domain (mean score 2.38, 95% CI 2.30-2.46). Pharmacists (1.69, 1.58-1.80), nurses (1.05, 0.95-1.16), and patient associations (0.36, 0.29-0.44), along with group sessions (0.85, 0.75-0.95), the internet (0.77, 0.67-0.88), and delivery of material at the patient's home (1.26, 1.14-1.38), were ranked poorly in terms of delivering educational material. This study revealed substantial discrepancies between patient preferences and current educational programs. These findings should be useful for tailoring future educational programs that are better adapted to patients, with a potential associated enhancement of their effectiveness.

  20. Efficiency from Pharmacy Inventory Technology: A Means to Improving Quality in Non-Profit Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Florence Ann

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals, like all organizations, have both a mission and a finite supply of resources with which to accomplish that mission. Because the inventory of therapeutic drugs is among the more expensive resources needed by a hospital to achieve its mission, a conceptual model of structure plus process equals outcome posits that adequate emphasis should…

  1. Efficiency from Pharmacy Inventory Technology: A Means to Improving Quality in Non-Profit Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Florence Ann

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals, like all organizations, have both a mission and a finite supply of resources with which to accomplish that mission. Because the inventory of therapeutic drugs is among the more expensive resources needed by a hospital to achieve its mission, a conceptual model of structure plus process equals outcome posits that adequate emphasis should…

  2. Satisfaction of clients with the services of an outpatient pharmacy at a university hospital in northwestern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surur, Abdrrahman Shemsu; Teni, Fitsum Sebsibe; Girmay, Genet; Moges, Elsabet; Tesfa, Meseret; Abraha, Messele

    2015-06-11

    Evaluation of patient/client satisfaction with pharmacy services as a crucial part of the health services through appropriate studies is important. This will help identify specific areas of the service which need improvement in realizing high quality pharmacy services in general and enhance the positive changes in the current pharmaceutical services provision in Ethiopia. The current study aimed at assessing the level of client satisfaction with the services of the outpatient pharmacy of Gondar University Referral Hospital (GURH) in northwestern Ethiopia. An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted involving 400 clients who had prescriptions/orders filled at the outpatient pharmacy of the hospital during the period of 5th to 25th of November 2013. The data on the level of satisfaction of clients with the services of the outpatient pharmacy in the hospital was collected using a structured interview guide adopted from an instrument translated into Amharic and validated. The data collected was entered into and analyzed using Statistical Packages for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16. The overall mean score the respondents gave to satisfaction with the pharmaceutical services was 2.48 out of a maximum of 5.00 score. The mean scores for all the individual parameters rated were less than 3.00. Maximum mean scores were given for parameters asking about the promptness of prescription medication service (2.99), and professionalism of the pharmacy staff (2.96) with the lowest being scored for information given to clients about the storage of medication (1.25), and explanations of possible side effects (1.27). Clients who were served free of fee recorded significantly higher level of satisfaction than those who paid. Higher levels of satisfaction were also reported among illiterates, older adults and those with no job compared to those with higher education, merchants and government employees. This study showed that the overall mean satisfaction level of clients

  3. 医院药房数字化模式探讨%Discussion of the Mode of Digital Pharmacy in Hospitals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽萍; 韩晋; 刘军; 朱姗薇; 王依文

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨医院药房数字化工作模式,为我国医院药房的现代化建设提供借鉴.方法:依托数字化医院的概念,参考国外药房自动化和信息化建设经验,结合我院现代药房建设的实践,探讨数字化药房的基本构成和总体架构.结果与结论:数字化药房由药品供应链系统、自动化调配系统、药学服务系统和管理支持系统4大模块组成,由物理层面和信息层面构成,可划分为“物理层-数据层-业务层-知识层-决策层”5个层次结构,实施一体化管理模式.医院药房实施数字化模式,可实现药房所有业务和管理信息的整合,达到优化业务流程、提高工作质量和效率、保证临床用药安全的目的,体现了现代医院药房建设的发展方向.%OBJECTIVE:To discuss the mode of digital pharmacy in hospitals,and to provide reference for the construction of modern hospital pharmacy in China.METHODS:Based on the concept of digital hospitals,referring to the experience of automation and informatization construction in foreign pharmacy,combined with the practice of modem pharmacy construction in our hospital,the essential structure and the frame for digital pharmacy had been explored.RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS:Digital pharmacy make up of 4 modules as drug supply chain system,autonomous dispensing system,pharmaceutical care system and management support system.The mode of digital pharmacy is expatiated from physical aspect and information aspect.It has been constituted a collection of arrangement for 5 administrative levels:"physical level,data processing level,business level,knowledge level and decision-making level",and the integrated management mode has been implemented.The mode of digital pharmacy in hospitals can help to achieve the integration of business and management information,optimize operation flow,improve the quality and efficiency of management,guarantee the safety of drug use and embody the development direction of modem

  4. Monitoring and use of antimycotic (micafungin for systemic use provided by the pharmacy of Marsala Hospital, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Venturella

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Micafungin is an antimycotic drug and represents an important addition to the available therapies for the treatment of systemic fungal infections. Micafungin is used: in the treatment of invasive candidiasis, oesophageal and prophylaxis of Candida infections. It inhibits, in a non-competitive way, the synthesis of 1,3-β-D-glucan, a component of fungal cell wall and is rapidly distributed into the tissues. It has a high-rate respectful bond with plasma protein, which is independent from the concentration of the drug. It is metabolized through the liver, being not subject to intense metabolic transformations until the excretion. There is no evidence of systemic accumulation after repeated use. The steady-state is reached in 4-5 days. Medical records examined at the pharmacy of Marsala Hospital highlight that, from 01/06/2014 to 01/08/2014, in this hospital 12 vials were used by the hospitalized patients in the Department of Intensive Care: 8 patients between 75 and 83 years old had a body weight (BW higher than 40 kg; 3 patients between 40 and 60 years of age had a BW higher than 40 kg, and one 17 year-old patient had a BW of 40 kg. Two patients needed a dose increase, while for the other 10 patients the first dose resulted sufficient. Mycamine® was used for the treatment of hypovolemic post-operative shock. The most recorded adverse reactions were anemia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, phlebitis, nausea, liver problems. Given the different weight of the subjects, the dosage was different.

  5. Analysis on Existing Automatic Dispensing Pattern in Hospital Outpatient Pharmacy%医院门诊药房现行自动化调剂模式分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁茂本; 王国如; 吕新颜

    2015-01-01

    目的:推动医院门诊药房自动化调剂模式发展。方法走访国内数家三级甲等综合性医院门诊药房和自动化药房系统生产厂家,并参阅相关文献,分析现行自动化调剂模式。结果与结论先进的门诊药房自动化调剂模式是集实时发药、智能预配发药、自助发药多种模式于一体的自动化和智能化系统,可提高配方准确率,降低了劳动强度,体现了我国现代化药房的建设和发展方向。%Objective To promote the development of the existing automatic dispensing pattern in the hospital outpatient pharmacy. Methods By conducting the visiting to the outpatient pharmacy of several domestic class 3A general hospitals and manufacturers for producing the automatic pharmacy systems and refering to pertinent literatures, the existing automatic dispensing patterns were ana-lyzed. Results and Conclusion The advanced automatic dispensing pattern of outpatient pharmacy is an automatic and intelligent system integrating the real-time dispensing, intelligently pre-allocation dispensing and self-service dispensing, which improves the dispensing accuracy, reduces the labor intensity and reflects the construction and development direction of modern pharmacy in our country.

  6. Drug and Therapeutics (D & T) committees in Dutch hospitals : a nation-wide survey of structure, activities, and drug selection procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Brouwers, JRBJ; Knaap, RJ; De Jong-Van den Berg, LTW

    1999-01-01

    Aims To determine structure, activities and drug selection processes used by Dutch hospital drug and therapeutics (D & T) committees. Methods A pretested structured survey questionnaire based on the Australian process and impact indicators, previous research, and consultation of professionals was de

  7. The prevalence and clonal expansion of high-level gentamicin-resistant enterococci isolated from blood cultures in a Dutch university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.P.W.C.J. van den Braak (Nicole); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); D. Kreft; R. te Witt (René); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); H.P. Endtz (Hubert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the prevalence and clonality of high-level gentamicin-resistant enterococci (HLGRE) in a Dutch university hospital. Of 238 enterococcal strains isolated from blood cultures between 1991 and 1997, 57 were HLGRE. Genomic analysis of these strains re

  8. Clinical rules in hospital pharmacy practice to prevent adverse drug events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, Mirjam Kristien

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) refer to any injury from the use of a drug. ADEs occur frequently in hospitalized patients and a substantial proportion are considered preventable. A method to prevent ADEs is computerized physician order entry (CPOE) combined with a clinical decision support system

  9. Pharmaceutical policies and access to medicines : a hospital-pharmacy perspective from Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, D.

    2017-01-01

    Access to quality medicines is a universal human right which featured prominently on the agenda of the World Health Organisation (WHO) over the past decades. Hospital pharmacists play a pivotal role in ensuring that treatment outcomes are optimal. This thesis studied pharmaceutical policies and acce

  10. Pharmaceutical policies and access to medicines : a hospital-pharmacy perspective from Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, D.

    2017-01-01

    Access to quality medicines is a universal human right which featured prominently on the agenda of the World Health Organisation (WHO) over the past decades. Hospital pharmacists play a pivotal role in ensuring that treatment outcomes are optimal. This thesis studied pharmaceutical policies and

  11. Clinical rules in hospital pharmacy practice to prevent adverse drug events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, Mirjam Kristien

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) refer to any injury from the use of a drug. ADEs occur frequently in hospitalized patients and a substantial proportion are considered preventable. A method to prevent ADEs is computerized physician order entry (CPOE) combined with a clinical decision support system (CDSS)

  12. Pharmaceutical policies and access to medicines : a hospital-pharmacy perspective from Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, D.

    2017-01-01

    Access to quality medicines is a universal human right which featured prominently on the agenda of the World Health Organisation (WHO) over the past decades. Hospital pharmacists play a pivotal role in ensuring that treatment outcomes are optimal. This thesis studied pharmaceutical policies and acce

  13. Changes of Outpatient Pharmacy in Our Hospital by Automation%自动化建设给我院门诊药房带来的改变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寿张轩; 金雪

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide beneficial reference for the development and construction of automated outpatient pharmacy. METHODS: The automation of outpatient pharmacy was conducted by rapid delivery system, intelligent storage system, massive addition system and smart dispensing system. A comparative analysis was performed for the changes brought about by the automation of outpatient pharmacy of our hospital in terms of pharmaceutical administration, quality of drug dispensing, pharmacists' work efficiency and so on. RESULTS: Automated outpatient pharmacy optimized pharmaceutical administration, strengthened storage management and drug maintenance, resolved validity period and achieved lot number tracking. Internal dispensing error was decreased by 65.3% from 32.6 events per week to 11.3 events per week. Automated pharmacy equipments were involved in 90% of outpatient prescriptions dispensing to realize the transformation of "drug standing by for patient" from "patient waiting for drug", improve work efficiency and ensure patients' safety. CONCLUSION: Pharmacy automation contributes to improving pharmaceutical administration and service level in outpatient pharmacy of large-scale hospitals in China.%目的:为国内大型医院自动化门诊药房的建设与发展提供参考.方法:采用快速出药、智能存储、批量上药及智能发药等设备对我院门诊药房进行自动化改造,分析门诊药房自动化改造后药品管理、调剂质量、药师工作效率等方面发生的改变.结果:门诊药房自动化优化了药品管理,有利于药品养护,加强了库存管理,解决了效期管理难题,实现了药品批号追踪;调剂差错由改造前的32.6件/周减少至改造后的11.3件/周,降低了65.3%;自动化药房设备参与了约90%的门诊处方调配,实现了药品调剂从“人等药”到“药等人”的转变,提高了工作效率,保障了患者的用药安全.结论:自动化有利于提高国内大型医院门

  14. [Ethical and methodological quality of non-interventional post-authorization studies promoted by Hospital Pharmacy Departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Bermejo, D; Vicente Sánchez, M P; Pozuelo González, C; Macías Saint-Gerons, D; Greciano Greciano, V; de la Fuente Honrubia, C

    2013-01-01

    To describe the ethical and methodological quality of non-interventional post-authorization studies promoted by Hospital Pharmacy Departments (HPD). HPD promoted studies in the 2009-2011 period included in the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Medical Devices (AEMPS) registry and/or published in "Farmacia Hospitalaria" were identified. The most relevant ethical and methodological characteristics were analyzed. Studies promoted by HPD were also compared with studies not promoted by HPD. Twenty two studies promoted by HPD, and registered in the AEMPS were identified. Within the registered studies HPD promoted studies had lower sample size estimation (41,5% vs 80%) and international scope (0% vs 24%) compared to non HPD promoted studies with significant differences (p Farmacia Hospitalaria have been registered in the AEMPS and had lower methodological quality than the registered studies promoted by HPD in characteristics such as presence of control group (3,8% vs 27,3%) (p = 0,0072) and the sample size estimation of (19,2% vs 42,8%) (p < 0,05). The management and the methodological and ethical characteristics of the studies promoted by HPD should be improved according to the regulation. The registration in the AEMPS might have a positive impact on the quality of these research protocols. Copyright © 2013 SEFH. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of hospital simulation tutorials on nursing and pharmacy student perception of interprofessional collaboration: Findings from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehlik, Paulina; Frotjold, Astrid; Schneider, Carl R

    2017-09-18

    Interprofessional learning (IPL) during formal training enables interprofessional collaboration (IPC) in the workforce; however, on-campus IPL opportunities are seldom incorporated into curricula. We describe the development and implementation of two hospital simulation tutorials between nursing and pharmacy students. Students were required to provide "usual care" to a simulated patient at admission and discharge. A pre-post survey design was used to evaluate changes in Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) score and student perceived educational value of the tutorials. The tutorials had a positive effect on IEPS scores (p < 0.001), whereas gender and profession did not appear to influence scores (p = 0.082 and p = 0.923, respectively). Tutorials were rated either good or very good by 89.9% of students and 79.6% of students reporting new insights into the other profession This tutorial format could be easily adapted by other institutions as an engaging and rewarding strategy to better prepare students for IPC the workforce.

  16. Economic assessment of aseptic compounding rooms in hospital pharmacies in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekyndt, Bérengère; Décaudin, Bertrand; Lannoy, Damien; Odou, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    The aims of the study are to make an inventory of fixtures of aseptic compounding structures, to compare, using real examples, the design and operating costs of controlled atmosphere area (CAA) with isolators and CAA with laminar flow biological safety cabinets (BSCs) in order to determine the most economical scheme in hospitals and to give a final facilities cost calculated for one workstation. Forty-three hospitals were interviewed (21 French and 22 from four European countries) over seven months. Hospital pharmacists completed a form with 390 items. Hospitals are compared according to their workstation type: BSCII or BSCIII (group B) and isolator (group I), using Mann and Whitney's statistical test and Monte-Carlo modeling. Twenty-one hospitals responded (11 French and 10 from other European countries). All European compounding unit organizations are not significantly different. The study compared items such as infrastructure cost, equipment cost, staff cost, consumable cost, cleaning cost and control cost. A synthesis of all costs has been drafted to calculate an estimated preparation cost which seemed to be higher for group B than for group I when staff costs were included ($46 and $31, respectively, in study conditions). The different costs studied have revealed little significant difference between group B and I. The preparation cost in group B appears higher than in group I. This pilot study has resulted in the calculation of an estimated manufactured preparation cost but this work should be completed to help optimize resources and save money. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Outpatient Pharmacy Management in Hospital:Status and Trends%医院门诊药房管理现状及展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文森; 孙洁; 王书杰; 尹晓飞

    2012-01-01

    通过对18所医院的门诊药房调查发现,所有医院的门诊药房均存在着同种药品、同一规格只对应单一的某个生产厂家,没有自由选择药品品牌和规格的权力等实际问题,提出构建“门诊药房超市”引入竞争机制,让自主选择药品,药师提供面对面的用药咨询指导,全面提高药学服务水平和患者满意率.%By investigating the outpatient pharmacy departments of 18 hospitals, the author finds that one medicine, one specification only corresponds to one manufacturer in all the outpatient pharmacy departments. It provides the convenience of development of sick competitions. Patients do not have power to choose the brand and specification of medicines by themselves. Construction of "outpatient pharmacy supermarket" is put forward, such as introducing competition, making independent choices for patients, providing advisory of drug face - to - face, comprehensively improving the level of pharmacy service and satisfaction rate of patients.

  18. Analysis of medication information exchange at discharge from a Dutch hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berlo-van de laar, Inge R. F.; Driessen, Erwin; Merkx, Maria M.; Jansman, Frank G. A.

    Background At hospitalisation and discharge the risk of errors in medication information transfer is high. Objective To study the routes by which medication information is transferred during discharge from Deventer Hospital, and to improve medication information transfer. Setting Eight hospital

  19. Influence Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction towards Drug Purchase Intention in Anggrek Outpatient Pharmacy Depo at Hasan Sadikin Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiwi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The quality of service is an evaluation which focused on customer’s awareness about a structural construction of a service or product that involves 5 main aspects which are tangibility, empathy, responsiveness, reliability and assurance. Based on monthly reports of pharmacy installation only about 30% of patients buy drugs in the Anggrek out patient depo out off patients visiting Anggrek out patient specialist clinic in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of service quality and customer satisfaction to purchase intention in the Anggrek out patient depo Hasan Sadikin hospital at Bandung. The method used in this study is analytical survey with cross sectional design. The samples used were 200 patients, consist of 104 customers who have visited more than one times and 96 first visit costumer to this clinic. Data was collected using a questionnaire and analyzed using Smart PLS V 2.0 software. The results of this study showed that the service quality with tangible dimensions, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy are affecting the customer satisfaction with a score of 12.755 t-count (greater than t-table 1.983 and a positive value of the original sample of 0.800. Customer satisfaction affecting the customer purchase intentions with t-count is greater than t-table values of 5.012 and 0.726 of the original positive sample. While the service quality does not directly influence customer purchase intention with the t-test is smaller than t-table is 1.455 and the negative of the original sample -0.287. Some of service quality influence customers that causes not purchasing drugs from the out patient depo there are effect of unavailability of counseling, long waiting time of service, the need for special counseling room, a spacious waiting room, and the completeness of drug availability.

  20. Hospital pharmacy indexes: a tool for assessing purchasing and inventory control performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coarse, J F; Kubica, A J

    1980-06-01

    The development and use of price and value indexes that differentiate between the effects of price and volume changes on a hospital's cost of drug products and related supplies are discussed. To construct a price index it is necessary to (1) compile a general list of drug products representative of a major portion of the institution's annual drug expenditure, (2) assign appropriate weights (quantity determinants) to these listed products, (3) select a base period that reflects normal hospital operations, and (4) select a suitable equation, the authors' choice being a fixed-weight aggregates method. The value index, which measures the combined effects of acquisition cost changes and volume changes, can be calculated when the acquisition cost change for the period is known. Information derived from the indexes can be used in (1) cost analysis and operational forecasts, (2) measurement and assessment of purchasing and inventory control, and (3) simplification of procurement and inventory processes.

  1. Association between occupational exposure and control measures for antineoplastic drugs in a pharmacy of a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Jin; Koda, Shigeki; Nishida, Shozo; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Tei, Genshin; Kumagai, Shinji

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the association between occupational contamination and exposure levels to antineoplastic drugs and the application of control measures in a hospital work environment. Wipe samples of equipments were collected at a hospital in Osaka Prefecture, Japan, from 2007 to 2011. These samples were subjected to measurements of cyclophosphamide (CP), gemcitabine (GEM), platinum-containing drugs (Pt), and fluorouracil (5FU). Additionally, 24-h urine samples were collected from pharmacists who handled antineoplastic drugs, which were analyzed for CP and alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (AFBA). The application of control measures was scored according to a checklist, which consisted of the following five items: safety equipment and maintenance, training and documentation, devices for safe handling, personal protective equipment, and emergency care. The aim was to obtain a score of 80%. The median CP, GEM, and 5FU concentrations of all wipe samples were significantly lower during the period when the mean score was >80% (attainment period) versus when the mean score was ≤80% (nonattainment period; all P antineoplastic drugs decreased with a score higher than 80%. The scores of the items on the checklist appeared to adequately reflect the condition of the control measures, as increases in all five items were associated with reductions in the contamination by and levels of exposure to all drugs.

  2. Radiation Protection in Pediatric Radiology: Results of a Survey Among Dutch Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijwaard, Harmen; Valk, Doreth; de Waard-Schalkx, Ischa

    2016-10-01

    A survey about radiation protection in pediatric radiology was conducted among 22 general and seven children's hospitals in the Netherlands. Questions concerned, for example, child protocols used for CT, fluoroscopy and x-ray imaging, number of images and scans made, radiation doses and measures taken to reduce these, special tools used for children, and quality assurance issues. The answers received from 27 hospitals indicate that radiation protection practices differ considerably between general and children's hospitals but also between the respective general and children's hospitals. It is recommended that hospitals consult each other to come up with more uniform best practices. Few hospitals were able to supply doses that can be compared to the national Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs). The ones that could be compared exceeded the DRLs in one in five cases, which is more than was expected beforehand.

  3. Impact of the new handling recommendations for hazardous drugs in a hospital pharmacy service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alcántara, Beatriz G; Perelló Alomar, Catalina; Moreno Centeno, Elena; Modamio, Pilar; Mariño, Eduardo L; Delgado Sánchez, Olga

    2017-03-01

    Objetivo: Describir las actuaciones realizadas en el Servicio de Farmacia de un hospital de tercer nivel para adaptarse a las recomendaciones establecidas en NIOSH 2014 para el manejo de medicamentos peligrosos. Método: Estudio observacional retrospectivo. Se elaboró una lista de los medicamentos peligrosos según NIOSH 2014 disponibles en el hospital como comercializados, extranjeros o utilizados en ensayos clínicos y se revisaron los procesos de adquisición, re-envasado, preparación, circuitos organizativos, dispensación e identificación.Resultados: Tras el análisis se redactó y envió un informe de las necesidades a la gerencia del hospital. Se incluyó en el sistema informático de prescripción la información pertinente sobre la manipulación y la administración de medicamentos peligrosos. Hubo cambios en la adquisición de dos medicamentos para evitar el fraccionamiento y la presentación multidosis. De las 75.779 unidades de medicamentos peligrosos re-envasadas en un año, se encontró alternativa o mejora para 35.253. El Servicio de Farmacia asumió la preparación de cuatro medicamentos no estériles, así como de todos los medicamentos parenterales estériles de las listas 1 y 2 que no se preparaban allí con anterioridad y uno de la lista 3. También se incluyó información en los procedimientos de elaboración de fórmulas magistrales que implicaban medicamentos peligrosos de las listas 2 y 3.Conclusión: La adaptación a las recomendaciones NIOSH 2014 ha supuesto un cambio, pero también una minimización significativa de la manipulación de medicamentos peligrosos por parte del personal sanitario, reduciéndose de esta manera el riesgo de exposición ocupacional.

  4. APPLICATION OF SIX SIGMA METHODOLOGY TO REDUCE MEDICATION ERRORS IN THE OUTPATIENT PHARMACY UNIT: A CASE STUDY FROM THE KING FAHD UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, SAUDI ARABIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al Kuwaiti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors will affect the patient safety and quality of healthcare. The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of Six Sigma (DMAIC methodology in reducing medication errors in the outpatient pharmacy of King Fahd Hospital of the University, Saudi Arabia. It was conducted through the five phases of Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control (DMAIC model using various quality tools. The goal was fixed as to reduce medication errors in an outpatient pharmacy by 20%. After implementation of improvement strategies, there was a marked reduction of defects and also improvement of their sigma rating. Especially, Parts per million (PPM of prescription/data entry errors reduced from 56,000 to 5,000 and its sigma rating improved from 3.09 to 4.08. This study concluded that the Six Sigma (DMAIC methodology is found to be more significant in reducing medication errors and ensuring patient safety.

  5. Experience with a Drug Screening Program at a School of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Marshall E.; Hogue, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Substance use and abuse among pharmacy students is a concern of pharmacy schools, boards of pharmacy, and training sites alike. Pharmacy students must complete approximately 30% of their academic coursework in experiential settings such as community pharmacies, hospitals, and other health systems as part of any accredited pharmacy school's…

  6. Experience with a Drug Screening Program at a School of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Marshall E.; Hogue, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Substance use and abuse among pharmacy students is a concern of pharmacy schools, boards of pharmacy, and training sites alike. Pharmacy students must complete approximately 30% of their academic coursework in experiential settings such as community pharmacies, hospitals, and other health systems as part of any accredited pharmacy school's…

  7. Evaluation of early implementations of antibiotic stewardship program initiatives in nine Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Limburg, Maarten; Sinha, Bhanu; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia Ewc

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to patient safety and care. In response, hospitals start antibiotic stewardship programs to optimise antibiotic use. Expert-based guidelines recommend strategies to implement such programs, but local implementations may differ per hospital. Earlie

  8. Evaluation of early implementations of antibiotic stewardship program initiatives in nine Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limburg, van Maarten; Sinha, Bhanu; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Gemert-Pijnen, van Julia E.W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to patient safety and care. In response, hospitals start antibiotic stewardship programs to optimise antibiotic use. Expert-based guidelines recommend strategies to implement such programs, but local implementations may differ per hospital. Earlier

  9. Evaluation of early implementations of antibiotic stewardship program initiatives in nine Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Limburg, Maarten; Sinha, Bhanu; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia Ewc

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to patient safety and care. In response, hospitals start antibiotic stewardship programs to optimise antibiotic use. Expert-based guidelines recommend strategies to implement such programs, but local implementations may differ per hospital. Earlie

  10. Analysis of medication information exchange at discharge from a Dutch hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berlo-van de laar, Inge R. F.; Driessen, Erwin; Merkx, Maria M.; Jansman, Frank G. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background At hospitalisation and discharge the risk of errors in medication information transfer is high. Objective To study the routes by which medication information is transferred during discharge from Deventer Hospital, and to improve medication information transfer. Setting Eight hospital ward

  11. Analysis of medication information exchange at discharge from a Dutch hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berlo-van de laar, Inge R. F.; Driessen, Erwin; Merkx, Maria M.; Jansman, Frank G. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background At hospitalisation and discharge the risk of errors in medication information transfer is high. Objective To study the routes by which medication information is transferred during discharge from Deventer Hospital, and to improve medication information transfer. Setting Eight hospital ward

  12. The Application Value of Hospital Information System in the Management of Pharmacy Store%医院信息系统在药库管理中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝玉英; 石妍; 吴佳升; 菅艳艳

    2015-01-01

    Objective By using hospital information system,enhancing the management level of hospital pharmacy. Methods This paper introduces the function of the hospital pharmacy information system and management advantages and actual operation situation,analysis and evaluation.Results Through the application in pharmacy management information system,improve the work efficiency and quality,make the hospital pharmacy inventory reasonable,signify-ntly reduce the incidence of unsalable,breakage,helps to normalized and scientific process of pharmacy management. Conclusion The drug information system make the pharmacy management level and work efficiency has greatly improved,On the basis of pharmacy management institutionalized,standardization,and make the hospital pharmacy drug management level in a new step.%目的:利用医院信息系统,提高医院药库管理水平。方法介绍我院药库信息系统的功能和管理优势和实际运行情况,并进行分析评价。结果通过信息系统在药库管理中应用,提高工作效率和质量,使我院药库库存合理,滞销、破损等问题发生率显著减少,有助于药库管理的正规化与科学化。结论药品信息系统使药库管理水平和工作效率有很大提高,在此基础上药库管理制度化、正规化,使医院的药库药品管理水平上了一个新的台阶。

  13. Implementation of a pharmacist-led antimicrobial management team in a community teaching hospital: use of pharmacy residents and pharmacy students in a prospective audit and feedback approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Brad R; Nazir, Jawad; Assimacopoulos, Aris P; Schut, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship is an important process proven to combat antimicrobial resistance, improve patient outcomes, and reduce costs. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) have provided guidelines for the provision of antimicrobial stewardship. According to these recommendations, antimicrobial stewardship teams should be multidisciplinary in nature, with core members consisting of an infectious disease physician and an infectious disease-trained clinical pharmacist. Due to limited resources, our institution chose to implement a pharmacist-led antimicrobial stewardship service on 1 medical/surgical ward, with the existing clinical pharmacist and 3 infectious disease physicians as core members. This clinical pharmacist was not trained in infectious disease specialty, and stewardship activities were only one part of his daily activities. Pharmacy residents and students were extensively utilized to assist in the stewardship process. Approximately two thirds of stewardship recommendations were accepted using primarily a prospective audit and feedback approach.

  14. 基于知识管理的医院药剂管理模式探析%Analysis of Hospital Pharmacy Management Mode Based on Knowledge Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱梅君

    2013-01-01

    以知识管理的理念,从医院药剂管理的内容、作用出发,确立以人为本观念,平台建设--药品管理信息系统,制度建设,设置临床药学机构,药房管理规范化科学化,人力资源建设。是根据我国医药卫生体制改革和新医改工作的要求,对医院药剂管理模式的全新探索,基于知识管理,向专业化、信息化、服务化方向发展。保证为人民群众提供安全、有效、方便、价廉的医疗卫生服务。%Based on the concept of knowledge management,starting from the hospital pharmacy management content,function,establish the people-oriented concept,platform construction-drug management information system,system construction,set of clinical pharmacy,scientific pharmacy management standardization,the construction of human resources. According to the Chinese health reform and the new medical reform work requirements, to the new exploration of hospital pharmacy management model,based on knowledge management,to the development of specialization,information, service orientation. Guarantee for the people to provide safe,effective,convenient,affordable medical and health services.

  15. Effect of medication reconciliation on unintentional medication discrepancies in acute hospital admissions of elderly adults: A multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemt, P.M.L.A. van den; Schrieck-De Loos, E.M. van der; Linden, C. van der; Theeuwes, A.M.L.J.; Pol, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of pharmacy-based medication reconciliation on the frequency of unintentional medication discrepancies in acutely admitted individuals aged 65 and older. Design Multicenter intervention study with pre-post design. Setting Twelve Dutch hospitals. Participants One

  16. Effect of medication reconciliation on unintentional medication discrepancies in acute hospital admissions of elderly adults: A multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemt, P.M.L.A. van den; Schrieck-De Loos, E.M. van der; Linden, C. van der; Theeuwes, A.M.L.J.; Pol, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of pharmacy-based medication reconciliation on the frequency of unintentional medication discrepancies in acutely admitted individuals aged 65 and older. Design Multicenter intervention study with pre-post design. Setting Twelve Dutch hospitals. Participants One

  17. [Not every delirium protocol in Dutch hospitals is up-to-date: evaluation of the implementation of the new delirium guideline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentin, Z H A; Dautzenberg, P L J; Boelens, H M; de Rooij, S E J A; van Munster, B C

    2016-01-01

    To describe the extent to which the essential changes in the new Dutch delirium guideline for adults and the elderly, published in April 2014, have been incorporated in local hospital protocols, so as to estimate the consequences this could have for patients. Quantitative study. Dutch hospital protocols were collected for two periods: before (September to December 2012) and after publication of the guideline (March to July 2015). Protocols were compared with respect to basic delirium care (screening, diagnostic approach, therapy and follow-up care) and organisation of care. Of the 80 Dutch hospitals approached, we were able to include 57 (71%) protocols in this study. 16 hospitals (28%) had adapted their protocols to the new guideline. Screening for the risk of delirium using the questions from the Dutch safety management system (Veiligheidsmanagementsysteem) was described in 29 (51%) of the protocols. Use of the Delirium Observation Screening Scale was reported in 52 (91%) protocols. A policy of moderation regarding antipsychotic therapy was described in 12 of 53 (23%) protocols, but in 21/53 (40%) the haloperidol dosages were higher than advised by the guideline. Follow-up care is described in 40 (70%) of the protocols. Organisation of delirium care, for example restriction of consultation of an expert to complex cases, was advised in 33/57 (58%) protocols. 15 months after publication, only just over a quarter of the protocols incorporated the guideline. In terms of the treatment of patients with delirium, this may have led to unnecessary treatment with antipsychotics. Furthermore, basic delirium care is apparently still not considered as the responsibility of every medical specialist in the hospital.

  18. Hybrid practices as a means to implement quality improvement: A comparative qualitative study in a Dutch and Swedish hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartz-Topp, Julia; Sanne, Johan M; Pöstges, Heide

    2016-11-15

    Managers and scholars commonly perceive resistance from professionals as hampering the implementation of quality improvement (QI) and refer to the incompatibility of clinical and managerial approaches to QI as a reason. Yet a growing body of research indicates that, in practice, these two approaches rather blend into hybrid practices that embody different types of QI-related knowledge and values. This opens up a new perspective on implementation challenges that moves attention away from resistance against managerial QI toward difficulties for clinicians to draw together different types of knowledge and values within their clinical work. So far, little is known about how managers can support clinicians to generate hybrid QI practices. The aim of this study was to deepen our understanding of how managers can support the generation of hybrid practices that help clinicians to integrate QI into their everyday work. We draw on comparative qualitative research including 21 semistructured interviews, documentary analysis, and participant observation that we conducted in one Dutch and one Swedish hospital over a period of 8 months in 2011/2012. Hospital managers designed hybrid forums, tools, and professional roles in order to facilitate the integration of different QI practices, knowledge, and values. This integration generated new hybrid practices and an infrastructure for QI that has potential to support clinicians in their efforts to align different demands. New opportunities to implement QI emerge when we change the implementation problem from clinical resistance to the need of support for clinicians to develop hybrid QI practices. Hospital managers then have to intentionally organize for the generation of hybrid practices by designing, for example, hybrid forums, tools, and professional roles that integrate different knowledge and values in a nonhierarchical way.

  19. Trends in Dutch hospital spending by age and disease 1994-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubulihasimu, P.; Gheorghe, M.; Slobbe, L.C.J.; Polder, J.J.; van Baal, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the age pattern of medical spending and changes therein – the purpose of this paper – is essential in an ageing society. We started by combining several data sources to create a comprehensive time-based data series of hospital spending by age group, gender and disease category for The

  20. Risk analysis and user satisfaction after implementation of computerized physician order entry in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Willem; de Gier, Han J. J.; van der Schaaf, Tjerk; Taxis, Katja; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) in hospitals is widely considered to be important for patient safety, but implementation is lagging behind and user satisfaction is often low. Risk analysis methods may improve the implementation process and thus user satisfaction. Objective The a

  1. Doctors’ Orders: Specialists’ Day to Day Work and their jurisdictional Claims in Dutch Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Kruijthof

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis study analyses the nature and organisation of specialists' day to day work in general hospitals in the Netherlands and the claims for jurisdiction specialists make in their work. It is of interest because it presents a picture of specialist work from within. Most studies abou

  2. Two decades of external peer review of cancer care in general hospitals; the Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, M.J.; Siesling, S.; Otter, R.; Harten, van W.H.

    2015-01-01

    External peer review was introduced in general hospitals in the Netherlands in 1994 to assess and improve the multidisciplinary team approach in cancer care. This paper aims to explore the value, perceived impact, and (future) role of external peer review in cancer care. Semistructured interviews we

  3. Point prevalence of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in a Dutch university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Akhloufi, H.; Streefkerk, R. H.; Melles, D. C.; de Steenwinkel, J. E. M.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Verkooijen, R. P.; van der Hoeven, C. P.; Verbon, A.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship teams have been shown to increase appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy and reduce medical errors and costs in targeted populations, but the effect in non-targeted populations is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of inappropriate antibiotic use in a large university hospital and identify areas in which antimicrobial stewardship will be the most effective. In a point prevalence survey we assessed the appropriateness of antibiotic ...

  4. 医院药事管理的精益管理分析%Analysis of Lean Management of Hospital Pharmacy Administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文琴

    2016-01-01

    药事管理是为了让公民用药的安全性、经济性、合理性、及时性以及便捷性,是保证公众生命健康的重要手段,对于国家而言是宪法规定的责任,对于医院来讲更是重中之重,如何提高药事管理水平是一个必须要引起重视的问题。精益管理是现代企业生产和管理的一种理念和模式,是一种有效的管理方式。近年来精益管理开始应用于医院药事管理中,实践证明其应用在提高医院药事管理水平,提高医院核心竞争力以及促进医院创新发展发挥了重要作用。该文首先简单阐述精益管理的思想、核心内容、以及管理方法,并对医院药事管理中的精益管理的相关应用进行探讨。%Pharmacy management is to make the citizens of medication safety, economy, rationality, timeliness and conve-nience, is an important means to ensure public health, for the country's constitutional responsibility, in terms of the hospital is most important, if to improve the management level of the fish to fry is a necessary to pay attention to the problem. Lean management is a kind of idea and mode of production and management in modern enterprises. It is an effective way of man-agement. In recent years, lean management began to be used in the management of hospital pharmacy. Practice has proved that its application in improving the management level of the hospital pharmacy, to enhance the core competitiveness of the hospital and promote the innovation and development of hospital has played an important role. Firstly, this paper briefly ex-pounds the idea of lean management, core content and management method, and discussed the application of lean manage-ment in hospital pharmacy management.

  5. Prevalence, risk factors and molecular epidemiology of highly resistant gram negative rods in hospitalized patients in the Dutch region Kennemerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Souverein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes (1 the Highly Resistant Gram Negative Rod (HR-GNR prevalence rate, (2 their genotypes, acquired resistance genes and (3 associated risk factors of HR-GNR colonization among the hospitalized population in the Dutch region Kennemerland. Methods Between 1 October 2013 and 31 March 2014, cross-sectional prevalence measurements were performed in three regional hospitals as part of each hospitals infection control program. Rectal swabs were analyzed at the Regional Public Health Laboratory Kennemerland by direct culturing. Genotypes and acquired resistance genes of positive isolates were determined using Whole Genome Sequencing with the MiSeq instrument (Illumina. Association between several independent variables and HR-GNR positivity was examined using logistic regression models. Results Out of 427 patients, 24 HR-GNR positive isolates were recovered from 22 patients, resulting in a regional HR-GNR colonization prevalence (95 % CI of 5.2 % (3.6–7.9. Of these 22 positive patients, 15 were Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL positive (3.5 % (2.1–5.7, 7 patients were positive for a Fluoroquinolones and Aminoglycosides (Q&A resistant Enterobacteriaceae (1.6 % (0.8–3.3 and from one patient (0.2 % (0–1.3 a Stenotrophomonas maltophilia resistant towards co-trimoxazole was isolated. No carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE, multi-resistant Acinetobacter species or multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated. The ESBL genes found were bla CTX-M-1 (n = 4, 25.0 %, bla CTX-M-15 (n = 3, 18.8 %, bla CTX-M-27 (n = 2, 12.5 %, bla CTX-M-14b (n = 2, 12.5 %, bla CTX-M-9 (n = 2, 12.5 %, bla CTX-M-14 (n = 1, 6.3 %, bla CTX-M-3 (n = 1, 6.3 %, bla SHV-11 (n = 1, 6.3 % and bla SHV-12 (n = 1, 6.3 %. Being known HR-GNR positive in the past was the only significant associated risk factor for HR-GNR positivity, odds ratio (95 % CI: 7.32 (1.82–29.35, p

  6. Three-level Prescription Review Pattern in Pharmacy Department of Our Hospital%我院药学部门三级处方点评模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟萍; 兰伯恩; 徐蜀远; 杨丽萍

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the prescription quality, promote the rational drug use and ensure the medical safety, the establishment of prescription review pattern suitable for pharmacy department of hospital was explored. Under the guidance of the Prescription Administrative Policy and the Management Practice on Hospital Prescription Review (Tentative), the pharmacists in our hospital paid great attention to the prescription verification and participated in the prescription review. Clinical pharmacists put their emphasis on the prescription (doctor’s advice list) review and re-evaluation of pharmacy review. The prescription review working group reexamined the review results and put forward improvement proposals to the hospital. The prescription review system raised prescription review ability of pharmacists , guaranteed its fairness and rationality and showed benefits for the continuous improvement on prescription quality.%为提高处方质量,促进合理用药,保障医疗安全,探索建立适合我院药学部门的处方点评模式。在《处方管理办法》、《医院处方点评管理规范(试行)》的指导下,我院药房药师重在进行处方审核,参与处方点评;临床药师重在进行处方(医嘱单)点评及对药房药师点评进行再评价;处方点评工作小组复查点评结果,向医院提出改进措施。通过处方点评制度提高药房药师的审方能力,保证处方点评的公正合理,有利于处方的持续质量改进。

  7. The 2011 PHARMINE report on pharmacy and pharmacy education in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey; Rombaut, Bart

    2011-10-01

    The PHARMINE consortium consists of 50 universities from European Union member states or other European countries that are members of the European Association of Faculties of Pharmacy (EAFP). EU partner associations representing community (PGEU), hospital (EAHP) and industrial pharmacy (EIPG), together with the European Pharmacy Students' Association (EPSA) are also part of the consortium. THE CONSORTIUM SURVEYED PHARMACIES AND PHARMACISTS IN DIFFERENT SETTINGS: community, hospital, industry and other sectors. The consortium also looked at how European Union higher education institutions and courses are organised. The PHARMINE survey of pharmacy and pharmacy education in Europe produced country profiles with extensive information for EU member states and several other European countries. These data are available at: http://www.pharmine.org/losse_paginas/Country_Profiles/. This 2011 PHARMINE report presents the project and data, and some preliminary analysis on the basic question of how pharmacy education is adapted to pharmacy practice in the EU.

  8. Design and methods of the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP), a multicomponent targeted intervention to prevent delirium in hospitalized older patients: efficacy and cost-effectiveness in Dutch health care

    OpenAIRE

    Strijbos, Marije; Steunenberg, Bas; Schuurmans,, Marieke J.; Mast, van der, N.; Inouye, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Background The Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) has been shown to be highly efficient and (cost-)effective in reducing delirium incidence in the USA. HELP provides multicomponent protocols targeted at specific risk factors for delirium and introduces a different view on care organization, with trained volunteers playing a pivotal role. The primary aim of this study is the quantification of the (cost-)effectiveness of HELP in the Dutch health care system. The second aim is to investigate the...

  9. The Faculties of Pharmacy Schools Should Make an Effort to Network with Community Pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    By law, medical faculties are mandated to have a designated partner hospital for the purposes of student practical training. In contrast, pharmacy faculties do not have such a legal requirement for student training in a community pharmacy setting. Nevertheless, there are several public and private universities that do have community pharmacies. However, there is no national university that has established both an educational hospital and a community pharmacy. When Kanazawa University (KU) established a graduate school with a clinical pharmacy course, the faculty of KU deemed it necessary to set up an independent community pharmacy for the purpose of practical training. Thus, in 2003, the Acanthus Pharmacy was set up as the first educational community pharmacy in Japan, managed by a nonprofit organization, with the permission of the Ishikawa Pharmaceutical Association and local community pharmacists. Since that time, Acanthus has managed a clinical pharmacy practice for students from both the undergraduate and graduate schools of KU. From 2006, the undergraduate pharmacy program was changed to a 6-year program, and the Acanthus Pharmacy has continued its roles in educating undergraduate pharmaceutical students, medical students, and as a site of early exposure for KU freshmen. From our experience, it is important to have a real clinical environment available to university pharmacy faculty and students, especially in training for community pharmacy practices.

  10. 医院药剂科文化的构建与实践%Cultural Construction and Practice of the Pharmacy Department in Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜淑娴; 程红勤; 王育琴

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To explore the influence of the cultural construction on the management of the pharmacy department and the level of pharmaceutical care.METHODS:The experience of the construction of department culture in our hospital was introduced,i.g.establishing same values of pharmacy department by building up the service concept of "patient-centered" and the contents of "quality,learning,team,sharing and performance".RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS:The cultural construction of pharmacy department is developed by insisting quality management,building up learning organization,enhancing team construction and learning and communication,carrying out performance management.All pharmacist's enthusiasm and initiative are mobilized,cohesion of sections is enhanced,which contribute to the sustainable development of the department of pharmacy and the level of pharmaceutical care.%目的:探讨文化建设对药剂科管理和药学服务水平的影响.方法:介绍该院科室文化建设的经验,内容包括通过树立“以患者为中心”的服务理念,结合“质量、学习、团队、分享、绩效”等具体内容,确立了药剂科的共同价值观.结果与结论:通过坚持质量管理、构建学习型组织、加强团队建设、加强学习交流、实施绩效管理等进行药剂科的文化建设,调动了全体药师工作的积极性和主动性,科室的凝聚力得以加强,从而促进了药剂科的持续发展和药学服务水平的提升.

  11. Examination of psychosocial predictors of Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services using the theory of planned behaviour: a cross-sectional questionnaire study

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Yang, Fan; Mu, Dongqin; Xing, Yuan; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Main study aim was as follows: (1) to explore the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model in predicting Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services (CPSs), including auxiliary CPSs and core CPSs; (2) to identify the main factors affecting the Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide core CPSs based on TPB quantitatively. Design Cross-sectional questionnaire study. Setting The study was conducted in 22 general hospitals in seven cities located in the eastern and western part of China. Participants 416 hospital pharmacists (292 (70.2%) female) entered and completed the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Quantitative responses with hospital pharmacists' intention, attitude, subjective norms (SNs) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) over provision of CPSs and their past behaviour (PB)-related CPSs. Results The structural equation model analysis found that attitude (p=0.0079, β=0.12), SN (p=0.038, β=0.10) and the pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs (p=0.0001, β=0.63) significantly predicted of their intention to provide core CPSs, accounting for 54.0% of its variance. Attitude (p=0.0001, β=0.35), PBC (p=0.0182, β=0.12) and PB (p=0.0009, β=0.15) are significant predictors of pharmacists' intention, accounting for 21% of the variance in pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs. Conclusions The TPB with the addition of PB is a useful framework for predicting pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs in Chinese hospital care context. Strategies to improve hospital pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs should focus on helping the individuals related medical care see the value of CPSs, altering their perception of social pressure towards core CPSs and the removal of obstacles that impede the translation of intentions into behaviour. PMID:27707835

  12. Examination of psychosocial predictors of Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services using the theory of planned behaviour: a cross-sectional questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Yang, Fan; Mu, Dongqin; Xing, Yuan; Li, Xin

    2016-10-05

    Main study aim was as follows: (1) to explore the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model in predicting Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services (CPSs), including auxiliary CPSs and core CPSs; (2) to identify the main factors affecting the Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide core CPSs based on TPB quantitatively. Cross-sectional questionnaire study. The study was conducted in 22 general hospitals in seven cities located in the eastern and western part of China. 416 hospital pharmacists (292 (70.2%) female) entered and completed the study. Quantitative responses with hospital pharmacists' intention, attitude, subjective norms (SNs) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) over provision of CPSs and their past behaviour (PB)-related CPSs. The structural equation model analysis found that attitude (p=0.0079, β=0.12), SN (p=0.038, β=0.10) and the pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs (p=0.0001, β=0.63) significantly predicted of their intention to provide core CPSs, accounting for 54.0% of its variance. Attitude (p=0.0001, β=0.35), PBC (p=0.0182, β=0.12) and PB (p=0.0009, β=0.15) are significant predictors of pharmacists' intention, accounting for 21% of the variance in pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs. The TPB with the addition of PB is a useful framework for predicting pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs in Chinese hospital care context. Strategies to improve hospital pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs should focus on helping the individuals related medical care see the value of CPSs, altering their perception of social pressure towards core CPSs and the removal of obstacles that impede the translation of intentions into behaviour. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, J.E.; Wierenga, P.C.; de Rooij, S.E.; Stuijt, C.C.; Arisz, L.; Kuks, P.F.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Smorenburg, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs) during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical

  14. On-ward participation of a hospital pharmacist in a Dutch intensive care unit reduces prescribing errors and related patient harm: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopotowska, Joanna E; Kuiper, Rob; van Kan, Hendrikus J; de Pont, Anne-Cornelie; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; Lie-A-Huen, Loraine; Vroom, Margreeth B; Smorenburg, Susanne M

    2010-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for prescribing errors and related adverse drug events (ADEs). An effective intervention to decrease this risk, based on studies conducted mainly in North America, is on-ward participation of a clinical pharmacist in an ICU team. As the Dutch Healthcare System is organized differently and the on-ward role of hospital pharmacists in Dutch ICU teams is not well established, we conducted an intervention study to investigate whether participation of a hospital pharmacist can also be an effective approach in reducing prescribing errors and related patient harm (preventable ADEs) in this specific setting. A prospective study compared a baseline period with an intervention period. During the intervention period, an ICU hospital pharmacist reviewed medication orders for patients admitted to the ICU, noted issues related to prescribing, formulated recommendations and discussed those during patient review meetings with the attending ICU physicians. Prescribing issues were scored as prescribing errors when consensus was reached between the ICU hospital pharmacist and ICU physicians. During the 8.5-month study period, medication orders for 1,173 patients were reviewed. The ICU hospital pharmacist made a total of 659 recommendations. During the intervention period, the rate of consensus between the ICU hospital pharmacist and ICU physicians was 74%. The incidence of prescribing errors during the intervention period was significantly lower than during the baseline period: 62.5 per 1,000 monitored patient-days versus 190.5 per 1,000 monitored patient-days, respectively (P Medication Error Reporting and Prevention severity categories E and F) were reduced from 4.0 per 1,000 monitored patient-days during the baseline period to 1.0 per 1,000 monitored patient-days during the intervention period (P = 0.25). Per monitored patient-day, the intervention itself cost €3, but might have saved €26 to €40 by preventing

  15. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Industrial Clinical Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Joseph; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A postdoctoral pharmacy fellowship is described that provides training in industrial clinical pharmacy practice and related tasks associated with the development of new pharmaceuticals, through experience in industrial and hospital settings and in research projects. (MSE) PUBTYPE[141

  16. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Industrial Clinical Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Joseph; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A postdoctoral pharmacy fellowship is described that provides training in industrial clinical pharmacy practice and related tasks associated with the development of new pharmaceuticals, through experience in industrial and hospital settings and in research projects. (MSE) PUBTYPE[141

  17. Factors influencing the exit knowledge of patients for dispensed drugs at outpatient pharmacy of Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital, Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirko N

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nigatu Hirko,1 Dumessa Edessa2 1Department of Pharmacy, Bisidimo Hospital, East Hararghe Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia; 2Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Health and Medical Sciences, Haramaya University, Harar, Ethiopia Background: A satisfactory counseling process between the patient and pharmacist is critical for rational use of dispensed drug(s and is highly influenced by many factors including the experience of pharmacist in dispensing process. To improve patients’ knowledge of dispensed drugs, it is necessary to understand the factors that optimize a pharmacist interaction with a patient in each activity of the dispensing process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the pharmacist and patient factors that influence knowledge of dispensed drugs by ambulatory patients at Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital, Harar, Ethiopia.Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 422 respondents. Data were collected by interviews using a structured questionnaire that measures “exit knowledge” of the ambulatory patients for dispensed drugs. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS Version 20.0. Potential covariates were identified using χ2 test, and logistic regression analyses were undertaken to adjust for the covariates.Results: Our findings showed significant proportions of the patients did not recall the name of their dispensed medication (53.6%, major side effects (66.4%, and what to do in case of missed doses (65.4%. Patients’ knowledge of dispensed drugs was significantly associated with their educational level (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01–3.84 [primary], AOR: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.04–4.04 [secondary], and AOR: 2.71; 95% CI: 1.35–5.46 [tertiary]; clear instruction from the pharmacist (AOR: 3.36; 95% CI: 1.16–9.72; and the politeness of the pharmacist (AOR: 2.02; 95% CI: 1.04–4.04.Conclusion: We found that the

  18. The merits of a robot : A Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mobach, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the merits of a robot at the community pharmacy in a quasi-experiment. Method: The applied methods for data-collection were barcode-time measurements, direct observations, time-interval studies, and tally at a Dutch community pharmacy. The topics consisted of workload, waiting

  19. Lean Hospital Approach to Identify Critical Waste in the Outpatient Pharmacy Instalation of RSI PKU Muhammadiyah Pekajangan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusi Rahmani Putri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This Research Purpose to identify critical waste, root cause of critical waste, up to giving recommended improvement to minimize critical waste in the outpatient pharmacy. This research uses qualitative approach with case study design. The health service process is visualized with value stream mapping, the amount of critical waste is obtained by distributing questionnaires, while the root cause of critical waste is acquired by 5 why method of interview. The recommended improvementis accomplished by discussion between team and expert panel. Based on the value stream mapping, it has obtained 16,67% of ratio value added to waste for non concoction prescription and 14.52% of ratio value added to waste for concoction prescription. Based on waste questionnaire distribution, motion got the highest rank as the most often exist waste with 19% percentage. The root causes of this motion waste is nonexistence of a routine schedule on the work space organization, which affecting the effectiveness of pharmacy staff to complete their task. The recommended improvement to minimize this waste motion is to conduct 5S method.

  20. 等级评审契机下的医院药学发展策略分析%Analysis of the Strategy about Hospital Pharmacy Development at the Moment of Hospital Grade Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾立华; 李彦博; 王亮

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the strategy of constructing a high-quality and advanced pharmacy management pattern. METHODS: Some strategies were adpoted to improve the construction of subject, it included the status quo of subject development analyzed with SWOT theory, development objectives formulated according to SMART rules, PDCA rules employed to promote quality improvement of pharmacy, KPI evaluation system established to improve work efficiency. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: Through analyzing the pros and cons of subject development, the measure of "developing priorities, padding short board" was determined; through formulating objective, clear and step-by-step work objectives, the team of clinical pharmacists was established and developed; multiple pharmaceutical management groups were established and work process was standardized; drug quality and safety management were improved continuously through quality control and safety management team activities; the evaluation system was established and department culture was developed to stimulate the initiative and enthusiasm of the pharmacy staff for work. The scientific management methods are adopted for construction of pharmacy and can effectively integrate resources and enhance the development of subject about hospital pharmacy.%目的:探索构建优质、先进的医院药学管理模式的策略.方法:分别采用SWOT法分析学科发展现状、依据SMART原则制订发展目标、运用PDCA法则促进药事质量改进、建立KPI考评体系以提高工作效率等多种策略提高学科建设.结果与结论:通过学科发展优劣势分析,确定了“发展重点,补齐短板”的实施措施;通过制订客观、明确、循序渐进的工作目标,成立并发展了临床药师队伍;建立多个药事工作管理小组,规范了工作流程,并通过质量控制安全管理团队活动促进了药品质量与安全管理的持续提高;建立考评体系,发展科室文化,激发药学人员的工

  1. Investigation of the important role of the pharmacy management of de-partment of pharmacy in the hospital administration%药剂科药事管理在医院管理工作中重要作用的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔志豪

    2014-01-01

    According to the relevant provisions of the Ministry of medical institutions file management of National Original of Public Health and State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine,combined with the present situation of pharmacy management of department of pharmacy in China,the essence,objective,existing problems and countermea-sures of pharmacy management of department of pharmacy in hospital management are analyzed in this study,and im-portance of pharmacy management is illustrated applying the mature management knowledge.Our country should carry out the separation of medicine,and optimize the management system,manage drugs using the informationalized and modern method to accelerate the development of the clinical pharmacy work so as to promote?the construction and de-velopment of hospital for the well-being of people’s health.%本研究根据国家原卫生部、中医药管理局医药机构文件管理的相关规定,结合我国医院药剂科药事管理的现状,分析药剂科药事管理在医院管理工作中的实质、目的、存在的问题及解决对策,运用成熟的管理学知识,说明药事管理的重要性。我国应该推行医药分家,优化管理制度,采用信息化、现代化的方式对药品进行管理,加快推进临床药学工作的发展,从而推动医院的建设和发展,为人民的健康谋福祉。

  2. Pharmacy alternatives (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common source for obtaining prescriptions is the local pharmacy. Usually the pharmacy is located in a drug or grocery store. ... some insurance companies have chosen is mail-order pharmacy. Once a pharmacy has been chosen it is ...

  3. Cancer Patients Use Hospital-Based Care Until Death : A Further Analysis of the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuse, Jan J.; van der Linden, Yvette M.; Post, Wendy J.; Wanders, Rinus; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Leer, Jan Willem H.; Reyners, Anna K. L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe health care utilization (HCU) at the end of life in cancer patients. These data are relevant to plan palliative care services, and to develop training programs for involved health care professionals. Methods: The Dutch Bone Metastasis Study (DBMS) was a nationwide study proving

  4. Cancer patients use hospital-based care until death: a further analysis of the dutch bone metastasis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuse, J.J.; Linden, Y.M. van der; Post, W.J.; Wanders, R.; Gans, R.O.; Leer, J.W.H.; Reyners, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To describe health care utilization (HCU) at the end of life in cancer patients. These data are relevant to plan palliative care services, and to develop training programs for involved health care professionals. Methods: The Dutch Bone Metastasis Study (DBMS) was a nationwide study

  5. 药学管理引入ISO质量管理体系的实践及体会%The Practice and Experience of Applying ISO Quality Management Systems to the Hospital Pharmacy Manage-ment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玉刚; 陈淑媛; 付小平

    2009-01-01

    医院药学管理工作中引入ISO质量管理体系.探讨了提高药学管理水平的途径和方法 .结果 表明药学事业迅速发展,工作有章可循,药学管理的制度化、程序化程度提高.%The way of improving the pharmacy management level was discussed in the article, through the ISO quantity man-agement system being applied to the hospital pharmacy management and the plan being executed according to the system's request The results showed that the pharmacy developed rapidly and the degree of institutionalized process was increased.

  6. Clinical Pharmacy Education in a Dental Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Dennis K.; Walker, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A clinical pharmacy training program for undergraduate students developed at the University of Iowa provides conjoint training of pharmacy and dental students in the clinic areas and pharmacy at the College of Dentistry. (LBH)

  7. Pharmacy Dashboard: An Innovative Process for Pharmacy Workload and Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Ashley; Bui, Quyen; Hodding, Jane; Le, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Background: Innovative approaches, including LEAN systems and dashboards, to enhance pharmacy production continue to evolve in a cost and safety conscious health care environment. Furthermore, implementing and evaluating the effectiveness of these novel methods continues to be challenging for pharmacies. Objective: To describe a comprehensive, real-time pharmacy dashboard that incorporated LEAN methodologies and evaluate its utilization in an inpatient Central Intravenous Additives Services (CIVAS) pharmacy. Methods: Long Beach Memorial Hospital (462 adult beds) and Miller Children's and Women's Hospital of Long Beach (combined 324 beds) are tertiary not-for-profit, community-based hospitals that are served by one CIVAS pharmacy. Metrics to evaluate the effectiveness of CIVAS were developed and implemented on a dashboard in real-time from March 2013 to March 2014. Results: The metrics that were designed and implemented to evaluate the effectiveness of CIVAS were quality and value, financial resilience, and the department's people and culture. Using a dashboard that integrated these metrics, the accuracy of manufacturing defect-free products was ≥99.9%, indicating excellent quality and value of CIVAS. The metric for financial resilience demonstrated a cost savings of $78,000 annually within pharmacy by eliminating the outsourcing of products. People and value metrics on the dashboard focused on standard work, with an overall 94.6% compliance to the workflow. Conclusion: A unique dashboard that incorporated metrics to monitor 3 important areas was successfully implemented to improve the effectiveness of CIVAS pharmacy. These metrics helped pharmacy to monitor progress in real-time, allowing attainment of production goals and fostering continuous quality improvement through LEAN work.

  8. Motivating pharmacy employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S J; Generali, J A

    1984-07-01

    Concepts from theories of motivation are used to suggest methods for improving the motivational environment of hospital pharmacy departments. Motivation--the state of being stimulated to take action to achieve a goal or to satisfy a need--comes from within individuals, but hospital pharmacy managers can facilitate motivation by structuring the work environment so that it satisfies employees' needs. Concepts from several theories of motivation are discussed, including McGregor's theory X and theory Y assumptions, Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory, Herzberg's motivation hygiene theory, and Massey's value system theory. Concepts from the Japanese style of management that can be used to facilitate motivation, such as quality circles, also are described. The autocratic, participative, and laissez faire styles of leadership are discussed in the context of the motivation theories, and suggested applications of theoretical concepts to practice are presented.

  9. Brief discussion of crisis management system of department of pharmacy in hospital%浅谈医院药学部的危机管理体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡晓华; 朱轶红

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Through investigation of crisis management system of department of pharmacy in hospital, to improve related crisis awareness and response capacity of pharmacy worker to security event and change crisis into opportunity. Methods: An Analysis from the aspects of policy crisis, management crisis, quality crisis, quality crisis, technology crisis, security and emergency crisis, public relations crisis, and occupation pressure crisis was done. Results: The crisis management system can find problems, solve the problem, and avoid unsafe events to further expand and develop. Conclusions:The establishment of crisis management sys-tem can ensure the public physical and mental health, and medical and health services to the greatest extent.%目的::通过探讨医院药学部的危机管理体系,提高药学工作者对安全事件相关的危机意识和反应能力,从危机变为转机。方法:从政策危机、管理危机、质量危机、素质危机、技术危机、安全与突发事件危机、公共关系危机、职业压力危机等方面分析。结果:危机管理体系能够及早发现问题,解决问题,杜绝不安全事件的进一步发扩大、发展。结论:危机管理体系的建立能够最大地保障公众的身心健康与卫生健康事业。

  10. 医院药事管理服务理念革新%Scientifically Promoting Service Concept of Hospital Pharmacy Administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷嘉川; 宋金春; 彭燕

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨新形势下的医院药事管理方法。方法从药事管理组织机构、药品招标采购、药品质量监控、药师参与临床药物治疗、个体化药物治疗监测等方面阐述药事管理的工作重点及服务理念。结果与结论随着医药卫生体制改革的深入和《医疗机构药事管理规定》的实施,医院应建立药事管理转型的服务理念,优化药事管理组织机构,加强人才培养和制度建设,重点加大医院信息化管理系统建设的投入,积极推进临床药师制,促进临床科学、合理用药。%Objective To investigate the management method of hospital pharmaceutical affairs under the new situation. Methods To e-laborate the work focus and the service concept from the aspects of the pharmacy administration organization,drug purchasing by invita-tion to bid,quality control,pharmacists participating in clinical medication treatment and individualized therapeutic medication monitor-ing. Results and Conclusion With the development of the medical and health system reform and the implementation of the Pharma-ceutical Affairs Management of Medical Institutions,hospital should establish the concept of pharmacy administration service transforma-tion,optimize the organization of pharmaceutical affairs administration,strengthen the personnel training and the system construction, increase the inputs of hospital information management system and actively boost the clinical pharmacist system for promoting clinical scientific and rational use of drugs.

  11. 乡镇医院药房管理中存在的问题及对策探讨%An Exploration of the Problems in the Pharmacy Management in Township Hospitals and Their Countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海燕

    2015-01-01

    药房作为医院管理系统的终端,在医院管理业务中占有举足轻重的地位,但由于目前乡镇药房管理中存在的不足,严重影响了药房职能的充分发挥。为此,本文在深入剖析乡镇药房管理中存在的问题基础上,有针对性的提出解决问题的四种对策。%As the terminal of the hospital management system, pharmacy management places a significant role in the hospital management business. However, the inappropriate management of township pharmacy seriously influences the performance of pharmacy functions. As a result, the author proposes four countermeasures to solve these problems basing on the analysis of the current problems existing in the township pharmacy management.

  12. 略论新医改对医院药剂管理模式转变的影响%The impact of the new medical reform on transformation of hospital pharmacy manage-ment model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯书屏

    2014-01-01

    Combined with the new medical reform policy,analy-sis of the new medical reform impact on hospital pharmacy man-agement model,further discusses the new development direction of hospital pharmacy management.Combined with the current sta-tus of hospital pharmacy management model,reform brings impact analysis,study after medical hospital pharmacy management mode to change.After the reform,should be strictly management of drugs,to encourage the hospital self-made drug.After health care reform should be strictly managed medicines,hospitals are en-couraged to develop self-control drugs.Health care reform is a measure benefits the country,reducing patients's economic bur-den.Changing drugs for medical policies implemented to medical of technology.Hospital Pharmacy can be independently devel-oped,increase revenue,while the government needs to increase economic subsidies for public hospitals to safeguard its normal op-eration.%结合新医改政策,分析新医改对医院药剂管理模式的影响,进一步探讨医院药剂管理新的发展方向。结合目前医院药剂管理模式现状,分析医改带来的影响,研究医改后医院药剂管理模式如何进行转变。医改后应严格管理药品,鼓励医院研发自制药品。医改是利国利民的措施,实行零差价药品,降低了患者的经济负担。改变以药养医的政策,实行以技养医。医院可以自主研发药剂,增加收入,同时政府需要增加对公立医院的经济补贴,以保障其正常运作。

  13. Dosage uniformity problems which occur due to technological errors in extemporaneously prepared suppositories in hospitals and pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Eva; Lasher, Jason Richard; Tarry, Thomas Dean; Myers, Andrea; Szakonyi, Gerda; Dombi, György; Baki, Gabriella; Alexander, Kenneth S

    2014-09-01

    The availability of suppositories in Hungary, especially in clinical pharmacy practice, is usually provided by extemporaneous preparations. Due to the known advantages of rectal drug administration, its benefits are frequently utilized in pediatrics. However, errors during the extemporaneous manufacturing process can lead to non-homogenous drug distribution within the dosage units. To determine the root cause of these errors and provide corrective actions, we studied suppository samples prepared with exactly known errors using both cerimetric titration and HPLC technique. Our results show that the most frequent technological error occurs when the pharmacist fails to use the correct displacement factor in the calculations which could lead to a 4.6% increase/decrease in the assay in individual dosage units. The second most important source of error can occur when the molding excess is calculated solely for the suppository base. This can further dilute the final suppository drug concentration causing the assay to be as low as 80%. As a conclusion we emphasize that the application of predetermined displacement factors in calculations for the formulation of suppositories is highly important, which enables the pharmacist to produce a final product containing exactly the determined dose of an active substance despite the different densities of the components.

  14. Dosage uniformity problems which occur due to technological errors in extemporaneously prepared suppositories in hospitals and pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Éva; Lasher, Jason Richard; Tarry, Thomas Dean; Myers, Andrea; Szakonyi, Gerda; Dombi, György; Baki, Gabriella; Alexander, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of suppositories in Hungary, especially in clinical pharmacy practice, is usually provided by extemporaneous preparations. Due to the known advantages of rectal drug administration, its benefits are frequently utilized in pediatrics. However, errors during the extemporaneous manufacturing process can lead to non-homogenous drug distribution within the dosage units. To determine the root cause of these errors and provide corrective actions, we studied suppository samples prepared with exactly known errors using both cerimetric titration and HPLC technique. Our results show that the most frequent technological error occurs when the pharmacist fails to use the correct displacement factor in the calculations which could lead to a 4.6% increase/decrease in the assay in individual dosage units. The second most important source of error can occur when the molding excess is calculated solely for the suppository base. This can further dilute the final suppository drug concentration causing the assay to be as low as 80%. As a conclusion we emphasize that the application of predetermined displacement factors in calculations for the formulation of suppositories is highly important, which enables the pharmacist to produce a final product containing exactly the determined dose of an active substance despite the different densities of the components. PMID:25161378

  15. Management of the Validity Period of Drugs in Pharmacy of Tonghua Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital%通化市中医院西药房药品的有效期管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张桂英

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨如何加强医院西药房药品的有效期管理.方法:介绍吉林省通化市中医院(以下简称"我院")采用专业电脑软件管理联合人工管理措施,对医院西药房药品的有效期进行管理的方法.结果与结论:通过计算机软件,可对医院西药房药品库存及消耗情况进行查询,设置药房药品的上、下限,对药房未消耗药品进行查询,对药房药品批号及药品有效期进行查询,以及对药房药品有效期进行预警;辅以人工管理措施,严格检查进入药房药品的有效期,划分区域、责任到人,利用好有色标签,加强口服摆药的有效期管理,可以较好地实现对西药房药品的有效期管理.%OBJECTIVE:To investigate how to strengthen the management of the validity period of drugs in hospital pharmacy .METHODS:Professional computer software combined with manual management measures were adopted in the management of the validity period of drugs in hospital pharmacy of Jilin Tonghua Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital(hereinafter referred to as "our hospital").RESULTS&CONCLUSIONS: The inventory and consumption of drugs in hospital pharmacy could be inquired through the computer software; the upper and lower pharmacy drugs could be set;and unused drugs , batch number and validity period of drugs also could be inquired; early-warning of validity period of drugs could be set .Combined with artificial management measures , validity period of drugs were checked strictly before entering the pharmacy , each person took responsibility for each area , color labels were used in this management .It is necessary to strengthen the validity period of oral drugs , which could help to realize the valid management of drugs in pharmacy .

  16. Balancing the health workforce: breaking down overall technical change into factor technical change for labour-an empirical application to the Dutch hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jos L T; van Hulst, Bart L

    2017-02-17

    Well-trained, well-distributed and productive health workers are crucial for access to high-quality, cost-effective healthcare. Because neither a shortage nor a surplus of health workers is wanted, policymakers use workforce planning models to get information on future labour markets and adjust policies accordingly. A neglected topic of workforce planning models is productivity growth, which has an effect on future demand for labour. However, calculating productivity growth for specific types of input is not as straightforward as it seems. This study shows how to calculate factor technical change (FTC) for specific types of input. The paper first theoretically derives FTCs from technical change in a consistent manner. FTC differs from a ratio of output and input, in that it deals with the multi-input, multi-output character of the production process in the health sector. Furthermore, it takes into account substitution effects between different inputs. An application of the calculation of FTCs is given for the Dutch hospital industry for the period 2003-2011. A translog cost function is estimated and used to calculate technical change and FTC for individual inputs, especially specific labour inputs. The results show that technical change increased by 2.8% per year in Dutch hospitals during 2003-2011. FTC differs amongst the various inputs. The FTC of nursing personnel increased by 3.2% per year, implying that fewer nurses were needed to let demand meet supply on the labour market. Sensitivity analyses show consistent results for the FTC of nurses. Productivity growth, especially of individual outputs, is a neglected topic in workforce planning models. FTC is a productivity measure that is consistent with technical change and accounts for substitution effects. An application to the Dutch hospital industry shows that the FTC of nursing personnel outpaced technical change during 2003-2011. The optimal input mix changed, resulting in fewer nurses being needed to let

  17. Extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence and associated factors of drug-drug interaction and potential adverse drug reactions in Gondar Teaching Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endalkachew Admassie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence, and associated factors for the occurrence of drug-drug interaction (DDI and potential adverse drug reaction (ADR in Gondar University Teaching Referral Hospital. Institutional-based retrospective cross-sectional study. This study was conducted on prescriptions of both in and out-patients for a period of 3 months at Gondar University Hospital. Both bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and possible ADRs. All the statistical calculations were performed using SPSS; software. A total of 12,334 prescriptions were dispensed during the study period of which, 2,180 prescriptions were containing two or more drugs per prescription. A total of 21,210 drugs were prescribed and the average number of drugs per prescription was 1.72. Occurrences of DDI of all categories (Major, Moderate, and Minor were analyzed and DDI were detected in 711 (32.6% prescriptions. Sex was not found to be a risk factor for the occurrence of DDI and ADR, while age and number of medications per prescription were found to be significant risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and ADR. The mean number of drugs per prescription was 1.72 and hence with regard to the WHO limit of drugs per prescription, Gondar hospital was able to maintain the limit and prescriptions containing multiple drugs supposed to be taken systemically. Numbers of drugs per prescription as well as older age were found to be predisposing factors for the occurrence of DDI and potential ADRs while sex was not a risk factor.

  18. 某区域军队医院药学人力资源动态变化分析%Analysis on dynamic changes of pharmacy human resources in military hospitals in a region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾智鹏; 霍花; 顾洪双; 黄海波

    2016-01-01

    目的 为优化某区域军队医院药学资源配置提供参考依据.方法 提取2006年和2013年2次军队医院药学资源现状调查的某区域15家军队医院药学人力资源数据,按医院床位数分成399张以下、400~600张和1000张以上3组,比较分析2001-2005年和2010-2012年这8年间某区域军队医院药学人力资源变化情况.结果 2010-2012年间1000张以上医院组药学人力资源平均年增长率为7.11%,400~600张医院组为5.05%,399张以下医院组为2.28%,延续了2005年以来的增长趋势;3组医院的药学人力资源平均年增长率远低于医院门诊量平均年增长率;高学历和高职称药学人员集中于1000张以上医院组,3组医院本科学历药学人员均占一半左右;2005年以来引进人员基本是初、中级职称.结论 药学人员占医技人员比重偏低,药学部门人均工作量逐年增加,应增加药学人员数量;调剂、制剂等传统岗位与静脉药物配置、临床药学等新兴岗位竞争药学人力资源,应理性控制临床药学发展对人力资源的需求;区域内高层次人力资源分布集中,应从整体出发优化区域药学人力资源布局.%Objective To provide a reference for optimizing pharmacy human resources allocation in military hospitals in a region .Methods Data of pharmacy human resources of 15 military hospitals in a region were collected from 2 pharmacy re-sources investigations of military hospitals in 2006 and 2013 .For comparison analysis on the changes of pharmacy human re-sources in regional military hospitals in 8 years during 2001-2005 and 2010-2012 ,15 military hospitals were divided into 3 groups according actual beds number ,as 399 beds or less ,400-600 beds ,1000 beds above .Results 2010-2012 ,the average annual growth rate of pharmacy human resources was 7 .11% in 1000 beds above group ,5 .05% in 400-600 beds group ,and 2 .28% in 399 beds or less group .It was showed that the changes of pharmacy human

  19. Establish the Procedure of Hospital Pharmacy Service Based on Six Sigma Management%基于六西格玛管理构建医院药学服务流程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张美玲; 黄萍; 应茵; 叶佐武; 杨秀丽; 袁雍

    2011-01-01

    目的 运用六西格玛管理形成一套系统、切实可行的标准化流程,提升医院药学服务质量.方法 按照六西格玛的五步法(DMAIC)实施,即定义-测量-分析-改进-控制,重组和优化药学服务流程.结果 形成98个标准流程,涵盖药事管理各个方面.结论 应用六西格玛管理,使医院药学流程标准化和规范化,以低资源成本、低缺陷的质量水平、优质的服务水准整体上实现医院药学服务质量的提升,实现六西格玛水准,满足患者多层次的需求,顺利接轨新医改.%OBJECTIVE To establish a set of systemic, available and standard procedure, and improve the quality of hospital pharmacy service by the application of six sigma management. METHODS According to five steps of six sigma management including definition, measurement, analysis, improvement and control, we rebuilt and optimized the pharmacy service procedure. RESULTS All of 98 standard procedures were established covering all aspects of pharmacy management. CONCLUSION The established hospital pharmacy service procedure based on six sigma management can improve the quality of pharmacy service by reducing the resource cost and the defect of service quality. This will be benefit for satisfying patients at multi-aspects requirements and connecting to the new medical system reformation.

  20. A UV-Raman spectrometry method for quality control of anticancer preparations: Results after 18 months of implementation in hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardella, Flore; Beck, Morgane; Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre; Becker, Guillaume; Boulanger, Coralie; Perello, Laurent; Gairard-Dory, Anne; Gourieux, Bénédicte; Ubeaud-Séquier, Geneviève

    2016-02-29

    In France, chemotherapy preparation units of hospital pharmacy compound cytotoxic infusion bags adapted to each patient. The narrow therapeutic index of these preparations led us to implement qualitative and quantitative control for patients' safety. To this aim, we calibrated an equipment combining UV-vis spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy (QC Prep+) and monitored 14 different molecule-solvent combinations over a 18 months period. This rapid and specific method allowed the qualitative and quantitative analysis of 1 mL sample tests in less than 2 min. On 5742 anticancer preparations, we obtained accepted results with more than 99.4% solvent identification, 99.6% drug identification and only 1.52% of preparations not matching quantitative specifications (±15% of theoretical concentration). This quantitative control enabled us to pinpoint some critical points of production for two of the most common preparations. We thus updated the procedures of reconstitution and preparation, increasing the quality of final product. UV-Raman spectrometry is thus an effective tool to control chemotherapy infusions and to improve good practices of preparation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 县级医院药剂科加强管理的一点思路%Train of Thoughts on Strengthening Management of Pharmacy Department in the County-level Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘则宗; 李玉霞

    2016-01-01

    该文从药品采购与出库、药剂科的财务管理及药剂科信息化建设、临床药学四个方面进行阐述和分析,探索基层医院药剂科加强管理的策略,指出制定科学合理的管理制度,加强临床药学及信息化建设才能使药剂科进一步转变职能,更好地为患者服务é%to explore four aspects for the pharmacy department to strengthen management in primary hospitals. This paper states and analyzes the four aspects from drug purchase and delivery from storage, financial management and information construction and Clinical Pharmacy. Make further change in function of department of pharmacy, and provide better service for patients, we have to come up with scientific and reasonable management, and strengthen clinical pharmacy and informa-tion construction.

  2. Colloquial Dutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard

    This course in colloquial Dutch was originally prepared for use by American Armed Forces personnel who needed to develop a working command of the spoken language in a short period of time. Thirty-one lessons, based on activities common to Dutch culture, are contained in the text. Each lesson provides three parallel columns of sentences: the…

  3. Colloquial Dutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard

    This course in colloquial Dutch was originally prepared for use by American Armed Forces personnel who needed to develop a working command of the spoken language in a short period of time. Thirty-one lessons, based on activities common to Dutch culture, are contained in the text. Each lesson provides three parallel columns of sentences: the…

  4. Evaluation of a Clostridium difficile infection management policy with clinical pharmacy and medical microbiology involvement at a major Canadian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, S S T; Yeung, J K; Lau, T T Y; Forrester, L A; Steiner, T S; Bowie, W R; Bryce, E A

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) represents a spectrum of disease and is a significant concern for healthcare institutions. Our study objective was to assess whether implementation of a regional CDI management policy with Clinical Pharmacy and Medical Microbiology and Infection Control involvement would lead to an improvement in concordance in prescribing practices to an evidence-based CDI disease severity assessment and pharmacological treatment algorithm. Conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital, this two-phase quality assurance study consisted of a baseline retrospective healthcare record review of patients with CDI prior to the implementation of a regional CDI management policy followed by a prospective evaluation post-implementation. One hundred and forty-one CDI episodes in the pre-implementation group were compared to 283 episodes post-implementation. Overall treatment concordance to the CDI treatment algorithm was achieved in 48 of 141 cases (34%) pre-implementation compared with 136 of 283 cases (48·1%) post-implementation (P = 0·01). The median time to treatment with vancomycin was reduced from five days to one day (P < 0·01), with median length of hospital stay decreasing from 30 days to 21 days (P = 0·01) post-implementation. There was no difference in 30-day all-cause mortality. A comprehensive approach with appropriate stakeholder involvement in the development of clinical pathways, education to healthcare workers and prospective audit with intervention and feedback can ensure patients diagnosed with CDI are optimally managed and prescribed the most appropriate therapy based on CDI disease severity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Social Pharmacy and Clinical Pharmacy - Joining Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdottir, Anna Birna; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2016-01-01

    This commentary seeks to define the areas of social pharmacy and clinical pharmacy to uncover what they have in common and what still sets them apart. Common threats and challenges of the two areas are reviewed in order to understand the forces in play. Forces that still keep clinical and social...... and external key players in putting forth what is needed for the profession of pharmacy. At the end the question is posed, “What’s in a name?” and we argue that it is important to emphasize what unifies the families of clinical pharmacy and social pharmacy for the benefit of both fields, pharmacy in general...... pharmacy apart are university structures, research traditions, and the management of pharmacy services. There are key (but shrinking) differences between clinical and social pharmacy which entail the levels of study within pharmaceutical sciences, the location in which the research is carried out...

  6. Comparative Analysis of Understanding of Pictograms among Pharmacy and Non-Pharmacy Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riffat Yasmin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate awareness and significance of pictograms among pharmacy and non-pharmacy students. The study was conducted in two public and private sector institutes of Karachi during July to Oct 2013. Altogether 306 pharmacy and non pharmacy students participated in the study. A self administered questionnaire was used for this purpose. Nineteen pictograms from the USP-DI and corresponding set of 19 locally developed pictograms conveying the same medication instructions or messages were evaluated. Respondents were evaluated for their interpretation of all 38 pictograms. More than 98% of the pharmacy students agreed that pictograms attracts attention of people to provide information about medicine use. 97% considered that pictograms are used as universal language that can be easily understood by everyone and they are effective tools for educating the illiterate patients. 97.87% non pharmacy students agreed that patients are unfamiliar with medical terminologies and pictograms may be used to convey the medically significant information to patients. Both pharmacy and non pharmacy students preferred USP-DI pictograms over the pictograms of local origin. It is a need of time to introduce pictograms as a topic in curriculum of Pharm -D courses like Dispensing Pharmacy, Hospital pharmacy and Community pharmacy so that during professional life pharmacist can use these tools to improve patient counseling techniques. It is a way to maximize patient care and provide patient education regardless of any barrier.

  7. Design and methods of the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP), a multicomponent targeted intervention to prevent delirium in hospitalized older patients: efficacy and cost-effectiveness in Dutch health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbos, Marije J; Steunenberg, Bas; van der Mast, Roos C; Inouye, Sharon K; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2013-07-23

    The Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) has been shown to be highly efficient and (cost-)effective in reducing delirium incidence in the USA. HELP provides multicomponent protocols targeted at specific risk factors for delirium and introduces a different view on care organization, with trained volunteers playing a pivotal role. The primary aim of this study is the quantification of the (cost-)effectiveness of HELP in the Dutch health care system. The second aim is to investigate the experiences of patients, families, professionals and trained volunteers participating in HELP. A multiple baseline approach (also known as a stepped-wedge design) will be used to evaluate the (cost-) effectiveness of HELP in a cluster randomized controlled study. All patients aged 70 years and older who are at risk for delirium and are admitted to cardiology, internal medicine, geriatrics, orthopedics and surgery at two participating community hospitals will be included. These eight units are implementing the intervention in a successive order that will be determined at random. The incidence of delirium, the primary outcome, will be measured with the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Secondary outcomes include the duration and severity of delirium, quality of life, length of stay and the use of care services up to three months after hospital discharge. The experiences of patients, families, professionals and volunteers will be investigated using a qualitative design based on the grounded theory approach. Professionals and volunteers will be invited to participate in focus group interviews. Additionally, a random sample of ten patients and their families from each hospital unit will be interviewed at home after discharge. We hypothesize that HELP will reduce delirium incidence during hospital admission and decrease the duration and severity of delirium and length of hospital stays among these older patients, which will lead to reduced health care costs. The results of this study may

  8. Study on Optimal Management of Pharmacy Inventory Turnover Rate of a Top Grade Hospital%某三甲医院住院药品库存周转率优化管理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玮霄; 王淑玲

    2015-01-01

    For improving the hospital pharmacy inventory management and the optimization of drug inventory turnover rate,an analysis was made in this paper on pharmacy inventory turnover rate of a top grade hospitals in 2013 and 2014. It was suggested that further attention should be paid to the economic construction of inventory, the use of information technology and establishment of rules and regulations to optimize inventory management. The improvement of pharmacy inventory turnover rate is the key point for the inventory management.%为改善医院药房库存管理,优化药品库存周转率,分析某三甲医院2013年与2014年药品库存周转率状况。提出通过加强对库存经济化建设的重视、利用信息技术和设立规章制度来优化该医院库存管理,库存管理关键从药品库存周转率入手进行优化提升。

  9. Hospital Variation in Failure to Rescue after Colorectal Cancer Surgery : Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, D.; Snijders, H. S.; Fiocco, M.; van Leersum, N. J.; Kolfschoten, N. E.; Wiggers, Th; Wouters, M. W. J. M.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative mortality is frequently used in hospital comparisons as marker for quality of care. Differences in mortality between hospitals may be explained by varying complication rates. A possible modifying factor may be the ability to let patients with a serious complication survive, referred to

  10. Pharmacy data in epidemiological studies : an easy to obtain and reliable tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monster, TBM; Janssen, WMT; de Jong, PE; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2002-01-01

    Purpose The agreement between drug use measured in computerized pharmacy records and patient interviews or questionnaires is generally good. However, most investigations on this subject studied selected populations or subsets. We studied the coverage of Dutch pharmacy data for our study cohort, and

  11. Critérios e indicadores de resultados para a farmácia hospitalar brasileira utilizando o método Delfos Establishment of criteria and outcome indicators for hospital pharmacies in Brazil using Delphos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Magarinos-Torres

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A farmácia hospitalar é responsável por diversas atividades com influência no cuidado à saúde de pacientes hospitalizados. Este artigo descreve a construção de critérios e indicadores de resultado para a farmácia hospitalar brasileira utilizando Delfos, um método de consenso que dispensa contato presencial. Participaram do estudo 22 especialistas de quatro regiões brasileiras. Todo processo ancorou-se no modelo lógico da farmácia hospitalar brasileira, previamente construído. Foram enviados por correio eletrônico quatro documentos de trabalho. A primeira rodada identificou 103 possíveis resultados. O julgamento quanto à adequação, relevância e possibilidade de mensuração permitiu selecionar 22 critérios que originaram 20 indicadores, agrupados em 7 aspectos da qualidade do serviço. As contribuições iniciais permitiram explicitar melhor o objetivo de quatro componentes do modelo lógico. Observa-se que todos os itens considerados como resultado pelos especialistas neste estudo encontram-se descritos na literatura, seja como indicadores de estrutura ou processo da farmácia hospitalar. Estima-se que a construção de indicadores compostos para a farmácia hospitalar, com base nos aspectos de qualidade observados, permitiria traduzir melhor sua contribuição na avaliação do cuidado a pacientes hospitalizados.The hospital pharmacy is responsible for several services which influence inpatient outcomes. This paper describes the construction of criteria and outcome indicators for Brazilian hospital pharmacies using Delphos, a consensus technique in which physical presence of specialists is not necessary. 22 specialists from 4 Brazilian regions participated. The entire process was anchored on the logical model previously constructed for the Brazilian hospital pharmacy. The four phases were conducted through e-mail contact. The first round of contributions identified 103 possible outcomes. These were screened and classified

  12. Defining professional pharmacy services in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moullin, Joanna C; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2013-01-01

    Multiple terms and definitions exist to describe specific aspects of pharmacy practice and service provision, yet none encompass the full range of professional services delivered by community pharmacy. The majority of current pharmacy service definitions and nomenclature refer to either the professional philosophy of pharmaceutical care or to specific professional pharmacy services; particularly pharmaceutical services provided by pharmacists with a focus on drug safety, effectiveness and health outcomes. The objective of this paper is therefore to define a professional pharmacy service within the context of the community pharmacy model of service provision. A professional pharmacy service is defined as "an action or set of actions undertaken in or organised by a pharmacy, delivered by a pharmacist or other health practitioner, who applies their specialised health knowledge personally or via an intermediary, with a patient/client, population or other health professional, to optimise the process of care, with the aim to improve health outcomes and the value of healthcare." Based on Donabedian's framework, the professional pharmacy service definition incorporates the concepts of organizational structure, process indicators and outcome measures. The definition will assist in many areas including recognition of the full range of services provided by community pharmacy and facilitating the identification of indicators of professional pharmacy service implementation and sustainable provision. A simple conceptual model for incorporating all services provided by community pharmacy is proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 我院门诊药房绩效分配方案的实践%Practice of Performance Evaluation-related Distribution Program in Outpatient Pharmacy of Our Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李璐璐

    2016-01-01

    随着公立医院综合改革的全面展开,现有的人事薪酬模式已不能适应医院药学的发展需求,亟需建立行之有效的薪酬激励制度,变革医院药学工作的现状。根据我院门诊药房的特点,我们采取细化分工,明确岗位职责,制定考评细则,利用360度评价法综合考评量化、质化指标,并且运用PDCA循环的方法对考核方案的可行性进行评估,旨在建立科学合理、公平有效的绩效分配方案,以提高药学服务质量。。%With fully comprehensive reform of public hospital, the existing personnel salary model has been unable to meet the needs of the development of hospital pharmacy. Thus there is an urgent need to establish effective compensation incentive system to change the status quo of hospital pharmacy. According to the characteristics of our hospital outpatient pharmacy, we take a detailed division of labor, a clear job responsibility to formulate detailed rules for examination and assessment, using 360 degree evaluation method for comprehensive evaluation of quantitative and qualitative indicators, and the method of PDCA cycle to evaluate the feasibility of the evaluation scheme. This is aimed at building scientiifc and reasonable, fair and effective performance bonus distribution program to improve the quality of pharmaceutical service.

  14. Safety culture in a pharmacy setting using a pharmacy survey on patient safety culture: a cross-sectional study in China

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, P L; Zhang, L. H.; Zhang, M.M; Zhang, L.L.; Zhang,C.; Qin, S F; Li, X. L.; Liu, K. X.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the attitudes and perceptions of patient safety culture for pharmacy workers in China by using a Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (PSOPSC), and to assess the psychometric properties of the translated Chinese language version of the PSOPSC. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants Data were obtained from 20 hospital pharmacies in the southwest part of China. Methods We performed χ2 test to explore the differences on pharmacy staff in different hospital and quali...

  15. Patients' priorities for ambulant hospital care centres: a survey and discrete choice experiment among elderly and chronically ill patients of a Dutch hospital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Triemstra, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study established patients' preferences regarding the facilities in an adjacent centre for ambulatory hospital care. It also identified determinants of patients' choice to visit this centre instead of the regional hospital. Methods: A questionnaire survey among 1477 elderly and

  16. Patients' priorities for ambulant hospital care centres: a survey and discrete choice experiment among elderly and chronically ill patients of a Dutch hospital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Triemstra, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study established patients' preferences regarding the facilities in an adjacent centre for ambulatory hospital care. It also identified determinants of patients' choice to visit this centre instead of the regional hospital. Methods: A questionnaire survey among 1477 elderly and chron

  17. Analysis of use of anti-infectives in the hospital pharmacy%某住院药房抗感染药物使用情况分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀敏; 范胜军

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyze the use of anti-infectives in our hospital pharmacy and to provide basis for rational clinical use of anti-infectives. Methods The analysis was conducted using the methods of defined daily use and order of consumption sum based on the raw data retrieved from Hospital Drug Inventory Management System. Results Anti-infectives using proportion after November droped. The use of varieties followed by the biggest amount of injection cefminox sodium,piperacillin sodium and sulbactam sodium for injection,cefazolin sodium needles. Medication is the highest frequency of piperacillin sodium and sulbactam sodium needles,cefminox needle,needle penicillin sodium. Conclusion Use of anti-infectives'situation wholely became stable. β-lactams,Quinolones was our clinical anti-infection treatment leading medicine. The individual frequency of use high variety took the amount rise,and it explained that still waited for the standard in antibiotics use.%目的 分析住院药房抗感染药物的使用情况,为临床合理应用抗感染药提供参考.方法 根据"药局库存管理程序"的原始数据资料,按金额、限定日剂量进行排序、分析.结果 抗感染药物使用比例从11月份后有所下降,使用金额最大的品种依次是注射用头孢米诺钠、注射用哌拉西林钠舒巴坦钠、头孢唑啉钠针,用药频率最高的是哌拉西林钠舒巴坦钠针、头孢米诺钠针、青霉素钠针.结论 抗感染用药情况整体趋稳,β-内酰胺类、喹诺酮类是临床抗感染治疗的主导药物,个别使用频率较高的品种占用金额上升,说明在抗菌药物的使用上仍有待规范.

  18. The Fifth-Year Institutional Clinical Pharmacy Program at the Medical University of South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putney, Blake F.; Ray, Max D.

    1976-01-01

    Students spend approximately 240 clock-hours in various areas of the university hospital in fulfillment of the institutional component requirement of the clinical pharmacy program. The major strength of this program is the utilization of hospital pharmacy supervisory personnel as instructors in clinical pharmacy. (LBH)

  19. The need for redesigned pharmacy practice courses in Pakistan: the perspectives of senior pharmacy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Umair Khan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In Pakistan, courses in pharmacy practice, which are an essential component of the PharmD curriculum, were launched with the aim of strengthening pharmacy practice overall and enabling pharmacy students to cope with the challenges involved in meeting real-world healthcare needs. Since very little research has assessed the efficacy of such courses, we aimed to evaluate students’ perceptions of pharmacy practice courses and their opinions about whether their current knowledge of the topics covered in pharmacy practice courses is adequate for future practice. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted over two months among the senior pharmacy students of two pharmacy colleges. A content- and face-validated questionnaire was used to collect data, which were then analysed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression were performed. Results: Research in pharmacy practice (30.2%, applied drug information (34.4%, health policy (38.1%, public health and epidemiology (39.5%, pharmacovigilance (45.6%, and pharmacoeconomics (47.9% were the major courses that were covered to the least extent in the PharmD curriculum. However, hospital pharmacy practice (94.4%, pharmacotherapeutics (88.8%, and community pharmacy practice (82.8% were covered well. Although 94% of students considered these courses important, only 37.2% considered themselves to be competent in the corresponding topics. Of the participants, 87.9% agreed that the pharmacy courses in the present curriculum should be redesigned. Conclusion: Our results showed that the pharmacy practice courses in the current PharmD curriculum do not encompass some important core subjects. A nationwide study is warranted to further establish the necessity for remodelling pharmacy practice courses in Pakistan.

  20. Management of children’s acute diarrhea by community pharmacies in five towns of Ethiopia: simulated client case study

    OpenAIRE

    Abegaz TM; Belachew SA; Abebe TB; Gebresilassie BM; Teni FS; Woldie HG

    2016-01-01

    Tadesse Melaku Abegaz,1 Sewunet Admasu Belachew,1 Tamrat Befekadu Abebe,1 Begashaw Melaku Gebresilassie,1 Fitsum Sebsibe Teni,2 Habtamu Gebremeskel Woldie3 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Gondar University, Gondar, 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Social Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, 3Department of Hospital Pharmacy, Debremarkos Teaching and Referral Hospital, Debremarkos, Ethiopia Background: Acute diarr...

  1. Physician’ entrepreneurship explained: a case study of intra-organizational dynamics in Dutch hospitals and specialty clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelewijn, W.; Rover, de Matthijs; Ehrenhard, M.L.; Harten, van Wim H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Challenges brought about by developments such as continuing market reforms and budget reductions have strained the relation between managers and physicians in hospitals. By applying neo-institutional theory, we research how intra-organizational dynamics between physicians and managers ind

  2. Cost of the meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus search and destroy policy in a Dutch university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nulens, E; Broex, E; Ament, A; Deurenberg, R H; Smeets, E; Scheres, J; van Tiel, F H; Gordts, B; Stobberingh, E E

    2008-01-01

    Costs related to a search and destroy policy and treatment for Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in the University Hospital Maastricht were calculated for the period 2000 and 2004. The financial cost-benefit break-even point of the search and destroy policy was determined by modelling. On average 22

  3. A survey of the use of off-label and unlicensed drugs in a Dutch children's hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W. 't Jong (Geert); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); M. de Hoog (Matthijs); K.J. Schimmel; D. Tibboel (Dick); J.N. van den Anker (John)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The treatment of pediatric patients with drugs in hospitals is being impeded by a shortage in the availability of licensed drugs in an appropriate formulation. We have studied the extent of use of drugs that are not licensed for use in children (unlicensed)

  4. A survey of the use of off-label and unlicensed drugs in a Dutch children's hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W. 't Jong (Geert); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); M. de Hoog (Matthijs); K.J. Schimmel; D. Tibboel (Dick); J.N. van den Anker (John)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The treatment of pediatric patients with drugs in hospitals is being impeded by a shortage in the availability of licensed drugs in an appropriate formulation. We have studied the extent of use of drugs that are not licensed for use in children (unlicensed)

  5. A validation study of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in different groups of Dutch subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, P; Ormel, J; Sloekers, PPA; Kempen, GIJM; Speckens, AEM; VanHemert, AM; van Hemert, A.M.

    Background. Research on the dimensional structure and reliability of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and its relationship with age is scarce. Moreover, its efficacy in determining the presence of depression in different patient groups has been questioned. Methods. Psychometric

  6. Nurse middle managers' dispositions of habitus a bourdieusian analysis of supporting role behaviors in Dutch and American hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalleman, P. C B; Smid, G. A C; Lagerwey, M. D.; Oldenhof, L.; Schuurmans, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    A Magnet-related program has been recently adopted in the Netherlands. Support for staff nurses from nurse middle managers (NMMs) is a key component of such a program. A Bourdieusian ethnographic organizational case study in 4 hospitals in the Netherlands and the United States (Magnet,

  7. Physician’ entrepreneurship explained: a case study of intra-organizational dynamics in Dutch hospitals and specialty clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Challenges brought about by developments such as continuing market reforms and budget reductions have strained the relation between managers and physicians in hospitals. By applying neo-institutional theory, we research how intra-organizational dynamics between physicians and managers induce physicians to become entrepreneurs by starting a specialty clinic. In addition, we determine the nature of this change by analyzing the intra-organizational dynamics in both hospitals and clinics. Methods For our research, we interviewed a total of fifteen physicians and eight managers in four hospitals and twelve physicians and seven managers in twelve specialty clinics. Results We found evidence that in becoming entrepreneurs, physicians are influenced by intra-organizational dynamics, including power dependence, interest dissatisfaction, and value commitments, between physicians and managers as well as among physicians’ groups. The precise motivation for starting a new clinic can vary depending on the medical or business logic in which the entrepreneurs are embedded, but also the presence of an entrepreneurial nature or nurture. Finally we found that the entrepreneurial process of starting a specialty clinic is a process of sedimented change or hybridized professionalism in which elements of the business logic are added to the existing logic of medical professionalism, leading to a hybrid logic. Conclusions These findings have implications for policy at both the national and hospital level. Shared ownership and aligned incentives may provide the additional cement in which the developing entrepreneurial values are ‘glued’ to the central medical logic. PMID:24885912

  8. Physician' entrepreneurship explained: a case study of intra-organizational dynamics in Dutch hospitals and specialty clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelewijn, Wout T; de Rover, Matthijs; Ehrenhard, Michel L; van Harten, Wim H

    2014-05-19

    Challenges brought about by developments such as continuing market reforms and budget reductions have strained the relation between managers and physicians in hospitals. By applying neo-institutional theory, we research how intra-organizational dynamics between physicians and managers induce physicians to become entrepreneurs by starting a specialty clinic. In addition, we determine the nature of this change by analyzing the intra-organizational dynamics in both hospitals and clinics. For our research, we interviewed a total of fifteen physicians and eight managers in four hospitals and twelve physicians and seven managers in twelve specialty clinics. We found evidence that in becoming entrepreneurs, physicians are influenced by intra-organizational dynamics, including power dependence, interest dissatisfaction, and value commitments, between physicians and managers as well as among physicians' groups. The precise motivation for starting a new clinic can vary depending on the medical or business logic in which the entrepreneurs are embedded, but also the presence of an entrepreneurial nature or nurture. Finally we found that the entrepreneurial process of starting a specialty clinic is a process of sedimented change or hybridized professionalism in which elements of the business logic are added to the existing logic of medical professionalism, leading to a hybrid logic. These findings have implications for policy at both the national and hospital level. Shared ownership and aligned incentives may provide the additional cement in which the developing entrepreneurial values are 'glued' to the central medical logic.

  9. Nurse middle managers' dispositions of habitus a bourdieusian analysis of supporting role behaviors in Dutch and American hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalleman, P. C B; Smid, G. A C; Lagerwey, M. D.; Oldenhof, L.; Schuurmans, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    A Magnet-related program has been recently adopted in the Netherlands. Support for staff nurses from nurse middle managers (NMMs) is a key component of such a program. A Bourdieusian ethnographic organizational case study in 4 hospitals in the Netherlands and the United States (Magnet, Magnet-relate

  10. Medication management of febrile children: a qualitative study on pharmacy employees' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakenborg, Jacqueline P G; de Bont, Eefje G P M; Peetoom, Kirsten K B; Nelissen-Vrancken, Marjorie H J M G; Cals, Jochen W L

    2016-10-01

    Background While fever is mostly self-limiting, antibiotic prescription rates for febrile children are high. Although every parent who receives a prescription visits a pharmacy, we have limited insight into pharmacy employees' experiences with these parents. Pharmacy employees do however exert an important role in ensuring children receive correct dosages and in advising parents on administration of antibiotics. Objective To describe pharmacists' and pharmacy assistants' experiences with parents contacting a pharmacy for their febrile child, and to identify ways of improving medication management of these children. Setting Community pharmacies in the Netherlands. Method A qualitative study including 24 Dutch pharmacy employees was conducted, performing four focus group discussions among pharmacy employees. Analysis was based on constant comparative technique using open and axial coding. Main outcome measure Pharmacy employees' experiences with parents contacting a pharmacy for their febrile child. Results Three categories were identified: (1) workload and general experience, (2) inconsistent information on antibiotic prescriptions, (3) improving communication and collaboration. Pharmacy employees experienced that dosing errors in antibiotic prescriptions occur frequently and doctors provide inconsistent information on prescriptions. Consequently, they have to contact doctors, resulting in a higher workload for both stakeholders. They believe this can be improved by providing the indication for antibiotics on prescriptions, especially when deviating from standard dosages. Conclusion Pharmacy employees experience a high amount of dosing errors in paediatric antibiotic prescriptions. Providing the indication for antibiotics in febrile children on prescriptions, especially when deviating from standard dosages, can potentially reduce dosage errors and miscommunication between doctors and pharmacy employees.

  11. Projeto Diagnóstico da Farmácia Hospitalar no Brasil: uma proposta de hierarquização dos serviços The Hospital Pharmacy Survey in Brazil: a proposal for hierarchical organization of hospital pharmaceutical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Márcia Messeder

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho tem como objetivo desenvolver uma abordagem capaz de hierarquizar hospitais de acordo com o desempenho dos seus serviços de farmácia hospitalar frente a indicadores de estrutura e processo. A abordagem empregada considera questões a respeito da influência do contexto hospitalar sobre o desempenho dos serviços e a interdependência das atividades. Foram construídos algoritmos de atividades para diferentes níveis de complexidade hospitalar, considerando pontuações diferenciais de acordo com a necessidade de realização da atividade pelo serviço no nível de complexidade em que o hospital se insere. Foram atribuídos pesos diferenciados para componentes, no intuito de indicar que alguns componentes influenciam mais o desempenho do serviço. A aplicação da abordagem aos serviços de farmácia hospitalar analisados permitiu determinar os hospitais que apresentam melhor e pior desempenho dos serviços. Utilizando-se categorias de desempenho bom, regular e insuficiente, nenhum dos serviços de farmácia hospitalar, independentemente do nível de complexidade hospitalar, integra a categoria de bom, e mais de 50% dos serviços integram a categoria de insuficiente.This paper discusses the development of a methodological approach to classify hospital pharmacies according to their performance, measured by structure and process indicators. The method considers the influence exerted on performance by the level of care in the hospital and the interdependence among pharmaceutical activities. Algorithms for assessing performance of hospital pharmacies were constructed for each level of care. Different weights were used for core activities in the pharmacy and other specific activities, according to the level of care in the hospital where the respective service was provided. This methodology allowed classifying hospital pharmacies from best to worst, based on performance. Independently of level of care in the hospital, no hospital

  12. Pharmacy Practice and Education in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Petkova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacies in Bulgaria have a monopoly on the dispensing of medicinal products that are authorized in the Republic of Bulgaria, as well as medical devices, food additives, cosmetics, and sanitary/hygienic articles. Aptekari (pharmacists act as responsible pharmacists, pharmacy owners, and managers. They follow a five year Masters of Science in Pharmacy (M.Sc. Pharm. degree course with a six month traineeship. Pomoshnik-farmacevti (assistant pharmacists follow a three year degree with a six month traineeship. They can prepare medicines and dispense OTC medicines under the supervision of a pharmacist. The first and second year of the M.Sc. Pharm. degree are devoted to chemical sciences, mathematics, botany and medical sciences. Years three and four center on pharmaceutical technology, pharmacology, pharmacognosy, pharmaco-economics, and social pharmacy, while year five focuses on pharmaceutical care, patient counselling, pharmacotherapy, and medical sciences. A six month traineeship finishes the fifth year together with redaction of a master thesis, and the four state examinations with which university studies end. Industrial pharmacy and clinical (hospital pharmacy practice are integrated disciplines in some Bulgarian higher education institutions such as the Faculty of Pharmacy of the Medical University of Sofia. Pharmacy practice and education in Bulgaria are organized in a fashion very similar to that in most member states of the European Union.

  13. Impact of Hurricane Ivan on pharmacies in Baldwin County, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Wolkin, Amy; Sanchez, Carlos; Bayleyegn, Tesfaye; Young, Stacy; Kieszak, Stephanie; Oberst, Kathleen; Batts, Dahna; Thomas, Charles C; Rubin, Carol

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of Hurricane Ivan, which made landfall east of Mobile, Alabama, on September 16, 2004, on pharmacies in the affected areas. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis. Baldwin County, Alabama. Pharmacy community rapid-needs-assessment survey. 41 hospital and community (chain and independent) pharmacies. Posthurricane pharmacy hours of operations, prescription volumes, infrastructure damage, and prehurricane disaster planning. During the week of the hurricane, both chain and independent community pharmacies within the evacuation zone worked significantly fewer hours (46% and 49%, respectively) and dispensed significantly fewer prescriptions (37% and 52%) compared with the same week of the prior year. Overall, 40% of pharmacies depleted their supplies of certain medications (e.g., anxiolytics, antihypertensives). A total of 60% of the chain and independent pharmacies outside the evacuation zone closed because of loss of electricity, but pharmacies with a generator were significantly less likely to report having turned away patients. The proportion of pharmacies that had a disaster plan but turned away patients or rationed or ran out of medications was similar to that of pharmacies without a disaster plan. Although Hurricane Ivan primarily affected the operation of pharmacies within the evacuation zone, pharmacies in the surrounding area were also affected because of loss of power. Emergency management officials should evaluate the efficacy of specific guidelines outlined in disaster plans and identify ways to deliver essential medications to people in disaster-affected areas.

  14. Cost of drugs manufactured by the University Hospital - role of the Central Pharmacy Custo de medicamentos produzidos pelo Hospital Universitário, papel da Farmácia Central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Lucia M. Marin

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The hospital pharmacy in large and advanced institutions has evolved from a simple storage and distribution unit into a highly specialized manipulation and dispensation center, responsible for the handling of hundreds of clinical requests, many of them unique and not obtainable from commercial companies. It was therefore quite natural that in many environments, a manufacturing service was gradually established, to cater to both conventional and extraordinary demands of the medical staff. That was the case of Hospital das Clinicas, where multiple categories of drugs are routinely produced inside the pharmacy. However, cost-containment imperatives dictate that such activities be reassessed in the light of their efficiency and essentiality. METHODS: In a prospective study, the output of the Manufacturing Service of the Central Pharmacy during a 12-month period was documented and classified into three types. Group I comprised drugs similar to commercially distributed products, Group II included exclusive formulations for routine consumption, and Group III dealt with special demands related to clinical investigations. RESULTS: Findings for the three categories indicated that these groups represented 34.4%, 45.3%, and 20.3% of total manufacture orders, respectively. Costs of production were assessed and compared with market prices for Group 1 preparations, indicating savings of 63.5%. When applied to the other groups, for which direct equivalent in market value did not exist, these results would suggest total yearly savings of over 5 100 000 US dollars. Even considering that these calculations leave out many components of cost, notably those concerning marketing and distribution, it might still be concluded that at least part of the savings achieved were real. CONCLUSIONS: The observed savings, allied with the convenience and reliability with which the Central Pharmacy performed its obligations, support the contention that internal manufacture of

  15. Experiences with the Dutch Working Party on antibiotic policy (SWAB).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.M.; Degener, J.E.; Neeling, A.J. de; Gyssens, I.C.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (Stichting Werkgroep AntibioticaBeleid, SWAB) was founded in 1996 as an initiative of the Society for Infectious Diseases, the Dutch Society for Medical Microbiology, and the Dutch Association of Hospital Pharmacists. Its primary goal is to contribute to

  16. 精细化药房管理模式应用于医院中成药药房管理中的效果观察%Effect Observation on Refined Pharmacy Management Model in the Hospital Chinese Traditional Medicine Pharmacy Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋忠海

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨医院中成药药房实施精细化药房管理模式的效果,为改善中成药房工作效率提供参考依据。方法该院中成药药房自2014年1月开始实施精细化药房管理模式,精细化管理模式包括:工作目标制定、动作精细化要求及工作流程精细化要求等内容。并随机抽取该院中成药药房2013年1-12月与2014年1-12月期间的工作量资料,工作资料包括处方平均调配时间、候药时间等。比较精细化药房管理模式实施前后工作效率。结果实施前,药房平均候药时间为(16.7±4.3)min、处方平均调配时间为(6.1±1.9)min;实施后,药房平均候药时间为(7.9±2.3)min、处方平均调配时间为(3.4±1.3)min;组间比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。结论在中成药药房管理工作中应用精细化管理模式,可以有效优化配、发药流程,使必要动作标准化、规范化,避免延迟动作和无进展动作,从而显著提高工作效率,缩短患者候药时间,既有利于发挥中成药药房在医院中的价值,又可以帮助医院建立良好形象,拉近医患关系,值得临床推广应用。%Objective To study the effect of refined pharmacy management model in the hospital Chinese traditional medicine pharmacy management and provide reference for improving the work efficiency of Chinese traditional medicine pharmacy. Methods The Chinese traditional medicine pharmacy had begun to implement the refined pharmacy management model since January 2014, the refined management model included: work target formulation, action refined requirement and work procedure refined requirement, the workload data of Chinese traditional medicine pharmacy in our hospital from Jan-uary 2013 to December 2013 and from January 2014 to December 2014 were randomly extracted, and the work data in-cluded mean prescription allocation time and waiting time, and the work efficiency before and after the

  17. Pharmacy in a New Frontier - The First Five Years at the Johnson Space Center Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, Tina

    2008-01-01

    A poster entitled "Space Medicine - A New Role for Clinical Pharmacists" was presented in December 2001 highlighting an up-and-coming role for pharmacists at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. Since that time, the operational need for the pharmacy profession has expanded with the administration s decision to open a pharmacy on site at JSC to complement the care provided by the Flight Medicine and Occupational Medicine Clinics. The JSC Pharmacy is a hybrid of traditional retail and hospital pharmacy and is compliant with the ambulatory care standards set forth by the Joint Commission. The primary charge for the pharmacy is to provide medication management for JSC. In addition to providing ambulatory care for both clinics, the pharmacists also practice space medicine. A pharmacist had been involved in the packing of both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station Medical Kits before the JSC Pharmacy was established; however, the role of the pharmacist in packing medical kits has grown. The pharmacists are now full members of the operations team providing consultation for new drug delivery systems, regulations, and patient safety issues. As the space crews become more international, so does the drug information provided by the pharmacists. This presentation will review the journey of the JSC Pharmacy as it celebrated its five year anniversary in April of 2008. The implementation of the pharmacy, challenges to the incorporation of the pharmacy into an existing health-care system, and the current responsibilities of a pharmacist at the Johnson Space Center will be discussed.

  18. Spoken Dutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard

    This course in spoken Dutch is intended for use in introductory conversational classes. The book is divided into five major parts, each containing five learning units and one unit devoted to review. Each unit contains sections including (1) basic sentences, (2) word study and review of basic sentences, (3) listening comprehension, and (4)…

  19. Spoken Dutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard

    This course in spoken Dutch is intended for use in introductory conversational classes. The book is divided into five major parts, each containing five learning units and one unit devoted to review. Each unit contains sections including (1) basic sentences, (2) word study and review of basic sentences, (3) listening comprehension, and (4)…

  20. 医院药房管理存在的问题及其规范化建议%Existing Problems in Hospital Pharmacy Management and Proposal for Its Standardization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈佳伟

    2014-01-01

    通过分析当前医院中药房管理中存在的问题,包括患者反映的问题,进行深入探讨,明确提出医院和药师应通过整体观念的转变,推行有效的规范化管理,以此来保证药房管理的科学性和规范性,从而提高从业人员的职业素质和药品的安全质量管理,保障患者的利益。%Through the analysis of existing problems in current hospital pharmacy management, including problems reflected by patients, the article clearly put forward that the hospital and pharmacists should implement standardized management by transforming their overall concept, in order to ensure the scientific and normative pharmacy management. Then the quality control management of medicines and professional quality of medicine practitioners could be enhanced, and the interests of patients could be guaranteed.

  1. Application of Hospital Pharmacy Drug Management Methods and Digital Management%住院药房药品管理方式及数字化管理的应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟诗尧

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析该院住院药房药品管理方式并探究其数字化管理的应用效果。方法分析该院实施数字化管理的情况,并统计对比实施数字化管理和传统管理住院房药品的请领、调剂、盘点等工作情况。结果实施数字化管理模式数字组的请领时间及准确率、调剂时间及准确率、盘点时间等均明显优于传统管理模式下请领时间及准确率、调剂时间及准确率、盘点时间,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论通过住院药房药品管理方式分析并实施数字化管理能有效提高药房药品管理的工作效率,提高工作质量,提高医院用药安全性,降低了药师的职业风险。%Objective To analyze drugs in our hospital pharmacy management application and explore the effect of its digi-tal management. Methods Analysis of the situation of the implementation of digital management in our hospital, and the implementation of statistical comparison of digital management and traditional management in hospital rooms medicines Please collar, transfers, inventory and other working conditions. Results Please implement digital management mode digital set-neck time and accuracy, adjust the time and accuracy, inventory and time management etc obviously superior to the traditional mode Please lead time and accuracy, adjust the time and accuracy, inventory time difference statistically signifi-cant(P<0.05).Conclusion Drug hospital pharmacy management analysis and implementation of digital management can ef-fectively improve work efficiency pharmacy drug management, improve the quality of work, improving hospital drug safety, reduce occupational risks pharmacist.

  2. PDCA Cycle Management Method in the Hospital Pharmacy and Drug Use Management Application%PDCA循环管理法在医院药事与药物使用管理工作中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐慧

    2015-01-01

    Objective For the use of PDCA cycle management method in the hospital pharmacy and drug use in the management of application effect. Methods Two hospitals selected for the experiment to explore the object, take the hospital PDCA cycle man-agement method in the hospital pharmacy and drug use in the management of the observation group and the control group is the ordinary routine of the hospital pharmacy management and drug administration, and then the two houses were relatively error rate of medication and medical personnel medical staff and patient satisfaction with the hospital management. Results The hospital's medical staff of medication error rate was significantly lower than the control group of hospitals, and medical personnel and hospi-tal patients in the observation group to the hospital management level of satisfaction was significantly higher hospital. Between the two groups was statistically significant,(P<0.05). Conclusion PDCA circulation management method to improve the correct rate of medical personnel, and greatly increased the quality of care medical staff, so it improves patient satisfaction with hospital manage-ment tools worth introduce and promote the use of the medical profession in the treatment.%目的:探讨PDCA循环管理法在医院药事与药物使用管理工作中的应用效果。方法选取两家医院在医院药事与药物使用管理工作中采取PDCA循环管理法的医院为观察组,对照组则是采用普通常规的管理方法对医院药事与药物进行管理,分别比较两院医务人员用药的错误率以及医务人员和患者对该项医院管理的满意程度。结果观察医院的医务人员用药的错误率明显低于对照医院,而观察医院的医务人员以及患者对该医院管理的满意程度明显高于对照组医院。两组比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 PDCA循环管理法提高了医务人员的用药正确率,提高了患者对医务人员的信任,

  3. Variation in Prices of Cardiovascular Drugs in Public and Private Pharmacies in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Raj Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Higher price of cardiovascular drugs is one of the reasons for high out-of-pocket expenditure in cardiovascular care. The objective of the study was to determine the price variation in commonly available cardiovascular drugs between public and private hospital pharmacies in Nepal. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 3 public and 3 private pharmacies in tertiary-level hospitals in Nepal. The price was recorded for the list of drugs commonly available in those pharmacies. A total of 23 drugs were selected for data collection. The price was recorded based on the payment receipt and price reported by surrogate customers. We defined the price variation as the difference between price of cardiovascular drugs between public hospital and private pharmacy. The price variation was expressed as percentage. Results: Price of Amlodipine 5 mg was higher by 667% in private pharmacy nearby Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH compared to that of TUTH pharmacy. Price of Enalapril 5 mg was higher by 14.47% in Manmohan Cardio Thoracic and Vascular Transplant Centre (MCVTC compared to nearby private pharmacy. We observed that the price of cardiovascular drugs varied significantly between hospital and private retail pharmacies in TUTH (P < .001 and MCVTC (P < .001. Conclusion: For most of the cardiovascular drugs, the price in private retail pharmacies were significantly higher than in hospital pharmacies. Future steps should be taken to establish and run own pharmacies in hospitals which would reduce the cost of medicine and thereby, increase access to medicine.

  4. Variation in Prices of Cardiovascular Drugs in Public and Private Pharmacies in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Raj Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Higher price of cardiovascular drugs is one of the reasons for high out-of-pocket expenditure in cardiovascular care. The objective of the study was to determine the price variation in commonly available cardiovascular drugs between public and private hospital pharmacies in Nepal. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 3 public and 3 private pharmacies in tertiary-level hospitals in Nepal. The price was recorded for the list of drugs commonly available in those pharmacies. A total of 23 drugs were selected for data collection. The price was recorded based on the payment receipt and price reported by surrogate customers. We defined the price variation as the difference between price of cardiovascular drugs between public hospital and private pharmacy. The price variation was expressed as percentage. Results: Price of Amlodipine 5 mg was higher by 667% in private pharmacy nearby Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH compared to that of TUTH pharmacy. Price of Enalapril 5 mg was higher by 14.47% in Manmohan Cardio Thoracic and Vascular Transplant Centre (MCVTC compared to nearby private pharmacy. We observed that the price of cardiovascular drugs varied significantly between hospital and private retail pharmacies in TUTH ( P < .001 and MCVTC ( P < .001. Conclusion: For most of the cardiovascular drugs, the price in private retail pharmacies were significantly higher than in hospital pharmacies. Future steps should be taken to establish and run own pharmacies in hospitals which would reduce the cost of medicine and thereby, increase access to medicine.

  5. Variation in Prices of Cardiovascular Drugs in Public and Private Pharmacies in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shiva Raj; Kandel, Nirajan; Subedi, Narayan; Khanal, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Higher price of cardiovascular drugs is one of the reasons for high out-of-pocket expenditure in cardiovascular care. The objective of the study was to determine the price variation in commonly available cardiovascular drugs between public and private hospital pharmacies in Nepal. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 3 public and 3 private pharmacies in tertiary-level hospitals in Nepal. The price was recorded for the list of drugs commonly available in those pharmacies. A total of 23 drugs were selected for data collection. The price was recorded based on the payment receipt and price reported by surrogate customers. We defined the price variation as the difference between price of cardiovascular drugs between public hospital and private pharmacy. The price variation was expressed as percentage. Price of Amlodipine 5 mg was higher by 667% in private pharmacy nearby Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH) compared to that of TUTH pharmacy. Price of Enalapril 5 mg was higher by 14.47% in Manmohan Cardio Thoracic and Vascular Transplant Centre (MCVTC) compared to nearby private pharmacy. We observed that the price of cardiovascular drugs varied significantly between hospital and private retail pharmacies in TUTH (P drugs, the price in private retail pharmacies were significantly higher than in hospital pharmacies. Future steps should be taken to establish and run own pharmacies in hospitals which would reduce the cost of medicine and thereby, increase access to medicine.

  6. Multi-View Interaction Modelling of human collaboration processes: a business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuit, Marco; Wortmann, Hans; Szirbik, Nick; Roodenburg, Jan

    2011-12-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelling tools for healthcare process management, which are the most commonly applied, are not suited for healthcare HCPs mainly due to their focus on the definition of task sequences instead of the graphical description of human interactions. This paper uses a case study of a healthcare HCP at a Dutch academic hospital to evaluate a novel interaction-centric process modelling method. The HCP under study is the care pathway performed by the head and neck oncology team. The evaluation results show that the method brings innovative, effective, and useful features. First, it collects and formalizes the tacit domain knowledge of the interviewed healthcare workers in individual interaction diagrams. Second, the method automatically integrates these local diagrams into a single global interaction diagram that reflects the consolidated domain knowledge. Third, the case study illustrates how the method utilizes a graphical modelling language for effective tree-based description of interactions, their composition and routing relations, and their roles. A process analysis of the global interaction diagram is shown to identify HCP improvement opportunities. The proposed interaction-centric method has wider applicability since interactions are the core of most multidisciplinary patient-care processes. A discussion argues that, although (multidisciplinary) collaboration is in many cases not optimal in the healthcare domain, it is increasingly considered a necessity to improve integration, continuity, and quality of care. The proposed method is helpful to describe, analyze, and improve the functioning of healthcare collaboration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical Nuclear Pharmacy Clerkship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, George L.; Christopherson, William J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The School of Pharmacy, University of the Pacific, and the Pharmacy Service, Letterman Army Medical Center, initiated a 15-week clinical nuclear pharmacy clerkship in 1975. It includes basic nuclear medical science, technical competency, professional competency, and special interest emphasis. (LBH)

  8. 基于作业成本法的我院中药房成本预算分析%Budget Analysis of TCM Pharmacy in Our Hospital Based on Activity-Based Costing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨挽澜; 甘露; 王燕平

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To control the cost effectively,and to improve the management of TCM pharmacy.METHODS:Budget management of TCM pharmacy based on activity-based costing was introduced in terms of method,principle and process,and the cost of TCM pharmacy in the fourth quarter were budgeted and analyzed according to financial information of East Branch of Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital in the third quarter of 2011.RESULTS&CONCLUSIONS:It's convenient to calculate the standard and actual value of costs using activity-based costing and predict relationship between supply and demand so as to adjust supply and service strategy referring to difference,refine and control cost effectively and improve management.%目的:有效控制成本,提高医院中药房管理水平.方法:介绍作业成本法预算中药房成本的方法、原理和流程,以四川省人民医院城东病区2011年第三季度财务资料为基础,预算并分析第四季度作业成本.结果与结论:利用作业成本法可以简便地计算出中药房成本的标准值和实际值,可预测供求关系,进而根据所得差异调整资源的供应水平和服务战略,从而有效地细化、控制成本,提高管理水平.

  9. An Opportunity Revisited: Research in Community Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    Research in ambulatory pharmacy is needed because of changes in its organizational financing and patient population. With health care payers seeking to move patients out of hospitals and into less costly care environments, pharmacy must help discover how to care for this growing patient population effectively and efficiently. (MSE)

  10. Minimum Requirements for Core Competency in Pediatric Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Elizabeth A; Burke, Margaret M; Johnson, Peter N; Klein, Kristin C; Miller, Jamie L

    2015-01-01

    Colleges of pharmacy provide varying amounts of didactic and clinical hours in pediatrics resulting in variability in the knowledge, skills, and perceptions of new graduates toward pediatric pharmaceutical care. The Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) endorses the application of a minimum set of core competencies for all pharmacists involved in the care of hospitalized children.

  11. Feasibility Study for the Establishment of a Pharmacy Technology Program. Volume 11, Number 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Patricia G.; And Others

    In December 1980, a study was conducted by William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to determine the feasibility of establishing a pharmacy technology program. Professional Life Science and Human Services staff members telephoned 13 hospital pharmacies and four retail pharmacies in WRHC's service area. It was felt that if the 15 responding pharmacies…

  12. Problems and Countermeasures of the Daily Management of the Grass-Roots Hospital Pharmacy Department%基层医院药剂科日常管理存在的问题及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝国强

    2015-01-01

    随着现代医药研究的进步,有新的医药产品被不断研发出来,并在临床上得到广泛的应用,这就要求强化医药产品的日常管理。医院药剂科就是管理临床医药产品的重要性部门,其职责就是向各科室提供临床用药,并进行监督和管理,以保证患者安全,药剂管理是医院管理中不可或缺的部分。但是,目前在我国基层医院的药剂管理存在一些问题,影响到药物临床应用的安全性和有效性,本文全面剖析存在的问题,并提出了相应的对策和建议,以期实现科学、合理的药剂日常管理。%With the development of modern medical research progress, there have been new pharmaceutical products have been developed, and is widely used in clinic, this requires strengthening the daily management of pharmaceutical products. The hospital pharmacy management of clinical medicine is the importance of the product department, whose duty is to all departments to provide clinical medication, and supervise and management, to ensure the effective drug to patient safety, therefore said, pharmacy management is an integral part of the management of the hospital. However, there are some prob-lems in the pharmacy management of grass roots hospitals in our country, the influence to the safety and effectiveness of clinical drug application, in this paper, a comprehensive analysis of the existing problems, and puts forward the correspond-ing countermeasures and suggestions, in order to realize the scientific, reasonable drug daily management.

  13. Change management in pharmacy: a simulation game and pharmacy leaders' rating of 35 barriers to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Aurélie; Lebel, Denis; Hall, Kevin; Bussières, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective was to rank barriers to change in pharmacy practice. Our secondary objective was to create a simulation game to stimulate reflection and discussion on the topic of change management. The game was created by the authors and used during a symposium attended by 43 hospital pharmacy leaders from all regions of Canada (Millcroft Conference, Alton, Ontario, June 2013). The main theme of the conference was 'managing change'. The simulation game, the rating of 35 barriers to change and the discussion that followed provided an opportunity for hospital pharmacy leaders to reflect on potential barriers to change, and how change might be facilitated through the use of an organized approach to change, such as that described in Kotter's eight-step model. This simulation game, and the associated rating of barriers to change, provided an opportunity for a group of hospital pharmacy leaders in Canada to reflect on the challenges associated with managing change in the healthcare setting. This simulation game can be modified and used by pharmacy practitioners in other countries to help identify and rank barriers to change in their particular pharmacy practice setting. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Assessment tool for pharmacy drug-drug interaction software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warholak, Terri L; Hines, Lisa E; Saverno, Kim R; Grizzle, Amy J; Malone, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    To assess the performance of pharmacy clinical decision support (CDS) systems for drug-drug interaction (DDI) detection and to identify approaches for improving the ability to recognize important DDIs. Pharmacists rely on CDS systems to assist in the identification of DDIs, and research suggests that these systems perform suboptimally. The software evaluation tool described here may be used in all pharmacy settings that use electronic decision support to detect potential DDIs, including large and small community chain pharmacies, community independent pharmacies, hospital pharmacies, and governmental facility pharmacies. A tool is provided to determine the ability of pharmacy CDS systems to identify established DDIs. It can be adapted to evaluate potential DDIs that reflect local practice patterns and patient safety priorities. Beyond assessing software performance, going through the evaluation processes creates the opportunity to evaluate inadequacies in policies, procedures, workflow, and training of all pharmacy staff relating to pharmacy information systems and DDIs. The DDI evaluation tool can be used to assess pharmacy information systems' ability to recognize relevant DDIs. Suggestions for improvement include determining whether the software allows for customization, creating standard policies for handling specific interactions, and ensuring that drug knowledge database updates occur frequently.

  15. AN ANALYSIS OF PHARMACY SERVICES BY PHARMACIST IN COMMUNITY PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Up to now there are more than 60 schools of pharmacy with a variety of accreditation level in lndonesia. Previous study found that the standard of pharmaceutical services at various service facilities (hospitals, primary health care and community pharmacy can not be fully implemented because of the limited competency of pharmacist. This study was conducted to identify the qualification of pharmacist who delivers services in community pharmacy in compliance with the Indonesian Health Law No. 36 of 2009. As mandated in the Health Law No. 36 of 2009, the government is obliged to establish minimum requirements that must be possessed. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in 2010 at 2 community pharmacies in each of 3 cities, i.e. Bandung, DI Yogyakarta and Surabaya. Other than ten pharmacists delivering services in community pharmacies, there were pharmacists as informants from 4 institutions in each city selected, i.e. six pharmacists from two Schools of Pharmacy, three pharmacists from three Regional Indonesian Pharmacists Association,six pharmacists from three District Health Offices and three Provincial Health Offices. Primary data collection through in-depth interviews and observation as well as secondary data collection concerning standard operating procedures, monitoring documentation and academic curricula has been used. Descriptive data were analysed qualitatively Results: The findings indicate that pharmacists' qualification to deliver services in a community pharmacy in accordance with the Government Regulation No. 51 of 2009, Standards of Pharmacy Services in Community Pharmacy and Good Pharmaceutical Practices (GPP was varied. Most pharmacists have already understood their roles in pharmacy service, but to practice it in accordance with the standards or guidelines they are still having problems. It is also acknowledged by pharmacists in other institutions, including School of Pharmacy, Regional

  16. Pharmacy Education in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedouch, Pierrick; Nguyen, Thi-Hoai; Nguyen, Thi-Lien-Huong; Hoang, Thi-Kim-Huyen; Calop, Jean; Allenet, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacy education programs in Vietnam are complex and offer various career pathways. All include theory and laboratory modules in general, foundation, and pharmaceutical knowledge; placements in health facilities; and a final examination. The various pharmacy degree programs allow specialization in 1 or more of 5 main fields: (1) drug management and supply, (2) drug development and production, (3) pharmacology and clinical pharmacy, (4) traditional medicine and pharmacognosy, and (5) drug quality control, which are offered as main specialization options during the reformed undergraduate and postgraduate programs. However, pharmacy education in Vietnam in general remains product oriented and clinical pharmacy training has not received adequate attention. Only students who have obtained the bachelor of pharmacy degree, which requires a minimum of 5 years of study, are considered as fully qualified pharmacists. In contrast, an elementary diploma in pharmacy awarded after 1 year of pharmacy study permits entry into more junior pharmacy positions. Since the 2000s, there has been a surge in the number and types of schools offering pharmacy qualifications at various levels. PMID:23966717

  17. Dutch audiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobben, L M; van Ligtenberg, C L

    1977-01-01

    In the Netherlands audiological care is given at different stages. An attempt is made to screen the hearing of all Dutch babies between the ages of 8 and 12 months. At the age of 4 or over, general audiological care is given by the school medical service; referral is first to a family doctor, who may refer to an otolaryngologist. Curative medical care (examination and therapy) is the province of the family doctor and the otolaryngologist. Otolaryngologists and pediatricians can refer patients to one of 19 Audiological Centers distributed around the country, where a number of workers in different disciplines cooperate for habilitation and rehabilitation. These may include an otolaryngologist in charge, a psychologist, a speech and hearing therapist, an audiologist (usually a physicist or university-trained engineer), social worker, technician, ortho-pedagogue, audiology assistant, and teacher. There are at the moment 25 schools for the hard of hearing and 5 institutes for the deaf. These are often found in conjunction with Audiological Centers, the latter providing paramedical assistance to the pupils by agreement. Finally, the Dutch Organization for Preventive Medicine works to prevent hearing loss in noisy industries.

  18. Atividades da farmácia hospitalar brasileira para com pacientes hospitalizados: uma revisão da literatura Pharmaceutical services for inpatients provided by hospital pharmacies in Brazil: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Magarinos-Torres

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo discute a produção científica relacionada à farmácia hospitalar brasileira direcionada à internação, na tentativa de ampliar a visão sobre características e prioridades. Foram localizados dezessete artigos nas bases de dados Medline e Lilacs condizentes com os critérios de inclusão e exclusão definidos a priori. A maioria ateve-se aos componentes ensino/pesquisa, logística e farmacotécnica, a partir da observação de hospitais públicos localizados no Sudeste. Percebe-se a escassez de textos relacionados a atividades estruturais como gerenciamento e seleção. Estima-se que à formação acadêmica dos farmacêuticos atrele-se a percepção da manipulação como atividade preponderante nos serviços embora, atualmente, esta seja necessária apenas em um número restrito de hospitais. Soma-se a isto a baixa adequação das atividades realizadas a normas legais e padrões estabelecidos e a inexistência de revista brasileira dedicada ao tema e indexada pela BVS. Tendo em vista a maior freqüência de trabalhos oriundos do setor público, há, aparentemente, ou maior liberdade de atuação do farmacêutico neste setor ou menor produção científica, quantificada por publicações, no setor privado.This paper discusses the literature on hospital pharmacy services for in-patients in Brazil, seeking a broader view of its characteristics and priorities. Seventeen papers were located in the Medline and Lilacs databases that complied with the pre-defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Most of them were related to teaching and research, logistics and compounding, based on observations in public hospitals in Southeast Brazil. Few studies focused on core activities such as management and selection. The academic syllabus through which pharmacy students are trained may underlie the perception that compounding is the preponderant aspect of hospital pharmacy services, although this is required in only a few institutions. Added to

  19. Influences on Malaysian pharmacy students' career preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Kwai Chong, David Weng; Ahmadi, Keivan; Se, Wong Pei; Hassali, Mohammed Azmi; Hata, Ernieda Mohammed; Hadi, Muhammed Abdul; Sridhar, Sathvik Belagodu; Ahmed, Syed Imran; Yean, Low Bee; Efendie, Benny

    2010-11-10

    To identify and evaluate factors affecting the career preferences of fourth-year bachelor of pharmacy (BPharm) students in Malaysia in the presence of a 4-year period of mandatory government service. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used in this cross-sectional study to collect data from final-year BPharm students enrolled at 3 government-funded universities and 1 private university in Malaysia. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis. Three hundred fourteen students responded (213 from public universities and 101 from the private university). Approximately 32% of public university students and 37% of private university students ranked their own interest in pharmacy as the reason for undertaking pharmacy degree studies; 40.4% of public and 19.8% of private university respondents stated that they would enter a nonpharmacy-related career upon graduation if given the choice. Public university students ranked hospital pharmacy as their choice of first career setting (4.39, p = 0.001), while private students ranked community pharmacy first (4.1, p = 0.002). On a scale of 1 to 5, salary received the highest mean score (3.9 and 4.0, p = 0.854) as the extrinsic factor most influencing their career choice. Final-year students at Malaysian public universities were most interested in hospital pharmacy practice as their first career step upon graduation, while private university students were most interested in community pharmacy. The top 3 extrinsic factors rated as significant in selecting a career destination were salary, benefits, and geographical location.

  20. Exploring example models of cross-sector, sessional employment of pharmacists to improve medication management and pharmacy support in rural hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amy Cw; Emmerton, Lynne M; Hattingh, Laetitia; La Caze, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Many rural hospitals in Australia are not large enough to sustain employment of a full-time pharmacist, or are unable to recruit or retain a full-time pharmacist. The absence of a pharmacist may result in hospital nurses undertaking medication-related roles outside their scope of practice. A potential solution to address rural hospitals' medication management needs is contracted part-time ('sessional') employment of a local pharmacist external to the hospital ('cross-sector'). The aim of this study was to explore the roles and experiences of pharmacists in their provision of sessional services to rural hospitals with no on-site pharmacist and explore how these roles could potentially address shortfalls in medication management in rural hospitals. A qualitative study was conducted to explore models with pharmacists who had provided sessional services to a rural hospital. A semi-structured interview guide was informed by a literature review, preliminary research and stakeholder consultation. Participants were recruited via advertisement and personal contacts. Consenting pharmacists were interviewed between August 2012 and January 2013 via telephone or Skype for 40-55 minutes. Thirteen pharmacists with previous or ongoing hospital sessional contracts in rural communities across Australia and New Zealand participated. Most commonly, the pharmacists provided weekly services to rural hospitals. All believed the sessional model was a practical solution to increase hospital access to pharmacist-mediated support and to address medication management gaps. Roles perceived to promote quality use of medicines were inpatient consultation services, medicines information/education to hospital staff, assistance with accreditation matters and system reviews, and input into pharmaceutical distribution activities. This study is the first to explore the concept of sessional rural hospital employment undertaken by pharmacists in Australia and New Zealand. Insights from participants

  1. Using an integrated information system to reduce interruptions and the number of non-relevant contacts in the inpatient pharmacy at tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Binobaid

    2017-07-01

    The research design is based on a quasi-experiment using pre-post testing using the continuous improvement approach. The improvement project is performed using a six-step method. A survey was conducted in Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC to measure the volume and types of telephone calls before and after implementation to evaluate the impact of the new system. Beforehand of the system implementation, during the two-week measurement period, all pharmacies received 4466 calls and the majority were follow-up calls. Subsequently of the integrated system rollout, there was a significant reduction (p > 0.001 in the volume of telephone calls to 2630 calls; besides, the calls nature turned out to be more professional inquiries (p > 0.001. As a result, avoidable interruptions and workload were decreased.

  2. Reform of Public Hospitals and the Joint Reform of Medical Insurance, Pharmacy Purchase Regime and Medical Service Provision%公立医院改革与三医联动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王震

    2016-01-01

    The Joint reform of Medical Insurance, Pharmacy Purchase Regime and Medical Service Provision has been issued in recent years to advance the reform of public hospitals, which has become the key task of medical reform in China. However, the aim of the joint reform is to form an independent, mutually restricting, balanced and eff ective competitive mechanism among diff erent sectors rather than merging them as one government department, and to form a resource allocation mechanism adapting to current socialist market economic system. It should avoid that medical insurance becoming a tool of cost reimbursement for public hospitals; but from the point of de-bureaucratic reform of public hospitals, we should promote establishing a health-insurance-physicians system and separating the payment of pharmacy from medical service, to achieve the general goal of three sectors joint-acting in medical system reform.%公立医院改革是当前医改的关键。“三医”联动助推公立医院改革不等于医保、医药和医疗三个部门之间的行政化合并,而是要各司其职,形成相互制约、平衡的有序竞争机制,形成与社会主义市场经济体制相适应的资源配置机制。从这个角度看,“三医”联动要避免诸如医保成为公立医院“成本补偿”渠道等重新行政化、计划化的思路,而是要从推动公立医院去行政化改革的角度,加快推进医保医师制度,推进医疗服务与医药的分开支付,实现符合医改总目标的“三医”联动新机制。

  3. Opportunities for pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philip J

    2007-07-15

    To summarize key points from the most recent Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Preventing Medication Errors, and their relevance to health-system pharmacists. Creating a culture of safety is an important antecedent to making changes needed to reduce medication errors. The patient can play an important, but often unrealized, role in preventing medication errors. There are considerable opportunities to improve the application of technology to prevent medication errors. The National Hospital Pharmacy surveys conducted ty the American Society of Health- System Pharmacists have demonstrated the slow rate of adoption of technologies. Pharmacists can play a leadership role in improving both the patients' role and the use of technology to improve medication-use safety. There are major opportunities for pharmacists to re-think how involved patients are in their care in the institutional setting, by seeing patients as building another check into the medication-use system and by recommitting ourselves to getting patients involved. There are also opportunities to help with patient-safety technology decisions. These extremely expensive technologies almost always involve people changing what they do and their implementation and use often involve other people besides pharmacists, yet the potential is great for new technologies to reduce medication errors.

  4. A pharmacogenetics service experience for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Katarzyna; Labinov, Yana; Jiang, Ruixuan; Thomas, Margaret R; Wong, Shan S; Patel, Shitalben; Nutescu, Edith A; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2013-10-14

    To utilize a comprehensive, pharmacist-led warfarin pharmacogenetics service to provide pharmacy students, residents, and fellows with clinical and research experiences involving genotype-guided therapy. First-year (P1) through fourth-year (P4) pharmacy students, pharmacy residents, and pharmacy fellows participated in a newly implemented warfarin pharmacogenetics service in a hospital setting. Students, residents, and fellows provided genotype-guided dosing recommendations as part of clinical care, or analyzed samples and data collected from patients on the service for research purposes. Students', residents', and fellows' achievement of learning objectives was assessed using a checklist based on established core competencies in pharmacogenetics. The mean competency score of the students, residents, and fellows who completed a clinical and/or research experience with the service was 97% ±3%. A comprehensive warfarin pharmacogenetics service provided unique experiential and research opportunities for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows and sufficiently addressed a number of core competencies in pharmacogenetics.

  5. 'Burnout' among Dutch midwives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.H.C.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Jabaaij, L.; Meijer, W.; Sixma, H.; Veer, A. de

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to determine the effect of workload on 'burnout' having considered work capacity. DESIGN: cross-sectional study. SETTING: Dutch community midwives in independent practice. PARTICIPANTS: 200 Dutch community midwives. MEASUREMENTS: three-week diary recordings, a questionnaire on practice

  6. Impact of the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative on Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Judith; Ray, Shaunta'; Danelich, Ilya; Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth; Eckel, Stephen; Guharoy, Roy; Militello, Michael; O'Donnell, Paul; Sam, Teena; Crist, Stephanie M; Smidt, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the goals of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) and its recommendations for health-system pharmacy practice transformation to meet future patient care needs and elevate the role of pharmacists as patient care providers. PPMI envisions a future in which pharmacists have greater responsibility for medication-related outcomes and technicians assume greater responsibility for product-related activities. Although the PPMI recommendations have elevated the level of practice in many settings, they also potentially affect existing clinical pharmacists, in general, and clinical pharmacy specialists, in particular. Moreover, although more consistent patient care can be achieved with an expanded team of pharmacist providers, the role of clinical pharmacy specialists must not be diminished, especially in the care of complex patients and populations. Specialist practitioners with advanced training and credentials must be available to model and train pharmacists in generalist positions, residents, and students. Indeed, specialist practitioners are often the innovators and practice leaders. Negotiation between hospitals and pharmacy schools is needed to ensure a continuing role for academic clinical pharmacists and their contributions as educators and researchers. Lessons can be applied from disciplines such as nursing and medicine, which have developed new models of care involving effective collaboration between generalists and specialists. Several different pharmacy practice models have been described to meet the PPMI goals, based on available personnel and local goals. Studies measuring the impact of these new practice models are needed.

  7. Internationalisation of Dutch SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanda Hessels

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the Dutch business sector as a whole is among the largest exporters, importers and foreign direct investors, Dutch SMEs, as compared to SMEs from other European countries, occupy a position in the middle with respect to the share of enterprises that export, import or invest abroad. In the coming years an increase in the international involvement of Dutch SMEs is expected. In this report the following subjects are adressed: Overview of the internationalisation of Dutch SME's, the inter...

  8. Dutch for Reading Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baalen, C.; Blom, F.R.E.; Hollander, I.

    2012-01-01

    This first Dutch for Reading Knowledge book on the market promotes a high level of reading and translation competency by drawing from Dutch grammar, vocabulary and reading strategies, and providing many translation "shortcuts" and tips when tackling complex texts in Dutch. Aimed at students, researc

  9. Enhanced clinical pharmacy service targeting tools: risk-predictive algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajji, Feras W D; Scullin, Claire; Scott, Michael G; McElnay, James C

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of using a mix of clinical pharmacy data and routine hospital admission spell data in the development of predictive algorithms. Exploration of risk factors in hospitalized patients, together with the targeting strategies devised, will enable the prioritization of clinical pharmacy services to optimize patient outcomes. Predictive algorithms were developed using a number of detailed steps using a 75% sample of integrated medicines management (IMM) patients, and validated using the remaining 25%. IMM patients receive targeted clinical pharmacy input throughout their hospital stay. The algorithms were applied to the validation sample, and predicted risk probability was generated for each patient from the coefficients. Risk threshold for the algorithms were determined by identifying the cut-off points of risk scores at which the algorithm would have the highest discriminative performance. Clinical pharmacy staffing levels were obtained from the pharmacy department staffing database. Numbers of previous emergency admissions and admission medicines together with age-adjusted co-morbidity and diuretic receipt formed a 12-month post-discharge and/or readmission risk algorithm. Age-adjusted co-morbidity proved to be the best index to predict mortality. Increased numbers of clinical pharmacy staff at ward level was correlated with a reduction in risk-adjusted mortality index (RAMI). Algorithms created were valid in predicting risk of in-hospital and post-discharge mortality and risk of hospital readmission 3, 6 and 12 months post-discharge. The provision of ward-based clinical pharmacy services is a key component to reducing RAMI and enabling the full benefits of pharmacy input to patient care to be realized. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Measuring change in health-system pharmacy over 50 years: "reflecting" on the mirror, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert J; Stevenson, James; Ng, Christine; White, Sara

    2013-12-01

    The Director's Forum guides pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. August 2013 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Mirror to Hospital Pharmacy, which was a comprehensive study of hospital pharmacy services in the United States. This iconic textbook was co-authored by Donald Francke, Clifton J. Latiolais, Gloria N. Francke, and Norman Ho. The Mirror profiled hospital pharmacy of the 1950s and established goals for the profession in 6 paradigms: (1) professional philosophy and ethics, (2) scientific and technical expansion of health-system pharmacy, (3) development of administrative and managerial acumen, (4) increased practice competence, (5) wage and salary compensation commensurate with professional responsibilities, and (6) health-system pharmacy as a vehicle for advancing the profession as a whole. This article critically reviews the profession's progress on the first 3 goals; an article in the January 2014 issue of Hospital Pharmacy will review the final 3 goals. An understanding of the profession's progress on these goals since the seminal work of the Mirror provides directors of pharmacy a platform from which to develop strategies to enhance patient-centered pharmacy services.

  11. Time Investment in Drug Supply Problems by Flemish Community Pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Weerdt, Elfi; Simoens, Steven; Casteels, Minne; Huys, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Drug supply problems are a known problem for pharmacies. Community and hospital pharmacies do everything they can to minimize impact on patients. This study aims to quantify the time spent by Flemish community pharmacies on drug supply problems. Materials and Methods: During 18 weeks, employees of 25 community pharmacies filled in a template with the total time spent on drug supply problems. The template stated all the steps community pharmacies could undertake to manage drug supply problems. Results: Considering the median over the study period, the median time spent on drug supply problems was 25 min per week, with a minimum of 14 min per week and a maximum of 38 min per week. After calculating the median of each pharmacy, large differences were observed between pharmacies: about 25% spent less than 15 min per week and one-fifth spent more than 1 h per week. The steps on which community pharmacists spent most time are: (i) "check missing products from orders," (ii) "contact wholesaler/manufacturers regarding potential drug shortages," and (iii) "communicating to patients." These three steps account for about 50% of the total time spent on drug supply problems during the study period. Conclusion: Community pharmacies spend about half an hour per week on drug supply problems. Although 25 min per week does not seem that much, the time spent is not delineated and community pharmacists are constantly confronted with drug supply problems.

  12. Life in a fishbowl: accountability and integrity in pharmacy leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumschild, Ryan J; Weber, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    The Director's Forum is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems by providing practical information on various leadership topics. Pharmacists are bound to practice in the best interest of the patient and are obligated to act with integrity and in an ethical manner. Pharmacy directors and their leadership staff are additionally bound to manage their department with integrity. Staff often scrutinize the pharmacy director's actions, giving the director a feeling of "life in a fishbowl." Every action of the leader is judged in the context of personal integrity or their individual commitment to moral, spiritual, and ethical values. The objective of this article is to describe how a pharmacy leader manages this responsibility. This article addresses the pharmacy leader's obligations to act with integrity, reviews key integrity concerns in pharmacy leadership, and provides guidance for leading and managing in the context of ethics and integrity. Pharmacy directors must always be aware that they are open to both department and public scrutiny if they do not conduct themselves in a professional manner. Being accountable for their actions and maintaining a high standard of integrity, leaders can keep the focus of their departments on the goal of patient-centered pharmacy services.

  13. A qualitative case study of ehealth and digital literacy experiences of pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLure, Katie; Stewart, Derek

    2017-07-03

    eHealth's many forms are benchmarked by the World Health Organization. Scotland is considered an advanced adopter of ehealth. The third global survey on ehealth includes pharmacy-related ehealth indicators. Advances in ehealth place an obligation on pharmacy staff to demonstrate proficiency, or digital literacy, in using ehealth technologies. The aim of this study was to provide an indepth exploration of the ehealth and digital literacy experiences of pharmacy staff in the North East of Scotland. A qualitative local case study approach was adopted for observational and interview activities in community and hospital pharmacies. Interview and observational data were collated and analysed using a framework approach. This study gained management approval from the local health board following ethical review by the sponsor university. Nineteen pharmacies and staff (n = 94) participated including two hospitals. Most participants were female (n = 82), aged 29 years and younger (n = 34) with less than 5 years pharmacy experience (n = 49). Participants identified their own digital literacy as basic. Most of the pharmacies had minimum levels of technology implemented (n = 15). Four themes (technology, training, usability, processes) were inducted from the data, coded and modelled with illustrative quotes. Scotland is aspirational in seeking to support the developing role of pharmacy practice with ehealth, however, evidence to date shows most pharmacy staff work with minimum levels of technology. The self-reported lack of digital literacy and often mentioned lack of confidence in using IT suggest pharmacy staff need support and training. Informal work based digital literacy development of the pharmacy team is self-limiting. Usability of ehealth technology could be a key element of its' acceptability. There is potential to better engage with ehealth process efficiencies in both hospital and community pharmacy. As Scotland increasingly invests in ehealth pharmacy

  14. New Pharmacy Schools Needed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J Russell Teagarden

    2011-01-01

      [...] pharmacy school graduates could have many more options with some adaptations made to their education and training, but, regrettably, these other options are not taken into account by those who...

  15. Value of Hospital Pharmacy Management Work Analysis QCC%医院药事管理工作中品管圈的应用价值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩继超

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo discuss the hospital pharmaceutical affairs management work, observe the qc circle application in the hospital pharmaceutical affairs management work value, provide a reference for the clinical management of in the future.MethodsJanuary 2010 - June 2011 to come to our hospital make a diagnosis and give treatment of 50 cases of patients with different types of controls, select in July 2011 - January 2013 to come to our hospital make a diagnosis and give treatment of 50 patients with different types as the observation group, a total of 100 cases. Control group patients admitted to hospital during the period of treatment, the hospital pharmaceutical affairs management did not implement the qc circle, observation group of patients admitted to hospital during the treatment, the hospital pharmaceutical affairs management began to try out quality management circle. Comparative observation group and control group in clinical situations.ResultsThrough comparison and analysis of clinical data, found that the satisfaction of the observation group of patients was (95.77±2.42)%, control group was (79.85±2.90)%, quality control circles in the application of the hospital pharmaceutical affairs management effect is ideal, can be actively used in the future.ConclusionThe method of quality control circles to improve after imported into the hospital pharmaceutical affairs management, can improve work level, and rehabilitation of patients and nurse daily, has great positive signiifcance, reduce the medical disputes. Can be further in the future, according to the actual situation of each big hospital supplies circle has effect, promote the medical management level of ascension.%目的:对医院药事管理工作展开讨论,观察品管圈在医院药事管理工作中的应用价值,为日后的临床管理工作提供参考。方法选择2010年1月至2011年6月前来我院诊治的50例不同类型患者为对照组,选择2011年7月至2013年1月前来我

  16. Improvement in medication adherence and self-management of diabetes with a clinical pharmacy program: a randomized controlled trial in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Gomes Cani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a clinical pharmacy program on health outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital in Brazil. METHOD: A randomized controlled trial with a 6-month follow-up period was performed in 70 adults, aged 45 years or older, with type 2 diabetes who were taking insulin and who had an HbA1c level ≥8%. Patients in the control group (CG (n = 36 received standard care, patients in the intervention group (IG (n = 34 received an individualized pharmacotherapeutic care plan and diabetes education. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA1c. Secondary outcomes included diabetes and medication knowledge, adherence to medication, insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques and diabetes-related quality of life. Outcomes were evaluated at baseline and 6 months using questionnaires. RESULTS: Diabetes knowledge, medication knowledge, adherence to medication and correct insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques significantly improved in the intervention group but remained unchanged in the control group. At the end of the study, mean HbA1c values in the control group remained unchanged but were significantly reduced in the intervention group. Diabetes-related quality of life significantly improved in the intervention group but worsened significantly in the control group. CONCLUSION: The program improved health outcomes and resulted in better glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy.

  17. [Drugs of a Baroque monastery pharmacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drábek, Pavel

    2013-08-01

    This paper deal with a manuscript from the years 1714-1720, originating most probably from the hospital of the Brothers of Mercy in Nové Mesto nad Metují. it contains the records of the hospital pharmacy about the drugs prepared for both patients and monks who operated this hospital. The included drugs were mainly intended for elderly males. The manuscript lists about fifteen hundred drugs and more than three hundred active ingredients, of which about two thirds were of plant origin. The paper presents the compositions of more important drugs and partly deals also with their preparation.

  18. Medication errors and drug-dispensing systems in a hospital pharmacy Erros de medicação e sistemas de dispensação de medicamentos em farmácia hospitalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Azevedo Anacleto

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacies permeate and interconnect various actions developed in different sectors within the complex process of the use of drugs in a hospital. Dispensing failures mean that a breach has occurred in one of the last safety links in the use of drugs. Although most failures do not harm patients, their existence suggests fragility in the process and indicates an increased risk of severe accidents. Present concepts on drug-related incidents may be classified as side effects, adverse effects, and medication errors. Among these are dispensing errors, usually associated with poor safety and inefficient dispensing systems. Factors associated with dispensing errors may be communication failures, problems related to package labels, work overload, the physical structure of the working environment, distraction and interruption, the use of incorrect and outdated information sources and the lack of patient knowledge and education about the drugs they use. So called banal dispensing errors reach significant epidemiological levels. The purpose of this paper, which is part of a study on the occurrence of dispensing errors in the pharmacy of a large hospital, is to review the main concepts that guide studies on adverse effects and to provide an update on dispensing errors.A farmácia hospitalar permeia e interliga várias ações desenvolvidas em diferentes setores no complexo processo de utilização do medicamento dentro do hospital. Falhas na dispensação significam o rompimento de um dos últimos elos na segurança do uso dos medicamentos. Ainda que grande parte dessas falhas não cause danos aos pacientes, sua existência denuncia fragilidade no processo e indica, em uma relação direta, riscos maiores de ocorrência de acidentes graves. Os conceitos atuais dos incidentes relacionados a medicamentos podem ser categorizados em grupos e incluem as reações adversas, os eventos adversos e os erros de medicação. Dentre estes se inclui os erros de dispensa

  19. Big data in pharmacy practice: current use, challenges, and the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolyn Ma, Helen Wong Smith, Cherie Chu, Deborah T JuarezDepartment of Pharmacy Practice, The Daniel K Inouye College of Pharmacy, University of Hawai'i at Hilo, Hilo, HI, USAAbstract: Pharmacy informatics is defined as the use and integration of data, information, knowledge, technology, and automation in the medication-use process for the purpose of improving health outcomes. The term “big data” has been coined and is often defined in three V's: volume, velocity, and variety. This paper describes three major areas in which pharmacy utilizes big data, including: 1 informed decision making (clinical pathways and clinical practice guidelines; 2 improved care delivery in health care settings such as hospitals and community pharmacy practice settings; and 3 quality performance measurement for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid and medication management activities such as tracking medication adherence and medication reconciliation.Keywords: clinical pharmacy data base, pharmacy informatics, patient outcomes

  20. Improving pharmacy supply-chain management in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J A; Martin, V; Frank, S

    2000-12-01

    Anesthesia services can account for a significant portion of a healthcare organization's costs. Deaconess Hospital of Evansville, Indiana, used a collaborative, multidisciplinary effort to implement process improvements that yielded significant cost savings while improving patient care. Shifting responsibility for drug distribution from the operating room (OR) nurses to a pharmacist, the hospital established a satellite pharmacy service for the OR. As a result, the hospital was able to improve control of drug distribution and record-keeping, reduce turnaround time for medication preparation, lower its medication charge error rate, and increase the percentage of surgeries that start on time. The success of the OR satellite pharmacy led the hospital to expand satellite pharmacy services to labor and delivery, the cardiac cath laboratory, and the intensive care units.

  1. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  2. Assessment of medication adherence in type-2 diabetes patients on poly pharmacy and the effect of patient counseling given to them in a multispecialty hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Elizabeth Mampally; Rajiah, Kingston

    2013-12-01

    The ability of physicians to recognize non-adherence is poor and interventions to improve adherence have had mixed results. Furthermore, successful interventions generally are substantially complex and costly. Poor adherence to medication regimens accounts for substantial worsening of disease; death and increased health care costs. The aim of this study is to assess the medication adherence in type-2 diabetes patients who are on polypharmacy and the effect of counseling provided for them in a multispecialty hospital. The study was carried out at Kovai Medical Center and Hospital; Coimbatore Tamil Nadu, India. This is a 500-bedded modernized, multi-specialty tertiary care hospital with full-fledged diabetic department. It caters to the needs of both out-patients and in-patients. An assessment was made on type-2 diabetic patients who are receiving more than 5 drugs for their co-morbidities were included in this study. A medication adherence questionnaire was prepared based on the literatures. The study was approved by the Kovai Medical Center and Hospital ethics committee. Among 240 patients, 124 patients were adherent to medication whereas 116 patients were non-adherent. The non-adherent patients were giving verbal counseling in a private counseling room regarding medication adherence. Best way health professionals can tackle the adherence problem is through quality patient counseling as done in this study. With limited time most professionals have with a patient today this can be easier said than done. However, techniques such as the ask-educate-ask approach, the teach-back method and motivational interviewing can help ensure patient understanding of the counseling provided.

  3. Service preferences differences between community pharmacy and supermarket pharmacy patrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominelli, Angela; Weck Marciniak, Macary; Jarvis, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Differences in service preferences between patrons of supermarket and chain pharmacies were determined. Subjects fell into two groups: patrons of a supermarket chain's pharmacies and patrons of the same supermarket chain who patronized other community chain pharmacies for prescription drug purchases. Subjects were asked to prioritize services in terms of convenience and impact on pharmacy selection. Differences in service preferences emerged. Community pharmacy patrons were more likely to rate easy navigation through a pharmacy and 24 X 7 hours of operation as key services. Supermarket pharmacy patrons were more likely to rate one-stop shopping and adequate hours of operation as priorities. Both groups rated basic services such as maintenance of prescription and insurance information as priorities. Pharmacies should stress the delivery of basic services when trying to attract customers.

  4. 看板法应用下的医院二级药房药品运营实践与策略探讨%Practice and Strategy Study on Hospital Pharmacy Management Based on Kanban Method in the Drug Supply Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭婕; 葛卫红; 方芸; 韩飞; 沈国平

    2013-01-01

    Kanban method was introduced into the hospital pharmacy management process.It can help optimize the hospital overall inventory and improve the level of logistics management.%我院将看板法引入二级药房药品运营过程,压缩了库存周转率,减少了药房物流作业工作量,降低差错.使二级药房药品物流管理水平得到提高,并优化了医院药品供应链整体库存.

  5. Pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward pharmaceutical service quality at community pharmacies

    OpenAIRE

    Urbonas, Gvidas; Jakušovaitė, Irayda; Savickas, Arūnas

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The main objective of this study was to analyze pharmacy specialists’ attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at Lithuanian community pharmacies. Material and methods. Between April and June 2009, a total of 471 Lithuanian community pharmacy specialists completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate their attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at community pharmacies. The main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted by principal ...

  6. Special Risks of Pharmacy Compounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed The Special Risks of Pharmacy Compounding Get Consumer Updates by E-mail Consumer ... page: A Troubling Trend What You Can Do Pharmacy compounding is a practice in which a licensed ...

  7. Pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward pharmaceutical service quality at community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbonas, Gvidas; Jakušovaitė, Irayda; Savickas, Arūnas

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze pharmacy specialists' attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at Lithuanian community pharmacies. Between April and June 2009, a total of 471 Lithuanian community pharmacy specialists completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate their attitudes toward the quality of pharmaceutical services at community pharmacies. The main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted by principal component analysis. Two main dimensions of pharmaceutical service quality were extracted: pharmacotherapeutic aspects (provision of information about drug therapy, possible side effects, health promotion, the amount of time spent with a patient, and the ascertainment that a patient understood the provided information) and socioeconomic aspects (considering patient's needs and financial capabilities, making a patient confident with the services provided). Pharmacy specialists evaluated the quality of both dimensions positively, but the quality of the first dimension was rated significantly worse than that of the second dimension. The attitudes of pharmacy specialists working at independent pharmacies were more positive toward pharmacotherapeutic aspects as compared to the specialists working at chain or state pharmacies. Pharmacotherapeutic aspects were rated better by pharmacy specialists, aged ≥ 55 years, than those younger than 45 years. Moreover, the attitudes of 45-54-year-old pharmacy specialists toward the socioeconomic aspects were more positive as compared with those of 35-44-year olds. Pharmacists rated the socioeconomic aspects of pharmaceutical service quality worse as compared with pharmacy technicians. The attitudes of pharmacy specialists working at pharmacies with 6-9 specialists were more negative toward pharmacotherapeutic aspects than those of the pharmacies with 1-2 specialists. Pharmacy specialists working at pharmacies with ≥ 10 specialists reported lower scores of socioeconomic

  8. Course experiences, satisfaction and career intent of final year pre-registration Australian pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Grace; Fois, Romano; Nissen, Lisa; Saini, Bandana

    2014-04-01

    In Australia, the profession of pharmacy has undergone many changes to adapt to the needs of the community. In recent years, concerns have been raised with evidence emerging of workforce saturation in traditional pharmacy practice sectors. It is not known how current final year pharmacy students' perceive the different pharmacy career paths in this changing environment. Hence investigating students' current experiences with their pharmacy course, interaction with the profession and developing an understanding of their career intentions would be an important step, as these students would make up a large proportion of future pharmacy workforce. The objective of this study was thus to investigate final year students' career perspectives and the reasons for choosing pharmacy, satisfaction with this choice of pharmacy as a tertiary course and a possible future career, factors affecting satisfaction and intention of future career paths. A quantitative cross sectional survey of final year students from 3 Australian universities followed by a qualitative semi-structured interview of a convenience sample of final year students from the University of Sydney. 'Interest in health and medicine' was the most important reason for choosing pharmacy (n=238). The majority of students were 'somewhat satisfied' with the choice of pharmacy (35.7%) as a course and possible future career. Positive associations were found between satisfaction and reasons for joining pharmacy such as 'felt pharmacy is a good profession' (p=0.003) while negative associations included 'joined pharmacy as a gateway to medicine or dentistry' (p=0.001). Quantitate and qualitative results showed the most frequent perception of community pharmacy was 'changing' while hospital and pharmaceutical industry was described as 'competitive' and 'research' respectively. The highest career intention was community followed by hospital pharmacy. Complex factors including university experiences are involved in shaping

  9. Course experiences, satisfaction and career intent of final year pre-registration Australian pharmacy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Australia, the profession of pharmacy has undergone many changes to adapt to the needs of the community. In recent years, concerns have been raised with evidence emerging of workforce saturation in traditional pharmacy practice sectors. It is not known how current final year pharmacy students’ perceive the different pharmacy career paths in this changing environment. Hence investigating students’ current experiences with their pharmacy course, interaction with the profession and developing an understanding of their career intentions would be an important step, as these students would make up a large proportion of future pharmacy workforce Objective: The objective of this study was thus to investigate final year students’ career perspectives and the reasons for choosing pharmacy, satisfaction with this choice of pharmacy as a tertiary course and a possible future career, factors affecting satisfaction and intention of future career paths. Methods: A quantitative cross sectional survey of final year students from 3 Australian universities followed by a qualitative semi-structured interview of a convenience sample of final year students from the University of Sydney. Results: ‘Interest in health and medicine’ was the most important reason for choosing pharmacy (n=238. The majority of students were ‘somewhat satisfied’ with the choice of pharmacy (35.7% as a course and possible future career. Positive associations were found between satisfaction and reasons for joining pharmacy such as ‘felt pharmacy is a good profession’ (p=0.003 while negative associations included ‘joined pharmacy as a gateway to medicine or dentistry’ (p=0.001. Quantitate and qualitative results showed the most frequent perception of community pharmacy was ‘changing’ while hospital and pharmaceutical industry was described as ‘competitive’ and ‘research’ respectively. The highest career intention was community followed by hospital

  10. Documentation of pharmacotherapeutic interventions of pharmacy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King ED

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available During patient care rounds with the medical team, pharmacy students have made positive contributions for the benefit of the patient. However, very little has been documented regarding the impact these future healthcare professionals are making while on clinical rotations.The objective of this study was to assess the impact that clinical interventions made by 6th year pharmacy students had on overall patient outcome. Using a special program for a personal digital assistant (PDA, the students daily recorded the pharmacotherapeutic interventions they made. The interventions ranged from dosage adjustments to providing drug information. Data was collected over a 12-week period from various hospitals and clinics in the Jacksonville, Florida area.In total, there were 89 pharmaceutical interventions performed and recorded by the students. Fifty interventions involved drug modification and fifty-four interventions were in regards to drug information and consulting. Of the drug information and consulting interventions, 15 were drug modification.This study shows the impact pharmacy students make in identifying, recommending, and documenting clinical pharmacotherapeutic interventions. Similar to pharmacists, pharmacy students can also have a positive contribution towards patient care.

  11. Drug-dispensing errors in the hospital pharmacy Erros de dispensação de medicamentos em farmácia hospitalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Azevedo Anacleto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the dispensing error rate and to identify factors associated with them, and to propose prevention actions. METHODS: A cross-sectional study focusing on the occurrence of dispensing errors in a general hospital in Belo Horizonte that uses a mixed system (a combination of multidose and unit dose systems of collective and individualized dosing. RESULTS: A total of 422 prescription order forms were analyzed, registering 81.8% with at least 1 dispensing error. Opportunities for errors were higher in the pretyped prescription order forms (odds ratio = 4.5; P OBJETIVO: Determinar a taxa de erros de dispensação e identificar fatores associados, propondo ações de prevenção. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal investigou-se a ocorrência de erros de dispensação em um hospital geral de Belo Horizonte que emprega um sistema misto de dose coletiva e individualizada. RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas 422 prescrições, registrando em 81,8% destas pelo menos um erro de dispensação. Oportunidades de erros foram maiores nas prescrições pré-digitadas (Odds Ratio=4,5; p<0,001, naquelas com nove ou mais medicamentos (Odds Ratio=4,0; p<0,001 e com os injetáveis (Odds Ratio=5,0; p<0,001. Uma das equipes de profissionais apresentou maior chance de erros (Odds Ratio=2,0; p=0,02. A análise multivariada ratifica estes resultados. CONCLUSÃO: Conclui-se que o sistema de dispensação da farmácia apresenta muitas falhas latentes e poucas defesas, com diversas condições que predispõe a ocorrência de erros, contribuindo para a elevada taxa registrada.

  12. Analysis on the reasons of medicine-return in a hospital pharmacy and corresponding countermeasures%某医院病房药房退药原因分析及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海荣; 艾登滨

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析某医院病房药房退药原因,提出解决对策,减少患者用药隐患。方法对某医院病房2013年7月~12月的退药品种和原因进行统计和分析。结果每个科室都有退药,其中退药平均每月3万元以上的科室依次是ICU、普外科、神经内科、呼吸科、肝胆外科,占本科用药的比例前5名的依次为ICU6.82%、消化科3.62%、呼吸科3.02%、心内科2.97%、肾内科2.68%。结论各种原因导致退药,有些原因如医嘱录入错误等为主观原因,可通过加强责任心和增加复核等减小出现频率;部分原因如患者死亡、过敏等为客观原因,是无法避免的。%Objective This paper aims to analyze the reasons of returning medicines in a hospital pharmacy, puts forward countermeasures, so as to reduce the hidden danger in the use of medication. Methods The specific method is to count and analyze what kinds of medicines were returned in a hospital pharmacy from July to December of 2013 and discuss what the reasons are. Results The analysis shows that medicine-returned takes place in all departments. In some of these departments the sum of refunded money amounts to 30,000 RMB. They are ranked in accordance with the refunded total as follows:ICU, general surgery department, neurology department, respiratory department, and hepatic surgery department. The top 5 departments which rank high according to the proportions of the returned medicines to the sold medicines are as follows:ICU(6.82%), gastroenterology department(3.62%), respiratory department(3.02%), cardiology department(2.97%), and nephrology department(2.68%). Conclusions Various causes contribute to the phenomenon of medicine-returned. There are some subjective reasons, such as errors in inputting doctor’s prescriptions. These can be improved by intensifying the sense of responsibility and double-checking all the figures. Some reasons are objective, such as the death or the allergy of the

  13. Controlling pharmacy costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, S

    1988-01-01

    There are many costs associated with parenteral nutrition: physician time, nursing time, biochemical monitoring, patient education, ancillary equipment and the nutrition solutions themselves. The solutions are easily identified as responsible for a large proportion of these costs. There are several strategies that can be used to help control pharmacy costs, such as selection of ingredients, purchasing contracts, standardized formulae and prescribing procedures, preprinted doctor's order forms, automated manufacturing and labelling processes, patient monitoring, all-in-one preparation, and contracted manufacturing services. Individual pharmacies need to know what options are available in order to select those that, in the context of their own institutions, can lead to cost savings and improved efficiency.

  14. Factors affecting pharmacy engagement and pharmacy customer devotion in community pharmacy: A structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitadpakorn, Sujin; Farris, Karen B; Kittisopee, Tanattha

    2017-01-01

    The concept of customer engagement and devotion has been applied in various service businesses to keep the customers with business However, a limited number of studies were performed to examine the context of customer engagement and devotion in pharmacy business which focus on the impact of customer perceptions about pharmacists, perceived quality of pharmacy structure, medication price strategy on pharmacy engagement and pharmacy customer devotion in a pharmacy providing pharmaceutical care to the customers. This study aimed to assess a conceptual model depicting the relationships among customer perceptions about pharmacists, pharmacy quality structure, medication price, customer engagement, and customer devotion. And also aimed to assess and measure if there is a direct or indirect relationship between these factors. A quantitative study was conducted by using self-administered questionnaires. Two hundred and fifty three customers who regularly visited the pharmacy were randomly recruited from a purposively selected 30 community pharmacies in Bangkok. The survey was completed during February to April 2016. A structural equation model (SEM) was used to assess the direct and indirect relationships between constructs. A total of 253/300 questionnaires were returned for analysis, and the response rate was 84%. Only perceptions about pharmacist in customers receiving professional pharmacy services was statically significant regarding relationship with pharmacy engagement (beta=0.45). Concurrently, the model from empirical data fit with the hypothetical model (p-value = 0.06, adjusted chi-square (CMIN/DF)=1.16, Goodness of Fit Index (GFI)=0.93, Comparatively Fit Index (CFI)=0.99, and Root Mean Square Error Approximation (RMSEA)=0.03). The study confirmed the indirect positive influence of customer perceptions about pharmacist on pharmacy customer devotion in providing pharmacy services via pharmacy engagement It was customer perceptions about pharmacist that influenced

  15. 我院计算机新系统使用前后病房退药情况的分析%Analysis on Drug-return of Ward Pharmacy before and after the New System Computer in Our Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛家凤; 林丽

    2015-01-01

    目的:减少实际工作中的不必要退药,促进临床用药安全、合理、有效。方法:分析本院病房退药原因、退药管理制度,以及2013年10月-2014年3月以来的退药情况。结果:退药情况在计算机新系统启用后有明显改善,平均退药率由2013年12月份的6%降为2014年3月份的3%。结论:要进一步降低退药率,还需药房和医护人员共同努力,从而使退药工作更加规范、合理。%Objective:To reduce the unnecessary drug-return on our work ,so as to improve clinical using medicines safely and effectively.Method:The reason of drug-return,system and methods of the drug-retrurn management were analyzed.The situation of drug-return from October 2013 to March 2014 were analyzed. Result:The situation of drug-reyurn had improved obviously from new system computer in our Hospital. The average rate of drug-return had reduced to 3%in March 2014 from 6%in December 2013.Conclusion:The personnel of pharmacy,doctors and nurses should try hard jointly,to reduce the drug-return,to make the drug-return reasonably and canonically.

  16. Perceived Motivating Factors and Barriers for the Completion of Postgraduate Training Among American Pharmacy Students Prior to Beginning Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Drayton A; Oyler, Douglas R; Devlin, John W; Painter, Jacob T; Bolesta, Scott; Swanson, Joseph M; Bailey, Brett J; Branan, Trisha; Barletta, Jeffrey F; Dunn, Brianne; Haney, Jason S; Juang, Paul; Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Kiser, Tyree H; Shafeeq, Hira; Skaar, Debra; Smithburger, Pamela; Taylor, Jodi

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To examine perceived motivating factors and barriers (MFB) to postgraduate training (PGT) pursuit among pharmacy students. Methods. Third-year pharmacy students at 13 schools of pharmacy provided demographics and their plan and perceived MFBs for pursuing PGT. Responses were characterized using descriptive statistics. Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-proportions rank tests determined if differences in perceived MFBs existed between students based on plan to pursue PGT. Results. Among 1218 (69.5%) respondents, 37.1% planned to pursue PGT (32.9% did not, 30% were undecided). Students introduced to PGT prior to beginning pharmacy school more frequently planned to pursue PGT. More students who planned to pursue PGT had hospital work experience. The primary PGT rationale was, "I desire to gain more knowledge and experience." Student debt was the most commonly cited barrier. Conclusion. Introducing pharmacy students early to PGT options and establishing work experiences in the hospital setting may increase students' desire to pursue PGT.

  17. Effective management strategy for establishing an operating room satellite pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakebill, J I; Schoeneman, P F; Buchanan, B

    1988-11-01

    The steps involved in justifying and implementing an operating room (OR) pharmacy satellite are described. A hospital administrator's viewpoint on the project is included. Objectives of the satellite were to reduce inventory costs, improve control of distribution, reduce loss of revenue and improve patient charging, improve IV compounding and labeling, and significantly improve narcotic control and accountability. The satellite provides comprehensive services 12 hours a day, five days a week. Effective after-hours procedures have been developed to provide efficient drug distribution when the pharmacy is closed. Achieved benefits of the satellite include decreased drug inventory, improved patient charging, accurate labeling, improved IV compounding, and improved pharmacy/surgery relations. The OR pharmacy satellite is a successful cost-effective operation.

  18. A Comparison of Clinical Education in Baccalaureate Pharmacy Curricula in Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchuk, John W.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A survey of North American schools of pharmacy to obtain information on the structure, methodology, and quantity of clinical instruction in B.S. pharmacy curricula is discussed. Canadian-U.S. differences included extent of reliance on the university hospital, variety of nonhospital clerkship sites, and types of required clerkship activities.…

  19. Optimizing the location-allocation problem of pharmacy warehouses: A case study in Gaziantep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Özceylan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a known fact that basic health care services cannot reach the majority of the population due to poor geographical accessibility. Unless quantitative location-allocation models and geographic information systems (GIS are used, the final decision may be made on pragmatic considerations which can result far from optimal. In this paper, current and possible (or potential new locations of pharmacy warehouses in Gaziantep are investigated to provide optimal distribution of hospitals and pharmacies. To do so, first of all, geographic information of 10 current and 10 potential pharmacy warehouses, 231 pharmacies and 29 hospitals are gathered using GIS. Second, a set covering mathematical model is handled to determine coverage capability of current and potential pharmacy warehouses and minimize the number of warehouses to be opened. Finally, P-center and P-median mathematical models are applied to open potential warehouses and to assign pharmacies & hospitals to the opened warehouses so that the total distance and the demand’s longest distance to the source are minimized. Developed integer programming (IP models and GIS software are compared with on a case study. Computational experiments prove that our approach can find new potential pharmacy warehouses which cover wider areas than current warehouses to service pharmacies and hospitals in the city.

  20. Measuring Change in Health-System Pharmacy Over 50 Years: "Reflecting" on the Mirror, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert J; Stevenson, James G; White, Sara J

    2014-01-01

    The Director's Forum guides pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. 2013 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Mirror to Hospital Pharmacy, which was a comprehensive study of hospital pharmacy services in the United States. This iconic textbook was co-authored by Donald Francke, Clifton J. Latiolais, Gloria N. Francke, and Norman Ho. The Mirror's results profiled hospital pharmacy of the 1950s; these results established goals for the profession in 6 paradigms: (1) professional philosophy and ethics; (2) scientific and technical expansion of health-system pharmacy; (3) development of administrative and managerial acumen; (4) increased practice competence; (5) wage and salary commensurate with professional responsibilities; and (6) health-system pharmacy as a vehicle for advancing the profession as a whole. This article critically reviews our progress on the last of 3 goals. An understanding of the profession's progress on these goals since the seminal work of the Mirror provides directors of pharmacy a platform from which to develop strategies to enhance patient-centered pharmacy services.

  1. Pharmacy management of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, H Eric

    2007-09-01

    Although standard vaccines have traditionally been granted full coverage in managed care, the recent introduction of several novel vaccine products has necessitated the revision of pharmacy management strategies throughout the nation. To review pharmacy management strategies for a number of emerging vaccines, with unique plan perspectives from SelectHealth, an Intermountain Healthcare company serving approximately 500,000 members in Utah. Because several recently introduced vaccines target previously unaddressed diseases and carry higher costs than traditional vaccines, several plans have adapted a novel approach to manage vaccine coverage on an individual product basis. At SelectHealth, recently introduced vaccines for rotavirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), herpes zoster, and human papillomavirus (HPV) have required special attention in terms of pharmacy management. After carefully weighing acquisition and administration costs, anticipated uptake and use, direct and indirect health care costs averted, and quality of life issues, plan leadership decided to cover many of the new vaccines (i.e., rotavirus, RSV, and herpes zoster) under a nonstandard vaccination benefit. However, because substantial cost savings and high use of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was anticipated within SelectHealth, the plan decided to fully cover the product. Although they complicate traditional pharmacy management, novel vaccines provide clinical benefit that managed care organizations cannot ignore. One universal strategy will not suffice in managing all the different vaccines entering the market, and a tailored approach should be employed based on the individual characteristics and use of each product.

  2. Biotechnology: A Dutch perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Apeldoorn, J.H.F.

    1981-01-01

    Biotechnology: a Dutch Perspective assesses the future potential of biotechnology in the Netherlands. It has been published in English because it is felt that the Dutch case could be of relevance to other industrialised nations. Although the report is aimed primarily at policy planners and decision

  3. 'Burnout' among Dutch midwives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.H.C.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Jabaaij, L.; Meijer, W.; Sixma, H.; Veer, A. de

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to determine the effect of workload on 'burnout' having considered work capacity. DESIGN: cross-sectional study. SETTING: Dutch community midwives in independent practice. PARTICIPANTS: 200 Dutch community midwives. MEASUREMENTS: three-week diary recordings, a questionnaire on practice an

  4. Biotechnology: A Dutch perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Apeldoorn, J.H.F.

    1981-01-01

    Biotechnology: a Dutch Perspective assesses the future potential of biotechnology in the Netherlands. It has been published in English because it is felt that the Dutch case could be of relevance to other industrialised nations. Although the report is aimed primarily at policy planners and decision

  5. hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of congenital orthopaedic malformations in an African teaching hospital ... malformation in this environment while congenital hip dislocation (CDH) is rare when .... malformations of radial dysplasia and other congenital malformations.

  6. Trends in Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) Producing Enterobacteriaceae and ESBL Genes in a Dutch Teaching Hospital, Measured in 5 Yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (2010-2014)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Ina; Oome, Stijn; Verhulst, Carlo; Pettersson, Annika; Verduin, Kees; Kluytmans, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the trends in prevalence of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and ESBL genes, measured in five consecutive yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (PPS). All patients present in the hospital and in a day-care clinic (including patients on dialysis) on the day of the survey,

  7. Trends in Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) Producing Enterobacteriaceae and ESBL Genes in a Dutch Teaching Hospital, Measured in 5 Yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (2010-2014)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Ina; Oome, Stijn; Verhulst, Carlo; Pettersson, Annika; Verduin, Kees; Kluytmans, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the trends in prevalence of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and ESBL genes, measured in five consecutive yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (PPS). All patients present in the hospital and in a day-care clinic (including patients on dialysis) on the day of the survey, wer

  8. Behavioural and psychological responses of lower educated smokers to the smoke-free legislation in Dutch hospitality venues : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Heiden, Sander; Gebhardt, Winifred A.; Willemsen, Marc C.; Nagelhout, Gera E.; Dijkstra, Arie

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In 2008, smoke-free legislation was implemented in hospitality venues (HV) in the Netherlands. We investigated how continuing smokers with a lower educational background respond behaviourally and psychologically to the legislation and the norm it communicates. Design: In 2010, 18 lower-ed

  9. Behavioural and psychological responses of lower educated smokers to the smoke-free legislation in Dutch hospitality venues : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Heiden, Sander; Gebhardt, Winifred A.; Willemsen, Marc C.; Nagelhout, Gera E.; Dijkstra, Arie

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In 2008, smoke-free legislation was implemented in hospitality venues (HV) in the Netherlands. We investigated how continuing smokers with a lower educational background respond behaviourally and psychologically to the legislation and the norm it communicates. Design: In 2010, 18 lower-ed

  10. Análise de correspondência múltipla na avaliação de serviços de farmácia hospitalar no Brasil Análisis de correspondencia múltiple en la evaluación de servicios de farmacia hospitalaria en Brasil Multiple correspondence analysis in the evaluation of hospital pharmacy services in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Rodrigues de Castilho

    2013-06-01

    presencia de actividades, sugiriendo así un eje de caracterización de la estructura de los servicios de farmacia hospitalaria. Los resultados indican la relación directa entre el cumplimiento de las actividades y el tipo de hospital y farmacéuticos con especialización. El análisis de agrupamientos identificó seis grupos relativos al porte del hospital, consiguiendo un mayor cumplimiento de actividades los servicios de farmacia hospitalaria en unidades de gran porte y con farmacéutico (mayor tiempo dedicado al servicio de farmacia hospitalaria y mayor nivel de experiencia. Se concluye que las técnicas fueron capaces de identificar las asociaciones y un elenco conciso de variables para una evaluación englobadora de los servicios de farmacia hospitalaria en el país.This study aimed to evaluate associations among variables in hospital pharmacy services. Thirty variables were used from the project Diagnosis of Hospital Pharmacies in Brazil pertaining to the overall description of the hospital, overall characterization of the hospital pharmacy service, and stages in pharmaceutical care. The statistical techniques were multiple correspondence and cluster analysis. Dimension 1 of the multiple correspondence analysis explained 90.6% of variance, differentiating between hospital pharmacy services based on the presence of certain activities, thus suggesting an axis of characterization for the hospital pharmacy services. The results indicate a direct relationship between compliance with the activities and the type of hospital and pharmacists with specialized training. Cluster analysis identified six clusters related to hospital size; greater compliance with the activities was associated with large hospitals and those with a pharmacist (more time dedicated to the hospital pharmacy service and higher level of training. The study concludes that the techniques were able to identify associations and a concise range of variables for a comprehensive evaluation of hospital pharmacy

  11. First-Year Pharmacy Students' Views on Their Chosen Professional Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Lezley-Anne; Askin, Fergal; Hall, Maurice

    2016-11-25

    Objective. To investigate what factors influenced students to study pharmacy and determine in which sector they hoped to gain employment, both in the short and longer term. Methods. First-year pharmacy students (n=124) were invited to complete a paper-based, self-administered questionnaire consisting of 4 sections. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests were conducted. Results. One hundred (96.8% response rate) students completed the questionnaire (22.5% male; 77.5% female). Key influential factors for choosing pharmacy included: enjoyment of science at school, a desire to improve people's health and wellbeing, and to work in health care. Career aspirations were to work in a hospital or in community practice rather than in industry or academia. Conclusions. Students choose pharmacy as a career primarily for altruistic and clinical reasons. This research provides information for pharmacy schools about the career aspirations of students and data from future pharmacists is potentially helpful to pharmacy professional organizations and potential employers.

  12. Comparison of self-reported professional competency across pharmacy education programs: a survey of Thai pharmacy graduates enrolled in the public service program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumpradit N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nithima Sumpradit,1,2 Siritree Suttajit,3 Saowalak Hunnangkul,4 Thunthita Wisaijohn,1 Weerasak Putthasri1 1International Health Policy Program, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand; 2Food and Drug Administration, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand; 3Faculty of Pharmacy, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 4Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Introduction: Thai pharmacy education consists of two undergraduate programs, a 5-year Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (BScPsci and BScPcare degree and a 6-year Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm D. Pharmacy students who wish to serve in the public sector need to enroll in the public service program. This study aims to compare the perception of professional competency among new pharmacy graduates from the three different pharmacy programs available in 2013 who enrolled in the public service program.Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among new pharmacy graduates in 2013 using a self-administered, structured, close-ended questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of respondents' characteristics and perception of professional competencies. The competency questions consisted of 13 items with a 5-point scale. Data collection was conducted during Thailand's annual health professional meeting on April 2, 2013 for workplace selection of pharmacy graduates.Results: A total of 266 new pharmacy graduates responded to the questionnaire (response rate 49.6%. There were no significant differences in sex and admission modes across the three pharmacy programs. Pharm D graduates reported highest competency in acute care services, medication reconciliation services, and primary care services among the other two programs. BScPsci graduates reported more competence in consumer health protection and herbal and alternative medicines than BScPcare graduates. There were significant differences in three competency domains: patient care, consumer protection

  13. Formulary compliance and pharmacy labor costs associated with systematic formulary management strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter J.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Daniels, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The impact of a comprehensive hospital formulary management system on formulary compliance and pharmacy labor costs was evaluated. Methods. The formulary management system consisted of monitoring nonformulary medication use, reviewing formulary medication use annually, and providing periodi

  14. Tracking Cholera through Surveillance of Oral Rehydration Solution Sales at Pharmacies: Insights from Urban Bangladesh

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Azman, Andrew S; Lessler, Justin; Satter, Syed Moinuddin; Mckay, Michael V; Khan, Azharul; Ahmed, Dilruba; Gurley, Emily S

    2015-01-01

    .... We tracked daily ORS sales at 50 pharmacies and drug-sellers in an urban Bangladesh community of 129,000 for 6-months while simultaneously conducting surveillance for diarrhea hospitalizations among residents...

  15. Formulary compliance and pharmacy labor costs associated with systematic formulary management strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter J.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Daniels, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The impact of a comprehensive hospital formulary management system on formulary compliance and pharmacy labor costs was evaluated. Methods. The formulary management system consisted of monitoring nonformulary medication use, reviewing formulary medication use annually, and providing

  16. Importance of social pharmacy education in Libyan pharmacy schools: perspectives from pharmacy practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Saad Saleh Abrika

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to explore the perceptions among pharmacy practitioners in Libya on the importance of social pharmacy education. A qualitative methodology was employed to conduct this study. Using a purposive sampling technique, a total of ten Libyan registered pharmacists were interviewed. Based on the content analysis of the interviews, two major themes emerged, namely the understanding of social pharmacy education and the need for incorporating social pharmacy courses into the pharmacy education curriculum. The majority of the respondents knew about the concept. Of those that had no prior knowledge of this term, half of them expressed interest in knowing more about it. There was a positive perception of introducing social pharmacy into the undergraduate curricula among the respondents, and they believed that it is necessary for future pharmacists to know about social pharmacy components. The findings from the pharmacy practitioners??evaluation suggest the need to incorporate social pharmacy courses into the curricula of all pharmacy schools in Libya.

  17. 全自动片剂摆药机在我院中心药房的应用%Application of Full-Automatic Tablet Dispensing Machine in the Central Pharmacy of Our Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    訾梅; 古艳婷

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To provide references for rational application of full-automatic tablet dispensing machine in the inpa-tient pharmacy of the hospital. METHODS:According to the work flow and use of the machine,the errors and problems arising from the use thereof by our hospital were summarized and analyzed,and corresponding improvement measures and solutions were put forward. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS:Common errors in the use of full-automatic tablet dispensing machine included errors for the machine(including in-box drug shortage warnings accounting for 58.61% and abnormal responses to the quantity of in-box drugs accounting for 36.96%),errors caused by human factors(including errors of inputting doctor’s order and errors of pharma-cist’s adding drugs)and errors of material installation and operation. The solutions put forward are as follows as adjusting the tilt angle of the outlet mouth and controlling the quantity of the drugs added to the box to reduce the errors for the machine;two phar-macists’checking doctor’s order in the hospital information system in advance to reduce the errors caused by human factors;carry-ing out operation training for operators to reduce the errors of material installation;designating special personnel to maintain the ma-chine,etc.%目的:为医院住院药房合理应用全自动片剂摆药机提供参考。方法:根据全自动片剂摆药机的工作流程和使用情况,总结分析我院在其使用中发生的差错及问题,并提出改进措施和解决方法。结果与结论:使用全自动片剂摆药机的常见差错包括自动摆药机发生的差错(其中药盒缺药报警占58.61%,药盒内数量反应错误占36.96%)、人为因素产生的差错(包括医嘱录入错误和药师加药错误)以及耗材安装操作差错。提出的解决方法包括调整出药口的倾斜角度、控制贮药盒内药品添加的数量以减少自动摆药机发生的差错;药师提前审核医院信

  18. The feasibility of implementing an evidence-based core set of clinical pharmacy services in 2020: manpower, marketplace factors, and pharmacy leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, C A; Raehl, Cynthia L; Patry, Roland

    2004-04-01

    Development of a national plan to implement a core set of clinical pharmacy services in United States hospitals by 2020 requires assertive leadership from pharmacy organizations and state boards of pharmacy, and a commitment from the profession. Factors that may affect the development are grouped into three areas: manpower, marketplace variables, and pharmacy leadership. Although the number of pharmacy school graduates (7000) was about the same in 1990 and 2000, a greater number of pharmacy schools and high student enrollment, coupled with the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education's acceptance of foreign-trained pharmacists, suggest that the number of pharmacists will increase substantially in the near future. We estimate that the net increase in pharmacists (new pharmacy graduates less pharmacists who retire or die) in the United States will be 139,929 from 2000-2020, for a total of 335,040 pharmacists (71% increase). The number of pharmacy technicians increased substantially (66%), from 150,000 in 1996 to 250,000 in 2002. The number of residents in programs accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists increased 148%, from 435 in 1990 to 1080 in 2002. We conservatively project an increase of 33,000 pharmacists who complete residencies from 2000-2020. The pharmacy marketplace has changed dramatically over the last 12 years, with 10,754 independent community pharmacies closing (2.46 pharmacies/day) and 8459 chain outlets opening (1.93 chains/day). In recent years, mail-order pharmacies have expanded faster than other retail outlets and now process over 18% of U.S. prescriptions. Increased use of robotic systems (some can process 5000 prescriptions/hr) and technicians will diminish the demand for dispensing pharmacists. In addition, up to 10% of U.S. retail prescriptions may be filled outside the country's borders. These data indicate that there will be a sufficient supply of pharmacists and technicians in the future. Thus, it is feasible

  19. The Country Profiles of the PHARMINE Survey of European Higher Educational Institutions Delivering Pharmacy Education and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The PHARMINE (Pharmacy Education in Europe consortium surveyed pharmacy education and practice in 2012. Surveys were updated in 2017 for publication. The PHARMINE consortium was especially interested in specialization in pharmacy education and practice (for community, hospital, and industrial pharmacy, and in the impact of the Bologna agreement and the directive of the European Commission on education and training for the sectoral profession of pharmacy on European degree courses. The surveys underline the varying attitudes of the different European countries to these various aspects. The surveys will now be published in Pharmacy. They will be useful to researchers in education, and to staff and students interested in mobility amongst different European and/or non-European countries. In order to assure a full understanding of the country profiles to be published in the journal Pharmacy, this introductory article describes the general format of the survey questionnaire used.

  20. Potential Risks of Pharmacy Compounding

    OpenAIRE

    Gudeman, Jennifer; Jozwiakowski, Michael; Chollet, John; Randell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacy compounding involves the preparation of customized medications that are not commercially available for individual patients with specialized medical needs. Traditional pharmacy compounding is appropriate when done on a small scale by pharmacists who prepare the medication based on an individual prescription. However, the regulatory oversight of pharmacy compounding is significantly less rigorous than that required for Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs; as such, compoun...

  1. Variation in Prices of Cardiovascular Drugs in Public and Private Pharmacies in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Shiva Raj Mishra; Nirajan Kandel; Narayan Subedi; Vishnu Khanal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Higher price of cardiovascular drugs is one of the reasons for high out-of-pocket expenditure in cardiovascular care. The objective of the study was to determine the price variation in commonly available cardiovascular drugs between public and private hospital pharmacies in Nepal. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 3 public and 3 private pharmacies in tertiary-level hospitals in Nepal. The price was recorded for the list of drugs commonly available in those pharm...

  2. MOOC Introduction to Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hollander, Franciscus; Piersma, Kristien

    2015-01-01

    Interview met Margriet Hidding, Birgit Lijmbach en Jeroen van Engen, medewerkers van het Talencentrum en de makers van de Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Introduction to Dutch over het grote succes van deze cursus

  3. The Dutch surgical colorectal audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leersum, N J; Snijders, H S; Henneman, D; Kolfschoten, N E; Gooiker, G A; ten Berge, M G; Eddes, E H; Wouters, M W J M; Tollenaar, R A E M; Bemelman, W A; van Dam, R M; Elferink, M A; Karsten, Th M; van Krieken, J H J M; Lemmens, V E P P; Rutten, H J T; Manusama, E R; van de Velde, C J H; Meijerink, W J H J; Wiggers, Th; van der Harst, E; Dekker, J W T; Boerma, D

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the nationwide Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) was initiated by the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands (ASN) to monitor, evaluate and improve colorectal cancer care. The DSCA is currently widely used as a blueprint for the initiation of other audits, coordinated by the Dutch Institute for Clinical Auditing (DICA). This article illustrates key elements of the DSCA and results of three years of auditing. Key elements include: a leading role of the professional association with integration of the audit in the national quality assurance policy; web-based registration by medical specialists; weekly updated online feedback to participants; annual external data verification with other data sources; improvement projects. In two years, all Dutch hospitals participated in the audit. Case-ascertainment was 92% in 2010 and 95% in 2011. External data verification by comparison with the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) showed high concordance of data items. Within three years, guideline compliance for diagnostics, preoperative multidisciplinary meetings and standardised reporting increased; complication-, re-intervention and postoperative mortality rates decreased significantly. The success of the DSCA is the result of effective surgical collaboration. The leading role of the ASN in conducting the audit resulted in full participation of all colorectal surgeons in the Netherlands. By integrating the audit into the ASNs' quality assurance policy, it could be used to set national quality standards. Future challenges include reduction of administrative burden; expansion to a multidisciplinary registration; and addition of financial information and patient reported outcomes to the audit data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementing an operating room pharmacy satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, P J; Maland, L; Bair, J N; McCall, J D; Wong, K C

    1983-07-01

    Implementation of an operating room (OR) pharmacy satellite is described, and its impact on cost-effectiveness and efficiency of drug distribution is analyzed. The OR satellite provided pharmacy coverage for 30-35 patients per day in 10 centralized surgical suites, 2 obstetric suites, and 1 burn-unit suite in a 401-bed teaching hospital. Objectives of the satellite were to consolidate accountability for drug distribution and control, reduce controlled substance loss and waste, reduce inventory costs, and improve recording of patient charges. Stock on the OR supply cart was reduced, controlled substances were dispensed to anesthesiologists from the satellite, and a system of standardized anesthesiology exchange trays was developed. A new billing form served as both the charging document and replacement list. Reduction in the medication cart stock resulted in smaller discrepancies in patient charges. For the five most commonly used controlled substances, accounting discrepancies were reduced. Inventory turnover increased and inventory dollar value and cost per patient were reduced. The percent of nurses who believed that a pharmacist should work in the area increased from 31% before implementation of the satellite to 95% after. The pilot OR pharmacy satellite was a financial success. Efficiency and effectiveness in drug distribution and control were improved, and communication between pharmacists and other medical personnel working in the OR areas was enhanced.

  5. Prescribed doses of inhaled steroids in Dutch children : too little or too much, for too short a time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirm, E.; de Vries, T.W.; Tobi, H.; van den Berg, P.B.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Aims To investigate the dosage and duration of inhaled steroids prescribed to children and to compare the prescribed doses with recommended doses for the treatment of asthma in children. Methods For 2514 Dutch children aged 0-12 years who had used inhaled steroids in 2002, pharmacy dispensing data w

  6. Prescribed doses of inhaled steroids in Dutch children: too little or too much, for too short a time.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirm, E.; Vries, de T.W.; Tobi, H.; Berg, van den P.B.; Jong-van den Berg, de L.T.W.; Lolkje, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the dosage and duration of inhaled steroids prescribed to children and to compare the prescribed doses with recommended doses for the treatment of asthma in children. Methods: For 2514 Dutch children aged 0-12 years who had used inhaled steroids in 2002, pharmacy dispensing data

  7. Application and Analysis of Electronic Pharmacy Consultation System in Our Hospital%我院电子化合理用药咨询系统的应用与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈溪; 邬蓉; 陶霞; 张莉; 陈万生

    2016-01-01

    目的:提高药师咨询工作质量,为患者提供实时、精准、全程的用药指导,促进合理用药。方法:介绍我院使用的电子化合理用药咨询系统(EPCS)的各项功能,并评价其实践应用效果。结果:该系统具有多维度的知识辅助系统、处方实时审核引擎、电子化咨询记录方法和药师工作量及质量统计分析模块,通过便捷的知识查询、处方审核、咨询记录、统计分析4大功能,显著提高了咨询工作的效率和准确性。与应用系统前比较,药师知识查询的速度提高了3.75倍,处方审核速度提高了4倍,咨询记录速度提高了6倍,工作量统计速度提高了20倍,对患者的回访率从0.03%提高到0.34%;咨询数量逐月上升;借助该系统还实现了对咨询问题类型及咨询人身份等的便捷的分类统计。结论:药师借助EPCS使咨询工作更加科学、高效、主动,促进了医院安全、合理用药。%OBJECTIVE:To improve the quality of pharmacist consultation,provide real-time,precise and whole-process medi-cine guidance and to promote rational drug use. METHODS:The functions of electronic pharmacy consultation system(EPCS)in our hospital were introduced,and its effects were evaluated. RESULTS:The system had several modules as multiple dimensional knowledge assistant system,real-time prescription checking engine,electronic consultation record method,pharmacist workload and quality statistical analysis. EPCS provided convenient information access,prescription auditing,consultation record and statisti-cal analysis so as to improve consultation efficiency and accuracy. Compared with before using EPCS,EPCS had enhanced speed of inquiring information by 3.75 times,prescription auditing by 4 times,consultation record by 6 times and statistical analysis by 20 times;return visit rate to potients increased from 0.03% to 0.34%. The number of consulting questions increased month by month

  8. Self-Reported Digital Literacy of the Pharmacy Workforce in North East Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie MacLure

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In their day-to-day practice, pharmacists, graduate (pre-registration pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, dispensing assistants and medicines counter assistants use widely available office, retail and management information systems alongside dedicated pharmacy management and electronic health (ehealth applications. The ability of pharmacy staff to use these applications at home and at work, also known as digital literacy or digital competence or e-skills, depends on personal experience and related education and training. The aim of this research was to gain insight into the self-reported digital literacy of the pharmacy workforce in the North East of Scotland. A purposive case sample survey was conducted across NHS Grampian in the NE of Scotland. Data collection was based on five items: sex, age band, role, pharmacy experience plus a final question about self-reported digital literacy. The study was conducted between August 2012 and March 2013 in 17 community and two hospital pharmacies. With few exceptions, pharmacy staff perceived their own digital literacy to be at a basic level. Secondary outcome measures of role, age, gender and work experience were not found to be clear determinants of digital literacy. Pharmacy staff need to be more digitally literate to harness technologies in pharmacy practice more effectively and efficiently.

  9. Disruptive innovation in community pharmacy - Impact of automation on the pharmacist workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Jean; Jackson, John; Kirkpatrick, Carl M; Wheeler, Amanda J

    Pharmacy workforce planning has been relatively static for many decades. However, like all industries, health care is exposed to potentially disruptive technological changes. Automated dispensing systems have been available to pharmacy for over a decade and have been applied to a range of repetitive technical processes which are at risk of error, including record keeping, item selection, labeling and dose packing. To date, most applications of this technology have been at the local level, such as hospital pharmacies or single-site community pharmacies. However, widespread implementation of a more centralized automated dispensing model, such as the 'hub and spoke' model currently being debated in the United Kingdom, could cause a 'technology shock,' delivering industry-wide efficiencies, improving medication accessibility and lowering costs to consumers and funding agencies. Some of pharmacists' historical roles may be made redundant, and new roles may be created, decoupling pharmacists to a certain extent from the dispensing and supply process. It may also create an additional opportunity for pharmacists to be acknowledged and renumerated for professional services that extend beyond the dispensary. Such a change would have significant implications for the organization and funding of community pharmacy services as well as pharmacy workforce planning. This paper discusses the prospect of centralized automated dispensing systems and how this may impact on the pharmacy workforce. It concludes that more work needs to be done in the realm of pharmacy workforce planning to ensure that the introduction of any new technology delivers optimal outcomes to consumers, insurers and the pharmacy workforce.

  10. ASHP statement on the pharmacy technician's role in pharmacy informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The American Society of Health- System Pharmacists (ASHP) believes that specially trained pharmacy technicians can assume important supportive roles in pharmacy informatics. These roles include automation and technology systems management, management of projects, training and education, policy and governance, customer service, charge integrity, and reporting. Such roles require pharmacy technicians to gain expertise in information technology (IT) systems, including knowledge of interfaces, computer management techniques, problem resolution, and database maintenance. This knowledge could be acquired through specialized training or experience in a health science or allied scientific field (e.g., health informatics). With appropriate safeguards and supervision, pharmacy technician informaticists (PTIs) will manage IT processes in health-system pharmacy services, ensuring a safe and efficient medication-use process.

  11. Do guidelines on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in Dutch hospitals and nursing homes reflect the law? A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, B A M; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B D; Janssen, A J G M; Buiting, H M; Kollau, M; Rietjens, J A C; Pasman, H R W

    2012-01-01

    To describe the content of practice guidelines on euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) and to compare differences between settings and guidelines developed before or after enactment of the euthanasia law in 2002 by means of a content analysis. Most guidelines stated that the attending physician is responsible for the decision to grant or refuse an EAS request. Due care criteria were described in the majority of guidelines, but aspects relevant for assessing these criteria were not always described. Half of the guidelines described the role of the nurse in the performance of euthanasia. Compared with hospital guidelines, nursing home guidelines were more often stricter than the law in excluding patients with dementia (30% vs 4%) and incompetent patients (25% vs 4%). As from 2002, the guidelines were less strict in categorically excluding patients groups (32% vs 64%) and in particular incompetent patients (10% vs 29%). Healthcare institutions should accurately state the boundaries of the law, also when they prefer to set stricter boundaries for their own institution. Only then can guidelines provide adequate support for physicians and nurses in the difficult EAS decision-making process.

  12. Trends in Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) Producing Enterobacteriaceae and ESBL Genes in a Dutch Teaching Hospital, Measured in 5 Yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (2010-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Ina; Oome, Stijn; Verhulst, Carlo; Pettersson, Annika; Verduin, Kees; Kluytmans, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the trends in prevalence of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and ESBL genes, measured in five consecutive yearly Point Prevalence Surveys (PPS). All patients present in the hospital and in a day-care clinic (including patients on dialysis) on the day of the survey, were screened for perianal ESBL-E carriage. Perianal swabs were taken and cultured using an enrichment broth and a selective agar plate. Both phenotypic and genotypic methods were used to detect the production of ESBL, presence of ESBL-genes and clonal relatedness. Out of 2,695 patients, 135 (5.0%) were tested ESBL-E positive. The overall ESBL-E prevalence was stable over the years. Overall 5.2% of all ESBL-E were acquired by nosocomial transmission. A relative decrease of CTX-M-1-1-like ESBL genes (from 44 to 25%, p = 0.026) was observed, possibly related to the strong (>60%) decrease in antibiotic use in livestock in our country during the same period.

  13. Behavioural and psychological responses of lower educated smokers to the smoke-free legislation in Dutch hospitality venues: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Heiden, Sander; Gebhardt, Winifred A; Willemsen, Marc C; Nagelhout, Gera E; Dijkstra, Arie

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, smoke-free legislation was implemented in hospitality venues (HV) in the Netherlands. We investigated how continuing smokers with a lower educational background respond behaviourally and psychologically to the legislation and the norm it communicates. In 2010, 18 lower-educated daily smokers were interviewed. Transcripts were analysed with MAXQDA software. Theories of self-awareness and social in- and exclusion were applied to interpret findings. Smokers had become more self-aware and the experience of a more negative norm surrounding smoking had made them reevaluate their smoking. Smokers had also become more self-aware of their own smoking, both in HV and in general. Feelings of increased social exclusion were reported. Participants dealt with the increased awareness and feelings of social exclusion in different ways depending on their evaluation of the smoking ban, changes in attitude towards own smoking, changes in HV patronage and changes in smoking behaviour. Theories of self-awareness and social in- and exclusion were useful in understanding consequences of a HV smoking ban on continuing smokers. Four different types of responses were identified, i.e. (1) actively trying to quit, (2) socially conscious smoking, (3) feeling victimised and (4) rejecting the norm. Implications for future smoke-free legislation are discussed.

  14. Pharmaceutical Education in Japan--Past, Present--, and Human Social Pharmacy Education in the Near Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the foundation of the 74 Japanese pharmacy schools was reviewed. From the early Meiji era until the beginning World War II, 21 schools including Tokyo University were established. After the war, the new four-year university system was introduced from America, and the above 21 schools became universities and 25 universities were newly founded. In 2006, clinical pharmacy was introduced from America, and the six-year undergraduate system began. This system was divided into 2 groups, 1) 6 year system of clinical pharmacy plus 4 years doctor course and 2) 4 years system of pharmaceutical sciences and a master degree lasting 2 years plus a 3 year doctor course. These two systems started in 2006. The students of clinical pharmacy course must take the 22 weeks of clerkships in a community pharmacy and hospital pharmacy. The graduates (8,446) in 2015 March took the National License Examination for pharmacist, and the pass rate was 72.65%. The entrance into pharmacy school is not easy; however, the passing of the National License Examination is more difficult. The aim of pharmacy education should be to foster pharmacists with a deeper understanding of society and with richer humanity for the patient. To achieve this, what needs to be included in the curriculum are the subjects of the human social pharmacy, such as philosophy of pharmacy, ethics, religions, history of pharmacy, pharmaceutical affairs law, economics, management, and social pharmacy. The inclusion of such subjects needs to be implemented in the near future. Of course, the study of pharmaceutical sciences is a life-long endeavor.

  15. Student Mentors in Pharmacy Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James D.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study investigated use of upper-level undergraduate pharmacy students, rather than graduate students, as mentors/teaching assistants in a pharmacy ethics course. Course participants felt the student mentors facilitated their successful completion of the course, and that carefully selected, trained, and supported upper-level undergraduate student…

  16. Design and methods of the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP), a multicomponent targeted intervention to prevent delirium in hospitalized older patients: efficacy and cost-effectiveness in Dutch health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Marije; Steunenberg, Bas; Mast, Roos van der; Inouye, Sharon; Schuurmans, Marieke

    2013-01-01

    The Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) has been shown to be highly efficient and (cost-)effective in reducing delirium incidence in the USA. HELP provides multicomponent protocols targeted at specific risk factors for delirium and introduces a different view on care organization, with trained volunt

  17. 2013-2015年新乡市第四人民医院住院药房麻醉药品应用分析%Analysis on Application of Narcotic Drugs in Hospital Pharmacy in Xinxiang the Fouth People's Hospital During 2013-2015

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯艳

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To investigate the application of narcotic drugs in hospital pharmacy in Xinxiang the Fouth People's Hospital ( hereinafter referred to as “our hospital”) , and to evaluate the rationality of the clinical application .METHODS:According to the application data and the special registration book for narcotic drugs provided by the HIS during 2013-2015, the defined daily dose system( DDDs) , drug utilization index( DUI) and defined daily cost( DDC) were calculated and the rationality was analyzed.RESULTS: The narcotic drugs used in our hospital increased year by year in both consumption amount and consumption sum, and the DUI were less than or equal to one except for sufentanil citrate injections, remifentanil hydrochloride injections and morphine sulfate sustained-release tablets.CONCLUSIONS:The application of narcotic drugs in our hospital was basically rational, which still need to further perfect the regulations for the administration of narcotic drugs and correct the irrational clinical application of drugs, so as to promote more safe, effective and rational application of narcotic drugs.%目的:了解新乡市第四人民医院(以下简称“我院”)住院药房麻醉药品的使用情况,评价其临床应用是否合理。方法:根据我院住院药房医院信息系统提供的2013—2015年麻醉药品使用数据及麻醉药品专用登记簿,计算麻醉药品的用药频度、药物利用指数( drug utilization index,DUI)、限定日费用,分析用药合理性。结果:2013—2015年我院住院药房麻醉药品的用量、销售金额逐年增加;除枸橼酸芬太尼注射液、注射用盐酸瑞芬太尼、硫酸吗啡缓释片的DUI>1外,其他麻醉药品的DUI≤1。结论:我院麻醉药品的使用基本合理,但还需进一步完善麻醉药品管理制度,纠正临床不合理用药,促使更安全、有效、经济地使用麻醉药品。

  18. Measuring empathy in pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjortoft, Nancy; Van Winkle, Lon J; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2011-08-10

    To validate the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Profession Students version (JSE-HPS) in pharmacy students. The JSE-HPS (20 items), adapted from the original Jefferson Scale of Empathy for use among students in the healthcare professions, was completed by 187 first-year pharmacy students at Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy. Two factors, "perspective-taking" and "compassionate care," emerged from factor analysis in this study, accounting for 31% and 8% of the variance, respectively. These factors are similar to the prominent ones reported in previous research involving physicians and medical students, supporting the construct validity of this instrument for pharmacy students. In the current study, mean JSE-HPS score was comparable to those reported for medical students, and consistent with previous findings with medical students and physicians. Women scored significantly higher than men. Findings support the construct validity and reliability of the JSE-HPS for measuring empathy in pharmacy students.

  19. Branding a college of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Michael T

    2012-11-12

    In a possible future of supply-demand imbalance in pharmacy education, a brand that positively differentiates a college or school of pharmacy from its competitors may be the key to its survival. The nominal group technique, a structured group problem-solving and decision-making process, was used during a faculty retreat to identify and agree on the core qualities that define the brand image of Midwestern University's College of Pharmacy in Glendale, AZ. Results from the retreat were provided to the faculty and students, who then proposed 168 mottos that embodied these qualities. Mottos were voted on by faculty members and pharmacy students. The highest ranked 24 choices were submitted to the faculty, who then selected the top 10 finalists. A final vote by students was used to select the winning motto. The methods described here may be useful to other colleges and schools of pharmacy that want to better define their own brand image and strengthen their organizational culture.

  20. 基于循证医学角度探讨医院药房药品数量与有效期管理%The Study that Evidence-based Medicine Angle Discussion on the Number and Validity of Hospital Pharmacy Management Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付蓉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the evidence-based medical point of view the number of drugs and the validity of hos-pital pharmacy management. Methods Select a pharmacy in the hospital from May 2012 to May -2014 as the research ob-ject, during a month before and after the evidence-based medicine management management of randomly selected experi-mental group uses the principles of evidence-based medicine method pharmacy drugs to manage the number and validity of the control group using conventional methods management, comparison of patient satisfaction with the two management methods. Results After a period of management, patient satisfaction with the management of the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group, the level of satisfaction. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine management of the pharmacy, make work more scientific and efficient, meet patient needs and improve patient satisfaction.%目的:基于循证医学角度探讨医院药房的药品数量和有效期的管理。方法选取该院2012年5月-2014年5月的一个药房为研究对象,在进行循证医学管理前后的1个月随机抽取药房药品数量和有效期的管理情况,实验组使用循证医学原理的方法进行管理,对照组使用常规的方法进行管理,对比患者对两种管理方式的满意程度。结果经过一段时间的管理,患者对实验组管理的满意程度明显要比对照组的满意程度高。结论循证医学方式管理药房,可使工作更科学、高效,满足患者需要,提高患者满意度。

  1. 品管圈用于提高门诊西药房药品质量管理实践%Application of Quality Control Circle for Improving Drug Quality Management in Outpatient Western Medicine Pharmacy of Our Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨华; 周祖萍

    2015-01-01

    quality management ) and intangible results ( circle ability ) were evaluated and the standardized work flow was formulated. Results The drug deliquescence was mainly due to the cipher prescriptions and scattered tablets;drug invali-dation was mainly due to the poor working responsibility of pharmacists and the backlog of drugs;refrigerated drugs mainly due to many varieties of cold medicines, large quantity and few refrigerating cabinets. In view of the above reasons, a series of measures were adopted including the standardized packing of cipher prescriptions, standardization of applying receiving drugs, the refrigerated drugs taking the method of small amount and multiple batches of receiving and increasing the refrigerating cabinets, and enhancing the responsibility sense of pharmacists. After the activity, the deliquescence drugs were dropped from 13 times before the activity to 5 times, the drug in-validation was dropped from 5 times before the activity to twice, the drugs of cold storage management were dropped from 16 times be-fore the activity to 6 times;at the same time the circle staffs were greatly improved in the aspects of the work enthusiasm, team cohe-sion and ability to solve problems. Conclusion The application of QCC management model is feasible to improve the quality manage-ment of the outpatient Western medicine pharmacy in our hospital.

  2. DutchParl: A corpus of parliamentary documents in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marx, M.; Schuth, A.; Calzolari, N.; Choukri, K.; Maegaard, B.; Mariani, J.; Odijk, J.; Piperidis, S.; Rosner, M.; Tapias, D.

    2010-01-01

    A corpus called DutchParl is created which aims to contain all digitally available parliamentary documents written in the Dutch language. The first version of DutchParl contains documents from the parliaments of The Netherlands, Flanders and Belgium. The corpus is divided along three dimensions: per

  3. Dutch School in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch School in Geneva organizes Dutch education for children in the primary and secondary school. For the school year 2011-2012 the Dutch School in Geneva is looking for qualified part time teachers Dutch for the primary and secondary school. If you are interested, please send your application and curriculum vitae in Dutch by email to the NTC coordinator, Mrs. Anne Saeys (anne.saeys@free.fr). More info : www.ntcgeneve.info De vereniging Nederlandse Taal en Cultuur De Taalfontein, kortweg NTC Genève, is een oudervereniging, die tot doel heeft de Nederlandse taal en de Nederlandse en Vlaamse cultuur in de regio Genève te stimuleren. Dit geschiedt d.m.v. het organiseren van Nederlandse les voor leerlingen zowel in het basisonderwijs als het voortgezet onderwijs. Voor het volgende schooljaar zoekt NTC parttime docenten (M/V) vanaf 2 uur per week, zowel voor het Primair Onderwijs als voor het Voortgezet Onderwijs, met name voor de IB-opleiding. Voor het Primair Onderwijs dienen ge&...

  4. 21 CFR 1304.05 - Records of authorized central fill pharmacies and retail pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records of authorized central fill pharmacies and retail pharmacies. 1304.05 Section 1304.05 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fill pharmacies and retail pharmacies. (a) Every retail pharmacy that utilizes the services of...

  5. Predicting tobacco sales in community pharmacies using population demographics and pharmacy type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Lisa M; Farris, Karen B; Peterson, N Andrew; Aquilino, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether the population demographics of the location of pharmacies were associated with tobacco sales in pharmacies, when controlling for pharmacy type. Retrospective analysis. Iowa. All retailers in Iowa that obtained tobacco licenses and all pharmacies registered with the Iowa Board of Pharmacy in 2003. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE AND INTERVENTIONS: Percentage of pharmacies selling tobacco (examined by pharmacy type using chi-square analysis); median income and distribution of race/ethnicity in the county for pharmacies that did or did not sell tobacco (t tests); predictors of whether a pharmacy sold tobacco (logistic regression using the independent variables county-level demographic variables and pharmacy characteristics). County gender composition, race/ethnicity make-up, and income levels were different for tobacco-selling and -nonselling pharmacies. Logistic regression showed that whether a pharmacy sold tobacco was strongly dependent on the type of pharmacy; compared with independent pharmacies (of which only 5% sold tobacco products), chain pharmacies were 34 times more likely to sell tobacco products, mass merchandiser outlets were 47 times more likely to stock these goods, and grocery stores were 378 times more likely to do so. Pharmacies selling tobacco were more likely to be located in counties with significantly higher numbers of multiracial groups. The best predictor of whether an Iowa pharmacy sells tobacco products is type of pharmacy. In multivariable analyses, population demographics of the county in which pharmacies were located were generally not predictive of whether a pharmacy sold tobacco.

  6. Patients'/Clients' Expectation Toward and Satisfaction from Pharmacy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalew, Mohammed Biset; Taye, Kaleab; Asfaw, Daniel; Lemma, Bethlehem; Dadi, Filagot; Solomon, Habtamu; Tazeze, Haile; Tsega, Bayew

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Satisfaction is becoming a popular health-care quality indicator as it reflects the reality of service or care provided. The aim of this study was to assess the level of patients' expectation toward and satisfaction from pharmacy service provided and to identify associated factor that might affect their expectation and satisfaction. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 287 patients, who were served in five pharmacies of Gondar University Hospital in May 2015. Data regarding socio-demographic characteristics and parameters that measure patients' expectation and satisfaction were collected through interview using the Amharic version of the questionnaire. Data were entered into SPSS version 21, and descriptive statistics, cross-tabs, and binary logistic regressions were utilized. P (2000 Ethiopian birr [ETB]) than those who get less income (<1000 ETB). Conclusion: Although patients have a higher level of expectation toward pharmacy services, their satisfaction from the service was found to be low. PMID:28331862

  7. 我院对外药房分区间小范围盘点的实施方案介绍%Implementation of Inter-district Small-scale Stocktaking in Outpatient Pharmacy of Our Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉; 季波; 张晓琳

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To strength pharmacy management, improve pharmacy stocktaking efficiency and lower the error rate of the stocktaking in outpatient pharmacy. METHODS: Based on "Army No. 1" inventory management system, the data were retrieved and adjusted using Excel spreadsheet, and the inter- district small- scale inventory table of the outpatient pharmacy was designed in which certain individuals should be responsible for certain drugs and the order of drugs in the inventory table were in line with the arrangement order of drugs. RESULTS: The new drug stocktaking model reduced the error rate of traditional monthly drug stocktaking by 3%. CONCLUSION: The established drug stocktaking method reduces human and material resources, facilitates a more flexible, convenient and rapid stocktaking, and greatly enhances the conformity rate between drugs and accounts.%目的:加强药房管理,提高药房盘点效率,降低药品盘点误差.方法:依托"军卫一号"库存管理系统,从中提取数据并应用Excel表格加以调整,设计对外药房分区间(按药柜划分)小范围盘点表,采用定人定药使库存盘点表药品排序与药品摆放顺序相符的方式进行盘点.结果:新方案实施误差率较传统的每月式盘点降低了3个百分点.结论:该盘点方法不仅减少了人力物力,而且使得盘点更为灵活、方便、快捷,账物相符率也有了明显的提高.

  8. 住院药房基于胜任力岗前培训模式的建立与实践%Establishment and practice of the competency based on pre-job training mode in hospital pharmacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴保香; 单文治; 徐艳萍; 张楠; 黄静; 龚虹霖; 孙艳; 郭代红

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To establish the competency based on pre-job training mode in hospital pharmacy and observe the effect.Methods: Detailed work index was developed, and pre-job training mode was established based on the index requirements as well as competency. The training content, training methods, assessment requirements, assessment methods and teaching process were written in the form of schedule. The training process was standardized and whole quantitative evaluation was taken. After one year, check and evaluation were carried out again according to the standardized schedules of pharmacists.Results: The training program was approved by both teaching staffs and trainees. Compared with the control group, trainees in the observed group were better in the theory and operation skill examination scores, pass rate and reevaluation scores.Conclusion:The training mode based on competency, combined with the reevaluation method, greatly improved the responsibility and initiative of new employees. The detailed and clear form was helpful for the pharmacists to master the training contents and cooperate with the trainers during the whole process. The training program played an important role in improving the integral level of the pharmaceutical group.%目的:建立住院药房基于胜任力的岗前培训模式,并观察实施效果。方法:制定详细工作指标,并围绕实现指标要求建立基于胜任力的培训方案。以日程表的形式将培训内容、培训方法、考核要求、考核方式及带教流程详细列入,实施全程量化测评的规范化培训。一年后以医院药学系列专业技术人员规范化培训考核细则要求进行再考评。结果:基于胜任力的培训方案得到带教与受训人员的认可;观察组理论、操作技能考核成绩、通过率和再评价成绩均高于对照组。结论:基于胜任力培训模式的实施和再考评相结合的方法,充分发挥了新员工的责任

  9. 医院药房常见拆零药品的稳定性分析与管理%Stability analysis and management of the common dismantle medicines in hospital pharmacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋伟

    2014-01-01

    To explore the stability analysis and management method of the common dismantle medicines vitamin B1 and acetaminophen tablets in hospital pharmacy.Methods:Vitamin B1 and acetaminophen tablets were separately arranged to take samples in a specified environment.The content of drugs was measured at 0,14,28,56 and 84 days.Results:After 28 days of experiment,the average amount determination result of vitamin B1 was 92.83%,and it had already been reached the standard critical value range.The determination result at 56 days reached 96.14%,and it had shown that the determination result did not meet the standards or had abnormal changes.The content change of acetaminophen tablets was not obvious.It was also in the qualified range after 84 days.Conclusion:Dismantle medicines should be based their pharmaceutical properties to select the corresponding drug packaging materials and storage environment,at the same time, we should pay attention to indicate its validity in the outer packing of repackaged drug.%目的:探讨医院药房常见拆零药品维生素B1、对乙酰氨基酚片的稳定性分析与管理方法。方法:将维生素B1、对乙酰氨基酚片在规定环境下进行分装留样,在第0、14、28、56以及84天内对于药品的含量进行测定。结果:维生素B1片在实验第28天之后的测定中,其平均标示量测定结果92.83%,已经达到标准的临界值范围,并且在第56天的测定时,测定结果达到了96.14%,已经显示其不符合标准或者已经发生异常变化;对乙酰氨基酚片含量变化并不明显,在84天后也处于合格范围内。结论:拆零药品应根据各自的药品性质选择相对应的药品包装材料和存放环境,同时注意在分装药品的外包装上注明其有效期。

  10. 21 CFR 1311.200 - Pharmacy responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pharmacy responsibilities. 1311.200 Section 1311... ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS (Eff. 6-1-10) Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.200 Pharmacy responsibilities. (a) Before initially using a pharmacy application to process controlled substance prescriptions, the pharmacy...

  11. Opportunities and challenges in social pharmacy and pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Kaae, Susanne; Traulsen, Janine M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacy practice and social pharmacy are two important research areas within pharmaceutical and health sciences. As the disciplines have undergone and are still undergoing changes, it is useful to reflect on the current state of their research as the basis for discussing further development....... The two areas are currently beset by a lack of consensus and charged all too often with evaluating narrowly focused pharmacy services. With the added challenge of diminished funding for research and the pressures to publish results, these fields have to accommodate a much broader research framework than...

  12. Current status and future prospects of the development of clinical Pharmacy in China: A SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zhao, Qingwei; Zhang, Xiangyi; Yang, Hongyu; Lou, Yan; Zhang, Xingguo

    2016-03-01

    In many industrialized countries, clinical pharmacy has developed into a separate discipline and become a vital part of inpatient care in hospitals. However, as compared to many established branches of medicine, clinical pharmacy is still in its infancy, with much room for growth, improvement, and recognition by both the medical community and patients. In this study, a widely-recognized development strategy analysis tool, Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat (SWOT), was used to systematically address several key issues to the development of clinical pharmacy in China. This analysis aims to provide feasible recommendations for the development of clinical pharmacy in China by identifying current problems and growth opportunities. Full development of clinical pharmacy as a mature clinical discipline will help promote the rational use of drugs by both clinicians and patients and lead to enhanced drug efficacy and safety.

  13. A New Dutch Spelling Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyt, J. G.; van Sterkenburg, P. G. J.

    This paper describes the development of two new corpus-based Dutch spelling guides using language data gathered by the Institute for Dutch Lexicology, a research institute subsidized by the Dutch and Belgian governments. The guides were produced in 1990 and 1995. The guides are based on two earlier ones, published in 1866 and 1954, but attempt to…

  14. Brief History of pharmacy ethics in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsam, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacy is an ethical profession. The aim of this study was to investigate the history of pharmacy ethics in Iran. In the ancient Persia, medical and pharmaceutical ethics were related to religious rules, and everybody had to respect it. The ethical rules were similar to some current pharmacy ethics. During Islamic era, the pharmacy ethics were edited according to the Islamic rules. After introduction of European pharmacy into Iran, the pharmacy ethics did not change and was regarded as before. By presentation of bioethics and medical ethics in recent years, new activities are carried out for better manipulation of their rules in health professions including pharmacy.

  15. Clinical Pharmacy Education in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Melody; Yang, Li; Nie, Xiao-Yan; Zhai, Suo-Di; Shi, Lu-Wen; Lubawy, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacy education in China focuses on pharmaceutical sciences, with the bachelor of science (BS) of pharmacy as the entry-level degree. Pharmacy practice curricula in these programs are centered on compounding, dispensing, pharmacy administration, and laboratory experiences, which are the traditional responsibilities for pharmacists. Additional graduate-level training is available at the master of science (MS) and the doctor of philosophy (PhD) levels, most of which concentrate on drug discovery and drug development research. Presently, the emphasis in practice is beginning to shift to clinical pharmacy. With this change, additional degree offerings are being developed to meet the growing demand for clinical pharmacists. There is also interest in developing more clinical skills in practicing pharmacists through additional non-degree training. The Ministry of Education is considering a proposal for an entry-level professional degree of master and/or doctor in clinical pharmacy similar to the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree in the United States. PMID:19325949

  16. Pharmacy Malpractice: The rate and prevalence of dispensing high-risk prescription-only medications at community pharmacies in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Thamir M; Alhindi, Salman A; Alrashdi, Ahmed M; Benmerzouga, Imaan; Aljofan, Mohamad

    2017-07-01

    To assess the compliance of community pharmacies with the regulations that prohibit the dispensing of prescription-only medications in the absence of a physician prescription in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the period between October 2014 and January 2015. A list of 10 prescription-only medications were selected to be studied. 150 community pharmacies were visited across 6 major regions in Saudi Arabia to assess the prevalence of non-compliance among community pharmacies. Pharmacies were selected in random and researchers (disguised as patients) requested to purchase prescription-only medications in the absence of a prescription. Not all medications were purchased at once. Data were recorded per pharmacy, where pharmacies that approved dispense of the selected drug were scored as non-compliant and the pharmacies that rejected dispense of the selected drug were scored as compliant. Compliance rate was calculated per region per drug. Pharmacies based in governmental hospitals were visited in parallel. A total of 20 were visited. Data and statistical analysis were performed using Statistical Analyses Software (SAS 9.3). A total of 150 pharmacies were visited over a period of 3 months. On average, the percent approved dispense of prescription-only drugs across 6 regions in Saudi Arabia is 63% and the percent rejected dispense is 37% representing a significant non-compliance rate regarding the selected list of medications in this study. The frequency of dispense per medication across 6 major regions in Saudi Arabia is as follows: Isosorbide dinitrate (86%), Enoxaparin (82%), nitroglycerin (74%), Propranolol (73%), Verapamil (70%), Warfarin (65%), Methyldopa (64%), Ciprofloxacin (57%) and Codeine (4%). Non-compliance of community pharmacies with the law of pharmaceutical practice is at an alarming rate in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and authoritative figures must intervene to impede and combat such activities.

  17. College/school of pharmacy affiliation and community pharmacies' involvement in public health activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Salisa C; Mount, Jeanine; Watcharadamrongkun, Suntaree

    2009-11-12

    To examine the relationship between pharmacy college/school affiliation and community pharmacies' involvement in immunization and emergency preparedness activities. Telephone interviews were completed with 1,704 community pharmacies randomly sampled from 17 states to determine the pharmacies' involvement in immunization promotion, vaccine distribution, in-house immunization delivery, and health emergency preparedness and response, affiliation with college/school of pharmacy, and selected pharmacy and public health-related characteristics. Pharmacy college/school-affiliated community pharmacies were more likely than non-affiliated pharmacies to participate in immunization and emergency preparedness when controlling for pharmacy characteristics. College/school affiliation generally became nonsignificant, however, when public health-related characteristics were included in the analysis. Affiliation with a college/school of pharmacy was related to community pharmacies' involvement in immunization and emergency preparedness.

  18. Antihistamine drugs usage analysis of outpatient pharmacy of skin disease hospital from 2010 to 2012%皮肤病医院2010-2012年门诊药房抗组胺药物使用情况分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志林

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore application and problems of antihistamine drugs usage of outpatient pharmacy of our hospital from 2010 to 2012.Methods With hospital information system (HIS),extracted the data of antihistamines usage,including drug name,specification,quantity,sales etc.in outpatient pharmacy of our hospital from 2010 to 2012.At the same time,a retrospective analysis of 3000 copies of dermatology prescription for allergic skin disease and skin itching of outpatient department was issued,evaluated antihistamines usage.Results The use of antihistamines of the out-patient service pharmacy was reasonable.Usage and dosage in part of prescriptions had shortcomings,mainly the larger dose and the longer course of treatment; the combination treatment was also not reasonable,too much emphasis on efficacy,while ignoring the poisonous side effect.Conclusion Outpatient department should strengthen the rational use of antihistamine drugs,reduce side effects of drugs and ensure patient health.%目的 分析和了解2010至2012年间我院门诊药房抗组胺药物的使用情况及存在问题.方法 利用医院信息系统(HIS),提取我院在2010至2012年门诊药房抗组胺药物的使用情况数据,包括药物名称、药品规格、使用量、销售量等.同时,结合皮肤科对门诊过敏性皮肤病、瘙痒性皮肤病所开具的处方3000份,并进行回顾性分析,评价抗组胺药物的使用情况.结果 门诊药房抗组胺药物的使用情况基本合理,部分处方中用法用量有不足之处,主要表现为剂量较大而且疗程较长,其中联合用药也有不合理之处,过分注重疗效而忽视了抗组胺药物的毒副作用.结论 门诊部门应加强对抗组胺药物的合理使用,降低药物的毒副作用,保证病人身体健康.

  19. Analysis of Prescriptions in the Outpatient Pharmacy of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Xi'an Medical College Baoji Hospital from 2010 to 2012%2010-2012年西安医学院附属宝鸡医院门诊中成药处方点评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史丽娟

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To improve the quality of the outpatient prescriptions of Chinese patent medicine in the outpatient pharmacy of traditional Chinese medicine and promote the rational use of traditional Chinese medicine . METHODS:4 965 outpatient prescriptions of Chinese patent medicine in the outpatient pharmacy of traditional Chinese medicine in Xi'an Medical College Baoji Hospitals ( hereinafter referred to as “our hospital”) from 2010 to 2012 period were analyzed statistically in accordance with “hospital prescription review management practices ( Trial )” and “Prescription Management Methods” issued .RESULTS: Of a total of 4 965 prescriptions reviewed , 4725 ( 95.21%) were qualified prescriptions versus 240 unqualified prescriptions .The unqualified prescriptions manifested mainly as discrepancies between diagnosis and medication , repeated drug use , unreasonable in usage or dosage forms , and nonstandard in prescription writing etc .CONCLUSIONS:The writing of the outpatient prescriptions of Chinese patent medicine in the outpatient pharmacy of traditional Chinese medicine of our hospital is far from standard , and the rational use of drugs remains to be strengthened .%目的:提高门诊药房的中成药处方质量,促进中成药的合理使用。方法:随机抽取西安医学院附属宝鸡医院(以下简称“我院”)2010-2012年门诊中成药处方4965张,参考2010年《医院处方点评管理规范(试行)》和《处方管理办法》对处方进行点评。结果:共抽查的4965张处方中,合格处方4725张,不合格处方240张,处方合格率为95.17%。不合格处方主要表现为用药与诊断不符,重复用药,剂型、剂量及用法不合理,书写不规范等。结论:我院处方书写欠规范,合理用药水平有待加强。

  20. Digital literacy knowledge and needs of pharmacy staff: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLure, Katie; Stewart, Derek

    2016-10-07

    To explore the digital literacy knowledge and needs of pharmacy staff including pharmacists, graduate (pre-registration) pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, dispensing assistants and medicine counter assistants. A systematic review was conducted following a pre-published protocol. Two reviewers systematically performed the reproducible search, followed by independent screening of titles/abstracts then full papers, before critical appraisal and data extraction. Full articles matching the search terms were eligible for inclusion. Exclusions were recorded with reasons. Kirkpatrick's 4 level model of training evaluation (reaction, learning, behaviour and results) was applied as an analytical framework. Screening reduced the initial 86 papers to 5 for full review. Settings included hospital and community pharmacy plus education in Australia, Canada and the US. No studies of pharmacy staff other than pharmacists were identified. Main findings indicate that pharmacy staff lack digital literacy knowledge with minimal research evidenced at each level of Kirkpatrick's model. As a society, we acknowledge that technology is an important part of everyday life impacting on the efficiency and effectiveness of working practices but, in pharmacy, do we take cognisance, 'that technology can change the nature of work faster than people can change their skills'? It seems that pharmacy has embraced technology without recognised occupational standards, definition of baseline skills or related personal development plans. There is little evidence that digital literacy has been integrated into pharmacy staff training, which remains an under-researched area.

  1. Ranking Dutch Economists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.; Vermeulen, F.M.P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper ranks Dutch economists using information about publications and citations. Rankings involve the aggregation of several performance dimensions. Instead of using a cardinal approach, where each dimension is weighted based on impact factors of journals for example, we use an ordinal approach

  2. Revisiting the Dutch hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Dirkje S.; Weiss, Scott T.; van den Berge, Maarten; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    The Dutch hypothesis was first articulated in 1961, when many novel and advanced scientific techniques were not available, such as genomics techniques for pinpointing genes, gene expression, lipid and protein profiles, and the microbiome. In addition, computed tomographic scans and advanced analysis

  3. Survival of Dutch heathlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemont, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES OF THE THESISHeathlands in The Netherlands are vanishing due to the invasion of trees. The transition from heathland to woodland in Dutch heathlands may either proceed directly or is preceded by the development of an intermediate grass heath. These changes are due to natural succession in

  4. Dutch Vegetation Database (LVD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekens, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch Vegetation Database (LVD) hosts information on all plant communities in the Netherlands. This substantial archive consists of over 600.000 recent and historic vegetation descriptions. The data provide information on more than 85 years of vegetation recording in various habitats covering te

  5. The New Dutch Waterline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuure, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, heritage is shifting towards a more structural approach, focusing on the urban landscape in which the intangible or the narrative of the place is used more often. The New Dutch Waterline is an example of this changing focus. This national transformation process (1999-now) led to high profi

  6. Dutch Culture Overseas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouda, Frances

    1995-01-01

    Why were citizens of a small and politically insignificant European nation like the Netherlands able to represent as natural and normal their paternalistic dominance over ancient civilizations in places such as Java and Bali? How did 'ethical' twentieth century residents of the Dutch East Indies see

  7. The Fine Dutch Tradition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooimeijer, F.L.

    2012-01-01

    Publication of the exhibition and symposium on water adaptive urban planning and architecture in Bangkok. The Urban Fine Dutch Tradition is a dynamic tradition of making urban designs using the parameters of the natural system – incorperating in an efficient way the hydrological cycle, the soil and

  8. Dutch house price fundamentals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haffner, M.E.A.; de Vries, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses house price developments in the Netherlands, specifically focussing on the question whether current house prices in the Dutch owner-occupied market are likely to decrease. We analyse three aspects of the question based on a literature review: (1) whether there is a house price b

  9. Dutch house price fundamentals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haffner, M.E.A.; de Vries, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses house price developments in the Netherlands, specifically focussing on the question whether current house prices in the Dutch owner-occupied market are likely to decrease. We analyse three aspects of the question based on a literature review: (1) whether there is a house price

  10. The New Dutch Waterline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuure, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, heritage is shifting towards a more structural approach, focusing on the urban landscape in which the intangible or the narrative of the place is used more often. The New Dutch Waterline is an example of this changing focus. This national transformation process (1999-now) led to high

  11. Dutch Arthurian literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besamusca, A.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Ironically, the currently flourishing study of Arthurian literature in the Low Countries had a false start, as L.G. Visscher’s 1838 publication of Ferguut, the thirteenth-century Middle Dutch rendition of Guillaume le Clerc’s Fergus, was full of flaws.1 The many inaccuracies in this first complete e

  12. Delay in the Provision of Medication by a Pharmacy Outside the Respiratory Outpatient Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masataka; Fujita, Sachiko; Kannen, Miwa; Kawase, Kaori; Kaneshiro, Kazumi; Takatsuki, Kiyonobu

    2017-03-01

     Respiratory medicine physicians prescribe many different kinds of medications depending on patient's condition. To examine an outside pharmacy's ability to meet the demand of our respiratory prescription services, we developed a questionnaire for all the patients who came to our outpatient department from November 1, 2015 to January 31, 2016. A total of 298 of 330 patients answered the questionnaire. Overall, 169 patients mainly went to the pharmacy near our hospital, whereas 64 patients mainly went to another pharmacy. Specifically, 23 of 219 patients who answered the question "When you went to the pharmacy with prescription, have you ever been not immediately given medication?", were not immediately given medication by the pharmacy. The results show that the other pharmacy significantly delayed medication compared with the one near our hospital. Interestingly, there were many types of inhaler cases that were out of stock in both pharmacies. Also, we found that 9 of 11 patients who were not provided medication on the spot acquired the medication within 1 or 2 d. Further, 10 of 20 patients who were not provided medication on the spot were only able to obtain the medication once. We did not observe any changes in patients' physical condition due to the delay in medication.

  13. Pharmacy school survey standards revisited

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mészáros, Károly; Barnett, Mitchell J; Lenth, Russell V; Knapp, Katherine K

    2013-01-01

    ..., and these criteria are reflected in the Author Instructions provided on the Journal's Web site. This paper discusses the relevance of these criteria for publication of survey research regarding pharmacy colleges and schools...

  14. 马斯洛需求层次理论在医院药学实习生带教中的应用%Application of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs in the Hospital Pharmacy Interns Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光丽

    2013-01-01

    马斯洛需求层次理论重视人的需要、尊严和价值。在药学实习生带教过程中正确应用该理论,可以帮助实习生满足不同层次的需求,提高实习带教水平。%Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory pays at ention to people's need, respect and value. Application of the theory appropriately in the process of teaching can help pharmacy interns to meet the needs of dif erent levels, and improve teaching level.

  15. Pharmacy education in India: strategies for a better future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jishnu, V; Gilhotra, Rm; Mishra, Dn

    2011-10-01

    In this world of specialization and globalization the pharmacy education in India is suffering from serious backdrops and flaws. There is an urgent need to initiate an academic exercise aimed at attaining revamping of curriculum, keeping in pace with current and emerging trends in the field of pharmacy. Unfortunately all these years, enough emphasis was not laid on strengthening the components of Community Pharmacy, Hospital and Clinical pharmacy, while designing curriculum at diploma and degree levels of teaching. The curriculum followed by almost all universities in India are no were up to the world standards and students are still getting the 20-30 yrs older compounding practical exposure in labs during the graduation level. The article emphasises the concept of innovation ecosystems and quality management. Application of TQM to the educational system improves the present situation. The counseling system which serves to be the gateway of the students for entry into the profession should be brought under the scanner. Introducing specializations at the graduation level will result in professional expertise and excellence. Education is a customer focused industry and every student should be capable of evaluating themselves for continuously improving their quality and professionalism. Teacher focused mastery learning should give away to student focused smart learning. An educational institution should provide the student with a stress-free atmosphere for learning and developing his intellectual capabilities. Every college should have a counseling centre to address the problems of students in their academic and personal life. An emphasis on the concept of quality teacher is included. Revival of the pharmacy education in India is the need of the hour which in turn will pave the way for the up gradation of the pharmacy profession in the country.

  16. 智能化药房建设的经验体会%Intelligent Experiences of the Construction of the Pharmacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李焕平; 赵子龙

    2016-01-01

    智能化药房建设是医院药房发展的必然趋势,有助于提高医院药学的服务水平。该文介绍该院智能化药房建设过程中的经验及体会,为医院药房智能化建设提供参考。%The intelligent pharmacy construction is a necessary trend of hospital pharmacy development, which contributes to improving the service level of the hospital pharmacy.In this paper introducing the experience in the course of intelligent pharmacy construction in our hospital. To provide reference for the intelligent construction of hospital pharmacy.

  17. Pharmacy Education in Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Wazaify, Mayyada; Matowe, Lloyd; Albsoul-Younes, Abla; Al-Omran, Ola A.

    2006-01-01

    The practice of pharmacy, as well as pharmacy education, varies significantly throughout the world. In Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia, the profession of pharmacy appears to be on the ascendance. This is demonstrated by an increase in the number of pharmacy schools and the number of pharmacy graduates from pharmacy programs. One of the reasons pharmacy is on the ascendance in these countries is government commitment to fund and support competitive, well-run pharmacy programs.

  18. A public health pharmacy course at a Malaysian pharmacy school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Awaisu, Ahmed; Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Ahmed, Syed Imran

    2009-11-12

    To develop and implement a new course on public health into the bachelor of pharmacy (BPharm) curriculum in Malaysia. A required 2-credit-hour course was designed to provide an overview of public health pharmacy roles and the behavioral aspects of human healthcare issues. Graded activities included nursing home visits, in-class quizzes, mini-projects, and poster sessions, and a comprehensive final examination. The majority of the students performed well on the class activities and 93 (71.5%) of the 130 students enrolled received a grade of B or higher. A Web-based survey was administered at the end of the semester and 90% of students indicated that they had benefited from the course and were glad that it was offered. The majority of students agreed that the course made an impact in preparing them for their future role as pharmacists and expanded their understanding of the public health roles of a pharmacist. A public health pharmacy course was successfully designed and implemented in the BPharm curriculum. This study highlighted the feasibilities of introducing courses that are of global relevance into a Malaysian pharmacy curriculum. The findings from the students' evaluation suggest the needs to incorporate a similar course in all pharmacy schools in the country and will be used as a guide to improve the contents and methods of delivery of the course at our school.

  19. Evaluation of Dutch Helicopter Emergency Medical Services in transporting children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Beekers, C.; Eijk, R.J.R.; Edwards, M.J.; Hoogerwerf, N.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the Netherlands, helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) function as an adjunct to paramedic ambulance service delivering hospital-level medical care to a prehospital location. The main goal of Dutch HEMS is to provide on-scene medical expertise and not primarily to serve as trans

  20. Pharmacy Education Development In Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Peymani

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time in 1922, a pharmacy division was set up atthe school of medicine. In 1926, the first union of Iranianpharmacy students who had graduated in France and returnedto Iran. Duration of this course was 3 years. In 1939 this coursechanges to 4-years program and 140 Credits. After that TehranUniversity changed the Pharmacy degree from Masters todoctorate (Pharm.D. and the duration of the study wasincreased to 5 years [1, 2].During all these years pharmacy department were belongto faculty of medicine. In 1956 the first faculty of pharmacywas established. Then, in 1973 each academic year waschanged into two semesters. After this modification, Pharmacystudents would get their Pharm.D degree after writing thesesand taking an oath [1]. Graduates need to present and defendtheir theses in different fields of pharmacy and this addsanother year to their studies and generally after 6 yearsstudents can graduate as Doctor in Pharmacy. The Pharm.Ddegree program requires at least 2-years of specific preprofessional(undergraduate coursework followed by 4-academic years of professional study. Pharmacy colleges andschools accept students directly from high school for Pharm.Dprogram [3].When Iranian students finished eight years of primaryschool and four years of high school in natural sciences(Experimental Sciences Diploma, can attend a nationalentrance exam for universities. At now, we have 16 faculty ofpharmacy in university of medical sciences. After Fivesemesters which is equal to 90-100 credits of general and basicsciences study, students entrance National test named “thebasic sciences exam” which is held for pharmacy students[3].

  1. Prevalence and types of disease management programs in community pharmacies in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Anandi V; Okamoto, Mark P; Chang, Peter S

    2005-01-01

    To (1) evaluate the prevalence and types of disease management (DM) programs provided by independent and chain community pharmacies in the state of California, (2) examine the interest among community pharmacists in establishing programs, and (3) assess perceived barriers to developing a successful DM program in community pharmacy. An exploratory telephone survey was conducted from February 2003 to February 2004 to collect data from community (primarily independent and chainstore) pharmacies across California. The survey evaluated existence (or lack of) and types of DM programs in community pharmacies in California. Pharmacies that did not have a DM program were queried on their interest and decisionmaking authority in establishing new programs. Pharmacies that had existing DM programs were sent a follow-up survey to determine the details of the DM programs, including challenges in establishing DM programs, reimbursement issues, and program effectiveness. The sample comprised 1,875 pharmacies, 60 (3.2%) of which had existing DM programs. There were significantly more independent pharmacies (37) with DM programs than chain-store pharmacies (23), Pindependent and chain pharmacies in operating hours, number of pharmacist and nonpharmacist staff members per day, and proximity to a clinic or hospital (Pindependent and chain pharmacies on interest (P = 0.234); however, there were significantly more chain pharmacists that did not have the decision-making authority. Of the 18 of 60 pharmacies (30%) that had DM programs and responded to the follow-up survey, 9 respondents (50%) reported monitoring medications as part of their DM program. Fifteen of 18 (83%) perceived lack of reimbursement as a challenge to implementing DM programs. Only 2 pharmacies reported an increase in revenue as a gain from the program, and 2 reported cost savings. Improved patient satisfaction was reported by 16 of 18 respondents (89%) with DM programs, but only 8 (44%) reported that patient

  2. Dutch ministerial visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science R. Plasterk (third from left) in the ATLAS cavern with NIKHEF Director F. Linde, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen, Ambassador J. van Eenennaam, ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Mission Representative G. Vrielink and ATLAS Magnet Project Leader H. ten Kate.Minister of Education, Culture and Science from the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Ronald Plasterk, visited CERN on 25th October. With Jos Engelen, CERN Scientific Director, as his guide he visited Point 1 of the LHC tunnel and ATLAS, where Nikhef (the national institute for subatomic physics, a Dutch government and university collaboration) constructed all 96 of the largest muon drift chambers in the barrel as well as parts of the magnet system, the inner detector, the DAQ and triggering. Overall the Netherlands contribute 4.5% to the annual CERN budget and the minister’s visit celebrated the contributions of the 79 ...

  3. 南阳市中心医院门诊西药房248例药物咨询情况分析%ANALYSIS OF PHARMACEUTICAL CONSULTATION SERVICE OF 248 CASES IN THE OUTPATIENT.PHARMACY IN THE CENTER HOSPITAL OF NANYANG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏简汇

    2011-01-01

    [目的]探讨本院门诊西药房的药物咨询情况,总结咨询内容,提高我院药学服务质量,为更好的指导临床工作提供依据.[方法]对我院2009年7~12月门诊西药房248例药物的咨询情况进行回顾性分析,对咨询的药物类型、咨询内容进行统计分析.[结果]咨询药物的不良反应、药物之间的相互作用、用法用量的比例较高,分别占33.06%、27.42%、20.16%;咨询的药物类型排序前3位的分别为心脑血管系统药物、呼吸系统药物、中枢神经系统药物,分别占26.61%、20.16%、17.74%.[结论]药物咨询服务是临床药学工作的重要组成部分,也是提高药学服务的重要环节,同时药物咨询对于提高患者的用药安全性及提高药师的知识水平具有重要的作用.%[Objective]To investigate the hospital outpatient pharmacy drug consultation, summarize the consultation content and improve the quality of service in our hospital pharmacy, so that to provide a better basis for clinical work.[Methods]248 cases were collected in our hospital from July 2009 to December 2009 in the outpatient pharmacy, and we retrospectively analyzed the consultation, the types of medicines device on the consultation content for statistical analysis.[Results]The rates of the consulting adverse drug reactions, drug interactions and dosage showed to be high, and accounted for 33.06%, 27.42% and 20.16%, respectively; The top 3 consultation drug types were cardiovascular system drugs, respiratory system agents and central nervous system drugs, and accounted for 26.61%, 20.16% and 17.74%, respectively.[Conclusion]Clinical Pharmacy drug counseling service is an important part of the work, and also an important part of improving pharmaceutical care, drug counseling plays an important role in improving the patient medication safety and the level of knowledge of pharmacists.

  4. Dutch perfusion incident survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenenberg, Ingrid; Weerwind, Patrick W; Everts, Peter A M; Maessen, Jos G

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass procedures remain complex, involving many potential risks. Therefore, a nationwide retrospective study was conducted to gain insight into the number of incidents and accidents in Dutch adult perfusion practice. An anonymous postal survey (85 questions about hardware, disposables, fluids and medication, air emboli, anticoagulation, practice, and safety measures) was sent to all Dutch perfusionists involved in adult cardiovascular perfusion during 2006 and 2007. To guarantee complete anonymity, respondents were asked to return the survey to a notary who discarded personal information. The net response rate was 72% and covered 23,500 perfusions. Individual respondents performed 240 ± 103 perfusions during the 2-year study period and had 13.8 ± 8.7 years of practical experience. The incident rate was 1 per 15.6 perfusions and the adverse event rate was 1 per 1,236 perfusions. The three most reported incidents were: (1) persistent inability to raise the activated coagulation time above 400s during perfusion (184 incidents); (2) an allergic or anaphylactic reaction to drugs, fluids, or blood products (114 incidents); and (3) clotting formation in the extracorporeal circuit (74 incidents). Furthermore, pre-bypass safety measures showed no statistically significant association with the reported incidents. In comparison with data from the recent literature, the reported number of incidents is high. Nevertheless, the adverse outcome rate is well matched to other published surveys. The relatively high response rate conveys the impression that the Dutch perfusionist is vigilant and willing to report incidents. Hence, a web-based Dutch perfusion incident registration system is recommended.

  5. Survival of Dutch heathlands.

    OpenAIRE

    Diemont, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES OF THE THESISHeathlands in The Netherlands are vanishing due to the invasion of trees. The transition from heathland to woodland in Dutch heathlands may either proceed directly or is preceded by the development of an intermediate grass heath. These changes are due to natural succession in the absence of management. In addition to the absence of management atmospheric pollution i.e. increased inputs of nitrogen has accelerated the replacement of heather heath by grass heath.The main...

  6. DUTCH R&B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>I have forgotten who had said: "Music has no boundary." In the Netherlands, we met with the four boys of the bandRe-Play by accident. As we talked about the "Tornado," they,who were grown up in the Netherlands, sang it in the Dutchlanguage. We felt very surprised.It was the year of 1994 when four guys from Rotterdam,the Netherlands, decided to take part in a Dutch singing contest,

  7. 76 FR 51415 - Ideal Pharmacy Care, Inc., D/B/A Esplanade Pharmacy; Revocation of Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... Enforcement Administration Ideal Pharmacy Care, Inc., D/B/A Esplanade Pharmacy; Revocation of Registration On... to Show Cause and Immediate Suspension of Registration to Ideal Pharmacy Care, Inc., d/b/a Esplanade Pharmacy (Registrant), of New Orleans, Louisiana. The Show Cause Order proposed the revocation of...

  8. Disillusionment in Pharmacy Students: A Reconsideration with the Advent of Clinical Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCook, William M.; Speranza, Kenneth A., Sr.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study with 168 students from three professional classes at the University of Connecticut's School of Pharmacy suggest that clinical pharmacy education may overcome the disillusionment toward pharmacy shown to develop in pharmacy students as they progress through a professional curriculum. (LBH)

  9. “Click for Closer Care”: A Content Analysis of Community Pharmacy Websites in Four Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Combinations of professional and commercial communication are typically very controversial, particularly in health care communication on the Internet. Websites of licensed community pharmacies on the other hand tend to raise remarkably little controversy, although they typically contain controversial combinations of clinical and commercial services previously unprecedented in professional health care communication. Objective The aim of this study was to fill the void of knowledge about the combination of clinical and commercial services presented on the websites of licensed community pharmacies. Methods A content analysis of clinical and commercial services presented in a random sample of 200 licensed community pharmacy websites from Great Britain, the Netherlands, the Canadian provinces British Columbia and Manitoba, and the Australian states New South Wales and Western Australia was conducted. Results The top five specific services mentioned on the community pharmacy websites were cosmetic products (126/200, 63.0%), medication refill request options (124/200, 62.0%), over-the-counter medicine (115/200, 57.5%), complementary and alternative medicine (107/200, 53.5%), and home medical aids (98/200, 49.0%). On average, 72.5% (145/200) of the community pharmacy websites across the 4 countries included a combination of clinical and commercial services. A combination of clinical and commercial services was more often present on chain pharmacy websites (120/147, 82.8%) than single pharmacy websites (25/53, 47%; Ppharmacy websites, followed by the Australian, British, and Dutch pharmacy websites, respectively (Ppharmacies’ homepages contained a combination of clinical and commercial images (107/200, 53.5%), and almost half of the homepage menus contained a combination of clinical and commercial items (99/200, 49.5%). The latter were, again, more common on chain pharmacy than single pharmacy websites (Ppharmacies in Great Britain, the Netherlands, Canada, and

  10. "Click for Closer Care": A Content Analysis of Community Pharmacy Websites in Four Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwier, Sandra

    2017-06-14

    Combinations of professional and commercial communication are typically very controversial, particularly in health care communication on the Internet. Websites of licensed community pharmacies on the other hand tend to raise remarkably little controversy, although they typically contain controversial combinations of clinical and commercial services previously unprecedented in professional health care communication. The aim of this study was to fill the void of knowledge about the combination of clinical and commercial services presented on the websites of licensed community pharmacies. A content analysis of clinical and commercial services presented in a random sample of 200 licensed community pharmacy websites from Great Britain, the Netherlands, the Canadian provinces British Columbia and Manitoba, and the Australian states New South Wales and Western Australia was conducted. The top five specific services mentioned on the community pharmacy websites were cosmetic products (126/200, 63.0%), medication refill request options (124/200, 62.0%), over-the-counter medicine (115/200, 57.5%), complementary and alternative medicine (107/200, 53.5%), and home medical aids (98/200, 49.0%). On average, 72.5% (145/200) of the community pharmacy websites across the 4 countries included a combination of clinical and commercial services. A combination of clinical and commercial services was more often present on chain pharmacy websites (120/147, 82.8%) than single pharmacy websites (25/53, 47%; Ppharmacy websites, followed by the Australian, British, and Dutch pharmacy websites, respectively (Ppharmacies' homepages contained a combination of clinical and commercial images (107/200, 53.5%), and almost half of the homepage menus contained a combination of clinical and commercial items (99/200, 49.5%). The latter were, again, more common on chain pharmacy than single pharmacy websites (Ppharmacies in Great Britain, the Netherlands, Canada, and Australia combine clinical services

  11. Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmocology: Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaky, T. Z.

    1973-01-01

    Two recent trends in the field of health education-the declining emphasis on basic sciences in medical instruction and the heavy emphasis on pharmacology, therapeutics, and clinical pharmacy in colleges of pharmacy-are compared. (Editor)

  12. Understanding Business Models in Pharmacy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdford, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to define business models, contrast the business models in pharmacy schools, and discuss issues that can arise from misunderstandings about whom pharmacy schools serve and how they do so. PMID:28720910

  13. Pharmaceutical Consultation in UAE Community Pharmacies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamoudi, N M; Shirwaikar, A A; Ali, H S; Al Ayoubi, E I

    2011-01-01

    .... Pharmacy profession is evolving steadily in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Pharmacists in UAE are so much occupied in their administrative and managerial duties that dispensing is mostly attended to by pharmacy technicians...

  14. Pharmaceutical policy and the pharmacy profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine M; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors look at the relationship between pharmaceutical policy and the pharmacy profession with focus on pharmacy practice and pharmacists in the health care sector. Pharmaceutical policy encompasses three major policy inputs: public health policy, health care policy...... and industrial policy. In order to analyse and understand pharmaceutical policy, it is important to know how policymakers view pharmacy and pharmacists. The authors look at the issues that arise when policy regulates pharmacy as a business, and what this means for the profession. The perspective of pharmacy...... in managerialism, and how the division of labour with other health professionals such as physicians and pharmacy assistants is affecting the pharmacy profession's position in the labour market. Next the authors look at ways in which the pharmacy profession has affected policy. Pharmacists have been instrumental...

  15. Antibiotic Self-Prescribing Trends, Experiences and Attitudes in Upper Respiratory Tract Infection among Pharmacy and Non-Pharmacy Students: A Study from Lahore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zikria Saleem

    Full Text Available Pharmacists are the custodians of drugs; hence their education, training, behaviors and experiences would affect the future use of drugs at community and hospital pharmacies. Therefore, we aimed at evaluating the self-prescribing antibiotic trends, knowledge and attitudes among pharmacy and non-pharmacy students. We found that pharmacy students had higher risks of experiencing URIs related symptoms such as cough (RR; 1.7, p = 0.002, allergy (RR; 2.07, p = 0.03 and running nose (RR; 3.17, p<0.005, compared to non-pharmacy students -resulting in higher probabilities of selecting cough syrups (OR; 2.3, p<0.005, anti-histamines (OR; 1.8, p = 0.036 and anti-inflammatory/anti-pyretic (OR; 2.4, p<0.005 drugs. Likewise, bachelor's degree pupils (OR; 2, p = 0.045, urban area residents (OR; 2.44; p = 0.002 and pharmacy students (OR; 2.9, p<0.005 exhibited higher propensities of antibiotic self-use-notable classes include, b-lactams (45.9% followed by macrolides (26.5% and augmentin (28.94%, respectively. Surprisingly, pharmacy and non-pharmacy students had higher odds of using antibiotics in common cold (OR; 3.2, p<0.005 and pain (OR; 2.37, p = 0.015, respectively. Unlike non-pharmacy students, pharmacy students were likely to select alternative therapy, such as Joshanda (OR; 2.22, p = 0.011 and were well acquainted with antibiotic hazards, with 77% reduction in risk of antibiotics re-use. In conclusion, university students exhibited antibiotic self-prescribing trends in conditions that does not warrant their use, thus are irrational users. The pharmacy education confers very little benefit to rational self-prescribing practices among students, while non-pharmacy students are more vulnerable to repeated antibiotic usage. Thus, the educational and training modules should be designed for university students to disseminate targeted information regarding the potential hazards of antibiotic self-use and importance of consultation with qualified and registered

  16. Burnout experienced by recent pharmacy graduates of Mercer University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, C W; Hopkins, W A; Jackson, R A

    1986-11-01

    The degree of burnout experienced by graduates of the Mercer University Southern School of Pharmacy from 1973 to 1983 was studied. Questionnaires were mailed to 1000 alumni, representing 850 Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and 150 Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) graduates. Three components of burnout--emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal achievement--were measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory to determine relationships between burnout and primary work setting, primary work activity, and type of degree (Pharm.D. or B.S.). The response rate was 41%. The respondents experienced a moderate degree of burnout. Those pharmacists working primarily in community chain store settings reported greater levels of burnout than those working in hospital or institutional pharmacies, independent community pharmacies, academia, and home health care. Respondents who performed primarily nondistributive duties (direct patient care, drug information, teaching or research, and management or administration) experienced lower levels of burnout than those involved primarily in drug distribution. Pharmacists holding the Pharm.D. degree were involved to a greater extent in nondistributive positions and experienced a lower degree of burnout than the pharmacists holding a B.S. degree only. Pharmacists in nondistributive roles appear to be less affected by burnout than pharmacists performing traditional distributive activities.

  17. Community pharmacy and mail order cost and utilization for 90-day maintenance medication prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Nikhil; Duncan, Ian; Rubinstein, Elan; Ahmed, Tamim; Pegus, Cheryl

    2012-04-01

    Pharmacy benefit management (PBM) companies promote mail order programs that typically dispense 90-day quantities of maintenance medications, marketing this feature as a key cost containment strategy to address plan sponsors' rising prescription drug expenditures. In recent years, community pharmacies have introduced 90-day programs that provide similar cost advantages, while allowing these prescriptions to be dispensed at the same pharmacies that patients frequent for 30-day quantities. To compare utilization rates and corresponding costs associated with obtaining 90-day prescriptions at community and mail order pharmacies for payers that offer equivalent benefits in different 90-day dispensing channels. We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional investigation using pharmacy claims and eligibility data from employer group clients of a large PBM between January 2008 and September 2010. We excluded the following client types: government, third-party administrators, schools, hospitals, 340B (federal drug pricing), employers in Puerto Rico, and miscellaneous clients for which the PBM provided billing services (e.g., the pharmacy's loyalty card program members). All employer groups in the sample offered 90-day community pharmacy and mail order dispensing and received benefits management services, such as formulary management and mail order pharmacy, from the PBM. We further limited the sample to employer groups that offered equivalent benefits for community pharmacy and mail order, defined as groups in which the mean and median copayments per claim for community and mail order pharmacy, by tier, differed by no more than 5%. Enrollees in the sample were required to have a minimum of 6 months of eligibility in each calendar year but were not required to have filled a prescription in any year. We evaluated pharmacy costs and utilization for a market basket of 14 frequently dispensed therapeutic classes of maintenance medications. The proportional share of claims for

  18. Development of an operating room pharmacy substation on a restricted budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, E C; Gaither, M W

    1986-07-01

    Pharmaceutical services implemented in an operating room (OR) pharmacy substation without addition of staff in a 764-bed teaching hospital with 22 operating rooms are described. In 1984 an interdepartmental task force recommended that pharmacy take control of responsibility for controlled drugs used in anesthesia. The anesthesia department contributed space for a pharmacy substation and some of the necessary equipment. Two technicians staff the substation (1.5 full-time equivalent positions); pharmacy contributed 0.5 FTE and the additional FTE was obtained through staffing adjustments in other departments. Anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists obtain controlled drugs directly from the technicians, and records of drug disposition are compared with inventory twice daily. The substation also handles exchange carts for noncontrolled drugs for anesthesia and for other drugs used in the operating rooms. Total cost (additional cost to pharmacy and other departments) for operating the substation for its first year was +2161, and there were no unresolved discrepancies in controlled drug accounting. Undocumented use of noncontrolled drugs has been reduced by 67%, and cooperation and communication between the pharmacy and anesthesia departments has improved. Substation personnel do not prepare intravenous admixtures or provide clinical services. An operating room substation staffed by technicians 10.5 hours daily Monday through Friday provided cost-effective pharmacy control of drugs used in the OR.

  19. Pharmacist interest in and attitudes toward direct pharmacy access to hormonal contraception in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Sharon; Besinque, Kathleen; Chung, Frances; Dries-Daffner, Ingrid; Maderas, Nicole Monastersky; McGhee, Belle Taylor; Foster, Diana Greene

    2009-01-01

    To assess pharmacist interest, comfort level, and perceived barriers regarding providing pharmacist-initiated access to hormonal contraceptives (i.e., tablets, patches, rings, injectables, emergency contraception [EC]). Descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional study. United States between November 2004 and January 2005. 2,725 pharmacists working in community chain pharmacies (64%), community independent pharmacy (31%), and other practice settings, including hospitals and home care facilities (5%). Survey sent electronically by the American Pharmacists Association to a random sample of 14,142 of its 50,000 pharmacist members nationally. Pharmacist interest and comfort level in providing pharmacy access to hormonal contraception (HC), perceived barriers and training needs, and familiarity with and provision of EC. 2,725 survey responses (19% response rate) were received. Pharmacists reported being very familiar with HC. The majority of respondents were comfortable and interested in providing direct access to HC in the pharmacy. Perceived barriers to providing HC in the pharmacy included lack of time, no mechanism of reimbursement for the service, and possible resistance from physicians. Strong interest, comfort level, and capability from pharmacists, combined with a documented demand for direct pharmacy access from patients, indicate that pharmacy access to HC has the potential to meet patient needs and increase access to HC. Education about current clinical practice recommendations-which no longer require pelvic examinations and Papanicolaou (Pap) smears before hormonal contraception is initiated-may increase pharmacist support for providing hormonal methods directly.

  20. The Second Round of the PHAR-QA Survey of Competences for Pharmacy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the second European Delphi round on the ranking of competences for pharmacy practice and compares these data to those of the first round already published. A comparison of the numbers of respondents, distribution by age group, country of residence, etc., shows that whilst the student population of respondents changed from Round 1 to 2, the populations of the professional groups (community, hospital and industrial pharmacists, pharmacists in other occupations and academics were more stable. Results are given for the consensus of ranking and the scores of ranking of 50 competences for pharmacy practice. This two-stage, large-scale Delphi process harmonized and validated the Quality Assurance in European Pharmacy Education and Training (PHAR-QA framework and ensured the adoption by the pharmacy profession of a framework proposed by the academic pharmacy community. The process of evaluation and validation of ranking of competences by the pharmacy profession is now complete, and the PHAR-QA consortium will now put forward a definitive PHAR-QA framework of competences for pharmacy practice.

  1. Pharmacist Collaborative Drug Therapy Management in U.S. Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Pragya

    2014-01-01

    The objectives for this study were to 1) assess the current extent, scope and perceptions of CDTM in U.S. hospitals, 2) determine the associations between hospital characteristics, pharmacy director characteristics, and perceptions of CDTM, 3) investigate hospitals' short-term and long-term plans regarding CDTM, and 4) identify pharmacy directors' views about the major facilitators and barriers for CDTM in hospitals. A self-administered written survey was mailed to a national random sample...

  2. 42 CFR 483.60 - Pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pharmacy services. 483.60 Section 483.60 Public... Care Facilities § 483.60 Pharmacy services. The facility must provide routine and emergency drugs and... the provision of pharmacy services in the facility; (2) Establishes a system of records of receipt and...

  3. 42 CFR 413.241 - Pharmacy arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pharmacy arrangements. 413.241 Section 413.241... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.241 Pharmacy arrangements. Effective January 1, 2011, an ESRD facility that enters into an arrangement with a pharmacy to furnish renal dialysis...

  4. Motivational interviewing and specialty pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bruce A; Bertram, Carl T

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented in substance abuse and health care literature that motivational interviewing is an evidenced-based and effective intervention for influencing patient behaviors and associated positive health outcomes. The introduction of motivational interviewing training in specialty pharmacy has great potential to increase patient and pharmacist satisfaction, maximize adherence rates, and improve health outcomes. This commentary examines the need for effective approaches for improving patient adherence and outcomes and briefly describes the history and efficacy of motivational interviewing. Case studies using traditional approaches to patient care and motivational interviewing are analysed, and real-world experience using motivational interviewing is presented in the form of a specialty pharmacy case study.

  5. Restructuring supervision and reconfiguration of skill mix in community pharmacy: Classification of perceived safety and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Fay; Willis, Sarah C; Noyce, Peter R; Schafheutle, Ellen I

    2016-01-01

    Broadening the range of services provided through community pharmacy increases workloads for pharmacists that could be alleviated by reconfiguring roles within the pharmacy team. To examine pharmacists' and pharmacy technicians (PTs)' perceptions of how safe it would be for support staff to undertake a range of pharmacy activities during a pharmacist's absence. Views on supervision, support staff roles, competency and responsibility were also sought. Informed by nominal group discussions, a questionnaire was developed and distributed to a random sample of 1500 pharmacists and 1500 PTs registered in England. Whilst focused on community pharmacy practice, hospital pharmacy respondents were included, as more advanced skill mix models may provide valuable insights. Respondents were asked to rank a list of 22 pharmacy activities in terms of perceived risk and safety of these activities being performed by support staff during a pharmacist's absence. Descriptive and comparative statistic analyses were conducted. Six-hundred-and-forty-two pharmacists (43.2%) and 854 PTs (57.3%) responded; the majority worked in community pharmacy. Dependent on agreement levels with perceived safety, from community pharmacists and PTs, and hospital pharmacists and PTs, the 22 activities were grouped into 'safe' (n = 7), 'borderline' (n = 9) and 'unsafe' (n = 6). Activities such as assembly and labeling were considered 'safe,' clinical activities were considered 'unsafe.' There were clear differences between pharmacists and PTs, and sectors (community pharmacy vs. hospital). Community pharmacists were most cautious (particularly mobile and portfolio pharmacists) about which activities they felt support staff could safely perform; PTs in both sectors felt significantly more confident performing particularly technical activities than pharmacists. This paper presents novel empirical evidence informing the categorization of pharmacy activities into 'safe,' 'borderline' or 'unsafe

  6. Pharmacy benefit managers, pharmacies, and pharmacogenomic testing: prescription for progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, Eric J

    2010-08-11

    Few would argue that the ability to match individual patients with the safest and most effective drugs and doses would be a major advance for clinical medicine. But while clinicians have been reluctant to routinely use pharmacogenomic analyses to guide their prescribing practices, pharmacy benefit managers and drugstores are proceeding with major pharmacogenetic initiatives.

  7. The Effect of Reflective Activities on Reflective Thinking Ability in an Undergraduate Pharmacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsingos-Lucas, Cherie; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Schneider, Carl R; Smith, Lorraine

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To determine the effectiveness of integrating reflective practice activities into a second-year undergraduate pharmacy curriculum and their impact on reflective thinking ability. Design. A cross-over design with repeated measures was employed. Newly developed reflective modules based on real hospital and community pharmacy cases were integrated into the second-year pharmacy practice curriculum. A novel strategy, the Reflective Ability Clinical Assessment (RACA), was introduced to enhance self- and peer reflection. Assessment. Student responses (n=214) to the adapted Kember et al(1) Reflective Thinking Questionnaire (RTQ) were compared before and after reflective activities were undertaken. Significant improvement in three indicators of reflective thinking was shown after students engaged in reflective activities. Conclusion. Integration of reflective activities into a pharmacy curriculum increased the reflective thinking capacity of students. Enhancing reflective thinking ability may help students make better informed decisions and clinical judgments, thus improving future practice.

  8. Safety culture in a pharmacy setting using a pharmacy survey on patient safety culture: a cross-sectional study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, P L; Zhang, L H; Zhang, M M; Zhang, L L; Zhang, C; Qin, S F; Li, X L; Liu, K X

    2014-06-30

    To explore the attitudes and perceptions of patient safety culture for pharmacy workers in China by using a Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture (PSOPSC), and to assess the psychometric properties of the translated Chinese language version of the PSOPSC. Cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from 20 hospital pharmacies in the southwest part of China. We performed χ(2) test to explore the differences on pharmacy staff in different hospital and qualification levels and countries towards patient safety culture. We also computed descriptive statistics, internal consistency coefficients and intersubscale correlation analysis, and then conducted an exploratory factor analysis. A test-retest was performed to assess reproducibility of the items. A total of 630 questionnaires were distributed of which 527 were responded to validly (response rate 84%). The positive response rate for each item ranged from 37% to 90%. The positive response rate on three dimensions ('Teamwork', 'Staff Training and Skills' and 'Staffing, Work Pressure and Pace') was higher than that of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) data (ppatient safety culture at different hospital and qualification levels. The internal consistency of the total survey was comparatively satisfied (Cronbach's α=0.89). The results demonstrated that among the pharmacy staffs surveyed in China, there was a positive attitude towards patient safety culture in their organisations. Identifying perspectives of patient safety culture from pharmacists in different hospital and qualification levels are important, since this can help support decisions about action to improve safety culture in pharmacy settings. The Chinese translation of the PSOPSC questionnaire (V.2012) applied in our study is acceptable. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Market dynamics of community pharmacies in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommer, Jon C; Singh, Reshmi L; Cline, Richard R; Hadsall, Ronald S

    2006-09-01

    From a pharmacist workforce perspective, an understanding of pharmacy location is important for monitoring access points for pharmacist services such as medication dispensing, medication counseling, medication therapy management, and disease management. To understand access to community pharmacies, our goal was to describe changes in pharmacy mix (independent vs chain) between 1992 and 2002 for 87 counties in Minnesota. Study objectives were to describe the association of (1) change in population density, (2) metropolitan designation, change in (3) proportion of nonwhite population, (4) proportion of elderly population, and (5) household income with change in (a) number of community pharmacies overall, (b) number of chain pharmacies, (c) number of independent pharmacies, and (d) the independent-to-total community pharmacy ratio. Records from the State of Minnesota Board of Pharmacy were used to examine changes in the community pharmacy mix from 1992 to 2002. Data on county level demographics in 1990 and 2000 were obtained from the US Census Bureau and Datanet. Chi-square analysis was used to test the relationships between the independent and dependent variables. As of 2002, every county in Minnesota had at least one pharmacy as was the case in 1992. The ratio of independent to chain pharmacies changed from approximately 2:1 in 1992 to approximately 1:1 in 2002. Chi-square results revealed that change in population density was significantly associated with change in the number of community pharmacies overall (Pchain pharmacies (P=0.03). The findings revealed an interesting u-shaped pattern for the association between population density and change in independent pharmacies. It appears that chain pharmacies follow changes in population density for making decisions about market entry and exit. The results suggest that some independent pharmacies might be closing due to chain competition in high population density growth areas. However, there was also evidence to

  10. Dutch house price fundamentals

    OpenAIRE

    Haffner, M.E.A.; De Vries, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses house price developments in the Netherlands, specifically focussing on the question whether current house prices in the Dutch owner-occupied market are likely to decrease. We analyse three aspects of the question based on a literature review: (1) whether there is a house price bubble ready to burst; (2) whether house prices will decline in response to the credit crisis that started in 2007; and (3) whether it is likely that house prices will decrease as a result of reform...

  11. Pharmacists’ journey to clinical pharmacy practice in Ethiopia: Key informants’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemayehu B Mekonnen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients and providing medication consultation to staff. This area of practice is at the infant stage in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to explore key informants’ perspective in the implementation of clinical pharmacy practice in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia. Method: A qualitative study was conducted through in-depth interviews with the heads of departments (internal medicine, paediatrics, surgery, nurse, pharmacy, medical director, administration and pharmacy student representatives. Qualitative data analysis was done after audiotapes were transcribed verbatim and notes were compiled. Results: All of the respondents interviewed express diverse and conflicting perspectives on pharmacists’ role, varying from a health-care professional to a business man. Despite this, the current pace of change worldwide takes the professions’ mission to that of a provider of clinical pharmacy services. The data ascertained the change in pharmacy practice, and integrating clinical pharmacy services within the health-care system should be seen as a must. Pharmacists should delineate from a business perspective and focus on widening the scope of the profession of pharmacy and should come close to the patient to serve directly. Conclusions: Although the perception of people on traditional roles of pharmacists was weak, there were promising steps in developing clinical pharmacy practice within the health-care system. Moreover, the results of this study revealed a high demand for this service among health-care providers.

  12. Marketing of rural and remote pharmacy practice via the digital medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, G M; Fitzmaurice, K D; Rasiah, R L; Kruup, H

    2010-08-01

    The shortage of community and hospital pharmacists is particularly acute in rural and remote areas of Australia. Pharmacy students, in particular, as those who may be able to alleviate this shortage, need to be made more aware of the challenges and rewards of rural pharmacy practice. A marketing tool was developed to promote rural and remote pharmacy practice as a career option. A DVD was produced from interviews with health professionals working in rural and remote areas of Australia. This DVD will complement current rural practical placements, which have been incorporated into the curriculum of Australian schools of pharmacy. Interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals from areas in Tasmania, Northern Queensland and the Northern Territory. Interviewees included pharmacists, graduate pharmacists, pharmacy students, aboriginal health workers and a general practitioner. Each of the interviewees was able to provide personal accounts of experiences in rural and remote healthcare, and roles and opportunities for pharmacists. A final draft of the DVD was shown to University of Tasmania students to assess the impact and quality of the production. A number of common themes arose from interviewing and these were subsequently converted into five key chapters of the DVD - Lifestyle, Belonging, Diversity, Indigenous Health and 'Give it a go'. The final DVD, produced from over 15 h of footage, runs for 35 min. Students reported positive feedback on both the technical quality and the information contained within the DVD; 37% of students who viewed the DVD felt that it increased their awareness of what rural pharmacy has to offer. The rural pharmacy, 'Enjoy the Lifestyle' DVD can be used to increase awareness of rural and remote pharmacy practice to students and other pharmacists, and complements other pharmacy workforce strategies for rural and remote areas of Australia. It could also be a useful approach for adaptation in other countries.

  13. Specific Plan and Implementation of Performance Evaluation in Outpatient Pharmacy of Our Hospital%我院门诊药房绩效考核的具体方案与实施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭永红; 范开华; 金伟华; 王诗华; 蒋燕

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide reference for improving the working enthusiasm and the working quality of the dispensers in outpatient pharmacy. METHODS: The scientific evaluation method for the working performance was formulated, and the working performance was evaluated according to workload and ability of work, responsibility of post, attitude of work, colleague' s comments, examinations, rewards and punishments so as to calculate the bonus by score ranks. The workload and ability of work scored 50 points, responsibility of post 15 points, attitude of work 15 points, colleague's comments 5 points, examinations 15 points. Rewards and punishment were not included in total score. RESULTS: After implementing performance evaluation plan, the monthly quantitative evaluation of workload and quality of work of each pharmacist became available. The quantitative evaluation method motivated the working enthusiasm of the dispensers, decreased dispensing errors, improved working quality and service attitude, enhanced labour discipline. CONCLUSION: The performance evaluation methods can improve the level of outpatient pharmacy management to some extent.%目的:为提高门诊药房调剂人员的工作积极性和工作质量提供参考.方法:制定科学的绩效考核方案,根据调剂人员的工作量及工作能力、岗位责任、工作态度、同事评价、考试、奖惩情况几方面标准综合评分,按所得分值排名后计算奖金金额:工作量及工作能力占50分,岗位责任占15分,工作态度占15分,同事评价占5分,考试占15分,奖惩情况未计入100分里面,于所得总分后加减.结果:实施该绩效考核方案后每月对每个调剂人员的工作量与工作质量等有了量化考核,激励了调剂人员的工作积极性,降低了出错率,提升了工作质量,改善了服务态度,强化了劳动纪律.结论:该绩效考核方案一定程度上提高了门诊药房的管理水平.

  14. 医院住院药房医嘱点评的现状与思考%Current Situation and Thinking of Medical Orders Comment in Pharmacy of Our Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海燕; 李连新; 吴娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To ensure the safety of patient' s medication and to pay attention to the role of clinical pharmacists. Methods By adopting the review and thinking,the existing problems in the medical orders comments in the inpatients were analyzed. The current sit-uation and development trend of the clinical pharmacist team building were summarized. Results Through the implementation of the ef-fect on patients' medication orders comments,the necessity of clinical pharmacist team must be made clear,only clinical pharmacists participated in clinical drug therapy,the phenomenon of irrational drug use would be found timely. Conclusion The clinical pharmacist fully playing the advantages of professional pharmacy in clinical treatment team,playing the role in the clinical rational drug use work and establishing the important position of clinical pharmacists in clinical therapeutical work are the topic needing to urgently resolve by the pharmacy workers.%目的:保证患者用药安全,关口前移,重视临床药师作用。方法分析住院患者用药医嘱点评存在的问题,总结临床药师团队建设的现状与发展趋势。结果住院患者用药医嘱点评实施效果显示,必须重视临床药师团队的必要性,只有临床药师参与临床药物治疗,才能及时发现不合理用药现象。结论临床药师在临床治疗团队中如何充分发挥药学专业优势,在临床合理用药工作中发挥应有作用,确立临床药师在临床治疗工作中的重要地位,是医院药学工作亟待解决的课题。

  15. Issues Facing Pharmacy Leaders in 2015: Suggestions for Pharmacy Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015 include practice model growth and the role of pharmacy students, clinical privileging of health-system pharmacists and provider status, medication error prevention, and specialty pharmacy services. The goal of this article is to provide practical approaches to 4 issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015 to help them focus their department’s goals. This article will address (1) advances in the pharmacy practice model initiative and the role of pharmacy students, (2) the current thinking of pharmacists being granted clinical privileges in health systems, (3) updates on preventing harmful medication errors, and (4) the growth of specialty pharmacy services. The sample template of a strategic plan may be used by a pharmacy department in 2015 in an effort to continue developing patient-centered pharmacy services. PMID:25717212

  16. Issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015: suggestions for pharmacy strategic planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    Issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015 include practice model growth and the role of pharmacy students, clinical privileging of health-system pharmacists and provider status, medication error prevention, and specialty pharmacy services. The goal of this article is to provide practical approaches to 4 issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015 to help them focus their department's goals. This article will address (1) advances in the pharmacy practice model initiative and the role of pharmacy students, (2) the current thinking of pharmacists being granted clinical privileges in health systems, (3) updates on preventing harmful medication errors, and (4) the growth of specialty pharmacy services. The sample template of a strategic plan may be used by a pharmacy department in 2015 in an effort to continue developing patient-centered pharmacy services.

  17. Social Pharmacy Research in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Kildemoes, Helle Wallach

    2016-01-01

    Social Pharmacy (SP) is a multidisciplinary field to promote the adequate use of medicine. The field of SP is increasingly important due to a numbers of new trends all posing challenges to society. The SP group at the University of Copenhagen has for several years used a broad approach to SP...

  18. Community pharmacy practice in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nousheen Aslam

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: This study concludes that the current status of community pharmacy practice is below par. There is a need to involve more pharmacists at community level and develop awareness programs to counter patients′ routine drug issues and reducing the burden of disease from society.

  19. Action research in pharmacy practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sørensen, Ellen Westh

    2015-01-01

    -based study. Concepts related to AR are described; in addition, the multifaceted role of the action researcher is described, along with a set of data quality criteria for evaluating the quality of an AR-based study. Then follows a thorough description of a Danish AR-based pharmacy practice study. The chapter...

  20. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 11. Pharmacy QPCB Task Sort for Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 11 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties in pharmacy. (BT)