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Sample records for dutch consumer quality

  1. Patient's experiences with quality of hospital care: the Dutch Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Brouwer, W.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients' feedback is of great importance in health care policy decisions. The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire (CQI Cataract) was used to measure patients' experiences with quality of care after a cataract operation. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and the

  2. The Dutch Consumer Quality Index: an example of stakeholder involvement in indicator development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rademakers Jany JDJM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like in several other Western countries, in the Dutch health care system regulated competition has been introduced. In order to make this work, comparable information is required about the performance of health care providers in terms of effectiveness, safety and patient experiences. Without further coordination, external actors will all try to force health care providers to be transparent. For health care providers this might result in a situation in which they have to deliver data for several sets of indicators, defined by different actors. Therefore, in the Netherlands an effort is made to define national sets of performance indicators and related measuring instruments. In this article, the following questions are addressed, using patient experiences as an example: - When and how are stakeholders involved in the development of indicators and instruments that measure the patients' experiences with health care providers? - Does this involvement lead to indicators and instruments that match stakeholders' information needs? Discussion The Dutch experiences show that it is possible to implement national indicator sets and to reach consensus about what needs to be measured. Preliminary evaluations show that for health care providers and health insurers the benefits of standardization outweigh the possible loss of tailor-made information. However, it has also become clear that particular attention should be given to the participation of patient/consumer organisations. Summary Stakeholder involvement is complex and time-consuming. However, it is the only way to balance the information needs of all the parties that ask for and benefit from transparency, without frustrating the health care system.

  3. Explaining purchases of organic meat by Dutch consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, PC

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of economic and marketing variables ( quality, price, and distribution), emotions ( fear, empathy, and guilt), social norms, and environment-related variables ( environmental concern, green behaviour, and perceived consumer effectiveness) on Dutch consumers'

  4. Radioactivity in Dutch consumer products

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, M P M

    2002-01-01

    This study took place within the framework of a general update of the average radiation dose for the Dutch population. It focuses on consumer products in which radionuclides have been intentionally incorporated and on radiation-emitting devices that can be supplied to members of the public without special surveillance. Eleven consumer products were studied in more detail. The radiation from these products determined 90% of the total collective dose due to consumer products in the Netherlands in 1988. Individual and collective doses are presented here for each product. The total collective dose has decreased from 130 personSv in 1988 to 4.6 personSv at present. This reduction was attributed to: a decrease in the number of radioactive products (gas mantles), lower estimates of the number of radioactive products present in the Netherlands thanks to new information (camera lenses, smoke detectors containing Ra-226), replacement of radioactive by non-radioactive products (gas mantles, dental protheses), and a lowe...

  5. Ethical motivation of Dutch egg consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burrell, A.M.; Vrieze, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyses a representative sample of 356 Dutch egg consumers in order to measure the extent to which ethical principles concerning the welfare of hens in different rearing systems are translated into egg purchasing intentions, and the extent to which declared intentions are expressed in

  6. Consumer price sensitivity in Dutch health insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Dijk (Machiel); M. Pomp (Marc); R.C.H.M. Douven (Rudy); T. Laske-Aldershof (Trea); F.T. Schut (Erik); W. de Boer (Willem); A. Boo (Anne)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAim: To estimate the price sensitivity of consumer choice of health insurance firm. Method: Using paneldata of the flows of insured betweenpairs of Dutch sickness funds during the period 1993-2002, we estimate the sensitivity of these flows to differences in insurance premium. Results:

  7. Competition in the Dutch consumer credit market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the degree of competitiveness of the Dutch consumer credit market. We use the well-known Bresnahan-Lau method that estimates a structural model consisting of a demand relation and a supply relation, based on aggregate data. The level of competition is derived from the estimated

  8. Competition in the Dutch consumer credit market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toolsema-Veldman, Linda

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers the degree of competitiveness of the Dutch consumer credit market. We use the well-known I Bresnahan-Lau method that estimates it structural model consisting of a demand relation and a supply relation, based on aggregate data. The level of compelition is derived from the

  9. Stakeholder involvement in the development of national indicator sets: the example of the Dutch Consumer Quality Index.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delnoij, D.M.J.; Rademakers, J.; Groenewegen, P.

    2010-01-01

    Issue/problem: In health-care systems based on regulated competition, such as The Netherlands, consumers and health insurers need comparable information about the performance of healthcare providers in terms of effectiveness, safety and patient experiences. Without further coordination, health-care

  10. Creating sport consumers in Dutch sport policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roest, Jan Willem; Vermeulen, Jeroen; van Bottenburg, Maarten; LS Sportontw. & Managing Social Issues; UU LEG Research USG Public Matters Managing Social Issues; LS Management van Cultuur en Zingeving

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the tension between the association logic and the market logic that appears in the domain of voluntary sport clubs (VSCs). We present a qualitative analysis of sport policy texts of fifteen Dutch national sport organizations (NSOs) and the national umbrella organization to

  11. Consumers' quality perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Anne C.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Bredahl, Lone

    2001-01-01

    Much has been said about food quality, and the disussion is endless because the notion of quality changes along with the changes in our life and society. This underlines the complexity of the issue of food quality. Today food production in Europe is highly concentrated, and the global market is r...... framework, the Total Food Quality Model, which we believe is useful in understanding consumers perception of food quality. We will then illustrate applications of the model using two recent examples of the quality perception of meat and fish.......Much has been said about food quality, and the disussion is endless because the notion of quality changes along with the changes in our life and society. This underlines the complexity of the issue of food quality. Today food production in Europe is highly concentrated, and the global market...... of quality and the ability of producers to react to changes in consumers' perception of quality may form the basis of market success or failure, independent of whether you are a local or multinational producer. This chapter deals with the analysis of consumers' quality perception. We will introduce a general...

  12. Consumer evaluation of complaint handling in the Dutch health insurance market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Sonja; de Jong, Judith D; Curfs, Emile C

    2011-11-15

    How companies deal with complaints is a particularly challenging aspect in managing the quality of their service. In this study we test the direct and relative effects of service quality dimensions on consumer complaint satisfaction evaluations and trust in a company in the Dutch health insurance market. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Survey data of 150 members of a Dutch insurance panel who lodged a complaint at their healthcare insurer within the past 12 months were surveyed. The data were collected using a questionnaire containing validated multi-item measures. These measures assess the service quality dimensions consisting of functional quality and technical quality and consumer complaint satisfaction evaluations consisting of complaint satisfaction and overall satisfaction with the company after complaint handling. Respondents' trust in a company after complaint handling was also measured. Using factor analysis, reliability and validity of the measures were assessed. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between these variables. Overall, results confirm the hypothesized direct and relative effects between the service quality dimensions and consumer complaint satisfaction evaluations and trust in the company. No support was found for the effect of technical quality on overall satisfaction with the company. This outcome might be driven by the context of our study; namely, consumers get in touch with a company to resolve a specific problem and therefore might focus more on complaint satisfaction and less on overall satisfaction with the company. Overall, the model we present is valid in the context of the Dutch health insurance market. Management is able to increase consumers' complaint satisfaction, overall satisfaction with the company, and trust in the company by improving elements of functional and technical quality. Furthermore, we show that functional and technical quality do not influence consumer satisfaction evaluations and

  13. Vulnerable Consumers in the Deregulated Dutch Health System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booltink, L.; Genugten, M.L. van; Lako, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Public service deregulation is favoured for motivating providers to offer consumers better price-quality services. Consequently, consumers are enabled to make informed choices and choose for the best service provider. However, recent publications reveal that consumers are not capable of exercising

  14. Choosing a health plan: are Dutch consumers loyal to their health insurer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    In 2006, a number of far-reaching reforms have been implemented in the Dutch health insurance system. Giving Dutch consumers the freedom to change health plans every year increases consumer mobility. The idea is that especially consumers who are dissatisfied with their insurer will decide to switch

  15. Quality systems in Dutch health care institutions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casparie, A.F.; Sluijs, E.M.; Wagner, C.; Bakker, D.H. de

    1997-01-01

    The implementation of quality systems in Dutch health care was supervised by a national committee during 1990-1995. To monitor the progress of implementation a large survey was conducted in the beginning of 1995. The survey enclosed all subsectors in health care. A postal questionnaire-derived

  16. Consumer evaluation of complaint handling in the Dutch health insurance market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendel Sonja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How companies deal with complaints is a particularly challenging aspect in managing the quality of their service. In this study we test the direct and relative effects of service quality dimensions on consumer complaint satisfaction evaluations and trust in a company in the Dutch health insurance market. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was used. Survey data of 150 members of a Dutch insurance panel who lodged a complaint at their healthcare insurer within the past 12 months were surveyed. The data were collected using a questionnaire containing validated multi-item measures. These measures assess the service quality dimensions consisting of functional quality and technical quality and consumer complaint satisfaction evaluations consisting of complaint satisfaction and overall satisfaction with the company after complaint handling. Respondents' trust in a company after complaint handling was also measured. Using factor analysis, reliability and validity of the measures were assessed. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between these variables. Results Overall, results confirm the hypothesized direct and relative effects between the service quality dimensions and consumer complaint satisfaction evaluations and trust in the company. No support was found for the effect of technical quality on overall satisfaction with the company. This outcome might be driven by the context of our study; namely, consumers get in touch with a company to resolve a specific problem and therefore might focus more on complaint satisfaction and less on overall satisfaction with the company. Conclusions Overall, the model we present is valid in the context of the Dutch health insurance market. Management is able to increase consumers' complaint satisfaction, overall satisfaction with the company, and trust in the company by improving elements of functional and technical quality. Furthermore, we show that functional and

  17. Consumer evaluation of complaint handling in the Dutch health insurance market

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background How companies deal with complaints is a particularly challenging aspect in managing the quality of their service. In this study we test the direct and relative effects of service quality dimensions on consumer complaint satisfaction evaluations and trust in a company in the Dutch health insurance market. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was used. Survey data of 150 members of a Dutch insurance panel who lodged a complaint at their healthcare insurer within the past 12 months were surveyed. The data were collected using a questionnaire containing validated multi-item measures. These measures assess the service quality dimensions consisting of functional quality and technical quality and consumer complaint satisfaction evaluations consisting of complaint satisfaction and overall satisfaction with the company after complaint handling. Respondents' trust in a company after complaint handling was also measured. Using factor analysis, reliability and validity of the measures were assessed. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between these variables. Results Overall, results confirm the hypothesized direct and relative effects between the service quality dimensions and consumer complaint satisfaction evaluations and trust in the company. No support was found for the effect of technical quality on overall satisfaction with the company. This outcome might be driven by the context of our study; namely, consumers get in touch with a company to resolve a specific problem and therefore might focus more on complaint satisfaction and less on overall satisfaction with the company. Conclusions Overall, the model we present is valid in the context of the Dutch health insurance market. Management is able to increase consumers' complaint satisfaction, overall satisfaction with the company, and trust in the company by improving elements of functional and technical quality. Furthermore, we show that functional and technical quality do not

  18. Food quality and the consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper

    1993-01-01

    Executive Summary: 1. Consumers and professionals in the food sector will differ in the way they view food quality. Professionals have knowledge and resources to establish quality based on objective criteria. Consumers lack both, and they are typically concerned with many different products...... resources, of means of transportation, of time, of knowledge. Consumers' shopping behaviour is therefore an imperfect indicator of the quality consumers want, insufficient way of communicating consumer wishes to the food sector. 3. The fact that the food producer may be separated from the consumer...... certain attributes of food products or materials which may contradict consumer intentions. Economic pressure to reduce costs may lead to deteriorating quality. 5. While the information supplied by the market may be enough to give feed back on products launched based on the trial-and-error method...

  19. Consumer perception of bread quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellynck, Xavier; Kühne, Bianka; Van Bockstaele, Filip; Van de Walle, Davy; Dewettinck, Koen

    2009-08-01

    Bread contains a wide range of important nutritional components which provide a positive effect on human health. However, the consumption of bread is declining during the last decades. This is due to factors such as changing eating patterns and an increasing choice of substitutes like breakfast cereals and fast foods. The aim of this study is to investigate consumer's quality perception of bread towards sensory, health and nutrition attributes. Four consumer segments are identified based on these attributes. The different consumer segments comprise consumers being positive to all three quality aspects of bread ("enthusiastic") as wells as consumers perceiving bread strongly as "tasteless", "non-nutritious" or "unhealthy". Moreover, factors are identified which influence the consumers' quality perception of bread. The results of our study may help health professionals and policy makers to systematically inform consumers about the positive effects of bread based on its components. Furthermore, firms can use the results to build up tailor-made marketing strategies.

  20. Consumer demand and quality assurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Wognum, Nel; Trienekens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Consumers differ in their demands, and this mau have implications for the type of supply chain governance that is most suitable for serving them. We present a segmentation of pork consumers in the EU based on their food-related lifestyles and demand for different pork products. We then present...... an inventory of pork chain governance and quality management systems, also resulting from a pan-European study, and attempt to match types of chains to consumer segments, arguing that the type of quality demanded by the consumers has implications especially for the quality management system governing the chain......, and that these implications are different for fresh meat and processed meat. The paper closes with a call for more collaboration between chain researchers and consumer researchers....

  1. A Dutch Nationwide Bariatric Quality Registry: DATO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelemeijer, Youri Q M; Liem, Ronald S L; Nienhuijs, Simon W

    2017-12-22

    In the Netherlands, the number of bariatric procedures increased exponentially in the 90s. To ensure and improve the quality of bariatric surgery, the nationwide Dutch Audit for Treatment of Obesity (DATO) was established in 2014. The audit was coordinated by the Dutch Institute for Clinical Auditing (DICA). This article provides a review of the aforementioned process in establishing a nationwide registry in the Netherlands. In collaboration with the DATO's scientific committee and other stakeholders, an annual list of several external quality indicators was formulated. This list consists of volume, process, and outcome indicators. In addition to the annual external indicators, the database permits individual hospitals to analyze their own data. The dashboard provides several standardized reports and detailed quality indicators, which are updated on a weekly base. Since the start, all 18 Dutch bariatric centers participated in the nationwide audit. A total of 21,941 cases were registered between 2015 and 2016. By 2016, the required variables were registered in 94.3% of all cases. A severe complicated course was seen in 2.87%, and mortality in 0.05% in 2016. The first-year follow-up shows a > 20% TWL in 86.1% of the registered cases. The DATO has become rapidly a mature registry. The well-organized structure of the national audit institution DICA and governmental funding were essential. However, most important were the bariatric teams themselves. The authors believe reporting the results from the registry has already contributed to more knowledge and acceptance by other health care providers.

  2. Website quality indicators for consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kathleen M; Christensen, Helen

    2005-11-15

    The rating tool DISCERN was designed for use by consumers without content expertise to evaluate the quality of health information. There is some evidence that DISCERN may be a valid indicator of evidence-based website quality when applied by health professionals. However, it is not known if the tool is a valid measure of evidence-based quality when used by consumers. Since it is a lengthy instrument requiring training in its use, DISCERN may prove impractical for use by the typical consumer. It is therefore important to explore the validity of other simpler potential indicators of site quality such as Google PageRank. This study aimed to determine (1) whether the instrument DISCERN is a valid indicator of evidence-based Web content quality for consumers without specific mental health training, and (2) whether Google PageRank is an indicator of website content quality as measured by an evidence-based gold standard. This was a cross-sectional survey of depression websites using consumer and health professional raters. The main outcome measures were (1) site characteristics, (2) evidence-based quality of content as measured by evidence-based depression guidelines, (3) DISCERN scores, (4) Google PageRank, and (5) user satisfaction. There was a significant association between evidence-based quality ratings and average DISCERN ratings both for consumers (r = 0.62, P = .001) and health professionals (r = 0.80, P PageRank (r = 0.59, P = .002). However, the correlation between DISCERN scores and user satisfaction was higher than the correlation between Google PageRank and user satisfaction. DISCERN has potential as an indicator of content quality when used either by experts or by consumers. Google PageRank shows some promise as an automatic indicator of quality.

  3. Food-related lifestyle and health attitudes of Dutch vegetarians, non-vegetarian consumers of meat substitutes, and meat consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, A.C.; Luning, P.A.; Stafleu, A.; Graaf, C. de

    2004-01-01

    The aim was to investigate socio-demographic characteristics, and attitudes to food and health of vegetarians, non-vegetarian consumers of meat substitutes, and meat consumers in the Netherlands. The sample used for this study (participants ≥18 years) was taken from the Dutch National Food

  4. Food-related lifestyle and health attitudes of Dutch vegetarians, non-vegetarian consumers of meat substitutes, and meat consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, A.C.; Luning, P.A.; Stafleu, A.; Graaf, de C.

    2004-01-01

    The aim was to investigate socio-demographic characteristics, and attitudes to food and health of vegetarians, non-vegetarian consumers of meat substitutes, and meat consumers in The Netherlands. The sample used for this study (participants > or =18 years) was taken from the Dutch National Food

  5. Consumer behaviour towards vegetables: a study on domestic processing of broccoli and carrots by Dutch households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongoni, R; Verkerk, R; Dekker, M; Steenbekkers, L P A

    2015-06-01

    Preferences for sensory properties (e.g. taste and texture) are assumed to control cooking behaviour with respect to vegetables. Conditions such as the cooking method, amount of water used and the time-temperature profile determine the nutritional quality (e.g. vitamins and phytochemicals) of cooked vegetables. Information on domestic processing and any underlying motives can be used to inform consumers about cooking vegetables that are equally liked and are nutrient-rich. Two online self-reporting questionnaires were used to identify domestic processing conditions of broccoli and carrots by Dutch households. Questions on various aspects of domestic processing and consumer motives were included. Descriptive data analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were performed for both vegetables, separately, to group consumers with similar motives and behaviour towards vegetables. Approximately 70% of consumers boiled vegetables, 8-9% steamed vegetables, 10-15% stir fried raw vegetables and 8-10% stir fried boiled vegetables. Mainly texture was used as a way to decide the 'doneness' of the vegetables. For both vegetables, three clusters of consumers were identified: texture-orientated, health-orientated, or taste-orientated. The texture-orientated consumers are identified as the most prevalent (56-59%) group in the present study. Statistically significant associations are found between domestic processing conditions and clusters, whereas no such association are found between demographic details and clusters. A wide variation in domestic processing of broccoli and carrots is found in the present study. Mainly sensory properties (i.e. texture and taste) determined the domestic processing conditions. The findings of the present study can be used to optimise cooking to yield vegetables that meet consumer's specific sensory preference and are higher in nutrients, and as well as to communicate with target consumer groups. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  6. Non-legislative means of consumer protection: The Dutch perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hondius, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    This report approaches the new spheres of self-regulation, soft law and deregulation in the Netherlands from both a factual and historical point of view. Using the Dutch Advertising Code as an example, the article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of self-regulation, thereby illustrating

  7. Consumer perception of bread quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to evaluate consumers’ perception of bread quality in Slovakia. Bread belongs to essential foodstuffs and we all have it served on our table every day.Cereal products keep their importance in people’s nutrition mainly because of their preventive effects on health. They saturate about 40 % of the daily energy need of an average European, who in ave­ra­ge acquires from cereals about 30 % of proteins, vitamin B1, niatin and phosphorus, around 1/6 of fats (out of it 19 % of linol acid, almost 60 % of saccharides, Ľ iron and about 13 % of vitamin B2 and calcium. If we add some cereal fiber which is an effective prevention factor of cardiovascular di­sea­ses, metabolic and oncological diseases of colon and anus, we will get a complex picture about positive effects of cereals in our nutrition. If we were to mark any foodstuff which has been accompanying the mankind in the course of history, it could be bread. Its consummation is spread in the whole world. Only the ones who once suffered from its lack have recognized its value.It results from our research that consumers in Slovakia prefer consuming the wheat-ray bread (38.5 %. The respondents – consumers prefer at choosing buying bread in terms of the external, subjective factors, the overall shape when choosing bread (45 % and dark color of crust (25 %. They showed minimum interest in white color crust and packaging size. In terms of the internal, objective factors, the most important factor for respondents, for women as well as for men was freshness of foodstuffs followed by fiber (with a big difference (12.82 %.Almost 60 % of bread consumers claimed that they did not have any possibility to obtain the required information regarding bread in supermarkets and hypermarkets because it is not possible to find professional staff providing them with the required information. A different situation is in the classical, small, self-service, and

  8. Consumer driven supply chains: the case of Dutch organic tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anastasiadis, F.; Dam, van Y.K.

    2014-01-01

    Supply chain management refers to the efficient integration of various processes involved in turning resources into consumer products. Effectiveness of the supply chain is more easily understood in terms of Value Chain Management, and the integration of processes that turn resources into consumer

  9. Similar taste-nutrient relationships in commonly consumed Dutch and Malaysian foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Pey Sze; van Langeveld, Astrid W B; Pol, Korrie; Siebelink, Els; de Graaf, Cees; Yan, See Wan; Mars, Monica

    2018-06-01

    Three recent studies showed that taste intensity signals nutrient content. However, current data reflects only the food patterns in Western societies. No study has yet been performed in Asian culture. The Malaysian cuisine represents a mixture of Malay, Chinese and Indian foods. This study aimed to investigate the associations between taste intensity and nutrient content in commonly consumed Dutch (NL) and Malaysian (MY) foods. Perceived intensities of sweetness, sourness, bitterness, umami, saltiness and fat sensation were assessed for 469 Dutch and 423 Malaysian commonly consumed foods representing about 83% and 88% of an individual's average daily energy intake in each respective country. We used a trained Dutch (n = 15) and Malaysian panel (n = 20) with quantitative sensory Spectrum™ 100-point rating scales and reference solutions, R1 (13-point), R2 (33-point) and R3 (67-point). Dutch and Malaysian foods had relatively low mean sourness and bitterness (Dutch foods (8-point). Positive associations were found between sweetness and mono- and disaccharides (R 2  = 0.67 (NL), 0.38 (MY)), between umami and protein (R 2  = 0.29 (NL), 0.26 (MY)), between saltiness and sodium (R 2  = 0.48 (NL), 0.27 (MY)), and between fat sensation and fat content (R 2  = 0.56 (NL), 0.17(MY)) in Dutch and Malaysian foods (all, p < 0.001). The associations between taste intensity and nutrient content are not different between different countries, except for fat sensation-fat content. The two dimensional basic taste-nutrient space, representing the variance and associations between tastes and nutrients, is similar between Dutch and Malaysian commonly consumed foods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Piloting a generic cancer consumer quality index in six European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A.; Roeling, M.P.; Heerink, J.; Sixma, H.; Presti, P.; Lombardo, C.; Harten, W. van

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accounting for patients’ perspective has become increasingly important. Based on the Consumer Quality Index method (founded on Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) a questionnaire was recently developed for Dutch cancer patients. As a next step, this study aimed to

  11. Piloting a generic cancer consumer quality index in six European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke; Roeling, Mark Patrick; Heerink, Jana; Sixma, Herman; Presti, Pietro; Lombardo, Claudio; van Harten, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accounting for patients' perspective has become increasingly important. Based on the Consumer Quality Index method (founded on Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) a questionnaire was recently developed for Dutch cancer patients. As a next step, this study aimed to

  12. Translation and validation of the Dutch version of the Effective Consumer Scale (EC-17)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Klooster, Peter M.; Taal, Erik; Tjin-Kam-Jet-Siemons, Liseth; Oostveen, J.C.M.; Oostveen, Johanna C.M.; Harmsen, Etelka J.; Tugwell, Peter S.; Rader, Tamara; Lyddiatt, Anne; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Effective Consumer Scale (EC-17) measures the skills of musculoskeletal patients in managing their own healthcare. The objectives of this study were to translate the EC-17 into Dutch and to further evaluate its psychometric properties. METHODS: The EC-17 was translated and cognitively

  13. Associations between company at dinner and daily diet quality in Dutch men and women from the NQplus study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, van L.; Geelen, M.M.E.E.; Hooft Van Huysduynen, E.J.C.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Veer, van 't P.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Consuming the evening meal in the company of others has been associated with overall diet quality. Nevertheless, studies on the association between type of company at dinner and diet quality in adults are scarce.
    SUBJECTS/METHODS: Dutch men (n = 895) and women (n = 845)

  14. Innovative quality management practices in the Dutch construction industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossink, B.A.G.

    2002-01-01

    Quality management practices do support the management of strategically important innoυation processes. This conclusion is based on empirical research in the Dutch construction industry. A large-scale innovative construction project is intensively studied during a three-year period. The quality

  15. Quality and satisfaction of thermal comfort in Dutch offices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, Henk Willem; Mobach, Mark P.; Balslev Nielsen, S.; Jensen, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This field study analyses the quality of the actual thermal comfort and indoor air quality in Dutch office buildings. A linear regression analysis was used to determine how much these variables and demographic variables influenced the perceived thermal comfort of office workers. Approach:

  16. Environmental quality in the Dutch province North-Holland 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosma, S.

    2002-08-01

    An overview is given of the environmental quality in the Dutch province Noord-Holland in the year 2002. Special attention is paid to safety, energy, agriculture and the airport Schiphol. The report is available in electronic form in parts, discussing Social developments, the quality of Air, Soil, and Water, Public Health, Nature, Safety, Energy, Agriculture, and Schiphol (airport) [nl

  17. Consumer perception of meat quality and safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsø, Karen; Grunert, Klaus G.; Bredahl, Lone

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of meat quality and safety is not an easy task for consumers. In this article, the Total Food Quality Model will be introduced as a framework for understanding how consumers perceive meat quality, and results from a Danish study dealing with consumer perception and experience of beef...... will be presented. Consumers form expectations about the eating quality of meat at the point of purchase, based on prior experience and information available in the shopping environment, while the eating quality is experienced in the home during and after meal preparation. Results show that consumers have...... difficulty in evaluating meat quality, resulting in uncertainty and dissatisfaction, and reveal a need for educating consumers about evaluating eating quality during shopping....

  18. Food-related lifestyle and health attitudes of Dutch vegetarians, non-vegetarian consumers of meat substitutes, and meat consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, Annet C; Luning, Pieternel A; Stafleu, Annette; de Graaf, Cees

    2004-06-01

    The aim was to investigate socio-demographic characteristics, and attitudes to food and health of vegetarians, non-vegetarian consumers of meat substitutes, and meat consumers in The Netherlands. The sample used for this study (participants > or =18 years) was taken from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey, 1997/1998. Vegetarians (n = 63) and consumers of meat substitutes (n = 39) had similar socio-demographic profiles: higher education levels, higher social economic status, smaller households, and more urbanised residential areas, compared to meat consumers (n = 4313). Attitudes to food were assessed by the food-related lifestyle instrument. We found that vegetarians (n = 32) had more positive attitudes towards importance of product information, speciality shops, health, novelty, ecological products, social event, and social relationships than meat consumers (n = 1638). The health consciousness scale, which was used to assess attitudes to health, supported earlier findings that vegetarians are more occupied by health. Food-related lifestyle and health attitudes of meat substitute consumers (n = 17) were predominantly in-between those from vegetarians and meat consumers. The outcome of this study suggests that in strategies to promote meat substitutes for non-vegetarian consumers, the focus should not only be on health and ecological aspects of foods.

  19. Service quality in consumer's credit branch

    OpenAIRE

    Blechová, Věra

    2008-01-01

    The diploma thesis deals with consumer's credit grants of banking and non-banking corporations and comparison of their service quality. The first part of research is dedicated to consumer's knowledge of credit issues. Second describes main difficulties of consumer's credit grants of banking and non-banking corporations and proves their use of unfair manners. The final part of thesis propose improvements, which will boost consumer's protection on field of consumer's credits.

  20. A market without tension. Market monitor, development of the Dutch small-scale consumer market for electricity and natural gas. January 2006 - June 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Liere, M.; Postema, B.; Te Velthuis, M.

    2006-11-01

    The energy market is liberalized since 1 July 2004. The Dutch government has liberalized the energy market to stimulate competition between suppliers and to offer the consumer freedom of choice of their own energy supplier. As energy suppliers must put continuous effort in acquiring and preserving customers, the customers may expect better quality and service at relatively lower prices. In a well-functioning energy market the customer will benefit from the liberalisation. DTe (Dutch Office of Energy Regulation) is the regulator of the energy sector and supervises the energy companies adhering to the rules of the energy markets, protecting customers where needed. Moreover, DTe also monitors the developments in the energy markets. In the market monitor private consumers market DTe reports on the operating of the consumer market, also called the private consumers market. [mk] [nl

  1. On transparency and trust. Market monitor, development of the Dutch small-scale consumer market for electricity and natural gas. July 2006 - June 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Liere, M.; Postema, B.; Te Velthuis, M.

    2007-10-01

    The energy market is liberalized since 1 July 2004. The Dutch government has liberalized the energy market to stimulate competition between suppliers and to offer the consumer freedom of choice of their own energy supplier. As energy suppliers must put continuous effort in acquiring and preserving customers, the customers may expect better quality and service at relatively lower prices. In a well-functioning energy market the customer will benefit from the liberalisation. DTe (Dutch Office of Energy Regulation) is the regulator of the energy sector and supervises the energy companies adhering to the rules of the energy markets, protecting customers where needed. Moreover, DTe also monitors the developments in the energy markets. In the market monitor private consumers market DTe reports on the operating of the consumer market, also called the private consumers market. [mk] [nl

  2. Governmental point of view on the Dutch National Cooperative Programme for Air Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    Dutch air quality does not yet meet the European standards throughout the Netherlands. The Dutch National Cooperative Programme for Air Quality (NSL) is expected to realize improvements. This publication explains the Dutch plans for meeting the European standards for air quality in the coming years. It addresses the following subjects: the Dutch National Cooperative Programme for Air Quality (NSL); legal framework; historical development; current situation and autonomous development for PM10 and NO2; spatial projects; measure packages and financial means. [mk] [nl

  3. Consumers' food choice and quality perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsø, Karen; Fjord, Thomas Ahle; Grunert, Klaus G.

    to which the topic has been researched at MAPP. As a general framework for analysing consumer quality perception and choice of food products, MAPP has developed the Total Food Quality Model, which will be used to structure this overview. We start by presenting the Total Food Quality Model and an overview......There is a long tradition of research into consumers' food choice and quality perception. In the last few years, however, these topics have received even more attention due to the intense debate about such issues as ethical considerations in relation to food production and quality, food scandals...... and the resulting food scares among consumers, genetic modification of foods, and animal welfare (or, rather, non-welfare), which has made questions regarding food quality and consumers' supposedly rational or irrational food choices even more urgent. Increased interest in health and quality stands in stark...

  4. Consuming America : A Data-Driven Analysis of the United States as a Reference Culture in Dutch Public Discourse on Consumer Goods, 1890-1990

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, M.J.H.F.

    2017-01-01

    Consuming America offers a data-driven, longitudinal analysis of the historical dynamics that have underpinned a long-term, layered cultural-historical process: the emergence of the United States as a dominant reference culture in Dutch public discourse on consumer goods between 1890 and 1990. The

  5. Sound insulation quality in Dutch dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerretsen, E.

    2003-01-01

    In the context of the EAA symposium on Building acoustic quality, an overview is given of the current situation in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands. The topics considered are the current common building techniques, the legal minimum requirements, the desirable acoustic quality and the building

  6. CARCASS AND MEAT QUALITY CONSUMER AND RESEARCH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meat Research is concerned with measuring meat quality and quantity and investigating how production methods, processing, storage and transport, display for sale and methods of cooking influence quality. Quality must be defined as the requirements of the consumer, the market place and the processor. Take for example ...

  7. Organic pork: Consumer quality perception: Final report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Nielsen, Niels Asger; Bredahl, Lone

    2004-01-01

    Previous research indicates that consumers expect substantially higher eating quality in pork that was produced in organic and free-range systems. Sensory studies and comparisons of objective quality suggest that these expectations are not completely realistic: in most cases, the performance...... of organic and free-range pork is equal to, and in some times even lower than that of conventional pork. However, consumers' expectations may be so strong that they may override differences in experienced quality. An experiment was conducted with 185 consumers to separate these effects and estimate...... were (a) organic pork, (b) free-range pork, (c) conventional pork, and (d) no information. Samples were prepared at a sensory lab following a standardised protocol. Serial positions of samples were counterbalanced across subjects. Before tasting each sample, consumers rated expected quality. After...

  8. Consumer Perception of Bread Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Gellynck, Xavier; Kuhne, Bianka; Van Bockstaele, F.; Van de Walle, D.; Dewettinck, K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate consumers’ perception of bread quality in Slovakia. Bread belongs to essential foodstuffs and we all have it served on our table every day.Cereal products keep their importance in people’s nutrition mainly because of their preventive effects on health. They saturate about 40 % of the daily energy need of an average European, who in ave­ra­ge acquires from cereals about 30 % of proteins, vitamin B1, niatin and phosphorus, around 1/6 of fats (out of it 19 % ...

  9. Lesjes van de Nederlanders: Little Lessons from the Dutch to Promote Educational Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Barbara H.

    1996-01-01

    A study explored quality assessment and accountability in Dutch university education. The national system of quality assurance and various models used successfully to implement it are described, and the range of apparent effects and influences of quality assurance on Dutch higher education are examined. Comparison is made with American higher…

  10. Consuming America : A Data-Driven Analysis of the United States as a Reference Culture in Dutch Public Discourse on Consumer Goods, 1890-1990

    OpenAIRE

    Wevers, M.J.H.F.

    2017-01-01

    Consuming America offers a data-driven, longitudinal analysis of the historical dynamics that have underpinned a long-term, layered cultural-historical process: the emergence of the United States as a dominant reference culture in Dutch public discourse on consumer goods between 1890 and 1990. The ideas, values, and practices associated with the United States in public discourse remained relatively steady over time, which might explain the country’s longevity as a reference culture and its po...

  11. B2B or B2C? : Dutch approaches towards marketing and the consumer, 1945-1968, with particular attention to Heineken's Brewery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyterman, K.E.

    2017-01-01

    In this article I analyse how Dutch companies approached the consumers and marketing during the years 1945-1968, a period during which the Netherlands became a ‘consumer society’. In the first part I examine articles in the Dutch journal Tijdschrift voor Efficiëntie en Documentatie (ted, or Journal

  12. The Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire measuring patients' experience with quality of care after a total hip or knee arthroplasty.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Gelsema, T.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Dutch Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire (CQI Hip Knee) was used to assess patients' experiences with and evaluations of quality of care after a total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of this study is to evaluate the construct validity and internal

  13. Limits to growth in organic sales : price elasticity of consumer demand for organic food in Dutch supermarkets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunte, F.H.J.; Galen, van M.A.; Kuiper, W.E.; Bakker, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    This report determines how sensitive consumer demand for organic products is to changes in the prices of organic products. The report is based on the analysis of scanner data for supermarkets in ten Dutch communities. In the framework of the analysis, an experiment has been performed in which the

  14. Parenting Practices and Quality of Life in Dutch and Portuguese Adolescents : A Cross-Cultural Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes, Cristina; Bodden, Denise; Lemos, Ida; Lorence, Barbara; Jimenez, Lucia; Bodden, Denise

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in Quality of life (QoL) and parenting practices, as well as the impact of parenting practices on QoL in Dutch and Portuguese adolescents. A total of 168 Portuguese (44.64% girls, 55.36% boys) and 155 Dutch adolescents (55.68% girls, 44.32% boys) aged

  15. Parenting Practices and Quality of Life in Dutch and Portuguese Adolescents: A Cross-Cultural Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes, C.; Bodden, D.H.M.; Lemos, I.; Lorence, B.; Jimenez, L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in Quality of life (QoL) and parenting practices, as well as the impact of parenting practices on QoL in Dutch and Portuguese adolescents. A total of 168 Portuguese (44.64% girls, 55.36% boys) and 155 Dutch adolescents (55.68% girls, 44.32% boys) aged

  16. Quality assurance, information tracking, and consumer labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caswell, Julie A. . E-mail caswell@resecon.umass.edu

    2006-01-01

    Reducing marine-based public health risk requires strict control of several attributes of seafood products, often including location and conditions of catch or aquaculture, processing, and handling throughout the supply chain. Buyers likely will also be interested in other attributes of these products such as eco-friendliness or taste. Development of markets for improved safety, as well as for other quality attributes, requires an effective certification and tracking of these attributes as well as their communication to buyers. Several challenges must be met if labeling, particularly consumer labeling, is to support the development of markets for improved seafood safety

  17. Quality indicators for the hospital transfusion chain : A national survey conducted in 100 dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlker-Jansen, Pauline Y.; Janssen, M. P.; van Tilborgh-de Jong, A. J W; Schipperus, M. R.; Wiersum-Osselton, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2011 Dutch Blood Transfusion Guideline for hospitals incorporates seven internal quality indicators for evaluation of the hospital transfusion chain. The indicators aim to measure guideline compliance as shown by the instatement of a hospital transfusion committee and transfusion

  18. Quality and use of consumer information provided with home test kits: room for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grispen, Janaica E J; Ickenroth, Martine H P; de Vries, Nanne K; van der Weijden, Trudy; Ronda, Gaby

    2014-10-01

    Diagnostic self-tests (tests on body materials that are initiated by consumers with the aim of diagnosing a disorder or risk factor) are becoming increasingly available. Although the pros and cons of self-testing are currently not clear, it is an existing phenomenon that is likely to gain further popularity. To examine consumers' use of and needs for information about self-testing, and to assess the quality of consumer information provided with home test kits, as perceived by consumers and as assessed using a checklist of quality criteria. A cross-sectional Internet survey among 305 self-testers assessed their use of and needs for information and their perception of the quality of consumer information provided with self-test kits. A meta-search engine was used to identify Dutch and English consumer information for home diagnostic tests available online at the time of the study. The quality of this consumer information was evaluated using a checklist of quality criteria. The consumers' information needs were in line with the most frequently used information, and the information was perceived as being of moderate to good quality. The information was mostly in agreement with clinical practice guidelines, although information on reliability and follow-up behaviour was limited. Approximately half of the instruction leaflets did not include information on the target group of the test. Although generally of moderate to good quality, some aspects of the information provided were in many cases insufficient. European legislation concerning self-tests and accompanying information needs to be adapted and adhered to more closely. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Market monitor of the Dutch small-scale consumer market for electricity and natural gas. July 2006 - June 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Liere, M.; Postema, B.; Te Velthuis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Every year the Dutch Competition Authority compiles a monitor report with the purpose of monitoring developments in the small consumers' markets for electricity and gas, identifying potential bottlenecks and providing recommendations for the enhancement of more efficient market power. This monitor report maps the market structure and market results of the small consumers' market. First, an overview is provided of a number of events that were in the news in the last year. Next chapters 1,2 and 3 (concentration, transparency and access thresholds) provide a description of the market structure in the small consumers' market. Chapters 4 up to and including 8 (prices, product range, services, switching and market confidence) address the market results [nl

  20. Relating consumer perceptions of pork quality to physical product characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone; Grunert, Klaus G.; Fertin, Claus

    , or vice versa. 7. Since consumers obviously lack competence in judging the quality of meat when choosing among different kinds of meat in a purchase situation, marketers of pork are faced with a serious problem. One way of dealing with this problem, in cases where quality experience exceeds expectations......1. Consumers form expectations about the quality of meat at the point of purchase based on the quality cues that are available to them in the shop. These expectations can either be confirmed or disconfirmed during consumption, depending on how cap the consumers actually are of predicting...... the quality that they will perceived when preparing and consuming the meat. 2. The study uses the Total Food Quality Model as a frame of reference to investigate how consumers' quality expectations and quality experience with regard to pork are formed, how they are interrelated, and how both of them...

  1. Lesjes van de Nederlanders: Little Lessons from the Dutch to Promote Educational Quality. AIR 1995 Annual Forum Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Barbara H.

    This study explored quality assessment and accountability in Dutch university education using a case study approach. The Dutch national system of quality assurance is described, and developments since the mid-1980s are traced. The university case studies illustrate models which are being employed to implement the quality assurance system including…

  2. Food quality and safety: Consumer perception and demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.

    2005-01-01

    choice and consumer demand, addressing questions of price perception and the validity of willingness-to-pay measurements. It is concluded that food quality and safety are central issues in today's food economics, though many research questions remain to be addressed. Udgivelsesdato: SEP 1......Research on consumer quality perception is reviewed using the Total Food Quality Model as a structuring device. The relationship between food safety and quality is addressed, and is discussed in the context of research on consumer risk perception. Quality and safety perception is linked to food...

  3. Food quality and safety: Consumer perception and demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.

    2005-01-01

    Research on consumer quality perception is reviewed using the Total Food Quality Model as a structuring device. The relationship between food safety and quality is addressed, and is discussed in the context of research on consumer risk perception. Quality and safety perception is linked to food...... choice and consumer demand, addressing questions of price perception and the validity of willingness-to-pay measurements. It is concluded that food quality and safety are central issues in today's food economics, though many research questions remain to be addressed. Udgivelsesdato: SEP 1...

  4. Psychometric test of the Team Climate Inventory-short version investigated in Dutch quality improvement teams

    OpenAIRE

    Nieboer Anna P; Strating Mathilde MH

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although some studies have used the Team Climate Inventory within teams working in health care settings, none of these included quality improvement teams. The aim of our study is to investigate the psychometric properties of the 14-item version of the Team Climate Inventory in healthcare quality improvement teams participating in a Dutch quality collaborative. Methods This study included quality improvement teams participating in the Care for Better improvement program for...

  5. An exploration of socio-economic and food characteristics of high trans fatty acid consumers in the Dutch and UK national surveys after voluntary product reformulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippin, H L; Hutchinson, J; Ocke, M; Jewell, J; Breda, J J; Cade, J E

    2017-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) increase the risk of mortality and chronic diseases. TFA intakes have fallen since reformulation, but may still be high in certain, vulnerable, groups. This paper investigates socio-economic and food consumption characteristics of high TFA consumers after voluntary reformulation in the Netherlands and UK. Post-reformulation data of adults aged 19-64 was analysed in two national surveys: the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS) collected 2007-2010 using 2*24hr recalls (N = 1933) and the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) years 3&4 collected 2010/11 and 2011/12 using 4-day food diaries (N = 848). The socio-economic and food consumption characteristics of the top 10% and remaining 90% TFA consumers were compared. Means of continuous data were compared using t-tests and categorical data means using chi-squared tests. Multivariate logistic regression models indicated which socio-demographic variables were associated with high TFA consumption. In the Dutch analyses, women and those born outside the Netherlands were more likely to be top 10% TFA consumers than men and Dutch-born. In the UK unadjusted analyses there was no significant trend in socio-economic characteristics between high and lower TFA consumers, but there were regional differences in the multivariate logistic regression analyses. In the Netherlands, high TFA consumers were more likely to be consumers of cakes, buns & pastries; cream; and fried potato than the remaining 90%. Whereas in the UK, high TFA consumers were more likely to be consumers of lamb; cheese; and dairy desserts and lower crisps and savoury snack consumers. Some socio-demographic differences between high and lower TFA consumers were evident post-reformulation. High TFA consumers in the Dutch 2007-10 survey appeared more likely to obtain TFA from artificial sources than those in the UK survey. Further analyses using more up-to-date food composition databases may be needed.

  6. Predictive model for the Dutch post-consumer plastic packaging recycling system and implications for the circular economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Marieke T; Thoden van Velzen, Eggo U; Augustinus, Antje; Soethoudt, Han; De Meester, Steven; Ragaert, Kim

    2018-01-01

    The Dutch post-consumer plastic packaging recycling network has been described in detail (both on the level of packaging types and of materials) from the household potential to the polymeric composition of the recycled milled goods. The compositional analyses of 173 different samples of post-consumer plastic packaging from different locations in the network were combined to indicatively describe the complete network with material flow analysis, data reconciliation techniques and process technological parameters. The derived potential of post-consumer plastic packages in the Netherlands in 2014 amounted to 341 Gg net (or 20.2 kg net.cap -1 .a -1 ). The complete recycling network produced 75.2 Gg milled goods, 28.1 Gg side products and 16.7 Gg process waste. Hence the net recycling chain yield for post-consumer plastic packages equalled 30%. The end-of-life fates for 35 different plastic packaging types were resolved. Additionally, the polymeric compositions of the milled goods and the recovered masses were derived with this model. These compositions were compared with experimentally determined polymeric compositions of recycled milled goods, which confirmed that the model predicts these compositions reasonably well. Also the modelled recovered masses corresponded reasonably well with those measured experimentally. The model clarified the origin of polymeric contaminants in recycled plastics, either sorting faults or packaging components, which gives directions for future improvement measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Obsessive compulsive disorder and the internet. An evaluation of Dutch-language websites and quality indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdobbel, Y; Pieters, G; Joos, S

    2006-01-01

    The Internet is an important source of information about health matters. The quality of the information about Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) has not been investigated. Possible indicators of quality are the DISCERN rating tool, Google PageRank and cooperation from health care professionals. To investigate the quality of the information given on Dutch-language websites relating to OCD and to determine whether the quality of the contents is correlated with site characteristics, scores on DISCERN and Google PageRank. We selected 27 Dutch-language websites via Google and Ixquick and investigated the correlation between the quality of the contents measured by 4 parameters and the presence of incorrect information, site characteristics, the DISCERN score and Google PageRank. The quality of the information was generally poor. The only investigated site characteristic that was found to be associated with basic criteria relating to symptoms and diagnosis was the size of the site. The DISCERN score was significantly correlated with the quality of the information. The occurrence of incorrect information was independent of the quality of the content, site characteristics, Google PageRank and DISCERN scores. The quality of Dutch-language websites on the subject of OCD is inadequate. Site characteristics and Google PageRank are not good predictors of the quality of information. The DISCERN rating tool is a potentially valuable indicator of content quality with regard to treatment options.

  8. Between marketing and financial support : Dutch municipal policy instruments to improve the quality of private housing stock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambach, M.; Meijer, F.; Visscher, H.

    2011-01-01

    Dutch municipalities are faced with an ageing private housing stock, of which parts show a diversity of quality backlogs, including their energy quality. Dutch municipalities are in the process of developing a combination of communicative and economic policy instruments to seduce private homeowners

  9. The Social Construction of the Dutch Air Quality Clash : How Road Expansions Bit the Dust Against Particulate Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.T. Arnoldussen (Tobias)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractFrom a small policy issue in the 1990s, air quality became a hotly debated public problem in Dutch law and politics in 2004. During the political and legal clash over air quality in the years 2004 - 2010, Dutch infrastructure development and road expansion grinded to all but a halt

  10. Improving the quality of pork and pork products for the consumer : development of innovative, integrated, and sustainable food production chains of high quality pork products matching consumer demands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimann, B.; Christensen, M.; Rosendal Rasmussen, S.; Bonneau, M.; Grunert, K.G.; Arnau, J.; Trienekens, J.H.; Oksbjerg, N.; Greef, de K.H.; Petersen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Improving the quality of pork and pork products for the consumer: development of innovative, integrated, and sustainable food production chains of high quality pork products matching consumer demands.

  11. The Importance of Relationships with Parents and Best Friends for Adolescents' Romantic Relationship Quality: Differences between Indigenous and Ethnic Dutch Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Thao; Overbeek, Geertjan; de Greef, Marieke; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how the quality of relationships with parents and friends were related to intimacy, commitment, and passion in adolescents' romantic relationships for indigenous Dutch and ethnic Dutch adolescents. Self-report survey data were used from 444 (88.9%) indigenous Dutch and 55 (11.1%) ethnic Dutch adolescents between 12 and 18 years…

  12. Cell Phone Roulette and "Consumer Interactive" Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Under current policies, cell phone consumers face a lower probability of finding the best carrier for their usage patterns than winning at roulette. Corroborating survey data consistently show significant dissatisfaction among cell phone users, network performance is a major issue, and customer "churn" is high. This problem may be traced to a new…

  13. Consumer Motives as Supply Chain Drivers: The Case of Dutch Organic Tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anastasiadis, F.; Dam, van Y.K.

    2012-01-01

    The consumer is one of the most important stakeholders in the supply chain (SC), mainly due to the fact that all the other participants involved in the SC should work in fulfilling a customer request. Moreover, the information generated at the consumer level is critical with respect to the design of

  14. Sensationalism in front page photographs : Content analysis of Dutch popular and quality newspapers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Gabi; Pleijter, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    GABI SCHAAP & ALEXANDER PLEIJTER Sensationalism in front page photographs: Content analysis of Dutch popular and quality newspapers Sensation in the news has been a longtime cause for social and scientific debate. Sensational news is thought to substitute 'serious' information needed for serious

  15. Planning of and System for the Dutch National Cooperative Programme for Air Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    In order to deal with the emission problem of particulates and NO2 in the Netherlands in the coming five year a new program to improve the air quality in the Netherlands will be set up and implemented (NSL, abbreviated in Dutch) [nl

  16. Quality of weight-loss counseling by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of weight-loss counseling provided by Dutch primary care practice nurses (PNs) to overweight and obese patients including both PNs' compliance with the Five A's Model for behavioral counseling in primary care, and the use of different communication styles.

  17. Application of the Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 to benthos in Dutch transitional and coastal waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loon, W.M.G.M.; Boon, A.R.; Gittenberger, A.; Walvoort, D.J.J.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Verschoor, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 (BEQI2) is the Dutch multi-metric index (MMI) for assessing the status and trend of benthic invertebrates in transitional and coastal waters for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). It contains the same indicators, i.e. species richness, Shannon index and AMBI,

  18. Application of the Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 to benthos in Dutch transitional and coastal waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van W.M.G.M.; Boon, A.R.; Gittenberger, A.; Walvoort, D.J.J.; Lavaleye, M.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Verschoor, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 (BEQI2) is the Dutch multi-metric index (MMI) for assessing the status and trend of benthic invertebrates in transitional and coastal waters for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). It contains the same indicators, i.e. species richness, Shannon index and

  19. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector : Empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Ramsis; Krabbe, Yvonne; Mikkers, Misja

    There is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be characterized as a

  20. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector: empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, R.R.; Krabbe-Alkemade, Y.J.F.M.; Mikkers, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThere is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be

  1. Quality of Austrian and Dutch Falls-Prevention Information: A Comparative Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoberer, Daniela; Mijnarends, Donja M.; Fliedner, Monica; Halfens, Ruud J. G.; Lohrmann, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the quality of written patient information material available in Austrian and Dutch hospitals and nursing homes pertaining to falls prevention. Design: Comparative descriptive study design Setting: Hospitals and nursing homes in Austria and the Netherlands. Method: Written patient…

  2. Quality of life assessment in facial palsy: validation of the Dutch Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiss, Ingrid J; Beurskens, Carien H G; Stalmeier, Peep F M; Ingels, Koen J A O; Marres, Henri A M

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed at validating an existing health-related quality of life questionnaire for patients with facial palsy for implementation in the Dutch language and culture. The Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale was translated into the Dutch language using a forward-backward translation method. A pilot test with the translated questionnaire was performed in 10 patients with facial palsy and 10 normal subjects. Finally, cross-cultural adaption was accomplished at our outpatient clinic for facial palsy. Analyses for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity and responsiveness were performed. Ninety-three patients completed the Dutch Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale, the Dutch Facial Disability Index, and the Dutch Short Form (36) Health Survey. Cronbach's α, representing internal consistency, was 0.800. Test-retest reliability was shown by an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.737. Correlations with the House-Brackmann score, Sunnybrook score, Facial Disability Index physical function, and social/well-being function were -0.292, 0.570, 0.713, and 0.575, respectively. The SF-36 domains correlate best with the FaCE social function domain, with the strongest correlation between the both social function domains (r = 0.576). The FaCE score did statistically significantly increase in 35 patients receiving botulinum toxin type A (P = 0.042, Student t test). The domains 'facial comfort' and 'social function' improved statistically significantly as well (P = 0.022 and P = 0.046, respectively, Student t-test). The Dutch Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale shows good psychometric values and can be implemented in the management of Dutch-speaking patients with facial palsy in the Netherlands. Translation of the instrument into other languages may lead to widespread use, making evaluation and comparison possible among different providers.

  3. Comparing quality of nutritional care in Dutch and German nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nie-Visser, Noémi C; Meijers, Judith M M; Schols, Jos M G A; Lohrmann, Christa; Bartholomeyczik, Sabine; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates possible differences in malnutrition prevalence rates in Dutch and German nursing homes. It seeks to provide insight into the screening, prevention and treatment of malnutrition and the indicators for nutritional care policy. For decades, malnutrition has been an important problem in health care settings worldwide. A considerable percentage of frail older people suffer from malnutrition. In European nursing homes, the reported prevalence rates range widely (2% to 85%). This is a multicentre, cross-sectional prevalence study of malnutrition in Dutch and German nursing homes using standardised methodology, with the participation of respectively 5848 and 4923 residents (65+ years). Patient characteristics differed significantly between the two countries. Dutch residents were more often male, younger, more care-dependent and significantly more at risk of malnutrition (31·7%). However, overall malnutrition prevalence rates did not differ significantly (Netherlands 26·8% and Germany 26·5%). All German residents were screened at admission, whereas only 73·1% of the Dutch residents were. As part of screening, nutritional screening tools were used in 38·0% of Dutch and 42·1% of the German residents. A dietician was consulted for 36·7% Dutch and 9·3% German malnourished residents. The proportion of malnourished receiving nutritional intervention was larger in Germany than in the Netherlands. Structural indicators for nutritional policy were fulfilled more often in the Netherlands care at institutional level whereas in Germany they were fulfilled more often at ward level. In this study, German residents had a somewhat better nutritional status than Dutch residents and more is done to enhance nutritional status in German nursing homes. The differences would be somewhat larger if both populations were more comparable. Comparing malnutrition prevalence rates, prevention and interventions in health care institutions and countries gives insight into

  4. Consumer Evaluations of Food Risk Management Quality in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Houghton, J.R.; Krystallis, A.; Pfenning, U.; Rowe, G.; Dijk, van H.; Lans, van der I.A.; Frewer, L.J.

    2007-01-01

    In developing and implementing appropriate food risk management strategies, it is important to understand how consumers evaluate the quality of food risk management practices. The aim of this study is to model the underlying psychological factors influencing consumer evaluations of food risk

  5. Can traceability improve consumers' confidence in food quality and safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijk, van W.; Cornelisse-Vermaat, J.R.; Frewer, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This paper investigates whether the implementation of traceability systems in line with the European General Food Law as well as food labelling laws related to allergens can impact on consumer confidence in food quality and safety. It aims to give insight into consumer demands regarding

  6. the quality factor in consumers' preference of textile fabrics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DGS-FUTO

    2018-06-01

    Jun 1, 2018 ... Whereas one consumer may derive much utility from a particular brand of .... companies adopt a value model and provide higher quality for less money. ..... wrappers, the difference in consumers‟ rating is slight or marginal; ...

  7. Quality; Research of method; Consumer of satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altamir da Silva Souza

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The customers' evaluation is an indicator used by the concerned organizations with the quality services. Starting from a research of evaluation of the quality services of a company of public cleaning, accomplished the denizen close to, we decided to elaborate this paper to present the found results and a critical analysis of the methodology used by the company. The research outcomes indicate a positive evaluation of the services. However, some changes are suggested on the adopted procedures.

  8. Illness perceptions and quality of life in Japanese and Dutch patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, Ad A.; Yamaoka, Kazue; Snoei, Lucia; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Uchida, Yuka; van der Kloot, Willem A.; Tabei, Toshio; Kleijn, Wim Chr; Koster, Mariska; Wijnands, Giel; Kaajan, Hans; Tran, Tommy; Inoue, Kenichi; van Klink, Rik; van Dooren-Coppens, Eva; Dik, Hans; Hayashi, Fumi; Willems, Luuk; Annema-Schmidt, Dunja; Annema, Jouke; van der Maat, Bas; van Kralingen, Klaas; Meirink, Corrie; Ogoshi, Kyoji; Aaronson, Neil; Nortier, Hans; Rabe, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    This study examined quality of life (QOL) and illness perceptions in Dutch and Japanese patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, thereby extending the body of knowledge on cultural differences and psychosocial aspects of this illness. 24 Dutch and 22 Japanese patients with non-small-cell lung

  9. [Mission statements of Dutch mental health institutions; the quality of communication with stakeholders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, D G H; de Kruif, J

    2013-01-01

    As a result of recent reforms in Dutch health care, healthcare providers are having to operate more and more like commercial organisations and adopt some of the rules prevailing in the profit sector. Because missions statements can be an efficient means of useful communication with internal and external stakeholders they can make a useful contribution to the way healthcare institutions are managed and to their status and reputation. Research shows that in view of this the quality of the messages conveyed via mission statements is important. To ascertain which stakeholders are mentioned in the mission statements of Dutch mental healthcare providers and to quantify the quality of the messages conveyed to them via mission statements. We examined the mission statements of 34 mental health providers to find out which stakeholders were included. The message conveyed to the stakeholders was quantified by means of a validated measuring instrument devised specifically for this purpose. Patients were referred to in all mission statements and the quality of the messages conveyed was of higher quality than the messages conveyed to other stakeholders. Other important stakeholders on whom the institutions depended were referred to much less frequently and the quality of sections of text referring to them was definitely inferior. Mission statements frequently serve as management tool for Dutch mental healthcare providers. The potential benefits that these statements could bestow on the providers are not being fully exploited because the standard of communication with several internal and external stakeholders is of poor quality.

  10. Cross-Cultural Comparison between German, French and Dutch Consumer Preferences for Meat Substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Weinrich

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is becoming an increasingly important consideration for consumers when purchasing food. As meat production has a significant impact on the environment, meat substitutes are becoming more and more popular in Europe. However, consumers who regularly buy meat substitutes are still the exception. Although there are some initial results indicating why this proportion is still low, most research has been concentrated in the Netherlands. This paper aims to compare reasons for consuming or not consuming meat substitutes in three European countries—Germany, the Netherlands and France. As very little is known about the underlying reasons, an explorative approach was chosen. Focus group discussions were carried out in all three countries, six altogether. The results show that all participants can enumerate meat substitutes. The main reason for not consuming meat substitutes is the taste of meat. Further, eating habits seem to be fixed and convenience might also be an impediment to reducing meat consumption in favour of meat substitutes, as is confusion regarding healthy eating.

  11. Measuring Dutch consumers' willingness-to-pay for ethically-improved foods and supply chains through the performance of experimental auctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Ana I.A.

    for ethical benefits to be introduced in fish production, namely for those perceived to be associated with food safety. Nevertheless, these findings also point out that consumers' may not always value the ethical attributes they consider relevant in a consistent manner, especially if these seem to contradict......This paper presents the outcome of a pilot study on Dutch consumers' willingness-to-pay for fresh fish originating from production systems with different levels of ethical attributes, as estimated through the performance of experimental auctions. Fifteen Dutch citizens living in Noord......-Holland and being regular consumers of fresh fish were selected to participate in this study. Two experimental sessions were held in December 2003. Information regarding the subjects, their knowledge about fish production systems and the perceived relevance of different ethical attributes was collected prior...

  12. 78 FR 66655 - Consumer Information; Uniform Tire Quality Grading Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... information indicating the relative performance of passenger car tires in the areas of treadwear, traction... [Docket No. NHTSA-2013-0120] RIN 2127-AL49 Consumer Information; Uniform Tire Quality Grading Standards...). ACTION: Interim final rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Uniform Tire Quality Grading Standards...

  13. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  14. Quality assessment in small businesses: the case of Dutch culinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Offering information to potential customers about these two factors are very important in customer decision-making. This research will stimulate discourse on quality in the relatively underexplored sector of culinary restaurant small businesses. Keywords:culinary restaurants, quality assessment, service management, small ...

  15. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard RJ; Crockett, Alan J; Poels, Patrick JP; van Dijke, Jacob J; Akkermans, Reinier P; Vlek, Hans F; Pieters, Willem R

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. Aim To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. Design of study Analysis of routine spirometry test records. Setting Fifteen general practices which had a working agreement with a local hospital pulmonary function laboratory for spirometry assessment regarding test quality and interpretation. Method Spirometry tests were judged by a pulmonary function technician and a chest physician. Proportions of test adequacy were analysed using markers for manoeuvre acceptability and test reproducibility derived from the 1994 American Thoracic Society spirometry guideline. Associations between quality markers and age, sex, and severity of obstruction were examined using logistic regression. Results Practices performed a mean of four (standard deviation = 2) spirometry tests per week; 1271 tests from 1091 adult patients were analysed; 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.6 to 97.2) of all tests consisted of ≥3 blows. With 60.6% of tests, forced expiratory time was the marker with the lowest acceptability rate. An overall 38.8% (95% CI = 36.0 to 41.6) of the tests met the acceptability as well as reproducibility criteria. Age, sex, and severity of obstruction were associated with test quality markers. Conclusion The quality of routine spirometry tests was better than in previous reports from primary care research settings, but there is still substantial room for improvement. Sufficient duration of forced expiratory time is the quality marker with the highest rate of inadequacy. Primary care professionals should be aware of patient characteristics that may diminish the quality of their spirometry tests. Further research is needed to establish to what extent spirometry tests that are inadequate, according to stringent international expert criteria

  16. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector: empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, R R; Krabbe-Alkemade, Y J F M; Mikkers, M C

    2018-01-01

    There is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be characterized as a system involving managed competition and mandatory healthcare insurance. Information about the quality of care provided by hospitals has been publicly available since 2008. In this paper, we evaluate the relationship between quality scores for three diagnosis groups and the market power indicators of hospitals. We estimate the impact of competition on quality in an environment of liberalized pricing. For this research, we used unique price and production data relating to three diagnosis groups (cataract, adenoid and tonsils, bladder tumor) produced by Dutch hospitals in the period 2008-2011. We also used the quality indicators relating to these diagnosis groups. We reveal a negative relationship between market share and quality score for two of the three diagnosis groups studied, meaning that hospitals in competitive markets have better quality scores than those in concentrated markets. We therefore conclude that more competition is associated with higher quality scores.

  17. Swiss and Dutch "consumer-driven health care": ideal model or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okma, Kieke G H; Crivelli, Luca

    2013-02-01

    This article addresses three topics. First, it reports on the international interest in the health care reforms of Switzerland and The Netherlands in the 1990s and early 2000s that operate under the label "managed competition" or "consumer-driven health care." Second, the article reviews the behavior assumptions that make plausible the case for the model of "managed competition." Third, it analyze the actual reform experience of Switzerland and Holland to assess to what extent they confirm the validity of those assumptions. The article concludes that there is a triple gap in understanding of those topics: a gap between the theoretical model of managed competition and the reforms as implemented in both Switzerland and The Netherlands; second, a gap between the expectations of policy-makers and the results of the reforms, and third, a gap between reform outcomes and the observations of external commentators that have embraced the reforms as the ultimate success of "consumer-driven health care." The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of this "triple gap". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Consumer perception of eatable oils quality in SR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to highlight the perception of the quality of edible oils and preferences of the Slovak consumers for the oil purchase as well as the factors that can affect the purchase of oil, respectively the consumer decision-making. In order to obtain primary data was used the method of questionnaire investigation. In the questionnaire research there were 664 respondents from all over Slovakia involved. The results of marketing research showed the different approaches to assessing the quality by Slovak consumers. Nearly 54% of respondents connect the food quality with health certificate, high-quality ingredients and freshness. Brand quality SK is known by 58% of respondents. The raw material from which is oil produced, oil clarity, thermal stability and color are features that respondents prefer when purchasing the edible oils. To know the content of essential fatty acids was interesting only for 7.44% of the respondents. Slovak consumers prefer sunflower, olive and rapeseed oil.

  19. Consumer behaviour towards vegetables: a study on domestic processing of broccoli and carrots by Dutch households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongoni, R.; Verkerk, R.; Dekker, M.; Steenbekkers, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preferences for sensory properties (e.g. taste and texture) are assumed to control cooking behaviour with respect to vegetables. Conditions such as the cooking method, amount of water used and the time-temperature profile determine the nutritional quality (e.g. vitamins and

  20. Consumer-perceived quality in 'traditional' food chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krystallis, Athanasios; Chryssochoidis, George; Scholderer, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    pressing yet? The present paper seeks to answer this question based on a survey conducted in the Athens area, involving a sample of 268 participants responsible for food purchasing decisions. The survey mainly aims to develop an integrated model of factors that affect consumer-perceived meat quality...... as efforts to decrease risk of the purchasing decision. Moreover, consumers with such behaviour seem to relate domestic country of origin of meat mostly with perceptions of general safety. Finally, a small, but promising trend with substantial marketing implications of frequent purchases of chicken and pork...... and to develop the profile of different consumer segments in relation to these perceptions. The substantial findings of the survey include the fact that, despite their enormous per capita consumption, the majority of consumers are not particularly involved in the meat-purchasing process. Rather they attach...

  1. Health related quality of life in Dutch young adults: psychometric properties of the PedsQL generic core scales young adult version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limperg, Perrine F.; Haverman, Lotte; van Oers, Hedy A.; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Grootenhuis, Martha A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide Dutch norm data and to assess internal consistency and construct validity for the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Young Adult Generic Core Scales (PedsQL_YA) in Dutch young adults aged 18-30 years. A sample of 649 young adults from the general Dutch

  2. Modelling consumers' preferences for Novel Protein Foods and environmental quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, X.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2005-01-01

    We develop a theoretical Applied General Equilibrium (AGE) model that explicitly includes the environmental input in production functions and the consumers' preferences for environmental quality in utility functions. We empirically apply the model to provide some insights into the effects of the

  3. Marketing the move to a poor neighborhood, researching consumer oriented housing development strategies in a Dutch urban renewal project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, E.

    2011-01-01

    Urban renewal in Dutch deprived neighbourhoods often consists of demolishing cheaper rental dwellings to build more expensive dwellings for sale. This fits the planning consensus that poor neighbourhoods should become socioeconomically mixed areas, which has become central to Dutch urban renewal

  4. Exploring consumer understanding and preferences for pharmacy quality information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyanbola, Olayinka O.; Mort, Jane R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe consumer understanding of pharmacy quality measures and consumer preferences for pharmacy quality information. Methods: Semi-structured focus group design was combined with survey methods. Adults who filled prescription medications for self-reported chronic illnesses at community pharmacies discussed their understanding of Pharmacy Quality Alliance approved quality measures. Questions examined preference of pharmacy quality information rating systems (e.g. stars versus percentages) and desired data display/formats. During the focus group, participants completed a survey examining their understanding of each pharmacy quality measure. All focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis and descriptive statistics. Results: Thirty-four individuals participated (mean age= 62.85; SD=16.05). Participants were unfamiliar with quality measures information and their level of understanding differed for each quality measure. Surveys indicated 94.1% understood “Drug-Drug Interactions” and “Helping Patients Get Needed Medications” better than other measures (e.g., 76.5% understood “Suboptimal Treatment of Hypertension in Patients with Diabetes”). Qualitative analysis indicated participants preferred an overall pharmacy rating for quick access and use. However, participants also wanted quality measures information displayed by health conditions. Participants favored comparison of their pharmacy to city data instead of state data. Most participants liked star ratings better than percentages, letter grades, or numerical ratings. Conclusions: Individuals who have a chronic illness and regularly use community pharmacies are interested in pharmacy quality measures. However, specific quality measures were not understood by some participants. Participants had specific preferences for the display of pharmacy quality information which will be helpful in the design of appropriate quality report systems. PMID

  5. Exploring consumer understanding and preferences for pharmacy quality information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyanbola OO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe consumer understanding of pharmacy quality measures and consumer preferences for pharmacy quality information. Methods: Semi-structured focus group design was combined with survey methods. Adults who filled prescription medications for self-reported chronic illnesses at community pharmacies discussed their understanding of Pharmacy Quality Alliance approved quality measures. Questions examined preference of pharmacy quality information rating systems (e.g. stars versus percentages and desired data display/formats. During the focus group, participants completed a survey examining their understanding of each pharmacy quality measure. All focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis and descriptive statistics. Results: Thirty-four individuals participated (mean age= 62.85; SD=16.05. Participants were unfamiliar with quality measures information and their level of understanding differed for each quality measure. Surveys indicated 94.1% understood “Drug-Drug Interactions” and “Helping Patients Get Needed Medications” better than other measures (e.g., 76.5% understood “Suboptimal Treatment of Hypertension in Patients with Diabetes”. Qualitative analysis indicated participants preferred an overall pharmacy rating for quick access and use. However, participants also wanted quality measures information displayed by health conditions. Participants favored comparison of their pharmacy to city data instead of state data. Most participants liked star ratings better than percentages, letter grades, or numerical ratings. Conclusions: Individuals who have a chronic illness and regularly use community pharmacies are interested in pharmacy quality measures. However, specific quality measures were not understood by some participants. Participants had specific preferences for the display of pharmacy quality information which will be helpful in the design of appropriate quality

  6. Quality and availability of organic foods by Slovak consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Fikselová

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing consumer demand for organic products caused that the organic food market has expanded in all continents of the world. Organic foods represent a specific segment of the food market. Currently land area farmed organically in Slovakia represents 9% of the total agricultural land. In this work we identified organic foods purchase by Slovak consumers, the availability, reasons of purchase and quality assortment of organic foods at the Slovak market. Questionnaire survey involved 271 respondents. The Hierarchical multiple factor analysis was used for the segregation and classification of consumers into representative groups. The group of respondents was based on algorithms divided into three groups. In the first group of respondents, prevalent are responses that assortment is not sufficient and no answer, in the second group think that organic food assortment is not sufficient, and in the third group of respondents also dominates opinion that is not sufficient. At the question of organic food quality in all three groups is prevalent opinion that it is rather high, in the first group nearly the third of respondents considered the quality of organic foods as rather low, in the second group of respondents is rate: „rather low“ response and „rather high“ almost equal. In the third group of respondents strongly dominated response that the quality of organic food is rather high. Regarding the availability of organic products at the Slovak market, 16% of respondents considered it to be sufficient, 54% of consumers considered assortment as not enough available for all. We also analyzed the reasons of buying organic food. 42% of respondents reported that the main reason for buying organic food is a concern for the environment and landscape, 33% of respondents state it is a pleasure and the opportunity to try something unusual, 11% reported confidence in the quality of organic food and 7% their health care. Environmental education in

  7. First Dutch Consensus of Pain Quality Indicators for Pain Treatment Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meij, Nelleke; van Grotel, Marloes; Patijn, Jacob; van der Weijden, Trudy; van Kleef, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    There is a general consensus about the need to define and improve the quality of pain treatment facilities. Although guidelines and recommendations to improve the quality of pain practice management have been launched, provision of appropriate pain treatment is inconsistent and the quality of facilities varies widely. The aim of the study was to develop an expert-agreed list of quality indicators applicable to pain treatment facilities. The list was also intended to be used as the basis for a set of criteria for registered status of pain treatment facilities. The University Pain Center Maastricht at the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management of the Maastricht University Medical Center conducted a 3-round Delphi study in collaboration with the Board of the Pain Section of the Dutch Society of Anesthesiologists (NVA). Twenty-five quality indicators were selected as relevant to 2 types of pain treatment facilities, pain clinics and pain centers. The final expert-agreed list consisted of 22 quality indicators covering 7 quality domains: supervision, availability of care, staffing level and patient load, quality policy, multidisciplinarity, regionalization, and research and education. This set of quality indicators may facilitate organizational evaluation and improve insight into service quality from the perspectives of patients, pain specialists, and other healthcare professionals. Recommendations for improvements to the current set of quality indicators are made. In 2014 the process of registering pain treatment facilities in the Netherlands started; facilities can register as a pain clinic or pain center. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  8. Cost effectiveness of the Dutch incentive for the environmental quality of power generation (MEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melgerd, R.

    2005-01-01

    This article relates to research on the cost effectiveness of the MEP scheme ('Milieukwaliteit Elektriciteitsproductie' or Environmental Quality of Electricity Generation), carried out as a graduation project at the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands. MEP subsidies are intended to promote investment in sustainable energy sources in the Netherlands by offering investors more certainty and a simpler structure than previous energy subsidies. The MEP also helps prevent Dutch taxpayers' money 'leaking' abroad to purchase sustainable electricity produced cheaper elsewhere. This makes the MEP measurably more effective than its predecessors. The scheme is moreover a step towards the effective deployment of state funds for the reduction of CO2 emission [nl

  9. B2B or B2C? Dutch approaches towards marketing and the consumer, 1945-1968, with particular attention to Heineken’s Brewery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keetie Sluyterman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article I analyse how Dutch companies approached the consumers and marketing during the years 1945-1968, a period during which the Netherlands became a ‘consumer society’. In the first part I examine articles in the Dutch journal Tijdschrift voor Efficiëntie en Documentatie (ted, or Journal for Efficiency and Documentation, a leading management periodical. This examination shows how new ideas from abroad were taken up and disseminated in the Netherlands by both management consultants and large producers of consumer goods such as Unilever and Philips. In the second part of this article I take a closer look at Heineken’s brewery, drawing on the company’s archives. Heineken closely followed the ideas afloat at the time and put them intopractice. However, the Heineken case also shows the different approaches necessary for business-to-consumer (b2c and business-to-business (b2b relationships. The second type of relationships deserves more attention from historians.

  10. Deciding on PSA-screening - Quality of current consumer information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfage, Ida J; van den Bergh, Roderick C N; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2010-11-01

    Given that screening for prostate cancer has the potential to reduce prostate cancer mortality at the expense of considerable overdiagnosis and overtreatment, the availability of core consumer information - correct, balanced and supportive of autonomous decision-making - is a must. We assessed the quality of consumer information available through the Internet per November 2009 and its possible contribution to informed decision-making by potential screenees. Consumer information on PSA-screening was sought through the Internet in November 2009. Materials had to be targeted at potential consumers, offered by not-for-profit organisations, released in 2005 or after, in English or Dutch. Per material 2 of the authors assessed independently from each other whether standardised pre-defined topics were addressed, whether the content was correct and which approach was taken towards the decision-making process about uptake. Twenty-three materials were included, of which 11 were released (shortly) after the results of 2 large randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effectiveness of screening for prostate cancer had been published in March 2009. That a PSA-test result can be abnormal because of non-cancerous conditions (false positive) and that it may miss prostate cancer (false negative) was not addressed in 2/23 and 8/23 materials, respectively. The risk of overdiagnosis and overtreatment was not mentioned in 6 out of 23. PSA-screening was presented as a usual thing to do in some materials, whereas other materials emphasised the voluntary nature of PSA-screening ('it is your decision'). The content of 19/23 materials was considered sufficiently informative according to the pre-defined criteria, 12/23 materials were considered supportive of informed decision-making by men. Most materials of not-for-profit organizations supplied adequate information about PSA-screening, whilst the degree of persuasion towards uptake reflected variations in opinions on men

  11. Media advertising effects on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daenya T; Shroff, Bhavna; Lindauer, Steven J; Fowler, Chad E; Tufekci, Eser

    2008-09-01

    To determine the effect of media advertising on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality. A survey instrument was designed to evaluate factors influencing consumer selection of an orthodontist and consumer perception of different forms of media advertising (radio, television, newspaper, magazine, direct mail, and billboard) by orthodontic practices. The surveys were distributed by eight orthodontic offices in and around the Richmond, Virginia area. The survey return rate was 97%. Respondents most often cited dentist and patient referrals as how they learned of the orthodontic practices they visited (50% to 57%). A caring attitude and good practitioner reputation were the top reasons influencing actual selection of an orthodontist (53% and 49%, respectively). Of respondents, 14% to 24% felt that advertising orthodontists would offer a lower quality of care than nonadvertising orthodontists. Newspaper, magazine, and direct mail advertisements were viewed more favorably than radio, television, and billboard advertisements. Chi-square analyses revealed few statistically significant differences in perception between different income and education groups. The majority of patients do not perceive advertising to reflect poorly on the quality of orthodontic care. However, patients with different income and education levels perceive media advertising differently.

  12. The implementation of a quality system in the Dutch GP specialty training: barriers and facilitators; a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, N.; Braspenning, J.C.; Roosmalen, S. van; Dijk, N. van; Visser, Machteld

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality assurance programs in medical education are introduced to gain insight into the quality of such programs and to trigger improvements. Although of utmost importance, research on the implementation of such programs is scarce. The Dutch General Practice (GP) specialty training

  13. The implementation of a quality system in the Dutch GP specialty training: barriers and facilitators; a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, Nienke; Braspenning, Jozé; van Roosmalen, Sanne; van Dijk, Nynke; Visser, Mechteld

    2017-01-01

    Quality assurance programs in medical education are introduced to gain insight into the quality of such programs and to trigger improvements. Although of utmost importance, research on the implementation of such programs is scarce. The Dutch General Practice (GP) specialty training institutes used

  14. Validity and Reliability of the Dutch Adaptation of the Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, Freke; Arends, Suzanne; McKenna, Stephen P; Houtman, Pieternella M; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Spoorenberg, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) questionnaire is a disease-specific instrument developed to measure quality of life (QoL) in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The aim of this study was to translate the measure into Dutch and to determine its psychometric

  15. The perception of quality mapping product and service quality to consumer perceptions

    CERN Document Server

    Kenyon, George N

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the concept of quality management from a new point of view, this book presents a holistic model of how consumers judge the quality of products. It links consumer perceptions of quality to the design and delivery of the final product, and presents models and methods for improving the quality of these products and services. It offers readers an improved understanding of how and why the design process must consider how the consumer will perceive a product or service. In order to facilitate the presentation and understanding of these concepts, illustrations and case examples are also provided throughout the book.   This book provides an invaluable resource for managers, designers, manufacturers, professional practitioners and academics interested in quality management. It also offers a useful supplementary text for marketing and quality management courses.

  16. Consumer Perception of the Quality of Lamb and Lamb Confit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Guillermo; Joy, Margalida; Panea, Begoña

    2018-05-22

    The patterns of food consumption in general and those of meat, in particular, are constantly changing. These changes are due not only to socioeconomic and cultural trends that affect the whole society but also to the specific lifestyles of consumer groups. Due to the importance of consumer lifestyle, the objectives of this study were (i) to identify the profiles of lamb meat consumers according to their orientation toward convenience, as defined by their eating and cooking habits; (ii) to characterize these profiles according to their socioeconomic characteristics and their preferences regarding the intrinsic and extrinsic quality signals of lamb meat; and (iii) to analyze the willingness to pay for lamb confit. In this study, four types of consumers have been differentiated according to their lifestyles related to lamb consumption. These groups, due to their characteristics, could be called "Gourmet", "Disinterested", "Conservative", and "Basic". The Gourmet group has characteristics that make it especially interesting to market a product such as lamb confit. However, this group is unaware of this product. Therefore, a possible strategy to expand the commercialization of light lamb and the confit product would be guided marketing to this niche market.

  17. Psychometric test of the Team Climate Inventory-short version investigated in Dutch quality improvement teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieboer Anna P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although some studies have used the Team Climate Inventory within teams working in health care settings, none of these included quality improvement teams. The aim of our study is to investigate the psychometric properties of the 14-item version of the Team Climate Inventory in healthcare quality improvement teams participating in a Dutch quality collaborative. Methods This study included quality improvement teams participating in the Care for Better improvement program for home care, care for the handicapped and the elderly in the Netherlands between 2006 and 2008. As part of a larger evaluation study 270 written questionnaires from team members were collected at baseline and 139 questionnaires at end measurement. Confirmatory factor analyses, reliability, Pearson correlations and paired samples t-tests were conducted to investigate construct validity, reliability, predictive validity and temporal stability. Results Confirmatory factor analyses revealed the expected four-factor structure and good fit indices. For the four subscales – vision, participative safety, task orientation and support for innovation – acceptable Cronbach's alpha coefficients and high inter-item correlations were found. The four subscales all proved significant predictors of perceived team effectiveness, with participatory safety being the best predictor. As expected the four subscales were found to be stable over time; i.e. without significant changes between baseline and end measurement. Conclusion The psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the TCI-14 are satisfactory. Together these results show that the TCI-14 is a useful instrument to assess to what extent aspects of team climate influence perceived team effectiveness of quality improvement teams.

  18. Psychometric test of the Team Climate Inventory-short version investigated in Dutch quality improvement teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2009-07-24

    Although some studies have used the Team Climate Inventory within teams working in health care settings, none of these included quality improvement teams. The aim of our study is to investigate the psychometric properties of the 14-item version of the Team Climate Inventory in healthcare quality improvement teams participating in a Dutch quality collaborative. This study included quality improvement teams participating in the Care for Better improvement program for home care, care for the handicapped and the elderly in the Netherlands between 2006 and 2008. As part of a larger evaluation study 270 written questionnaires from team members were collected at baseline and 139 questionnaires at end measurement. Confirmatory factor analyses, reliability, Pearson correlations and paired samples t-tests were conducted to investigate construct validity, reliability, predictive validity and temporal stability. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed the expected four-factor structure and good fit indices. For the four subscales--vision, participative safety, task orientation and support for innovation--acceptable Cronbach's alpha coefficients and high inter-item correlations were found. The four subscales all proved significant predictors of perceived team effectiveness, with participatory safety being the best predictor. As expected the four subscales were found to be stable over time; i.e. without significant changes between baseline and end measurement. The psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the TCI-14 are satisfactory. Together these results show that the TCI-14 is a useful instrument to assess to what extent aspects of team climate influence perceived team effectiveness of quality improvement teams.

  19. Assessment of the Dutch National Air Quality Plan 2004; Beoordeling van het Nationaal Luchtkwaliteitsplan 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, J.P.; Buringh, E.; Wieringa, K.

    2005-02-01

    The Dutch government expects that targets for the reduction of emission of particulates and nitrogen dioxide can not be reached in time. Therefore, the Netherlands is obliged to draft a plan of actions in order to realize those targets within the period that has been agreed upon in the context of the European Union air quality policy. The present plan of action has been assessed by the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (MNP) with regard to the feasibility of the boundary values and the preconditions for action plans as formulated by the European Committee. Also, the plan has been assessed for the prevention or limitation of health effects and the Dutch position with regard to particulates. [Dutch] Het luchtbeleid heeft als doelstelling dat op lange termijn de gezondheidsrisico's en de effecten op ecosystemen en biodiversiteit moeten dalen tot een verwaarloosbaar niveau. Daartoe zijn in Europees verband normen voor de luchtkwaliteit vastgesteld. Nederland verwacht dat met het vastgestelde beleid niet tijdig aan de grenswaarden voor fijn stof en stikstofdioxide zal worden voldaan. Hierdoor is Nederland verplicht om een actieplan op te stellen. De uitvoering ervan zal er toe moeten leiden dat Nederland alsnog de doelen binnen de gestelde termijn haalt. Het Milieu- en Natuurplanbureau (MNP) van het RIVM heeft het actieplan getoetst aan de haalbaarheid van grenswaarden en aan de voorwaarden die door de Europese Commissie voor actieplannen zijn opgesteld. Daarnaast is het plan beoordeeld in het perspectief van de doelstelling van de richtlijn: het voorkomen of verminderen van gezondheidseffecten. Tenslotte geeft de evaluatie aanknopingspunten voor het herijken van de Nederlandse positie in de fijnstofproblematiek.

  20. Consumer preferences for food product quality attributes from Swedish agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Fredrik; Frykblom, Peter; Lagerkvist, Carl Johan

    2005-06-01

    This paper employs a choice experiment to obtain consumer preferences and willingness to pay for food product quality attributes currently not available in Sweden. Data were obtained from a large mail survey and estimated with a random parameter logit model. We found evidence for intraproduct differences in consumer preferences for identical attributes, as well as interproduct discrepancies in ranking of attributes. Furthermore, we found evidence of a market failure relating to the potential use of genetically modified animal fodder. Finally, we found support for the idea that a cheap-talk script can alleviate problems of external validity of choice experiments. Our results are useful in forming product differentiation strategies within the food industry, as well as for the formation of food policy.

  1. Associations between multidimensional frailty and quality of life among Dutch older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbens, Robbert J J; van Assen, Marcel A L M

    2017-11-01

    To examine the associations between components of physical, psychological and social frailty with quality of life among older people. This cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of Dutch citizens. A total of 671 people aged 70 years or older completed a web-based questionnaire ('the Senioren Barometer'). This questionnaire contained the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) for measuring physical, psychological and social frailty, and the WHOQOL-OLD for measuring six quality of life facets (sensory abilities, autonomy, past, present and future activities, social participation, death and dying, intimacy) and quality of life total. Nine of fifteen individual frailty components had an effect on at least one facet of quality of life and quality of life total, after controlling for socio-demographic factors, multimorbidity and the other frailty components. Of these nine components five, two and two refer to physical, psychological and social frailty, respectively. Feeling down was the only frailty component associated with all quality of life facets and quality of life total. Both physical inactivity and lack of social relations were associated with four quality of life facets and quality of life total. This study showed that quality of life in older people is associated with physical, psychological and social frailty components, emphasizing the importance of a multidimensional assessment of frailty. Health care and welfare professionals should in particular pay attention to feeling down, physical inactivity and lack of social relations among older people, because their relation with quality of life seems to be the strongest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Consumers' quality perception of national branded, national store branded, and imported store branded beef

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banovic, Marija; Grunert, Klaus G.; Barreira, Maria Madalena

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the differences in the consumers' quality perception of national branded, national store branded, and imported store branded beef. Partial Least Squares analysis is used for modelling the quality perception process. Results show that consumers perceived national branded...

  3. Measuring relatives’ perspectives on the quality of palliative care: the Consumer Quality Index Palliative Care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, S.J.J.; Francke, A.L.; Sixma, H.J.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Deliens, L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: A Consumer Quality Index (CQ-index) is a questionnaire assessing the actual care experiences and how important the recipient finds certain care aspects, as well as the priorities for improving quality. A CQ-index Palliative Care (CQ-index PC) for bereaved relatives was developed to measure

  4. Diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups and outpatient clinics: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J E; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2014-08-07

    In recent years, most Dutch general practitioners started working under the umbrella of diabetes care groups, responsible for the organisation and coordination of diabetes care. The quality management of these new organisations receives growing interest, although its association with quality of diabetes care is yet unclear. The best way to measure quality management is unknown and it has not yet been studied at the level of outpatient clinics or care groups. We aimed to assess quality management of type 2 diabetes care in care groups and outpatient clinics. Quality management was measured with online questionnaires, containing six domains (see below). They were divided into 28 subdomains, with 59 (care groups) and 57 (outpatient clinics) questions respectively. The mean score of the domains reflects the overall score (0-100%) of an organisation. Two quality managers of all Dutch care groups and outpatient clinics were invited to fill out the questionnaire.Sixty care groups (response rate 61.9%) showed a mean score of 59.6% (CI 57.1-62.1%). The average score in 52 outpatient clinics (response rate 50.0%) was 61.9% (CI 57.5-66.8%).Mean scores on the six domains for care groups and outpatient clinics respectively were: 'organisation of care' 71.9% (CI 68.8-74.9%), 76.8% (CI 72.8-80.7%); 'multidisciplinary teamwork' 67.1% (CI 62.4-71.9%), 71.5% (CI 65.3-77.8%); 'patient centeredness' 46.7% (CI 42.6-50.7%), 62.5% (CI 57.7-67.2%); 'performance management' 63.3% (CI 61.2-65.3%), 50.9% (CI 44.2-57.5%); 'quality improvement policy' 52.6% (CI 49.2-56.1%), 50.9% (CI 44.6-57.3%); and 'management strategies' 56.0% (CI 51.4-60.7%), 59.0% (CI 52.8-65.2%). On subdomains, care groups scored highest on 'care program' (83.3%) and 'measured outcomes' (98.3%) and lowest on 'patient safety' (15.1%) and 'patient involvement' (17.7%). Outpatient clinics scored high on the presence of a 'diabetic foot team' (81.6%) and the support in 'self-management' (81.0%) and low on 'patient

  5. The "Consumer Report" version of Earth Science Data Quality description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    The generation, delivery and access of Earth Observation (EO) data quality information is a difficult problem because it is not uniquely defined, user dependent, difficult to be quantified, handled differently by different teams and perceived differently by data providers and data users. Initiatives such as the International Organization for Standards (ISO) 19115 and 19157 are important steps forward but difficult to implement, too complex and out of reach for the majority of data producers and users. This is because most users only want a quick and intelligible way to compare data sets from different providers to find the ones that best fit their interest. Therefore we need to simplify the problem by focusing on a few relevant quality parameters and develop a common framework to deliver them. This work is intended to tap into the data producers and user's knowledge and expertise on data quality for the development and adoption of a "Consumer Report" version of a "Data Quality Matrix". The goal is to find the most efficient and friendly approach to displays a selected number of quality parameters rated to each product and to target group of users.

  6. The governance of quality management in dutch health care: new developments and strategic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarse, J A M; Ruwaard, D; Spreeuwenberg, C

    2013-01-01

    This article gives a brief sketch of quality management in Dutch health care. Our focus is upon the governance of guideline development and quality measurement. Governance is conceptualized as the structure and process of steering of quality management. The governance structure of guideline development in the Netherlands can be conceptualized as a network without central coordination. Much depends upon the self-initiative of stakeholders. A similar picture can be found in quality measurement. Special attention is given to the development of care standards for chronic disease. Care standards have a broader scope than guidelines and take an explicit patient perspective. They not only contain evidence-based and up-to-date guidelines for the care pathway but also contain standards for self-management. Furthermore, they comprise a set of indicators for measuring the quality of care of the entire pathway covered by the standard. The final part of the article discusses the mission, tasks and strategic challenges of the newly established National Health Care Institute (Zorginstituut Nederland), which is scheduled to be operative in 2013.

  7. Measuring the quality of infection control in Dutch nursing homes using a standardized method; the Infection prevention RIsk Scan (IRIS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, I.; Nelson-Melching, J.; Hendriks, Y.; Mulders, A.; Verhoeff, S.; Kluytmans-Vandenbergh, M.; Kluytmans, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We developed a standardised method to assess the quality of infection control in Dutch Nursing Home (NH), based on a cross-sectional survey that visualises the results. The method was called the Infection control RIsk Infection Scan (IRIS). We tested the applicability of this new tool in

  8. Validation of a disease-specific quality-of-life questionnaire in a large sample of Dutch achalasia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankhuisen, R.; Heijkoop, R.; van Herwaarden, M. A.; de Vries, D. R.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Baron, A.; Samsom, M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: The aim of this study was to validate a translated version of an achalasia-specific quality-of-life questionnaire (achalasia-DSQoL) by examining its psychometric properties in a Dutch cohort of achalasia patients. The achalasia-DSQoL was administered to 171 treated achalasia patients

  9. Application of the Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 to benthos in Dutch transitional and coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, W. M. G. M.; Boon, A. R.; Gittenberger, A.; Walvoort, D. J. J.; Lavaleye, M.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Verschoor, A. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 (BEQI2) is the Dutch multi-metric index (MMI) for assessing the status and trend of benthic invertebrates in transitional and coastal waters for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). It contains the same indicators, i.e. species richness, Shannon index and AMBI, as in the multivariate m-AMBI. The latter MMI has been adopted by several European countries in the context of WFD implementation. In contrast to m-AMBI, the BEQI2 calculation procedure has been strongly simplified and consists of two steps, i.e. the separate indicator values are normalized using their long-term reference values resulting in three Ecological Quality Ratios (EQRs), which are subsequently averaged to give one BEQI2 value. Using this method only small numbers of samples need to be analysed by Dutch benthos laboratories annually, without the necessity to co-analyse a larger historical dataset. BEQI2 EQR values appeared to correlate quantitatively very well with m-AMBI EQR values. In addition, a data pooling procedure has been added to the BEQI2 tool which enables the pooling of small core samples (0.01-0.025 m2) into larger standardized data pools of 0.1 m2 in order to meet the data requirements of the AMBI indicator and to obtain comparable reference values. Furthermore, the BEQI2 tool automatically and efficiently converts species synonym names into standardized species names. The BEQI2 tool has been applied to all Dutch benthos data monitored by Rijkswaterstaat in the period of 1991-2010 in the transitional and coastal waters and salt lakes and these results are reported here for the first time. Reference values for species richness and Shannon index (99 percentile values) and AMBI reference values (1 percentile values) were estimated for all water body-ecotopes and are discussed. BEQI2 results for all these water bodies are discussed in view of natural and human pressures. The pressure sensitivity of the BEQI2 for sewage and dredging/dumping, via the

  10. Malnutrition in Dutch health care: prevalence, prevention, treatment, and quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Judith M M; Halfens, Ruud J G; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Dassen, Theo; Schols, Jos M G A

    2009-05-01

    In most health care organizations there is still insufficient awareness for recognizing and treating malnourished patients. To gain more insight into nutritional care policies in Dutch health care organizations, this study investigated screening, treatment, and other quality indicators of nutritional care. In 2007 a cross-sectional multicenter study was performed that included 20 255 patients (hospitals, n = 6021; nursing homes, n = 11 902; home care, n = 2332). A standardized questionnaire was used to study nutritional screening and treatment at the patient level and quality indicators at institutional and ward levels (e.g., malnutrition guidelines/protocols, nutritional education, and weighing policy). Nutritional screening was performed more often in nursing homes (60.2%) than in hospitals (40.3%) and home care (13.9%, P hospitals, and home care. At ward level nursing homes focused more on the quality of nutritional care than did hospitals and home care, especially with respect to controlling the use of nutritional guidelines (54.6%, P malnutrition is still a considerable problem in one of every five patients in all participating health care settings. It furthermore demonstrates that recognizing and treating malnutrition continues to be problematic. To target the problem of malnutrition adequately, more awareness is needed of the importance of nutritional screening, appropriate treatment, and other nutritional quality indicators.

  11. Consumer perception of the quality of beef resulting from various fattening regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsø, Karen; Bredahl, Lone; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2005-01-01

    with beef will be presented. Consumers form expectations about the eating quality of meat at the point of purchase, based on prior experience and information available in the shopping environment, while the eating quality is experienced at home during and after meal preparation. Results show that consumers......The evaluation of meat quality and safety is not a straightforward task for consumers. In this article, the Total Food Quality Model will be introduced as a framework for understanding how consumers perceive meat quality, and results from a Danish study of consumer perception and experience...

  12. The EFQM excellence model: European and Dutch experiences with the EFQM approach in health care. European Foundation for Quality Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabitz, U; Klazinga, N; Walburg, J

    2000-06-01

    One way to meet the challenges in creating a high performance organization in health care is the approach of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM). The Foundation is in the tradition of the American Malcolm Baldrige Award and was initiated by the European Commission and 14 European multi-national organizations in 1988. The essence of the approach is the EFQM Model, which can be used as a self-assessment instrument on all levels of a health care organization and as an auditing instrument for the Quality Award. In 1999 the EFQM Model was revised but its principles remained the same. In The Netherlands many health care organizations apply the EFQM Model. In addition to improvement projects, peer review of professional practices, accreditation and certification, the EFQM Approach is used mainly as a framework for quality management and as a conceptualization for organizational excellence. The Dutch National Institute for Quality, the Instituut Nederlandse Kwaliteit, delivers training and supports self-assessment and runs the Dutch quality award programme. Two specific guidelines for health care organizations, 'Positioning and Improving' and 'Self-Assessment', have been developed and are used frequently. To illustrate the EFQM approach in The Netherlands, the improvement project of the Jellinek Centre is described. The Jellinek Centre conducted internal and external assessments and received in 1996, as the first health care organization, the Dutch Quality Prize.

  13. Three issues in consumer quality perception and acceptance of dairy products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Bredahl, Lone

    2000-01-01

    in communication provided. Drawing on five different empirical studies on consumer quality perception of dairy products, three issues related to the communication on credence quality dimensions are discussed: providing credible information, the role of consumer attitudes, and inference processes in quality......It is argued that consumer quality perception of dairy products is characterised by four major dimensions: hedonic, health-related, convenience-related and process-related quality. Two of these, viz. health and process-related quality, are credence dimensions, ie, a matter of consumer trust...

  14. A Nursing Interaction Approach to Consumer Internet Training on Quality Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesley, Marsha L.; Oermann, Marilyn H.; Vander Wal, Jillon S.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of using the Internet to teach consumers about quality health care, compared consumer definitions of quality health care prior to and following completion of the Internet experience, and compared ratings of learning, satisfaction and value of the Internet instruction between consumers who completed the…

  15. A model of service quality perceptions and health care consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, S J; Shewchuk, R M; Bowers, M R

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of covariance structures (LISREL) was used to examine the influence of consumer held perceptions of service quality on consumer satisfaction and intentions to return. Results indicate that service quality is a significant predictor of consumer satisfaction which, in turn, predicts intention to return. Health care marketing implications are discussed.

  16. Consumers' expected quality and intention to purchase high quality pork meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanagiotou, P; Tzimitra-Kalogianni, I; Melfou, K

    2013-03-01

    Expected quality is believed to be one of the most important factors that influence consumers' intention to purchase food. The present study seeks to explore the concept of pork meat expected quality and compare it with self-stated consumer intention to purchase pork meat. The aim is attempted by means of a field research conducted in Greece, following a conjoint analytic procedure. Results show that quality expectations comply with intention to buy pork, in many aspects. However, several differences have been identified. More specifically, country of origin and marbling appear to be more important for respondents' purchase decisions than they are for their quality evaluations, while the opposite appears to be true for price. Finally, socio-demographic factors such as gender, level of education, place of purchase and consumption habits seem to influence perceptions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Associations between structural quality aspects and process quality in Dutch early childhood education and care settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, P.L.; Leseman, P.P.M.; Verhagen, J.; Mulder, H.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between structural quality and process quality in early childhood education and care (ECEC) has been addressed in several studies. However, the findings are not conclusive. The present study was conducted in the Netherlands, which has a strongly regulated mid-quality ECEC system

  18. Why Do So Few Consumers Use Health Care Quality Report Cards? A Framework for Understanding the Limited Consumer Impact of Comparative Quality Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Neeraj; Scanlon, Dennis P; Shi, Yunfeng; Smith, Rachel A

    2018-05-01

    Despite growing investment in producing and releasing comparative provider quality information (CQI), consumer use of CQI has remained poor. We offer a framework to interpret and synthesize the existing literature's diverse approaches to explaining the CQI's low appeal for consumers. Our framework cautions CQI stakeholders against forming unrealistic expectations of pervasive consumer use and suggests that they focus their efforts more narrowly on consumers who may find CQI more salient for choosing providers. We review the consumer impact of stakeholder efforts to apply the burgeoning knowledge of consumers' cognitive limitations to the design and dissemination of the new generation of report cards; we conclude that while it is too limited to draw firm conclusions, early evidence suggests consumers are responding to the novel design and dissemination strategies. We find that consumers continue to have difficulty accessing reliable report cards, while the media remains underused in the dissemination of report cards.

  19. Description and earlier quality review of the Dutch educational system (primary and secondary education)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap; Scheerens, J; Luyten, H.; van Ravens, J.

    2011-01-01

    The chapter starts out with a brief overview of the structure of the Dutch education system. As compared to other national educational systems the Dutch secondary school system is strongly differentiated, featuring several separate school categories and sub-categories. Next, attention is paid to

  20. Quality and safety of products containing Ephedra Herba on the Dutch market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lake OA; Slijkhuis C; Maas WF; Vliet MEA van; Kaste D de; Verdonk-Kleinjan W; Keuringsdienst van Waren, regio; LGO

    2001-01-01

    We performed analytical studies on dietary supplements and smart products containing Ephedra herba on the Dutch market. Such products are labelled 'from natural, herbal sources' and do not fall under Dutch Medicines Act. Most of the samples tested from 1993 to 1999 contained unacceptably

  1. Classifying indicators of quality: a collaboration between Dutch and English regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Alex; Vesseur, Jan; Hamblin, Richard; Long, Paul; Den Ouden, Lya

    2011-12-01

    Many approaches to measuring quality in healthcare exist, generally employing indicators or metrics. While there are important differences, most of these approaches share three key areas of measurement: safety, effectiveness and patient experience. The European Partnership for Supervisory Organisations in Health Services and Social Care (EPSO) exists as a working group and discussion forum for European regulators. This group undertook to identify a common framework within which European approaches to indicators could be compared. A framework was developed to classify indicators, using four sets of criteria: conceptualization of quality, Donabedian definition (structure, process, outcome), data type (derivable, collectable from routine sources, special collections, samples) and data use (judgement (singular or part of framework) benchmarking, risk assessment). Indicators from English and Dutch hospital measurement programmes were put into the framework, showing areas of agreement and levels of comparability. In the first instance, results are only illustrative. The EPSO has been a powerful driver for undertaking cross-European research, and this project is the first of many to take advantage of the access to international expertize. It has shown that through development of a framework that deconstructs national indicators, commonalities can be identified. Future work will attempt to incorporate other nations' indicators, and attempt cross-national comparison.

  2. Citrus fruit quality assessment; producer and consumer perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumption of citrus fruit and juices is popular with consumers worldwide and makes an important contribution to a healthy diet. Nevertheless, consumer preferences for citrus have undergone significant changes over the last twenty years and it is important to understand what consumers are looking ...

  3. Charting and shaping the modern consumer. The rise of customer research in the Dutch department store De Bijenkorf, 1930-1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hein Furnée

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the decades before and after World War ii, major European department stores were increasingly eager to know and understand their customers. This article analyses how the Dutch department store De Bijenkorf, in dialogue with leading European partners, developed a wide range of research techniques to chart the social composition and buying behavior of its customers in order to enhance the company’s efficiency in procurement, advertising, spatial organization and sales. The customer research of De Bijenkorf helped to legitimize new business policiessuch as up- and downtrading and impulse buying, but also reflected and established new ideas and images of modern urban consumers as statistical categories behaving in astonishing regular ways.

  4. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campmans-Kuijpers MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marjo JE Campmans-Kuijpers,1 Lidwien C Lemmens,2 Caroline A Baan,2 Guy EHM Rutten1 1Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, 2Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Utrecht, the Netherlands Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention.Methods: This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100% was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non parametric tests.Results: Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002, and on its subdomains “access to

  5. Validity and reliability of the Dutch adaptation of the Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL Questionnaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freke Wink

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL questionnaire is a disease- specific instrument developed to measure quality of life (QoL in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. The aim of this study was to translate the measure into Dutch and to determine its psychometric properties. METHOD: Translation of the original English PsAQoL into Dutch was performed by bilingual and lay panel. Ten field-test interviews with PsA patients were performed to assess face and content validity. In total, 211 PsA patients were included in a test-retest postal survey to investigate the reliability and construct validity of the Dutch adaptation of the PsAQoL. The PsAQoL, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ and Skindex-17 were administered on two different occasions approximately two weeks apart. RESULTS: The Dutch version of the PsAQoL was found to be relevant, understandable and easy to complete in only a few minutes. It correlated as expected with the HAQ (Spearman's ρ = 0.72 and the 2 subscales of the Skindex-17 (ρ = 0.40 for the psychosocial and ρ = 0.46 for the symptom scale. Furthermore, the measure had good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.92 and test-retest reliability (ρ = 0.89. The PsAQoL was able to define groups of patients based on self-reported general health status, self-reported severity of PsA and flare of arthritis. Duration of PsA did not influence PsAQoL scores. CONCLUSIONS: The Dutch version of the PsAQoL is a valid and reliable questionnaire suitable for use in clinical or research settings to asses PsA-specific QoL.

  6. The Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire measuring patients' experiences with quality of care after a total hip or knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delnoij Diana MJ

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dutch Consumer Quality Index Hip Knee Questionnaire (CQI Hip Knee was used to assess patients' experiences with and evaluations of quality of care after a total hip (THA or total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The aim of this study is to evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency reliability of this new instrument and to assess its ability to measure differences in quality of care between hospitals. Methods Survey data of 1,675 subjects who underwent a THA or TKA were used to evaluate the psychometric properties. Exploratory factor analyses were performed and item-total correlations and inter-factor correlations were calculated to assess the construct validity of the instrument. Reliability analyses included tests of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficients. Finally, multilevel analyses were performed to assess the ability of the instrument to discriminate between hospitals in quality of care. Results Exploratory factor analyses indicated that the survey consisted of 21 items measuring five aspects of care (i.e. communication with nurses, communication with doctors, communication with general practitioner, communication about new medication, and pain control. Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.76 to 0.90 indicating good internal consistency. The survey's ability to discriminate between hospitals was partly supported by multilevel analysis. Two scales (i.e. communication with nurses and communication with doctors were able to measure differences between hospitals with respect to patients' experiences with quality of care. Logistic multilevel analyses indicated that hospitals explained part of the variation between patients in receiving information. Conclusion These findings suggest that the CQI Hip Knee is reliable and valid for use in Dutch health care. Health care providers or health plans can use this survey to measure patients' experiences with hospital care and to identify variations in care

  7. What do Polish and Dutch consumers think about dried fruit and products with them - creaiwe group discussions as a means of recognittion consumers'perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jesionkowska, K.; Konopacka, D.; P¿ocharski, W.; Sijtsema, S.J.; Zimmermann, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to get insight into consumers' perception towards dried fruit and products with them, thus the exploratory study designed as a group discussion took place. While group discussions association (as one of the projective technique) and Kelly repertory grid were used to

  8. Planning for quality? Assessing the role of quality of place in current Dutch planning practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, R.C.; Trip, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, an attractive urban environment has increasingly been recognized as a factor of local competitiveness in a globalizing world. Notably, Richard Florida and Charles Landry have stressed the importance of the concept of quality of place. The implications of their often criticized, but

  9. Quality and safety of products containing Ephedra Herba on the Dutch market

    OpenAIRE

    Lake OA; Slijkhuis C; Maas WF; Vliet MEA van; Kaste D de; Verdonk-Kleinjan W; Keuringsdienst van Waren, regio Zuid; LGO

    2001-01-01

    We performed analytical studies on dietary supplements and smart products containing Ephedra herba on the Dutch market. Such products are labelled 'from natural, herbal sources' and do not fall under Dutch Medicines Act. Most of the samples tested from 1993 to 1999 contained unacceptably large amounts of ephedrine (EP) alkaloids (the active substances of Ephedra herba) in relation to the safety criteria in the literature. Some samples also contained an effect-enhancing substance (e.g. coffein...

  10. Rice-eating quality among consumers in different rice grain preference countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwannaporn, P.; Linnemann, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    More rice is eaten nowadays in traditionally nonrice-eating countries. This study investigated consumer eating quality preferences among consumers in target rice export countries to identify opportunities and strategic implications. A quantitative study with 1,128 consumers of target nationalities

  11. Unfair contract terms and the consumer: ECJ case-law, foreign literature and their impact on Dutch law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hondius, E.H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In the late twentieth century, most European states have adopted legislation on unfair contract terms. The Directive 93/13/EEC on unfair terms in consumer contracts has effectively made the European Court of Justice (ECJ) the final arbiter in interpreting much of this legislation. The

  12. On transparency and trust. Market monitor, development of the Dutch small-scale consumer market for electricity and natural gas. July 2006 - June 2007; Over transparantie en vertrouwen. Marktmonitor, ontwikkeling van de Nederlandse kleinverbruikersmarkt voor Elektriciteit en Gas. Juli 2006 - juni 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Liere, M.; Postema, B.; Te Velthuis, M.

    2007-10-15

    The energy market is liberalized since 1 July 2004. The Dutch government has liberalized the energy market to stimulate competition between suppliers and to offer the consumer freedom of choice of their own energy supplier. As energy suppliers must put continuous effort in acquiring and preserving customers, the customers may expect better quality and service at relatively lower prices. In a well-functioning energy market the customer will benefit from the liberalisation. DTe (Dutch Office of Energy Regulation) is the regulator of the energy sector and supervises the energy companies adhering to the rules of the energy markets, protecting customers where needed. Moreover, DTe also monitors the developments in the energy markets. In the market monitor private consumers market DTe reports on the operating of the consumer market, also called the private consumers market. [mk]. [Dutch] Sinds 1 juli 2004 is de energiemarkt geliberaliseerd. De Nederlandse overheid heeft de energiemarkt vrijgegeven om de concurrentie tussen leveranciers te bevorderen en de consument keuzevrijheid te geven om zelf een eigen energieleverancier te kiezen. Omdat energieleveranciers zich hierdoor telkens weer moeten inspannen om klanten te werven en te behouden, kunnen consumenten betere kwaliteit en service verwachten tegen verhoudingsgewijs lagere prijzen. In een goed werkende energiemarkt plukt de consument dus de vruchten van de liberalisering. DTe is de toezichthouder op de energiesector en ziet erop toe dat energiebedrijven zich houden aan de spelregels van de energiemarkten en beschermt consumenten waar nodig. Daarnaast heeft DTe de taak om de ontwikkelingen op de energiemarkten in de gaten te houden. In de marktmonitor kleinverbruikersmarkt rapporteert DTe over de werking van de consumentenmarkt, ook wel de kleinverbruikersmarkt genoemd.

  13. E-Learning Quality Standards for Consumer Protection and Consumer Confidence: A Canadian Case Study in E-Learning Quality Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Kathryn Chang

    2007-01-01

    Emerging concerns about quality of e-learning products and services animated a project in Canada to create quality standards that derived primarily from the needs of consumer, that could be used to guide the development and choice of e-learning at all levels of education and training, and that could be implemented in a simple manner. A set of…

  14. Improving behaviour in self-testing (IBIS): Study on frequency of use, consequences, information needs and use, and quality of currently available consumer information (protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grispen, Janaica E J; Ickenroth, Martine H P; de Vries, Nanne K; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Ronda, Gaby; van der Weijden, Trudy

    2010-08-03

    Self-tests are available to consumers for more than 25 conditions, ranging from infectious diseases to cardiovascular risk factors. Self-tests are defined as in-vitro tests on body materials such as blood, urine, faeces, or saliva that are initiated by consumers to diagnose a particular disorder or risk factor without involving a medical professional. In 2006, 16% of a sample of Dutch Internet users had ever used at least one self-test and 17% intended to use a self-test in the future. The objectives of this study are to determine (1) the frequency of self-test use, (2) the consumers' reasons for using or not using a self-test, (3) the information that is used by self-testers in the different self-test stages and the consumers' interpretation of the quality of this information, (4) the consumers' response to self-test results in terms of their confidence in the result, reassurance by the test result, and follow-up behaviour, (5) the information consumers report to need in the decision making process of using or not using a self-test, and in further management on the basis of the self-test result, and (6) the quality of the currently available consumer information on a selected set of self-tests. Mixed methods study with (1) a cross-sectional study consisting of a two-phase Internet-questionnaire, (2) semi-structured interviews with self-testers and consumers who intend to use a self-test, and (3) the assessment of the quality of consumer information of self-tests. The Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour will serve as the theoretical basis for the questionnaires and the interview topic guides. The self-testing area is still in a state of flux and therefore it is expected that self-test use will increase in the future. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study which combines quantitative and qualitative research to identify consumers' information needs and use concerning self-testing, and the consumers' actual follow-up behaviour based

  15. Improving behaviour in self-testing (IBIS: Study on frequency of use, consequences, information needs and use, and quality of currently available consumer information (protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Nanne K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-tests are available to consumers for more than 25 conditions, ranging from infectious diseases to cardiovascular risk factors. Self-tests are defined as in-vitro tests on body materials such as blood, urine, faeces, or saliva that are initiated by consumers to diagnose a particular disorder or risk factor without involving a medical professional. In 2006, 16% of a sample of Dutch Internet users had ever used at least one self-test and 17% intended to use a self-test in the future. The objectives of this study are to determine (1 the frequency of self-test use, (2 the consumers' reasons for using or not using a self-test, (3 the information that is used by self-testers in the different self-test stages and the consumers' interpretation of the quality of this information, (4 the consumers' response to self-test results in terms of their confidence in the result, reassurance by the test result, and follow-up behaviour, (5 the information consumers report to need in the decision making process of using or not using a self-test, and in further management on the basis of the self-test result, and (6 the quality of the currently available consumer information on a selected set of self-tests. Methods Mixed methods study with (1 a cross-sectional study consisting of a two-phase Internet-questionnaire, (2 semi-structured interviews with self-testers and consumers who intend to use a self-test, and (3 the assessment of the quality of consumer information of self-tests. The Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour will serve as the theoretical basis for the questionnaires and the interview topic guides. Conclusions The self-testing area is still in a state of flux and therefore it is expected that self-test use will increase in the future. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study which combines quantitative and qualitative research to identify consumers' information needs and use concerning self

  16. Improvements in the quality of co-ordination of nursing care following implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Pot, A.M.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) on the quality of co-ordination of nursing care in Dutch nursing homes. Background: The Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) was designed to improve the quality of care and quality of life in nursing homes. Until

  17. Consumer reactions to the use of EU quality labels on food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Aachmann, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The EU promotes three types of food quality labels, PDO, PGI and TSG in order to protect producers of food with special qualities and to aid consumers in their decision-making. This papers reviews published research on how these labels affect consumers. 35 studies were identified and are reviewed...... based on a hierarchy of effects framework. While results are conflicting, some overall themes emerge, suggesting that the role of these quality labels in consumer decision-making at present is still relatively low. Suggestions for research are made that would provide a better basis for evidence......-based policy formulation with regard to food quality labels....

  18. Consumer Willingness to Pay for Quality Attributes of Fresh Seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thong Tien; Haider, Wolfgang; Solgaard, Hans Stubbe

    2015-01-01

    We applied a labeled choice experiment (LCE) to investigate consumer demand and choice behavior for fresh seafood in a retail market. The LCE was conducted for a large number of seafood alternatives (i.e., seafood species) labeled by the respective seafood name (e.g., cod, salmon, mussels......). Consumer heterogeneity in preference was expressed by estimating a labeled latent class model with alternative-specific effects, which varies choice probability and model parameters over seafood alternatives and across classes. The willingness to pay (WTP) for extrinsic attributes (e.g., product form...

  19. Developments in mineral surpluses and water quality in the Dutch dairy sector, 1960-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, van den A.; Luesink, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    In line with the agricultural policy during 1950-1980, which aimed at increasing production levels, inputs of fertiliser and purchased fodder increased considerably, resulting in higher milk production levels per hectare and per cow on Dutch dairy farms. This intensification of the dairy farming

  20. Dutch cities: a possible trend towards economic deconcentration and impacts on the quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler JCM; MGO

    2006-01-01

    For decades a very fine-meshed retail structure has existed in The Netherlands. Dutch citizens can reach convenience shops easily and quickly. These shops are often established within walking distance. The reason for this fine-meshed shopping structure is the restrictive governmental policy

  1. Mutations in the Foodstuff Quality Perception of the New Consumers in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin Popescu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the current context of the market, very complex and dynamic, we can observe the crystallization of a new generation of consumers, with a specific behavior and a particular manner of approaching the quality unlike the one of traditional consumer. The concept of quality, perceived by the traditional consumer in the classical, deterministic and objective sense, loses its facets nowadays and transcends into another dimension, in the vision of the new consumer, in which the perception of quality in a predominantly subjective manner, comes first. This paper presents the objectives of a research project that we intend to develop, in order to highlight the mutations that occurred in the foodstuff quality perception of the new consumers from Romania. We focused on foodstuff because it is a customary part of our daily lives, that shouldn’t be approached merely as a common factor for meeting physiological needs of macro and micro-nutrients, but from a holistic perspective in terms of its social and identity functions and the effects on individual health. Another important goal of the project is to improve the standard of education and culture in foodstuff consumption and to give to the new consumers from Romania the skills for an objective assessment of food quality. We believe that all these could lead to the conversion of the new consumers of foodstuff in ethical and responsible consumers.

  2. Dutch healthcare reform: did it result in performance improvement of health plans? A comparison of consumer experiences over time.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many countries have introduced elements of managed competition in their healthcare system with the aim to accomplish more efficient and demand-driven health care. Simultaneously, generating and reporting of comparative healthcare information has become an important quality-improvement

  3. Consumer Choice between Food Safety and Food Quality: The Case of Farm-Raised Atlantic Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghiri, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Since the food incidence of polychlorinated biphenyls in farm-raised Atlantic salmon, its market demand has drastically changed as a result of consumers mistrust in both the quality and safety of the product. Policymakers have been trying to find ways to ensure consumers that farm-raised Atlantic salmon is safe. One of the suggested policies is the implementation of integrated traceability methods and quality control systems. This article examines consumer choice between food safety and food quality to purchase certified farm-raised Atlantic salmon, defined as a product that has passed through various stages of traceability systems in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. PMID:28231118

  4. Pasta Fortified with Potato Juice: Structure, Quality, and Consumer Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczewski, Przemysław; Lewandowicz, Grażyna; Makowska, Agnieszka; Knoll, Ismena; Błaszczak, Wioletta; Białas, Wojciech; Kubiak, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    The potential of potato juice in relieving gastrointestinal disorders has already been proven. Work continues on implementation of this active component into products that are widely consumed. In this article, results of an attempt to fortify pasta with potato juice are presented and discussed. Fortification is performed using fresh and dried juice. The influence of the addition on culinary properties of the final product, such as cooking weight and cooking loss, as well as microstructure, color, texture, and consumer acceptance were evaluated. It was found that potato juice can be used for fortification of pasta both in its fresh and dried forms, however the effects on different responses depend on the potato juice form used. The addition of potato juice influenced the color of the product reducing its lightness and shifting color balances from green to red, yellow color saturation was decreased as well. Changes in color were more significant in the case of fresh juice addition. The firmness and microstructure of pasta was also influenced. The surface microstructure of pasta containing fresh potato juice was different from that of the other 2 products being a likely explanation of the lower cooking loss observed in its case. In contrast, the consistency of dough was strengthened by addition of dried potato juice. Principal components analysis indicated that the color change had the most pronounced effect on consumer acceptance. Other physicochemical changes were slightly less significant. Nevertheless, sensory evaluation proved that functional pasta produced with fresh potato juice finds consumer acceptance comparable with that of classic pasta. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Associations of Perceived Sibling and Parent-Child Relationship Quality with Internalizing and Externalizing Problems: Comparing Indian and Dutch Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Kirsten L.; Verhoeven, Marjolein; Hoksbergen, René; ter Laak, Jan; Watve, Sujala; Paranjpe, Analpa

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study were (a) to examine whether Dutch and Indian early adolescents differ concerning sibling and parent-child relationship quality and externalizing and internalizing problems, and (b) to compare the associations between sibling and parent-child relationship quality and externalizing and internalizing problems for Indian…

  6. Associations of Perceived Sibling and Parent-Child Relationship Quality With Internalizing and Externalizing Problems: Comparing Indian and Dutch Early Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, K. L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241099218; Verhoeven, Marjolein|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304349747; Hoksbergen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068229127; Ter Laak, J.; Watve, S.; Paranjpe, A.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study were (a) to examine whether Dutch and Indian early adolescents differ concerning sibling and parent-child relationship quality and externalizing and internalizing problems, and (b) to compare the associations between sibling and parent-child relationship quality and

  7. Differences between Slovak and Dutch patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft surgery regarding clinical and psychosocial predictors of physical and mental health-related quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Baz, Noha; Ondusova, Daniela; Studencan, Martin; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van Dijk, Jitse P; Middel, Berrie

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differences in health-related quality of life in coronary artery disease patients and associated factors between patients of central and western European descent are rarely investigated. We aim to test differences between Dutch and Slovak health-related quality of life, whether

  8. Consumer perceptions of food quality and safety and their relation to traceability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijk, van W.; Frewer, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - The research presented here aims to gain understanding of consumers¿ perceptions of the concepts of food quality and safety, two concepts that play an important role in how consumers perceive food, and that are used in decision making. Design/methodology/approach - Qualitative

  9. 78 FR 26301 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Consumer Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R05-OAR-2010-0394; EPA-R05-OAR-2012-0786; FRL-9786-1] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Consumer Products and... consumer products categories into the State's SIP. Finally, EPA is proposing to approve language to clarify...

  10. Consumer evaluation of fish quality as basis for fish market segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Wim; Vermeir, Iris; Brunsø, Karen

    2007-01-01

    evaluation: personal relevance attached to fish quality and self-confidence in fish quality evaluation, which allow segmenting the market in four fish consumer segments. The segments are typified as Uninvolved, Uncertain, Self-confident and Connoisseurs, and have distinctive behavioural, attitudinal......This paper focuses on consumer evaluation of fish quality and its association with fish consumption, risk and benefit beliefs and information processing variables. Cross-sectional data were collected from a sample of 429 consumers in March 2003 in Belgium. Two dimensions shape fish quality...... and socio-demographic profiles. The Uninvolved are mainly young males, have the lowest fish consumption level, weakest belief in health benefits from eating fish, and lowest interest in both search and credence information cues. Uncertain fish consumers are mainly females, with a tendency of lower education...

  11. Association between quality management and performance indicators in Dutch diabetes care groups: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J E; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Klomp, Maarten L H; Romeijnders, Arnold C M; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2015-05-11

    To enhance the quality of diabetes care in the Netherlands, so-called care groups with three to 250 general practitioners emerged to organise and coordinate diabetes care. This introduced a new quality management level in addition to the quality management of separate general practices. We hypothesised that this new level of quality management might be associated with the aggregate performance indicators on the patient level. Therefore, we aimed to explore the association between quality management at the care group level and its aggregate performance indicators. A cross-sectional study. All Dutch care groups (n=97). 23 care groups provided aggregate register-based performance indicators of all their practices as well as data on quality management measured with a questionnaire filled out by 1 or 2 of their quality managers. The association between quality management, overall and in 6 domains ('organisation of care', 'multidisciplinary teamwork', 'patient centredness', 'performance management', 'quality improvement policy' and 'management strategies') on the one hand and 3 process indicators (the percentages of patients with at least 1 measurement of glycated haemoglobin, lipid profile and systolic blood pressure), and 3 intermediate outcome indicators (the percentages of patients with glycated haemoglobin below 53 mmol/mol (7%); low-density lipoprotein cholesterol below 2.5 mmol/L; and systolic blood pressure below 140 mm Hg) by weighted univariable linear regression. The domain 'management strategies' was significantly associated with the percentage of patients with a glycated haemoglobin quality management were not associated with aggregate process or outcome indicators. This first exploratory study on quality management showed weak or no associations between quality management of diabetes care groups and their performance. It remains uncertain whether this second layer on quality management adds to better quality of care. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  12. Into beef consumers' mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Barcellos, Marcia Dutra; Brei, Vinicius A.

    indicated similarities amongst Brazilian and Australian consumers regarding their positive attitude towards beef and main concerns regarding its consumption. Dutch consumers, although presented negative attitudes, considered beef consumption as important. In general respondents presented a high degree...

  13. Bottled Water: United States Consumers and Their Perceptions of Water Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zhihua; Morton, Lois Wright; Mahler, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Consumption of bottled water is increasing worldwide. Prior research shows many consumers believe bottled water is convenient and has better taste than tap water, despite reports of a number of water quality incidents with bottled water. The authors explore the demographic and social factors associated with bottled water users in the U.S. and the relationship between bottled water use and perceptions of the quality of local water supply. They find that U.S. consumers are more likely to report...

  14. Microbial Quality of Traditional Alcoholic Beverages Consumed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mbege', 'mnazi' and 'komoni' were subjected to microbiological assessments in order to determine their microbial quality and possible resistance to antibiotics among the isolated microorganisms. Twenty-seven samples were randomly ...

  15. Consumers' ratings of the natural and unnatural qualities of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Greg; de Challemaison, Blandine; Cox, David N

    2010-06-01

    An investigation sought to understand what consumers perceive by the term natural. The aim was to test eight hypotheses on food ingredients and processes used for manufactured food. A representative sample (n=190, aged 18-65 years), rated 50 food exemplars for naturalness (0-100 scale). Data were analysed by repeated measures ANOVA. Results support three hypotheses: chemical changes were more potent than physical changes; there was a minimal effect of mixing like entities and the more processing the greater the effect on consumer's deviation away from natural. Two hypotheses were validated conditionally: contagion accounts for naturalness reduction but is independent of dose above a certain level; E-numbers were always perceived to be less natural than the same preservatives described by chemical and common names; however, there were gender and some education interaction effects. The hypothesis that addition has a greater effect than removal was only partially validated. There was no evidence found to support the hypotheses that process has more effect than content, or that novel ingredients have a greater effect than 'known' ingredients, however, this result may have been confounded. The implications for new manufactured food products, suggested by the results, are that products with physical changes, less processing, with like ingredients and described using common named descriptors for ingredients would be perceived to be more natural. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. When symbolism overtakes quality: Materialists consumers disregard product quality when faced with luxury brands

    OpenAIRE

    Audrin, Catherine; Brosch, Tobias; Chanal, Julien; Sander, David

    2017-01-01

    Consumers use extrinsic and intrinsic cues to set preferences and make purchase decisions. However, the extent to which luxury-related extrinsic cues determine consumer preferences and whether the relative weighting of extrinsic vs. intrinsic cues depends on consumers' values is still unclear. We investigated how luxury vs. non-luxury brands affect consumer preferences, and how this impact is moderated by consumers' materialistic values. Results from Experiment 1 showed that materialistic and...

  17. Consumer perception of meat quality and implications for product development in the meat sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Bredahl, Lone; Brunsø, Karen

    2004-01-01

    of purchase, based on own experience and informational cues available in the shopping environment, is described, as well as the way in which quality is experienced in the home during and after meal preparation. The relationship between quality expectations and quality experience and its implications...... for consumer satisfaction and repeat purchase intent is addressed. In the second part of the paper, and building on the insights obtained on subjective quality perception, possibilities for consumer-oriented product development in the meat sector are addressed. Issues dealt with here are branding...

  18. Consumer perception of meat quality and implications for product development in the meat sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Bredahl, Lone; Brunsø, Karen

    of purchase, based on own experience and informational cues available in the shopping environment, is described, as well as the way in which quality is experienced in the home during and after meal preparation. The relationship between quality expectations and quality experience and its implications...... for consumer satisfaction and repeat purchase intent is addressed. In the second part of the paper, and building on the insights obtained on subjective quality perception, possibilities for consumer-oriented product development in the meat sector are addressed. Issues dealt with here are branding...

  19. Work environment characteristics associated with quality of care in Dutch nursing homes: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Ramona; Rossum, Erik van; Verbeek, Hilde; Halfens, Ruud J G; Tan, Frans E S; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2017-01-01

    A lack of relationship between direct care staffing levels and quality of care, as found in prior studies, underscores the importance of considering the quality of the work environment instead of only considering staff ratios. Only a few studies, however, have combined direct care staffing with work environment characteristics when assessing the relationship with quality of care in nursing homes. To examine the relationship between direct care staffing levels, work environment characteristics and perceived quality of care in Dutch nursing homes. Cross-sectional, observational study in cooperation with the Dutch Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems. Twenty-four somatic and 31 psychogeriatric wards from 21 nursing homes in the Netherlands. Forty-one ward managers and 274 staff members (registered nurses or certified nurse assistants) from the 55 participating wards. Ward rosters were discussed with managers to obtain an insight into direct care staffing levels (i.e, total direct care staff hours per resident per day). Participating staff members completed a questionnaire on work environment characteristics (i.e., ward culture, team climate, communication and coordination, role model availability, and multidisciplinary collaboration) and they rated the quality of care in their ward. Data were analyzed using multilevel linear regression analyses (random intercept). Separate analyses were conducted for somatic and psychogeriatric wards. In general, staff members were satisfied with the quality of care in their wards. Staff members from psychogeriatric wards scored higher on the statement 'In the event that a family member had to be admitted to a nursing home now, I would recommend this ward'. A better team climate was related to better perceived quality of care in both ward types (p≤0.020). In somatic wards, there was a positive association between multidisciplinary collaboration and agreement by staff of ward recommendation for a family member (p=0.028). In

  20. Consumer expectations of the quality of pork produced in sustainable outdoor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Bredahl, Lone; Magnussen, Maria

    , most Swedish consumers bought fresh pork at the traditional butcher's. Although large segments of consumers (30-50%) stated higher purchase intentions for pork from outdoor systems than for conventional pork, results should be interpreted with caution. Since intention-behaviour consistency was found...... to be extremely low for pork in general, stated purchase intentions should also be discounted in the case of pork from outdoor production systems. The most striking result in the present research was observed in relation to consumers' quality expectations. Respondents had been asked to state their quality...... to those of conventional pork. Finally, consumers prefer as much information as possible on the label of pork products. Since influences at the point of sale, including the information on product labels, appear to be the major determinants of consumers' pork purchases, the development of clear and credible...

  1. Information quality, homophily, and risk propensity: Consumer responses to online hotel reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Kusumasondjaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Searching through online review sites becomes an alternative for consumers to obtain product information. The efficiency and effectiveness in finding quality information on the online review sites contributes to the popularity of online review sites among consumers at the moment. There are some previous studies discussing consumer trust on hotels being reviewed on online review sites, but the roles of information quality, homophily, and consumer risk propensity as antecedents of trust and online purchase intention are still questionable. The purpose of this study is to investigate how information quality, homophily, and consumer risk propensity affect consumer trust on hotels being reviewed on online review sites and on intention to make a reservation. A survey involving 430 young travelers from 16 countries was conducted in popular tourist destination. Results confirm that information quality influences consumers’ trust on hotel being reviewed and intention to make reservation. Moreover, consumer online trust is also found to affect intention to make reservation.

  2. The implementation of a quality system in the Dutch GP specialty training: barriers and facilitators; a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwalda, Nienke; Braspenning, Jozé; van Roosmalen, Sanne; van Dijk, Nynke; Visser, Mechteld

    2017-07-21

    Quality assurance programs in medical education are introduced to gain insight into the quality of such programs and to trigger improvements. Although of utmost importance, research on the implementation of such programs is scarce. The Dutch General Practice (GP) specialty training institutes used an implementation strategy to implement a quality system (QS), and we aimed to study the success of this strategy and to learn about additional facilitators and barriers. Seventeen structured interviews were conducted with the directors and quality coordinators (QCs) of the eight Dutch GP training institutes. A five-stage process model of implementation was used to structure these interviews and analyze the data. Two researchers analyzed the data with a framework approach. The strategy supported the institutes in implementing the QS. However, after the introduction of the QS, staff experienced the QS as demanding, although they noticed almost no concrete short-term results. Moreover, they experienced difficulties in integrating the QS into their local situation. Collectively working with the QS and following common deadlines did create a sense of commitment towards each other that appeared to be a true stimulus to the introduction of the QS. The implementation strategy focused mainly on the introduction of the QS in the GP specialty training, and it was, as such, rather successful. An important barrier concerned the acceptance of the QS and the integration of the QS into local structures, which suggests that there is a need for guidance on the translation of the QS to local contexts. All in all, we recommend more focus on the benefits of a QS.

  3. Product quality : an investigation into the concept and how it is perceived by consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Steenkamp, J.B.E.M.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of the present work are (1) to review the literature on product quality from different perspectives, (2) to develop a model that describes the way consumers form judgments about product quality, and (3) to investigate the proposed model empirically. In addition, price-perceived quality tradeoffs and the relationship between price and product quality in the marketplace are investigated. The main conclusions are summarized in this chapter.

    The concept o...

  4. Consumer attitudes to food quality products : emphasis on Southern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopcic, M.; Kuipers, A.; Hocquette, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Quality foods, such as traditional, EU certified, organic and health claimed are part of a growing trend towards added value in the agri-food sector. In these foods, elements of production, processing, marketing, agro-tourism and speciality stores are combined. Paramount above all is the link to the

  5. Consumers and Food Choice: Quality, Nutrition and Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Iztok Ostan, I.; Borut Poljsak, B.; Simcic, M.

    2010-01-01

    The quantity and quality of food needed for reproduction differs from nutritional needs for health and longevity. The choice of food type and amount is driven by our genetic need for growth and reproduction, not for long term health. So, fast digestible food, rich in energy is searched for. We

  6. Assessment of Consumers' Satisfaction with the Automotive Product Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amineh, Hadi; Kosach, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    Relevance of article is caused by the fact that customer's satisfaction currently serves as the mechanism allowing the carmakers to be competitive in the market. The paper describes issues of assessment of the quality of products manufactured by automobile companies. The assessment is based on widely applicable complex characteristics of the…

  7. Natural gas quality for the future. Part 1. Technical/economical inventory of consequences of natural gas quality variations for final consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinsky, H.B.; Van Rij, M.L.D.

    2011-01-01

    By request of various market parties (suppliers and users of natural gas), the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation (ELI) took a leading role in anticipating the future changes in gas quality. ELI requested an inventory of the consequences of variations in natural gas quality for end users. [nl

  8. Portrait Value Questionnaire's (PVQ) usefulness in explaining quality food-related consumer behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotopoulos, C.; Krystallis, Athanasios; Pagiaslis, A.

    2011-01-01

    consumers did not form a separate and clearly diversified cluster if the PVQ inventory functions as a basis for segmentation. Future models should incorporate values together with intermediate-level constructs (e.g. beliefs and/or attitudes) when attempting to predict consumer behaviour towards quality food...... products. Originality/value - The paper shows that while values can be used to meaningfully segment quality food consumers, there is still much to learn regarding the direct and indirect determinants of quality food purchase behaviour.......Purpose - Schwartz's portrait value questionnaire (PVQ) has extensively been used in personal values research. The present paper aims to validate the 40-item PVQ typology, using a nationally representative sample of 997 consumers. The main objective of the survey was to investigate whether higher...

  9. Consumer-perceived quality in 'traditional' food chains: the case of the Greek meat supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystallis, Athanassios; Chryssochoidis, George; Scholderer, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Recent food scares have increased consumer concern about meat safety. However, the Greek 'traditional' meat supply chain from producers to local butchers does not seem to realise the pressing consumer demand for certified meat quality. Or is it that, in such food chains, this demand is not so pressing yet? The present paper seeks to answer this question based on a survey conducted in the Athens area, involving a sample of 268 participants responsible for food purchasing decisions. The survey mainly aims to develop an integrated model of factors that affect consumer-perceived meat quality and to develop the profile of different consumer segments in relation to these perceptions. The substantial findings of the survey include the fact that, despite their enormous per capita consumption, the majority of consumers are not particularly involved in the meat-purchasing process. Rather they attach importance to visual intrinsic quality cues evaluated in a pre-purchasing context. In this respect, intrinsic quality cues are assigned a role similar to that of quality certification; coupled with the choice of traditional channels and the resulting personal relation with the butcher, they can be understood as efforts to decrease risk of the purchasing decision. Moreover, consumers with such behaviour seem to relate domestic country of origin of meat mostly with perceptions of general safety. Finally, a small, but promising trend with substantial marketing implications of frequent purchases of chicken and pork at supermarkets should not be ignored.

  10. Nutritional quality of major meals consumed away from home in Brazil and its association with the overall diet quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgulho, Bartira Mendes; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the nutritional quality of meals consumed away from home and its association with overall diet quality. Data was obtained from 834 participants of a Health Survey in São Paulo, Brazil. Food intake was measured by a 24-hour dietary recall applied telephonically using the Automated Multiple-Pass Method. Overall dietary quality was assessed by the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised (B-HEIR) and the Meal Quality Index (MQI) was used to evaluate dietary quality of the main meals. The association between the B-HEIR and the MQI was assessed by linear regression analysis. The consumption of at least one of the three main meals away from home was reported for 32% of respondents (70 adolescents, 156 adults and 40 elderly). The average MQI score of lunch consumed away from home was lower than lunch consumed at home, with higher amounts of total and saturated fats. The average score of B-HEIR was 58 points and was associated with the MQI score, energy, meal consumption location and gender. Lunch consumed away from home presented the worst quality, being higher in total and saturated fat. However, the meals consumed at home also need improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinimetric quality of the fire fighting simulation test as part of the Dutch fire fighters Workers' Health Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluiter Judith K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinimetric data for the fire fighting simulation test (FFST, a new test proposed for the Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS of Dutch fire fighters, were evaluated. Methods Twenty-one fire fighters took the FFST three times with one and three weeks between testing. Clinimetric quality was determined by means of reliability, agreement and validity. For reliability and agreement, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, and standard error of measurement (SEM, were analysed. For construct validity, the tests from 45 fire fighters were correlated with their own and their supervisors' rated work ability. Results The ICCs were 0.56 and 0.79 at the one-week and three-week test-retest periods, respectively. Testing times ranged from 9 to 17 minutes; the SEMs were 70 s at the one-week and 40 s at the three-week test-retest periods. The construct validity was moderate (-0.47 ≤ r ≤ -0.33; p Conclusions The FFST was reliable with acceptable agreement after three weeks. Construct validity was moderate. We recommend using FFST as a part of the WHS for Dutch fire fighters. It is advised that fire fighters should perform the FFST once as a trial before judging their performance in testing time during the second performance.

  12. MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF ICE CREAM CONSUMED IN ISTANBUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Kahraman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ice cream is a dairy product that is produced by freezing a mixture enriched with sugar, cream, stabilizers, emulsifiers and aroma materials. The present study was aimed at determining the microbiological quality of 150 ice cream samples (75 plain and 75 strawberry-flavored collected from artisanal producers in Istanbul, Turkey. The samples were investigated for total mesophilic aerobic bacteria (TMAB, Enterobacteriaceae, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes. Results showed that TMAB counts ranged from 2.0 x 101 - 2.5 x 105 cfu/g with a mean of 1.5 x 104 cfu/g, while Enterobacteriaceae count ranged from 1 - 8.8 x 103 cfu/g with a mean of 3.0 x 102 cfu/g. Overall, 23.33% (35/150 of ice cream samples were of unacceptable quality based on recommended criteria by the Turkish Food Codex. Salmonella spp. was not determined in the samples. L. monocytogenes was detected in only one strawberry-flavored ice cream sample. The results indicated that ice cream might have been contaminated with pathogens, presenting a potential hazard for public health. Therefore, it is essential to ensure the safety of final products by improving the quality of production technology and sanitation strategies.

  13. Determinants of the Credit Quality Decision on Retail Consumer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwinto Johan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to study the retail customers’ 4C (character, capacity, collateral, and capital that affected credit quality on finance companies. This study focused on the financing of used motorcycles from 2013-2014 with the position of balanced of book per December 2015. This study used artificial intelligence concept with scoring system. The dependent variable was the customer credit quality that was overdue 90 days, and the independent variables were character, capacity, collateral and capital of the customers. This study took samples of 67,500 customers using logistic regression test model. The empirical results showed that 4C had a significant effect on credit quality. There were 12 out of 13 variables that showed significant influence namely sex, age, length of stay, home ownership, marital status, employment status, cost ratio, motor guarantee brand, ownership status, down payment, and tenor. This significance was tested with a 5 percent confidence level. Income did not have significant effect.

  14. PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS CONSUMER PERCEPTION OF QUALITY DENTAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Надежда Алексеевна Кудинова

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose to examine the motivational space, values and health-social and psychological portrait of patients who rated the quality of dental care.Methodology historical, sociological, statistical. Results: In a market economy, patients’ satisfaction is of one of the most important regulators of demand.  Estimate of the quality of dental services (QDS depends on the patients having stable socio-psychological status being in a certain system of values, in space of some motives and needs. Got data have revealed that nearly 17.5% of patients dissatisfied with the quality of dental care, but the size of the motivational area of this group by nearly 20% higher than that of their opponents. With the structure of the motives are no such positions as "visiting the dentist enters my behavior stereotype", "I want to know the details of my dental health" and "The process of dental treatment gives me pleasure" In the group of patients who are satisfied QDS, relevance value orientation "good health" is 1.5 times the value of "education" in 2.5 times, and the value of "high social security" is 4.5 times higher than among the dissatisfied patients.Practical implications public health and health care.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-22

  15. PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS CONSUMER PERCEPTION OF QUALITY DENTAL CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudinova Nadezhda Alekseevna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose to examine the motivational space, values ​​and health-social and psychological portrait of patients who rated the quality of dental care. Methodology historical, sociological, statistical. Results: In a market economy, patients’ satisfaction is of one of the most important regulators of demand. Estimate of the quality of dental services (QDS depends on the patients having stable socio-psychological status being in a certain system of values, in space of some motives and needs. Got data have revealed that nearly 17.5% of patients dissatisfied with the quality of dental care, but the size of the motivational area of this group by nearly 20% higher than that of their opponents. With the structure of the motives are no such positions as "visiting the dentist enters my behavior stereotype", "I want to know the details of my dental health" and "The process of dental treatment gives me pleasure" In the group of patients who are satisfied QDS, relevance value orientation "good health" is 1.5 times the value of "education" in 2.5 times, and the value of "high social security" is 4.5 times higher than among the dissatisfied patients. Practical implications public health and health care.

  16. Fast-food consumers in Singapore: demographic profile, diet quality and weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Clare; Ma, Yi; Bastian, Amber Carla; Fen Chan, Mei; Chew, Ling

    2014-08-01

    To determine the demographic profile of fast-food consumers among adult Singapore residents and ascertain whether fast-food consumption frequency is associated with diet quality and weight status. A nationally representative cross-sectional survey including an FFQ and anthropometric measures. Participants were grouped based on their fast-food consumption frequency as non-consumer, occasional consumer or regular consumer, with regular defined as at least once per week. Individuals living in the community in Singapore. Singapore residents (n 1627) aged 18-69 years of Chinese, Malay and Indian ethnicity. Proportions of regular fast-food consumers were higher in younger age groups, higher income groups and middle education level groups. Mean daily energy intake was positively associated with fast-food consumption frequency (non-consumers 9636 kJ (2303 kcal); occasional consumers 11 159 kJ (2667 kcal); regular consumers 13 100 kJ (3131 kcal); P for trend food consumers were more likely to exceed the RDA for energy, fat and saturated fat, and less likely to meet wholegrain and fruit recommendations. Both regular consumers (OR = 1·24; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·51) and occasional consumers (OR = 1·52; 95 % CI 1·32, 1·77) were more likely to have a waist:hip ratio indicating abdominal obesity. Occasional consumers were more likely to have a BMI ≥ 23·0 kg/m2 (OR = 1·19; 95 % CI 1·04, 1·37), whereas regular consumers were less likely (OR = 0·76; 95 % CI 0·64, 0·91) to have an 'at-risk' BMI. Fast-food consumption is most prevalent in young adults, high income and middle education level groups. Frequent fast-food consumption in Singapore is associated with unfavourable dietary and nutrient profiles and abdominal obesity.

  17. Beef customer satisfaction: USDA quality grade and marination effects on consumer evaluations of top round steaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrends, J M; Goodson, K J; Koohmaraie, M; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Morgan, W W; Reagan, J O; Gwartney, B L; Wise, J W; Savell, J W

    2005-03-01

    An in-home beef study evaluated consumer ratings of top round steaks (semimembranosus) as influenced by USDA quality grade (top Choice or high Select), city (Chicago or Philadelphia), consumer segment (beef loyalists = heavy consumers of beef; budget rotators = cost-driven and split meat consumption between beef and chicken; and variety rotators = higher incomes and education and split meat consumption among beef, poultry, and other foods), degree of doneness, cooking method, and marination. Consumers evaluated each steak for overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, and flavor amount using 10-point scales (1 = dislike extremely, not at all tender, not at all juicy, dislike extremely, and none at all to 10 = like extremely, extremely tender, extremely juicy, like extremely, and an extreme amount of flavor, respectively). Quality grade affected several consumer sensory traits, with top Choice receiving higher (P Consumers in Chicago rated steaks cooked "medium and less" higher for overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, and flavor amount than those in Philadelphia (city x degree of doneness; P customers in Philadelphia received among the highest scores for overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, and flavor amount compared with any cooking method used by customers in Chicago (cooking method x city; P customers' satisfaction with top round steaks, and was the sensory trait most highly correlated to overall like, followed by tenderness, flavor amount, and juiciness. Preparation of top round steaks was crucial in consumers' likes and dislikes, and by improving flavor, higher consumer satisfaction may be achieved.

  18. Review: The variability of the eating quality of beef can be reduced by predicting consumer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, S P F; Hocquette, J-F; Pethick, D W; Legrand, I; Wierzbicki, J; Allen, P; Farmer, L J; Polkinghorne, R J; Gardner, G E

    2018-04-02

    The Meat Standards Australia (MSA) grading scheme has the ability to predict beef eating quality for each 'cut×cooking method combination' from animal and carcass traits such as sex, age, breed, marbling, hot carcass weight and fatness, ageing time, etc. Following MSA testing protocols, a total of 22 different muscles, cooked by four different cooking methods and to three different degrees of doneness, were tasted by over 19 000 consumers from Northern Ireland, Poland, Ireland, France and Australia. Consumers scored the sensory characteristics (tenderness, flavor liking, juiciness and overall liking) and then allocated samples to one of four quality grades: unsatisfactory, good-every-day, better-than-every-day and premium. We observed that 26% of the beef was unsatisfactory. As previously reported, 68% of samples were allocated to the correct quality grades using the MSA grading scheme. Furthermore, only 7% of the beef unsatisfactory to consumers was misclassified as acceptable. Overall, we concluded that an MSA-like grading scheme could be used to predict beef eating quality and hence underpin commercial brands or labels in a number of European countries, and possibly the whole of Europe. In addition, such an eating quality guarantee system may allow the implementation of an MSA genetic index to improve eating quality through genetics as well as through management. Finally, such an eating quality guarantee system is likely to generate economic benefits to be shared along the beef supply chain from farmers to retailors, as consumers are willing to pay more for a better quality product.

  19. Tomato quality: from the field to the consumer : interactions between genotype, cultivation and postharvest conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farneti, B.

    2014-01-01

    The preservation of product quality in the marketing chain is of great importance for the final financial result of all stakeholders and consumer satisfaction. Improve product quality management requires an understanding of the various aspects of product and requires the availability of

  20. Product quality : an investigation into the concept and how it is perceived by consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenkamp, J.B.E.M.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of the present work are (1) to review the literature on product quality from different perspectives, (2) to develop a model that describes the way consumers form judgments about product quality, and (3) to investigate the proposed model empirically. In addition,

  1. Video quality-of-service for consumer terminals : a novel system for programmable components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hentschel, C.; Bril, R.J.; Chen, Y.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Lan, T-H.

    2003-01-01

    Future consumer terminals will be more and more based on programmable platforms instead of only dedicated hardware. Novel scalable video algorithm (SVA) software modules trade off resource usage against quality of the output signal. SVAs together with a strategy manager and a quality-of-service

  2. Measuring service quality and its relationship to future consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, D E; Miller, S J

    1993-01-01

    The authors adapt the SERVQUAL scale for medical care services and examine it for reliability, dimensionality, and validity in a primary care clinic setting. In addition, they explore the possibility of a link between perceived service quality--and its various dimensions--and a patient's future intent to complain, compliment, repeat purchase, and switch providers. Findings from 159 matched-pair responses indicate that the SERVQUAL scale can be adapted reliably to a clinic setting and that the dimensions of reliability, dependability, and empathy are most predictive of a patient's intent to complain, compliment, repeat purchase, and switch providers.

  3. The Choice of Canned Whole Peeled Tomatoes is Driven by Different Key Quality Attributes Perceived by Consumers Having Different Familiarity with the Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frez-Muñoz, Lucía; Steenbekkers, Bea Lpa; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Canned whole peeled tomatoes are a premium tomato product; however, no information is available about the key intrinsic and extrinsic quality attributes perceived by consumers when buying this product. This research considered consumers differing in the level of familiarity with peeled tomatoes, that is, knowledge, frequency of consumption, and availability of this product, on 3 markets: Chile (low), The Netherlands (medium), and Italy (high). The perceptions and preferences of each group were studied using first focus groups and subsequently conjoint analysis in order to identify the key quality attributes leading their preferences for this product. Focus groups identified 7 intrinsic attributes (color, packing medium, tomato consistency, acidity level, sweetness level, extra ingredients, and intensity of product taste), and 5 extrinsic attributes (packaging material, product type, country of origin, brand, and label design). Significant variations according to the familiarity were found. The conjoint analyses showed that color of tomatoes was the most important intrinsic quality attribute for all groups, while packaging material was the most important extrinsic quality attribute for Chileans and Dutch, being a glass container or a can with easy open the preferred packaging for respective groups. In contrast, country of origin was the most important parameter for Italians. We concluded that intrinsic and extrinsic attributes were strongly influenced by the degree of familiarity with canned whole peeled tomatoes. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Quality of care in the intensive care unit from the perspective of patient's relatives: development and psychometric evaluation of the consumer quality index 'R-ICU'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensen, Ans; van Mol, Margo M; Menheere, Ilse; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Verhoogt, Ellen; Maris, Bea; Manders, Willeke; Vloet, Lilian; Verharen, Lisbeth

    2017-01-24

    The quality standards of the Dutch Society of Intensive Care require monitoring of the satisfaction of patient's relatives with respect to care. Currently, no suitable instrument is available in the Netherlands to measure this. This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the questionnaire-based Consumer Quality Index 'Relatives in Intensive Care Unit' (CQI 'R-ICU'). The CQI 'R-ICU' measures the perceived quality of care from the perspective of patients' relatives, and identifies aspects of care that need improvement. The CQI 'R-ICU' was developed using a mixed method design. Items were based on quality of care aspects from earlier studies and from focus group interviews with patients' relatives. The time period for the data collection of the psychometric evaluation was from October 2011 until July 2012. Relatives of adult intensive care patients in one university hospital and five general hospitals in the Netherlands were approached to participate. Psychometric evaluation included item analysis, inter-item analysis, and factor analysis. Twelve aspects were noted as being indicators of quality of care, and were subsequently selected for the questionnaire's vocabulary. The response rate of patients' relatives was 81% (n = 455). Quality of care was represented by two clusters, each showing a high reliability: 'Communication' (α = .80) and 'Participation' (α = .84). Relatives ranked the following aspects for quality of care as most important: no conflicting information, information from doctors and nurses is comprehensive, and health professionals take patients' relatives seriously. The least important care aspects were: need for contact with peers, nuisance, and contact with a spiritual counsellor. Aspects that needed the most urgent improvement (highest quality improvement scores) were: information about how relatives can contribute to the care of the patient, information about the use of meal-facilities in the hospital, and

  5. Consumer perceptions of supermarket service quality: Scale development and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PF Venter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The retail industry remains one of the largest sectors in the global economy. In South Africa, retailing is one of the toughest and most competitive industries. The South African retail business environment is becoming increasingly hostile and unforgiving, with intense competition from both domestic and foreign companies (Terblanche, 1998: 1. The findings of this preliminary study do provide basic support for a three-factor structure for supermarket service quality in terms of reliability and validity. The reliability analysis, which followed the factor analysis, reflected coefficient α values ranging from 0.85 to 0.90, indicating high internal consistency among variables within each dimension. In today's saturated retail markets, retailersface increasing hurdles to attract and maintain customers.

  6. Do individual characteristics matter? The quality of work during the implementation of a workflow management system in a Dutch social insurance company.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, B.M.E. de; Breman, P.; Batenburg, R.

    2012-01-01

    Do individual characteristics influence how the quality of work is related to the use of a workflow management system (WFM) in a Dutch social insurance organisation? This key question is addressed in this paper. Building upon DeLone and McLean’s model, we investigated the effects of gender, age,

  7. Do individual characteristics matter? The quality of work during the implementation of a workflow management system in a Dutch social insurance company

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Paul Breman; Benny de Waal; Ronald Batenburg

    2012-01-01

    Do individual characteristics influence how the quality of work is related to the use of a workflow management system (WFM) in a Dutch social insurance organisation? This key question is addressed in this paper. Building upon DeLone and McLean’s model, we investigated the effects of gender, age,

  8. Effect of third molar surgery on oral health-related quality of life in the first postoperative week using Dutch version of Oral Health Impact Profile-14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Arjen; Kieffer, Jacobien M.; Lindeboom, Jerome H.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of third molar surgery on oral health-related quality of life, related to pain and clinical variables, in the first postoperative week using the Dutch version of the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile. A total of 50 patients, referred to the Department of

  9. Effect of third molar surgery on oral health-related quality of life in the first postoperative week using Dutch version of oral health impact profile-14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, A.; Kieffer, J.M.; Lindeboom, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The present study investigated the effect of third molar surgery on oral health-related quality of life, related to pain and clinical variables, in the first postoperative week using the Dutch version of the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients,

  10. Swedish Consumers' Perception of Food Quality and Sustainability in Relation to Organic Food Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosona, Techane; Gebresenbet, Girma

    2018-04-01

    Consumers' demand for locally produced and organic foods has increased in Sweden. This paper presents the results obtained from the analysis of data acquired from 100 consumers in Sweden who participated in an online survey during March to June 2016. The objective was to identify consumers' demand in relation to organic food and sustainable food production, and to understand how the consumers evaluate food quality and make buying decisions. Qualitative descriptions, descriptive statistics and Pearson's Chi-square test (with alpha value of p price were found to be relatively less important parameters. Food buying decisions and food quality were found to be highly related with Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = 0.99.

  11. Comparing health-related quality of life of Dutch and Chinese patients with traumatic brain injury: do cultural differences play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnossen, Maryse C; Polinder, Suzanne; Vos, Pieter E; Lingsma, Hester F; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Sun, Yanming; Ye, Pengpeng; Duan, Leilei; Haagsma, Juanita A

    2017-04-14

    There is growing interest in health related quality of life (HRQoL) as an outcome measure in international trials. However, there might be differences in the conceptualization of HRQoL across different socio-cultural groups. The objectives of current study were: (I) to compare HRQoL, measured with the short form (SF)-36 of Dutch and Chinese traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients 1 year after injury and; (II) to assess whether differences in SF-36 profiles could be explained by cultural differences in HRQoL conceptualization. TBI patients are of particular interest because this is an important cause of diverse impairments and disabilities in functional, physical, emotional, cognitive, and social domains that may drastically reduce HRQoL. A prospective cohort study on adult TBI patients in the Netherlands (RUBICS) and a retrospective cohort study in China were used to compare HRQoL 1 year post-injury. Differences on subscales were assessed with the Mann-Whitney U-test. The internal consistency, interscale correlations, item-internal consistency and item-discriminate validity of Dutch and Chinese SF-36 profiles were examined. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to assess whether Dutch and Chinese data fitted the SF-36 two factor-model (physical and mental construct). Four hundred forty seven Dutch and 173 Chinese TBI patients were included. Dutch patients obtained significantly higher scores on role limitations due to emotional problems (p cultural differences in conceptualization, since item- and scale statistics were all sufficient. However, differences among Dutch and Chinese patients were found in the conceptualization of the domains vitality, mental health and social functioning. One year after TBI, Dutch and Chinese patients reported a different pattern of HRQoL. Further, there might be cultural differences in the conceptualization of some of the SF-36 subscales, which has implications for outcome evaluation in multi-national trials.

  12. Brand Image and Perceived Quality on Consumer Buying Decision of Samsung Mobile Phone in Manado

    OpenAIRE

    Tumewu, Ferdinand; Lapian, Joyce; Maindoka, Raiza

    2014-01-01

    Buying decision is the stage in which consumers make the decision or take an action whether to purchase a certain product or not. The purpose of this research is to analyze the simultaneous effect of brand images and perceived quality of consumer buying decision. This research, the population refers to people in the city of Manado which used mobile phone brand Samsung with sample size as many as 100 respondents. This research used quantitative analyze by using questionnaires and used Multiple...

  13. Consumers in a social network: the perception of clothing quality per gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Sarto Freire Castelo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The general objective of this paper is to evaluate the determinant attributes of the perception of clothing quality by the users of a social network and to verify if there are any differences of evaluation of these determinants between genders. Design/methodology/approach – To achieve the objective, a survey was conducted with a sample of 295 consumers. All participants, regardless of gender, were asked to access the SurveyMonkey site link and to answer the questions regarding the quality of clothing for both men and women. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and variance analysis (ANOVA. Findings – The main results show that: 1. The consumers of garments regard as highly important to take into consideration quality attributes when deciding to buy clothes, especially for women in relation to menswear; 2. Women has a higher perception than men as for the evaluation of the quality attributes of both women’s wear and menswear; and, 3. Clothing consumers, in particular consumers of women’s products, only consider to purchase such products if they have, in particular, style, fabric quality and fair price. Originality/value – This research filled in some theoretical and methodological gaps with regard to giving emphasis to gender differences in clothing quality assessment. This is in line with the conclusions of quality research conducted long ago, such as Olson & Jacoby’s (1972, which findings are specific to the type of product and/or consumer investigated. Therefore, generalizations beyond the product or the consumers examined are of dubious validity.

  14. Examining the nutritional quality of food and beverage consumed at Melbourne aquatic and recreation centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelsen-Robinson, Tara; Chung, Alexandra; Khalil, Marianne; Wong, Evelyn; Kurzeme, Ariana; Peeters, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Examine the nutritional quality of food and beverages consumed across a sample of community aquatic and recreation centres in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Interviewer-administered surveys of randomly selected patrons attending four aquatic and recreation centres were conducted to ascertain food and beverage items consumed over two data collection periods (May-June 2014, January-February 2015). We selected centres in and around metropolitan Melbourne with a sit-down cafeteria and children's swimming classes. We classified items by government nutrient profiling guidelines; 'green' (best choice), 'amber' (choose carefully) or 'red' (limit). A total of 2,326 surveys were conducted (response rate 63%). Thirty-five per cent of surveyed patrons consumed food or beverages while at the centre; 54% of patrons purchased from the café and 61% brought items to the centre. More than half the food consumed from the café was 'red', increasing to 92% for children. One in five children visiting the centre consumed a 'red' item bought from the centre café. The nutritional quality of food and beverages consumed at recreation centres was generally poor, with the on-site cafés providing the majority of discretionary items consumed. Implications for public health: Community aquatic and recreation centres provide an opportunity to promote healthy eating by increasing the provision of healthy options and limiting discretionary food and drink items. © 2017 The Authors.

  15. Quality management system in trade: Internationalization of marketing relations with consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Gvozden

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of marketing management is to satisfy the needs and desires of consumers. A lot of factors have influenced the consumers and their purchasing. Besides price and assortment factors there are requirements of consumers for the quality of a product. It means that a product should possess physical, chemical, designing, aesthetic, ecological and other desirable properties that should be expressed before the use of products. Because of that the quality in the theory and practice of management is beginning to affirm itself. This has been particularly expressed by the introduction of ISO 9000 which makes internationalization of quality system and circulation of goods and services without 'physical-fiscal-technical' barriers possible.

  16. Consumer preferences of student population as a determinant of successful milk quality management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Kristić

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The final result of milk quality management is a superior product with high quality levels of all intrinsic and extrinsic components. To achieve this, most activities in the management process should be directed towards the quality components that are recognized by the average consumer of milk. To determine these factors, an indicative research was carried out on a sample of 1,157 respondents among the young population. Regarding the intrinsic components, the results indicate that young consumers mostly appreciate the taste and milk fat content in the range 2.8-3.2 %, whereas regarding the extrinsic components they value price and the origin of products, that is, the origin of milk. The last component has not been fully used in promotional efforts of producers in their advertising of milk, especially in a sub segment of urban young consumers. A stronger emphasis of this would help producers to differentiate themselves, and achieve competitive advantage on domestic and international markets.

  17. Development of a questionnaire to measure consumers' perceptions of service quality in Australian community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Ardalan; Carter, Stephen R; Chen, Jenny Yimin; Rittsteuer, Claudia; Schneider, Carl R

    2018-06-11

    Recent changes within community pharmacy have seen a shift towards some pharmacies providing "value-added" services. However, providing high levels of service is resource intensive yet revenues from dispensing are declining. Of significance therefore, is how consumers perceive service quality (SQ). However, at present there are no validated and reliable instruments to measure consumers' perceptions of SQ in Australian community pharmacies. The aim of this study was to build a theory-grounded model of service quality (SQ) in community pharmacies and to create a valid survey instrument to measure consumers' perceptions of service quality. Stage 1 dealt with item generation using theory, prior research and qualitative interviews with pharmacy consumers. Selected items were then subjected to content validity and face validity. Stages 2 and 3 included psychometric testing among English-speaking adult consumers of Australian pharmacies. Exploratory factor analysis was used for item reduction and to explain the domains of SQ. In stage 1, item generation for SQ initially generated 113 items which were then refined, through content and face validity, down to 61 items. In stage 2, after subjecting the questionnaire to psychometric testing on the data from the first pharmacy (n = 374), the use of the primary dimensions of SQ was abandoned leaving 32 items representing 5 domains of SQ. In stage 3, the questionnaire was subject to further testing and item reduction in 3 other pharmacies (n = 320). SQ was best described using 23 items representing 6 domains: 'health and medicines advice', 'relationship quality', 'technical quality', 'environmental quality', 'non-prescription service', and 'health outcomes'. This research presents a theoretically-grounded and robust measurement scale developed for consumer perceptions of SQ in a community pharmacy. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Quality of diabetes care in Dutch care groups: no differences between diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone R de Bruin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between presence and nature of co-morbidity and quality of care for diabetes patients enrolled in diabetes disease management programmes provided by care groups.Methods: We performed an observational study within eight Dutch diabetes care groups. Data from patient record systems of care groups and patient questionnaires were used to determine quality of care. Quality of care was measured as provision of the recommended diabetes care, patients’ achievement of recommended clinical outcomes and patients’ perception of coordination and integration of care.Results: 527 diabetes patients without and 1187 diabetes patients with co-morbidity were included. Of the co-morbid patients, 7.8% had concordant co-morbid conditions only, 63.8% had discordant co-morbid diseases only and 28.4% had both types of conditions. Hardly any differences were observed between patients with and without co-morbidity in terms of provided care, achievement of clinical outcomes and perceived coordination and integration of care.Conclusions: Our study implies that care groups are able to provide similar quality of diabetes care for diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity. Considering the expected developments regarding additional disease management programmes in care groups, it is of importance to monitor quality of care, including patient experiences, for all chronic diseases. It will then become clear whether accountable provider-led organisations such as care groups are able to ensure quality of care for the increasing number of patients with multiple chronic conditions.

  19. Switching health insurers: the role of price, quality and consumer information search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonen, Lieke H H M; Laske-Aldershof, Trea; Schut, Frederik T

    2016-04-01

    We examine the impact of price, service quality and information search on people's propensity to switch health insurers in the competitive Dutch health insurance market. Using panel data from annual household surveys and data on health insurers' premiums and quality ratings over the period 2006-2012, we estimate a random effects logit model of people's switching decisions. We find that switching propensities depend on health plan price and quality, and on people's age, health, education and having supplementary or group insurance. Young people (18-35 years) are more sensitive to price, whereas older people are more sensitive to quality. Searching for health plan information has a much stronger impact on peoples' sensitivity to price than to service quality. In addition, searching for health plan information has a stronger impact on the switching propensity of higher than lower educated people, suggesting that higher educated people make better use of available health plan information. Finally, having supplementary insurance significantly reduces older people's switching propensity.

  20. The role of consumer protection in ensuring quality in the hotel services market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neacșu Andreea Nicoleta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In Romania, tourism is an attractive sector with high potential, but unfortunately not exploited enough, so it is not yet a source of attraction for investors and foreign tourists. Most tourists are not satisfied with the quality of the hotel services in Romania and complain about it. The existence of adequate legislation on the protection of the consumer of tourist services could lead to the provision of quality services on this market and to a higher degree of tourists’ satisfaction.In the first part, this paper presents the public organizations dealing with the protection of the consumer on the hotel services market in Romania. The second part of the paper analyzes the quality of hotel services in Romania from the tourists’ point of view. In this respect, the author made a quantitative marketing research. The results featured the opinions and attitudes of tourists regarding the quality of hotel services in Romania.

  1. Diet quality of Italian yogurt consumers: an application of the probability of adequate nutrient intake score (PANDiet).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistura, Lorenza; D'Addezio, Laura; Sette, Stefania; Piccinelli, Raffaela; Turrini, Aida

    2016-01-01

    The diet quality in yogurt consumers and non-consumers was evaluated by applying the probability of adequate nutrient intake (PANDiet) index to a sample of adults and elderly from the Italian food consumption survey INRAN SCAI 2005-06. Overall, yogurt consumers had a significantly higher mean intake of energy, calcium and percentage of energy from total sugars whereas the mean percentage of energy from total fat, saturated fatty acid and total carbohydrate were significantly (p yogurt consumers than in non-consumers, (60.58 ± 0.33 vs. 58.58 ± 0.19, p yogurt consumers. The items of calcium, potassium and riboflavin showed the major percentage variation between consumers and non-consumers. Yogurt consumers were more likely to have adequate intakes of vitamins and minerals, and a higher quality score of the diet.

  2. Consumers' choice of drinking water: Is it dependent upon perceived quality, convenience, price and attitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Nabsiah Abdul; Cheng, Patrick Tan Foon; Abustan, Ismail; Nee, Goh Yen

    2017-10-01

    Tap water is one of the many sources of water that the public as consumers can choose for drinking. This study hypothesized that perceived quality, convenience, price and environmental attitude would determine consumers's choice of drinking water following the Attribution Theory as the underlying model. A survey was carried out on Malaysia's public at large. From 301 usable data, the PLS analysis revealed that only perceived quality, convenience and price attributed towards the public's choice of drinking water while attitude was not significant. The findings are beneficial for the water sector industry, particularly for drinking water operators, state governments, and alternative drinking water manufacturers like bottled water companies. The ability to identify factors for why consumers in the marketplace choose the source of their drinking water would enable the operators to plan and strategize tactics that can disseminate accurate knowledge about the product that can motivate marketability of drinking water in Malaysia.

  3. The Effect of Brand Equity and Prodcut Quality Toward Consumer's Purchase Decision (Case Study: J.co Donuts & Coffee Manado)

    OpenAIRE

    Kiling, Christika; Tumewu, Ferdinand F. J

    2017-01-01

    Purchasing decisions are in the stage of the buyer decision-making process in which consumer actually buy. Some of the factors that influence consumer purchase decisions are brand equity and product quality. This research aimed to analyze simultaneously and partially effect of brand equity and product quality toward consumer purchase decision of J.CO Donuts & Coffee Manado. Theories supporting research are brand equity, product quality and purchase decision. The population refers to J.CO Donu...

  4. Service Quality and Consumer Perception on Retail Banking Facilities and Employees' Courtesy in Malaysia and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Moha Asri Abdullah; Noor Hazilah Abd Manaf; Kamru Ahsan; Ferdous Azam

    2014-01-01

    Service quality and consumer perception are the issues being focused solicitously by the business community today. With the expansion of the banking sector and extensive market formation, scopes of different acuity and satisfaction level for consumers seem to impose a mingle game of their perception on service quality especially in retail banking. However, this study is focused on the service quality and consumer perception on retail banking facilities and employees' courtesy in Malaysia and ...

  5. Consumer behaviour with regard to food innovation: Quality perception and decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.

    2005-01-01

    and ligeslation, quality management and control systems such as HACCP and TQM. The chapters of the first edition have been updated and extended. New chapters have been added, on consumer behaviour, corporate strategy, food safety and nutritional aspect of food innovation. Researchers and professionals in the food...

  6. Psychometric properties of the consumer quality index to assess shelter and community care services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, M.D.; Asmoredjo, J.K.; Christians, M.G.M.; Wolf, J.R.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our aim was to design a valid and reliable consumer quality index (CQI) specifically suited to assess the experiences that homeless people, homeless youth, and abused women have with shelter and community care services. METHODS: A pilot CQI questionnaire was constructed on the basis of

  7. Consumer assessment of beef tenderloin steaks from various USDA quality grades at 3 degrees of doneness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Quinn, Travis G; Brooks, J Chance; Miller, Markus F

    2015-02-01

    A consumer study was conducted to determine palatability ratings of beef tenderloin steaks from USDA Choice, USDA Select, and USDA Select with marbling scores from Slight 50 to 100 (USDA High Select) cooked to various degrees of doneness. Steaks were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 degree of doneness categories: very-rare, medium-rare, or well-done. Consumers (N = 315) were screened for preference of degree of doneness and fed 4 samples of their preferred doneness (a warm-up and one from each USDA quality grade treatment in a random order). Consumers evaluated steaks on an 8-point verbally anchored hedonic scale for tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and overall like as well as rated steaks as acceptable or unacceptable for all palatability traits. Quality grade had no effect (P > 0.05) on consumer ratings for tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and overall like scores, with all traits averaging above a 7 ("like very much") on the 8-point scale. In addition, no differences (P > 0.05) were found in the percentage of samples rated as acceptable for all palatability traits, with more than 94% of samples rated acceptable for each trait in all quality grades evaluated. Steaks cooked to well-done had lower (P Choice and Select quality grades. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. The Dutch Banking Chipcard Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. de Vries (Henk); G.W.J. Hendrikse (George)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe banks in the Dutch chipcard market initially agreed on one chipcard system. One system is attractive for companies as well as consumers. Companies, banks and retailers, prevent costs of duplication, while consumers enjoy the benefits of a widespread acceptance of one card and do not

  9. Differences between Slovak and Dutch patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft surgery regarding clinical and psychosocial predictors of physical and mental health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Baz, Noha; Ondusova, Daniela; Studencan, Martin; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van Dijk, Jitse P; Middel, Berrie

    2018-04-01

    Differences in health-related quality of life in coronary artery disease patients and associated factors between patients of central and western European descent are rarely investigated. We aim to test differences between Dutch and Slovak health-related quality of life, whether nationality predicted health-related quality of life and if standardised beta weights of health-related quality of life determinants differ across countries. An observational multicentre study at university cardiac centres in the Netherlands and Slovakia. In 226 coronary artery disease patients, health-related quality of life was measured by the Short Form Health Survey 36, anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and type D personality was assessed with the 14-item Type D Scale. Multivariate analysis was used to explore the effect of patient characteristics on the physical and mental component summaries. Estimates of each predictor's beta value of the physical and mental component summaries in the Slovak and Dutch patient sample were separately calculated using the Cummings criterion for comparison of two independent betas. Stronger predictors of physical health-related quality of life in Slovak patients were educational level, current smoking, poor functional status, history of diabetes and amount of social support. In Dutch patients, only more symptoms of depression was a stronger predictor ( Pquality of life, stronger predictors were educational level, current smoking and amount of social support. Female gender, history of myocardial infarction and more symptoms of depression were stronger predictors in Dutch patients ( Pquality of life should be considered while planning care, follow-up, health education and rehabilitation.

  10. Quality and availability of consumer information on heart failure in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semple Susan J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Provision of consumer information and patient education are considered an essential part of chronic disease management programmes developed for patients with heart failure. This study aimed to review the quality and availability of consumer information materials for people with heart failure in Australia. Methods The availability of consumer information was assessed through a questionnaire-based survey of the major organisations in Australia known, or thought, to be producing or using consumer materials on heart failure, including hospitals. The questionnaire was designed to explore issues around the use, production and dissemination of consumer materials. Only groups that had produced consumer information on heart failure were asked to complete the totality of the questionnaire. The quality of information booklets was assessed by using a standardised checklist. Results Of 101 organisations which were sent a questionnaire, 33 had produced 61 consumer resources on heart failure including 21 information booklets, 3 videos, 5 reminder fridge magnets, 7 websites, 15 self-management diaries and 10 self-management plans. Questionnaires were completed for 40 separate information resources. Most had been produced by hospitals or health services. Two information booklets had been translated into other languages. There were major gaps in the availability of these resources as more than half of the resources were developed in 2 of the 8 Australian states and territories, New South Wales and Victoria. Quality assessment of 19 information booklets showed that most had good presentation and language. Overall eight high quality booklets were identified. There were gaps in terms of topics covered, provision of references, quantitative information about treatment outcomes and quality and level of scientific evidence to support medical recommendations. In only one case was there evidence that consumers had been involved in the production of

  11. Consumer knowledge, preference, and perceived quality of dried tomato products in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owureku-Asare, Mavis; Ambrose, R P Kingsly; Oduro, Ibok; Tortoe, Charles; Saalia, Firibu K

    2017-05-01

    Postharvest losses (PHL) are incurred in the tomato value chain in Ghana and solar drying of tomato is a promising technology for reducing the loss. However, there are concerns on the usage, functionality and sensory appeal of the dried products to consumers, compounded with the lack of information and research on dried tomato processing in Ghana. A survey was carried out by administering semistructured questionnaires to 395 randomly selected and willing respondents in the Accra Metropolis. Information was obtained on the socioeconomic profile, consumption pattern, knowledge, and acceptance of tomato processing technologies and assessment of quality attributes important to consumers. Most consumers (74%) preferred tomato powder that is conveniently packaged to retain the characteristic intense taste and the flavor using Friedman's rank mean procedure. The study indicated that consumers were more concerned about good manufacturing practices during the production of solar-dried tomato (48.8%) rather than the quality attributes (8.6%). These findings indicate the need for safe solar drying procedures in order to increase consumer acceptability of solar-dried tomato products in Ghana.

  12. Does the Dutch Building Decree 2012 guarantee air quality? Quality is essential for productivity and health; Bouwbesluit 2012 garantie voor luchtkwaliteit? Kwaliteit essentieel voor productiviteit en gezondheid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollebregt, R.

    2011-10-15

    Poor indoor air quality in new buildings is a common problem. According to the Health Council scientific evidence is lacking that it is necessary to tighten ventilation requirements in the Building Decree . GGD Netherlands are advocates for stricter rules. Several studies show that the productivity in offices and the academic performance of children will benefit. [Dutch] Slechte kwaliteit van de binnenlucht in nieuwe gebouwen is een veel voorkomend probleem. Volgens de Gezondheidsraad ontbreken echter wetenschappelijke aanwijzingen dat het noodzakelijk is de ventilatie-eisen in het Bouwbesluit aan te scherpen. GGD Nederland pleit wel voor strengere regels. Diverse onderzoeken laten zien dat de productiviteit op kantoor en de leerprestaties van kinderen daarbij gebaat zijn.

  13. Innovative Food Quality Models – Developed as an Interface for Modern Consumers and Sustainable Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Pamfilie

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The intensive development of global markets correlated with the modern consumer’s demands led to a new complex approach concerning the food sector and its’ main determinants. Old market theories that describe the food market mechanisms as a simple three point process: “to produce – to sell – to buy” are now growing into elaborated models based on more determinants that have one common challenge: quality. Thus, the present study aims to highlight the importance of producers’ accountability in ensuring the quality of food products, by implementing standardize methods of production and by informing the consumers in a correctly and completely manner. In other words, the research focuses on quality management systems as defining instruments that can assure high-quality food products are being delivered at competitive prices to domestic and international markets. In this sense, food quality management principles are analyzed from the point of view of one of the biggest actors in the food industry, Mondelez International. Having as a starting point the interview results with the Procurement Innovation Manager in Quality, this paper manages to outline a consumer preference based model in developing new food products. The present conceptual model takes into consideration both quality specialist and consumer’s demands, in order to maintain the requirements of food management and safety systems and, simultaneously, to be flexible and optimize new food products according to modern consumer’s quality requirements: design.

  14. Systematic tracking, visualizing, and interpreting of consumer feedback for drinking water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Andrea M; Phetxumphou, Katherine; Gallagher, Daniel L

    2014-12-01

    Consumer feedback and complaints provide utilities with useful data about consumer perceptions of aesthetic water quality in the distribution system. This research provides a systematic approach to interpret consumer complaint water quality data provided by four water utilities that recorded consumer complaints, but did not routinely process the data. The utilities tended to write down a myriad of descriptors that were too numerous or contained a variety of spellings so that electronic "harvesting" was not possible and much manual labor was required to categorize the complaints into majors areas, such as suggested by the Drinking Water Taste and Odor Wheel or existing check-sheets. When the consumer complaint data were categorized and visualized using spider (or radar) and run-time plots, major taste, odor, and appearance patterns emerged that clarified the issue and could provide guidance to the utility on the nature and extent of the problem. A caveat is that while humans readily identify visual issues with the water, such as color, cloudiness, or rust, describing specific tastes and odors in drinking water is acknowledged to be much more difficult for humans to achieve without training. This was demonstrated with two utility groups and a group of consumers identifying the odors of orange, 2-methylisoborneol, and dimethyl trisulfide. All three groups readily and succinctly identified the familiar orange odor. The two utility groups were much more able to identify the musty odor of 2-methylisoborneol, which was likely familiar to them from their work with raw and finished water. Dimethyl trisulfide, a garlic-onion odor associated with sulfur compounds in drinking water, was the least familiar to all three groups, although the laboratory staff did best. These results indicate that utility personnel should be tolerant of consumers who can assuredly say the water is different, but cannot describe the problem. Also, it indicates that a T&O program at a utility would

  15. Credence quality coordination and consumers' willingness-to-pay for certified halal labelled meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Wim; Rutsaert, Pieter; Bonne, Karijn; Vermeir, Iris

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on halal credence quality coordination and Muslim consumers' willingness to buy and pay for certified halal labelled meat at the supermarket and the Islamic butcher. Cross-sectional data were collected through a survey with 202 Muslim consumers in Belgium. Findings indicate that more acculturated and female consumers are more in favour of purchasing certified halal labelled meat in a supermarket. Important conditions are that supermarkets can provide a guarantee of separating halal from non-halal meat and of the organisation of adequate verification and control. Results further show that more Muslim consumers are willing to pay a price premium (of 13% on average) for halal labelled meat at the Islamic butcher shop than at the supermarket. The higher the importance attached to a certified halal label and the more distrust in the actual halal meat status, the higher the likelihood that a Muslim consumer is willing to pay a higher price for certified halal labelled meat at the Islamic butcher shop. Gender and generation determine the actual premium Muslim consumers are willing to pay. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving the sensory quality of flavored liquid milk by engaging sensory analysis and consumer preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Ruicong; Zhao, Lei; Shi, Jingye

    2016-07-01

    Developing innovative products that satisfy various groups of consumers helps a company maintain a leading market share. The hedonic scale and just-about-right (JAR) scale are 2 popular methods for hedonic assessment and product diagnostics. In this paper, we chose to study flavored liquid milk because it is one of the most necessary nutrient sources in China. The hedonic scale and JAR scale methods were combined to provide directional information for flavored liquid milk optimization. Two methods of analysis (penalty analysis and partial least squares regression on dummy variables) were used and the results were compared. This paper had 2 aims: (1) to investigate consumer preferences of basic flavor attributes of milk from various cities in China; and (2) to determine the improvement direction for specific products and the ideal overall liking for consumers in various cities. The results showed that consumers in China have local-specific requirements for characteristics of flavored liquid milk. Furthermore, we provide a consumer-oriented product design method to improve sensory quality according to the preference of particular consumers. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. First Dutch Consensus of Pain Quality Indicators for Pain Treatment Facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, N. de; Grotel, M. van; Patijn, J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Kleef, M. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a general consensus about the need to define and improve the quality of pain treatment facilities. Although guidelines and recommendations to improve the quality of pain practice management have been launched, provision of appropriate pain treatment is inconsistent and the

  18. From Quality in Services to Loyalty: Theoretical Perspective of Consumer Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Roque Mangini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Services show differences related to conception, production form, how they are consumed and how they are evaluated. These differences or characteristics influence directly on the evaluation of quality offered in the service. It is possible to observe certain consumer’s behavior with the evaluation of quality offered in a service, which could cause total rejection in future purchases. On the other hand, with the satisfaction of results, the consumer has a greater willingness to purchase, develop loyalty and make profit for the service operation. In order to understand the dynamic involving service quality and the formation of consumer’s loyalty, this theoretical article sought in literature the basis to create proposals that could increase the edges of knowledge frontiers in service marketing. As result, eight proposals were developed which entails future researches so that the empirical results could turn the theoretical findings into real results.

  19. Perceived relevance and information needs regarding food topics and preferred information sources among Dutch adults: results of a quantitative consumer study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, van S.M.E.; Hiddink, G.J.; Koelen, M.A.; Graaf, de C.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: For more effective nutrition communication, it is crucial to identify sources from which consumers seek information. Our purpose was to assess perceived relevance and information needs regarding food topics, and preferred information sources by means of quantitative consumer research.

  20. European beef consumers' interest in a beef eating-quality guarantee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Wim; Van Wezemael, Lyn; de Barcellos, Marcia Dutra

    2010-01-01

    and Germany to assess their opinions about beef muscle profiling and their interest in a beef eating-quality guarantee. Findings indicate that both concepts are well accepted by European beef consumers, although not unconditional. Besides acknowledging the opportunity to purchase beef with guaranteed...... tenderness, consumers express some reserve related to the possible upgrading of lower value cuts, too much standardisation, and the fact that tenderness is to some extent subjective. They further require the system to be simple, sufficiently documented and independent-party controlled. The insights obtained...

  1. Consumer Preferences for Animal Source Foods in Uganda: Quality, Retail Forms and Retail Outlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadhem Mtimet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a rapid consumer survey undertaken in Uganda. The survey aimed at identifying preferred quality and safety attributes, retail forms and retail outlets for major livestock products and by type of consumers. Results of the survey, combined with nationally representative household datasets, allows description of both the quantitative and qualitative dimensions of the developing market for animal-source foods, which is anticipated to provide major business opportunities for small-scale livestock producers in the short and medium terms.

  2. The quality of mobile phone services provided by Romanian operators, from consumers` perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doru Alexandru Pleşea

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mobile services are distinguished through their quality, either we speak about the way the client is approached and placed in the centre of the operator's actions, or about the services the client benefits in his capacity as a client. The Romanian mobile operators’ services have greatly evolved from their launch in 1997. Along these times, the mobile operators brought more value to these services, due to their need to meet the consumers' expectations with services of high quality and competitiveness. Usually the Romanian consumers place the price in the forefront of their service/mobile phone services acquisition, but an objective analyze of the quality of the mobile phone services has to take into account both technical aspects of the services and the interfacing services too. Therefore, this paper takes into account technical characteristics of the services such as national telephony coverage, data transmission services coverage, the signal quality, maximum speed of data transfer as well as related services such as distribution network, sales and support sales services, after-sales services, and range of available terminals. Based on mobile services comprehensive analysis made available to consumers by the major players on the Romanian market, this paper aims to highlight the main reasons of the consumers’ satisfaction and dissatisfaction.

  3. A Bayesian negotiation model for quality and price in a multi-consumer context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufo, M.J.; Martín, J.; Pérez, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian decision theory plays a significant role in a large number of applications that have as main aim decision making. At the same time, negotiation is a process of making joint decisions that has one of its main foundations in decision theory. In this context, an important issue involved in industrial and commercial applications is product reliability/quality demonstration. The goal is, among others, product commercialization with the best possible price. This paper provides a Bayesian sequential negotiation model in the context of sale of a product based on two characteristics: product price and reliability/quality testing. The model assumes several parties, a manufacturer and different consumers, who could be considered adversaries. In addition, a general setting for which the manufacturer offers a product batch to the consumers is taken. Both the manufacturer and the consumers have to use their prior beliefs as well as their preferences. Sometimes, the model will require to update the previous beliefs. This can be made through the corresponding posterior distribution. Anyway, the main aim is that at least one consumer accepts the product batch based on either product price or product price and reliability/quality. The general model is solved from the manufacturer viewpoint. Thus a general approach that allows us to calculate an optimal price and sample size for testing is provided. Finally, two applications show how the proposed technique can be applied in practice. - Highlights: • A general sequential Bayesian model of decision has been developed. • Product price and reliability/quality testing have been considered. • An original approach is implemented in order to obtain appropriate optimal values. • Distributions widely used in reliability and quality contexts have been taken.

  4. The Influence of Product Quality and Consumer Perception to Purchase Decision on Canon Dslr Camera in Manado

    OpenAIRE

    Gunadi, Nikita Prisilia

    2015-01-01

    Marketing is very important to the success of the company, marketing is used by employers as a tool to influence consumers, especially in making a purchase of a product. Consumer purchasing decision is a very important activity for the company, as one goal obtaining profits to the company. This study aimed to determine the influence of product quality, and consumer perception to purchase decision on canon DSLR camera in Manado. Quality has a direct impact on the performance products and servi...

  5. Public reporting in health care: how do consumers use quality-of-care information? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, M.J.; Bosch, M.C.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Leatherman, S.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the underlying goals of public reporting is to encourage the consumer to select health care providers or health plans that offer comparatively better quality-of-care. OBJECTIVE: To review the weight consumers give to quality-of-care information in the process of choice, to

  6. Influence of 1-MCP treatments on eating quality and consumer preferences of ‘Qinmei’ kiwifruit during shelf life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumers and growers in China sometime complain that Kiwifruits treated with an ethylene action inhibitor 1-MCP are difficult to ripen and show poor eating quality. This study addresses the quality parameters affecting consumer preferences and reevaluates the necessity of 1-MCP application for stor...

  7. Research on the Consumers Willingness to Buy Traceable Pork with Different Quality Information:A Case Study of Consumers in Weifang, Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan; BU; Dian; ZHU; Linhai; WU

    2013-01-01

    The traceability system can effectively reduce the food safety risks, however, it is confronted with various problems during its implementation. In this context, the paper carries out a case study of consumers in Weifang, Shandong Province, and studies their willingness to pay the traceable pork with different quality information. The results indicate that, the consumers show high expectations towards the introduction of traceability system, and they tend to buy the traceable pork only with breeding and slaughter information; their behaviors of purchase are greatly influenced by the following factors: the consumers education, age, income, attention on food safety and whether there are pregnant family members, etc..

  8. Relevance of brands and beef quality differentials for the consumer at the time of purchase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Mecca Giacomazzi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to identify the purchase habits and preferences of beef consumers, their level of knowledge on brands and products with quality differentials (certifications, packaging, premium lines, and the relevance of different attributes in the purchase decision, and to group consumers according to the profile of purchase decision. The methodology consisted of using an information-collecting instrument applied to 271 beef consumers. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistical analyses, chi-square analysis, and correspondence analysis, relating socio-demographic profile of the respondents with the other variables collected. Chi-square and correspondence analyses showed that younger consumers with lower levels of income and education are influenced by posters and advertisements at the point of sale, unaware of differentiated and branded products, and that they do not choose branded beef at the time of purchase. Consumers over 60 years showed a more conservative purchase profile, with no influence. The most valued attributes are appearance, price, and type of cut, being brand and certifications little relevant as tools to help decide the product purchase.

  9. Sensory analysis and consumer acceptance of 140 high-quality extra virgin olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Enrico; Bendini, Alessandra; Popp, Martin; Bongartz, Annette

    2014-08-01

    Sensory analysis is a crucial tool for evaluating the quality of extra virgin olive oils. One aim of such an investigation is to verify if the sensory attributes themselves - which are strictly related to volatile and phenolic compounds - may permit the discrimination of high-quality products obtained by olives of different cultivars and/or grown in various regions. Moreover, a crucial topic is to investigate the interdependency between relevant parameters determining consumer acceptance and objective sensory characteristics evaluated by the panel test. By statistically analysing the sensory results, a grouping - but not discriminatory - effect was shown for some cultivars and some producing areas. The preference map shows that the most appreciated samples by consumers were situated in the direction of the 'ripe fruity' and 'sweet' axis and opposite to the 'bitter' and 'other attributes' (pungent, green fruity, freshly cut grass, green tomato, harmony, persistency) axis. Extra virgin olive oils produced from olives of the same cultivars and grown in the same areas shared similar sensorial attributes. Some differences in terms of expectation and interpretation of sensory characteristics of extra virgin olive oils might be present for consumers and panellists: most of the consumers appear unfamiliar with positive sensorial attributes, such as bitterness and pungency. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Psychometric test of the Team Climate Inventory-short version investigated in Dutch quality improvement teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAbstract BACKGROUND: Although some studies have used the Team Climate Inventory within teams working in health care settings, none of these included quality improvement teams. The aim of our study is to investigate the psychometric properties of the 14-item version of the Team Climate

  11. Quality of Life and Behavioral Functioning in Dutch Children with a History of Kawasaki Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacke, Carline E.; Haverman, Lotte; Berk, Birgit M.; van Rossum, Marion A.; Kuipers, Irene M.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The authors evaluated health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and behavioral functioning in patients with a history of Kawasaki disease (KD). Study design A cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary referral center for KD follow-up in 280 patients (mean age 8.6 years, 60.0% male).

  12. Playing language games: higher education quality dynamics in Dutch national policies since 1985

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Kasja; Aarts, Noelle; Jacobs, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Higher education quality is a vague, ambiguous, multiple, and essentially contested concept. Quality’s contested character involves endless disputes about its proper use which makes it problematic to handle in governmental policies. Wittgenstein’s notion of language games is used to understand how,

  13. The quality of Dutch hospital drug formularies : Evaluation of technical features and organisational information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; de Vries, CS; Engles, SAG; Brouwers, JRBJ; de Blaey, CJ; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    Introduction: Hospital drug formularies (HDFs) are widely used tools to help influence clinicians' prescribing behaviour. Besides the therapeutic quality of HDFs, the available information and the way in which this is presented are key factors in HDFs' success or failure to influence prescribing

  14. Coping style and quality of life in Dutch intensive care unit survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dettling-Ihnenfeldt, Daniela S.; de Graaff, Aafke E.; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans; van der Schaaf, Marike

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore coping styles among intensive care unit (ICU) survivors and investigate the association between coping style and quality of life (QOL). In this cross-sectional multicenter study, 150 adult patients who were mechanically ventilated in an ICU for ≥2 days and

  15. Perceptions About The ISO 9000 Quality System Standard Revision And Its Value: The Dutch Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van der Wiele (Ton); J.D. van Iwaarden (Jos); A.R.T. Williams (Roger); B.G. Dale (Barry)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the research reported in this paper is to assess the relative value of the 2000 version of the ISO 9000 series of quality management system standards in comparison to the 1994 version. 773 organisations in the Netherlands which have all been certified to the ISO 9000 standard

  16. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J E; Lemmens, Lidwien C.; Baan, Caroline A.; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2016-01-01

    Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined

  17. Quality aspects of Dutch general practice based data : A conceptual approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, C.; Hoeymans, N.; Schellevis, F.G.; van Oers, J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. General practice–based data, collected within general practice registration networks (GPRNs), are widely used in research. The quality of the data is important but the recording criteria about what type of information is collected and how this information should be recorded differ

  18. Service quality: understanding and implementing the concept in the clinical laboratory. Match service quality to consumer expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, S J

    1989-01-01

    The increasingly competitive health-care marketplace has mandated that health-care managers pay careful attention to the issue of quality from the perspective of the consumer. The importance of this issue is underscored by the fact that numerous health-care institutions and associations have recently begun to recognize the urgent need to obtain a greater understanding of service quality in a health-care situation. This article suggests means to understand, identify, improve, and implement effective approaches to this vital aspect of the marketing mix.

  19. Portuguese quality wine and the region-of-origin effect: consumers' and retailers' perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    José Cadima Ribeiro; José de Freitas Santos

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relative importance of region of origin associated with extrinsic (price, brand, promotion) and intrinsic (grape, type of wine, colour, age, special references) cues in the decisions of final consumers and small retailers to buy Portuguese quality wine. In order to attain this goal we conducted a survey through face-to-face interviews in the Minho region. The results show that the dominant factor of influence in the acquisition of wine is the region of origin, both...

  20. "This body does not want free medicines": South African consumer perceptions of drug quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aarti; Gauld, Robin; Norris, Pauline; Rades, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Like many other developing countries, South Africa provides free medicines through its public health care facilities. Recent policies encourage generic substitution in the private sector. This study explored South African consumer perceptions of drug quality and whether these perceptions influenced how people procured and used their medicines. METHODS The study was undertaken in Durban, Cape Town and Johannesburg in South Africa between December 2005 and January 2006. A combination of purposive and snowball sampling was used to recruit participants from low and middle socio-economic groups as well as the elderly and teenagers. Data were collected through 12 focus group discussions involving a total of 73 participants. Interviews were tape-recorded. Thematic analysis was performed on the transcripts. RESULTS Irrespective of socio-economic status, respondents described medicine quality in terms of the effect the medicine produced on felt symptoms. Generic medicines, as well as medicines supplied without charge by the state, were considered to be poor quality and treated with suspicion. Respondents obtained medicines from three sources: public sector hospitals and/or clinics, dispensing doctors and community pharmacies. Cost, avoidance of feeling 'second-class', receiving individualized care and choice in drug selection were the main determinants influencing their procurement behaviour. Selection of over-the-counter medicines was influenced by prior knowledge of products, through advertising and previous use. Participants perceived that they had limited influence on selection of prescription medicines. Generic substitution would be supported if the doctor, rather than the pharmacist, recommended it. CONCLUSIONS Our findings emphasize the importance of meaningful consumer involvement in the development of national medicines policies, and strategic campaigns targeting consumers and prescribers regarding the quality of generic and essential medicines. Where

  1. Consumers´opinion of inflation bias due to quality improvements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanousek, Jan; Filer, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2004), s. 235-254 ISSN 0013-0079 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 595 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7085904 Keywords : consumers ´opinion * inflation bias * quality improvements Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.373, year: 2004 http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=14886614&site=ehost-live

  2. Issues of quality and consumer rights in the health care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, C

    1998-04-01

    This Issue Brief describes how the structure of the health care market has changed in the recent years. It outlines the growth in managed care and the changes in the types of managed care plans available. In addition, it discusses the issue of quality in the health care market. It also includes an overview of the legislative topics and issues relating to quality and consumer rights that policymakers are currently considering. Growth in national health expenditures, the medical care price index, and employer health care costs has slowed significantly since 1990. This decreased growth has coincided with substantial increases in managed care plan enrollment. The percentage of employees enrolled in managed care plans increased from 48 percent to 85 percent from 1992 to 1997. Quality is a multidimensional concept. Although individuals may agree on its components, they may disagree on the relative importance of these components. Therefore, disagreement exists not only on how to measure quality but also on how it is defined. Consequently, policy decisions need to be based on an evaluation of a particular law's effect as opposed to its stated goal or intent. This distinction is important because a law that addresses access or consumer rights does not necessarily address the quality of care a consumer receives. Ultimately, whether an individual believes that a law truly addresses quality will depend in a large part on his or her subjective opinion of what quality entails. To date, comparison of the quality of managed care plans with that of fee-for-service plans has not produced results that uniformly differentiate between these two plan types in either a positive or a negative way. In addition, it is important to note that the current debate on the quality of care provided in the health care market is not new to the present managed care era. The regulations and mandates discussed in this report would not guarantee increased quality in the health care market, unless quality

  3. Towards quality criteria for regional public health reporting: concept mapping with Dutch experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bon-Martens, Marja J H; Achterberg, Peter W; van de Goor, Ien A M; van Oers, Hans A M

    2012-06-01

    In the Netherlands, municipal health assessments are carried out by 28 Regional Health Services, serving 418 municipalities. In the absence of guidelines, regional public health reports were developed in two pilot regions on the basis of the model and experience of national health reporting. Though they were well received and positively evaluated, it was not clear which specific characteristics determined 'good public health reporting'. Therefore, this study was set up to develop a theoretical framework for the quality of regional public health reporting in The Netherlands. Using concept mapping as a standardized tool for conceptualization, 35 relevant reporting experts formulated short statements in two different brainstorming sessions, describing specific quality criteria of regional public health reports. After the removal of duplicates, the list was supplemented with international criteria, and the statements were sent to each participant for rating and sorting. The results were processed statistically and represented graphically. The output was discussed and interpreted, leading to the final concept map. The final concept map consisted of 97 criteria, grouped into 13 clusters, and plotted in two dimensions: a 'product' dimension, ranging from 'production' to 'content', and a 'context' dimension, ranging from 'science' to 'policy'. The three most important clusters were: (i) 'solution orientation', (ii) 'policy relevance' and (iii) 'policy impact'. This study provided a theoretical framework for the quality of regional public health reporting, indicating relevant domains and criteria. Further work should translate domains and criteria into operational indicators for evaluating regional public health reports.

  4. A Consumer Health Information System to Assist Patients Select Quality Home Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Zikos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients evaluate the quality of home health agencies (HHAs using the Health Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS survey. This paper describes a prototype community health information system to help patients select appropriate and quality HHAs, according to the location, proprietary status, type of service, and year of HHA establishment. Five HCAHPS indicators were selected: “summary rating”, “quality of care”, “professional care”, “communication”, and “recommend agency”. Independent t-test analysis showed that agencies offering Speech Pathology, Medical-Social, or Home Health Aide services, receive significantly worse HCAHPS ratings, while mean ratings vary significantly across different US states. Multiple comparisons with post hoc ANOVA revealed differences between and within HHAs of different proprietary status (p < 0.001: governmental HHAs receiving higher ratings than private HHAs. Finally, there was observed a relationship between all five quality rating variables and the HHA year of establishment (Pearson, p < 0.001. The older the agency is, the better the HCAPS summary ratings. Findings provided the knowledge to design of a consumer health information system, to provide rankings filtered according to user criteria, comparing the quality rankings of eligible HHAs. Users can also see how a specific agency is ranked against eligible HHAs. Ultimately, the system aims to support the patient community with contextually realistic comparisons in an effort to choose optimal HH service.

  5. Response of consumer and research grade indoor air quality monitors to residential sources of fine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, B C; Delp, W W

    2018-04-23

    The ability to inexpensively monitor PM 2.5 to identify sources and enable controls would advance residential indoor air quality (IAQ) management. Consumer IAQ monitors incorporating low-cost optical particle sensors and connections with smart home platforms could provide this service if they reliably detect PM 2.5 in homes. In this study, particles from typical residential sources were generated in a 120 m 3 laboratory and time-concentration profiles were measured with 7 consumer monitors (2-3 units each), 2 research monitors (Thermo pDR-1500, MetOne BT-645), a Grimm Mini Wide-Range Aerosol Spectrometer (GRM), and a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance with Filter Dynamic Measurement System (FDMS), a Federal Equivalent Method for PM 2.5 . Sources included recreational combustion (candles, cigarettes, incense), cooking activities, an unfiltered ultrasonic humidifier, and dust. FDMS measurements, filter samples, and known densities were used to adjust the GRM to obtain time-resolved mass concentrations. Data from the research monitors and 4 of the consumer monitors-AirBeam, AirVisual, Foobot, Purple Air-were time correlated and within a factor of 2 of the estimated mass concentrations for most sources. All 7 of the consumer and both research monitors substantially under-reported or missed events for which the emitted mass was comprised of particles smaller than 0.3 μm diameter. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Interactive effects of genotype and food quality on consumer growth rate and elemental content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Clay; Wagner, Nicole D; Frost, Paul C

    2017-05-01

    Consumer body stoichiometry is a key trait that links organismal physiology to population and ecosystem-level dynamics. However, as elemental composition has traditionally been considered to be constrained within a species, the ecological and evolutionary factors shaping consumer elemental composition have not been clearly resolved. To this end, we examined the causes and extent of variation in the body phosphorus (P) content and the expression of P-linked traits, mass specific growth rate (MSGR), and P use efficiency (PUE) of the keystone aquatic consumer Daphnia using lake surveys and common garden experiments. While daphnid body %P was relatively constrained in field assemblages sampled across an environmental P gradient, unique genotypes isolated from these lakes showed highly variable phenotypic responses when raised across dietary P gradients in the laboratory. Specifically, we observed substantial inter- and intra-specific variation and differences in daphnid responses within and among our study lakes. While variation in Daphnia body %P was mostly due to plastic phenotypic changes, we documented considerable genetic differences in daphnid MSGR and PUE, and relationships between MSGR and body P content were highly variable among genotypes. Overall, our study found that consumer responses to food quality may differ considerably among genotypes and that relationships between organismal life-history traits and body stoichiometry may be strongly influenced by genetic and environmental variation in natural assemblages. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. Light quality and efficiency of consumer grade solid state lighting products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Corell, Dennis Dan; Thorseth, Anders; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2013-03-01

    The rapid development in flux and efficiency of Light Emitting Diodes (LED) has resulted in a flooding of the lighting market with Solid State Lighting (SSL) products. Many traditional light sources can advantageously be replaced by SSL products. There are, however, large variations in the quality of these products, and some are not better than the ones they are supposed to replace. A lack of quality demands and standards makes it difficult for consumers to get an overview of the SSL products. Here the results of a two year study investigating SSL products on the Danish market are presented. Focus has been on SSL products for replacement of incandescent lamps and halogen spotlights. The warm white light and good color rendering properties of these traditional light sources are a must for lighting in Denmark and the Nordic countries. 266 SSL replacement lamps have been tested for efficiency and light quality with respect to correlated color temperature and color rendering properties. This shows a trade-off between high color rendering warm white light and energy efficiency. The lumen and color maintenance over time has been investigated and results for products running over 11000 h will be presented. A new internet based SSL product selection tool will be shown. Here the products can be compared on efficiency, light quality parameters, thus providing a better basis for the selection of SSL products for consumers.

  8. Rice Grain Quality and Consumer Preferences: A Case Study of Two Rural Towns in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Rosa Paula; Pede, Valerien O; McKinley, Justin; Velarde, Orlee; Demont, Matty

    2016-01-01

    Hedonic pricing analysis is conducted to determine the implicit values of various attributes in the market value of a good. In this study, hedonic pricing analysis was applied to measure the contribution of grain quality search and experience attributes to the price of rice in two rural towns in the Philippines. Rice samples from respondents underwent quantitative routine assessments of grain quality. In particular, gelatinization temperature and chalkiness, two parameters that are normally assessed through visual scores, were evaluated by purely quantitative means (differential scanning calorimetry and by digital image analysis). Results indicate that rice consumed by respondents had mainly similar physical and chemical grain quality attributes. The respondents' revealed preferences were typical of what has been previously reported for Filipino rice consumers. Hedonic regression analyses showed that grain quality characteristics that affected price varied by income class. Some of the traits or socioeconomic factors that affected price were percent broken grains, gel consistency, and household per capita rice consumption. There is an income effect on rice price and the characteristics that affect price vary between income classes.

  9. Rice Grain Quality and Consumer Preferences: A Case Study of Two Rural Towns in the Philippines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Paula Cuevas

    Full Text Available Hedonic pricing analysis is conducted to determine the implicit values of various attributes in the market value of a good. In this study, hedonic pricing analysis was applied to measure the contribution of grain quality search and experience attributes to the price of rice in two rural towns in the Philippines. Rice samples from respondents underwent quantitative routine assessments of grain quality. In particular, gelatinization temperature and chalkiness, two parameters that are normally assessed through visual scores, were evaluated by purely quantitative means (differential scanning calorimetry and by digital image analysis. Results indicate that rice consumed by respondents had mainly similar physical and chemical grain quality attributes. The respondents' revealed preferences were typical of what has been previously reported for Filipino rice consumers. Hedonic regression analyses showed that grain quality characteristics that affected price varied by income class. Some of the traits or socioeconomic factors that affected price were percent broken grains, gel consistency, and household per capita rice consumption. There is an income effect on rice price and the characteristics that affect price vary between income classes.

  10. The Business, Ethics, and Quality Cases for Consumer Engagement in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassmiller, Susan; Bilazarian, Ani

    2018-04-01

    The aims of this study were to illustrate the quality, safety, cost-effectiveness, and ethics of consumer engagement initiatives and identify promising practices and leadership strategies used by nursing leaders. A literature review was performed with supplementary interviews conducted with 25 key nursing informants including nursing executives and chief nursing officers at acute care hospitals, community health centers, policy institutions, and quality and safety organizations. A narrative synthesis approach was used to identify and compare existing measures of consumer engagement and compassionate care in acute care settings. One-hour semistructured interviews were performed, and information was gathered by notes and audio recordings. Consumer engagement activities focusing on compassionate patient and provider interactions involving patients and family as partners on the care team are associated with increases in treatment savings and patient safety in terms of length of stay and reduced medication errors. Engagement initiatives support employee health and reduce compassion fatigue. Findings illustrate the impact of patients and family engagement in decision making and promising organizational practices that reinforce engagement.

  11. The Business, Ethics, and Quality Cases for Consumer Engagement in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassmiller, Susan; Bilazarian, Ani

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aims of this study were to illustrate the quality, safety, cost-effectiveness, and ethics of consumer engagement initiatives and identify promising practices and leadership strategies used by nursing leaders. METHODS A literature review was performed with supplementary interviews conducted with 25 key nursing informants including nursing executives and chief nursing officers at acute care hospitals, community health centers, policy institutions, and quality and safety organizations. A narrative synthesis approach was used to identify and compare existing measures of consumer engagement and compassionate care in acute care settings. One-hour semistructured interviews were performed, and information was gathered by notes and audio recordings. RESULTS Consumer engagement activities focusing on compassionate patient and provider interactions involving patients and family as partners on the care team are associated with increases in treatment savings and patient safety in terms of length of stay and reduced medication errors. Engagement initiatives support employee health and reduce compassion fatigue. CONCLUSION Findings illustrate the impact of patients and family engagement in decision making and promising organizational practices that reinforce engagement. PMID:29470381

  12. Stability of the nine sky quality meters in the Dutch night sky brightness monitoring network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Outer, Peter; Lolkema, Dorien; Haaima, Marty; van der Hoff, Rene; Spoelstra, Henk; Schmidt, Wim

    2015-04-22

    In the context of monitoring abundance of artificial light at night, the year-to-year stability of Sky Quality Meters (SQMs) is investigated by analysing intercalibrations derived from two measurement campaigns that were held in 2011 and 2012. An intercalibration comprises a light sensitivity factor and an offset for each SQM. The campaigns were concerned with monitoring measurements, each lasting one month. Nine SQMs, together forming the Night Sky Brightness Monitoring network (MHN) in The Netherlands, were involved in both campaigns. The stability of the intercalibration of these instruments leads to a year-to-year uncertainty (standard deviation) of 5% in the measured median luminance occurring at the MHN monitoring locations. For the 10-percentiles and 90-percentiles, we find 8% and 4%, respectively. This means that, for urban and industrial areas, changes in the sky brightness larger than 5% become detectable. Rural and nature areas require an 8%-9% change of the median luminance to be detectable. The light sensitivety agrees within 8% for the whole group of SQMs.

  13. Analyzing The Effect Of Marketing Mix, Service Quality And Brand Equity On Consumer Buying Decision In Indomaret Manado

    OpenAIRE

    Tumewu, Ferdinand J; Mongdong, Vilanri G

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays retail industry has been growing quite fast supported by the consumer behavior that has begun to shift from traditional to modern retail market. APRINDO predicted that the growth would be around 10% by 2015. Indomaret franchise is the pioneer in Indonesia. The objective of this research is to identify the effect of marketing mix, service quality and brand equity on consumer buying decision. In this research, the population refers to the consumer of Indomaret Manado with cluster sampl...

  14. Brand Name, Store Image, and Country-of-Origin: The Effects on Consumers' Perception of Quality and Price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret C. A.

    1993-01-01

    A review of literature indicated that, with regard to brand labels, consumers' perception of price, but not of quality, was affected. Consumers expected to pay more for goods bought in a higher status store and rated imported goods as being more expensive than domestically produced goods. Products from developing countries received lower quality…

  15. What value to attribute to electricity quality? The opinion of consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignon, H.

    2012-01-01

    At a time when the media's centre stage is often taken up by questions relating to the cost of electricity and its trend, it may seem paradoxical to focus on power cuts. Yet, our economies have never before been as sensitive to security and quality of supply, because of the way demand is evolving: the growth of information technology and communication, the move to a tertiary economy, changes in consumer habits and life styles, whether personal or professional. It is this sensitivity that RTE (France's public electricity distributor) has decided to survey. (author)

  16. SEAFOODplus - how to provide health promoting, safe seafood of high eating quality to consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, Torger

    2008-01-01

    in the diet to diminish the increased incidences of e.g. cardiovascular, cancer and inflammatory diseases is being assessed by performing dietary intervention and epidemiological studies. Other focus areas are health of young populations, to treat overweight, to prevent osteoporosis and postpartum depression......, by identifying risk factors and avoiding risks caused by viral and bacterial contamination and biogenic amines in seafood. The total value chain is addressed by developing consumer driven tailor-made, functional seafood products to improve health and to ensure nutritional quality and safety by full utilisation...

  17. Effect of two Spanish breeds and diet on beef quality including consumer preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Guillermo; Blanco, Mireia; Albertí, Pere; Panea, Begoña; Joy, Margalida; Casasús, Isabel

    2014-03-30

    Farmers in dry mountain areas are changing their management strategies to improve livestock farming efficiency, by using different forages or different breeds. The effect of breed (Parda de Montaña vs. Pirenaica) and finishing diet (grazing on meadows vs. a total mixed ration (50% alfalfa, 40% maize grain, 10% straw)) on carcass characteristics and meat quality of steers was studied. Parda de Montaña had a greater (P < 0.01) amount of intramuscular fat than Pirenaica. The finishing diet did not influence carcass fat color, but fatty acid composition was slightly affected. Finishing steers on a total mixed ration increased the percentage of fat of the 10th rib (P < 0.001). Supplementation with concentrates increased the diet energy concentration and also increased the dressing percentage. Both breeds had similar carcass characteristics. Consumers preferred beef from the Pirenaica breed because of its greater tenderness. Consumers did not differentiate between beef from animals fed different finishing diets. However, consumers who like meat very much preferred meat aged in a cooler at 4 °C for 15 days rather than 8 days. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. The effects of illness beliefs and chemotherapy impact on quality of life in Japanese and Dutch patients with breast or lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kloot, Willem A; Uchida, Yuka; Inoue, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Yamaoka, Kazue; Nortier, Hans W R; Kaptein, Ad A

    2016-02-01

    Responses to diagnosis and treatment of cancer are mediated by a patient's illness perceptions. Such perceptions, though different among individuals, may be culturally dependent, and act upon health related quality of life (HRQOL). Over time, individual patients show different types of response trajectories. Four issues were investigated: (I) country and disease differences in illness beliefs between Japanese and Dutch patients with lung or breast cancer; (II) country and disease differences in HRQOL in early chemotherapy; (III) individual, country, and disease differences among HRQOL trajectories; (IV) the impact of illness beliefs on HRQOL trajectories. A total of 89 Japanese and Dutch patients with lung or breast cancer cooperated immediately before, one week after, and eight weeks after the start of chemotherapy. Data included the EORTC QLQ-C30 quality of life (QL) questionnaire and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ). EORTC QLQ-C30 scales were summarized by two dimensions: generalized quality of life (GENQOL) and psychological well-being (PSYQOL). (I) Japanese patients had higher means on B-IPQ's concern and time line than Dutch patients. Japanese lung cancer patients had a higher mean on treatment control than all other patients; (II) no differences between country and cancer type occurred on the two HRQOL dimensions. First assessment HRQOL differed significantly from the second and third assessments without differences between the latter two. Between the first two assessments, a decrease in GENQOL occurred, together with an improvement in PSYQOL; (III) individual differences dominated the trajectories; (IV) negative beliefs usually coincided with lower scores on GENQOL and PSYQOL. Patients initially lower on PSYQOL generally showed larger improvement. Individual differences in HRQOL dominate differences between culture and cancer type, and illness beliefs influence HRQOL changes in individual patients. Clinical application is possible through

  19. Influence of the Quality of Consumer Headphones in the Perception of Spatial Audio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gutierrez-Parera

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available High quality headphones can generate a realistic sound immersion reproducing binaural recordings. However, most people commonly use consumer headphones of inferior quality, as the ones provided with smartphones or music players. Factors, such as weak frequency response, distortion and the sensitivity disparity between the left and right transducers could be some of the degrading factors. In this work, we are studying how these factors affect spatial perception. To this purpose, a series or perceptual tests have been carried out with a virtual headphone listening test methodology. The first experiment focuses on the analysis of how the disparity of sensitivity between the two transducers affects the final result. The second test studies the influence of the frequency response relating quality and spatial impression. The third test analyzes the effects of distortion using a Volterra kernels scheme for the simulation of the distortion using convolutions. Finally, the fourth tries to relate the quality of the frequency response with the accuracy on azimuth localization. The conclusions of the experiments are: the disparity between both transducers can affect the localization of the source; the perception of quality and spatial impression has a high correlation; the distortion produced by the range of headphones tested at a fixed level does not affect the perception of binaural sound; and that some frequency bands have an important role in the front-back confusions.

  20. Light quality and efficiency of consumer grade solid state lighting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Corell, Dennis Dan; Thorseth, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development in flux and efficiency of Light Emitting Diodes (LED) has resulted in a flooding of the lighting market with Solid State Lighting (SSL) products. Many traditional light sources can advantageously be replaced by SSL products. There are, however, large variations in the quality...... of these products, and some are not better than the ones they are supposed to replace. A lack of quality demands and standards makes it difficult for consumers to get an overview of the SSL products. Here the results of a two year study investigating SSL products on the Danish market are presented. Focus has been...... on SSL products for replacement of incandescent lamps and halogen spotlights. The warm white light and good color rendering properties of these traditional light sources are a must for lighting in Denmark and the Nordic countries. 266 SSL replacement lamps have been tested for efficiency and light...

  1. Dutch Dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de B.; Zee, van der A.; Carp, J.C.; Soddu, C.

    2004-01-01

    Applying Generative Design (GD) for dwelling is not very common but it opens up the possibility to study whether GD systems can reproduce existing design typologies. Dutch dwellings as an exemplification of a design typology are analysed using the SAR methodology. Building regulations are used as

  2. Extrinsic Tooth Enamel Color Changes and Their Relationship with the Quality of Water Consumed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Luz Rosário de Sousa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the consumed drinking water may affect oral health. For example, the presence of iron in drinking water can cause aesthetic problems related to changes in dental enamel color. This study assessed the prevalence of extrinsic enamel color changes and their relationship with the quality of the water in the town of Caapiranga/AM-Brazil. Three hundred and forty six residents of the urban area were examined, and they also answered a questionnaire on eating habits and self-perceived oral health. As the initial results indicated an insufficient number of observations for the application of variance analysis (one-way ANOVA, the Student t test was chosen to compare levels of iron content in the water coming from two sources. The change in tooth color had a prevalence of 5.78% (20 people. The majority of the population (n = 261, 75.43% consumed well water. Those who presented extrinsic stains were uncomfortable with the appearance of their teeth (15.09%. We conclude that while there is excess of iron in the water in this region of Brazil, no association between extrinsic stains on the enamel and the level of iron in the water was found. There was a low prevalence of extrinsic stains in Caaparinga, being found only in children and adolescents. In the present study, an association between the presence of stains and the consumption of açai was determined, and those who presented them felt uncomfortable about their aesthetics.

  3. Evaluating the Inter-Respondent (Consumer vs. Staff) Reliability and Construct Validity (SIS vs. Vineland) of the Supports Intensity Scale on a Dutch Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, C.; Van Hove, G.; van Loon, J.; Vandevelde, S.; Schalock, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite various reliability studies on the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS), to date there has not been an evaluation of the reliability of client vs. staff judgments. Such determination is important, given the increasing consumer-driven approach to services. Additionally, there has not been an evaluation of the instrument's construct…

  4. The organic food philosophy. A qualitative exploration of the practices, values, and beliefs of Dutch organic consumers within a cultural-historical frame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schösler, H.; de Boer, J.; Boersema, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Food consumption has been identified as a realm of key importance for progressing the world towards more sustainable consumption overall. Consumers have the option to choose organic food as a visible product of more ecologically integrated farming methods and, in general, more carefully produced

  5. An exploration of socio-economic and food characteristics of high trans fatty acid consumers in the Dutch and UK national surveys after voluntary product reformulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rippin, H L; Hutchinson, J; Ocke, M; Jewell, J; Breda, J J; Cade, J E

    2017-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) increase the risk of mortality and chronic diseases. TFA intakes have fallen since reformulation, but may still be high in certain, vulnerable, groups. This paper investigates socio-economic and food consumption characteristics of high TFA consumers after voluntary

  6. The quality and readability of online consumer information about gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, Aleksandra; Ozakinci, Gozde

    2015-03-01

    The Internet has become an important source of health-related information for consumers, among whom younger women constitute a notable group. The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the quality and readability of online information about gynecologic cancer using validated instruments and (2) to relate the quality of information to its readability. Using the Alexa Rank, we obtained a list of 35 Web pages providing information about 7 gynecologic malignancies. These were assessed using the Health on the Net (HON) seal of approval, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmarks, and the DISCERN instrument. Flesch readability score was calculated for sections related to symptoms and signs and treatment. Less than 30% of the Web pages displayed the HON seal or achieved all JAMA benchmarks. The majority of the treatment sections were of moderate to high quality according to the DISCERN. There was no significant relationship between the presence of the HON seal and readability. Web pages achieving all JAMA benchmarks were significantly more difficult to read and understand than Web pages that missed any of the JAMA benchmarks. Treatment-related content of moderate to high quality as assessed by the DISCERN had a significantly better readability score than the low-quality content. The online information about gynecologic cancer provided by the most frequently visited Web pages is of variable quality and in general difficult to read and understand. The relationship between the quality and readability remains unclear. Health care providers should direct their patients to reliable material online because patients consider the Internet as an important source of information.

  7. Virgin olive oil color and perceived quality among consumers in emerging olive-growing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gámbaro, A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Five virgin olive oil samples were evaluated by 122 consumers for their color acceptability and expected quality on 9-point structured scales. A description of the attributes expected in the different oils was obtained from the responding consumers by means of a check-all-that-apply questionnaire consisting of a list of 17 possible virgin olive oil attributes. Hierarchical cluster analysis led to the identification of two consumer clusters with distinct behavior. Whereas one consumer cluster attributed higher quality to those oils that were greener in color, which they described as tasty, rich-flavored, strong-tasting, herb-flavored and expensive, consumers in the other cluster assumed that greener olive oils were of a poorer quality, as they described them as strange-tasting, strong-tasting, herb-tasting and defective. Despite the contrasting perception of a virgin olive oil’s green color, the respondents, irrespective of cluster, presumed that the virgin olive oil that was the yellowest in color was of poor quality and cheap, also assuming that it had a milder taste than the other oils.122 consumidores evaluaron el color de 5 muestras de aceite de oliva virgen, midiendo su aceptabilidad y la calidad esperada por medio de una escala estructurada de 9 puntos y describiéndolas por medio de preguntas “marque todo lo que corresponde” que consiste en una lista de 17 términos posibles para atributos de aceites de oliva extra vírgenes. Mediante un análisis de conglomerados jerárquico se identificó a dos grupos de consumidores Los consumidores de ambos grupos consideraron que los aceites más amarillos eran de baja calidad, describiéndolos como baratos y de gusto suave. Un grupo de consumidores asignó puntuaciones de calidad alta a todos los aceites con colores verdes, describiéndolos como sabrosos, aromáticos, con gusto fuerte, con sabor a hierba y caros. El otro grupo de consumidores consideró que los aceites de color verde m

  8. Low-calorie- and calorie-sweetened beverages: diet quality, food intake, and purchase patterns of US household consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piernas, Carmen; Mendez, Michelle A; Ng, Shu Wen; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have investigated the diet quality of consumers of low-calorie-sweetened (LCS) and calorie-sweetened (CS) beverages. The objective was to examine the dietary quality and adherence to dietary purchasing and consumption patterns of beverage consumers from 2000 to 2010. We analyzed purchases for 140,352 households from the Homescan longitudinal data set 2000-2010 and dietary intake from NHANES 2003-2010 (n = 34,393). We defined mutually exclusive consumer profiles as main exposures: LCS beverages, CS beverages, LCS & CS beverages, and non/low consumers. As main outcomes, we explored dietary quality by using total energy and macronutrients (kcal/d). We performed factor analyses and applied factor scores to derive dietary patterns as secondary outcomes. Using multivariable linear (NHANES) and random-effects (Homescan) models, we investigated the associations between beverage profiles and dietary patterns. We found "prudent" and "breakfast" patterns in Homescan and NHANES, "ready-to-eat meals/fast-food" and "prudent/snacks/LCS desserts" patterns in Homescan, and "protein/potatoes" and "CS desserts/sweeteners" patterns in NHANES. In both data sets, compared with non/low consumers, both CS- and LCS-beverage consumers had a significantly higher total energy from foods, higher energy from total and SFAs, and lower probability of adherence to prudent and breakfast patterns. In Homescan, LCS-beverage consumers had a higher probability of adherence to 2 distinct patterns: a prudent/snacks/LCS dessert pattern and a ready-to-eat meals/fast-food purchasing pattern. Our findings suggest that overall dietary quality is lower in LCS-, CS-, and LCS & CS-beverage consumers relative to non/low consumers. Our study highlights the importance of targeting foods that are linked with sweetened beverages (either LCS or CS) in intervention and policy efforts that aim to improve nutrition in the United States.

  9. Low-calorie- and calorie-sweetened beverages: diet quality, food intake, and purchase patterns of US household consumers123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piernas, Carmen; Mendez, Michelle A; Ng, Shu Wen; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have investigated the diet quality of consumers of low-calorie-sweetened (LCS) and calorie-sweetened (CS) beverages. Objective: The objective was to examine the dietary quality and adherence to dietary purchasing and consumption patterns of beverage consumers from 2000 to 2010. Design: We analyzed purchases for 140,352 households from the Homescan longitudinal data set 2000–2010 and dietary intake from NHANES 2003–2010 (n = 34,393). We defined mutually exclusive consumer profiles as main exposures: LCS beverages, CS beverages, LCS & CS beverages, and non/low consumers. As main outcomes, we explored dietary quality by using total energy and macronutrients (kcal/d). We performed factor analyses and applied factor scores to derive dietary patterns as secondary outcomes. Using multivariable linear (NHANES) and random-effects (Homescan) models, we investigated the associations between beverage profiles and dietary patterns. Results: We found “prudent” and “breakfast” patterns in Homescan and NHANES, “ready-to-eat meals/fast-food” and “prudent/snacks/LCS desserts” patterns in Homescan, and “protein/potatoes” and “CS desserts/sweeteners” patterns in NHANES. In both data sets, compared with non/low consumers, both CS- and LCS-beverage consumers had a significantly higher total energy from foods, higher energy from total and SFAs, and lower probability of adherence to prudent and breakfast patterns. In Homescan, LCS-beverage consumers had a higher probability of adherence to 2 distinct patterns: a prudent/snacks/LCS dessert pattern and a ready-to-eat meals/fast-food purchasing pattern. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that overall dietary quality is lower in LCS-, CS-, and LCS & CS–beverage consumers relative to non/low consumers. Our study highlights the importance of targeting foods that are linked with sweetened beverages (either LCS or CS) in intervention and policy efforts that aim to improve nutrition in the

  10. Development and validation of the Consumer Quality index instrument to measure the experience and priority of chronic dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Sabine N.; Jager, Kitty J.; Visserman, Ella; Beekman, Robert J.; Boeschoten, Els W.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Heuveling, Lara; Stronks, Karien; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2012-01-01

    Patient experience is an established indicator of quality of care. Validated tools that measure both experiences and priorities are lacking for chronic dialysis care, hampering identification of negative experiences that patients actually rate important. We developed two Consumer Quality (CQ) index

  11. Studying consumer behaviour related to the quality of food: A case on vegetable preparation affecting sensory and health attributes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongoni, R.; Steenbekkers, L.P.A.; Verkerk, R.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Dekker, M.

    2013-01-01

    The domestic preparation of vegetables induces a significant change in their sensory and health attributes. The preparation of vegetables by consumers is likely to be controlled by assessing perceivable (sensory) quality attributes such as colour and texture because other quality attributes,

  12. The Effect of Aging in the Quality of Life and in the Consumer Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arminda Paço

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Population aging is a worldwide phenomenon and one of the most important demographic changes of human’s history. In 2050 there will be more people older than 60 years than above 15 years old. This situation represents an enormous challenge to markets. Understanding the effects of aging and old people consumer behaviour becomes critical. Aging is a complex, heterogeneous and individual process, affecting physical, psychological and social domains of the human being. This is a marketing concern, because aging also affects consumer behaviour and decision-making. The objective of this research is to understanding elderly population behaviour, specifically if biological age and the quality of life (WHOQOL- bref are related, the relation between biological age and exploratory buying behaviour tendencies (EBBT and search if the two constructs are statistically correlated. The sample of 150 individuals was divided into two groups (45-64 years old and ≥ 65 years old that had to respond to a questionnaire with two scales of analysis: WHOQOL-bref and EBBT. The study reveals the influence in physical domain of WHOQOL-bref, not identifying biological age influence in EBBT scale, neither any kind of statistical correlation in WHOQOL-bref domains and EBBT scale dimensions.

  13. Quality characteristics and consumer acceptance of yogurt fortified with date fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, I B; Khalil, A H; Afifi, H S

    2009-11-01

    Yogurt is considered a healthy food and incorporating dietary fiber will make it even healthier. Date fiber (DF), a by-product of date syrup production, is a good source of dietary fiber. The effect of fortification with DF on fresh yogurt quality was investigated. Acidity, pH, color [L* (lightness), a* (redness), and b* (yellowness) values], texture profile, sensory properties, and consumer acceptance were studied. Control yogurt (without fiber), yogurt fortified with 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5% DF, and yogurt with 1.5% wheat bran (WB) were prepared. Fortification with DF did not cause significant changes in yogurt acidity, although pH was increased. Yogurts fortified with DF had firmer texture (higher hardness values) and darker color (lower L* and higher a*) compared with control or WB yogurts. Consumer test results indicated that the appearance, color, and flavor ratings were significantly affected by fiber fortification. Yogurt fortified with up to 3% DF had similar sourness, sweetness, firmness, smoothness, and overall acceptance ratings as the control yogurt. Sensory ratings and acceptability of yogurt decreased significantly when increasing DF to 4.5% or using 1.5% WB. Flavoring yogurt fortified with 4.5% DF with vanilla did not improve flavor or overall acceptance ratings. Thus, fortifying yogurt with 3% DF produced acceptable yogurt with beneficial health effects.

  14. The power of data--from data mining to consumer pricing and quality-of-care tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malof, Leah C

    2013-01-01

    Transparency tools, whether offered by carriers or third-party administrators, rely on adequate experience, by market and by service, to provide information to consumers about health care costs and quality of care. The opportunities for savings to individual consumers and to employer-sponsored health plans are clearly significant and possible if people will use the tools and act. This article reviews two studies showing a shift in consumer claims experience to less costly services afte the implementation of a transparency tool and when combined with a consumer-driven health plan. It also outlines best practices employers can implement to carefully craft interventions to engage and create value in the minds of health care consumers.

  15. Quality of life in oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia: validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory and the Deglutition Handicap Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speyer, Renée; Heijnen, Bas J; Baijens, Laura W; Vrijenhoef, Femke H; Otters, Elsemieke F; Roodenburg, Nel; Bogaardt, Hans C

    2011-12-01

    Quality of life is an important outcome measurement in objectifying the current health status or therapy effects in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. In this study, the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the Deglutition Handicap Index (DHI) and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) have been determined for oncological patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. At Maastricht University Medical Center, 76 consecutive patients were selected and asked to fill in three questionnaires on quality of life related to oropharyngeal dysphagia (the SWAL-QOL, the MDADI, and the DHI) as well as a simple one-item visual analog Dysphagia Severity Scale. None of the quality-of-life questionnaires showed any floor or ceiling effect. The test-retest reliability of the MDADI and the Dysphagia Severity Scale proved to be good. The test-retest reliability of the DHI could not be determined because of insufficient data, but the intraclass correlation coefficients were rather high. The internal consistency proved to be good. However, confirmatory factor analysis could not distinguish the underlying constructs as defined by the subscales per questionnaire. When assessing criterion validity, both the MDADI and the DHI showed satisfactory associations with the SWAL-QOL (reference or gold standard) after having removed the less relevant subscales of the SWAL-QOL. In conclusion, when assessing the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the DHI or the MDADI, not all psychometric properties have been adequately met. In general, because of difficulties in the interpretation of study results when using questionnaires lacking sufficient psychometric quality, it is recommended that researchers strive to use questionnaires with the most optimal psychometric properties.

  16. The effect of source credibility on consumers' perceptions of the quality of health information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Benjamin R; Romina, Sharon; Ahmed, Rukhsana; Hopson, Danielle

    2006-03-01

    Recent use of the Internet as a source of health information has raised concerns about consumers' ability to tell 'good' information from 'bad' information. Although consumers report that they use source credibility to judge information quality, several observational studies suggest that consumers make little use of source credibility. This study examines consumer evaluations of web pages attributed to a credible source as compared to generic web pages on measures of message quality. In spring 2005, a community-wide convenience survey was distributed in a regional hub city in Ohio, USA. 519 participants were randomly assigned one of six messages discussing lung cancer prevention: three messages each attributed to a highly credible national organization and three identical messages each attributed to a generic web page. Independent sample t-tests were conducted to compare each attributed message to its counterpart attributed to a generic web page on measures of trustworthiness, truthfulness, readability, and completeness. The results demonstrated that differences in attribution to a source did not have a significant effect on consumers' evaluations of the quality of the information.Conclusions. The authors offer suggestions for national organizations to promote credibility to consumers as a heuristic for choosing better online health information through the use of media co-channels to emphasize credibility.

  17. Consumer Quality Index Chronic Skin Disease (CQI-CSD): a new instrument to measure quality of care from the patient's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cranenburgh, O. D.; Krol, M. W.; Hendriks, M. C. P.; de Rie, M. A.; Smets, E. M. A.; de Korte, J.; Sprangers, M. A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing quality of care from the patient's perspective is considered to be highly relevant. As a standardized instrument in dermatology was lacking, we developed a patient experience questionnaire regarding chronic skin disease care: the Consumer Quality Index Chronic Skin Disease (CQI-CSD). (i)

  18. Access and Quality of Care in Direct-to-Consumer Telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Mulcahy, Andrew; Cowling, David; Hunter, Gerald; Burns, Rachel; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2016-04-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) telemedicine serves millions of patients; however, there is limited research on the care provided. This study compared the quality of care at Teladoc ( www.teladoc.com ), a large DTC telemedicine company, with that at physician offices and compared access to care for Teladoc users and nonusers. Claims from all enrollees 18-64 years of age in the California Public Employees' Retirement System health maintenance organization between April 2012 and October 2013 were analyzed. We compared the performance of Teladoc and physician offices on applicable Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set measures. Using geographic information system analyses, we compared Teladoc users and nonusers with respect to rural location and available primary care physicians. Of enrollees offered Teladoc (n = 233,915), 3,043 adults had a total of 4,657 Teladoc visits. For the pharyngitis performance measure (ordering strep test), Teladoc performed worse than physician offices (3% versus 50%, p located within a healthcare professional shortage area (odds ratio = 1.12, p = 0.10) or rural location (odds ratio = 1.0, p = 0.10). Teladoc providers were less likely to order diagnostic testing and had poorer performance on appropriate antibiotic prescribing for bronchitis. Teladoc users were not preferentially located in underserved communities. Short-term needs include ongoing monitoring of quality and additional marketing and education to increase telemedicine use among underserved patients.

  19. Creating more effective health plan quality reports for consumers: lessons from a synthesis of qualitative testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Kojetin, L D; McCormack, L A; Jaël, E F; Sangl, J A; Garfinkel, S A

    2001-07-01

    Social marketing techniques such as consumer testing have only recently been applied to develop effective consumer health insurance information. This article discusses lessons learned from consumer testing to create consumer plan choice materials. Data were collected from 268 publicly and privately insured consumers in three studies between 1994 and 1999. Iterative testing and revisions were conducted to design seven booklets to help Medicaid, Medicare, and employed consumers choose a health plan. Standardized protocols were used in 11 focus groups and 182 interviews to examine the content, comprehension, navigation, and utility of the booklets. A method is suggested to help consumers narrow their plan choices by breaking down the process into smaller decisions using a set of guided worksheets. Implementing these lessons is challenging and not often done well. This article gives examples of evidence-based approaches to address cognitive barriers that designers of consumer health insurance information can adapt to their needs.

  20. Disease prevalence in flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Dutch Wadden Sea as indicator of environmental quality: A summary of 1988-2005 surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vethaak, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    In 1988, epizootics of ulcer disease in the flatfish flounder in the Dutch Wadden Sea were reported near freshwater drainage sluices of IJsselmeer Lake, locally affecting up to 38.9% of fish. Other diseases such as fin rot and lymphocystis were less frequent, but followed a similar pattern. Results of follow-up surveys in the Wadden Sea in 1994-2005 confirm previous findings and also show significantly elevated ulcer prevalences at other smaller drainage works. The most likely stress factors that contributed to the development of the epizootics at these sites include osmotic stress, adverse water quality conditions including chemical contaminants, nutritional deficiencies, and obstruction to fish migration. It was shown that discharges of IJsselmeer Lake freshwater in 1988-96 had a wide effect on the prevalence and distribution of ulcers and lymphocystis in the western Wadden Sea. A general reduction in disease prevalence in flounder in the entire Dutch Wadden Sea was observed during 1988-2005, which was most likely due to a general improvement in water quality and locally improved habitat conditions for flounder near drainage sluices. Ulcer prevalences outside the two IJsselmeer Lake sluices (Den Oever and Kornwerderzand) declined in this period from approximately 30% to 10% for medium-sized fish. Other skin diseases have also displayed a downward trend at both sites in recent years, with prevalences falling sharply to below 1%. Elsewhere in the Wadden Sea and the Ems-Dollard estuary, disease prevalences have declined towards natural background levels (< 1%). It is concluded that skin diseases, especially ulcers, are useful indicators of environmental quality in the Wadden Sea.

  1. Honey bee (Apis mellifera nurses do not consume pollens based on their nutritional quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Corby-Harris

    Full Text Available Honey bee workers (Apis mellifera consume a variety of pollens to meet the majority of their requirements for protein and lipids. Recent work indicates that honey bees prefer diets that reflect the proper ratio of nutrients necessary for optimal survival and homeostasis. This idea relies on the precept that honey bees evaluate the nutritional composition of the foods provided to them. While this has been shown in bumble bees, the data for honey bees are mixed. Further, there is controversy as to whether foragers can evaluate the nutritional value of pollens, especially if they do not consume it. Here, we focused on nurse workers, who eat most of the pollen coming into the hive. We tested the hypothesis that nurses prefer diets with higher nutritional value. We first determined the nutritional profile, number of plant taxa (richness, and degree of hypopharyngeal gland (HG growth conferred by three honey bee collected pollens. We then presented nurses with these same three pollens in paired choice assays and measured consumption. To further test whether nutrition influenced preference, we also presented bees with natural pollens supplemented with protein or lipids and liquid diets with protein and lipid ratios equal to the natural pollens. Different pollens conferred different degrees of HG growth, but despite these differences, nurse bees did not always prefer the most nutritious pollens. Adding protein and/or lipids to less desirable pollens minimally increased pollen attractiveness, and nurses did not exhibit a strong preference for any of the three liquid diets. We conclude that different pollens provide different nutritional benefits, but that nurses either cannot or do not assess pollen nutritional value. This implies that the nurses may not be able to communicate information about pollen quality to the foragers, who regulate the pollens coming into the hive.

  2. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) nurses do not consume pollens based on their nutritional quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corby-Harris, Vanessa; Snyder, Lucy; Meador, Charlotte; Ayotte, Trace

    2018-01-01

    Honey bee workers (Apis mellifera) consume a variety of pollens to meet the majority of their requirements for protein and lipids. Recent work indicates that honey bees prefer diets that reflect the proper ratio of nutrients necessary for optimal survival and homeostasis. This idea relies on the precept that honey bees evaluate the nutritional composition of the foods provided to them. While this has been shown in bumble bees, the data for honey bees are mixed. Further, there is controversy as to whether foragers can evaluate the nutritional value of pollens, especially if they do not consume it. Here, we focused on nurse workers, who eat most of the pollen coming into the hive. We tested the hypothesis that nurses prefer diets with higher nutritional value. We first determined the nutritional profile, number of plant taxa (richness), and degree of hypopharyngeal gland (HG) growth conferred by three honey bee collected pollens. We then presented nurses with these same three pollens in paired choice assays and measured consumption. To further test whether nutrition influenced preference, we also presented bees with natural pollens supplemented with protein or lipids and liquid diets with protein and lipid ratios equal to the natural pollens. Different pollens conferred different degrees of HG growth, but despite these differences, nurse bees did not always prefer the most nutritious pollens. Adding protein and/or lipids to less desirable pollens minimally increased pollen attractiveness, and nurses did not exhibit a strong preference for any of the three liquid diets. We conclude that different pollens provide different nutritional benefits, but that nurses either cannot or do not assess pollen nutritional value. This implies that the nurses may not be able to communicate information about pollen quality to the foragers, who regulate the pollens coming into the hive.

  3. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) nurses do not consume pollens based on their nutritional quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lucy; Meador, Charlotte; Ayotte, Trace

    2018-01-01

    Honey bee workers (Apis mellifera) consume a variety of pollens to meet the majority of their requirements for protein and lipids. Recent work indicates that honey bees prefer diets that reflect the proper ratio of nutrients necessary for optimal survival and homeostasis. This idea relies on the precept that honey bees evaluate the nutritional composition of the foods provided to them. While this has been shown in bumble bees, the data for honey bees are mixed. Further, there is controversy as to whether foragers can evaluate the nutritional value of pollens, especially if they do not consume it. Here, we focused on nurse workers, who eat most of the pollen coming into the hive. We tested the hypothesis that nurses prefer diets with higher nutritional value. We first determined the nutritional profile, number of plant taxa (richness), and degree of hypopharyngeal gland (HG) growth conferred by three honey bee collected pollens. We then presented nurses with these same three pollens in paired choice assays and measured consumption. To further test whether nutrition influenced preference, we also presented bees with natural pollens supplemented with protein or lipids and liquid diets with protein and lipid ratios equal to the natural pollens. Different pollens conferred different degrees of HG growth, but despite these differences, nurse bees did not always prefer the most nutritious pollens. Adding protein and/or lipids to less desirable pollens minimally increased pollen attractiveness, and nurses did not exhibit a strong preference for any of the three liquid diets. We conclude that different pollens provide different nutritional benefits, but that nurses either cannot or do not assess pollen nutritional value. This implies that the nurses may not be able to communicate information about pollen quality to the foragers, who regulate the pollens coming into the hive. PMID:29324841

  4. Validation of the Dutch version of the Swallowing Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (DSWAL-QoL) and the adjusted DSWAL-QoL (aDSWAL-QoL) using item analysis with the Rasch model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpelaere, Ingeborg S.; Van Nuffelen, Gwen; De Bodt, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Background The Swallowing Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QoL) is considered the gold standard for assessing health-related QoL in oropharyngeal dysphagia. The Dutch translation (DSWAL-QoL) and its adjusted version (aDSWAL-QoL) have been validated using classical test theory (CTT). However...

  5. Relationships among Shopping Quality and Corporate Social Responsibility of Shopping Centers and Consumer Satisfaction: Case from Novi Sad (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Blešić

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration satisfied customer as necessary for business maintenance, companies are trying to discover determinants which have the biggest influence on their consumer satisfaction. Here are presented two factors that have influence on consumer satisfaction in shopping centers: quality of shopping and corporate social responsibility. In this research, each of these factors had six elements. The results of the regression analysis are that “Value for money in stores” (beta=0.387, p=0.000 has the greatest impact on satisfaction when shopping quality performance is concerned, and that “Retailer support for (national/local cultural and sport events“ (beta=0.333, p<0.001 has the greatest impact on satisfaction in the case of CSR performance. Further analysis showed the difference in consumer perception of corporate social responsibility, depending on their occupation and level of education. It is also important to mention that consumers with environment and empathic concern have higher scores perception of CSR. However, there is not statistically important difference in consumer perception of shopping quality in shopping centers

  6. Striving for quality use of medicines: how effective is Australia's ban on direct-to-consumer prescription medicine advertising?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sonja

    2009-02-01

    The potential for both positive and negative effects arising from direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription medicines challenges health policymakers to develop regulatory schemes which selectively capture the positive aspects of the practice. Australia has dealt with this quandary by banning the practice, while New Zealand and the United States permit it. However, in recent times pharmaceutical companies have been increasingly successful in introducing promotional materials into the Australian market. This article demonstrates that the Australian ban is consistent with striving for the major policy goal of quality use of medicines, thus providing the basis for arguing that solutions to strengthen the ban against the identified threats ought to be implemented. Quality use of medicines can be most effectively achieved via the combined effect of the strengthened ban and the mimicking of the limited positive aspects of direct-to-consumer advertising by government provision of non-promotional information to consumers.

  7. Substance abuse and quality of life among severely mentally ill consumers: a longitudinal modelling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanoski, Karen A; Cairney, John; Adlaf, Edward; Rush, Brian

    2007-10-01

    Evidence suggests that substance abuse negatively affects both psychiatric symptom severity and quality of life (QOL) in people with severe mental illness (SMI). However, these relationships have not been examined simultaneously, nor have they been characterized over time. Thus, it is difficult to appreciate the extent to which substance abuse exerts an enduring effect on psychiatric symptoms and distress and/or QOL in this population. The purpose of this study is to test a conceptual model linking these factors together. Subjects were participants in a longitudinal evaluation of community mental healthcare in Ontario (n = 133). Comprehensive consumer assessments were conducted at treatment entry, and at 9 and 18 months. Subjects were receiving intensive case management or assertive community treatment throughout the 18-month study period. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the concurrent and longitudinal relationships between substance abuse, symptoms and distress, and QOL. The prevalence of substance abuse was 55.0%. The SEM analysis suggested that substance abuse at baseline was associated with elevated symptomatology and distress and lower QOL, and that these effects endured after 18 months of treatment. Psychiatric symptoms and distress mediated the negative relationship between substance abuse and QOL. The mediating role played by symptom and distress levels in the relationship between substance abuse and QOL suggests the importance of closely monitoring changes in these factors among SMI patients with substance problems. Tracking symptom severity and distress levels over time will allow service providers to intervene and potentially improve the QOL of individuals with SMI.

  8. Effect of sorghum flour addition on in vitro starch digestibility, cooking quality, and consumer acceptability of durum wheat pasta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Yousif, Adel M; Johnson, Stuart K; Gamlath, Shirani

    2014-08-01

    Whole grain sorghum is a valuable source of resistant starch and polyphenolic antioxidants and its addition into staple food like pasta may reduce the starch digestibility. However, incorporating nondurum wheat materials into pasta provides a challenge in terms of maintaining cooking quality and consumer acceptability. Pasta was prepared from 100% durum wheat semolina (DWS) as control or by replacing DWS with either wholegrain red sorghum flour (RSF) or white sorghum flour (WSF) each at 20%, 30%, and 40% incorporation levels, following a laboratory-scale procedure. Pasta samples were evaluated for proximate composition, in vitro starch digestibility, cooking quality, and consumer acceptability. The addition of both RSF and WSF lowered the extent of in vitro starch digestion at all substitution levels compared to the control pasta. The rapidly digestible starch was lowered in all the sorghum-containing pastas compared to the control pasta. Neither RSF or WSF addition affected the pasta quality attributes (water absorption, swelling index, dry matter, adhesiveness, cohesiveness, and springiness), except color and hardness which were negatively affected. Consumer sensory results indicated that pasta samples containing 20% and 30% RSF or WSF had acceptable palatability based on meeting one or both of the preset acceptability criteria. It is concluded that the addition of wholegrain sorghum flour to pasta at 30% incorporation level is possible to reduce starch digestibility, while maintaining adequate cooking quality and consumer acceptability. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Assessment of patient's experiences across the interface between primary and secondary care : Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.J.; Groenier, K.H.; de Jong, G.M.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.; van der Veen, W.J.; Dekker, Janny; de Waal, M.W.M.; Schuling, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Development and validation of a questionnaire that measures patients' experiences of collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists. Methods: A questionnaire was developed using the method of the consumer quality index and validated in a cross-sectional study among a

  10. Assessment of patient's experiences across the interface between primary and secondary care: Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.J.; Groenier, K.H.; Jong, de G.M.; Jong, de B.A.; Veen, van der W.J.; Dekker, J.; Waal, de M.W.M.; Schuling, J.

    2009-01-01

    0.4, except between the domains GP Approach and GP Referral. All domains clearly produced discriminating scores for groups with different characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: The Consumer Quality Index (CQ-index) Continuum of Care can be a useful instrument to assess aspects of the collaboration between

  11. Going Dutch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoorn, C.

    2002-09-07

    The proposal by the Dutch to extract natural gas from the 40 billion cubic metres beneath the Wadden Sea has been cited as a serious cause for concern by environmentalists. The new right wing government is less concerned than was the recently ousted left wing government and stands to gain directly through increased revenue. The Wadden Sea is a vast area of tidal channels, mudflats, shifting sandbanks, salt marshes, wet meadows and dunes, and provides a safe haven for numerous protected plants and animals. It is also a sanctuary for migrating birds and a feeding ground for herring, sole and plaice. Subsidence is cited by the environmentalists as a major potential problem and pollution is said to be always a risk.

  12. Going Dutch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoorn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The proposal by the Dutch to extract natural gas from the 40 billion cubic metres beneath the Wadden Sea has been cited as a serious cause for concern by environmentalists. The new right wing government is less concerned than was the recently ousted left wing government and stands to gain directly through increased revenue. The Wadden Sea is a vast area of tidal channels, mudflats, shifting sandbanks, salt marshes, wet meadows and dunes, and provides a safe haven for numerous protected plants and animals. It is also a sanctuary for migrating birds and a feeding ground for herring, sole and plaice. Subsidence is cited by the environmentalists as a major potential problem and pollution is said to be always a risk

  13. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE SUPERVISION OF PERPETRATORS OF EFFORT IN PRODUCING QUALITY PRODUCTS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSUMER PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Haris

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was explain how the substance of the law against the perpetrators of the oversight arrangements of effort in producing quality products contained in the legislation in the field of consumer protection, explain how the implementation of surveillance against perpetrators of effort in producing quality products, explain how the form of the application of the sanctions for the perpetrators of the attempt that violates the provisions of the legislation in making products that are not qualified. Research conducted in the framework of this dissertation outlines is of type socio-juridical, because in addition to researching the secondary legal materials in the form of regulations, manual and electronic law library, relevant research results in the field of law of particular problems in the field of consumer protection and other written materials, as well as researching various legal facts about the implementation of surveillance against perpetrators of effort in producing quality products and its implications for consumer protection This is the case, the form of the application sanctions. The results showed that 1. The substance of the law against the perpetrators of the oversight arrangements of effort in producing quality products that are found in a wide range of legislation in the field of consumer protection is basically adequate. 2. surveillance of implementation against the perpetrators of the work done by the three main pillars of supervision: the Government, communities and non-governmental Consumer Protection Agency (LPKSM is not yet effective due to still having a lot of constraints. 3. The form of the application of the sanctions for the perpetrators of the attempt that violated regulations in making a quality product, it is still better to put forward sanctions administrative compared to criminal sanctions and civil penalties.

  14. Summarized Costs, Placement Of Quality Stars, And Other Online Displays Can Help Consumers Select High-Value Health Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jessica; Hibbard, Judith H; Sacks, Rebecca M

    2016-04-01

    Starting in 2017, all state and federal health insurance exchanges will present quality data on health plans in addition to cost information. We analyzed variations in the current design of information on state exchanges to identify presentation approaches that encourage consumers to take quality as well as cost into account when selecting a health plan. Using an online sample of 1,025 adults, we randomly assigned participants to view the same comparative information on health plans, displayed in different ways. We found that consumers were much more likely to select a high-value plan when cost information was summarized instead of detailed, when quality stars were displayed adjacent to cost information, when consumers understood that quality stars signified the quality of medical care, and when high-value plans were highlighted with a check mark or blue ribbon. These approaches, which were equally effective for participants with higher and lower numeracy, can inform the development of future displays of plan information in the exchanges. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  15. Green marketing of consumer electronics : Applying Kano's theory of attractive quality on EcoDesign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, R.; Lotgering, S.; Ruijs, F.

    2007-01-01

    To a consumer a green attribute, such as energy efficiency may be far more important for one product than another. For some products it may be seen as essential, for others as nice to have. Business belief says it may even be negative if consumers perceive it as conflicting with the primary

  16. Consumer demand and quality assurance: segmentation basis and implications for chain governance in the pork sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunert, K.G.; Wognum, P.M.; Trienekens, J.H.; Wever, M.; Scholderer, J.; Veflen Olsen, N.

    2011-01-01

    Consumers differ in their demands, and this may have implications for the type of supply chain governance that is most suitable for serving them. We present a segmentation of pork consumers in the EU based on their food-related lifestyles and demands for different pork products. We then present an

  17. Development of vegetables with improved consumer quality : a case study in Brussels sprouts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.E.

    1999-01-01

    In the last decade the vegetable production chain has changed from being production- driven into customer-driven, with special attention for consumer preferences. The current consumers want vegetables with additional value and demand convenient healthy vegetables with improved flavour and

  18. Food risk management quality: Consumer evaluations of past and emerging food safety incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Ueland, O.; Theodoridis, G.; Rowe, G.; Pfenning, U.; Houghton, J.R.; Dijk, van H.; Chryssochoidis, G.; Frewer, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    In European countries, there has been growing consumer distrust regarding the motives of food safety regulators and other actors in the food chain, partly as a result of recent food safety incidents. If consumer confidence in food safety is to be improved, a systematic understanding of what

  19. Innovation in Agri-Food systems. Product quality and consumer acceptance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, W.M.F.; Meulenberg, M.T.G.

    2005-01-01

    This is a fully rewritten and extended version of the successful textbook “Innovation of food production systems”. It focuses on consumer-driven food product innovation using a systems-oriented approach. It integrates marketing and consumer sciences with technological aspects such as processing,

  20. 78 FR 26258 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Consumer Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... adopt these VOC limits to create more consistency in regional and national markets for consumer products... organic compound (VOC) content limits and associated provisions for additional consumer products categories into the state's SIP. Finally, EPA is approving language to clarify VOC limit applicability for...

  1. Evaluation of Consumer Satisfaction for the Quality of Bread Modified with Additives: A Case Study of Alborz Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Nobari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bread is the staple food of Iranian society. Attention to its health and hygiene is important. Nowadays, the use of baking soda in the production of bread has seen by most of bakers which is because of producing bread with more beautiful and appearance and is more public acceptance. Methods: In this cross-sectional study that 40 people were taken, consumer satisfaction of prepared Barbari bread using three types additives Fenugreek juice, baking soda, and tomato juice by means of questionnaires were evaluated. Results: The results of this study showed that consumer satisfaction of taste and smell (34 of 40, appearance, glazing, and quality (36 of 40 of prepared bread by tomato juice was more than Fenugreek juice and baking soda. Consumer satisfaction of taste, smell, appearance, glazing, quality, shopping satisfaction, and quality of bread over time of three types of additives (baking soda, tomato juice, and Fenugreek juice was significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: Tomato juice has the attributes necessary for public acceptance and satisfaction of consumers, nevertheless don’t have the complications of baking soda. So it can be a reasonable alternative for the processing of bread dough instead of baking soda.

  2. Psychometric validation of the Dutch translation of the quality of life in reflux and dyspepsia (QOLRAD questionnaire in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engels Leopold GJB

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD questionnaire is one of the best-characterized disease-specific instruments that captures health-related problems and symptom-patterns in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. This paper reports the psychometric validation of a Dutch translation of the QOLRAD questionnaire in gastroenterology outpatients with GERD. Methods Patients completed the QOLRAD questionnaire at visit 1 (baseline, visit 2 (after 2, 4 or 8 weeks of acute treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg once daily, and visit 4 (after 6 months with on-demand esomeprazole 40 mg once daily or continuous esomeprazole 20 mg once daily. Symptoms were assessed at each visit, and patient satisfaction was assessed at visits 2 and 4. Results Of the 1166 patients entered in the study, 97.3% had moderate or severe heartburn and 55.5% had moderate or severe regurgitation at baseline. At visit 2, symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation were mild or absent in 96.7% and 97.7%, respectively, and 95.3% of patients reported being satisfied with the treatment. The internal consistency and reliability of the QOLRAD questionnaire (range: 0.83-0.92 supported construct validity. Convergent validity was moderate to low. Known-groups validity was confirmed by a negative correlation between the QOLRAD score and clinician-assessed severity of GERD symptoms. Effect sizes (1.15-1.93 and standardized response means (1.17-1.86 showed good responsiveness to change. GERD symptoms had a negative impact on patients' lives. Conclusions The psychometric characteristics of the Dutch translation of the QOLRAD questionnaire were found to be satisfactory, with good reliability and responsiveness to change, although convergent validity was at best moderate.

  3. Energy on the Move. Recommendations to stimulate consumers to save energy. Final report of the Dutch National ThinkTank 2009. Creating knowledge without constraints; Energie in beweging. Adviezen om consumenten aan te zetten tot energiebesparing. Eindrapport De Nationale Denktank 2009. Kennismaken zonder kaders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-12-15

    In this report the Dutch National ThinkTank shows that the consumer plays a crucial role in realizing the cabinet targets of 20% energy saving in 2020 and in increasing support for the climate conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. The question with regard to how consumers can be given the opportunity to save energy is answered with a coherent package of 22 concrete advices to make energy saving and sustainable energy generation easier, more affordable and more fun for the consumer. The government and the market can jointly speed up the savings of consumers. [Dutch] De Nationale Denktank toont in dit rapport aan dat de consument een cruciale rol speelt om de kabinetsdoelstelling van 20% energiebesparing in 2020 te realiseren en het draagvlak voor de klimaatconferentie in Kopenhagen, Denemarken, te vergroten. De vraag hoe de consument in staat gesteld kan worden om energie te besparen wordt beantwoordt in de vorm van een samenhangend pakket van 22 concrete adviezen die energiebesparing en duurzame energieopwekking door de consument makkelijker, betaalbaarder en leuker maken. Overheid en markt kunnen hiermee samen zorgen voor een versnelling van het besparen door de consument.

  4. Dutch Agribusiness in Russia: a review of enterpreneurs' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, J.C.; Berkum, van S.; Roza, P.

    2007-01-01

    Russia¿s economy is booming; that¿s no news. Certainly not for Dutch agribusiness, looking at the steady increase of Dutch exports and investments in Russia. Not only our bigger agro-industries are involved, also medium size companies have found their way to access a market of 143 million consumers.

  5. Importance of interactions between food quality, quantity, and gut transit time on consumer feeding, growth, and trophic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aditee; Flynn, Kevin J

    2007-05-01

    Ingestion kinetics of animals are controlled by both external food availability and feedback from the quantity of material already within the gut. The latter varies with gut transit time (GTT) and digestion of the food. Ingestion, assimilation efficiency, and thus, growth dynamics are not related in a simple fashion. For the first time, the important linkage between these processes and GTT is demonstrated; this is achieved using a biomass-based, mechanistic multinutrient model fitted to experimental data for zooplankton growth dynamics when presented with food items of varying quality (stoichiometric composition) or quantity. The results show that trophic transfer dynamics will vary greatly between the extremes of feeding on low-quantity/high-quality versus high-quantity/low-quality food; these conditions are likely to occur in nature. Descriptions of consumer behavior that assume a constant relationship between the kinetics of grazing and growth irrespective of food quality and/or quantity, with little or no recognition of the combined importance of these factors on consumer behavior, may seriously misrepresent consumer activity in dynamic situations.

  6. quality and consumer acceptability of goat milk with respect to goat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    African Crop Science Journal by African Crop Science Society is licensed under ... farmers' goats in Trans Nzoia County was also determined. ..... Consumer acceptability (panelists scores*) of goat milk products in the north rift region in Kenya.

  7. Using multilevel modeling to assess case-mix adjusters in consumer experience surveys in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Olga C; Stubbe, Janine H; Hendriks, Michelle; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Delnoij, Diana M J; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2009-04-01

    Ratings on the quality of healthcare from the consumer's perspective need to be adjusted for consumer characteristics to ensure fair and accurate comparisons between healthcare providers or health plans. Although multilevel analysis is already considered an appropriate method for analyzing healthcare performance data, it has rarely been used to assess case-mix adjustment of such data. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether multilevel regression analysis is a useful tool to detect case-mix adjusters in consumer assessment of healthcare. We used data on 11,539 consumers from 27 Dutch health plans, which were collected using the Dutch Consumer Quality Index health plan instrument. We conducted multilevel regression analyses of consumers' responses nested within health plans to assess the effects of consumer characteristics on consumer experience. We compared our findings to the results of another methodology: the impact factor approach, which combines the predictive effect of each case-mix variable with its heterogeneity across health plans. Both multilevel regression and impact factor analyses showed that age and education were the most important case-mix adjusters for consumer experience and ratings of health plans. With the exception of age, case-mix adjustment had little impact on the ranking of health plans. On both theoretical and practical grounds, multilevel modeling is useful for adequate case-mix adjustment and analysis of performance ratings.

  8. Het Nederlands signaleringscentrum kindergeneeskunde; een kwaliteitsinstrument voor preventie en onderzoek [The Dutch Paediatric Surveillance System; a quality-focused instrument for prevention and research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirasing, R.A.; Rodrigues Pereira, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Dutch Paediatric Surveillance System was initiated by the Dutch Paediatric Society and is housed within the TNO Prevention and Health office. The purpose of the surveillance system is (a) to gain insight on a population level into the prevalence of rare and new diseases in youths (0-18 year),

  9. Monitoring NSL. Progress of the Dutch National Air Quality Cooperation Programme (NSL). State of affairs 2012; Monitoringsrapportage NSL. Stand van zaken 2012 Nationaal Samenwerkingsprogamma Luchtkwaliteit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zanten, M.C.; Wesseling, J.; Mooibroek, D.; Van Alphen, A.; Nguyen, L. [Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Groot Wassink, H.; Verbeek, C. [InfoMil, Agentschap NL, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    The National Air Quality Cooperation Programme (NSL) has been created to facilitate improvements in air quality in the Netherlands and to ensure that the Netherlands meets the respective deadlines set for compliance to EU limit values for particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Local, regional and national authorities work together within the framework of this programme to ensure that these goals will be met. A monitoring programme has been put in place to monitor progress and, if necessary, to enable timely modifications to the programme. The annual results of the monitoring programme have been bundled together by the Monitoring Bureau (collaboration between RIVM and the InfoMil Knowledge Centre) into the 2012 progress report [Dutch] Om de luchtkwaliteit te verbeteren is het Nationaal Samenwerkingsprogramma Luchtkwaliteit (NSL) opgezet. Hierin werken de Rijksoverheid en decentrale overheden samen om te zorgen dat Nederland overal tijdig aan de grenswaarden voor fijn stof en stikstofdioxide zal voldoen. Om de voortgang van dit verbeterprogramma te volgen en tijdig eventuele extra maatregelen te kunnen nemen, is aan het NSL een monitoringsprogramma verbonden. De uitvoering van de monitoring is neergelegd bij Bureau Monitoring, een samenwerkingsverband tussen het RIVM en Kenniscentrum InfoMil.

  10. Neonatal treatment philosophy in Dutch and German NICUs: health-related quality of life in adulthood of VP/VLBW infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeman, Linda D; van der Pal, Sylvia; Verrips, Gijsbert H W; Baumann, Nicole; Bartmann, Peter; Wolke, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    Although survival after very preterm birth (VP)/very low birth weight (VLBW) has improved, a significant number of VP/VLBW individuals develop physical and cognitive problems during their life course that may affect their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We compared HRQoL in VP/VLBW cohorts from two countries: The Netherlands (n = 314) versus Germany (n = 260) and examined whether different neonatal treatment and rates of disability affect HRQoL in adulthood. To analyse whether cohorts differed in adult HRQoL, linear regression analyses were performed for three HRQoL outcomes assessed with the Health Utilities Index 3 (HUI3), the London Handicap Scale (LHS), and the WHO Quality of Life instrument (WHOQOL-BREF). Stepwise hierarchical linear regression was used to test whether neonatal physical health and treatment, social environment, and intelligence (IQ) were related to VP/VLBW adults' HRQoL and cohort differences. Dutch VP/VLBW adults reported a significantly higher HRQoL on all three general HRQoL measures than German VP/VLBW adults (HUI3: .86 vs .83, p = .036; LHS: .93 vs. .90, p = .018; WHOQOL-BREF: 82.8 vs. 78.3, p life.

  11. Assessing Consumer Emotional Responses in the Presence and Absence of Critical Quality Attributes: A Case Study with Chicken Eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardy, Wisdom; Sae-Eaw, Amporn; Sriwattana, Sujinda; No, Hong Kyoon; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon

    2015-07-01

    Effects of attribute presence and absence on the emotional profile and consumer acceptability of products with varying qualities were assessed using eggs as an example. An online survey (n = 320) was used to evaluate emotional responses and acceptability to 5 types of egg quality attributes: intrinsic, aesthetic, extrinsic, expediency, and wholesome/safety, for both present and absent conditions. Attribute absence rather than presence evoked greater consumer discriminating emotions associated with eggs. Mean emotion intensity elicited by the presence of all quality attributes ranged from 1.67 (intrinsic; guilty) to 4.05 (wholesome; good) versus 2.01 (wholesome; satisfied) to 3.29 (wholesome; disgusted) when absent. Key positive emotions elicited by presence of attributes were active, calm, good, interested, happy, safe, and satisfied; while dominant negative emotions elicited by absence of attributes included disgusted and worried. Wholesome quality (constituted by egg freshness, "packing/best-before-date" and absence of visible cracks) exhibited the highest liking (7.65) and emotion intensities, while the emotional responses to both the presence and absence of intrinsic quality (constituted by nutrient-fortified egg, organic egg, and USDA-certified farm egg) were similar, reflecting their dynamic effects on emotions. Emotions and acceptability were more correlated for attribute absence than presence; and good, happy, and satisfied emotions were strongly related to egg acceptability (r ≥ 0.6). Egg product/packaging design can be oriented toward emphasizing wholesome and expedient attributes, since they enhance good, safe, and satisfied emotions, while minimizing disgust, worry, and boredom. The use of emotional responses and hedonic testing regarding attribute presence and absence would allow for improved selection of attributes critical to consumer acceptance of products. Assessing effects of attribute presence compared with absence on food-evoked emotions may

  12. Defining and improving quality management in Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics: design of the study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, the organisation of diabetes care is changing. As a result general practices and diabetes teams in hospitals are becoming part of new organisations in which multidisciplinary care programs are implemented. In the Netherlands, 97 diabetes care groups and 104 outpatient clinics are working with a diabetes care program. Both types of organisations aim to improve the quality of diabetes care. Therefore, it is essential to understand the comprehensive elements needed for optimal quality management at organisational level. This study aims to assess the current level of diabetes quality management in both care groups and outpatient clinics and its improvement after providing feedback on their quality management system and tailored support. Methods/design This study is a before-after study with a one-year follow-up comparing the levels of quality management before and after an intervention to improve diabetes quality management. To assess the status of quality management, online questionnaires were developed based on current literature. They consist of six domains: organisation of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance management, quality improvement policy and management strategies. Based on the questionnaires, respondents will receive feedback on their score in a radar diagram and an elucidating table. They will also be granted access to an online toolbox with instruments that proved to be effective in quality of care improvement and with practical examples. If requested, personal support in implementing these tools will be available. After one year quality management will be measured again using the same questionnaire. Discussion This study will reveal a nationwide picture of quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics in the Netherlands and evaluate the effect of offering tailored support. The operationalisation of quality management on organisational level may be of interest for other countries

  13. Effect of irradiation on quality, shelf life and consumer acceptance of traditional Nigerian meat and fish products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aworh, O.C.; Okparanta, R.N.; Oyedokun, E.O

    2002-01-01

    The effect of low dose irradiation, up to 6 kGy, on quality, shelf life and consumer acceptance of three traditional Nigerian meat and fish products was investigated. Irradiation inhibited microbial growth in 'suya' and 'kilishi' with substantial reduction in total aerobic counts, yeasts and molds and Staphylococcus aureus. Nonirradiated smoked-dried catfish (Clarias gariepinus) had a shelf life of less than one week at tropical ambient temperature (21-31 deg. C) due to insect infestation. Irradiated 'kilishi' and smoked dried catfish packed in sealed polyethylene bags (0.04 mm thick) were shelf stable for a period of 4-6 months and remained free from moldiness, infestation and were considered acceptable in sensory quality by a consumer panel of 32 assessors. There was a slight increase in TBA values of irradiated 'kilishi' stored for 4 months relative to non-irradiated controls. (author)

  14. Water quality management in the Netherlands : Contribution to the Dutch-Japanese workshops on the treatment of municipal waste water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornstra, J.S.; De Jong, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes water management in the Netherlands with an emphasis on water quality aspects. First some features of the country are presented, underlining the importance of water and indicating the need for international cooperation on water quality matters. In the third paragraph, the water

  15. 'Burnout' among Dutch midwives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.H.C.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Jabaaij, L.; Meijer, W.; Sixma, H.; Veer, A. de

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to determine the effect of workload on 'burnout' having considered work capacity. DESIGN: cross-sectional study. SETTING: Dutch community midwives in independent practice. PARTICIPANTS: 200 Dutch community midwives. MEASUREMENTS: three-week diary recordings, a questionnaire on practice

  16. Changes in Consumer Demand Following Public Reporting of Summary Quality Ratings: An Evaluation in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Rachel M; Konetzka, R Tamara; Polsky, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Limited consumer use of health care report cards may be due to the large amount of information presented in report cards, which can be difficult to understand. These limitations may be overcome with summary measures. Our objective was to evaluate consumer response to summary measures in the setting of nursing homes. 2005-2010 nursing home Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) datasets. In December 2008, Medicare converted its nursing home report card to summary or star ratings. We test whether there was a change in consumer demand for nursing homes related to the nursing home's star rating after the information was released. The star rating system was associated with a significant change in consumer demand for low- and high-scoring facilities. After the star-based rating system was released, 1-star facilities typically lost 8 percent of their market share and 5-star facilities gained over 6 percent of their market share. The nursing home star rating system significantly affected consumer demand for high- and low-rated nursing homes. These results support the use of summary measures in report cards. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Measuring spatial variation in secondary production and food quality using a common consumer approach in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Evans, Mary Anne; Schaeffer, Jeff; Wynne, Timothy; Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Nelson, J. C.; Vallazza, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Erie is a large lake straddling the border of the U.S. and Canada that has become increasingly eutrophic in recent years. Eutrophication is particularly focused in the shallow western basin. The western basin of Lake Erie is hydrodynamically similar to a large estuary, with riverine inputs from the Detroit and Maumee Rivers mixing together and creating gradients in chemical and physical conditions. This study was driven by two questions: How does secondary production and food quality for consumers vary across this large mixing zone? and Are there correlations between cyanobacterial abundance and secondary production or food quality for consumers? Measuring spatial and temporal variation in secondary production and food quality is difficult for a variety of logistical reasons, so here a common consumer approach was used. In a common consumer approach, individuals of a single species are raised under similar conditions until placed in the field across environmental gradients of interest. After some period of exposure, the response of that common consumer is measured to provide an index of spatial variation in conditions. Here, a freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) was deployed at 32 locations that spanned habitat types and a gradient in cyanobacterial abundance in the western basin of Lake Erie to measure spatial variation in growth (an index of secondary production) and fatty acid (FA) content (an index of food quality). We found secondary production was highest within the Maumee rivermouth and lowest in the open waters of the lake. Mussel tissues in the Maumee rivermouth also included more eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic fatty acids (EPA and DPA, respectively), but fewer bacterial FAs, suggesting more algae at the base of the food web in the Maumee rivermouth compared to open lake sites. The satellite-derived estimate of cyanobacterial abundance was not correlated to secondary production, but was positively related to EPA and DPA content in the

  18. Do structural quality indicators of nutritional care influence malnutrition prevalence in Dutch, German, and Austrian nursing homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nie, Noémi C; Meijers, Judith M M; Schols, Jos M G A; Lohrmann, Christa; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether structural quality indicators for nutritional care influence malnutrition prevalence in the Netherlands, Germany, and Austria. Furthermore, differences in malnutrition prevalence and structural quality indicators for nutritional care nursing homes in the three countries were examined. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study using a standardized questionnaire at the patient, ward, and institutional levels. Malnutrition was assessed by low body mass index, undesired weight loss, and reduced intake. Structural quality indicators of nutritional care were measured at the ward and institutional levels. The prevalence of malnutrition differed significantly between the three countries (Netherlands 18%, Germany 20%, and Austria 22.7%). Structural quality indicators related to nutritional care as having a guideline of prevention and treatment of malnutrition were related to malnutrition and explained malnutrition prevalence variance between the Netherlands and Germany. Differences between the Netherlands and Austria in malnutrition prevalence still existed after controlling for these quality structural indicators. Structural quality indicators of nutritional care are important in explaining malnutrition variance between the Netherlands and Germany. However, they did not explain the difference in malnutrition prevalence between the Netherlands and Austria. Investigating the role of process indicators may provide insight in the role of structural quality indicators of nutritional care in explaining the malnutrition prevalence differences between the Netherlands and Austria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Marketing strategies - consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, C.

    1985-01-01

    As Australia's largest consumer organisation, the Australian Consumers' Association (ACA) has a vital role in providing information, so consumers can make an informed choice, as well as participating in formulation of standards to increase the quality of products, including foods. The consumer movement is marketing the process of irradiation and will continue to give consumers information that allows them to make an informed choice

  20. Colour and fat content as intrinsic cues for consumers attitudes towards meat product quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristić, M.; Troeger, K.; Đinović-Stojanović, J.; Knežević, N.; Damnjanović, M.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate consumers’ attitudes towards sensory properties of chicken, royal and beef salami, meat products from Zlatiborac Meat Company. Sensory evaluation was performed by Serbian consumers (n=1018) in four retail stores (Delhaize) in Belgrade. Consumers were asked for their preference concerning the colour and fat of three selected salami and then completed questionnaire of socio-demographic information including eating behaviour. Selected smoked meat products were evaluated in the DLG Test Center Food, Germany. Consumers, at all education levels and in all age groups, evaluated colour as good and fat as sufficient with a significantly (psmoked products passed the DLG tests and received “DLG award winner” medals in Gold (73%) or Silver (27%).

  1. Relationship between the presence of baccalaureate-educated RNs and quality of care: a cross-sectional study in Dutch long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Ramona; van Rossum, Erik; Verbeek, Hilde; Halfens, Ruud J G; Tan, Frans E S; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2017-01-19

    Recent evidence suggests that an increase in baccalaureate-educated registered nurses (BRNs) leads to better quality of care in hospitals. For geriatric long-term care facilities such as nursing homes, this relationship is less clear. Most studies assessing the relationship between nurse staffing and quality of care in long-term care facilities are US-based, and only a few have focused on the unique contribution of registered nurses. In this study, we focus on BRNs, as they are expected to serve as role models and change agents, while little is known about their unique contribution to quality of care in long-term care facilities. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 282 wards and 6,145 residents from 95 Dutch long-term care facilities. The relationship between the presence of BRNs in wards and quality of care was assessed, controlling for background characteristics, i.e. ward size, and residents' age, gender, length of stay, comorbidities, and care dependency status. Multilevel logistic regression analyses, using a generalized estimating equation approach, were performed. 57% of the wards employed BRNs. In these wards, the BRNs delivered on average 4.8 min of care per resident per day. Among residents living in somatic wards that employed BRNs, the probability of experiencing a fall (odds ratio 1.44; 95% CI 1.06-1.96) and receiving antipsychotic drugs (odds ratio 2.15; 95% CI 1.66-2.78) was higher, whereas the probability of having an indwelling urinary catheter was lower (odds ratio 0.70; 95% CI 0.53-0.91). Among residents living in psychogeriatric wards that employed BRNs, the probability of experiencing a medication incident was lower (odds ratio 0.68; 95% CI 0.49-0.95). For residents from both ward types, the probability of suffering from nosocomial pressure ulcers did not significantly differ for residents in wards employing BRNs. In wards that employed BRNs, their mean amount of time spent per resident was low, while quality of care on most wards was

  2. Water quality management in the Netherlands: Contribution to the Dutch-Japanese workshops on the treatment of municipal waste water

    OpenAIRE

    Hoornstra, J.S.; De Jong, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes water management in the Netherlands with an emphasis on water quality aspects. First some features of the country are presented, underlining the importance of water and indicating the need for international cooperation on water quality matters. In the third paragraph, the water management structure is discussed, such as relevant laws and authorities, management instruments (planning, licensing) and funding methods. More detailed information is provided on water use and pu...

  3. Manufacturing technology, manufacturing consumers : the making of Dutch consumer society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert de la Bruhèze, A.A.; Oldenziel, R.

    2009-01-01

    In the twentieth century, production and consumption rapidly grew, accompanied by businesses’ frantic search for new markets. Many new institutions, corporations, interest groups, research organizations, trade groups, shops, and laboratories were involved in the search. Twentieth-century European

  4. A model for consumers' preferences for Novel Protein Foods and environmental quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ierland, van E.C.; Zhu, X.

    2005-01-01

    We develop an environmental Applied General Equilibrium (AGE) model, which includes the economic functions of the environment, to investigate the impacts of consumers' preference changes towards the enhanced consumption of Novel Protein Foods (NPFs) and towards a higher willingness to pay for

  5. Nutrition Qualities of Different Cuts of Beef Meat Consumed in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various body organs and meat cuts of cattle consumed in Nigeria as sources of animal protein were analysed for their total protein, ash, total lipids, total and ester ... The in vitro digestibility study with pepsin showed that the liver, heart, kidney, spleen and the skeletal muscle were significantly more digestible than the lung, ...

  6. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) nurses do not consume pollens based on their nutritional quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) consume a variety of pollens to meet the majority of their requirements for protein and lipids. Recent work indicates that at both the colony and individual levels, honey bees prefer diets that reflect the proper ratio of nutrients necessary for optimal survival and homeo...

  7. 76 FR 69214 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Consumer and Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... portable fuel containers, consumer products, architectural and industrial (AIM) coatings, adhesives and...--Documents Incorporated by Reference, in order to make administrative changes for clarity, style, format, and..., sells, offers for sale, or manufactures any architectural coating within the Northern Virginia and...

  8. 77 FR 33659 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Consumer Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... voluntarily chosen to adopt these VOC limits to create more consistency in regional and national markets for... the Illinois SIP. This Part includes measures to limit volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions by... discussion of the provisions in this rule. The VOC limits for consumer products and AIM coatings in 35 IAC...

  9. Deciding on PSA-screening - Quality of current consumer information on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, Ida J.; van den Bergh, Roderick C. N.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Given that screening for prostate cancer has the potential to reduce prostate cancer mortality at the expense of considerable overdiagnosis and overtreatment, the availability of core consumer information - correct, balanced and supportive of autonomous decision-making - is a

  10. Influence of oak maturation regimen on composition, sensory properties, quality, and consumer acceptability of cabernet sauvignon wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Anna M; Johnson, Trent E; Wilkinson, Kerry L; Bastian, Susan E P

    2015-02-11

    Oak barrels have long been the preferred method for oak maturation of wine, but barrels contribute significantly to production costs, so alternate oak maturation regimens have been introduced, particularly for wines at lower price points. To date, few studies have investigated consumers' acceptance of wines made using non-traditional oak treatments. In this study, two Cabernet Sauvignon wines were aged using traditional (i.e., barrel) and/or alternative (i.e., stainless steel or plastic tanks and vats, with oak wood added) maturation regimens. Chemical and sensory analyses were subsequently performed to determine the influence on wine composition and sensory properties, that is, the presence of key oak-derived volatile compounds and perceptible oak aromas and flavor. The quality of a subset of wines was rated by a panel of 10 wine experts using a 20-point scoring system, with all wines considered technically sound. Consumer acceptance of wines was also determined. Hedonic ratings ranged from 5.7 to 5.9 (on a 9-point scale), indicating there was no significant difference in consumers' overall liking of each wine. However, segmentation based on individual liking scores identified three distinct clusters comprising consumers with considerably different wine preferences. These results justify wine producers' use of alternative oak maturation regimens to achieve wine styles that appeal to different segments of their target market.

  11. Effect of feeding period for dry cull cows on carcass quality, meat quality, and consumer reactions to loin steaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Niels T.; Vestergaard, Mogens; Bredahl, Lone

    2003-01-01

    A major part of the beef marketed for Danish retail consumers originates from dairy cows slaughtered when the are culled from milk production. As these cows are often slaughtered at varios stages of lactation and with variable degrees of fatness the meat is often criticised for having a considera......A major part of the beef marketed for Danish retail consumers originates from dairy cows slaughtered when the are culled from milk production. As these cows are often slaughtered at varios stages of lactation and with variable degrees of fatness the meat is often criticised for having...... thoroughly. The present study comprise two trials. The results of both the first and second trail, including 62 cows in 2002, are reported here....

  12. Measurement of urinary porphyrins and porphyrin precursors in Dutch hospital laboratories: a review of quality control over 5 years.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuijderhoudt, F.M.; Weykamp, C.W.; Willems, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated a quality control scheme for the measurement of urinary uroporphyrin, coproporphyrin, total urinary porphyrins and precursors of urinary porphyrins, delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen that was performed in The Netherlands during a period of 5 years. METHODS: Six

  13. The EFQM excellence model: European and Dutch experiences with the EFQM approach in health care. European Foundation for Quality Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabitz, U.; Klazinga, N.; Walburg, J.

    2000-01-01

    One way to meet the challenges in creating a high performance organization in health care is the approach of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM). The Foundation is in the tradition of the American Malcolm Baldrige Award and was initiated by the European Commission and 14 European

  14. Desk-study on habitat quality for the European Sturgeon in the Dutch Rhine and southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, H.V.; Teal, L.R.; Wolfshaar, van de K.E.; Griffioen, A.B.; Houben, B.; Breve, N.W.P.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most endangered fish species worldwide is the European sturgeon Acipenser sturio. The River Rhine was home to an important sturgeon population that went locally extinct in the first half of the 20th century. In recent decades, many improvements of the ecological quality of the Rhine have

  15. Towards evidence-based, quality-controlled health promotion: the Dutch recognition system for health promotion interventions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brug, J.; Dale, D. van; Lanting, L.; Kremers, S.; Veenhof, C.; Leurs, M.; Yperen, T. van; Kok, G.

    2010-01-01

    Registration or recognition systems for best-practice health promotion interventions may contribute to better quality assurance and control in health promotion practice. In the Netherlands, such a system has been developed and is being implemented aiming to provide policy makers and professionals

  16. Research quality and efficiency: An analysis of assessments and management issues in Dutch economics and business research programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, T.L.C.M.; Garcia Valderrama, T.

    2006-01-01

    Assessments of quality and productivity of academic research programs become more and more important in gaining financial support, in hiring and promoting research staff, and in building academic reputation. Most assessments are based on peer review or on bibliometric information. In this paper we

  17. Development of a Web-Based Quality Dashboard Including a Toolbox to Improve Pain Management in Dutch Intensive Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos-Blom, Marie-José; Gude, Wouter T.; de Jonge, Evert; Spijkstra, Jan Jaap; van der Veer, Sabine N.; Dongelmans, Dave A.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.

    2017-01-01

    Audit and feedback (A&F) is a common strategy to improve quality of care. Meta-analyses have indicated that A&F may be more effective in realizing desired change when baseline performance is low, it is delivered by a supervisor or colleague, it is provided frequently and in a timely manner, it is

  18. THE GOOD HOUSEKEEPING SEAL OF APPROVAL: FROM INNOVATIVE CONSUMER PROTECTION TO POPULAR BADGE OF QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Strach

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available By providing information through factual content, editorial comments, and advertising, the great magazine expansion of the late 19th century reduced market imperfections for many consumer goods. Given the virtual absence of government and non-profit sources of information, some magazines even took the initiative to prohibit misleading advertising. However, in the early 20th century Good Housekeeping surpassed normal practices and created both a guaranty for advertised products and a Seal of Approval from the Good Housekeeping Institute.

  19. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) nurses do not consume pollens based on their nutritional quality

    OpenAIRE

    Corby-Harris, Vanessa; Snyder, Lucy; Meador, Charlotte; Ayotte, Trace

    2018-01-01

    Honey bee workers (Apis mellifera) consume a variety of pollens to meet the majority of their requirements for protein and lipids. Recent work indicates that honey bees prefer diets that reflect the proper ratio of nutrients necessary for optimal survival and homeostasis. This idea relies on the precept that honey bees evaluate the nutritional composition of the foods provided to them. While this has been shown in bumble bees, the data for honey bees are mixed. Further, there is controversy a...

  20. THE GOOD HOUSEKEEPING SEAL OF APPROVAL: FROM INNOVATIVE CONSUMER PROTECTION TO POPULAR BADGE OF QUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Lauren Strach; Malcolm Russell

    2003-01-01

    By providing information through factual content, editorial comments, and advertising, the great magazine expansion of the late 19th century reduced market imperfections for many consumer goods. Given the virtual absence of government and non-profit sources of information, some magazines even took the initiative to prohibit misleading advertising. However, in the early 20th century Good Housekeeping surpassed normal practices and created both a guaranty for advertised products and a Seal of A...

  1. "How to Strike the Right Balance between Quality Assurance and Quality Control in the Perceptions of Individual Lecturers": A Comparison of UK and Dutch Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teelken, Christine; Lomas, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the way lecturers observe, feel restrained by and cope with quality management systems that have been implemented in the higher education systems of the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. As two sides of the same coin, quality enhancement and quality control are of increased significance in European Higher Education…

  2. Quality Indicators for In-Hospital Pharmaceutical Care of Dutch Elderly Patients Development and Validation of an ACOVE-Based Quality Indicator Set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, Peter C.; Klopotowska, Joanna E.; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; van Kan, Hendrikus J.; Bijleveld, Yuma A.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In 2001, the ACOVE (Assessing Care Of Vulnerable Elders) quality indicators (QIs) were developed in the US to measure the quality of care of vulnerable elderly patients. However, the ACOVE QI set was developed mainly to assess the overall quality of care of community-dwelling vulnerable

  3. The effects of oat β-glucan incorporation on the quality, structure, consumer acceptance and glycaemic response of steamed bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Ye, Fayin; Feng, Liyuan; Wei, Fubin; Zhao, Guohua

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the incorporation of oat β-glucan (OβG) on the sensory and nutritional quality of steamed bread. Wheat flour was substituted with OβG at levels varying from 0 g/100 g to 5 g/100 g. The results showed that the products containing 1 g/100 g and 3 g/100 g OβG produced a comparable overall consumer acceptance while a significantly lower score was given to the product with 5 g/100 g. Nutritionally, the presence of OβG impeded in vitro starch hydrolysis by amylolytic enzymes. More importantly, the addition of OβG up to 5 g/100 g did bring about a lower in vitro predicted glycaemic index to steamed bread, but it generated insignificant effects on the in vivo glycaemic response. The current work first demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating OβG-enriched steamed bread and its nutritional superiority compared to the corresponding normal product. Modern methods of food elaboration and processing frequently reduce the content of dietary fiber (DF). Despite the well-known health benefits of DF consumption, average intake levels still fall far below recommended ones. Oat β-glucan (OβG) is a kind of indigestible polysaccharide with diverse bioactivity. This article evaluated the effects of OβG incorporation on quality, structure, consumer acceptance, and glycaemic response of steamed bread. The addition of less than 3 g/100 g of OβG had negligible effects on the consumer acceptance of steamed bread. The enrichment at 5 g/100 g indeed deteriorated the consumer acceptance. Moreover, OβG highly lowered the glycaemic response of steamed bread. The current work first demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating OβG-enriched steamed bread and its nutritional superiority compared to the corresponding normal product. OβG enriched steamed bread may offer an alternative to improve DF intake of residents. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparing quality of dying and death perceived by family members and nurses for patients dying in US and Dutch ICUs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty; Hofhuis, José G M

    2017-01-01

    with 8 higher in the US and 2 higher in NL. CONCLUSION: The QODD was rated similarly by family members in the US and the Netherlands but varied when assessed by nurses. These differences may be due to organizational or cultural differences between the two countries or to expectations of respondents.......BACKGROUND: The Quality of Dying and Death (QODD) questionnaire is used as a self-reported measure to allow families and clinicians to assess patients' quality of dying and death. We evaluated end-of-life (EOL) experiences as measured by the QODD completed by families and nurses in the United...... States (US) and the Netherlands (NL) to explore similarities and differences in these experiences and identify opportunities for improving EOL care. METHODS: Questionnaire data were gathered from family members of patients dying in the ICU and nurses caring for these patients. In NL, data were gathered...

  5. It was nice with the brick so now I'll click: The effects of offline and online experience, perceived benefits, and trust on Dutch consumers' online repeat purchase intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beldad, Ardion Daroca; Segers, Mariel; Kurosu, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the factors influencing Dutch consumers’ intention to continue purchasing from a brick-and-click clothes shop’s online channel after an initial commercial exchange. Results on the online survey with 513 respondents reveal that their repeat online purchase intention is

  6. Using client experiences for quality improvement in long-term care organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidgeest, M.; Strating, M.; Luijkx, K.; Westert, G.P.; Delnoij, E.D.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether client experiences measured with the Consumer Quality Index (CQ-index or CQI) questionnaires are used in Dutch nursing homes and homes for the elderly for quality improvement. DESIGN: Information was gathered through face-to-face interviews with day-to-day workers,

  7. Context and wine quality effects on consumers' mood, emotions, liking and willingness to pay for Australian Shiraz wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Lukas; Ristic, Renata; Johnson, Trent E; Meiselman, Herbert L; Hoek, Annet C; Jeffery, David W; Bastian, Susan E P

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of different contexts on consumers' mood, product-evoked emotions, liking and willingness to pay for wine. Three consumer trials (n=114, 115, and 120) examined 3 different sample sets of 4 Australian commercial Shiraz wines. Each sample set was comprised of a high, medium-high, medium-low and low quality wine as designated by an expert panel. Wine consumers evaluated the same set of wines in the three different contexts, ranging from a highly-controlled laboratory setting to more realistic restaurant and at-home settings. Results showed that high quality wines were liked more and elicited more intense emotions of positive valence compared to wines of lower quality. Context effects were observed on emotions, but not on liking, indicating that although emotions and liking are correlated, the measurement of emotions can deliver additional information over liking. Tasting wine in the restaurant context evoked more intense positive emotions compared to the home and laboratory contexts. Participants' mood before tasting the wines had a strong influence on consecutive product-evoked emotion ratings, but only weak influence on liking ratings. Furthermore, a strong relationship between wine-evoked emotions and willingness to pay was observed, showing that if a wine-evoked more intense emotion of positive valence e.g., contented, enthusiastic, happy, optimistic and passionate participants were willing to pay significantly more for a bottle. Additionally, the absence of negative emotions, even if typically evoked to a very weak extent, is a requirement for an increased willingness to pay. This study indicates it is worthwhile to consider context and emotions in wine testing and marketing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality versus Quantity: An Investigation into Electronic Word of Mouth’s Influence on Consumer Buying Intention

    OpenAIRE

    Huyen, T.; Costello, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    Online consumer reviews play an increasingly crucial role in shaping purchasing intention. With the wide-spread reviews available around the world on sites like TripAdvisor or Yelp, companies’ reputation and hence survival are potentially at risk. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impacts of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) on the individual’s attitudes towards the quantity and quality of online store reviews and consider how it impacts their behavior. We incorporate brand trust ...

  9. Effect of ageing time on consumer-perceived quality of Italian Simmental beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Antonella Volpelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experiment was to provide an objective indication on the optimal ageing time of meat from ItalianSimmental (IS young bulls, the most important commercial category of the breed. The research was carried out on 10young bulls slaughtered at the average weight of 688 kg (SE: 7.3 kg. The right side of each carcass was stored for 7days and the left one for further 7 days, at normal refrigeration temperatures. At the end of the ageing period, the sideswere sampled at the loin for meat pH, color, cooking loss and shear force measurement. A central location, affective testinvolving 74 consumers was carried out to measure the degree of liking for grilled beef aged 7 or 14 days.The pH and color parameters were not significantly affected by the duration of post-mortem storage, while cooking lossincreased (31.4 vs 32.6 %; Pincreased from 7 to 14 days. The degree of liking by the untrained respondents for the two types of cooked meat wasdifferent, considering that consumers gave the highest hedonistic scores to beef aged 14 days. Tenderness was the sensoryattribute that allowed the best discrimination between beef stored for periods of different length. In fact, while thedifference between 14-day-aged and 7-day-aged beef for flavour ratings (7.0 vs 6.9 did not reach the threshold of significance,the former meat was perceived as significantly finer than the latter regarding tenderness (6.5 vs 5.6; P= 0.01and marginally preferred in overall terms (6.9 vs 6.5; P= 0.07. The classification test, carried out at the end of the quantitativetest by asking consumers to select from a list the most appropriate attributes describing the stimuli associatedwith meat consumption, confirmed the effectiveness of texture attributes in ranking different-aged beef acceptability. Infact, the number of ticks reported for chewiness and juiciness descriptors were different for the two types of meat: the14-day-aged beef was perceived as easier to chew (57 vs 34 ticks

  10. In search of a consumer-focused food classification system. An experimental heuristic approach to differentiate degrees of quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Ruiz, Francisco J; Marano-Marcolini, Carla; Lopez-Zafra, Esther

    2018-06-01

    The present paper focuses on the problems that arise in food classification systems (FCSs), especially when the food product type has different levels or grades of quality. Despite the principal function of these systems being to assist the consumer (to inform, clarify and facilitate choice and purchase), they frequently have the opposite effect. Thus, the main aim of the present research involves providing orientations for the design of effective food classification systems. To address this objective, considering the context of food product consumption (related to heuristic processing), we conducted an experimental study with 720 participants. We analysed the usefulness of heuristic elements by a factorial 2 (category length: short and long) × 3 (visual signs: colours, numbers and images) design in relation to recall and recognition activities. The results showed that the elements used to make the classification more effective for consumers vary depending on whether the user seeks to prioritize the recall or the recognition of product categories. Thus, long categories with images significantly improve recognition, and short categories with colours improve recall. A series of recommendations are provided that can help to enhance FCSs and to make them more intuitive and easier to understand for consumers. Implications with regard to theory and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The quality of school lunch consumed reflects overall eating patterns in 11-16-year-old schoolchildren in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilles-Tirkkonen, Tanja; Pentikäinen, Saara; Lappi, Jenni; Karhunen, Leila; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mykkänen, Hannu

    2011-12-01

    To explore how the quality of school lunch consumed reflected overall eating patterns in school-aged children. Children filled in an Internet-based questionnaire about their eating patterns. The children were then divided into balanced and imbalanced school lunch eaters on the basis of their responses in the questionnaire. A balanced school lunch consisted of, by the definition used in the present study, a main dish, salad and bread. Eleven primary schools and one middle school in eastern Finland. A total of 531 schoolchildren (247 boys and 284 girls) aged 11-16 years. The school lunch was balanced in 46·5% of children. Eating a balanced school lunch was associated with overall healthier eating patterns outside school. Children who ate a balanced school lunch had more regular meal times and consumed healthier snacks. They ate fruit or berries and vegetables, dairy products and wholegrain foods more often, consumed fewer salty snacks, pizzas, meat pies and drank fewer soft drinks and energy drinks. Their eating patterns at home were also healthier, with vegetables being offered at every family dinner and fruit being offered daily, whereas soft drinks were offered seldom. The choices made by children in their school lunch reflect the overall eating patterns among school-aged children. Eating a balanced school lunch is associated with more regular meal patterns, the availability of healthier foods at home and an overall healthier diet, suggesting that healthy eating patterns are learnt at home.

  12. Defensive technology and welfare analysis of environmental quality change with uncertain consumer health impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.K.; Moffitt, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measuring the ex post losses from environmental quality change is an important issue when environmental contamination creates health risks, liability is assigned, and private compensation efforts are required. This paper proposes a methodology for measuring the ex post welfare impact of environmental quality change using market behavior from defensive expenditures. Conditions under which a defensive technology can provide a bound on welfare estimates are identified

  13. Raising Awareness and Signaling Quality to Uninformed Consumers: A Price-Advertising Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Zhao

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the firm's optimal advertising and pricing strategies when introducing a new product. We extend the existing signaling literature on advertising spending and price by constructing a model in which advertising is used both to raise awareness about the product and to signal its quality. By comparing the complete information game and the incomplete information game, we find that the high-quality firm will reduce advertising spending and increase pric...

  14. Health risks encountered by Dutch medical students during an elective in the tropics and the quality and comprehensiveness of pre-and post-travel care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeldin, Elhadi; Soonawala, Darius; Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Hack, Evelien; Visser, Leo G

    2010-12-02

    Clinical and research electives abroad offer medical students many unique experiences. However, participating in an unfamiliar health-care setting combined with limited medical experience may place students at risk of illness. To improve pre-and post-travel care, we assessed the health risks and the quality and comprehensiveness of pre-and post-travel care in a cohort of Dutch medical students returning form an elective abroad. All medical students who had performed an elective in the tropics between July 2006 and December 2008 were sent an informative email asking them to complete a web-based questionnaire. 180 of 242 (74%) students completed the questionnaire. Regarding the risk of bloodborne viral infection: 67% of all students and 32% of junior students engaged in procedures that constitute a risk of exposure to bloodborne viral infection, often in countries with high HIV prevalence rates. None of nine students who experienced possible or certain mucosal or percutaneous exposure to potentially infectious body fluids reported the exposure at the time it occurred and none used PEP. Regarding other health risks: 8 of 40 (20%) students stopped using mefloquine due to adverse effects. This left a sizeable proportion unprotected in countries that are hyperendemic for malaria. Post-travel screening for schistosomiasis, tuberculosis (tuberculin skin test) and carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) encompassed approximately half of all students who should have been screened. Based on the results of this study we have adopted an integral set of measures to reduce the health risks associated with an elective abroad. The pre and post-travel consult has been centralized and standardized as well as the distribution of PEP. In addition we have developed a mandatory module on Global Health for all medical students planning an elective abroad.

  15. Health risks encountered by Dutch medical students during an elective in the tropics and the quality and comprehensiveness of pre-and post-travel care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandenbroucke Jan P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical and research electives abroad offer medical students many unique experiences. However, participating in an unfamiliar health-care setting combined with limited medical experience may place students at risk of illness. To improve pre-and post-travel care, we assessed the health risks and the quality and comprehensiveness of pre-and post-travel care in a cohort of Dutch medical students returning form an elective abroad. Methods All medical students who had performed an elective in the tropics between July 2006 and December 2008 were sent an informative email asking them to complete a web-based questionnaire. Results 180 of 242 (74% students completed the questionnaire. Regarding the risk of bloodborne viral infection: 67% of all students and 32% of junior students engaged in procedures that constitute a risk of exposure to bloodborne viral infection, often in countries with high HIV prevalence rates. None of nine students who experienced possible or certain mucosal or percutaneous exposure to potentially infectious body fluids reported the exposure at the time it occurred and none used PEP. Regarding other health risks: 8 of 40 (20% students stopped using mefloquine due to adverse effects. This left a sizeable proportion unprotected in countries that are hyperendemic for malaria. Post-travel screening for schistosomiasis, tuberculosis (tuberculin skin test and carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA encompassed approximately half of all students who should have been screened. Conclusions Based on the results of this study we have adopted an integral set of measures to reduce the health risks associated with an elective abroad. The pre and post-travel consult has been centralized and standardized as well as the distribution of PEP. In addition we have developed a mandatory module on Global Health for all medical students planning an elective abroad.

  16. Meat quality, microbiological status and consumer preference of beef gluteus medius aged in a dry ageing bag or vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Babol, Jakub; Wallby, Anna; Lundström, Kerstin

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated meat quality and consumer preference after ageing beef gluteus medius in a water vapour-permeable dry-ageing bag or in vacuum for 14 days. Higher ageing and trim losses but lower thawing loss, cooking loss and water content were found in samples aged in dry ageing bags compared to those aged in vacuum. Samples aged in dry ageing bags had higher total bacteria and yeast counts but lower lactic acid bacteria counts than those aged in vacuum, both before and after trimming. Meat aged in dry ageing bag was more tender and juicier and overall preferred by consumers compared with samples aged in vacuum. Female participants outperformed the males in detecting differences in palatability. No differences were found in pH, smell, shear force, colour, Enterobacteriaceae, and mould counts. Thus, by using a dry ageing bag, it is possible to produce dry-aged meat in a more controlled condition without negative effects on sensory or other quality attributes. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Direct-to-consumer Internet promotion of robotic prostatectomy exhibits varying quality of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkin, Joshua N; Lowrance, William T; Feifer, Andrew H; Mulhall, John P; Eastham, James E; Elkin, Elena B

    2012-04-01

    Robotic surgery to remove a cancerous prostate has become a popular treatment. Internet marketing of this surgery provides an intriguing case study of direct-to-consumer promotions of medical devices, which are more loosely regulated than pharmaceutical promotions. We investigated whether the claims made in online promotions of robotic prostatectomy were consistent with evidence from comparative effectiveness studies. After performing a search and cross-sectional analysis of websites that mentioned the procedure, we found that many sites claimed benefits that were unsupported by evidence and that 42 percent of the sites failed to mention risks. Most sites were published by hospitals and physicians, which the public may regard as more objective than pages published by manufacturers. Unbalanced information may inappropriately raise patients' expectations. Increasing enforcement and regulation of online promotions may be beyond the capabilities of federal authorities. Thus, the most feasible solution may be for the government and medical societies to promote the production of balanced educational material.

  18. Effect of Cooking on Quality Commonly Consumed Marine Fish Platycephalidae (Platycephalus indicus in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Aberoumand

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fish Platycephalus indicus usually are consumed by southern people in Iran. The present study assessed the effect of processing on proximate compositions in the fillets of P.indicus. The fish samples were prepared by boiling, baking and frying, while proximate analysis was done by standard methods. Boiling processing method significantly reduced ash content in the fillet whereas fat content was significantly increased in frying. Baking method recorded highest ash content of 10.64%. The highest protein concentration was obtained for boiled fillet (82.73%. Lipid content was recorded highest in fried fillet (17.27%. P. indicus was, rich in fat, protein, and ash, thus its consumption should be encouraged.

  19. Direct-To-Consumer Internet Promotion Of Robotic Prostatectomy Exhibits Varying Quality Of Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkin, Joshua N.; Lowrance, William T.; Feifer, Andrew H.; Mulhall, John P.; Eastham, James E.; Elkin, Elena B.

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery to remove a cancerous prostate has become a popular treatment. Internet marketing of this surgery provides an intriguing case study of direct-to-consumer promotions of medical devices, which are more loosely regulated than pharmaceutical promotions. We investigated whether the claims made in online promotions of robotic prostatectomy were consistent with evidence from comparative effectiveness studies. After performing a search and crosssectional analysis of websites that mentioned the procedure, we found that many sites claimed benefits that were unsupported by evidence and that 42 percent of the sites failed to mention risks. Most sites were published by hospitals and physicians, which the public may regard as more objective than pages published by manufacturers. Unbalanced information may inappropriately raise patients’ expectations. Increasing enforcement and regulation of online promotions may be beyond the capabilities of federal authorities. Thus, the most feasible solution may be for the government and medical societies to promote the production of balanced educational material. PMID:22492893

  20. Development of the information model for consumer assessment of key quality indicators by goods labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkina, S.; Ostrinskaya, L.

    2018-04-01

    An information model for “key” quality indicators of goods has been developed. This model is based on the assessment of f standardization existing state and the product labeling quality. According to the authors’ opinion, the proposed “key” indicators are the most significant for purchasing decision making. Customers will be able to use this model through their mobile technical devices. The developed model allows to decompose existing processes in data flows and to reveal the levels of possible architectural solutions. In-depth analysis of the presented information model decomposition levels will allow determining the stages of its improvement and to reveal additional indicators of the goods quality that are of interest to customers in the further research. Examining the architectural solutions for the customer’s information environment functioning when integrating existing databases will allow us to determine the boundaries of the model flexibility and customizability.

  1. Mothers and fathers of young Dutch adolescents with Down syndrome: Health related quality of life and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Jan Pieter; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; van Trotsenburg, A S Paul; Grootenhuis, Martha A

    2016-12-01

    Like any child, children with Down syndrome (DS) affect the lives of their families. Most studies focus on the adaptation of parents and families of young children with DS, while relatively few studies include the perspective of fathers. To determine 1) whether mothers and fathers of 11 to 13-year-olds with DS differ from reference parents in health related quality of life (HRQoL) and family functioning, and 2) whether HRQoL in parents of children with DS changes over time, from when the child was 6-8 years old to when the child was 11-13 years old. 80 mothers and 44 fathers completed HRQoL and family functioning questionnaires. 58 parents (53 mothers) had completed the HRQoL-questionnaire in a previous study. Mothers differed from reference mothers in one HRQoL-domain (Sexuality), while fathers' HRQoL did not significantly differ from reference fathers. Both mothers and fathers scored in the (sub)clinical range more frequently than reference parents in Total family functioning, and in the domains Partner relation and Social network. Furthermore, fathers scored in the (sub)clinical range more frequently than reference parents in Responsiveness and Organization. HRQoL showed no significant change over time. Our findings indicate frequent family functioning problems but few HRQoL problems in parents and families of children with DS. In offering care, a family based approach with special attention for partner relation and social functioning is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Empirical studies assessing the quality of health information for consumers on the world wide web: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysenbach, Gunther; Powell, John; Kuss, Oliver; Sa, Eun-Ryoung

    The quality of consumer health information on the World Wide Web is an important issue for medicine, but to date no systematic and comprehensive synthesis of the methods and evidence has been performed. To establish a methodological framework on how quality on the Web is evaluated in practice, to determine the heterogeneity of the results and conclusions, and to compare the methodological rigor of these studies, to determine to what extent the conclusions depend on the methodology used, and to suggest future directions for research. We searched MEDLINE and PREMEDLINE (1966 through September 2001), Science Citation Index (1997 through September 2001), Social Sciences Citation Index (1997 through September 2001), Arts and Humanities Citation Index (1997 through September 2001), LISA (1969 through July 2001), CINAHL (1982 through July 2001), PsychINFO (1988 through September 2001), EMBASE (1988 through June 2001), and SIGLE (1980 through June 2001). We also conducted hand searches, general Internet searches, and a personal bibliographic database search. We included published and unpublished empirical studies in any language in which investigators searched the Web systematically for specific health information, evaluated the quality of Web sites or pages, and reported quantitative results. We screened 7830 citations and retrieved 170 potentially eligible full articles. A total of 79 distinct studies met the inclusion criteria, evaluating 5941 health Web sites and 1329 Web pages, and reporting 408 evaluation results for 86 different quality criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted study characteristics, medical domains, search strategies used, methods and criteria of quality assessment, results (percentage of sites or pages rated as inadequate pertaining to a quality criterion), and quality and rigor of study methods and reporting. Most frequently used quality criteria used include accuracy, completeness, readability, design, disclosures, and references provided

  3. Analysis of quality information flows in the product creation process of high-volume consumer products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sander, P.C.; Brombacher, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    It is recently realised that Quality and Reliability are not only a function of the product but also of the organisation realising the product. In spite of this very few companies are able to translate this into their business processes. The Maturity Index on Reliability (MIR) was developed to

  4. The Quality of Online Health-Related Information – an Emergent Consumer Health Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nădăşan Valentin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has become one of the main means of communication used by people who search for health-related information. The quality of online health-related information affects the users’ knowledge, their attitude, and their risk or health behaviour in complex ways and influences a substantial number of users in their decisions regarding diagnostic and treatment procedures.

  5. Medical information on the internet: a tool for measuring consumer perception of quality aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowicz, Arthur; Schulz, Peter J

    2015-03-30

    Most of adult Internet users have searched for health information on the Internet. The Internet has become one of the most important sources for health information and treatment advice. In most cases, the information found is not verified with a medical doctor, but judged by the "online-diagnosers" independently. Facing this situation, public health authorities raise concern over the quality of medical information laypersons can find on the Internet. The objective of the study was aimed at developing a measure to evaluate the credibility of websites that offer medical advice and information. The measure was tested in a quasi-experimental study on two sleeping-disorder websites of different quality. There were 45 survey items for rating the credibility of websites that were tested in a quasi-experimental study with a random assignment of 454 participants to either a high- or a low-quality website exposure. Using principal component analysis, the original items were reduced to 13 and sorted into the factors: trustworthiness, textual deficits of the content, interferences (external links on the Web site), and advertisements. The first two factors focus more on the provided content itself, while the other two describe the embedding of the content into the website. The 45 survey items had been designed previously using exploratory observations and literature research. The final scale showed adequate power and reliability for all factors. The loadings of the principal component analysis ranged satisfactorily (.644 to .854). Significant differences at P<.001 were found between the low- and high-quality groups. Advertisements on the website were rated as disturbing in both experimental conditions, meaning that they do not differentiate between good and bad information. The scale reliably distinguished high- and low-quality of medical advice given on websites.

  6. Design methodology of Dutch banknotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heij, Hans A. M.

    2000-04-01

    Since the introduction of a design methodology for Dutch banknotes, the quality of Dutch paper currency has improved in more than one way. The methodology is question provides for (i) a design policy, which helps fix clear objectives; (ii) design management, to ensure a smooth cooperation between the graphic designer, printer, papermaker an central bank, (iii) a program of requirements, a banknote development guideline for all parties involved. This systematic approach enables an objective selection of design proposals, including security features. Furthermore, the project manager obtains regular feedback from the public by conducting market surveys. Each new design of a Netherlands Guilder banknote issued by the Nederlandsche Bank of the past 50 years has been an improvement on its predecessor in terms of value recognition, security and durability.

  7. English in Dutch commercials: Not understood and not appreciated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Meurs, W.F.J. van; Gijsbers, I.

    2000-01-01

    Dutch consumers are increasingly exposed to English in commercials on television. Advertising agencies appear to use English because of financial and image reasons. This article investigates how often commercials that contain English occur in the Netherlands and whether consumers comprehend the

  8. The consumer quality index (CQ-index in an accident and emergency department: development and first evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bos Nanne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of patients’ views are essential to provide a patient-centred health service and to evaluating quality of care. As no standardized and validated system for measuring patients’ experiences in accident and emergency departments existed, we have developed the Consumer Quality index for the accident and emergency department (CQI A&E. Methods Qualitative research has been undertaken to determine the content validity of the CQI A&E. In order to assess psychometric characteristics an 84-item questionnaire was sent to 653 patients who had attended a large A&E in the Netherlands. Also, fifty importance questions were added to determine relevance of the questions and for future calculations of improvement scores. Exploratory factor analysis was applied to detect the domains of the questionnaire. Results Survey data of 304 (47% patients were used for the analysis. The first exploratory factor analysis resulted in three domains based on 13 items: ‘Attitude of the healthcare professionals’, ‘Environment and impression of the A&E’ and ‘Respect for and explanation to the patient’. The first two had an acceptable internal consistency. The second analysis, included 24 items grouped into 5 domains: ‘Attitude of the healthcare professionals’, ‘Information and explanation’, ‘Environment of the A&E’,’Leaving the A&E’ and ‘General information and rapidity of care’. All factors were internal consistent. According to the patients, the three most important aspects in healthcare performance in the A&E were: trust in the competence of the healthcare professionals, hygiene in the A&E and patients’ health care expectations. In general, the highest improvement scores concerned patient information. Conclusions The Consumer Quality index for the accident and emergency department measures patients’ experiences of A&E healthcare performance. Preliminary psychometric characteristics are sufficient to justify

  9. Assessment of the impact of educational services quality on consumer satisfaction and loyalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Untaru Elena- Nicoleta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to determine the way in which the quality of the services provided by a private kindergarten from the city of Braşov impacts the satisfaction and loyalty of the parents as service beneficiaries. Thus, the objectives of the research have taken into account the analysis of the parents’ expectations and perceptions regarding the services offered by the kindergarten, as well as the differences between them, using the Servqual model, the analysis of the correlation between perceptions and satisfaction, perception and loyalty variables, as well as the evaluation of the general quality of the service. The results of the research indicate that the kindergarten should identify the most efficient strategies for improving medical services, personnel training, daily menu, modernizing the safety systems, purchasing outdoors playground equipment and fixing the exterior aspect of the building.

  10. Development and evaluation of the Dutch Healthy Diet index 2015.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looman, Moniek; Feskens, Edith Jm; de Rijk, Mariëlle; Meijboom, Saskia; Biesbroek, Sander; Temme, Elisabeth Hm; de Vries, Jeanne; Geelen, Anouk

    To update the Dutch Healthy Diet index, a measure of diet quality, to reflect adherence to the Dutch dietary guidelines 2015 and to evaluate against participants' characteristics and nutrient intakes with the score based on 24 h recall (24 hR) data and FFQ data.

  11. The Dutch nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering Services Ltd. has, in fulfillment of its contractual commitment to the Dutch Industrial Council for Energy and Environment Technology (IREM), investigated the broad capability of the Dutch industry in playing a major role in the supply of goods and services for the construction of nuclear plants in the Netherlands. The findings are summarized in this document. 5 tabs

  12. Biotechnology : A Dutch perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Apeldoorn, J.H.F.

    1981-01-01

    Biotechnology: a Dutch Perspective assesses the future potential of biotechnology in the Netherlands. It has been published in English because it is felt that the Dutch case could be of relevance to other industrialised nations. Although the report is aimed primarily at policy planners and decision

  13. Dutch elm disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Walters

    1992-01-01

    Since its discovery in the United States in 1930, Dutch elm disease has killed thousands of native elms. The three native elms, American, slippery, and rock, have little or no resistance to Dutch elm disease, but individual trees within each species vary in susceptibility to the disease. The most important of these, American elm, is scattered in upland stands but is...

  14. Exploring Normalized Systems Potential for Dutch MoD’s Agility : A Proof of Concept on Flexibility, Time-to-market, Productivity and Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Op 't Land, M.; Krouwel, M.R.; Van Dipten, E.G.; Verelst, J.

    2011-01-01

    Both the Command and Control Support Centre (C2SC) of the Dutch Ministry of Defense, and Capgemini are constantly exploring better ways of building and maintaining information systems which ef- fectively support strategy and operations of an enterprise. In a Proof of Concept conducted in March and

  15. Comparison of two Dutch follow-up care models for spinal cord-injured patients and their impact on health problems, re-admissions and quality of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen-Vrencken, J.H.; de Witte, L.P.; Post, M.W.; Pons, C.; van Asbeck, F.W.; van der Woude, L.H.V.; van den Heuvel, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether transmural care for people with spinal cord injury living in the community has more impact on health outcomes than traditional follow-up care within the Netherlands. Design: Quasi-experiment with 12 months of follow-up. Setting: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centres.

  16. Comparison of two Dutch follow-up care models for spinal cord-injured patients and their impact on health problems, re-admissions and quality of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen-Vrencken, J. H. A.; de Witte, L. P.; Post, M. W. M.; Pons, C.; van Asbeck, F. W. A.; van der Woude, L. H. V.; van den Heuvel, W. J. A.

    Objective: To evaluate whether transmural care for people with spinal cord injury living in the community has more impact on health outcomes than traditional follow-up care within the Netherlands. Design: Quasi-experiment with 12 months of follow-up. Setting: Eight Dutch rehabilitation centres.

  17. Quality characteristics of Dutch-style fermented sausages manufactured with partial replacement of pork back-fat with pure, pre-emulsified or encapsulated fish oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Josquin, N.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Houben, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Dutch-style fermented sausages were manufactured with 15% and 30% pork back-fat substitution by pure or commercial encapsulated fish oil, either added as such or as pre-emulsified mixture with soy protein isolate. Adding commercial encapsulated fish oil was the most important factor influencing the

  18. Consumer Quality Index Chronic Skin Disease (CQI-CSD): a new instrument to measure quality of care from the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Cranenburgh, O D; Krol, M W; Hendriks, M C P; de Rie, M A; Smets, E M A; de Korte, J; Sprangers, M A G

    2015-10-01

    Assessing quality of care from the patient's perspective is considered to be highly relevant. As a standardized instrument in dermatology was lacking, we developed a patient experience questionnaire regarding chronic skin disease care: the Consumer Quality Index Chronic Skin Disease (CQI-CSD). (i) To evaluate the dimensional structure of the CQI-CSD, (ii) to assess its ability to distinguish between hospitals according to patients' experiences with quality of care, (iii) to explore patients' experiences with dermatological care and priorities for quality improvement according to the patients, and (iv) to optimize the questionnaire based on psychometric results and stakeholders' input. In a cross-sectional study 5647 adult patients who received dermatological care in the past 12 months in 20 hospitals were randomly selected and invited to fill out the questionnaire. Overall 1160 of 3989 eligible respondents (29% response rate, 30-87 per hospital) were included for analysis. The CQI-CSD comprised seven scales with high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0·74-0·92). The instrument's discriminative power was limited. Patients were positive about the care provided by nurses and doctors, but the provision of information by healthcare providers, accessibility of care and patient involvement could be improved. We optimized the CQI-CSD, resulting in a revised questionnaire containing 65 items. In conclusion, the CQI-CSD is a useful instrument to measure patient experiences with dermatological care. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Course of Quality of Life After Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Detailed Analysis From the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westhoff, Paulien G.; Verdam, Mathilde G.E.; Oort, Frans J.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Vulpen, Marco van; Leer, Jan Willem H.; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.; Graeff, Alexander de; Linden, Yvette M. van der

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the course of quality of life (QoL) after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases. Patients and Methods: The Dutch Bone Metastasis Study randomized 1157 patients with painful bone metastases between a single fraction of 8 Gy and 6 fractions of 4 Gy between 1996 and 1998. The study showed a comparable pain response of 74%. Patients filled out weekly questionnaires for 13 weeks, then monthly for 2 years. In these analyses, physical, psychosocial, and functional QoL domain scores and a score of general health were studied. Mixed modeling was used to model the course of QoL and to study the influence of several characteristics. Results: In general, QoL stabilized after 1 month. Psychosocial QoL improved after treatment. The level of QoL remained stable, steeply deteriorating at the end of life. For most QoL domains, a high pain score and intake of opioids were associated with worse QoL, with small effect sizes (−0.11 to −0.27). A poor performance score was associated with worse functional QoL, with a medium effect size (0.41). There is no difference in QoL between patients receiving a single fraction of 8 Gy and 6 fractions of 4 Gy, except for a temporary worsening of physical QoL after 6 fractions. Conclusion: Although radiation therapy for painful bone metastases leads to a meaningful pain response, most domains of QoL do not improve after treatment. Only psychosocial QoL improves slightly after treatment. The level of QoL is related to the actual survival, with a rather stable course of QoL for most of the remaining survival time and afterward a sharp decrease, starting only a few weeks before the end of life. Six fractions of 4 Gy lead to a temporary worse physical QoL compared with a single fraction of 8 Gy.

  20. Course of Quality of Life After Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Detailed Analysis From the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westhoff, Paulien G., E-mail: p.g.westhoff@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Department of Radiotherapy, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Verdam, Mathilde G.E. [Department of Medical Psychology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oort, Frans J. [Research Institute of Child Development and Education, Department of Medical Psychology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jobsen, Jan J. [Department of Radiotherapy, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Leer, Jan Willem H. [Department of Radiotherapy, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Marijnen, Corrie A.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Graeff, Alexander de [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Linden, Yvette M. van der [Department of Radiotherapy, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To study the course of quality of life (QoL) after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases. Patients and Methods: The Dutch Bone Metastasis Study randomized 1157 patients with painful bone metastases between a single fraction of 8 Gy and 6 fractions of 4 Gy between 1996 and 1998. The study showed a comparable pain response of 74%. Patients filled out weekly questionnaires for 13 weeks, then monthly for 2 years. In these analyses, physical, psychosocial, and functional QoL domain scores and a score of general health were studied. Mixed modeling was used to model the course of QoL and to study the influence of several characteristics. Results: In general, QoL stabilized after 1 month. Psychosocial QoL improved after treatment. The level of QoL remained stable, steeply deteriorating at the end of life. For most QoL domains, a high pain score and intake of opioids were associated with worse QoL, with small effect sizes (−0.11 to −0.27). A poor performance score was associated with worse functional QoL, with a medium effect size (0.41). There is no difference in QoL between patients receiving a single fraction of 8 Gy and 6 fractions of 4 Gy, except for a temporary worsening of physical QoL after 6 fractions. Conclusion: Although radiation therapy for painful bone metastases leads to a meaningful pain response, most domains of QoL do not improve after treatment. Only psychosocial QoL improves slightly after treatment. The level of QoL is related to the actual survival, with a rather stable course of QoL for most of the remaining survival time and afterward a sharp decrease, starting only a few weeks before the end of life. Six fractions of 4 Gy lead to a temporary worse physical QoL compared with a single fraction of 8 Gy.

  1. Quality of consumer-targeted internet guidance on home firearm and ammunition storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Katherine L; Skoczylas, Maria Shakour; Schmidt, John P; Keshavarzi, Nahid R; Mohr, Bethany Anne

    2016-10-01

    Four storage practices protect against unintentional and/or self-inflicted firearm injury among children and adolescents: keeping guns locked (1) and unloaded (2) and keeping ammunition locked up (3) and in a separate location from the guns (4). Our aim was to mimic common Google search strategies on firearm/ammunition storage and assess whether the resulting web pages provided recommendations consistent with those supported by the literature. We identified 87 web pages by Google search of the 10 most commonly used search terms in the USA related to firearm/ammunition storage. Two non-blinded independent reviewers analysed web page technical quality according to a 17-item checklist derived from previous studies. A single reviewer analysed readability by US grade level assigned by Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Index. Two separate, blinded, independent reviewers analysed deidentified web page content for accuracy and completeness describing the four accepted storage practices. Reviewers resolved disagreements by consensus. The web pages described, on average, less than one of four accepted storage practices (mean 0.2 (95% CL 0.1 to 0.4)). Only two web pages (2%) identified all four practices. Two web pages (2%) made assertions inconsistent with recommendations; both implied that loaded firearms could be stored safely. Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Index averaged 8.0 (95% CL 7.3 to 8.7). The average technical quality score was 7.1 (95% CL 6.8 to 7.4) out of an available score of 17. There was a high degree of agreement between reviewers regarding completeness (weighted κ 0.78 (95% CL 0.61 to 0.97)). The internet currently provides incomplete information about safe firearm storage. Understanding existing deficiencies may inform future strategies for improvement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Microbiological quality of milk in Tanzania: from Maasai stable to African consumer table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoder, Dagmar; Maichin, Andreas; Lema, Benedict; Laffa, John

    2013-11-01

    In Tanzania, pastoralists such as the Maasai and small urban farmers are responsible for the country's milk production, and 95% of the national milk supply is sold without regulation. This study was conducted using hygiene checklists and milk sampling to investigate milk quality and safety at various steps throughout the milk production chain. In regions of Dar es Salaam and Lake Victoria, 196 milk samples were collected: 109 samples of raw milk, 41 samples of packed or open served heat-treated products, and 46 samples of fermented products. Samples were taken from (i) the production level (pastoralists and urban farmers), (ii) the collection level (middlemen and depots), (iii) processors (dairies), and (iv) retailers (kiosks). Samples were analyzed for hygiene criteria (total bacteria, total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and coagulase-positive staphylococci) and foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella, enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. Adequate heating of milk for drinking was determined via heat labile alkaline phosphatase and lactoperoxidase analysis. Total bacterial counts indicated that only 67% (73 of 109) of raw milk samples and 46% (19 of 41) of heat-treated samples met national Tanzanian standards. Bulk milk samples taken from the traditional milking vessels of Maasai pastoralists had the lowest total bacterial counts: ≥ 1 × 10(2) CFU/ml. Foodborne pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella were isolated from 10.1% (11 of 109) of raw milk samples but were not detected in heat-treated or fermented products, and 83% of heat-treated milk samples were lactoperoxidase negative, indicating overpasteurization. Coliforms were detected in 41% (17 of 41) of processed milk samples, thus indicating a high rate of recontamination. A progressive decrease in microbial quality along the milk production chain was attributed to departures from traditional methods, inadequate milk containers, long transport distances, lack of cooling, and

  3. Effect of marketing activities, benefits, risks, confusion due to over-choice, price, quality and consumer trust on online tourism purchasing

    OpenAIRE

    Pappas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    The paper focuses on website vendors and three fundamental aspects, which influence price quality and trust, the major factors that affect purchasing intentions amongst online consumers. The three fundamental aspects in question are: perceived benefits, risks and confusion due to over-choice. The purpose of the study is to examine the influence of these three aspects on consumers' trust and their online purchasing intentions, and also to evaluate their interrelationship with marketing activit...

  4. Effects of Consuming Preloads with Different Energy Density and Taste Quality on Energy Intake and Postprandial Blood Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Siew Ling; Salleh, Nurhazwani; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar; Forde, Ciaran G

    2018-01-31

    Consumption of reduced energy dense foods and drink has the potential to reduce energy intake and postprandial blood glucose concentrations. In addition, the taste quality of a meal (e.g., sweet or savoury) may play a role in satiation and food intake. The objective of this randomised crossover study was to examine whether energy density and taste quality has an impact on energy intake and postprandial blood glucose response. Using a preload design, participants were asked to consume a sweet ("Cheng Teng") or a savoury (broth) preload soup in high energy density (HED; around 0.50 kcal/g; 250 kcal) or low energy density (LED; around 0.12 kcal/g; 50 kcal) in mid-morning and an ad libitum lunch was provided an hour after the preload. Participants recorded their food intake for the rest of the day after they left the study site. Energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response were measured in 32 healthy lean males (mean age = 28.9 years, mean BMI = 22.1 kg/m²). There was a significant difference in ad libitum lunch intake between treatments ( p = 0.012), with higher intake in sweet LED and savoury LED compared to sweet HED and savoury HED. Energy intake at subsequent meals and total daily energy intake did not differ between the four treatments (both p ≥ 0.214). Consumption of HED preloads resulted in a larger spike in postprandial blood glucose response compared with LED preloads, irrespective of taste quality ( p < 0.001). Energy density rather than taste quality plays an important role in energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response. This suggests that regular consumption of low energy-dense foods has the potential to reduce overall energy intake and to improve glycemic control.

  5. Effects of Consuming Preloads with Different Energy Density and Taste Quality on Energy Intake and Postprandial Blood Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ling Tey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of reduced energy dense foods and drink has the potential to reduce energy intake and postprandial blood glucose concentrations. In addition, the taste quality of a meal (e.g., sweet or savoury may play a role in satiation and food intake. The objective of this randomised crossover study was to examine whether energy density and taste quality has an impact on energy intake and postprandial blood glucose response. Using a preload design, participants were asked to consume a sweet (“Cheng Teng” or a savoury (broth preload soup in high energy density (HED; around 0.50 kcal/g; 250 kcal or low energy density (LED; around 0.12 kcal/g; 50 kcal in mid-morning and an ad libitum lunch was provided an hour after the preload. Participants recorded their food intake for the rest of the day after they left the study site. Energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response were measured in 32 healthy lean males (mean age = 28.9 years, mean BMI = 22.1 kg/m2. There was a significant difference in ad libitum lunch intake between treatments (p = 0.012, with higher intake in sweet LED and savoury LED compared to sweet HED and savoury HED. Energy intake at subsequent meals and total daily energy intake did not differ between the four treatments (both p ≥ 0.214. Consumption of HED preloads resulted in a larger spike in postprandial blood glucose response compared with LED preloads, irrespective of taste quality (p < 0.001. Energy density rather than taste quality plays an important role in energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response. This suggests that regular consumption of low energy-dense foods has the potential to reduce overall energy intake and to improve glycemic control.

  6. The bacteriological quality of different brands of bottled water available to consumers in Ile-Ife, south-western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbeneghu, Oluwatoyin A; Lamikanra, Adebayo

    2014-11-28

    The upsurge in the demand for bottled water has prompted the interest of many manufacturers in the production of bottled water and very many water bottling companies are therefore involved in its production. These range from large scale multinational companies to medium scale business enterprises, institutional and government business investment companies as well as small scale entrepreneurs. There is however little information on the comparative quality of bottled water brands produced by different classes of water bottling companies in Nigeria. This study was undertaken to determine the bacteriological quality of brands of bottled water available to consumers in Ile-Ife. Forty-three samples of bottled water comprising of three batches each of thirteen bottled water brands and two batches of two brands were purchased and analyzed for total bacterial count, presence of coliform and the presence of other bacterial indicators of drinking water quality. Only 67.4% of the water samples representing the products of 10 companies or 66.7% of the brands had heterotrophic counts within the acceptable limits. Coliforms present in 100 ml of water were detected in 26.7% of the bottled water brands. Other indicator organisms detected included Staphylococci isolated from 27.9% of the samples (33.3% of the brands) and specifically Staphylococcus aureus found in four brands constituting 14% of the samples. Pseudomonas strains were consistently detected in consecutive batches of three brands of the water samples. Bottled water samples produced by the large scale multinational producers were of acceptable bacteriological quality unlike those produced by most small companies. There is need for a greater control of water bottling processes carried out by commercial bottled water producers in Nigeria.

  7. Variation in reward quality and pollinator attraction: the consumer does not always get it right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, David E; Haber, Ariela I; LeCroy, Kathryn A; Lee, De'Ashia E; Link, Rosabeth I

    2015-04-09

    Nearly all bees rely on pollen as the sole protein source for the development of their larvae. The central importance of pollen for the bee life cycle should exert strong selection on their ability to locate the most rewarding sources of pollen. Despite this importance, very few studies have examined the influence of intraspecific variation in pollen rewards on the foraging decisions of bees. Previous studies have demonstrated that inbreeding reduces viability and hence protein content in Mimulus guttatus (seep monkeyflower) pollen and that bees strongly discriminate against inbred in favour of outbred plants. We examined whether variation in pollen viability could explain this preference using a series of choice tests with living plants, artificial plants and olfactometer tests using the bumble bee Bombus impatiens. We found that B. impatiens preferred to visit artificial plants provisioned with fertile anthers over those provisioned with sterile anthers. They also preferred fertile anthers when provided only olfactory cues. These bumble bees were unable to discriminate among live plants from subpopulations differing dramatically in pollen viability, however. They preferred outbred plants even when those plants were from subpopulations with pollen viability as low as the inbred populations. Their preference for outbred plants was evident even when only olfactory cues were available. Our data showed that bumble bees are able to differentiate between anthers that provide higher rewards when cues are isolated from the rest of the flower. When confronted with cues from the entire flower, their choices are independent of the quality of the pollen reward, suggesting that they are responding more strongly to cues unassociated with rewards than to those correlated with rewards. If so, this suggests that a sensory bias or some level of deception may be involved with advertisement to pollinators in M. guttatus. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of

  8. Quality of Vegetables Based on Total Phenolic Concentration Is Lower in More Rural Consumer Food Environments in a Rural American State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Selena; Byker Shanks, Carmen

    2017-08-17

    While daily consumption of fruits and vegetables (FVs) is widely recognized to be associated with supporting nutrition and health, disparities exist in consumer food environments regarding access to high-quality produce based on location. The purpose of this study was to evaluate FV quality using total phenolic (TP) scores (a phytochemical measure for health-promoting attributes, flavor, appearance, and shelf-life) in consumer food environments along a rural to urban continuum in the rural state of Montana, United States. Significant differences were found in the means of the FV TP scores ( p vegetable TP scores ( p vegetable TP scores were highest for the least rural stores and lowest for the most rural stores. Results indicate an access gap to high-quality vegetables in more rural and more health-disparate consumer food environments of Montana compared to urban food environments. Findings highlight that food and nutrition interventions should aim to increase vegetable quality in rural consumer food environments in the state of Montana towards enhancing dietary quality and food choices. Future studies are called for that examine TP scores of a wide range of FVs in diverse food environments globally. Studies are further needed that examine linkages between FV quality, food choices, diets, and health outcomes towards enhancing food environments for public health.

  9. A Developing Model Of Relationship Among Service Quality, Consumer Satisfaction, Loyalty and Word of Mouth In Islamic Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suryani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This  research  aims  to  develop  a  measurement  tool  of  service  quality  in  Islamic banking sector, and examine its relationship among satisfaction, word of mouth (WOM,  and  consumer  loyalty.  A  convenience  sampling  of  235  respondents collected  from  seven  locations  in  the  Lhokseumawe,  Aceh.  Partial  least  square -structural equation modeling- (PLS-SEM was used to test the research hypotheses. The results revealed that the quality of service has four dimensions, they are: service portfolio and assurance/SPA, tangibles/TAN, reliability of communication/COM, and Islamic values/IVA. The PLS-SEM results suggest that SPA and COM are dominant factors affecting satisfaction, and satisfaction were significantly related to WOM and loyalty. Loyalty also positively and significantly related to WOM.DOI:10.15408/aiq.v7i1.1357

  10. Direct-to-consumer advertising: physicians' views of its effects on quality of care and the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; Lo, Bernard; Pollack, Lance; Donelan, Karen; Lee, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine physicians' views of the effects of Direct-to-Consumer Advertising (DTCA) on health service utilization, quality of care, and the doctor-patient relationship. Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of US physicians to determine their perceptions of the effects of patients discussing information from DTCA on time efficiency; requests for specific interventions; health outcomes; and the doctor-patient relationship. Physicians reported that more than half (56%) of patients who discussed information from DTCA in a visit did so because they wanted a specific intervention, such as a test, change in medication, or specialist referral. The physician deemed 49% of these requests clinically inappropriate. Physicians filled 69% of requests they deemed clinically inappropriate; 39% of physicians perceived DTCA as damaging to the time efficiency of the visit, and 13% saw it as helpful. Thirty-three percent of physicians thought discussing DTCA had improved the doctor-patient relationship; 8% felt it had worsened it. The effect on the relationship was strongly associated with doing what the patient wanted. DTCA can have good and bad effects on quality of care, the doctor-patient relationship, and health service utilization. The benefits might be maximized, and the harms minimized, by increasing the accuracy of information in advertisements; enhancing physicians' communication and negotiation skills; and encouraging patients to respect physicians' clinical expertise.

  11. Preferred providers and the credible commitment problem in health insurance: first experiences with the implementation of managed competition in the Dutch health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonen, Lieke H H M; Schut, Frederik T

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the impact of the transition towards managed competition in the Dutch health care system on health insurers' contracting behaviour. Specifically, we examine whether insurers have been able to take up their role as prudent buyers of care and examine consumers' attitudes towards insurers' new role. Health insurers' contracting behaviour is investigated by an extensive analysis of available information on purchasing practices by health insurers and by interviews with directors of health care purchasing of the four major health insurers, accounting for 90% of the market. Consumer attitudes towards insurers' new role are investigated by surveys among a representative sample of enrollees over the period 2005-2009. During the first four years of the reform, health insurers were very reluctant to engage in selective contracting and preferred to use 'soft' positive incentives to encourage preferred provider choice rather than engaging in restrictive managed care activities. Consumer attitudes towards channelling vary considerably by type of provider but generally became more negative in the first two years after the reform. Insurers' reluctance to use selective contracting can be at least partly explained by the presence of a credible-commitment problem. Consumers do not trust that insurers with restrictive networks are committed to provide good quality care. The credible-commitment problem seems to be particularly relevant to the Netherlands, since Dutch enrollees are not used to restrictions on provider choice. Since consumers are quite sensitive to differences in provider quality, more reliable information about provider quality is required to reduce the credible-commitment problem.

  12. Analysis of the impact of the Dutch Heat Act on projects and an inventory of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budding, B.; Gerrits, W.; Grootscholten, C.

    2010-08-01

    The Dutch Heat Act was adopted by the Dutch Lower Chamber in February 2009. The main aim of the Act is reliable delivery of heat at reasonable prices and conditions to protect the consumer. The Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs commissioned a study on the effect of the Heat Act on investment decisions for new heat projects, encompassing a quantitative and a qualitative assessment. [nl

  13. A comparison of consumer sensory acceptance, purchase intention, and willingness to pay for high quality United States and Spanish beef under different information scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriain, M J; Sánchez, M; Carr, T R

    2009-10-01

    Tests were performed to identify variation across consumer evaluation ratings for 2 types of beef (Spanish yearling bull beef and US Choice and Prime beef), using 3 information levels (blind scores; muscle fat content + production conditions; and all production data including geographical origin) and 3 consumer evaluation ratings (hedonic rating, willingness to pay, and purchase intention). Further testing was carried out to assess the extent to which expert evaluations converged with those of untrained consumers. Taste panel tests involving 290 consumers were conducted in Navarra, a region in northern Spain. The beef samples were 20 loins of Pyrenean breed yearling bulls that had been born and raised on private farms located in this Spanish region and 20 strip loins from high quality US beef that ranged from high Choice to average Prime US quality grades. The Spanish beef were slaughtered at 507 +/- 51 kg of BW and 366 +/- 23 d of age. The US beef proved more acceptable to consumers and received greater ratings from the trained panel, with greater scores for juiciness (3.33), tenderness (3.33), flavor (3.46), and fat content (5.83) than for Spanish beef (2.77, 2.70, 3.14, 1.17). The differences in sensory variable rating were more pronounced for the Spanish beef than for the US beef, always increasing with the level of information. The variation in the ratings across different information levels was statistically significant in the case of the Spanish beef, whereas the variation observed in the ratings of the US beef was highly significant in the willingness of consumers to pay a premium. Consumers who appreciated greater quality were also more willing to pay for the additional level of quality.

  14. Introducing gaming simulation in the Dutch railways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, S.

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the Dutch railways in the domain of capacity management and traffic control is increasingly difficult to implement because of the large interconnectedness of all processes and separation into different institutions and organizations. Meanwhile there is a push for quality improvements

  15. Balance in competition in Dutch soccer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Ruud H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate an ordered probit model for soccer results in The Netherlands. The result of a game is assumed to be determined by home advantage and quality differences of the opposing teams. The parameters of the model are used to assess whether competitive balance in Dutch professional

  16. Strategy disclosure in Dutch annual reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santema, S.C.; Rijt, van de J.

    2001-01-01

    Much attention is being paid to the financial part of the annual reports of companies. Not much research has been done into the quality of the Report of the Executive Board in annual reports (the narrative part). During the past 2 years Dutch firms were reviewed on the way the Executive Board dealt

  17. MOOC Introduction to Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hollander, Franciscus; Piersma, Kristien

    Interview met Margriet Hidding, Birgit Lijmbach en Jeroen van Engen, medewerkers van het Talencentrum en de makers van de Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Introduction to Dutch over het grote succes van deze cursus

  18. Organic viticulture and wine-making: development of environment and consumer friendly technologies for organic wine quality improvement and scientifically based legislative framework. Deliverable: D 2.7 Public report about first round qualitative consumer research and market needs

    OpenAIRE

    Stolz, Hanna; Schmid, Otto

    2007-01-01

    This survey of consumers’ perceptions and expectations regarding organic wine and viticulture in the selected case study countries of Italy (IT), France (FR), Germany (DE) and Switzerland (CH) was conducted within the framework of the EU research project ORWINE (Organic viticulture and wine-making: development of environment and consumer friendly technologies for organic wine quality improvement and scientifically based legislative framework). The objectives of the study were to investigat...

  19. The Dutch Economy 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    In the series 'The Dutch Economy' the Dutch Statistical Office describes and analyzes annual developments in enterprises, households and governments, and with respect to employment and the environment. One of the subjects is 'Economy and Environment' with the sub-topics 'Resources and Energy', 'Emissions' and 'Environmental Taxes'. Furthermore, in articles on specific themes current economic issues are discussed. One of those themes has the title 'Share of renewable energy in the Netherlands is still small'. [nl

  20. Emerson Parcel of Dutch Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Emerson Parcel of Dutch Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  1. A Decision-Making Model for Deterring Food Vendors from Selling Harmless Low-Quality Foods as High-Quality Foods to Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yu Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For certain types of foods, food vendors often label low-quality foods that are harmless to human health as foods of excellent quality and sell these falsely labeled products to consumers. Because this type of food poses no harm to human health, when public health units discover their act of false labeling or food adulteration, vendors are only penalized with a fine rather than having them assume criminal liability. Upon discovering vendors act of falsely labeling food, public health units typically punish the involved parties according to the extent of false labeling. Such static protective measure is ineffective. Instead, the extent of punishment should be based not only on the extent of false labeling, but also on the frequency of food sampling as well as the number of samples obtained for food inspections. Only through this dynamic approach can food adulteration or false labeling be effectively prevented. Adopting the standpoint of the public sector in food safety management, this study developed a mathematical model that facilitates discussion on the aforementioned problems. Furthermore, we discussed how the supply-demand environmental factors of the food market are influenced by the administrative means that the public health units have used to prevent food false labeling.

  2. Consumption of caffeinated beverages and the awareness of their caffeine content among Dutch students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackus, Marlou; van de Loo, Aurora J A E; Benson, Sarah; Scholey, Andrew; Verster, Joris C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the knowledge of caffeine content of a variety of caffeinated beverages among Dutch university students. A pencil-and-paper survey was conducted among N = 800 Dutch students. Most participants (87.8%) reported consuming caffeinated beverages during the

  3. Social media sentiment and consumer confidence

    OpenAIRE

    Daas, Piet J.H.; Puts, Marco J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the sentiment of Dutch public social media messages were compared with changes in monthly consumer confidence over a period of three-and-a-half years, revealing that both were highly correlated (up to r = 0.9) and that both series cointegrated. This phenomenon is predominantly affected by changes in the sentiment of all Dutch public Facebook messages. The inclusion of various selections of public Twitter messages improved this association and the response to changes in sentiment. G...

  4. Development and validation of the Consumer Quality index instrument to measure the experience and priority of chronic dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veer, Sabine N; Jager, Kitty J; Visserman, Ella; Beekman, Robert J; Boeschoten, Els W; de Keizer, Nicolette F; Heuveling, Lara; Stronks, Karien; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2012-08-01

    Patient experience is an established indicator of quality of care. Validated tools that measure both experiences and priorities are lacking for chronic dialysis care, hampering identification of negative experiences that patients actually rate important. We developed two Consumer Quality (CQ) index questionnaires, one for in-centre haemodialysis (CHD) and the other for peritoneal dialysis and home haemodialysis (PHHD) care. The instruments were validated using exploratory factor analyses, reliability analysis of identified scales and assessing the association between reliable scales and global ratings. We investigated opportunities for improvement by combining suboptimal experience with patient priority. Sixteen dialysis centres participated in our study. The pilot CQ index for CHD care consisted of 71 questions. Based on data of 592 respondents, we identified 42 core experience items in 10 scales with Cronbach's α ranging from 0.38 to 0.88; five were reliable (α ≥ 0.70). The instrument identified information on centres' fire procedures as the aspect of care exhibiting the biggest opportunity for improvement. The pilot CQ index PHHD comprised 56 questions. The response of 248 patients yielded 31 core experience items in nine scales with Cronbach's α ranging between 0.53 and 0.85; six were reliable. Information on kidney transplantation during pre-dialysis showed most room for improvement. However, for both types of care, opportunities for improvement were mostly limited. The CQ index reliably and validly captures dialysis patient experience. Overall, most care aspects showed limited room for improvement, mainly because patients participating in our study rated their experience to be optimal. To evaluate items with high priority, but with which relatively few patients have experience, more qualitative instruments should be considered.

  5. Translation, data quality, reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Norwegian version of the Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Scale (EC-17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristjansson Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Scale (EC-17 is a self-administered questionnaire for evaluating self-management interventions that empower and educate people with rheumatic conditions. The aim of the study was to translate and evaluate the Norwegian version of EC-17 against the necessary criteria for a patient-reported outcome measure, including responsiveness to change. Methods Data quality, reliability, validity and responsiveness were assessed in two groups. One group comprising 103 patients received a questionnaire before and at the end of a self-management programme. The second group comprising 96 patients' received the questionnaire two weeks before and on arrival of the program. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed. Construct validity was assessed through comparisons with the Brief Approach/Avoidance Coping Questionnaire, (BACQ, the Emotional Approach Coping Scale (EAC and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20. Responsiveness was assessed with the Standardised Response Mean (SRM. Results Respondents included 66 (64% and 52 (54% patients from the first and second groups respectively. Levels of missing data were low for all items. There was good evidence for unidimensionality, item-total correlations ranged from 0.59 to 0.82 and Cronbach's Alpha and test-retest correlations were over 0.90. As hypothesised EC-17 scores had statistically significant low to moderate correlations with the BACQ, EAC and GHQ-20 in the range 0.26 to 0.42. Following the self-management program, EC-17 scores showed a significant improvement with an SRM of 0.48. Conclusion The Norwegian version of the EC-17 has evidence for data quality, internal consistency and test-retest reliability, construct validity and responsiveness to change. The EC-17 seems promising as an outcome measure for evaluating self-management interventions for people with rheumatic conditions, but further studies are needed.

  6. Translation, data quality, reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Norwegian version of the Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Scale (EC-17).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamnes, Bente; Garratt, Andrew; Kjeken, Ingvild; Kristjansson, Elizabeth; Hagen, Kåre B

    2010-01-29

    The Effective Musculoskeletal Consumer Scale (EC-17) is a self-administered questionnaire for evaluating self-management interventions that empower and educate people with rheumatic conditions. The aim of the study was to translate and evaluate the Norwegian version of EC-17 against the necessary criteria for a patient-reported outcome measure, including responsiveness to change. Data quality, reliability, validity and responsiveness were assessed in two groups. One group comprising 103 patients received a questionnaire before and at the end of a self-management programme. The second group comprising 96 patients' received the questionnaire two weeks before and on arrival of the program. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed. Construct validity was assessed through comparisons with the Brief Approach/Avoidance Coping Questionnaire, (BACQ), the Emotional Approach Coping Scale (EAC) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20). Responsiveness was assessed with the Standardised Response Mean (SRM). Respondents included 66 (64%) and 52 (54%) patients from the first and second groups respectively. Levels of missing data were low for all items. There was good evidence for unidimensionality, item-total correlations ranged from 0.59 to 0.82 and Cronbach's Alpha and test-retest correlations were over 0.90. As hypothesised EC-17 scores had statistically significant low to moderate correlations with the BACQ, EAC and GHQ-20 in the range 0.26 to 0.42. Following the self-management program, EC-17 scores showed a significant improvement with an SRM of 0.48. The Norwegian version of the EC-17 has evidence for data quality, internal consistency and test-retest reliability, construct validity and responsiveness to change. The EC-17 seems promising as an outcome measure for evaluating self-management interventions for people with rheumatic conditions, but further studies are needed.

  7. Quality controlled logistics in vegetable supply chain networks: how can an individual batch reach an individual consumer in hte optimal state?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, R.E.; Kooten, van O.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.; Marcelis, W.J.; Luning, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Western-European consumers have become demanding on product availability in retail outlets and vegetable attributes such as quality, integrity, safety. When (re)designing vegetable supply chain networks one has to take these demands into consideration, next to traditional efficiency and

  8. Is the soil quality monitoring an effective tool in consumers' protection of agricultural crops from cadmium soil contamination?-a case of the Silesia region (Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekut, Agata; Baranowska, Renata; Marchwińska-Wyrwał, Ewa; Ćwieląg-Drabek, Małgorzata; Hajok, Ilona; Dziubanek, Grzegorz; Grochowska-Niedworok, Elżbieta

    2017-12-16

    The monitoring of soil quality should be a control tool used to reduce the adverse health effects arising from exposure to toxic chemicals in soil through cultivated crop absorption. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the monitoring and control system of soil quality in Poland, in terms of consumer safety, for agricultural plants cultivated in areas with known serious cadmium contamination, such as Silesia Province. To achieve the objective, the contents of cadmium in soils and vegetables in the Silesia administrative area were examined. The obtained results were compared with the results of soil contamination from the quality monitoring of arable soil in Poland. The studies show a significant exceedance of the permissible values of cadmium in soil samples and the vegetables cultivated on that soil. The threat to consumer health is a valid concern, although this threat was not indicated by the results of the national monitoring of soil quality. The results indicated an unequal distribution of risk to consumers resulting from contaminated soil. Moreover, the monitoring systems should be designed at the local or regional scale to guarantee the safety of consumers of edible plants cultivated in the areas contaminated with cadmium.

  9. Using the Consumer Experience with Pharmacy Services Survey as a quality metric for ambulatory care pharmacies: older adults' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyanbola, Olayinka O; Mott, David A; Croes, Kenneth D

    2016-05-26

    To describe older adults' perceptions of evaluating and comparing pharmacies based on the Consumer Experience with Pharmacy Services Survey (CEPSS), describe older adults' perceived importance of the CEPSS and its specific domains, and explore older adults' perceptions of the influence of specific CEPSS domains in choosing/switching pharmacies. Focus group methodology was combined with the administration of a questionnaire. The focus groups explored participants' perceived importance of the CEPSS and their perception of using the CEPSS to choose and/or switch pharmacies. Then, using the questionnaire, participants rated their perceived importance of each CEPSS domain in evaluating a pharmacy, and the likelihood of using CEPSS to switch pharmacies if their current pharmacy had low ratings. Descriptive and thematic analyses were done. 6 semistructured focus groups were conducted in a private meeting room in a Mid-Western state in the USA. 60 English-speaking adults who were at least 65 years, and had filled a prescription at a retail pharmacy within 90 days. During the focus groups, the older adults perceived the CEPSS to have advantages and disadvantages in evaluating and comparing pharmacies. Older adults thought the CEPSS was important in choosing the best pharmacies and avoiding the worst pharmacies. The perceived influence of the CEPSS in switching pharmacies varied depending on the older adult's personal experience or trust of other consumers' experience. Questionnaire results showed that participants perceived health/medication-focused communication as very important or extremely important (n=47, 82.5%) in evaluating pharmacies and would be extremely likely (n=21, 36.8%) to switch pharmacies if their pharmacy had low ratings in this domain. The older adults in this study are interested in using patient experiences as a quality metric for avoiding the worst pharmacies. Pharmacists' communication about health and medicines is perceived important and likely

  10. Dutch School in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch School in Geneva organizes Dutch education for children in the primary and secondary school. For the school year 2011-2012 the Dutch School in Geneva is looking for qualified part time teachers Dutch for the primary and secondary school. If you are interested, please send your application and curriculum vitae in Dutch by email to the NTC coordinator, Mrs. Anne Saeys (anne.saeys@free.fr). More info : www.ntcgeneve.info De vereniging Nederlandse Taal en Cultuur De Taalfontein, kortweg NTC Genève, is een oudervereniging, die tot doel heeft de Nederlandse taal en de Nederlandse en Vlaamse cultuur in de regio Genève te stimuleren. Dit geschiedt d.m.v. het organiseren van Nederlandse les voor leerlingen zowel in het basisonderwijs als het voortgezet onderwijs. Voor het volgende schooljaar zoekt NTC parttime docenten (M/V) vanaf 2 uur per week, zowel voor het Primair Onderwijs als voor het Voortgezet Onderwijs, met name voor de IB-opleiding. Voor het Primair Onderwijs dienen ge&...

  11. Psychometric Quality of the Dutch Version of the Children's Eating Attitude Test in a Community Sample and a Sample of Overweight Youngsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Theuwis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Disturbed eating attitudes may be important precursors of pathological eating patterns and, therefore need to be researched adequately. The Children's Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT is indicated for detecting at-risk attitudes and concerns in youngsters. Method. The present study was designed to provide a preliminary psychometric evaluation of the Dutch version of the ChEAT, by examining reliability and validity in a sample of 166 youngsters. Results. Generally the ChEAT seems to be a reliable instrument. Concurrent validity was demonstrated by positive correlations with measures assessing pathological eating behaviour and with related psychological problems. The discriminant validity was good. Based on ChEAT scores we can distinguish overweight youngsters from the community sample and “dieters” from “non dieters”. Divergent validity and factor structure show still shortcomings. Discussion. The Dutch version of the ChEAT seems to be a promising screening- and research instrument. Future prospective research could focus on a cut-off score for identifying at-risk youngsters.

  12. DutchParl: A corpus of parliamentary documents in Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marx, M.; Schuth, A.

    2010-01-01

    A corpus called DutchParl is created which aims to contain all digitally available parliamentary documents written in the Dutch language. The first version of DutchParl contains documents from the parliaments of The Netherlands, Flanders and Belgium. The corpus is divided along three dimensions: per

  13. Which product characteristics are preferred by Chinese consumers when choosing pork? A conjoint analysis on perceived quality of selected pork attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiu Q; Verkuil, Julia M; Reinbach, Helene C; Meinert, Lene

    2017-05-01

    Due to the economic growth achieved by China over the past 20 years, Chinese consumers have changed their purchasing behavior regarding meat. Instead of buying locally produced pork, they are increasingly willing to purchase imported pork. A conjoint analysis investigated how intrinsic pork attributes ( fat content and processing) and extrinsic pork attributes ( origin , price , and packaging ) relate to the perceived quality of pork and the choices made by Chinese consumers. A questionnaire distributed among a sample of Chinese consumers ( n  = 81) revealed that processing (fresh/frozen) is the most important determinant of pork choice (36%), followed by fat content (27%), origin (18%), price (12%), and packaging (6.6%). Estimates of utility showed that Chinese consumers value fresh pork highly (0.147), followed by lean pork (0.111) and pork imported from countries other than China (0.073). The findings indicate that Chinese consumer's value both intrinsic and extrinsic attributes, and these results may help the meat industry improve China's competitive meat market by developing new and more products that are tailored to the needs of the consumer.

  14. Evaluation of a consumer-oriented internet health care report card: the risk of quality ratings based on mortality data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Harlan M; Rathore, Saif S; Chen, Jersey; Wang, Yongfei; Radford, Martha J

    2002-03-13

    Health care "report cards" have attracted significant consumer interest, particularly publicly available Internet health care quality rating systems. However, the ability of these ratings to discriminate between hospitals is not known. To determine whether hospital ratings for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality from a prominent Internet hospital rating system accurately discriminate between hospitals' performance based on process of care and outcomes. Data from the Cooperative Cardiovascular Project, a retrospective systematic medical record review of 141 914 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years or older hospitalized with AMI at 3363 US acute care hospitals during a 4- to 8-month period between January 1994 and February 1996 were compared with ratings obtained from HealthGrades.com (1-star: worse outcomes than predicted, 5-star: better outcomes than predicted) based on 1994-1997 Medicare data. Quality indicators of AMI care, including use of acute reperfusion therapy, aspirin, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; 30-day mortality. Patients treated at higher-rated hospitals were significantly more likely to receive aspirin (admission: 75.4% 5-star vs 66.4% 1-star, P for trend =.001; discharge: 79.7% 5-star vs 68.0% 1-star, P =.001) and beta-blockers (admission: 54.8% 5-star vs 35.7% 1-star, P =.001; discharge: 63.3% 5-star vs 52.1% 1-star, P =.001), but not angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (59.6% 5-star vs 57.4% 1-star, P =.40). Acute reperfusion therapy rates were highest for patients treated at 2-star hospitals (60.6%) and lowest for 5-star hospitals (53.6% 5-star, P =.008). Risk-standardized 30-day mortality rates were lower for patients treated at higher-rated than lower-rated hospitals (21.9% 1-star vs 15.9% 5-star, P =.001). However, there was marked heterogeneity within rating groups and substantial overlap of individual hospitals across rating strata for mortality and process of care; only 3.1% of comparisons

  15. The importance of quality, access and price to health care consumers in Bulgaria: A self-explicated approach'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlova, M.; Groot, W.J.N.; van Merode, F.

    2003-01-01

    One approach to the problem of low patient satisfaction in Bulgaria is to identify attributes of health care services that the consumers value most and to focus on their improvement. Based on data from a household survey, this paper examines the importance that health care consumers attach to

  16. The Effect of Ratio, Issuance of Stocks and Auditors’ Quality toward the Timeliness of Financial Reporting on the Internet by Consumer Goods Sector Companies in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiyawati Lidiyawati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to analyze the factors that affect the timeliness of financial reporting on the Internet in the Consumer Goods sector companies listed in Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX. Variables used were leverage, profitability, size of company, the issuance of stock and the quality of auditors. Data analysis method used was logistic regression at the 0.05 level. The data used were secondary data and using sample Consumer Goods companies listed in the Indonesia Stock Exchange in 2010-2012. This study tested the effect of variable leverage, profitability, firm size, auditor quality stocks, and the timeliness of financial reporting on the Internet. The results obtained from these tests support the timeliness of audit quality of financial reporting on theInternet. However, other variables such as leverage, profitability, firm size, stock issuance did not support the timeliness of financial reporting on the Internet.

  17. Consumed by consumer culture? Advertising’s impact on children’s materialism and life satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opree, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Do children get consumed by consumer culture? This question occupies the thoughts of many parents, caretakers, and policymakers. Dutch children are annually exposed to approximately 9,500 television advertisements. These advertisements suggest that the good life can be obtained through the goods

  18. PERCEPTIONs OF RESTAURANT MANAGERS ABOUT THE QUALITY OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES OFFERED TO CONSUMERS. CASE STUDY: THE CITY OF BRAȘOV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea-Nicoleta NEACŞU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present economic crisis has had a powerful impact on the restaurants in the city of Brașov, which have confronted themselves in the past years both with a decrease in the number of consumers, and with a reduction in the consumption of products and public food services. In this context, this survey aims to analyze the perceptions of the restaurant managers in the city of Brașov regarding the quality of products and services they offer to the consumers, by using, in this sense, one of the techniques that are specific to qualitative research that is the semi - directive in - depth interview method.

  19. Nutrient Intake, Diet Quality, and Weight Measures in Breakfast Patterns Consumed by Children Compared with Breakfast Skippers: NHANES 2001-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol E. O'Neil

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Most studies showing that children consuming breakfast have better nutrient intakes, diet quality, and lower weight than breakfast skippers have the incorrect premise that breakfast meals are homogeneous. The purpose of this study was to classify breakfast meals into patterns and determine the association of the breakfast patterns with daily and breakfast nutrient intakes, diet quality, and weight. Data from children (2-18 years of age; N = 14,200 participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2008 were used. Intake was determined from one day 24-hour dietary recalls. Diet quality was measured using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005. Body mass index (BMI z-scores were determined. Twelve patterns (including No Breakfast [~19% of population], explaining 63% of the variance in energy from breakfast, were examined. Covariate adjusted general linear models were used to compare outcome variables of consumers of different patterns with breakfast skippers. The p value was Bonferroni corrected (< 0.05/12 = < 0.0042. Consumers of the Eggs/Grain/Meat, Poultry, Fish (MPF/Fruit Juice (FJ and MPF/Grain/FJ patterns showed higher daily intakes of saturated fats, solid fats, and sodium and lower daily intakes of added sugars than breakfast skippers. Consumers of most breakfast patterns showed higher daily intakes of some nutrients of public health concern (dietary fiber, vitamin D, calcium, and potassium; however, those consuming the Grain or MPF/Grain/FJ pattern did not. Consumers of the Grain/Lower Fat Milk (LFM/Sweets/FJ, Presweetened (PS Ready-to-eat Cereal (RTEC/LFM, RTEC/LFM, Cooked Cereal/Milk/FJ, and Whole Fruit patterns had higher total HEI-2005 scores than breakfast skippers; those consuming the MPF/Grain/FJ pattern had lower diet quality than breakfast skippers. Consumption of the Grain/LFM/Sweets/FJ, PSRTEC/whole milk, Soft Drinks/FJ/Grain/Potatoes, RTEC/whole milk, and Cooked Cereal/Milk/FJ patterns was associated

  20. Influence of quality labels on the formation of preferences of lamb meat consumers. A Spanish case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabéu, Rodolfo; Rabadán, Adrián; El Orche, Nour E; Díaz, Mónica

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of the attributes determining the formation of consumers' preferences when buying lamb meat is a key aspect in increasing the demand for this product. To this end, by means of conjoint analysis, we determined lamb meat consumers' preferences according to their frequency of consumption, and we used logistic simulation to analyse market shares of the most valued attributes. After segmenting the market into habitual and occasional consumers of lamb meat, our results seem to suggest that while regular consumers base their preferences mostly on origin, occasional consumers take other attributes into account, such as Protected Geographical Origin (PGI) and organic production. An analysis of market shares shows that PGI significantly influences consumer preferences, while ecological production has a less marked impact. This finding confirms the usefulness of PGI in the lamb meat market and highlights the urgent need to improve the communication strategy of the organic production sector as a synergistic effect to increase its acceptance among consumers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Online public response to Dutch news about money laundering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veul, Romy; van Charldorp, T.C.; Soudijn, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we analyze how Dutch Public Prosecution’s press releases about money laundering and underground banking are received by producers and consumers of online news reports. First we take a closer look at how journalists (re)framed six official press releases in 75 news reports. It turns out

  2. Dutch Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Broiler Welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Machiel; Zomer, Sigourney

    2017-01-01

    This article analyzes Dutch consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for the welfare of broiler chickens and the consequences for nonhuman animal welfare policies. Using data from a discrete-choice experiment and a random parameter logit model, this study showed that consumers particularly value

  3. Contrasting the Views and Actions of Data Collectors and Data Consumers in a Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring Project: Implications for Project Design and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caren B. Cooper

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Data collection or generation is the primary way that the majority of volunteers advance the scientific goals of citizen science projects, but other activities such as data consumption also may influence learning, civic, and conservation outcomes. Project designers and managers balance goals for multiple outcomes and thus need to consider the influence of all project-related activities on outcomes. In a study of the kayak-based Citizen’s Water Quality Testing (CWQT Program in New York City, we compared the characteristics, perceptions, and behaviors of those collecting and using CWQT data (data collectors and those solely using the data (data consumers. Data collectors (n = 40 and consumers (n = 24 were similar in gender and political orientation, but collectors were younger, devoted more time to the project, and experienced far more face-to-face interactions related to the project. Data collectors and consumers had similar motivations for participation, except that collectors were more likely motivated by recognition for their efforts. Lack of free time was the largest barrier to participation for both types of participants, and a significantly greater barrier for consumers. Data collectors and consumers trusted volunteer-collected data more than government-collected data. Collectors and consumers both recognized multiple scientific, environmental, and social benefits associated with the project, and both were equally likely to use volunteer-collected data for a variety of purposes, such as informing decisions about conservation and recreation. Importantly, both groups were equally likely to undertake a suite of conservation behaviors. We synthesize and expand current conceptual frameworks of citizen science participation and outcomes, highlighting the need for further study to understand mechanisms and linkages between the varied activities of citizen science projects and broader social and ecological impacts. To achieve conservation goals

  4. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilie BUDICA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of consumers helps firms and organizations improve their marketing strategies by understanding issues such as: the psychology of how consumers think, feel, reason, and select between different alternatives; the psychology of how the consumer is influenced by his or her environment; the behavior of consumers while shopping or making other marketing decisions; limitations in consumer knowledge or information processing abilities influence decisions and marketing outcome; how consumer motivation and decision strategies differ between products that differ in their level of importance or interest that they entail for the consumer; and how marketers can adapt and improve their marketing campaigns and marketing strategies to more effectively reach the consumer.

  5. Revisiting the Dutch hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Dirkje S.; Weiss, Scott T.; van den Berge, Maarten; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    The Dutch hypothesis was first articulated in 1961, when many novel and advanced scientific techniques were not available, such as genomics techniques for pinpointing genes, gene expression, lipid and protein profiles, and the microbiome. In addition, computed tomographic scans and advanced analysis

  6. Dutch Building Decree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, N.P.M.

    2000-01-01

    On the 1 October 1992 a change in the Dutch building legislation took effect: the revised Housing Act, the Building Decree and the technical documents related to this legislation came into force. This publication contains an English translation of the Building Decree. In order to give an idea of the

  7. Survival of Dutch heathlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemont, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES OF THE THESIS

    Heathlands in The Netherlands are vanishing due to the invasion of trees. The transition from heathland to woodland in Dutch heathlands may either proceed directly or is preceded by the development of an intermediate grass heath. These changes are due to natural

  8. Dutch surgery in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulik, Thomas M.; Nimura, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    An isolation policy was adopted in feudal Japan from 1639 to 1853 owing to the fear of foreign influence. During those 200 years of isolation, all foreigners were withheld from the country with the exception of the Dutch, who were permitted to establish a trading post on a small island in the Bay of

  9. Dutch Risk Assessment tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, A.

    2015-01-01

    The ‘Risico- Inventarisatie- en Evaluatie-instrumenten’ is the name for the Dutch risk assessment (RA) tools. A RA tool can be used to perform a risk assessment including an evaluation of the identified risks. These tools were among the first online risk assessment tools developed in Europe. The

  10. 'A Dutch Miracle'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jelle; Hemerijck, Anton

    1997-01-01

    The Dutch polder model recently dubbed a 'success story' by Bill Clinton and Jacques Delors - plays a prominent role in current discussions about possibilities for a new 'capitalism with a social face', and appeals to experts all over the world. Just ten years ago the Swedish sociologist Goran

  11. The Dutch Grey Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2008-01-01

    When-issued trading concerns transactions in securities that have not yet been issued. This type of trade often takes place in a so-called ‘grey market’, in which all contracts are conditional on the issuance of the security. In this paper, we investigate the Dutch grey market for when-issued shares

  12. The Dutch Grey Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2008-01-01

    When-issued trading concerns transactions in securities that have not yet been issued. This type of trade often takes place in a so-called 'grey market', in which all contracts are conditional on the issuance of the security. In this paper, we investigate the Dutch grey market for when-issued shares

  13. Dutch Ships and Sailors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Victor; Hoekstra, F.G.; Leinenga, Jurjen; van Rossum, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Dutch Ships and Sailors provides an infrastructure for maritime historical datasets, linking correlating data through semantic web technology. It brings together datasets related to recruitment and shipping in the East-India trade (mainly 18th century) and in the shipping of the northern provinces

  14. Dutch medical oath

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, H. E.; Briet, J. W.; Houwaart, E. S.; Legemaate, J.; Meerman, Th J. A. M.; Breetvelt, E. J.; van der Wall, E.

    2005-01-01

    In the first part of this article, the booklet Dutch Medical Oath is reviewed. The content of the new oath is discussed as are the reasons for revision of the previous version of the oath. This is followed by a short history of the oath. In the second part of the article the oath is compared with

  15. Dutch house price fundamentals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haffner, M.E.A.; de Vries, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses house price developments in the Netherlands, specifically focussing on the question whether current house prices in the Dutch owner-occupied market are likely to decrease. We analyse three aspects of the question based on a literature review: (1) whether there is a house price

  16. Investigating the Effects of Consumer Innovativeness, Service Quality and Service Switching Costs on Service Loyalty in the Mobile Phone Service Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Quoquab

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to examine the effects of consumer innovativeness, service quality, service switching costs and service satisfaction on service loyalty among mobile phone service users. A cross sectional survey was employed which yielded 535 responses. Structural equation modelling using the AMOS version 2.0 was utilized to test study the hypotheses. Test results reveal that service satisfaction, service switching costs and service quality are the three antecedents that directly influence service loyalty. However, consumer innovativeness does not have any direct effect on service loyalty. Moreover, service satisfaction is found to be a partial mediator between ‘service quality’ and ‘service loyalty’. Findings from this study will develop insights to enable policy-makers, managers and marketers to better strategize and effectively implement loyalty programs and prevent their customers from switching. This will enhance value creation for both their users and for the industry.

  17. Nutrient Intake, Diet Quality, and Weight Measures in Breakfast Patterns Consumed by Children Compared with Breakfast Skippers: NHANES 2001-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Carol E; Nicklas, Theresa A; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2015-01-01

    Most studies showing that children consuming breakfast have better nutrient intakes, diet quality, and lower weight than breakfast skippers have the incorrect premise that breakfast meals are homogeneous. The purpose of this study was to classify breakfast meals into patterns and determine the association of the breakfast patterns with daily and breakfast nutrient intakes, diet quality, and weight. Data from children (2-18 years of age; N = 14,200) participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2008 were used. Intake was determined from one day 24-hour dietary recalls. Diet quality was measured using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005). Body mass index (BMI) z-scores were determined. Twelve patterns (including No Breakfast [∼19% of population]), explaining 63% of the variance in energy from breakfast, were examined. Covariate adjusted general linear models were used to compare outcome variables of consumers of different patterns with breakfast skippers. The p value was Bonferroni corrected (eat Cereal (RTEC)/ LFM, RTEC/LFM, Cooked Cereal/Milk/FJ, and Whole Fruit patterns had higher total HEI-2005 scores than breakfast skippers; those consuming the MPF/ Grain/FJ pattern had lower diet quality than breakfast skippers. Consumption of the Grain/ LFM/Sweets/FJ, PSRTEC/whole milk, Soft Drinks/ FJ/Grain/Potatoes, RTEC/whole milk, and Cooked Cereal/ Milk/ FJ patterns was associated with lower BMI z-scores than seen in breakfast skippers. There are dietary and weight advantages of consuming breakfast, especially breakfasts that include grains, cereals, LFM, and fruit/ FJ, in contrast to the potential adverse effects of skipping breakfast.

  18. [Infection prevention in Dutch hospitals; results say more than process indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, Marc J M; Friedrich, Alexander; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Voss, Andreas; Vos, Margreet C

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch Health Care Inspectorate investigated the preparedness of Dutch hospitals for the emergence of antibiotic resistance, and concluded that hospitals are not well prepared and are insufficiently aware that infection prevention is a prerequisite for patient safety. These conclusions are based on observations of process indicators of current practice guidelines, without including the available outcome indicators that demonstrate the persistently low incidence of infections with antibiotic resistant bacteria in Dutch hospitals. The conclusions may have negative effects on the quality of infection prevention in Dutch hospitals. Therefore, it is advisable to use outcome indicators rather than process indicators to evaluate the quality of infection prevention.

  19. Evaluation of consumer satisfaction with the quality of training of young professionals by the universities for enterprises of coal-mining complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhalchenko Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the study results of evaluation of customer satisfaction (a big coal mining company with the quality of training of young specialists with higher education. Research is based on the model of Kano, one of the most effective tools for assessing the quality of products within the framework of modern management model - Total Quality Management. Based on the results, “quality profile” of training of young specialists with higher education is built and the factors that determine its level and characteristics are identified. The findings show universities the need to include such transformations and changes into the system and the processes of creation and positioning of their “product”. It will give a higher added value to the “product” and, therefore, provide the manufacturer and the consumer with the higher competitive advantage in the current economic conditions.

  20. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Ilie BUDICA; Silvia PUIU; Bogdan Andrei BUDICA

    2010-01-01

    The study of consumers helps firms and organizations improve their marketing strategies by understanding issues such as: the psychology of how consumers think, feel, reason, and select between different alternatives; the psychology of how the consumer is influenced by his or her environment; the behavior of consumers while shopping or making other marketing decisions; limitations in consumer knowledge or information processing abilities influence decisions and marke...

  1. Beef Consumer Preferences in Chile: Importance of Quality Attribute Differentiators on the Purchase Decision Preferencias del Consumidor de Carne de Vacuno en Chile: Importancia de Atributos de Calidad Diferenciadores en la Decisión de Compra

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Villalobos; Carlos Padilla; Cristian Ponce; Álvaro Rojas

    2010-01-01

    Agrifood markets worldwide have focused on searching for new quality attribute differentiators, which capture the attention of consumers and meet their needs. The purpose of this research was to determine the importance of a set of quality attribute differentiators associated with a beef cut on the choice behavior of the Chilean consumer. The evaluated differentiating characteristics were: price, origin, production method, and quality assurance. A total of 750 subjects were surveyed in the fo...

  2. Price asymmetry in the Dutch retail gasoline market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettendorf, Leon; Geest, Stephanie A. van der; Varkevisser, Marco

    2003-01-01

    This article analyses the retail price adjustments in the Dutch gasoline market. We estimate an asymmetric error correction model on weekly price changes for the years 1996-2001. We construct five datasets, one for each working day. The conclusions on asymmetric pricing are shown to differ over these datasets, suggesting that the choice of the day for which the prices are observed matters more than commonly believed. In our view, the insufficient robustness of the outcomes might explain the mixed conclusions found in the literature. Using these two approaches, we also show that the effect of asymmetry on the Dutch consumer costs is negligible. (Author)

  3. Price asymmetry in the Dutch retail gasoline market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettendorf, L.; Van der Geest, S.A.; Varkevisser, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses retail price adjustments in the Dutch gasoline market. We estimate an asymmetric error correction model on weekly price changes for the years 1996 to 2001. We construct five datasets, one for each working day. The conclusions on asymmetric pricing are shown to differ over these datasets, suggesting that the choice of the day for which prices are observed matters more than commonly believed. In our view, the insufficient robustness of outcomes might explain the mixed conclusions found in the literature. Using two approaches, we also show that the effect of asymmetry on Dutch consumer costs is negligible

  4. Application of Group-Level Item Response Models in the Evaluation of Consumer Reports about Health Plan Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reise, Steven P.; Meijer, Rob R.; Ainsworth, Andrew T.; Morales, Leo S.; Hays, Ron D.

    2006-01-01

    Group-level parametric and non-parametric item response theory models were applied to the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS[R]) 2.0 core items in a sample of 35,572 Medicaid recipients nested within 131 health plans. Results indicated that CAHPS responses are dominated by within health plan variation, and only weakly…

  5. Recycling of post-consumer glass: energy savings, CO2 emission reduction, effects on glass quality and glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kers, G.; Santen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    This presentation shows the advantages of re-melting post-consumer glass, but also the potential risks of using contaminated cullet in the raw material batch of glass furnaces (e.g. container glass furnaces). As an example of potential advantages: increasing the cullet % in the batch of an efficient

  6. Dutch ministerial visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science R. Plasterk (third from left) in the ATLAS cavern with NIKHEF Director F. Linde, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen, Ambassador J. van Eenennaam, ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Mission Representative G. Vrielink and ATLAS Magnet Project Leader H. ten Kate.Minister of Education, Culture and Science from the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Ronald Plasterk, visited CERN on 25th October. With Jos Engelen, CERN Scientific Director, as his guide he visited Point 1 of the LHC tunnel and ATLAS, where Nikhef (the national institute for subatomic physics, a Dutch government and university collaboration) constructed all 96 of the largest muon drift chambers in the barrel as well as parts of the magnet system, the inner detector, the DAQ and triggering. Overall the Netherlands contribute 4.5% to the annual CERN budget and the minister’s visit celebrated the contributions of the 79 ...

  7. Extra-virgin olive oil: are consumers provided with the sensory quality they want? A hedonic price model with sensory attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Carla; Caracciolo, Francesco; Cicia, Gianni; Del Giudice, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    Over the years, niche-differentiation strategies and food policies have pushed quality standards of European extra-virgin olive oil towards a product that has a sensory profile consisting of fruity, bitter and pungent notes, with such oils having excellent healthy features. However, it is unclear whether typical consumers are ready for a richer and more complex sensory profile than the neutral one historically found on the market. This potential discrepancy is investigated in the present study aiiming to determine whether current demand is able to appreciate this path of quality enhancement. Implicit prices for each and every attribute of extra-virgin olive oil with a focus on sensory characteristics were investigated using a hedonic price model. Although confirming the importance of origin and terroir for extra-virgin olive oil, the results of the present study strongly confirm the discrepancy between what is currently valued on the market and what novel supply trends are trying to achieve in terms of the sensory properties of such products. Increasing consumer awareness about the direct link between the health quality of oils and their sensory profile appears to be necessary to make quality enhancement programs more successful on the market and hence more effective for companies. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Dutch taboo norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Sander A; Visser, Tessa A; Zeelenberg, René

    2018-04-01

    This article provides norms for general taboo, personal taboo, insult, valence, and arousal for 672 Dutch words, including 202 taboo words. Norms were collected using a 7-point Likert scale and based on ratings by psychology students from the Erasmus University Rotterdam in The Netherlands. The sample consisted of 87 psychology students (58 females, 29 males). We obtained high reliability based on split-half analyses. Our norms show high correlations with arousal and valence ratings collected by another Dutch word-norms study (Moors et al.,, Behavior Research Methods, 45, 169-177, 2013). Our results show that the previously found quadratic relation (i.e., U-shaped pattern) between valence and arousal also holds when only taboo words are considered. Additionally, words rated high on taboo tended to be rated low on valence, but some words related to sex rated high on both taboo and valence. Words that rated high on taboo rated high on insult, again with the exception of words related to sex many of which rated low on insult. Finally, words rated high on taboo and insult rated high on arousal. The Dutch Taboo Norms (DTN) database is a useful tool for researchers interested in the effects of taboo words on cognitive processing. The data associated with this paper can be accessed via the Open Science Framework ( https://osf.io/vk782/ ).

  9. Dutch euthanasia revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenigsen, R

    1997-01-01

    The results of a follow-up study of euthanasia by the Dutch government, five years after the first study, were published on November 26, 1996. This article provides a detailed review of the two reports comparing and contrasting the statistics cited therein. The author notes that the "rules of careful conduct" proposed by the courts and by the Royal Dutch Society of Medicine were frequently disregarded. Special topics included for the first time in the second study were the notification and non-prosecution procedure, euthanasia of newborns and infants, and assisted suicide in psychiatric practice. The authors of the follow-up report state that it would be desirable to reduce the number of "terminations of life without patients' request," but this must be the common responsibility of the doctor and the patient. They suggest that the person who does not wish to have his life terminated should declare this clearly, in advance, verbally and in writing, preferably in the form of a living will. Involuntary euthanasia was rampant in 1990 and equally rampant in 1995. The author concludes that Dutch doctors who practice euthanasia are not on the slippery slope. From the very beginning, they have been at the bottom.

  10. Consumer Attitudes Toward Storing and Thawing Chicken and Effects of the Common Thawing Practices on Some Quality Characteristics of Frozen Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benli, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a survey was conducted to both evaluate the consumers' general attitudes for purchasing and storing the raw chicken and determine the thawing practices used for defrosting frozen chicken at home. About 75% of the consumers indicated purchasing chicken meat at least once a week or more. Furthermore, the majority (82.16%) of those who stored at least a portion of the raw chicken stated freezing the raw chicken meat at home. Freezing the chicken meat was considered to have no effect on the quality by 43.49% of the consumers while 56.51% thought that freezing had either negative or positive effects on the quality. The survey study indicated that top five most commonly used thawing practices included thawing on the kitchen counter, thawing in the refrigerator, thawing in the warm water, thawing in the microwave, and thawing under tap water. In addition, an experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of these most commonly used thawing practices on some quality characteristics of the chicken meat including pH, drip loss, cooking loss, color analysis and textural profile analysis. Although, L* value for thawing on the kitchen counter was the lowest, after cooking, none of the thawing treatments have a significant effect on the color values. Thawing in the microwave produced the highest drip loss of 3.47% while the lowest drip loss of 0.62% was observed with thawing in the refrigerator. On the other hand, thawing in the microwave and refrigerator caused the lowest cooking loss values of 18.29% and 18.53%, respectively. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences among textural parameter values of the defrosted and then cooked samples using the home based thawing practices, indicating similar quality characteristics among the samples.

  11. Consumer behaviour in the waiting area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mobach, M.P.

    Objective of the study: To determine consumer behaviour in the pharmacy waiting area. Method: The applied methods for data-collection were direct observations. Three Dutch community pharmacies were selected for the study. The topics in the observation list were based on available services at each

  12. Material recycling of post-consumer polyolefin bulk plastics: Influences on waste sorting and treatment processes in consideration of product qualities achievable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeisinger, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Material recycling of post-consumer bulk plastics made up of polyolefins is well developed. In this article, it is examined which effects on waste sorting and treatment processes influence the qualities of polyolefin-recyclats. It is shown that the properties and their changes during the product life-cycle of a polyolefin are defined by its way of polymerisation, its nature as a thermoplast, additives, other compound and composite materials, but also by the mechanical treatments during the production, its use where contact to foreign materials is possible and the waste sorting and treatment processes. Because of the sum of the effects influencing the quality of polyolefin-recyclats, conclusions are drawn for the material recycling of polyolefins to reach high qualities of their recyclats. Also, legal requirements like the EU regulation 1907/2006 concerning the registration, evaluation, authorisation and restrictions on chemicals are considered.

  13. The effect of food label cues on perceptions of quality and purchase intentions among high-involvement consumers with varying levels of nutrition knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Amber; Long, Marilee

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether differences in nutrition knowledge affected how women (a high-involvement group) interpreted intrinsic cues (ingredient list) and extrinsic cues ("all natural" label) on food labels. A 2 (intrinsic cue) × 2 (extrinsic cue) × 2 (nutrition knowledge expert vs novice) within-subject factorial design was used. Participants were 106 female college students (61 experts, 45 novices). Dependent variables were perception of product quality and purchase intention. As predicted by the elaboration likelihood model, experts used central route processing to scrutinize intrinsic cues and make judgments about food products. Novices used peripheral route processing to make simple inferences about the extrinsic cues in labels. Consumers' levels of nutrition knowledge influenced their ability to process food labels. The United States Food and Drug Administration should regulate the "all natural" food label, because this claim is likely to mislead most consumers. Copyright © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Field Report - Consumer Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian S.; Gwozdz, Wencke

    The present report outlines the purpose, scope, and methodology of a recently conducted four-country consumer survey that explored sustainable clothing consumption. The report also presents a sample of the descriptive findings from the survey (see Gwozdz, Nielsen & Müller, 2017 for further results...... foundation for upcoming deliverables relating to quality of life, acceptance of new business models, and consumer policy recommendations. The results presented in the report relate, specifically, to consumers’ general clothing consumption patterns, acceptance of new business models, and environmental...... purchasing outlets, and acceptance of new business models. Polish and American consumers purchased the most clothing items. Polish consumers also reported the lowest expenditures on clothing, whereas German consumers reported the highest expenditures. Only a limited proportion of consumers had previously...

  15. Will Dutch Become Flemish? Autonomous Developments in Belgian Dutch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Hans; Kissine, Mikhail; Tops, Evie; van der Harst, Sander; van Hout, Roeland

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a series of studies of standard Dutch pronunciation in Belgium and the Netherlands is presented. The research is based on two speech corpora: a diachronic corpus of radio speech (1935-1995) and a synchronic corpus of Belgian and Netherlandic standard Dutch from different regions at the turn of the millennium. It is shown that two…

  16. Physico-Chemical And Microbiological Quality Of Some Consumer Preferred Plain Set Yoghurts Sold In Matara Municipal Area Of Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K.G.U Hemamali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As yoghurt is a health food assessment of quality of commercialized yoghurt during storage period in refrigerator is needed. Lack of data on quality parameters of yoghurt brands in Sri Lanka is impediment to consumer health. This study is an attempt to fill that gap by providing data on evaluation of the changes of physico-chemical and microbiological parameters of some plain set yoghurt sold in Matara municipal area of Sri Lanka. Five different brands of plain set yoghurt samples were collected on the basis of consumer preference for the present study. From each brand fifteen samples were analyzed by means of their physico-chemical syneresis effect pH titratable acidity total protein content and microbiological composition total plate count total yeast and mould count by using three replicates of each sample at 4 7 14 21 and 28 days intervals from production date under refrigerated condition 4 amp61616C and compared against local and international standards. All microbiological parameters and total protein content of all plain set yoghurt brands were not within the permissible range for local and international standards. Titratable acidity was only in the permissible range of local standards. All the physico-chemical parameters and microbiological parameters of collected samples were significantly affected by storage period. Good quality yoghurt of physico-chemical and microbiological parameters with hygiene conditions during processing and storage should be encouraged for consumption.

  17. The Effect of Advertising, Perceived Quality and Brand Awareness on Consumer Purchase Intention (Case Study: Adidas Sport Shoes)

    OpenAIRE

    Laluyan, Wanda Nadya; Pangemanan, Sifrid S; Worang, Frederik G

    2017-01-01

    Sports as needs, which is read by the companies manufacturers who produce a sport shoes product. In Indonesia, the competition in footwear industry is getting tight and variety. It makes so much many shoes retail opened and developing. With that situation, the companies are trying to create a variety shoes and trying to adding new value on their product to keep their customer and getting new consumers and of course to make them still survive in the market. The aims of this study are to analyz...

  18. Influence of intramuscular fat content on the quality of pig meat - 2. Consumer acceptability of m. longissimus lumborum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, X; Monin, G; Talmant, A; Mourot, J; Lebret, B

    1999-09-01

    The present study is part of a project which aimed to examine the influence of intramuscular fat (IMF) content on sensory attributes and consumer acceptability of pork. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate consumer acceptability of pork chops with varying IMF level in muscle Longissimus lumborum (LL). Each experiment used 32 castrated male pigs selected after slaughter either from 125 Duroc × Landrace (Experiment 1) or 102 Tia Meslan × Landrace (Experiment 2) crossbred animals, and showing large variability in LL IMF content: from 3.5% in Experiment 1 and from 1.25 to 3.25% in Experiment 2. A group of 56 consumers evaluated various items on rib-eye (LL muscle trimmed of backfat) (Experiment 1) and on entire chops trimmed of backfat (Experiment 2). Data from Experiment 1 indicate that an increase in IMF level is associated with an increase in visual perception of fat and a corresponding decrease in the willingness to eat and purchase the meat, when expressed before tasting. The latter effect disappeared after the consumers had tasted the meat, probably due to a positive effect of increase IMF, up to 3.5%, on the perception of texture and taste. In Experiment 2, where entire chops were evaluated, the perception of visible fat was not affected by IMF level, probably due to the lack of variation in the level of intermuscular fat between the four IMF groups. The willingness to eat and purchase the meat were unaffected by IMF level, whereas the perception of texture and taste was enhanced with increased IMF levels up to 3.25%. The present data suggest that the acceptability of pork may be improved by increasing IMF level but: (1) this effect disappeared for IMF levels higher than 3.5%, which are associated with a high risk of meat rejection due to visible fat and (2) the positive effect of increased IMF probably holds true as long as it is not associated with an increase in the level of intermuscular fat.

  19. Profiles of the evaluators: impact of psychographic variables on the consumer-oriented quality assessment of mobile television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2008-02-01

    In the product development of services it is important to adjust mobile video quality according to the quality requirements of potential users. Therefore, a careful participant selection is very important. However, in the literature the details of participant selection are often handled without great detail. This is also reflected in the handling of experimental results, where the impact of psychographic factors on quality is rarely reported. As the user attributes potentially have a large effect to the results, we investigated the role of various psychographical variables on the subjective evaluation of audiovisual video quality in two different experiments. The studied variables were age, gender, education, professionalism, television consumption, experiences of different digital video qualities, and attitude towards technology. The results showed that quality evaluations were affected by almost all background factors. The most significant variables were age, professionalism, knowledge of digital quality features and attitude towards technology. The knowledge of these factors can be exploited in careful participant selection, which will in turn increase the validity of results as the subjective evaluations reflect better the requirements of potential users.

  20. Corporate social performance as a bottom of line for consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, M.M.; Schuyt, T.N.M.

    2005-01-01

    This study replicates Paul, Zalka, Downes, Perry, and Friday's scale to measure U.S. consumer sensitivity to corporate social performance (CSP) in another sample-namely, that of Dutch consumers. In addition, theories on the effects of sociodemographic variables on environmental concern have been

  1. Social housing in the Netherlands : The development of the Dutch social housing model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, J.S.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch model of social rental housing is often seen as a good practice for other European coun-tries. This is due to the fact that the Dutch social rental sector has a large size, offers dwellings of a relatively good quality and functions without receiving substantial subsidies. However, current

  2. Information management in supply chain partnering : improving maintenance processes in Dutch housing associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debby Goedknegt

    2017-01-01

    From the article: "Abstract Maintenance processes of Dutch housing associations are often still organized in a traditional manner. Contracts are based on lowest price instead of ‘best quality for lowest price’ considering users’ demands. Dutch housing associations acknowledge the need to improve

  3. Improving the energy and IAQ performance of ventilation systems in Dutch dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsteijn, R.C.A. van; Li, W.L.; Valk, H.J.J.; Kornaat, W.

    2016-01-01

    MONICAIR - MONItoring & Control of Air quality in Individual Rooms - is a pre-competitive field research project of a broad consortium of Dutch ventilation unit manufacturers and research institutes, supported by the Dutch government. The first aim of the project is to investigate and compare the

  4. The Dutch Health Care Performance Report: seven years of health care performance assessment in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Michael J.; Kringos, Dionne S.; Marks, Lisanne K.; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the first edition of a monitoring tool for the performance of the Dutch health care system was released: the Dutch Health Care Performance Report (DHCPR). The Netherlands was among the first countries in the world developing such a comprehensive tool for reporting performance on quality,

  5. Dutch Colonial Nostalgia Across Decolonisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that nostalgia for colonialism in the Netherlands, the so called tempo doeloe culture, is not a specifically postcolonial phenomenon caused by the collapse of the Dutch empire in Asia. In fact, nostalgia for the Dutch East Indies can be traced back to the nineteenth century, when

  6. Income smoothing by Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boterenbrood, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that hospitals manage their earnings. However, these findings might be influenced by methodological issues. In this study, I exploit specific features of Dutch hospitals to study income smoothing while limiting these methodological issues. The managers of Dutch hospitals have the

  7. The Dutch surgical colorectal audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leersum, N. J.; Snijders, H. S.; Henneman, D.; Kolfschoten, N. E.; Gooiker, G. A.; ten Berge, M. G.; Eddes, E. H.; Wouters, M. W. J. M.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Bemelman, W. A.; van Dam, R. M.; Elferink, M. A.; Karsten, Th M.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; Lemmens, V. E. P. P.; Rutten, H. J. T.; Manusama, E. R.; van de Velde, C. J. H.; Meijerink, W. J. H. J.; Wiggers, Th; van der Harst, E.; Dekker, J. W. T.; Boerma, D.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the nationwide Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) was initiated by the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands (ASN) to monitor, evaluate and improve colorectal cancer care. The DSCA is currently widely used as a blueprint for the initiation of other audits, coordinated by the Dutch

  8. Dutch word stress as pronounced by Indonesian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilie M. Roosman

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the way in which the Dutch monophthongal vowels are pronounced by Indonesian students. To investigate whether Indonesian students realize the Dutch vowels correctly, especially when they are stressed, I analysed duration and quality of stressed and unstressed Dutch vowels. Measurements were done on the duration and the formant frequencies of the vowels spoken by Indonesian students and by native speakers of Dutch as well. Statistical analysis showed that in general the differences in duration between vowels spoken by the Indonesian students and by the native speakers were not significant. However, the effect of stress on the lengthening of the vowels was stronger for the Indonesian students than for the native speakers. In addition, statistical analysis of the formant frequencies confirmed that the non-native speakers realized the Dutch vowels slightly differently from the Dutch native speakers. The Indonesian students pronounced the stressed vowels more clearly than their unstressed counterparts; yet their vowel diagram is smaller than the vowel diagram of the native speakers.

  9. Quality of Life Outcomes in Community-based Mental Health Consumers: Comparisons with Population Norms and Changes over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Stanton, Robert; Hodgetts, Danya; Scott, David

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life is shown to be lower in people diagnosed with mental illness in comparison to the general population. The aim of this study is to examine the Quality of life in a subset of people accessing mental health services in a regional Queensland Centre. Thirty-seven people accessing mental health services completed the SF36 Health Survey on three occasions. Differences and relationships between Physical Composite Scores and Mental Composite Scores, comparisons with Australian population norms, and temporal change in Quality of Life were examined. Physical Composite Scores were significantly different to, but significantly correlated with, Mental Composite Scores on each occasion. Physical Composite Scores and Mental Composite Scores were significantly different to population norms, and did not vary significantly across time. The poor Quality of life of people with mental illness remains a significant challenge for the mental health workforce.

  10. Consumer Attitudes Toward Storing and Thawing Chicken and Effects of the Common Thawing Practices on Some Quality Characteristics of Frozen Chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benli, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a survey was conducted to both evaluate the consumers’ general attitudes for purchasing and storing the raw chicken and determine the thawing practices used for defrosting frozen chicken at home. About 75% of the consumers indicated purchasing chicken meat at least once a week or more. Furthermore, the majority (82.16%) of those who stored at least a portion of the raw chicken stated freezing the raw chicken meat at home. Freezing the chicken meat was considered to have no effect on the quality by 43.49% of the consumers while 56.51% thought that freezing had either negative or positive effects on the quality. The survey study indicated that top five most commonly used thawing practices included thawing on the kitchen counter, thawing in the refrigerator, thawing in the warm water, thawing in the microwave, and thawing under tap water. In addition, an experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of these most commonly used thawing practices on some quality characteristics of the chicken meat including pH, drip loss, cooking loss, color analysis and textural profile analysis. Although, L* value for thawing on the kitchen counter was the lowest, after cooking, none of the thawing treatments have a significant effect on the color values. Thawing in the microwave produced the highest drip loss of 3.47% while the lowest drip loss of 0.62% was observed with thawing in the refrigerator. On the other hand, thawing in the microwave and refrigerator caused the lowest cooking loss values of 18.29% and 18.53%, respectively. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences among textural parameter values of the defrosted and then cooked samples using the home based thawing practices, indicating similar quality characteristics among the samples. PMID:26732333

  11. Consumer Attitudes Toward Storing and Thawing Chicken and Effects of the Common Thawing Practices on Some Quality Characteristics of Frozen Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Benli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a survey was conducted to both evaluate the consumers’ general attitudes for purchasing and storing the raw chicken and determine the thawing practices used for defrosting frozen chicken at home. About 75% of the consumers indicated purchasing chicken meat at least once a week or more. Furthermore, the majority (82.16% of those who stored at least a portion of the raw chicken stated freezing the raw chicken meat at home. Freezing the chicken meat was considered to have no effect on the quality by 43.49% of the consumers while 56.51% thought that freezing had either negative or positive effects on the quality. The survey study indicated that top five most commonly used thawing practices included thawing on the kitchen counter, thawing in the refrigerator, thawing in the warm water, thawing in the microwave, and thawing under tap water. In addition, an experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of these most commonly used thawing practices on some quality characteristics of the chicken meat including pH, drip loss, cooking loss, color analysis and textural profile analysis. Although, L* value for thawing on the kitchen counter was the lowest, after cooking, none of the thawing treatments have a significant effect on the color values. Thawing in the microwave produced the highest drip loss of 3.47% while the lowest drip loss of 0.62% was observed with thawing in the refrigerator. On the other hand, thawing in the microwave and refrigerator caused the lowest cooking loss values of 18.29% and 18.53%, respectively. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences among textural parameter values of the defrosted and then cooked samples using the home based thawing practices, indicating similar quality characteristics among the samples.

  12. Dutch radiodiagnostics viewed internationally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valois, J.C. de

    1990-01-01

    Dutch radiodiagnostics viewed internationally. - A quantitative description of diagnostic radiology is given in terms of radiological density (the number of radiological examinations per 1000 inhibitants), consumptions of roentgen film and contrast media. The data concerning examinations were recorded by a yearly inquiry system addressing all Dutch radiologists. The consumption of film and contrast media were derived from the data banks of the industries. In comparing these data with the data for Western Europe, Japan and the United States it is remarkable that diagnostic radiology scores lowest in regard to density, film consumption and use of contrast media. Only in the use of 35 mm cinefilm (coronary angiography) is The Netherlands number 2 on the list preceded by the United States. As a consequence radiation exposure of the population caused by diagnostic radiology is low in The Netherlands. Although the technical condition of the equipment is good due to regular and preventive service the life-span of the radiological equipment is gradually increasing beyond the limits of the normal economic depreciation. Growing arrears are found in the application of new technology: ultrasound, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The substitution of high osmolar contrast media by low osmolar media is also laggin gbehind. (author). 10 refs.; 1 fig.; 4 tab

  13. Dutch offshore skills assessed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaap, P

    1988-11-01

    The position is described of the different Dutch industries involved in the oil and gas exploitation business in the North Sea. Mentioned are, in the first place, the activities of towing services Smit Tak, and Wijsmuller. A well known drilling contractor is Neddrill. Drilling rigs are often designed in cooperation with consulting engineers firms Protech International, Heerema Engineering, Global Engineering, KTI, Fluor, and Tebodin. Drilling rigs constructors Grootint, Mercon Steel Structures, Heerema Havenbedrijf, HCG, Boele, and IHC have a sound name in the offshore construction scene. Offshore contractors like Heerema, Smit Tak, Volker Stevin and Allseas Engineering should be mentioned too. Special attention is given to the operation of saving drilling rigs in the Ekofisk field. Years of exploitation of oil and gas from this field resulted in subsidence of the sea floor, which endangered the drilling rigs. Hydraudyne designed the hydraulic lifter necessary for this saving operation. Dutch firms in this field have an estimated yearly turnover of Dfl 3 x 10/sup 9/. 6 figs.

  14. Neonatal treatment philosophy in Dutch and German NICUs: Health-Related Quality of Life in Adulthood of VP/VLBW infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeman, L.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/390776114; van der Pal, Sylvia; Verrips, Gijsbert; Baumann, Nicole; Bartmann, Peter; Wolke, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Although survival after very preterm birth (VP) / very low birth weight (VLBW) has improved, a significant number of VP/VLBW individuals develop physical and cognitive problems during their life course that may affect their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We compared HRQoL in

  15. Comparing health-related quality of life of Dutch and Chinese patients with traumatic brain injury: Do cultural differences play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); S. Polinder (Suzanne); P.E. Vos (Pieter); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); Sun, Y. (Yanming); Ye, P. (Pengpeng); Duan, L. (Leilei); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There is growing interest in health related quality of life (HRQoL) as an outcome measure in international trials. However, there might be differences in the conceptualization of HRQoL across different socio-cultural groups. The objectives of current study were: (I) to

  16. Child care quality and Dutch 2- and 3-year-olds' socio-emotional outcomes : Does the amount of care matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuizen, Martine L.; van Aken, Marcel A.G.; Dubas, Judith S.; Leseman, Paul P.M.

    High amounts of early child care have sometimes been linked to higher levels of behaviour problems, while high-quality child care has more often been related to fewer behaviour problems and more social competence. The current study investigated whether the level of centre emotional and behavioural

  17. Exchanging a few commercial, regularly consumed food items with improved fat quality reduces total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, Stine M; Leder, Lena; Elind, Elisabeth; Ottestad, Inger; Christensen, Jacob J; Telle-Hansen, Vibeke H; Skjetne, Anne J; Raael, Ellen; Sheikh, Navida A; Holck, Marianne; Torvik, Kristin; Lamglait, Amandine; Thyholt, Kari; Byfuglien, Marte G; Granlund, Linda; Andersen, Lene F; Holven, Kirsten B

    2016-10-01

    The healthy Nordic diet has been previously shown to have health beneficial effects among subjects at risk of CVD. However, the extent of food changes needed to achieve these effects is less explored. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of exchanging a few commercially available, regularly consumed key food items (e.g. spread on bread, fat for cooking, cheese, bread and cereals) with improved fat quality on total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and inflammatory markers in a double-blind randomised, controlled trial. In total, 115 moderately hypercholesterolaemic, non-statin-treated adults (25-70 years) were randomly assigned to an experimental diet group (Ex-diet group) or control diet group (C-diet group) for 8 weeks with commercially available food items with different fatty acid composition (replacing SFA with mostly n-6 PUFA). In the Ex-diet group, serum total cholesterol (PLDL-cholesterol (Pcholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, respectively. No difference in change in plasma levels of inflammatory markers (high-sensitive C-reactive protein, IL-6, soluble TNF receptor 1 and interferon-γ) was observed between the groups. In conclusion, exchanging a few regularly consumed food items with improved fat quality reduces total cholesterol, with no negative effect on levels of inflammatory markers. This shows that an exchange of a few commercially available food items was easy and manageable and led to clinically relevant cholesterol reduction, potentially affecting future CVD risk.

  18. Quality of reporting web-based and non-web-based survey studies: What authors, reviewers and consumers should consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Tarek; Elhady, Mohamed Tamer; Rashed, Sherwet; Abdelkhalek, Mariam; Nasef, Somia Ahmed; Khallaf, Ashraf Mohamed; Mohammed, Abdelrahman Tarek; Attia, Andrew Wassef; Adhikari, Purushottam; Amin, Mohamed Alsabbahi; Hirayama, Kenji; Huy, Nguyen Tien

    2018-01-01

    Several influential aspects of survey research have been under-investigated and there is a lack of guidance on reporting survey studies, especially web-based projects. In this review, we aim to investigate the reporting practices and quality of both web- and non-web-based survey studies to enhance the quality of reporting medical evidence that is derived from survey studies and to maximize the efficiency of its consumption. Reporting practices and quality of 100 random web- and 100 random non-web-based articles published from 2004 to 2016 were assessed using the SUrvey Reporting GuidelinE (SURGE). The CHERRIES guideline was also used to assess the reporting quality of Web-based studies. Our results revealed a potential gap in the reporting of many necessary checklist items in both web-based and non-web-based survey studies including development, description and testing of the questionnaire, the advertisement and administration of the questionnaire, sample representativeness and response rates, incentives, informed consent, and methods of statistical analysis. Our findings confirm the presence of major discrepancies in reporting results of survey-based studies. This can be attributed to the lack of availability of updated universal checklists for quality of reporting standards. We have summarized our findings in a table that may serve as a roadmap for future guidelines and checklists, which will hopefully include all types and all aspects of survey research.

  19. Animal welfare versus food quality: factors influencing organic consumers' preferences for alternatives to piglet castration without anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Astrid; Hamm, Ulrich

    2013-10-01

    Surgical piglet castration without pain relief has been banned in organic farming in the EU since the beginning of 2012. Alternative methods therefore need to be implemented that improve animal welfare and solve the underlying problem of boar taint. This paper explores German organic consumers' preferences for piglet castration without pain relief and three alternative methods. In an innovative approach using a multi-criteria decision making procedure, qualitative data from focus group discussions were compared with quantitative results from Vickrey auctions. Overall, participants preferred all alternatives to castration without pain relief. Different aspects influenced willingness-to-pay for the methods. Animal welfare was important for the evaluation of castration without pain relief and castration with anaesthesia. Food safety played a major role for willingness-to-pay for immunocastration, while taste and, to some extent, animal welfare were dominant factors for fattening of boars. These differences should be considered when communicating the alternatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Consumer Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Tufano

    2009-01-01

    Although consumer finance is a substantial element of the economy, it has had a smaller footprint within financial economics. In this review, I suggest a functional definition of the subfield of consumer finance, focusing on four key functions: payments, risk management, moving funds from today to tomorrow (saving/investing), and from tomorrow to today (borrowing). I provide data showing the economic importance of consumer finance in the American economy. I propose a historical explanation fo...