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Sample records for dutch case study

  1. Case Study of 'moral injury' : Format Dutch Case Studies Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, Sjaak; Walton, Martin N.; van Loenen, Guus

    2017-01-01

    The case study ‘Moral Injury’ traces care provided by a chaplain in a mental health institution to a former military marksman named Hans. Hans was in care at a specialized unit for military veterans with traumas. He sought contact with a chaplain “to set things right with God” and wanted the

  2. GLAMUR case-study report: The comparison of three Dutch pork cases (Tasks 3.5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindië, H.A.; Horlings, L.G.; Broekhuizen, van R.E.; Hees, E.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the case study results of local-global pork chain performances in The Netherlands. As part of Work Package 3, this case study was carried out in cooperation with our Italian GLAMUR partner. The Dutch pork production sector came up after World War 2 and developed into a highly

  3. On Making Autonomous Vehicles Respect Traffic Law : a Case Study for Dutch Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, H.

    Among the problems that still need to be solved before autonomous vehicles can fully autonomously participate in traffic is the one of making them respect the traffic laws. This paper discusses this problem by way of a case study of Dutch traffic law. First it is discussed to what extent Dutch

  4. Diffusion of combined heat and power in Dutch greenhouses : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkema, G.P.J.; Kasmire, J.; Van der Veen, R.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the case study of the rapid diffusion of combined heat and power (CHP) units in the Dutch greenhouse horticulture in the period 2003-2009. The aim of the case study is to find explanations for this particular transition, and to generalize on the nature of technology diffusion

  5. Combatting workplace aggression in detainee transport: A Dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasthuizen, K.M.; Paanakker, H.L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – In Dutch detainee care custodial transport police officers experience high levels of aggression and violence from detainees. Being a first of its kind in the Netherlands, the purpose of this paper is to unravel the true nature and origins of such workplace aggression against transport

  6. Transparency and performance communication: a case study of Dutch Railways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galetzka, Mirjam; Gelders, Dave; Verckens, Jan Pieter; Seydel, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – In an attempt to gain insight into the effects of transparent communication on critical performances, this paper aims to explore performance measures and communication of a large‐scale service organization, i.e. the Dutch Railways (Nederlandse Spoorwegen, (NS)). Design/methodology/approach

  7. Investment in sustainable electricity production by Dutch banks. A case study for the Fair Bank Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gelder, J.W.; Kouwenhoven, D.

    2010-05-01

    This report contains the results of the second case study commissioned by the Fair Bank Guide on the financing practices of twelve investigated banks in the Netherlands. It has been examined which part of the investments in electricity generation by Dutch banks involves electricity generation from sustainable sources (sustainable electricity generation) [nl

  8. Learning from case studies and monitoring of Dutch tunnel projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korff, M.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals and project-based organisations in the construction industry can learn in a (more) systematic way from case studies and the monitoring of underground construction works. Underground construction projects such as tunnels and excavations suffer as much or more from failure costs

  9. Combined heat and power in Dutch greenhouses: A case study of technology diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, Reinier A.C. van der; Kasmire, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the rapid diffusion of combined heat and power (CHP) units through the Dutch greenhouse horticulture sector between 2003 and 2009 in order to gain new insights regarding technology transitions. We present a sectoral diffusion analysis framework, which we apply to identify and examine developments in technical, economic, institutional, cultural and ecological domains that all contributed to an emergent and thorough CHP diffusion in the Dutch greenhouse sector. Five identified key drivers behind the CHP diffusion are the opening of the energy market in 2002, the high spark spread during the transition period, the compatibility of output of a CHP unit with greenhouse demand, the flexibility provided by heat buffers, and the cooperative and competitive greenhouse sector culture. We conclude that policies to stimulate or steer technology diffusion will benefit from an in-depth analysis of domain interactions and company decision-making processes. Such an in-depth analysis makes for well informed and targeted policies that are better able to steer an industrial sector effectively and in a socially desired direction. - Highlights: • We present a sectoral diffusion analysis framework. • We describe the case of the diffusion of cogeneration (CHP) in Dutch greenhouses. • We extract five key drivers of CHP diffusion in the Dutch greenhouse sector. • The case shows how technology diffusion emerges from co-evolutionary mechanisms. • We conclude that a co-evolutionary sectoral analysis will inform innovation policy.

  10. Dutch Case Studies Project in Chaplaincy Care : A description and theoretical explanation of the format en procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, Sjaak; Walton, Martin N.

    2017-01-01

    The recent surge of case studies in chaplaincy care raises challenges on the comparability of case studies and the degree to which they elucidate the relation between theory and practice. The Dutch Case Studies Project (CSP) addresses these and other issues by use of a set format and procedure and

  11. Risk factors for sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders among self-employed Dutch farmers: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E.; Vrielink, H.H.E.O.; Huirne, R.B.M.; Metz, J.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background In Dutch agriculture, musculoskeletal disorders are a main cause of sick leave. Among self-employed insured farmers, neck, shoulder upper extremity, and back disorders accounted for 30% of the claims for sick leave of less than 1 year This case-control study set out to identify and

  12. Risk factors for sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders among self-employed Dutch farmers : A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E; Vrielink, HHEO; Huirne, RBM; Metz, JHM

    Background In Dutch agriculture, musculoskeletal disorders are a main cause of sick leave. Among self-employed insured farmers, neck, shoulder upper extremity, and back disorders accounted for 30% of the claims for sick leave of less than 1 year This case-control study set out to identify and

  13. Risk factors for sick leave due to musculoskeletal disorders among self-employed Dutch farmers: a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E.; Oude Vrielink, H.H.E.; Huirne, R.B.M.; Metz, J.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background In Dutch agriculture, musculoskeletal disorders are a main cause of sick leave. Among self-employed insured farmers, neck, shoulder, upper extremity, and back disorders accounted for 30% of the claims for sick leave of less than 1 year This case-control study set out to identify and

  14. The influence of power in supply chain innovation; a case-study of the Dutch wheat chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Hanneke; Visscher, Klaasjan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to clarify the relation between the power structure of a supply chain and the possibilities to realize supply chain innovations. In an in-depth case study of the faltering start of an innovation trajectory in the Dutch wheat supply chain, we show that supply chain

  15. Evaluation of moral case deliberation at the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekles, Wike; Widdershoven, Guy; Robben, Paul; van Dalfsen, Gonny; Molewijk, Bert

    2016-05-21

    Moral case deliberation (MCD) as a form of clinical ethics support is usually implemented in health care institutions and educational programs. While there is no previous research on the use of clinical ethics support on the level of health care regulation, employees of regulatory bodies are regularly confronted with moral challenges. This pilot study describes and evaluates the use of MCD at the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ). The objective of this pilot study is to investigate: 1) the current way of dealing with moral issues at the IGZ; 2) experience with and evaluation of MCD as clinical ethics support, and 3) future preferences and (perceived) needs regarding clinical ethics support for dealing with moral questions at the IGZ. We performed an explorative pilot study. The research questions were assessed by means of: 1) interviews with MCD participants during four focus groups; and 2) interviews with six key stakeholders at the IGZ. De qualitative data is illustrated by data from questionnaires on MCD outcomes, perspective taking and MCD evaluation. Professionals do not always recognize moral issues. Employees report a need for regular and structured moral support in health care regulation. The MCD meetings are evaluated positively. The most important outcomes of MCD are feeling secure and learning from others. Additional support is needed to successfully implement MCD at the Inspectorate. We conclude that the respondents perceive moral case deliberation as a useful form of clinical ethics support for dealing with moral questions and issues in health care regulation.

  16. Determining authority of Dutch case law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.; de Ruyter, J.; Kroese, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of two studies to see whether the analysis of the network of citations between cases can be used as an indication of the relevance and authority in the Dutch legal system. Fowler e.a. have shown such results for the US common law system, but given the different

  17. E-commerce, paper and energy use: a case study concerning a Dutch electronic computer retailer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogeveen, M.J.; Reijnders, L. [Open University Netherlands, Heerlen (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    Impacts of the application of c-commerce on paper and energy use are analysed in a case study concerning a Dutch electronic retailer (e-tailer) of computers. The estimated use of paper associated with the e-tailer concerned was substantially reduced if compared with physical retailing or traditional mail-order retailing. However, the overall effect of e-tailing on paper use strongly depends on customer behaviour. Some characteristics of c-commerce, as practised by the e-tailer concerned, such as diminished floor space requirements, reduced need for personal transport and simplified logistics, improve energy efficiency compared with physical retailing. Substitution of paper information by online information has an energetic effect that is dependent on the time of online information perusal and the extent to which downloaded information is printed. Increasing distances from producers to consumers, outsourcing, and increased use of computers, associated equipment and electronic networks are characteristics of e-commerce that may have an upward effect on energy use. In this case study, the upward effects thereof on energy use were less than the direct energy efficiency gains. However, the indirect effects associated with increased buying power and the rebound effect on transport following from freefalling travel time, greatly exceeded direct energy efficiency gains. (author)

  18. Corporate Social Responsibility and Profitability: A Case Study on Dutch Bangla Bank Ltd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraiya Mahbuba

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, the banking sector has a glorious history of getting engaged themselves in different kinds of social activities which is formally known as CSR (Corporate Social Responsibilities. The paper examines the relationship between CSR and profitability of Dutch Bangla Bank Ltd (DBBL which is the initiator of CSR activities in the banking sector of Bangladesh. The study used annual reports of DBBL for the year 2002 to 2011. Ordinary least square (OLS model of regression was analyzed using SPSS 16. to assess the impact as well as test the hypothesis of the study whether there is a relationship and the extent of the relationship between the independent variable (corporate social responsibility expenditure and the dependent variable (profit after tax. Above all, the analysis revealed that 90.7% of the variance of profit after tax of DBBL has been explained by the benefit accrued from corporate social responsibility. The hypothesis that was formulated was tested and the result shows that there is significant positive relationship between corporate social responsibility and profitability in case of DBBL.

  19. Getting adolescents to inform themselves about ecogenomics: a Dutch case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cees M. Koolstra

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Public opinions toward emergent technologies may be highly dependent on the manner in which people are introduced to these technologies for the very first time. In this light, understanding how such first introductions are related to adolescents’ information seeking behaviors and their developing opinions may be particularly interesting because this target public can be considered to be not only future users of the technology but also future decision makers of its development. The present paper presents a case study of the introduction of ecogenomics among 246 adolescents who were asked to inform themselves about this technology and to write two essays: one that would reflect their personal opinions, and another that would reflect their advice to the Dutch government about further funding of ecogenomics research. Results showed that the Internet was by far their preferred source of information and that most adolescents held positive attitudes toward ecogenomics as expressed in essays that reflected their personal opinions and advice to others. In their perspective, ecogenomics was a positive development in science because of expected benefits concerning medical and environmental applications, such as the potential discovery of new antibiotics and the possible use in bioremediation.

  20. Understanding Emotional Identities: The Dutch Phlegmatic Temperament as Historical Case-Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Sturkenboom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Throughout history emotions and emotional styles have functioned as social markers to make a distinction between groups in societies. This essay introduces the concept of ‘emotional identity’ to reflect upon the underlying dynamic process in which both insiders and outsiders use (the handling of emotions, or the lack thereof, to characterise a group of persons. Taking the allegedly phlegmatic temperament of the Dutch as an example, it explains how such identities come into being and are sustained, but also contested, reappraised and altered over time. It discusses the non-exclusive and inherently paradoxical nature of emotional group identities as well as some of the key mechanisms and patterns of adjustment that account for the long life of the stereotypes involved. While the essay covers a time span of two millennia, it focuses mainly on the early modern era when classical climate zone theories merged with new modes of national thinking and even allowed for the smooth introduction of an entirely new element into the stolid character of the Dutch, that is, the national passion for profit. De dynamiek van emotionele identiteiten. Het Nederlands flegmatisch temperament als historische case-studyEmoties en emotionele stijlen zijn in de geschiedenis regelmatig aangewend als sociaal onderscheidingsmiddel om groepen in de samenleving verschillend te waarderen. Dit artikel introduceert het begrip ‘emotionele identiteit’ om na te kunnen denken over het onderliggende dynamische proces waarin direct betrokkenen en buitenstaanders (het omgaan met emoties, of het gebrek daaraan, gebruiken om een groep van personen te typeren. Met het verondersteld flegmatisch temperament van de Nederlanders als voorbeeld wordt uitgelegd hoe zulke identiteiten tot stand komen en in stand blijven, maar ook aangevochten kunnen worden en door de tijd heen onderhevig zijn aan veranderingen en herwaarderingen. Besproken worden de niet-exclusieve en inherent paradoxale

  1. General linguistics and the study of Dutch. The case of C.F.P. Stutterheim (1903-1991)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordegraaf, J.

    The mingling of linguistics and philosophy of language is characteristic of structuralism in the Netherlands. In this paper the case of the Dutch linguist C.F.P. Stutterheim (1903-1991), professor of Dutch language in the University of Leiden, is used to examine the extent to which this alliance

  2. Dutch Sport Federations Changing into Market Oriented Organizations: The Institutional Theory Applied on Three Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marije van 't Verlaat

    2007-01-01

    In 2005 and 2006, almost sixty Dutch National Sport Federations (NSFs) participated in a special program for creating a marketing strategy for the next four years. This program was initiated and organized by NOC*NSF (the Dutch Olympic Umbrella Sports Organization). The NSFs had to joint the project

  3. Upscaling Large Scale Deep Renovation in the Dutch Residential Sector : A Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oorschot, John; Hofman, Erwin; Halman, Johannes I.M.

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 carbon emission of the Dutch economy was estimated at 194.4 billion kg. Dutch households are responsible for a particular large part of the total emission, about 37.1 billion kg or 19% of the total emission in 2014. While society becomes aware of the negative side effects of carbon emission

  4. Soil processes as a guiding principle in precision agriculture : a case study for Dutch arable farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alphen, van J.

    2002-01-01

    The fact that conventional agricultural practices have many detrimental effects is widely acknowledged (Rabbinge, 1997). To mitigate these effects, Dutch policy makers have implemented environmental laws that are essentially based on characteristic indicators for groundwater quality. This

  5. Implementation of integrated care for diabetes mellitus type 2 by two Dutch care groups: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busetto, Loraine; Luijkx, Katrien; Huizing, Anna; Vrijhoef, Bert

    2015-08-21

    Even though previous research has demonstrated improved outcomes of integrated care initiatives, it is not clear why and when integrated care works. This study aims to contribute to filling this knowledge gap by examining the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes by two Dutch care groups. An embedded single case study was conducted including 26 interviews with management staff, care purchasers and health professionals. The Context + Mechanism = Outcome Model was used to study the relationship between context factors, mechanisms and outcomes. Dutch integrated care involves care groups, bundled payments, patient involvement, health professional cooperation and task substitution, evidence-based care protocols and a shared clinical information system. Community involvement is not (yet) part of Dutch integrated care. Barriers to the implementation of integrated care included insufficient integration between the patient databases, decreased earnings for some health professionals, patients' insufficient medical and policy-making expertise, resistance by general practitioner assistants due to perceived competition, too much care provided by practice nurses instead of general practitioners and the funding system incentivising the provision of care exactly as described in the care protocols. Facilitators included performance monitoring via the care chain information system, increased earnings for some health professionals, increased focus on self-management, innovators in primary and secondary care, diabetes nurses acting as integrators and financial incentives for guideline adherence. Economic and political context and health IT-related barriers were discussed as the most problematic areas of integrated care implementation. The implementation of integrated care led to improved communication and cooperation but also to insufficient and unnecessary care provision and deteriorated preconditions for person-centred care. Dutch integrated diabetes care is still a

  6. Dietary intake of folate and riboflavin, MTHFR C677T Genotype, and colorectal adenoma risk: a Dutch case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donk, van den M.; Buijsse, G.M.; Berg, van den S.W.; Ocké, M.C.; Harryvan, J.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the associations between dietary intake of folate and vitamin B2, MTHFR C677T genotype, and colorectal adenomas in a Dutch case-control study. Data of cases with at least one histologically confirmed colorectal adenoma (n = 768) and controls with no history of any type of colorectal

  7. Risk factors associated with sick leave due to work-related injuries in Dutch farmers: an exploratory case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E.; Frankena, K.; Oude Vrielink, H.H.E.; Nielen, M.; Metz, J.H.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Using data from an insurance company, the occurrence of sick leave among Dutch farmers due to work-related injuries, and the epidemiological risk factors were investigated. In this case-control study the cases had filed a sick leave claim for work-related injury from 19982001 and the controls had

  8. Conflicts about water: a case study about conflict and contest in Dutch rural policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, W.J.; Frouws, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Dutch countryside forms the scene for pressing problems of management and allocation of land and water. These problems underscore the need for comprehensive rural policies. For that purpose, area-based rural policy has been initiated. This new policy is part of a larger policy shift, labelled in

  9. Should we be scared of all salafists in Europe? A Dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roex, I.

    2014-01-01

    European governments consider the Salafi movement to be primarily a security threat. Yet developments in the Dutch Salafi movement reveal that quietist and political Salafists distance themselves from coercion and violence in the European context and also respect democratic authority. The movement

  10. Management strategies on Dutch dairy farms to meet environmental regulations; a multi-case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ondersteijn, C.J.M.; Harsh, S.B.; Giesen, G.W.J.; Beldman, A.C.G.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, the Dutch government introduced the Mineral Accounting System (MINAS) to prevent and reduce pollution of groundwater resources by agricultural nutrients. If farmers do not comply with this system they will be taxed, which could constitute a threat to the financial viability of their farms.

  11. Assessing transition trajectories towards a sustainable energy system: A case study on the Dutch transition to climate-neutral transport fuel chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suurs, R.A.A.; Hekkert, M.P.; Meeus, M.T.H.; Nieuwlaar, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for the ex ante evaluation of technological trajectories. As a case we study the Dutch transport energy system and its transition to climate neutrality. Two technological trajectories are proposed: (i) a sequence of transition steps based on radical infrastructural

  12. The nature of embedded purchasing activities in SMEs : results from a Dutch multiple case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagelaar, Geoffrey; Staal, Anne; Holman, Richard; Walhof, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Aims: identify and explain purchasing-oriented patterns in Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) via case study research. Scope: Using a conceptual framework and empirical research this article proposes a series of purchasing-oriented patterns in SMEs. These patterns align activities to achieve

  13. Extent, nature and covariates of multitasking of rail passengers in an urban corridor: a Dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waerden, van der P.J.H.J.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Neerven, van R.

    2009-01-01

    A study of the frequency and nature of multitasking on Dutch trains is described. Descriptive and model analyses were carried out on the basis of field observations on intercity and regional trains. The most frequent task was "doing nothing," followed by "talking socially" and "reading a newspaper."

  14. Organizational Culture, Performance and Career Choices of Ph.D.s: A Case Study of Dutch Medical Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weijden, Inge; de Gilder, Dick; Groenewegen, Peter; Geerling, Maaike

    2008-01-01

    Increasing demands for accountability and applicability raise the question of how organizational factors affect researchers' performance and career choices. In a study of Dutch medical Ph.D. student's experiences, organizational culture and climate and attitudes towards research quality are related to performance and career choices. Ph.D.s who…

  15. Developing ethnic talent in the Dutch national tax administration: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glastra, F.J.; Meerman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The lack of career movement of members of ethnic minority groups in work organizations has been widely documented. The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into conditions for the realization of diversity goals in the case of talent development. Design/methodology/approach - In a case

  16. Muslim Woman Seeking Work: An English Case Study with a Dutch Comparison, of Discrimination and Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bagley

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of discrimination in employment is a key variable in understanding dynamics in the nature of, and change in “race relations”. Measuring such discrimination using ‘situation’ and ‘correspondence’ tests was influenced by John Rex’s sociological analyses, and earlier work, begun in America, was continued in England in the 1960s, and further replicated in Europe and America in later decades. This literature is reviewed, and the methodologies of testing for employment discrimination are discussed. Recent work in Britain and the Netherlands is considered in detail in the light of changing social structures, and the rise of Islamophobia. Manchester, apparently the city manifesting the most discrimination in Britain, is considered for a special case study, with a focus on one individual, a Muslim woman seeking intermediate level accountancy employment. Her vita was matched with that of a manifestly indigenous, white Briton. Submitted vitas (to 1043 potential employers indicated significant discrimination against the Muslim woman candidate. Results are discussed within the context of Manchester’s micro-sociology, and Muslim women’s employment progress in broader contexts. We conclude with the critical realist comment that the “hidden racism” of employment discrimination shows that modern societies continue, in several ways, to be institutionally racist, and the failure to reward legitimate aspirations of minorities may have the effect of pushing some ethnic minorities into a permanent precariat, with implications for social justice and social control in ways which may deny minority efforts to “integrate” in society’s employment systems.

  17. Health impact assessment in multinationals: A case study of the Royal Dutch/Shell Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birley, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Health impact assessment is part of the risk management process of multinational corporations/companies. Sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS, and the 'paradox of plenty' are used as examples of the challenges they face. The 'business case' for impact assessment is explained. The policies, procedures, standards, and activities used by Shell to manage such risks are described. An approach to capacity building and competency development is presented that applies to both company staff and external contractors

  18. Collaborative learning in multicultural classrooms: a case study of Dutch senior secondary vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Bertha Vallejo; Dr. S. Bolhuis; Prof. dr. Perry den Brok; Drs. Kennedy Aquilino Tielman

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This research presents a descriptive study regarding collaborative learning in a multicultural classroom at a vocational education school in The Netherlands. The study bridges two domains of research: research on culturally diverse learning environments - which has mostly concerned primary

  19. Collaborative learning in multicultural classrooms : a case study of Dutch senior secondary vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielman, K.A.; Brok, den P.J.; Bolhuis, S.M; Vallejo, B.

    2012-01-01

    This research presents a descriptive study regarding collaborative learning in a multicultural classroom at a vocational education school in The Netherlands. The study bridges two domains of research: research on culturally diverse learning environments – which has mostly concerned primary and

  20. Fallacies of Virtualization: a Case Study of Farming, Manure, Landscapes, and Dutch Rural Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, W.J.; Bock, B.B.

    2009-01-01

    The recent rapprochement between Science and Technology Studies (STS) and Political Science (PS) is induced by the broadened understanding of political action. The debate concerning the nature of ``the political'' produces an important question concerning the possibilities of an issue- or

  1. High performance work practices in the health care sector: A dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boselie, J.P.P.E.F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to present an empirical study of the effect of high performance work practices on commitment and citizenship behaviour in the health care sector. The theory suggests that individual employees are willing “to go the extra mile” when they are given the opportunity to develop

  2. Chain digitisation maturity and its determinants: a Dutch CIO survey and case study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, M.G.A.; Rooij, R.C.M. van; Batenburg, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    Interorganisational or chain information systems have become a frequent subject of scientific research, but not often an empirical perspective on these systems is taken. In this study we develop a model for measuring the chain digitisation maturity of organisations and validate it by conducting a

  3. Landscape properties as drivers for farm diversification: A Dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeifer, C.; Jongeneel, R.A.; Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Stoorvogel, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Farm diversification is stimulated by the societal demand to transform production countryside into consumption countryside. In most empirical studies on farmers¿ decision making for diversification, geographical information is either omitted or reduced to a variable that links the farm to an

  4. The (limited) political influence of ecological economics. A case study on Dutch environmental policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boezeman, Daan; Leroy, Pieter; Maas, Rob; Kruitwagen, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Although the ecological economics (EE) discourse attempts to influence environmental policy, empirical studies have concluded that its success in this endeavour has been limited thus far. In the Netherlands, however, two EE-related policy concepts, Environmental Utilisation Space and Ecological Footprint, were strongly present in environmental policy during certain periods in time, but subsequently disappeared from the environmental agenda. The central question of this article is how these ups and downs of the EE concepts can be understood: which factors determine their rise on and fall from the policy agenda over time? To answer this question, this article offers a conceptual model informed by the approaches in political science on framing, agenda-setting and knowledge utilisation. We conclude that the interplay of concept-specific characteristics, the formation of coalitions around the concept and contextual variables explain the rise and fall of the aforementioned concepts. A match between the dominant policy frame and the core elements of the concept provides the opportunity for the two concepts to be pushed on the agenda. We observe the alternation of 'constraining' frames, which allows for EE concepts to survive, and 'reconciling' frames, which block agenda entrance for EE concepts. Furthermore, the alternation of these frames seems to correlate with economic and public environmental attention cycles in the Netherlands. (author)

  5. Problems of integrated palliative care: a Dutch case study of routines and cooperation in the region of Arnhem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raak, Arno; Paulus, Aggie; Cuijpers, Rianne; Te Velde, Clary

    2008-12-01

    Cooperation in networks of providers of palliative care in Europe is problematic. Based on the concept of routines (patterns of behavior) and data about a Dutch network, we developed an explanation of this problem, in order to better understand the conditions for cooperation. Although more research is needed, the study suggests that disparate matches (divergence) between routines of the network members hampers cooperation. To promote cooperation, divergence, and legislation that stabilizes existing routines, must be identified. Divergence must be overcome and negotiations and transformational leadership, which require power sources, may be useful for this.

  6. Excellence and Diversity: Selective Admission Policies in Dutch Higher Education. A Case Study on Amsterdam University College.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reumer, Christoffel; van der Wende, Marijk

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the emergence of selective admission policies in Dutch university education. Such policies are being developed to promote excellence in a higher education system that is generally known to be “egalitarian” and increasingly criticized for a lack of differentiation. The changing

  7. Service engineers in change: count your words : A case study into professional discourse and culture within three Dutch organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drs Jos Pieterse

    2014-01-01

    This doctoral thesis describes three case studies of service engineers participating in organizational change, interacting with managers and consultants. The study investigates the role of differences in professional discourse and culture when these three professional groups interact in

  8. Governmental filtering of websites: The Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stol, W.PH.; Kaspersen, H.W.K.; Kerstens, J.; Leukfeldt, E.R.; Lodder, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Following the example of Norway and other European Countries, such as Sweden and Denmark, in April 2007 the Dutch government started filtering and blocking web pages with child pornographic content. In this paper we present a research into the technological, legal and practical possibilities of this

  9. A Case Study in the Effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs): the Islands of Bonaire and Curacao, Dutch Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relles, Noelle J.

    The islands of Bonaire and Curacao, Dutch Caribbean, were both mapped along their leeward coasts for dominant coral community and other benthic cover in the early 1980s. This mapping effort offers a unique baseline for comparing changes in the benthic community of the two islands since that time, particularly given the marked differences between the two islands. Bonaire is well-protected and completely surrounded by a marine protected area (MPA), which includes two no-diving marine reserves; additionally, Bonaire's population is only around 15,000. In contrast, the island of Curacao is home to 140,000 inhabitants and marine protection is limited, with a reef area of 600 ha established as a "paper" park (i.e., little enforcement). Video transects collected by SCUBA over the reefs were collected on Bonaire in January of 2008; when compared to data from 1985, coral cover had declined in the shallowest portion of the reef ( 20%), predominantly sand (> 50%) and areas where hard coral and sand were mixed with soft corals, sea whips and marine plants. These modern maps (2007-09) were groundtruthed using the video data collected on Bonaire for accuracy and then compared to the early 1980s maps of the reefs on both islands. Bonaire experienced declines in coral cover overall and the remaining coral was increasingly patchy; however, changes in patch characteristics were not significant over the time period, but status as a marine reserve and the sheltering of the shoreline did appear to buffer against coral loss. Surprisingly, the island of Curacao did not experience a decline in total coral cover, but did become increasingly patchy, significantly more so than Bonaire. The Curacao Underwater Park afforded no additional protection against coral loss or fragmentation than an adjacent unprotected area of reef. The difference between the two islands in coral loss versus fragmentation has the potential for a unique natural experiment to study the effects of habitat fragmentation

  10. Study of building typology of school constructed during the Dutch Colonial Period in Indonesia. Case study of Hoogere Burgerschool (HBS) in Bandung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwo Wibowo, Arif

    2018-03-01

    Bandung is one of the most important colonial cities in Indonesia. In the early 20th century the capital city of Dutch East-Indies Government planned to move in Bandung. Critical infrastructures were intensively built during that period, such as streets and railways, houses, governmental buildings, train stations, hospitals and educational facilities. Besides the famous campus of Technische Hoogeschool te Bandoeng (ITB), still in the same period, several schools were also constructed. One of the most important schools was Hoogere Burgerschool in Bandung (HBS Bandung), now SMUN 3 and 5, Bandung designed by Charles Prosper Wolff Schoemaker and constructed in 1915. HBS Bandung was the fourth HBS constructed by Dutch East Indies Government, therefore became important and put itself as a reference for the later school buildings in Bandung. This study is analyzing how the architects’ frame of mind in producing this design works. Survey and direct data collecting were used to take the exact embodiment of building design. Usage and functional analysis were also used to match space and other standard used in a school building at that time. This study will give an understanding of building typology of school during the Dutch Colonial Period in Indonesia.

  11. Investment in sustainable electricity production by Dutch banks. A case study for the Fair Bank Guide; Investeringen in duurzame elektriciteitsopwekking door Nederlandse banken. Een onderzoeksrapport voor de Eerlijke Bankwijzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gelder, J.W.; Kouwenhoven, D.

    2010-05-15

    This report contains the results of the second case study commissioned by the Fair Bank Guide on the financing practices of twelve investigated banks in the Netherlands. It has been examined which part of the investments in electricity generation by Dutch banks involves electricity generation from sustainable sources (sustainable electricity generation) [Dutch] Dit rapport bevat de resultaten van het tweede onderzoek in opdracht van de Eerlijke Bankwijzer naar de financieringspraktijk van twaalf onderzochte banken in Nederland. Hiermee is in kaart gebracht welk deel van de investeringen in elektriciteitsopwekking door de Nederlandse banken, betrekking heeft op elektriciteitsopwekking met behulp van duurzame energiebronnen ('duurzame elektriciteitsopwekking')

  12. Epithelial dysplasia in oral lichen planus. A preliminary report of a Dutch-Hungarian study of 100 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, W F; Albrecht, M; Bánóczy, J; van der Waal, I

    1984-06-01

    In a combined study of the Free University, Amsterdam and the Semmelweis Medical University, Budapest, the presence of epithelial dysplasia was studied in 100 cases of oral lichen planus. The criteria of epithelial dysplasia which were used in this study correspond with those reported by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Precancerous Lesions in 1978. In approximately 25% of all cases, moderate or at least mild dysplasia was observed. The number of dysplastic changes per section did not show any significant correlation with the clinical type, nor with age or sex. There were no marked differences between the Amsterdam and Budapest material. Long-term data on the follow-up were not available yet. No comment can therefore be given about the meaning of the finding of epithelial dysplasia in lichen planus being a sign of premalignancy or not.

  13. Professional development of teachers using a research based approach to clarify their challenges in multicultural classrooms: a case study of Dutch senior secondary vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perry den Brok; dr.ir. Quinta Kools; Kennedy Tielman

    2013-01-01

    This research presents a descriptive study on regarding the use of a research-based approach by teachers to clarify problems they encountered in multicultural classrooms. It analyses the outcomes of a training in which seven teachers from a Dutch Senior Secondary Vocational Education school

  14. How will climate change affect spatial planning in agricultural and natural environments? Examples from three Dutch case study regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom-Zandstra, Margaretha; Schaap, Ben; Paulissen, Maurice; Agricola, Herman

    2009-01-01

    Climate change will place increasing pressure on the functioning of agricultural and natural areas in the Netherlands. Strategies to adapt these areas to stress are likely to require changes in landscape structure and management. In densely populated countries such as the Netherlands, the increased pressure of climate change on agricultural and natural areas will inevitably lead, through the necessity of spatial adaptation measures, to spatial conflicts between the sectors of agriculture and nature. An integrated approach to climate change adaptation may therefore be beneficial in limiting such sectoral conflicts. We explored the conflicting and synergistic properties of different climate adaptation strategies for agricultural and natural environments in the Netherlands. To estimate the feasibility and effectiveness of the strategies, we focussed on three case study regions with contrasting landscape structural, natural and agricultural characteristics. For each region, we estimated the expected climate-related threats and associated trade-offs for arable farming and natural areas for 2040. We describe a number of spatial and integrated adaptation strategies to mitigate these threats. Formulating adaptation strategies requires consultation of different stakeholders and deliberation between different interests. We discuss some trade-offs involved in this decision-making.

  15. Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates in the Dutch population from 2003 to 2014: The test-negative design case-control study with different control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Eva; Darvishian, Maryam; Dijkstra, Frederika; Donker, Gé A; Overduin, Pieter; Meijer, Adam; Hak, Eelko

    2017-05-15

    Information about influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) is important for vaccine strain selection and immunization policy decisions. The test-negative design (TND) case-control study is commonly used to obtain IVE estimates. However, the definition of the control patients may influence IVE estimates. We have conducted a TND study using the Dutch Sentinel Practices of NIVEL Primary Care Database which includes data from patients who consulted the General Practitioner (GP) for an episode of acute influenza-like illness (ILI) or acute respiratory infection (ARI) with known influenza vaccination status. Cases were patients tested positive for influenza virus. Controls were grouped into those who tested (1) negative for influenza virus (all influenza negative), (2) negative for influenza virus, but positive for respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus or enterovirus (non-influenza virus positive), and (3) negative for these four viruses (pan-negative). We estimated the IVE over all epidemic seasons from 2003/2004 through 2013/2014, pooled IVE for influenza vaccine partial/full matched and mismatched seasons and the individual seasons using generalized linear mixed-effect and multiple logistic regression models. The overall IVE adjusted for age, GP ILI/ARI diagnosis, chronic disease and respiratory allergy was 35% (95% CI: 15-48), 64% (95% CI: 49-75) and 21% (95% CI: -1 to 39) for all influenza negative, non-influenza virus positive and pan-negative controls, respectively. In both the main and subgroup analyses IVE estimates were the highest using non-influenza virus positive controls, likely due to limiting inclusion of controls without laboratory-confirmation of a virus causing the respiratory disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. We are all experts! Does stakeholder engagement in health impact scoping lead to consensus? A Dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, den Lea; Yin Chung, Kai; Geelen, Loes; Schuit, Albertina Jantine; Wagemakers, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement in Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Health Impact Assessment (HIA) provides opportunities for inclusive environmental decision-making contributing to the attainment of agreement about the potential environmental and health impacts of a plan. A case evaluation of

  17. Case note to report of Dutch Ombudsman regarding information disclosure on wind energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Case note to a report of of the Dutch Ombudsman concerning a complaint on the information disclosure by the Dutch Social and Economic Council concerning the advantages and disadvantages of windtubrines

  18. The soil-water system as basis for a climate proof and healthy urban environment: opportunities identified in a Dutch case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Jacqueline; Schram-Bijkerk, Dieneke; Dirven-van Breemen, Liesbet; Otte, Piet; van Wijnen, Harm

    2014-07-01

    One of the effects of climate change expected to take place in urban areas in the Netherlands is an increase in periods of extreme heat and drought. How the soil can contribute to making cities more climate proof is often neglected. Unsealed soil and green spaces increase water storage capacity and can consequently prevent flooding. The planning of public or private green spaces can have a cooling effect and, in general, have a positive effect on how people perceive their health. This paper reviews existing guidelines from Dutch policy documents regarding unsealed soil and green spaces in the Netherlands; do they support climate adaptation policies? Scientific literature was used to quantify the positive effects of green spaces on water storage capacity, cooling and public health. Finally we present a case study of a model town where different policy areas are linked together. Maps were made to provide insight into the ratio of unsealed soil and the number of green spaces in relation to existing guidelines using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Maps marking the age and social-economic status of the population were also made. The benefits of green spaces are difficult to express in averages because they depend on many different factors such as soil properties, type of green spaces, population characteristics and spatial planning. Moreover, it is not possible to provide quantifications of the benefits of green spaces because of a lack of scientific evidence at the moment. Based on the maps, however, policy assessments can be made, for example, in which site a neighborhood will most benefit from investment in parks and public gardens. Neighborhoods where people have a low social-economic status have for example fewer green spaces than others. This offers opportunities for efficient adaptation policies linking goals of several policy fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neighbourhood effects as indirect effects: evidence from a Dutch case study on the significance of neighbourhood for employment trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinkster, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in the study of neighbourhood effects on work is to understand the pathways through which disadvantaged neighbourhoods impact the employment opportunities of residents. Endogenous explanations for neighbourhood effects focus on social life in these neighbourhoods,

  20. Managing innovation in regional supply networks : a Dutch case of "knowledge industry clustering"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.P.J.H.; Batenburg, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the collaboration between Océ, a large Dutch manufacturer of copiers and printers, and several of its lead suppliers within the so-called "knowledge industry clustering" (KIC) project. In 1993 Océ initiated this project to enable innovation by creating

  1. Opportunities for Local for Local Food Production. A Case in the Dutch Fruit and Vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.; Trienekens, J.H.; Beek, van P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the opportunities for farmers to produce for local consumers, based on a case study in the Dutch horticulture sector. Main requirements for the set-up of a local chain of supply chain actors are investigated. Producer requirements are added value, availability of time,

  2. Longevity in services: the case of the Dutch warehousing companies 1600-2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. van Driel (Hugo); H.W. Volberda (Henk); S. Eikelboom

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we explore the factors that determine the longevity of firms. Five central factors were distilled from the literature: position in the supply chain, the nature of the technology used, structure, culture, and financial policy. We made an extensive case-study of the Dutch

  3. Uncertainties in the fate of nitrogen I: An overview of sources of uncertainty illustrated with a Dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, C.; Aerts, R.; Breemen, van N.; Dam, van D.; Hoek, van der K.; Hofschreuder, P.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Klein, de J.; Kros, H.; Oene, van H.; Oenema, O.; Tietema, A.; Veeren, van der R.; Verhoeven, H.; Vries, de W.

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the uncertainties in the fate of nitrogen (N) in the Netherlands. Nitrogen inputs into the Netherlands in products, by rivers, and by atmospheric deposition, and microbial and industrial fixation of atmospheric N2 amount to about 4450 Gg N y¿1. About 60% of this N is

  4. The Role of Second Language in Higher Education: A Case Study of German Students at a Dutch University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, Lidy; Neijt, Anneke; van Hout, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of the challenges and benefits of university students taking a degree course in a language other than their mother tongue. Our study was conducted from the point of view of the non-native students themselves, and our primary concern was the role of language. We investigated the academic achievement of…

  5. Implementation of integrated care for diabetes mellitus type 2 by two Dutch care groups : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busetto, Loraine; Luijkx, Katrien; Huizing, Anna; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Even though previous research has demonstrated improved outcomes of integrated care initiatives, it is not clear why and when integrated care works. This study aims to contribute to filling this knowledge gap by examining the implementation of integrated care for type 2 diabetes by two

  6. Personal and related kinds of proximity driving collaborations : a multi-case study of Dutch nanotechnology researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werker, C.; Ooms, Ward; Caniëls, Marjolein C J

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies investigating proximity and collaboration have not clarified personal elements, such as working or communication style. Here, we show that personal proximity—close similarity in terms of personal traits and behavioral patterns—substantially affects the whole life cycle of

  7. Preventing the Dutch Disease: The case of Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, R.

    1992-01-01

    Indonesia has been more successful than other oil exporters in mitigating the effects of the Dutch Disease, the decline in non-oil production associated with an oil boom. Typically sharp increases in oil revenues promote the accumulation of international reserves, increasing monetization, and raising prices of non-traded relative to traded goods. The latter causes contraction of output and employment in the traded sector. This study analyzes the magnitude of the boom and its fiscal, monetary, and production effects. Proxies of the real exchange rate, defined as the relative price of traded to non-traded goods, were constructed. The effect of the exchange rate on the Dutch Disease problems were examined. The movement of the real exchange rate and the remarkable growth of production of traded goods indicate that the effects of the Dutch Disease on the Indonesian economy were remarkably limited. Structural and policy-induced factors, such as exchange rate protection and micro interventions, that mitigated the anticipated effects of the Dutch Disease are examined

  8. Fit-for-purpose: species distribution model performance depends on evaluation criteria - Dutch Hoverflies as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Gutiérrez, Jesús; Carvalheiro, Luísa G; Polce, Chiara; van Loon, E Emiel; Raes, Niels; Reemer, Menno; Biesmeijer, Jacobus C

    2013-01-01

    Understanding species distributions and the factors limiting them is an important topic in ecology and conservation, including in nature reserve selection and predicting climate change impacts. While Species Distribution Models (SDM) are the main tool used for these purposes, choosing the best SDM algorithm is not straightforward as these are plentiful and can be applied in many different ways. SDM are used mainly to gain insight in 1) overall species distributions, 2) their past-present-future probability of occurrence and/or 3) to understand their ecological niche limits (also referred to as ecological niche modelling). The fact that these three aims may require different models and outputs is, however, rarely considered and has not been evaluated consistently. Here we use data from a systematically sampled set of species occurrences to specifically test the performance of Species Distribution Models across several commonly used algorithms. Species range in distribution patterns from rare to common and from local to widespread. We compare overall model fit (representing species distribution), the accuracy of the predictions at multiple spatial scales, and the consistency in selection of environmental correlations all across multiple modelling runs. As expected, the choice of modelling algorithm determines model outcome. However, model quality depends not only on the algorithm, but also on the measure of model fit used and the scale at which it is used. Although model fit was higher for the consensus approach and Maxent, Maxent and GAM models were more consistent in estimating local occurrence, while RF and GBM showed higher consistency in environmental variables selection. Model outcomes diverged more for narrowly distributed species than for widespread species. We suggest that matching study aims with modelling approach is essential in Species Distribution Models, and provide suggestions how to do this for different modelling aims and species' data

  9. Performance of Dutch children on the Bayley III: a comparison study of US and Dutch norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenis, Leonie J P; Verhoeven, Marjolein; Hessen, Dave J; van Baar, Anneloes L

    2015-01-01

    The Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-third edition (Bayley-III) are frequently used to assess early child development worldwide. However, the original standardization only included US children, and it is still unclear whether or not these norms are adequate for use in other populations. Recently, norms for the Dutch version of the Bayley-III (The Bayley-III-NL) were made. Scores based on Dutch and US norms were compared to study the need for population-specific norms. Scaled scores based on Dutch and US norms were compared for 1912 children between 14 days and 42 months 14 days. Next, the proportions of children scoring Dutch norms fluctuated around values based on US norms on all subtests. The extent of the deviations differed across ages and subtests. Differences in means were significant across all five subtests (p Dutch norms resulted in over-referral regarding gross motor skills, and under-referral regarding cognitive, receptive communication, expressive communication, and fine motor skills. The Dutch norms differ from the US norms for all subtests and these differences are clinically relevant. Population specific norms are needed to identify children with low scores for referral and intervention, and to facilitate international comparisons of population data.

  10. National Identification of Dutch Youth: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Louis

    2011-01-01

    246 Dutch participants aged 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 years were presented with the Strength of Identification Scale (SoIS; Barrett, 2007) and the National Identity scale based on Cultural and Historical achievements (NICH; derived from the NATID, Keillor & Hult, 1999). The study aimed to examine the extent and nature of Dutch children and…

  11. The value of postmortem computed tomography in paediatric natural cause of death : a Dutch observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Van Rijn, Rick R.; Beek, Erik J.; van de Putte, Elise M.; Teeuw, Arianne H.; Nikkels, Peter G.J.; Duijst, Wilma L.J.M.; Nievelstein, Rutger Jan A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Postmortem CT is a relatively new field of interest within paediatric radiology. This paper focusses on its value in cases of unexpected natural death. Objective We report on an observational Dutch study regarding the value of postmortem CT in children with an assumed natural unexpected death because postmortem CT is part of the Dutch NODO (additional investigations of cause of death) procedure. Materials and methods We included consecutive children who fulfilled criteria for the N...

  12. Performance of Dutch children on the Bayley III: a comparison study of US and Dutch norms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie J P Steenis

    Full Text Available The Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-third edition (Bayley-III are frequently used to assess early child development worldwide. However, the original standardization only included US children, and it is still unclear whether or not these norms are adequate for use in other populations. Recently, norms for the Dutch version of the Bayley-III (The Bayley-III-NL were made. Scores based on Dutch and US norms were compared to study the need for population-specific norms.Scaled scores based on Dutch and US norms were compared for 1912 children between 14 days and 42 months 14 days. Next, the proportions of children scoring < 1-SD and < -2 SD based on the two norms were compared, to identify over- or under-referral for developmental delay resulting from non-population-based norms.Scaled scores based on Dutch norms fluctuated around values based on US norms on all subtests. The extent of the deviations differed across ages and subtests. Differences in means were significant across all five subtests (p < .01 with small to large effect sizes (ηp2 ranging from .03 to .26. Using the US instead of Dutch norms resulted in over-referral regarding gross motor skills, and under-referral regarding cognitive, receptive communication, expressive communication, and fine motor skills.The Dutch norms differ from the US norms for all subtests and these differences are clinically relevant. Population specific norms are needed to identify children with low scores for referral and intervention, and to facilitate international comparisons of population data.

  13. Height system connection between island and mainland using a hydrodynamic model: a case study connecting the Dutch Wadden islands to the Amsterdam ordnance datum (NAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobbe, D. C.; Klees, R.; Verlaan, M.; Zijl, F.; Alberts, B.; Farahani, H. H.

    2018-03-01

    We present an efficient and flexible alternative method to connect islands and offshore tide gauges with the height system on land. The method uses a regional, high-resolution hydrodynamic model that provides total water levels. From the model, we obtain the differences in mean water level (MWL) between tide gauges at the mainland and at the islands or offshore platforms. Adding them to the MWL relative to the national height system at the mainland's tide gauges realizes a connection of the island and offshore platforms with the height system on the mainland. Numerical results are presented for the connection of the Dutch Wadden islands with the national height system (Normaal Amsterdams Peil, NAP). Several choices of the period over which the MWLs are computed are tested and validated. The best results were obtained when we computed the MWL only over the summer months of our 19-year simulation period. Based on this strategy, the percentage of connections for which the absolute differences between the observation- and model-derived MWL differences are ≤ 1 cm is about 34% (46 out of 135 possible leveling connections). In this case, for each Wadden island we can find several connections that allow the transfer of NAP with (sub-)centimeter accuracy.

  14. Barriers to and Facilitators of the Evaluation of Integrated Community-Wide Overweight Intervention Approaches: A Qualitative Case Study in Two Dutch Municipalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Koperen, Tessa M.; de Kruif, Anja; van Antwerpen, Lisa; Hendriks, Anna-Marie; Seidell, Jacob C.; Schuit, Albertine J.; Renders, Carry M.

    2016-01-01

    To prevent overweight and obesity the implementation of an integrated community-wide intervention approach (ICIA) is often advocated. Evaluation can enhance implementation of such an approach and demonstrate the extent of effectiveness. To be able to support professionals in the evaluation of ICIAs we studied barriers to and facilitators of ICIA evaluation. In this study ten professionals of two Dutch municipalities involved in the evaluation of an ICIA participated. We conducted semi-structured interviews (n = 12), observed programme meetings (n = 4) and carried out document analysis. Data were analyzed using a thematic content approach. We learned that evaluation is hampered when it is perceived as unfeasible due to limited time and budget, a lack of evaluation knowledge or a negative evaluation attitude. Other barriers are a poor understanding of the evaluation process and its added value to optimizing the programme. Sufficient communication between involved professionals on evaluation can facilitate evaluation, as does support for evaluation of ICIAs together with stakeholders at a strategic and tactical level. To stimulate the evaluation of ICIAs, we recommend supporting professionals in securing evaluation resources, providing tailored training and tools to enhance evaluation competences and stimulating strategic communication on evaluation. PMID:27043600

  15. How the Second Delta Committee Set the Agenda for Climate Change Adaptation: A Dutch Case Study on Framing Strategies for Policy Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduijn, S.H.; Meijerink, S.V.; Leroy, P.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, the Second State Delta Committee, commissioned by the Dutch Secretary of Public Works and Water Management, provided suggestions on how to defend the Netherlands against the expected impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise, longer periods of drought, more intense periods of

  16. Research paper 2000-B-6: adjustments in the Dutch domestic waste incineration sector in the context of the European directive 89/429/EEC. A case study on national implementation, environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lulofs, K. [Twente Univ., Center for Clean Technology and Environmental Policy, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    Within the context of the IMPOL project several fields of European environmental policy are studied on aspects as national implementation and environmental and efficiency outcomes. For the IMPOL project a case study was done on the transformation of the Dutch sector of domestic waste incineration in the context of the European Directive Directives 89/369/EEC and 89/429/ EEC. The case study was done and indicators for environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs were chosen in line with a document to coordinate the efforts in the four IMPOL countries. The European Directives 89/369/EEC and 89/429/ EEC regulate Plants for Domestic waste Incineration on the emissions of several pollutants. These emissions are relevant for air quality in general, acidification and the spreading of toxic substances. In the empirical part of this report emphasis is laid on 'existing' incineration plants, being permitted before 1990. In chapter 2 of this report the implementation of the directives 89/369/EEC and 89/429/EEC in the Netherlands is described. In section 2.1 already existing 'older' Dutch policy and regulation is presented. In paragraph 2.2 the integration of the European Directives into Dutch national law is described. In chapter 2.3 the efforts and outcomes on monitoring and enforcement are presented. Chapter 3 goes into the environmental effectiveness. Section 3.1 describes the abatement performance of the whole municipal waste incineration sector during the period of research. Section 3.2 goes into factors that explain the environmental outcomes. Within the IMPOL research-team the decision was taken to concentrate on a number of pollutants of existing waste incinerators. In section 3.3 the data for the existing incinerators are given. In chapter 4 the allocative efficiency of adjustments is elaborated. In section 4.1 the abatement patterns of existing municipal waste incineration plants are presented

  17. Patterns of feelings in face to face negotiation: a Sino-Dutch pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulijn, J.M.; Rutkowski, A.F.; Kumar, Rajesh; Zhu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a pilot study to compare the emotions experienced by Dutch and Chinese students during a face-to-face negotiation role play. Emotions play an important role in negotiations because they influence the behaviour and judgments of negotiators The Data Printer case developed by Greenhalgh

  18. Design of the Dutch prevention of influenza, surveillance and management (PRISMA) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, E; van Loon, S; Buskens, E; van Essen, G A; de Bakker, D; Tacken, M A J B; van Hout, B A; Grobbee, D E; Verheij, Th J M

    2003-01-01

    Rationale and design of a study on the cost-effectiveness of the Dutch influenza vaccination campaign are described. During two influenza epidemics, about 75,000 primary care patients recommended for influenza vaccination are included. Cases have fatal or non-fatal influenza, pneumonia, otitis

  19. Neural correlates of semantic and syntactic processes in the comprehension of case marked pronouns: Evidence from German and Dutch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammer Anke

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that both semantic and syntactic information play a role in pronoun resolution in sentences. However, it is unclear what the relative contribution of these sources of information is for the establishment of a coreferential relationship between the pronoun and the antecedent in combination with a local structural case constraint on the pronoun (i.e. case assignment of a pronoun under preposition governing. In a prepositional phrase in German and Dutch, it is the preposition that assigns case to the pronoun. Furthermore, in these languages different overtly case-marked pronouns are used to refer to male and female persons. Thus, one can manipulate biological/syntactic gender features separately from case marking features. The major aim of this study was to determine what the influence of gender information in combination with a local structural case constraint is on the processing of a personal pronoun in a sentence. Event-related brain potential (ERP experiments were performed in German and in Dutch. In a word by word sentence reading study in German and Dutch, gender congruency between the antecedent and the pronoun was manipulated and/or case assignment by the preposition was violated while ERPs of young native speakers were recorded. Results The German and the Dutch ERP data showed an enlarged negativity broadly distributed starting approximately 350 ms after onset of the pronoun followed by a late positivity for gender violations. For syntactic incongruencies without gender violations only a positivity was present. The Dutch data showed an earlier onset of the positivity in comparison to German. Conclusion Finding negativities and positivities for conditions with a gender violation indicates that pronoun resolution with gender incongruency between the pronoun and the antecedent suffers from semantic as well as syntactic integration problems. The presence of a positivity for the syntactically incongruent

  20. Nation-wide development of sustainable production patterns. The case of 16 years of sustainability in Dutch residential house building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossink, B.A.G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper integrates the interorganisational innovation process and national innovation system-approach into a new model. A case study research project that covers a 16-year period of sustainable innovations in the Dutch residential building industry applies the model. The research outcomes

  1. Expression and recognition of emotion in native and foreign speech : the case of Mandarin and Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Yinyin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the perception and production of emotional prosody by native and non-native listeners and speakers, i.e. Chinese and Dutch listeners and speakers, including Dutch L2 learners of Chinese. There is an acoustic analysis in this dissertation which shows the differences between

  2. Enhancing the contribution of research to health care policy-making: a case study of the Dutch Health Care Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegger, Ingrid; Marks, Lisanne K; Janssen, Susan W J; Schuit, Albertine J; van Oers, Hans A M

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch Health Care Performance Report, issued by the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, aims to monitor health care performance in The Netherlands. Both the National Institute and the Ministry of Health wish to increase the contribution of the Report to health care policy-making. Our aim was to identify ways to achieve that. We used contribution mapping as a theoretical framework that recognizes alignment of research as crucial to managing contributions to policy-making. To investigate which areas need alignment efforts by researchers and/or policy-makers, we interviewed National Institute researchers and policy-makers from the Ministry of Health and assessed the process for developing the 2010 Report. We identified six areas where alignment is specifically relevant for enhancing the contributions of future versions of the Dutch Health Care Performance Report: well-balanced information for different ministerial directorates; backstage work; double role actors; reports of other knowledge institutes; data collection/generation and presentation forms. The contribution of health care performance reporting to policy-making is complex and requires continuous alignment efforts between researchers and policy-makers. These efforts should form an inseparable part of health care performance reporting and although this demands considerable resources, it is worth considering since it may pay back in better contributions to policy-making. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. How the Second Delta Committee Set the Agenda for Climate Adaptation Policy: A Dutch Case Study on Framing Strategies for Policy Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H. Verduijn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, the Second State Delta Committee, commissioned by the Dutch Secretary of Public Works and Water Management, provided suggestions on how to defend the Netherlands against the expected impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise, longer periods of drought, more intense periods of rainfall and additional land subsidence over the coming two hundred years (Veerman, 2008. In this paper we show that even though no crisis actually occurred, the Second Delta Committee succeeded in three areas. First, the committee managed to create awareness and set the agenda for climate adaptation policy and the issue of safety in Dutch water management. Second, the committee succeeded to a large extent in getting the media, the public and politics to accept its frame and framing of the problems, causes, moral judgments and suggested remedies. Third, the committee has to a certain degree already succeeded in having its recommendations translated into policy programmes. It will be argued that framing strategies were key to the committee’s success and that the committee used various framing strategies to convince the Cabinet, citizens and others of the urgency and necessity of implementing adaptation measures. The most important framing strategies identified were adherence to the climate adaptation narrative, using the story of our delta identity, creating a sense of urgency and collectiveness, and creating a crisis narrative.

  4. Feasibility of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijning, J.E.; van Nispen, R.M.A.; van Rens, G.H.M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Demographic ageing will lead to increasing pressure on visual rehabilitation services, which need to be efficiently organised in the near future. The Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI) was developed to assess the rehabilitation needs of visually impaired persons. This pilot study tests

  5. Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates in the Dutch population from 2003 to 2014: the test-negative design case-control study with different control groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, E. van; Darvishian, M.; Dijkstra, F.; Donker, G.A.; Overduin, P.; Meijer, A.; Hak, E.

    2017-01-01

    Information about influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) is important for vaccine strain selection and immunization policy decisions. The test-negative design (TND) case-control study is commonly used to obtain IVE estimates. However, the definition of the control patients may influence IVE

  6. Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates in the Dutch population from 2003 to 2014 : The test-negative design case-control study with different control groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Eva; Darvishian, Maryam; Dijkstra, Frederika; Donker, Gé A; Overduin, Pieter; Meijer, Adam; Hak, Eelko

    2017-01-01

    Information about influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) is important for vaccine strain selection and immunization policy decisions. The test-negative design (TND) case-control study is commonly used to obtain IVE estimates. However, the definition of the control patients may influence IVE

  7. Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates in the Dutch population from 2003 to 2014: The test-negative design case-control study with different control groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Eva; Darvishian, Maryam; Dijkstra, Frederika; Donker, Gé A; Overduin, Pieter; Meijer, Adam; Hak, Eelko

    2017-01-01

    Information about influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) is important for vaccine strain selection and immunization policy decisions. The test-negative design (TND) case-control study is commonly used to obtain IVE estimates. However, the definition of the control patients may influence IVE

  8. Indonesianisasi of Dutch economic interests, 1930-1960 : The case of Internatio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper van der Kerkhof

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article looks in detail into the process of indonesianisasi at Internatio, a major Dutch trading firm in Indonesia. I draw on Dutch archival records and the voluminous Dutch and international literature on the changing environment for Dutch private business in Indonesia in the 1950s. Internatio’s case is particularly instructive for the following reasons: – Internatio was a leading trading firm in Indonesia and regarded as a ‘trendsetter’ among the so-called ‘Big Five’, the leading Dutch import houses in the archipelago. – Successive Indonesian cabinets considered import trade crucial in the process of indonesianisasi, and for this reason the sector was targeted for policies aimed at wresting control from Dutch firms and encouraging the development of indigenous ones. – Internatio had a pivotal role in the Indonesian economy due to its extensive interests, not only in import trade but also in exports, estates, manufacturing, shipping, and insurance. The article is chronologically structured, distinguishing five periods: depression and diversification (1930-1940; the end of Dutch supremacy (1940-1945; revolution and rehabilitation (1945-1950; adjusting to new realities (1950- 1956; confrontation and nationalization (1956-1960.

  9. Dutch pediatricians' views on the use of neuromuscular blockers for dying neonates: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, K.; van de Vathorst, S.

    2015-01-01

    To assess Dutch pediatricians' views on neuromuscular blockers for dying neonates. Qualitative study involving in-depth interviews with 10 Dutch pediatricians working with severely ill neonates. Data were analyzed using appropriate qualitative research techniques. Participants explained their view

  10. What do Dutch lawyers actually do in divorce cases?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffiths, John

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of a four-pronged research project concerning the behavior of Dutch divorce lawyers, in which lawyers, judges, and clients were interviewed and lawyer-client interaction directly observed. In the first part, some preliminary remarks are made on the practical and

  11. Equality on Different Terms: The Case of Dutch Hindu Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Michael S.; Driessen, Geert

    2012-01-01

    In this article the authors examine the reasons for the establishment of Hindu schools in the Netherlands and how the Dutch system of education facilitates these and other voluntarily separate schools. In particular, the authors explore the manner in which Hindu schools aim to cultivate and sustain attachments to their own group through a…

  12. Similar associations between personality dimensions and anxiety or depressive disorders in a population study of Turkish-Dutch, Moroccan-Dutch, and native Dutch subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrier, Agnes C; de Wit, Matty A S; Krol, Anneke; Fassaert, Thijs J L; Verhoeff, Arnoud P; Kupka, Ralph W; Dekker, Jack; Beekman, Aartjan T F

    2013-05-01

    It is well established that personality traits are associated with anxiety and depressive disorders in Western populations, but it is not known whether this is true also for people from non-Western cultures. In this study, we examined whether ethnicity moderates the association between personality dimensions and anxiety or depressive disorders or symptoms. In a random urban population sample, stratified by ethnicity, in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, we interviewed 309 native Dutch subjects, 203 Turkish-Dutch subjects, and 170 Moroccan-Dutch subjects. Dimensions of personality were measured using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Anxiety and depressive disorders and symptom levels were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. The association between personality factors and disorders or symptoms of anxiety and depression was very similar in the three ethnic groups: all show the typical profile of high neuroticism and low extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness.

  13. The Dutch Bipolar Offspring Study: 12-Year Follow-Up

    OpenAIRE

    Mesman, Esther; Nolen, Willem A.; Reichart, Catrien G.; Wals, Marjolein; Hillegers, Manon N. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Offspring of bipolar parents have a genetically increased risk of developing mood disorders. In a longitudinal study, the authors followed a bipolar offspring cohort from adolescence into adulthood to determine the onset, prevalence, and early course of mood disorders and other psychopathology. Method: The Dutch bipolar offspring cohort is a fixed cohort initiated in 1997 (N=140; age range at baseline, 12-21 years). Bipolar offspring were psychiatrically evaluated at baseline and a...

  14. The Dutch gas policy: 'Dutch disease' or imaginary disease. CERI Studies Nr 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, John

    1998-04-01

    The Netherlands are the first European gas producer and exporter. The author proposes an analysis of the gas policy of this country. He first recalls some elements of context: peculiarities of energy as a domain of public policy, and characteristics of the Dutch political system. He recalls the historical development of the Dutch gas industry from the 1960's: political economics of natural gas and of competing fuels, development of the Groningen site as the keystone of the Dutch gas policy, and regulation of the industrial sector. In the next part, the author comments the emergence of energy as a topic of public debate from 1995, and how the Dutch gas policy has been put into question again: actors and interaction dynamics, stakes, present policy and perspectives

  15. Tackling the workforce crisis in district nursing: can the Dutch Buurtzorg model offer a solution and a better patient experience? A mixed methods case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Vari M; Calestani, Melania; Ross, Fiona; Saunders, Mary; West, Peter

    2018-06-06

    Despite policy intentions for more healthcare out of hospital, district nursing services face multiple funding and staffing challenges, which compromise the care delivered and policy objectives. What is the impact of the adapted Buurtzorg model on feasibility, acceptability and effective outcomes in an English district nursing service? Mixed methods case study. Primary care. Neighbourhood nursing team (Buurtzorg model), patients and carers, general practitioners (GPs), other health professionals, managers and conventional district nurses. The adapted Buurtzorg model of community nursing demonstrated feasibility and acceptability to patients, carers, GPs and other health professionals. For many patients, it was preferable to previous experiences of district nursing in terms of continuity in care, improved support of multiple long-term conditions (encompassing physical, mental and social factors) and proactive care. For the neighbourhood nurses, the ability to make operational and clinical decisions at team level meant adopting practices that made the service more responsive, accessible and efficient and offered a more attractive working environment. Challenges were reported by nurses and managers in relation to the recognition and support of the concept of self-managing teams within a large bureaucratic healthcare organisation. While there were some reports of clinical effectiveness and efficiency, this was not possible to quantify, cost or compare with the standard district nursing service. The adapted Buurtzorg model of neighbourhood nursing holds potential for addressing issues of concern to patients, carers and staff in the community. The two interacting innovations, that is, a renewed focus on patient and carer-centred care and the self-managing team, were implemented in ways that patients, carers, other health professionals and nurses could identify difference for both the nursing care and also the nurses' working lives. It now requires longer term

  16. Combined clinical and home rehabilitation: case report of an integrated knowledge-to-action study in a Dutch rehabilitation stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanninga, Christa S; Postema, Klaas; Schönherr, Marleen C; van Twillert, Sacha; Lettinga, Ant T

    2015-04-01

    There is growing awareness that the poor uptake of evidence in health care is not a knowledge-transfer problem but rather one of knowledge production. This issue calls for re-examination of the evidence produced and assumptions that underpin existing knowledge-to-action (KTA) activities. Accordingly, it has been advocated that KTA studies should treat research knowledge and local practical knowledge with analytical impartiality. The purpose of this case report is to illustrate the complexities in an evidence-informed improvement process of organized stroke care in a local rehabilitation setting. A participatory action approach was used to co-create knowledge and engage local therapists in a 2-way knowledge translation and multidirectional learning process. Evidence regarding rehabilitation stroke units was applied in a straightforward manner, as the setting met the criteria articulated in stroke unit reviews. Evidence on early supported discharge (ESD) could not be directly applied because of differences in target group and implementation environment between the local and reviewed settings. Early supported discharge was tailored to the needs of patients severely affected by stroke admitted to the local rehabilitation stroke unit by combining clinical and home rehabilitation (CCHR). Local therapists welcomed CCHR because it helped them make their task-specific training truly context specific. Key barriers to implementation were travel time, logistical problems, partitioning walls between financing streams, and legislative procedures. Improving local settings with available evidence is not a straightforward application process but rather a matter of searching, logical reasoning, and creatively working with heterogeneous knowledge sources in partnership with different stakeholders. Multiple organizational levels need to be addressed rather than focusing on therapists as sole site of change. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  17. Procurement maturity, alignment and performance: a Dutch hospital case comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, M.; Batenburg, R.

    2009-01-01

    Procurement is an important supporting business function, with which competitive advantage can potentially be achieved. In this paper, the relation between maturity and alignment in procurement on the one hand, and procurement performance on the other, is investigated in the case study setting of

  18. Procurement Maturity, Alignment and Performance: a Dutch Hospital Case Comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, M.G.A.; Batenburg, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Procurement is an important supporting business function, with which competitive advantage can potentially be achieved. In this paper, the relation between maturity and alignment in procurement on the one hand, and procurement performance on the other, is investigated in the case study setting of

  19. Prevalence and characteristics of moral case deliberation in Dutch health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwerse, L.; Stolper, M.M.; Widdershoven, G.; Molewijk, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The attention for Moral case deliberation (MCD) has increased over the past years. Previous research on MCD is often written from the perspective of MCD experts or MCD participants and we lack a more distant view to the role of MCD in Dutch health care institutions in general. The purpose of this

  20. Triple P business development in the Dutch agro-food sector : 9 cases of strategic innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Someren, van T.C.R.; Nijhof, A.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The 21st Century will be dominated by innovations in order to realize sustainable development. Innovative entrepreneurs will search for and create Triple P business cases and thereby transform industries. The Dutch agro-food sector innovation programme TransForum has stimulated and supported a wide

  1. Professionals without a profession? Redesigning case management in Dutch local welfare agencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, H.H.A.; van der Aa, P.; van Gestel, N.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the new roles of frontline workers in Dutch local welfare agencies against the background of recent active welfare state reforms, with a specific focus on frontline workers involved in activating social assistance recipients. The results presented in the article come from case

  2. Interventions in Bicycle Infrastructure, Lessons from Dutch and Danish Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Goeverden, K.; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick; Harder, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    of interventions in bicycle infrastructure on travel choices, safety, design appreciation, and other factors. These clarify under which conditions certain measures are effective or not and inform about the effectiveness of improving a single route versus upgrading a whole network. The information from the studies...... to be still generally valid. In addition to studies that traditionally focus on dedicated bicycle infrastructure, two cases of shared space are discussed, a rather new type of intervention that assumes mixed use of infrastructure. One case is from Denmark, the other from the Netherlands. The paper will so...... uncover the valuable results of the possibly largest evaluations of interventions in bicycle infrastructure ever made, verify these by examining more recent studies, and contribute to the discussion of shared space....

  3. The value of postmortem computed tomography in paediatric natural cause of death: a Dutch observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijn, Rick R. van; Beek, Erik J.; Nievelstein, Rutger-Jan A.; Putte, Elise M. van de; Teeuw, Arianne H.; Nikkels, Peter G.J.; Duijst, Wilma L.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Postmortem CT is a relatively new field of interest within paediatric radiology. This paper focusses on its value in cases of unexpected natural death. We report on an observational Dutch study regarding the value of postmortem CT in children with an assumed natural unexpected death because postmortem CT is part of the Dutch NODO (additional investigations of cause of death) procedure. We included consecutive children who fulfilled criteria for the NODO procedure and were therefore referred to one of the centres for the procedure. Postmortem CT was performed in all cases and skeletal survey was performed in all children ages <5 years. The cause of death was defined in a consensus meeting. We included a total of 54 children (30 boys, median age 1.1 years, and 24 girls, median age 0.8 years). A definitive cause of death was established in 38 cases. In 7 cases the cause of death could be identified on postmortem CT. In 7 cases imaging findings were clinically relevant but did not lead to a cause of death. In the remaining 40 cases postmortem CT did not add to the diagnostic workup. Our study shows that in a group of children who unexpectedly died of an assumed natural cause of death and in whom a cause of death was found at autopsy, postmortem CT detected the cause of death in a minority of cases (12.9%). In the majority of cases (74.1%) postmortem CT did not add value in diagnosing the cause of death. (orig.)

  4. The value of postmortem computed tomography in paediatric natural cause of death: a Dutch observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijn, Rick R. van [Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam Zuid-Oost (Netherlands); Beek, Erik J.; Nievelstein, Rutger-Jan A. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Putte, Elise M. van de [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Paediatrics, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Teeuw, Arianne H. [Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Paediatrics, Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nikkels, Peter G.J. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Duijst, Wilma L.J.M. [Dutch Forensic Medical Association, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the Dutch NODO Group

    2017-10-15

    Postmortem CT is a relatively new field of interest within paediatric radiology. This paper focusses on its value in cases of unexpected natural death. We report on an observational Dutch study regarding the value of postmortem CT in children with an assumed natural unexpected death because postmortem CT is part of the Dutch NODO (additional investigations of cause of death) procedure. We included consecutive children who fulfilled criteria for the NODO procedure and were therefore referred to one of the centres for the procedure. Postmortem CT was performed in all cases and skeletal survey was performed in all children ages <5 years. The cause of death was defined in a consensus meeting. We included a total of 54 children (30 boys, median age 1.1 years, and 24 girls, median age 0.8 years). A definitive cause of death was established in 38 cases. In 7 cases the cause of death could be identified on postmortem CT. In 7 cases imaging findings were clinically relevant but did not lead to a cause of death. In the remaining 40 cases postmortem CT did not add to the diagnostic workup. Our study shows that in a group of children who unexpectedly died of an assumed natural cause of death and in whom a cause of death was found at autopsy, postmortem CT detected the cause of death in a minority of cases (12.9%). In the majority of cases (74.1%) postmortem CT did not add value in diagnosing the cause of death. (orig.)

  5. Pop and World Music in Dutch Music Education: Two Cases of Authentic Learning in Music Teacher Education and Secondary Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelein, Frits

    2006-01-01

    Popular and world music play an important role in Dutch music education. This article examines two case studies that illustrate authentic music learning environments in which these types of music are prominently used. The first case follows a student during her training at the Rotterdam Academy for Music Education, in which her own musical and…

  6. The Application of Seismic Attributes and Wheeler Transformations for the Geomorphological Interpretation of Stratigraphic Surfaces: A Case Study of the F3 Block, Dutch Offshore Sector, North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Afifi Ishak; Md. Aminul Islam; Mohamed Ragab Shalaby; Nurul Hasan

    2018-01-01

    This study was carried out in the Pliocene interval of the southern North Sea F3 Block in the Netherlands. This research paper demonstrates how an integrated interpretation of geological information using seismic attributes, sequence stratigraphic interpretation and Wheeler transformation methods allow for the accurate interpretation of the depositional environment of a basin, as well as locating seismic geomorphological features. The methodology adopted here is to generate a 3D dip-steered H...

  7. What Outcomes do Dutch Healthcare Professionals Perceive as Important Before Participation in Moral Case Deliberation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Snoo-Trimp, Janine; Widdershoven, Guy; Svantesson, Mia; de Vet, Riekie; Molewijk, Bert

    2017-05-01

    There has been little attention paid to research on the outcomes of clinical ethics support (CES) or critical reflection on what constitutes a good CES outcome. Understanding how CES users perceive the importance of CES outcomes can contribute to a better understanding, use of and normative reflection on CES outcomes. To describe the perceptions of Dutch healthcare professionals on important outcomes of moral case deliberation (MCD), prior to MCD participation, and to compare results between respondents. This mixed-methods study used both the Euro-MCD instrument and semi-structured interviews. Healthcare professionals who were about to implement MCD were recruited from nursing homes, hospitals, psychiatry and mentally disabled care institutions. 331 healthcare professionals completed the Euro-MCD instrument, 13 healthcare professionals were interviewed. The outcomes perceived as most important were 'more open communication', 'better mutual understanding', 'concrete actions', 'see the situation from different perspectives', 'consensus on how to manage the situation' and 'find more courses of action'. Interviewees also perceived improving quality of care, professionalism and the organization as important. Women, nurses, managers and professionals in mentally disabled care rated outcomes more highly than other respondents. Dutch healthcare professionals perceived the MCD outcomes related to collaboration as most important. The empirical findings can contribute to shared ownership of MCD and a more specific use of MCD in different contexts. They can inform international comparative research on different CES types and contribute to normative discussions concerning CES outcomes. Future studies should reflect upon important MCD outcomes after having experienced MCD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Research paper 2000-B-4: adjustments in the Dutch electricity producing sector in the context of the European directive 88/609/EEC: a case study on national implementation, environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lulofs, K. [Twente Univ., Center for Clean Technology and Environmental Policy, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    Within the context of the IMPOL project several fields of European environmental policy are studied on aspects as national implementation and environmental and efficiency outcomes. For the IMPOL project a case study was done on the transformation of the Dutch electricity sector in the context of the European Directive 88/609/EEC. The indicators used in this report for environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs were chosen in line with a coordinating document (Eames, 1999). The European Directive 88/609/EEC regulates Large Combustion Plants on their SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. These emissions are relevant for air quality and for the acidification problem. In the empirical part of this report emphasis is laid on the power plants as a specific sub-group of the large combustion plants. The report starts in chapter 2 with a description of the Dutch policy on acidification and regulation that existed when 88/609/EEC was issued. This way it is clarified that the formal implementation of the European Directive was done in the Netherlands with very little effort. In section 2.4 some major information on the structure of the electricity production sector is given as well as some insights into developments. In section 2.5 details on a covenant to reduce emissions from power plants is given. The electricity sector and the government agreed upon this document as a binding agenda for change. In section 2.6 information on monitoring and enforcement is given. In chapter 3, the environmental outcomes are discussed. First the emissions of all large combustion plants are presented in time series. Within the IMPOL research-team the decision was taken to concentrate on the SO{sub 2} emissions of power plants. Therefore, secondly the SO{sub 2} emissions of the power plants and the individual power plants are presented. This opens the possibility for an analysis of the found decrease of SO{sub 2} emissions. In section 3.3 the

  9. Research paper 2000-B-4: adjustments in the Dutch electricity producing sector in the context of the European directive 88/609/EEC: a case study on national implementation, environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulofs, K.

    2000-01-01

    Within the context of the IMPOL project several fields of European environmental policy are studied on aspects as national implementation and environmental and efficiency outcomes. For the IMPOL project a case study was done on the transformation of the Dutch electricity sector in the context of the European Directive 88/609/EEC. The indicators used in this report for environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs were chosen in line with a coordinating document (Eames, 1999). The European Directive 88/609/EEC regulates Large Combustion Plants on their SO 2 and NO x emissions. These emissions are relevant for air quality and for the acidification problem. In the empirical part of this report emphasis is laid on the power plants as a specific sub-group of the large combustion plants. The report starts in chapter 2 with a description of the Dutch policy on acidification and regulation that existed when 88/609/EEC was issued. This way it is clarified that the formal implementation of the European Directive was done in the Netherlands with very little effort. In section 2.4 some major information on the structure of the electricity production sector is given as well as some insights into developments. In section 2.5 details on a covenant to reduce emissions from power plants is given. The electricity sector and the government agreed upon this document as a binding agenda for change. In section 2.6 information on monitoring and enforcement is given. In chapter 3, the environmental outcomes are discussed. First the emissions of all large combustion plants are presented in time series. Within the IMPOL research-team the decision was taken to concentrate on the SO 2 emissions of power plants. Therefore, secondly the SO 2 emissions of the power plants and the individual power plants are presented. This opens the possibility for an analysis of the found decrease of SO 2 emissions. In section 3.3 the likely causes and their

  10. Food insecurity among Dutch food bank recipients: a cross-sectional study.

    OpenAIRE

    Neter, J.E.; Dijkstra, S.C.; Visser, M.; Brouwer, I.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of (very) low food security among Dutch food bank recipients, and to identify potential demographic, lifestyle and nutrition-related factors associated with (very) low food security. Setting: 11 of 135 Dutch food banks were selected throughout the Netherlands. Participants: 251 Dutch food bank recipients participated in the study (93 men and 158 women). Inclusion criteria for participation were: (1) at least 18 years of age, (2) sufficiently fluent in Du...

  11. The influence of the Energy Performance Certificate: The Dutch case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    All European Union Member States require an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) when buildings are constructed, sold and rented. At its introduction the EPC was considered a pioneering instrument, one that would help overcome an information deficit hindering consumer interest in energy efficient dwellings. Now that the EPC has been implemented for several years it is possible to examine its impact. This research draws on data from ex-ante and ex-post assessments of the EPC in a number of countries and presents the results of a survey of Dutch private dwelling purchasers. This survey was based on two sample populations, one received an EPC during property transaction and another did not. Differences were sought between the two samples in a number of areas relating to the adoption of energy efficiency measures. Results show that many projections about the impact of the EPC have fallen short. The EPC was found to have a weak influence, especially pre-purchase. The potential of the EPC in driving energy efficiency improvement in the existing stock is doubted especially if it continues to act independent from a mix of instruments designed to tackle multiple barriers. It is argued that the energy saving potential of existing dwellings, applauded in climate change policy, will remain unexploited if it continues to be assessed subjectively by householders. - Highlights: • Results of a survey of EPC recipients and non-recipients are presented. • The influence of the EPC is analysed descriptively and statistically. • EPC is found to have a weak influence pre and post-purchase. • More sophisticated mechanisms are needed to enhance the EPC

  12. Shea case study Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Drost (Sarah); J.C.A.C. van Wijk (Jeroen); S.R. Vellema (Sietze)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis shea case study is part of a larger Partnerships Resource Centre (PrC) project elaborated in tandem with two Dutch non-governmental organisations (NGOs); ICCO and Oxfam Novib. The endeavour of this ‘action research’ project is to combine the expert knowledge of development

  13. Religious Nonconformity and cultural Dynamics: The Case of the Dutch Collegiants

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Rosa Ricci Summary of the PHD Dissertation: Religious Nonconformity and cultural Dynamics: The Case of the Dutch Collegiants There is ample reason to engage in research around the Collegiants, a minority religious movement in the Netherlands of the 17th century. An exploration of this topic can be interesting not only for a contribution to the history of Religion but also to understand the development of some central concept in the early modernity. Prominent, in this research, is the ...

  14. On levies to reduce the nitrogen surplus: the case of Dutch pig farms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontein, P.; Thijssen, G.; Magnus, J.; Dijk, J.

    1994-01-01

    Pig farms in the Netherlands pay a zero or low price for using the environment. As a consequence, the environment is overused. The Dutch government wants to reduce the emissions of nitrogen and phosphorus. Possible instruments are regulation and levies. In this study a levy on feed and a levy on the

  15. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  16. Defining and describing birth centres in the Netherlands - a component study of the Dutch Birth Centre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermus, M A A; Boesveld, I C; Hitzert, M; Franx, A; de Graaf, J P; Steegers, E A P; Wiegers, T A; van der Pal-de Bruin, K M

    2017-07-03

    During the last decade, a rapid increase of birth locations for low-risk births, other than conventional obstetric units, has been seen in the Netherlands. Internationally some of such locations are called birth centres. The varying international definitions for birth centres are not directly applicable for use within the Dutch obstetric system. A standard definition for a birth centre in the Netherlands is lacking. This study aimed to develop a definition of birth centres for use in the Netherlands, to identify these centres and to describe their characteristics. International definitions of birth centres were analysed to find common descriptions. In July 2013 the Dutch Birth Centre Questionnaire was sent to 46 selected Dutch birth locations that might qualify as birth centre. Questions included: location, reason for establishment, women served, philosophies, facilities that support physiological birth, hotel-facilities, management, environment and transfer procedures in case of referral. Birth centres were visited to confirm the findings from the Dutch Birth Centre Questionnaire and to measure distance and time in case of referral to obstetric care. From all 46 birth locations the questionnaires were received. Based on this information a Dutch definition of a birth centre was constructed. This definition reads: "Birth centres are midwifery-managed locations that offer care to low risk women during labour and birth. They have a homelike environment and provide facilities to support physiological birth. Community midwives take primary professional responsibility for care. In case of referral the obstetric caregiver takes over the professional responsibility of care." Of the 46 selected birth locations 23 fulfilled this definition. Three types of birth centres were distinguished based on their location in relation to the nearest obstetric unit: freestanding (n = 3), alongside (n = 14) and on-site (n = 6). Transfer in case of referral was necessary for all

  17. Soccer injuries and recovery in dutch male amateur soccer players: Results of a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, A.M. van; Steffen, K.; Stubbe, J.H.; Frederiks, J.E.; Port, I.G.L. van de; Backx, F.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To describe characteristics of outdoor soccer injury and recovery among Dutch soccer players. DESIGN:: Prospective cohort study. SETTING:: The 2009-2010 competitive season (33 weeks). PARTICIPANTS:: Four hundred fifty-six Dutch male soccer players of 23 amateur teams. MAIN OUTCOME

  18. Nutrition awareness before and throughout different trimesters in pregnancy: a quantitative study among Dutch women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szwajcer, E.M.; Hiddink, G.J.; Maas, L.; Koelen, M.; Woerkum, van C.

    2012-01-01

    Method. Data were collected in a cross-sectional study with the aid of a face-to-face interview, based on our conceptualization of nutrition awareness and the 'rules of thumb' designed by the Dutch Nutrition Centre. The sample consisted of five groups each of similar to 100 Dutch nulliparous women:

  19. Parenting Practices and Quality of Life in Dutch and Portuguese Adolescents : A Cross-Cultural Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes, Cristina; Bodden, Denise; Lemos, Ida; Lorence, Barbara; Jimenez, Lucia; Bodden, Denise

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in Quality of life (QoL) and parenting practices, as well as the impact of parenting practices on QoL in Dutch and Portuguese adolescents. A total of 168 Portuguese (44.64% girls, 55.36% boys) and 155 Dutch adolescents (55.68% girls, 44.32% boys) aged

  20. Parenting Practices and Quality of Life in Dutch and Portuguese Adolescents: A Cross-Cultural Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes, C.; Bodden, D.H.M.; Lemos, I.; Lorence, B.; Jimenez, L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in Quality of life (QoL) and parenting practices, as well as the impact of parenting practices on QoL in Dutch and Portuguese adolescents. A total of 168 Portuguese (44.64% girls, 55.36% boys) and 155 Dutch adolescents (55.68% girls, 44.32% boys) aged

  1. Organizing moral case deliberation experiences in two Dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Dam, S.; Abma, T.A.; Molewijk, A.C.; Kardol, M.J.M.; Schols, J.M.G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a specific form of clinical ethics, aiming to stimulate ethical reflection in daily practice in order to improve the quality of care. This article focuses on the implementation of MCD in nursing homes and the questions how and where to organize MCD. The purpose of

  2. The New Oil Sector and the Dutch Disease: the Case of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Nchor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the impact of the new oil sector on the economic performance of major traditional sectors of the Ghanaian economy. The discovery of resource booming sectors in most countries often comes with several opportunities as well as challenges. Ghana discovered oil in 2007 and started subsequent commercial production and export in 2010. The results from the study show that, there is no clear case of declining performance of sectors in terms of output, growth and export earnings as a result of the oil production. The study could also not establish a sustained appreciation in the real effective exchange rate since commercial oil production commenced which is an indicator of the presence of the Dutch Disease phenomenon. The real effective exchange rate was also found to be highly influenced by oil production, oil prices, total exports and remittances. The study applied an autoregressive distributed lag model due to differences in the level of integration of variables. The data was obtained from the Bank of Ghana, the Ministry of Finance in Ghana and the Energy Information Administration.

  3. Historical and Political Thought in the Seventeenth-Century Dutch Republic: The Case of Marcus Zuerius Boxhorn (1612-1653)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. Nieuwstraten (Jaap)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis dissertation constitutes the first comprehensive study of the historical and political thought of the Dutch scholar Marcus Zuerius Boxhorn (1612-1653). Boxhorn was one of the most prolific scholars of his age. His Latin works were translated into Dutch, French, and English, and

  4. "He would never just hit the sofa" A narrative of non-complaining among Dutch Mothers: a qualitative study of the influences of attitudes on work preferences and employment patterns of Dutch mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenberg, J.

    2012-01-01

    Working patterns among Dutch mothers differ remarkably. This variation makes the Netherlands an interesting case to study the origins of the labour participation pattern of women and mothers in particular. This article explores the influence of mothers’ work and gender attitudes and preferences on

  5. The Future of Foreign Direct Liability? Exploring the International Relevance of the Dutch Shell Nigeria Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Enneking

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2013, The Hague District Court in the Netherlands rendered a groundbreaking verdict in a civil liability suit against Royal Dutch Shell and its Nigerian subsidiary (SPDC. The lawsuit had been brought before it by four Nigerian farmers and the Dutch NGO Milieudefensie, in response to a number of oil-spill incidents from SPDC-operated pipelines in the Nigerian Niger Delta. Although the majority of the claims were dismissed, the district court in its ruling did grant one claim that related to spills from an abandoned wellhead, ordering SPDC to pay compensation for the resulting loss. This judgment has international relevance, as this Dutch Shell Nigeria case forms part of a worldwide trend towards foreign direct liability cases. Growing numbers of similar lawsuits have been brought before the courts in other Western societies, but judgments on the merits have so far remained scarce. The relevance of the case has further increased with the US Supreme Court’s April 2013 ruling in the case of Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co., which has significantly limited the scope of the Alien Tort Statute. This article explores The Hague District Court’s decision in the Dutch Shell Nigeria case, and places the case within the socio-legal context of the contemporary trend towards foreign direct liability cases, the international debates on corporate accountability and business & human rights, and the Supreme Court's judgment in the Kiobel case.

  6. Update of the Dutch manual for costing studies in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Kanters (Tim A.); C.A.M. Bouwmans-Frijters (Clazien); N. van der Linden (Naomi); S.S. Tan (Siok Swan); L. van Hakkaart-van Roijen (Leona)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objectives__ Dutch health economic guidelines include a costing manual, which describes preferred research methodology for costing studies and reference prices to ensure high quality studies and comparability between study outcomes. This paper describes the most

  7. Exploring gender differences in charitable giving : The Dutch Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, Arjen; Bekkers, René

    2016-01-01

    Women’s philanthropy has drawn much attention during recent years, mostly in studies from the United States or the United Kingdom. Relevant issues are to what extent gender differences in charitable giving exist in another national context and how these differences can be explained. In this study,

  8. E-services for citizens: the Dutch usage case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Johannes A.G.M.; Pieterson, Willem Jan; Ebbers, Wolfgang E.; van Deursen, Alexander Johannes Aloysius Maria

    2007-01-01

    In most countries, the maturity of eService delivery is measured by the supply of electronic service delivery. However, in many countries there is a gap between the supply and demand of eServices. We studied the actual use of eServices and the potential use of eServices in the Netherlands. We found

  9. eServices for Citizens : The Dutch Usage Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Jan; Pieterson, Willem; van Deursen, Alexander; Ebbers, Wolfgang; Wimmer, Maria A.; Scholl, Jochen; Grönlund, Åke

    2007-01-01

    In most countries, the maturity of eService delivery is measured by the supply of electronic service delivery. However, in many countries there is a gap between the supply and demand of eServices. We studied the actual use of eServices and the potential use of eServices in the Netherlands. We found

  10. Contesting Consensus Culture: The Case of Dutch Gothic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, R.L.; Wesseling, L.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently the Gothic novel was considered to be a predominantly Anglo-Saxon phenomenon, but there are now several studies that have convincingly uncovered relevant European contributions to the development of this genre. We are adding to this project of Anglo-European comparisons by

  11. Freedom of speech versus freedom of religion? The case of Dutch politician Geert Wilders

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Erica

    2017-01-01

    Dutch right-wing politician Geert Wilders has already been prosecuted once for incitement to hatred and group defamation over remarks and a film criticising Islam and comparing the Quran to Hitler’s Mein Kampf. He was acquitted, but now faces another criminal trial on the same charges concerning remarks he made in March 2014 about ‘fewer Moroccans’. This Article examines Wilders’ expressions which led to both prosecutions. The case law of the European Court of Human Rights on freedom of expre...

  12. Identification of nutrition communication styles and strategies: a qualitative study among Dutch GP's

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, van S.M.E.; Hiddink, G.J.; Koelen, M.A.; Graaf, de C.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to identify nutrition communication styles of Dutch GPs, their strategies regarding nutrition communication and nutrition information seeking behaviours. Another aim is to provide a hypothetical model for nutrition communication style, including

  13. A study on the re-identifiability of Dutch citizens

    OpenAIRE

    Koot, M.R.; van 't Noordende, G.; de Laat, C.; Serjantov, A.; Troncoso, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the re-identifiability of Dutch citizens by various demographics. Our analysis is based on registry office data of 2.7 million Dutch citizens, ~16% of the total population. We provide overall statistics on re-identifiability for a range of quasi-identifiers, and present an in-depth analysis of quasi-identifiers found in two de-identified data sets. We found that 67.0% of the sampled population is unambiguously identifiable by date of birth and four-digit postal code alone,...

  14. Opportunities for Local for Local Food Production: A Case in the Dutch Fruit and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurriaan Visser

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the opportunities for farmers to produce for local consumers, based on a case study in the Dutch horticulture sector. Main requirements for the set-up of a local chain of supply chain actors are investigated. Producer requirements are added value, availability of time, infrastructure and training. Retailer requirements are quality of food, purchasing volumes, food safety, communication to consumers and traceability of products. For consumers taste/freshness, sustainability, health benefits and authenticity are important attributes of local foods. Based on literature review and interviews with stakeholders four possible strategies for local food chains are defined. The ‘keep it local’ strategy means that the local food supply chains will not make use of the current infrastructure of the marketing coop that acts as chain coordinator. Deliveries are directly between farmer and retail outlet. The local products - conventional supply chain strategy implies that current (non-local supply chains are used to distribute local products. The supply chain planning will be more complex since products need to be separated per grower and distributed to several local supermarkets. In the ‘enabling producers’ strategy the marketing coop/chain coordinator is going to enable its member producers to sell their products locally. The marketing coop can support producers in for instance, billing and payments, marketing, logistics. The fourth strategy aims at strengthening current consumer communication strategies. It is argued that connecting producers and consumers, regardless of where they live is advantageous.Conclusion is that strategy 3; ‘Enabling producers’, in combination with strategy 4; ‘Strengthening current consumer communication strategies’ are the most promising options in setting up local food supply chains. Strategies 1 and 2, where the marketing coop/chain coordinator itself takes on the challenge of setting up

  15. Feasibility of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Nispen Ruth MA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demographic ageing will lead to increasing pressure on visual rehabilitation services, which need to be efficiently organised in the near future. The Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI was developed to assess the rehabilitation needs of visually impaired persons. This pilot study tests the feasibility of the D-AI using a computer-assisted telephone interview. Methods In addition to the regular intake, the first version of the D-AI was assessed in 20 patients. Subsequently, patients and intake assessors were asked to fill in an evaluation form. Based on these evaluations, a new version of the D-AI was developed. Results Mean administration time of the D-AI was 88.8 (± 41.0 minutes. Overall, patients and assessors were positive about the D-AI assessment. However, professionals and 60% of the patients found the administration time to be too long. All included items were considered relevant and only minor adjustments were recommended. Conclusion The systematic character of the revised D-AI will prevent topics from being overlooked and indicate which needs have the highest priority from a patient-centred perspective. Moreover, ongoing assessment of the D-AI will enhance evaluation of the rehabilitation process. To decrease administration time, in the revised D-AI only the top priority goals will be fully assessed. Using the D-AI, a rehabilitation plan based on individual needs can be developed for each patient. Moreover, it enables better evaluation of the effects of rehabilitation. A larger validation study is planned.

  16. 'Burnout' among Dutch midwives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.H.C.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Jabaaij, L.; Meijer, W.; Sixma, H.; Veer, A. de

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to determine the effect of workload on 'burnout' having considered work capacity. DESIGN: cross-sectional study. SETTING: Dutch community midwives in independent practice. PARTICIPANTS: 200 Dutch community midwives. MEASUREMENTS: three-week diary recordings, a questionnaire on practice

  17. Dutch Disease in a small open economy: The case of oil in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mabrouk, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of 'Dutch Disease' come through two channels: real wage rate and real exchange rate. A sector export boom induces both resource movement and spending effects that reinforce each other in raising higher real wage and real exchange rates. In the case of an oil boom, only the spending effect is in operation because the oil sector does not employ domestic mobile factors. After a great deal of theoretical surveying and consolidation of 'Dutch Disease' on the Saudi Arabian economy throughout the period of 1970s and 1980s. The author was trying to see whether or not the oil boom was an obstacle to economic diversification. The empirical findings support the theoretical prediction. The real exchange rate of Saudi Arabia has appreciated throughout the period of the oil-boom and, in turn, it induced an expansion in the non-traded sector and a contraction in the non-oil traded sector. The indirect effect of the oil boom came through the use of oil wealth to import technology. This effect induced further expansion in the non-traded goods at a faster rate than the non-oil traded goods

  18. De relatieve duurzaamheid van de Nederlandse roodvleessector: een kwalitatieve vergelijking = A comparative study on the sustainability of the Dutch beef cattle production sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study the sustainability of Dutch specialized beef production is compared qualitatively with two other Dutch animal production systems (porc and broilers), and with beef production in Ireland and Brazil, the most prominent exporters of beef to the Dutch market with which the Dutch sector

  19. Active gaming in Dutch adolescents: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simons Monique

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adequate levels of physical activity are part of a healthy lifestyle and in this way linked to better health outcomes. For children and adolescents, the physical activity guideline recommends at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day. However, many adolescents are not physically active enough and they spend a lot of their time on sedentary activities (such as video games. A new generation of video games that require body movements to play them, so-called "active games", could serve to increase physical activity in adolescents. The activity level while playing these games is comparable to light-to-moderate intensity physical activity. The current study aims to increase our understanding of 1 the demographic characteristics of adolescents who play active games regularly (≥ 1 hour per week and non-regularly ( Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a Dutch internet panel, questioning adolescents in conjunction with one of their parents. A random sample of 320 households (with stratification on gender of the parent and the adolescent, the age of the adolescent and the region of the household was selected that owned a console or application for active video games and that had a child aged 12 through 16 years. 201 child–parent couples (63% response completed an internet survey with questions about demographics, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, and gaming behaviour. The questionnaire also contained questions designed to assess whether and how active gaming replaces other activities. Besides descriptive analyses, independent t-test, Pearson’s chi-square and Mann–Whitney test (when data were not normally distributed were used for comparisons between regular and non-regular active gamers. Results Eleven percent of the adolescents with an active game in their household never used the game. There were no significant differences in gender, education level (of adolescent and

  20. Opportunities in EU case law for achieving Dutch sustainable energy targets: it's up to the Netherlands to seize them

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavrijssen, S.A.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on recent case law of the European Court of Justice to examine the opportunities available in European Union law to promote the generating of electricity from renewable sources within the Dutch system for managing congestion in the electricity grid (CMS) and for allocating the

  1. Development of a web-based register for the Dutch national study on biologicals in JIA : www.ABC-register.nl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prince, F H M; Ferket, I S; Kamphuis, S.; Armbrust, W; Ten Cate, R; Hoppenreijs, E P A H; Koopman-Keemink, Y; van Rossum, M A J; van Santen-Hoeufft, M; Twilt, M; van Suijlekom-Smit, L W A

    OBJECTIVES: Most clinical studies use paper case record forms (CRFs) to collect data. In the Dutch multi-centre observational study on biologicals we encountered several disadvantages of using the paper CRFs. These are delay in data collection, lack of overview in collected data and difficulties in

  2. Palliative sedation in Dutch general practice from 2005 to 2011: a dynamic cohort study of trends and reasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, Gé A; Slotman, Frank G; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Francke, Anneke L

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the quantity and reasons for use of palliative sedation in general practice. To gain more insight into the trends of and reasons for palliative sedation in Dutch general practice. Dynamic cohort study using registrations and questionnaire data of Dutch GPs. Method Data collected in the years from 2005 until 2011 in the Dutch Sentinel General Practice Network were analysed. Trends and reasons for use of palliative sedation were analysed using multilevel analyses to control for clustering of observations within general practices. From 2005-2011, 183 cases were reported from 56 general practices. The incidence of palliative sedation fluctuated between 33.7 per 100 000 patients in 2006 and 15.2 in 2011. No rise or decline during the period was observed. Palliative sedation was applied in 5.7% of all deaths and most frequently used in younger patients with cancer. The mean number of refractory symptoms was 2.6 (SD 1.2); pain (69.4%), dyspnoea (53.0%), and fear (39.3%). Patient involvement in decision making before the start of palliative sedation (87.4%) was less frequently present in patients suffering from cardiovascular or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in older patients compared to patients with cancer (Ppalliative sedation in these cases was clearly motivated. Palliative sedation is performed in a small proportion of dying patients in Dutch general practice, without a rise or decline observed from 2005 to 2011. Patients with non-cancer diseases are less frequently involved in decision making than patients with cancer, possibly related to sudden deterioration.

  3. Dutch Dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de B.; Zee, van der A.; Carp, J.C.; Soddu, C.

    2004-01-01

    Applying Generative Design (GD) for dwelling is not very common but it opens up the possibility to study whether GD systems can reproduce existing design typologies. Dutch dwellings as an exemplification of a design typology are analysed using the SAR methodology. Building regulations are used as

  4. Policy alienation of Dutch public sector professionals: An exploratory case analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Tummers (Lars); V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor); A.J. Steijn (Bram)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn 2004 Dutch government changed the law regarding the welfare benefits that disabled citizens receive on behalf of the state. This followed a rise of the number of recipients between 1987 and 2003 from 805.000 to 982.000. In 2003, approximately 10 % of the Dutch workforce was dependent

  5. Dutch Linguists between Humboldt and Saussure. The case of Jac. van Ginneken (1877-1945)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordegraaf, J.

    2002-01-01

    The impact Ferdinand de Saussure’s Cours de linguistique générale (1916) had on Dutch linguistics in the 1930s and 1940s has not yet become the object of a thorough investigation. It can be pointed out, however, that in the interwar period Dutch reactions to the Cours were of a mixed character. When

  6. The future of foreign direct liability? Exploring the international relevance of the Dutch Shell Nigeria case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enneking, Liesbeth; Sub Burgelijk Recht; UCALL / Aansprakelijkheid en verantwoordelijkheid

    2014-01-01

    In January 2013, The Hague District Court in the Netherlands rendered a groundbreaking verdict in a civil liability suit against Royal Dutch Shell and its Nigerian subsidiary (SPDC). The lawsuit had been brought before it by four Nigerian farmers and the Dutch NGO Milieudefensie, in response to a

  7. The future of foreign direct liability? : Exploring the international relevance of the Dutch Shell Nigeria case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enneking, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    In January 2013, the The Hague district court in the Netherlands rendered a groundbreaking verdict in a civil liability suit against Royal Dutch Shell and its Nigerian subsidiary (SPDC). The lawsuit had been brought before it by four Nigerian farmers and the Dutch NGO Milieudefensie, in response to

  8. Update of the Dutch manual for costing studies in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Kanters (Tim A.); C.A.M. Bouwmans-Frijters (Clazien); N. van der Linden (Naomi); S.S. Tan (Siok Swan); L. van Hakkaart-van Roijen (Leona)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: Dutch health economic guidelines include a costing manual, which describes preferred research methodology for costing studies and reference prices to ensure high quality studies and comparability between study outcomes. This paper describes the most important revisions of the

  9. CASE STUDY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-02

    Jun 2, 2011 ... immunosuppression associated with HIV/AIDS puts them at a higher risk of developing oesophageal cancer. 47. CASE STUDY. A 49-year-old man was diagnosed as HIV infected, with a CD4 count of 60 cells/µl. He was started on an antiretroviral treatment regimen comprising zidovudine, lamivudine and ...

  10. Cross-Cultural Study of Information Processing Biases in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Comparison of Dutch and UK Chronic Fatigue Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, Alicia M.; Hirsch, Colette R.; Nikolaus, Stephanie; Chalder, Trudie; Knoop, Hans; Moss-Morris, Rona

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to replicate a UK study, with a Dutch sample to explore whether attention and interpretation biases and general attentional control deficits in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are similar across populations and cultures. Thirty eight Dutch CFS participants were compared to 52 CFS and

  11. Quality of Austrian and Dutch Falls-Prevention Information: A Comparative Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoberer, Daniela; Mijnarends, Donja M.; Fliedner, Monica; Halfens, Ruud J. G.; Lohrmann, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the quality of written patient information material available in Austrian and Dutch hospitals and nursing homes pertaining to falls prevention. Design: Comparative descriptive study design Setting: Hospitals and nursing homes in Austria and the Netherlands. Method: Written patient…

  12. Estimating the production, consumption and export of cannabis: The Dutch case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Giessen, Mark; van Ooyen-Houben, Marianne M J; Moolenaar, Debora E G

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying an illegal phenomenon like a drug market is inherently complex due to its hidden nature and the limited availability of reliable information. This article presents findings from a recent estimate of the production, consumption and export of Dutch cannabis and discusses the opportunities provided by, and limitations of, mathematical models for estimating the illegal cannabis market. The data collection consisted of a comprehensive literature study, secondary analyses on data from available registrations (2012-2014) and previous studies, and expert opinion. The cannabis market was quantified with several mathematical models. The data analysis included a Monte Carlo simulation to come to a 95% interval estimate (IE) and a sensitivity analysis to identify the most influential indicators. The annual production of Dutch cannabis was estimated to be between 171 and 965tons (95% IE of 271-613tons). The consumption was estimated to be between 28 and 119tons, depending on the inclusion or exclusion of non-residents (95% IE of 51-78tons or 32-49tons respectively). The export was estimated to be between 53 and 937tons (95% IE of 206-549tons or 231-573tons, respectively). Mathematical models are valuable tools for the systematic assessment of the size of illegal markets and determining the uncertainty inherent in the estimates. The estimates required the use of many assumptions and the availability of reliable indicators was limited. This uncertainty is reflected in the wide ranges of the estimates. The estimates are sensitive to 10 of the 45 indicators. These 10 account for 86-93% of the variation found. Further research should focus on improving the variables and the independence of the mathematical models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Moral Emotions during Military Deployments of Dutch Forces: A Qualitative Study on Moral Emotions in Intercultural Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, M; de Graaff, Miriam; Verweij, D.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Which emotions are generated by the behavior of “the other” in intercultural interactions that Dutch soldiers perceive as conflicting with their own values? How are these emotions related to types of behavioral reactions of Dutch military personnel? This preliminary study explores the emotional and

  14. The future of organization development: A delphi study among Dutch experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korten, F.; de Caluwe, L.I.A.; Geurts, J.

    2010-01-01

    From this Delphi study among Dutch experts, the future of organization development (OD) emerges as a loosely coupled community of practice, linking very diverse members, professionals as well as scholars. One finds different priorities and values in this community, some of them even dilemmatic. The

  15. Multiple Identities and Religious Transmission: A Study among Moroccan-Dutch Muslim Adolescents and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Thijs, Jochem; Stevens, Gonneke

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relation between religious group identification and ethnic and national identity among Moroccan-Dutch Muslim adolescents (11-18 years) and their parents (n = 369). Compared to their parents, adolescents showed higher national identification and lower religious and ethnic group identification. However, for adolescents…

  16. Dutch surgeons' views on the volume-outcome mechanism in surgery: A qualitative interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, R.; Faber, M.J.; Westert, G.P.; Berden, H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To contribute to a better understanding of volume-outcome relationships in surgery by exploring Dutch surgeons' views on the underlying mechanism. Design: A qualitative study based on face-to-face semi structured interviews and an inductive content analysis approach. Setting: Interviews

  17. Simulation supported field study of environmental tobacco smoke leakage from smoking rooms in 19 Dutch pubs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.; Opperhuizen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is produced during smoking and smoldering of tobacco products. This field study has measured how much ETS is leaking from smoking rooms into smoke free areas in 19 Dutch cafes. Nicotine, 3-EP and PM2,5 have been used as tracer compounds for ETS. The use of smoking

  18. Pathways into adulthood. A comparative study on family life transitions among migrant and Dutch youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, H.A.G. de

    2006-01-01

    The ethnic composition of the Dutch population has changed considerably in the past decades. Nowadays a substantial proportion of youth in the Netherlands has a migrant background. This study focuses on how these young adults make the transition to adulthood in the family domain. What preferences

  19. Acceptability of the Components of a Loneliness Intervention among Elderly Dutch People: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigh-de Vlaming, R.; Haveman-Nies, A.; Ziylan, C.; Renes, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Healthy Ageing is a complex intervention aimed at reducing the prevalence of loneliness among elderly Dutch people. Purpose: This study aimed to assess how mass media communication materials, information meetings, and psychosocial courses were received by elderly people at high risk of loneliness. Methods: Face-to-face interviews with…

  20. The importance of Internet as a strategic Management Tool: A study of Dutch SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for the identification and evaluation of Internet-based strategies and examines the role of the Internet as element of the strategic planning of Small and Medium Businesses (SMBs) from a variety of Dutch industrial sectors. The study has an explorative character and

  1. The link between family orientation, strategy, and innovation in Dutch SMEs : A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlaner, L.M.; Kemp, R.; Tan, S.

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying some of the factors determining innovation performance in the SME. Based on a sample of 388 Dutch SME's, hypotheses were tested in particular regarding the main effects of strategy, and the direct and indirect efects of family orientation on firm performance. The

  2. Technical efficiency under alternative environmental regulatory regimes : the case of Dutch horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlist, van der A.J.; Withagen, C.A.A.M.; Folmer, H.

    2007-01-01

    We consider the performance of small and medium sized enterprises in Dutch horticulture under different environmental policy regimes across time. We address the question whether technical performance differs under these alternative regulatory regimes to test Porter's hypothesis that stricter

  3. Biotechnology : A Dutch perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Apeldoorn, J.H.F.

    1981-01-01

    Biotechnology: a Dutch Perspective assesses the future potential of biotechnology in the Netherlands. It has been published in English because it is felt that the Dutch case could be of relevance to other industrialised nations. Although the report is aimed primarily at policy planners and decision

  4. Science in the service of colonial agro-industrialism: the case of cinchona cultivation in the Dutch and British East Indies, 1852-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roersch van der Hoogte, Arjo; Pieters, Toine

    2014-09-01

    The isolation of quinine from cinchona bark in 1820 opened new possibilities for the mass-production and consumption of a popular medicine that was suitable for the treatment of intermittent (malarial) fevers and other diseases. As the 19th century European empires expanded in Africa and Asia, control of tropical diseases such as malaria was seen as crucial. Consequently, quinine and cinchona became a pivotal tool of British, French, German and Dutch empire-builders. This comparative study shows how the interplay between science, industry and government resulted in different historical trajectories for cinchona and quinine in the Dutch and British Empires during the second half of the 19th century. We argue that in the Dutch case the vectors of assemblage that provided the institutional and physical framework for communication, exchange and control represent an early example of commodification of colonial science. Furthermore, both historical trajectories show how the employment of the laboratory as a new device materialised within the colonial context of agricultural and industrial production of raw materials (cinchona bark), semi-finished product (quinine sulphate) and plant-based medicines like quinine. Hence, illustrating the 19th century transition from 'colonial botany' and 'green imperialism' to what we conceptualise as 'colonial agro-industrialism'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A dynamic case definition is warranted for adequate notification in an extended epidemic setting: the Dutch Q fever outbreak 2007-2009 as exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Gutierrez, G; Wegdam-Blans, M C; ter Schegget, R; Korbeeck, J M; van Aken, R; Bijlmer, H A; Tjhie, J H; Koopmans, M P

    2013-10-10

    Q fever is a notifiable disease in the Netherlands:laboratories are obliged to notify possible cases to the Municipal Health Services. These services then try to reconfirm cases with additional clinical and epidemiological data and provide anonymised reports to the national case register of notifiable diseases. Since the start of the 2007–2009 Dutch Q fever outbreak,notification rules remained unchanged, despite new laboratory insights and altered epidemiology. In this study, we retrospectively analysed how these changes influenced the proportion of laboratory-defined acute Q fever cases (confirmed, probable and possible)that were included in the national case register, during(2009) and after the outbreak (2010 and 2011).The number of laboratory-defined cases notified to the Municipal Health Services was 377 in 2009, 96 in 2010 and 50 in 2011. Of these, 186 (49.3%) in 2009, 12(12.5%) in 2010 and 9 (18.0%) in 2011 were confirmed as acute infection by laboratory interpretation. The proportion of laboratory-defined acute Q fever cases that was reconfirmed by the Municipal Health Services and that were included in the national case register decreased from 90% in 2009, to 22% and 24% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. The decrease was observed in all categories of cases, including those considered to be confirmed by laboratory criteria. Continued use ofa pre-outbreak case definition led to over-reporting of cases to the Municipal Health Services in the post-epidemic years. Therefore we recommend dynamic laboratory notification rules, by reviewing case definitions periodically in an ongoing epidemic, as in the Dutch Q fever outbreak.

  6. Casing study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, P.

    2000-12-01

    An unorthodox method of casing drilling used by Tesco Corporation at a gas well in Wyoming to drill deeper using casings as drillpipe is discussed. The process involves either rotating the casing as drill string or using a downhole mud motor to rotate the bit. In this instance, the surface hole and the production hole were casing-drilled to a record 8,312 feet by rotating the casing. The 8 1/2-inch surface hole was drilled with 7-inch casing to 1,200 feet using a Tesco underreamer and a polycrystalline pilot bit; drilling and cementing was completed in 12 1/2 hours. The 6 1/4-inch production hole was drilled with 4 1/2-inch casing and the bottomhole assembly was retrieved after 191 hours rotating. This case was the first in which the entire well was casing-drilled from surface to TD. Penetration rate compared favorably with conventional methods: 12 1/2 hours for casing-drilling to 18.9 hours for conventional drilling, despite the fact that the casing-drilling technology is still in its infancy. It is suggested that casing-drilling has the potential to eliminate the need for the drillpipe entirely. If these expectations were to be realised, casing-drilling could be one of the most radical drilling changes in the history of the oil and gas industry. 1 photo.

  7. CASE STUDY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV infection has several oral manifestations, including oral candidiasis and oral hairy leucoplakia. Occasionally unusual presentations requiring rigorous investigations are seen, and in these cases the diagnosis sometimes remains a dilemma owing to limited investigation facilities.1-3 We present the case of a patient who.

  8. Technical efficiency under alternative environmental regulatory regimes: The case of Dutch horticulture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Vlist, Arno J.; Withagen, Cees; Folmer, Henk

    2007-01-01

    We consider the performance of small and medium sized enterprises in Dutch horticulture under different environmental policy regimes across time. We address the question whether technical performance differs under these alternative regulatory regimes to test Porter's hypothesis that stricter environmental regulation reduces technical inefficiency. For this purpose, we use a stochastic production frontier framework allowing for inclusion of policy variables to measure the effect of alternative environmental policy regimes on firms' performance. The main result is that stricter environmental policy regimes have indeed reduced technical inefficiencies in Dutch horticulture. The estimation results indicate amongst others that the 1997 agreement on energy, nutrient and pesticides use enhances technical efficiency. Firms under the strict environmental policy regime are found to be more technically efficient than those under a lax regime, thereby supporting the claims by Porter and Van der Linde (Porter, M., Van der Linde, C., 1995. Green and Competitive: Ending the stalemate. Harvard Business Review 73, pp. 120-137) concerning Dutch horticulture. (author)

  9. Service-oriented enterprise modelling and analysis: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacob, Maria Eugenia; Jonkers, H.; Lankhorst, M.M.; Steen, M.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    In order to validate the concepts and techniques for service-oriented enterprise architecture modelling, developed in the ArchiMate project (Lankhorst, et al., 2005), we have conducted a number of case studies. This paper describes one of these case studies, conducted at the Dutch Tax and Customs

  10. Food insecurity among Dutch food bank recipients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neter, Judith E; Dijkstra, S Coosje; Visser, Marjolein; Brouwer, Ingeborg A

    2014-05-16

    To determine the prevalence of (very) low food security among Dutch food bank recipients, and to identify potential demographic, lifestyle and nutrition-related factors associated with (very) low food security. 11 of 135 Dutch food banks were selected throughout the Netherlands. 251 Dutch food bank recipients participated in the study (93 men and 158 women). Inclusion criteria for participation were: (1) at least 18 years of age, (2) sufficiently fluent in Dutch to participate in oral and written interviews, (3) recipient of a Dutch food bank for at least 1 month and (4) collect own food parcel at the food bank. A single member per household was included. Level of food security. The prevalence of food insecurity was 72.9% (N=183), of which 40.4% (N=74) reported very low food security. Of the very low food secure participants, 56.8% (N=42) reported they were ever hungry but did not eat because they could not afford enough food in the previous 3 months. Adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that households without children were less likely to experience low food security (OR 0.39 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.88)) and men (OR 0.24 (95% CI 0.11 to 0.51)) were less likely to experience very low food security, while low-educated recipients (OR 5.05 (95% CI 1.37 to 18.61)) were more likely to experience very low food security. Furthermore, recipients with high satisfaction with overall food intake (OR 0.46 (95% CI 0.27 to 0.78)), high perceived healthiness of overall food intake (OR 0.34 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.62)) or high self-efficacy of eating healthy (OR 0.62 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.96)) were less likely to experience very low food security. Our study showed high prevalence rates of food insecurity among Dutch food bank recipients, and identified subgroups at increased risk of food insecurity. More research is urgently needed on the underlying determinants of food insecurity and the effectiveness of food assistance by food banks. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  11. The performance of Dutch photovoltaic inverters in areas with low grid voltage. A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Twisk, J.; Van der Borg, N.J.C.M.; Groeman, J.F.

    2000-08-01

    An important component of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems is the inverter. The inverter must be suitable for the expected characteristics of the input of the photovoltaic panels and for the expected characteristics of the output of the electricity network. The characteristics of the electric grid in potential markets for Dutch inverter manufacturers can differ from the characteristics of Dutch electric grids. A preliminary study has been carried out to determine the characteristics of relevant power distribution systems and the expected effects of those networks on PV-inverters. It is concluded that the following characteristics need further study: voltage level (nominal voltage and long-lasting deviations of that level); transient overvoltages, harmonic components in the voltage, and direct current component. 5 refs

  12. Adolescent alcohol intoxication in the dutch hospital Departments of Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, J.J. van; Lely, N. van der; Pereira, R.R.; Dalen, W.E. van

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to investigate the number and characteristics of adolescent alcohol intoxication cases in hospital Departments of Pediatrics. The study also analyzes drinking patterns and intoxication characteristics. Method: Data were collected using the Dutch Pediatric

  13. Project STARS (Studies on Trajectories of Adolescent Relationships and Sexuality) : A longitudinal, multidomain study on sexual development of Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitz, Ellen; van de Bongardt, Daphne; Baams, Laura; Doornwaard, Suzan; Dalenberg, Wieke; Dubas, Judith; van Aken, Marcel; Overbeek, Geertjan; ter Bogt, Tom; van der Eijnden, Regina; Vanwesenbeeck, Ine; Kunnen, Saskia; Timmerman, Greetje; van Geert, Paul; Dekovic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    This study gives an overview of Project STARS (Studies on Trajectories of Adolescent Relationships and Sexuality), a four-wave longitudinal study of 1297 Dutch adolescents. First, the sample, measures and four sub-projects are described. Second, hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to

  14. Cohort Profile of The GOALS Study: A Large-scale Research of Physical Activity in Dutch Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Renate; Van Dijk, Martin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The GOALS study (Grootschalig Onderzoek naar Activiteiten van Limburgse Scholieren [Large-scale Research of Activities in Dutch Students]) was set up to investigate possible associations between different forms of physical activity and inactivity with cognitive performance, academic achievement and

  15. Restrictions of frequent frames as cues to categories: the case of Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, M.A.; Chan, H.; Kapia, E.; Jacob, H.

    2008-01-01

    Why Dutch 12-month-old infants do not use frequent frames in early categorization Mintz (2003) proposes that very local distributional contexts of words in the input-so-called 'frequent frames'-function as reliable cues for categories corresponding to the adult verb and noun. He shows that

  16. The participation of children in Dutch child protection investigations: A case file analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Helen; Grietens, Hans; López López, Mónica; Knorth, Erik J.; Witte, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives - In scientific research there is growing attention for the importance of children’s participation in decision-making in the child protection system (CPS). In the Dutch Youth Act (2015), the importance of participation of children is highlighted as well. However, research in different

  17. Why might regional vaccinology networks fail? The case of the Dutch-Nordic Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.; Blume, S.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed an attempt to develop and clinically test a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for the developing world, undertaken by public health institutions from the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland: the Dutch Nordic Consortium (DNC), between 1990 and 2000. Our review shows that the

  18. Politicians, output-budgets and performance evaluation : case research in three Dutch municipalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogt, H.J. ter

    2000-01-01

    Since the mid-eighties many Dutch municipalities have divided their organizations into decentralized units. In addition, most municipalities have introduced management instruments derived from the private sector, and have been paying more attention to the outputs of the organizations. Nowadays, the

  19. Measuring innovation in a 'low-tech' service industry: the case of the Dutch hospitality industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, P.; Gallouj, F.; Segers, J.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a survey among 613 firms in the Dutch hospitality industry adopting a demarcation perspective. The paper illustrates that innovation in this service industry is much higher and more varied than regularly reported. It further indicates that innovation activities

  20. Putting advertising and marketing communications strategy into practice: Case of dutch companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mosmans (Andy); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWillem Verbeke and Andy Mosmans have undertaken a large survey of Dutch companies focusing on how effectively advertising and marketing communications compaigns are implemented. Their interesting results show, among other things, the extensive involvement of top management in advertising

  1. Domestic Interiors, Decorative Objects and their Multiple Temporalities : The Case of the Dutch Modernist Novel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    In reaction to Marvin Trachtenberg’s ideas about the atemporal and chronicidal nature of modernist architecture (2010), this article charts the temporal heterogeneity characteristic of the domestic interior as it is represented in the Dutch modernist novel in the interwar period. Although, on par

  2. case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elton

    particularly in patients who commence ART with low CD4 counts and established opportunistic infections. IRIS results from a pathological inflammatory response to pre-existing infective, host or other antigens, alive or dead, causing clinical deterioration in HIV-infected patients after initiating ART.1 A case definition for IRIS ...

  3. CASE STUDY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-09-01

    Sep 1, 2010 ... of the two diseases surgery can be successful, recovery can be similar to that .... lymphocytes predominated in 68% of cases, and that there was an .... using ferritin is the fact that it acts as an acute-phase reactant and will be ...

  4. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in recalls from the Dutch breast cancer screening program : validation of results in a large multireader, multicase study

    OpenAIRE

    Lalji, U C; Houben, I P L; Prevos, R; Gommers, S; van Goethem, M; Vanwetswinkel, S; Pijnappel, R; Steeman, R; Frotscher, C; Mok, W; Nelemans, P; Smidt, M L; Beets-Tan, R G; Wildberger, J E; Lobbes, M B I

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a promising problem-solving tool in women referred from a breast cancer screening program. We aimed to study the validity of preliminary results of CESM using a larger panel of radiologists with different levels of CESM experience. METHODS: All women referred from the Dutch breast cancer screening program were eligible for CESM. 199 consecutive cases were viewed by ten radiologists. Four had extensive CESM experience, three had no C...

  5. Using patient experiences on Dutch social media to supervise health care services: exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Belt, Tom H; Engelen, Lucien J L P G; Verhoef, Lise M; van der Weide, Marian J A; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Kool, Rudolf B

    2015-01-15

    Social media has become mainstream and a growing number of people use it to share health care-related experiences, for example on health care rating sites. These users' experiences and ratings on social media seem to be associated with quality of care. Therefore, information shared by citizens on social media could be of additional value for supervising the quality and safety of health care services by regulatory bodies, thereby stimulating participation by consumers. The objective of the study was to identify the added value of social media for two types of supervision by the Dutch Healthcare Inspectorate (DHI), which is the regulatory body charged with supervising the quality and safety of health care services in the Netherlands. These were (1) supervision in response to incidents reported by individuals, and (2) risk-based supervision. We performed an exploratory study in cooperation with the DHI and searched different social media sources such as Twitter, Facebook, and healthcare rating sites to find additional information for these incidents and topics, from five different sectors. Supervision experts determined the added value for each individual result found, making use of pre-developed scales. Searches in social media resulted in relevant information for six of 40 incidents studied and provided relevant additional information in 72 of 116 cases in risk-based supervision of long-term elderly care. The results showed that social media could be used to include the patient's perspective in supervision. However, it appeared that the rating site ZorgkaartNederland was the only source that provided information that was of additional value for the DHI, while other sources such as forums and social networks like Twitter and Facebook did not result in additional information. This information could be of importance for health care inspectorates, particularly for its enforcement by risk-based supervision in care of the elderly. Further research is needed to determine

  6. The Sisyphus paradox of cutting red tape and managing public risk
    The Dutch case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim J.M. Voermans

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cutting red tape has been topical in Dutch debates on legislative politics ever since the beginning of the 1990s, but has gained impetus – since 2003 – in the political arena as the combined consequence of the regulatory reform policies of the Balkenende II-IV administrations (2003-2010 to innovate the Dutch economy and efforts to meet the European Lisbon Agenda. The general aim of these policies is to simplify the regulatory environment by cutting red tape and making law more practicable, thus fostering economic growth. The new elements of these policies – compared to the recent pre-2000 past - are the focus on a precise definition of the regulatory administrative burden, the detailed quantification thereof, and the prefixed reduction targets. With these elements the Dutch reform policy aligns with – OECD-inspired – initiatives throughout Europe aiming at the reduction of red tape caused by legislation. Arguably these policies have met with some success: a 20% red tape reduction was achieved by the end of 2007. Encouraged by this success the present Balkenende administration has raised the stakes by fixing a new, additional, reduction target of 25%. This contribution will focus on critical success factors for the Dutch reform policies and the overall effects of these policies for legislation, its implementation and enforcement. It does so from a predominantly legal point of view. The article questions how Dutch success rates of better regulation are affected by tough political choices (is better regulation instrumental to tough political choices, or are the best results yielded by avoiding political choices?. A second critical success factor discussed is the question whether the law of diminishing returns will apply to the most recent episode of Dutch reform policies The contribution concludes with the hypothesis of the Sisyphus paradox, according to which risk management (Better Regulation Commission 2006 and legal protection, on the

  7. Application of portfolio analysis to the Dutch generating mix. Reference case and two renewables cases, year 2030, SE and GE scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, J.C.; Beurskens, L.W.M.; Van Tilburg, X.

    2006-02-01

    This report presents results of an application of Markowitz Portfolio Theory (MPT) to the future portfolio of electricity generating technologies in the Netherlands in year 2030. Projections are made based on two specific scenarios constructed by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB), i.e. 'Strong Europe (SE)' and 'Global Economy (GE)'. This study zooms in on the electricity cost risk dimension of the Dutch portfolio of generating technologies. Major results of this study are: (a) In both scenarios, the base variant is not very efficient. Graphical analysis suggests that diversification may yield up to 20% risk reduction at no extra cost; (b) Promotion of renewable energy can greatly decrease the portfolio risk. Defining mixes without renewables results in significantly riskier mixes with relatively small impact on portfolio costs; (c) Because of its relative low risk and high potential, large-scale implementation of offshore wind can reduce cost risk of the Dutch generating portfolio while only in the GE scenario a (small) upward effect on the projected Dutch electricity cost in year 2030 is foreseen. In a SE world large-scale implementation of offshore wind is projected to have a downward effect on Dutch electricity prices by the year 2030

  8. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  9. Adolescent alcohol intoxication in the dutch hospital departments of pediatrics: A 2-year comparison study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, J.J. van; Lely, N. van der; Bouthoorn, S.H.; Dalen, W.E. van; Pereira, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the prevalence of, and the circumstances leading to, adolescent alcohol intoxication admissions in Dutch hospital departments of pediatrics. Methods: Data were collected in 2007 and 2008, using the Dutch Pediatric Surveillance System, in which pediatricians received

  10. The Dutch Bipolar Offspring Study : 12-Year Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, Esther; Nolen, Willem A.; Reichart, Catrien G.; Wals, Marjolein; Hillegers, Manon N. J.

    Objective: Offspring of bipolar parents have a genetically increased risk of developing mood disorders. In a longitudinal study, the authors followed a bipolar offspring cohort from adolescence into adulthood to determine the onset, prevalence, and early course of mood disorders and other

  11. Flow and performance: a study among talented Dutch soccer players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.B.; Oerlemans, Wido; Demerouti, E.; Bruins Slot, B.; Karamat Ali, D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study examines the relationship between environmental resources (autonomy,social support from the coach, and performance feedback), flow, and performance among young talented soccer players. Design: The design was non-experimental and involved both self- and coach-rated

  12. Dutch transmural nurse clinics for chronic patients: a descriptive study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, D.; Francke, A.L.; Kerkstra, A.; Huyer Abu-Saad, H.

    2000-01-01

    'Transmural care' can be defined as patient-tailored care provided on the basis of close collaboration and joint responsibility between hospitals and home care organizations. One form of transmural care is transmural nurse clinics for chronically ill. This study describes 62 transmural nurse clinics

  13. Myasthenia gravis on the Dutch antilles : an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtsema, H; Mourik, J; Rico, RE; Falconi, [No Value; Kuks, JBM; Oosterhuis, HJGH

    2000-01-01

    We carried out an epidemiological study on thr prevalence and annual incidence of myasthenia gravis on tropical islands Curacao and Aruba in the period 1980 1995. Twenty-one patients (seven men and 14 women) were identified. The point prevalence increased from 29 per million in 1980 to about 70 per

  14. Knowledge management and innovation : An empirical study of Dutch SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlaner, L.M.; Tan, S.; Zhou, H.

    2007-01-01

    Western economies are increasingly viewed as knowledge-driven (Audretch and Thurik, 2001, 2004). Knowledge plays a crucial role in determining firm innovation capability and in enhancing working life quality of knowledge workers (Corso, Martini, Pelligrini, and Paolucci, 2001). Previous studies show

  15. The role of human intrusion in the dutch safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prij, J.; Weers, A.W.v.; Glasbergen, P.; Slot, A.F.M.

    1989-01-01

    In the Netherlands the OPLA research program in which a large number of possible disposal concepts for radioactive waste is investigated has been carried out recently. The disposal concepts concern three different waste strategies, two disposal techiques and three different types of salt formations. In the OPLA program the post-closure safety of the disposal concepts has been investigated. The paper reviews the role of the human intrusion in this safety study. The hydrological consequences of human activities in the underground are discussed and it has been demonstrated that these effects could be taken into account during the groundwater transport calculations. Four different scenario's for human intrusion in the repository have been studied to obtain an indication of the radiological effects. The results show that extremely high doses may result if, after several hundred years, human beings come into direct contact with highly active waste. For the final assessment the probability that the doses will be received should be calculated. This should be done in a subsequent research

  16. Inequity in contraceptive care between refugees and other migrant women?: a retrospective study in Dutch general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, Liselotte A D; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria E T C

    2018-01-17

    Female refugees are at high risk of reproductive health problems including unmet contraceptive needs. In the Netherlands, the general practitioner (GP) is the main entrance to the healthcare system and plays a vital role in the prescription of contraceptives. Little is known about contraceptive care in female refugees in primary care. To get insight into GP care related to contraception in refugees and other migrants compared with native Dutch women. A retrospective descriptive study of patient records of refugees, other migrants and native Dutch women was carried out in five general practices in the Netherlands. The prevalence of discussions about contraception and prescriptions of contraceptives over the past 6 years was compared in women of reproductive age (15-49 years). In total, 104 refugees, 58 other migrants and 162 native Dutch women were included. GPs in our study (2 male, 3 female) discussed contraceptives significantly less often with refugees (51%) and other migrants (66%) than with native Dutch women (84%; P Dutch women (79%; P Dutch women (4% respectively 4%). Contraceptives were significantly less often discussed with and prescribed to refugees and other migrant women compared with native Dutch women. More research is needed to elicit the reproductive health needs and preferences of migrant women regarding GP's care and experiences in discussing these issues. Such insights are vital in order to provide equitable reproductive healthcare to every woman regardless of her background. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Design of a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT on the effectiveness of a Dutch patient advocacy case management intervention among severely disabled Multiple Sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annema Coby

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Case management has been suggested as an innovative strategy that facilitates the improvement of a patient's quality of life, reduction of hospital length of stay, optimization of self-care and improvement of satisfaction of patients and professionals involved. However, there is little evidence about the effectiveness of the patient advocacy case management model in clinical practice. Therefore, the objective of our study was to examine the effects of the Dutch patient advocacy case management model for severely disabled Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients and their caregivers compared to usual care. Methods/design In this randomized controlled trial the effectiveness of casemanagement on quality of life of patients and their caregivers, quality of care, service use and economic aspects were evaluated. The primary outcomes of this study were quality of life of MS-patients and caregiver burden of caregivers. Furthermore, we examined quality of life of caregivers, quality of care, service use and costs. Discussion This is a unique trial in which we examined the effectiveness of case management from a broad perspective. We meticulously prepared this study and applied important features and created important conditions for both intervention and research protocol to increase the likelihood of finding evidence for the effectiveness of patient advocacy case management. Concerning the intervention we anticipated to five important conditions: 1 the contrast between the case management intervention compared to the usual care seems to be large enough to detect intervention effects; 2 we included patients with complex care situations and/or were at risk for critical situations; 3 the case managers were familiar with disease specific health-problems and a broad spectrum of solutions; 4 case managers were competent and authorized to perform a medical neurological examination and worked closely with neurologists specialized in MS; and 5 the

  18. Cross-Cultural Study of Information Processing Biases in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Comparison of Dutch and UK Chronic Fatigue Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alicia M; Hirsch, Colette R; Nikolaus, Stephanie; Chalder, Trudie; Knoop, Hans; Moss-Morris, Rona

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to replicate a UK study, with a Dutch sample to explore whether attention and interpretation biases and general attentional control deficits in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are similar across populations and cultures. Thirty eight Dutch CFS participants were compared to 52 CFS and 51 healthy participants recruited from the UK. Participants completed self-report measures of symptoms, functioning, and mood, as well as three experimental tasks (i) visual-probe task measuring attentional bias to illness (somatic symptoms and disability) versus neutral words, (ii) interpretive bias task measuring positive versus somatic interpretations of ambiguous information, and (iii) the Attention Network Test measuring general attentional control. Compared to controls, Dutch and UK participants with CFS showed a significant attentional bias for illness-related words and were significantly more likely to interpret ambiguous information in a somatic way. These effects were not moderated by attentional control. There were no significant differences between the Dutch and UK CFS groups on attentional bias, interpretation bias, or attentional control scores. This study replicated the main findings of the UK study, with a Dutch CFS population, indicating that across these two cultures, people with CFS demonstrate biases in how somatic information is attended to and interpreted. These illness-specific biases appear to be unrelated to general attentional control deficits.

  19. Update of the Dutch manual for costing studies in health care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim A Kanters

    Full Text Available Dutch health economic guidelines include a costing manual, which describes preferred research methodology for costing studies and reference prices to ensure high quality studies and comparability between study outcomes. This paper describes the most important revisions of the costing manual compared to the previous version.An online survey was sent out to potential users of the costing manual to identify topics for improvement. The costing manual was aligned with contemporary health economic guidelines. All methodology sections and parameter values needed for costing studies, particularly reference prices, were updated. An expert panel of health economists was consulted several times during the review process. The revised manual was reviewed by two members of the expert panel and by reviewers of the Dutch Health Care Institute.The majority of survey respondents was satisfied with content and usability of the existing costing manual. Respondents recommended updating reference prices and adding some particular commonly needed reference prices. Costs categories were adjusted to the international standard: 1 costs within the health care sector; 2 patient and family costs; and 3 costs in other sectors. Reference prices were updated to reflect 2014 values. The methodology chapter was rewritten to match the requirements of the costing manual and preferences of the users. Reference prices for nursing days of specific wards, for diagnostic procedures and nurse practitioners were added.The usability of the costing manual was increased and parameter values were updated. The costing manual became integrated in the new health economic guidelines.

  20. Hepatitis B in Moroccan-Dutch: a quantitative study into determinants of screening participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdiui, Nora; Stein, Mart L; Timen, Aura; Timmermans, Danielle; Wong, Albert; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria E T C; van Steenbergen, Jim E

    2018-03-29

    In November 2016, the Dutch Health Council recommended hepatitis B (HBV) screening for first-generation immigrants from HBV endemic countries. However, these communities show relatively low attendance rates for screening programmes, and our knowledge on their participation behaviour is limited. We identified determinants associated with the intention to request an HBV screening test in first-generation Moroccan-Dutch immigrants. We also investigated the influence of non-refundable costs for HBV screening on their intention. Offline and online questionnaires were distributed among first- and second/third-generation Moroccan-Dutch immigrants using respondent-driven sampling. Random forest analyses were conducted to determine which determinants had the greatest impact on (1) the intention to request an HBV screening test on one's own initiative, and (2) the intention to participate in non-refundable HBV screening at €70,-. Of the 379 Moroccan-Dutch respondents, 49.3% intended to request a test on their own initiative, and 44.1% were willing to attend non-refundable screening for €70,-. Clarity regarding infection status, not having symptoms, fatalism, perceived self-efficacy, and perceived risk of having HBV were the strongest predictors to request a test. Shame and stigma, fatalism, perceived burden of screening participation, and social influence of Islamic religious leaders had the greatest predictive value for not intending to participate in screening at €70,- non-refundable costs. Perceived severity and possible health benefit were facilitators for this intention measure. These predictions were satisfyingly accurate, as the random forest method retrieved area under the curve scores of 0.72 for intention to request a test and 0.67 for intention to participate in screening at €70,- non-refundable costs. By the use of respondent-driven sampling, we succeeded in studying screening behaviour among a hard-to-reach minority population. Despite the limitations

  1. School food policy at Dutch primary schools: room for improvement? Cross-sectional findings from the INPACT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ansem, Wilke Jc; Schrijvers, Carola Tm; Rodenburg, Gerda; Schuit, Albertine J; van de Mheen, Dike

    2013-04-12

    Schools can play an important role in the prevention of obesity, e.g. by providing an environment that stimulates healthy eating habits and by developing a food policy to provide such an environment. The effectiveness of a school food policy is affected by the content of the policy, its implementation and its support by parents, teachers and principals. The aim of this study is to detect opportunities to improve the school food policy and/or implementation at Dutch primary schools. Therefore, this study explores the school food policy and investigates schools' (teachers and principals) and parents' opinion on the school food policy. Data on the schools' perspective of the food policy was collected from principals and teachers by means of semi-structured interviews. In total 74 principals and 72 teachers from 83 Dutch primary schools were interviewed. Data on parental perceptions about the school food policy were based on a cross-sectional survey among 1,429 parents from the same schools. Most principals (87.1%) reported that their school had a written food policy; however in most cases the rules were not clearly defined. Most of the principals (87.8%) believed that their school paid sufficient attention to nutrition and health. Teachers and principals felt that parents were primarily responsible to encourage healthy eating habits among children, while 49.8% of the parents believed that it is also a responsibility of the school to foster healthy eating habits among children. Most parents reported that they appreciated the school food policy and comply with the food rules. Parents' opinion on the enforcement of the school food policy varied: 28.1% believed that the school should enforce the policy more strongly, 32.1% was satisfied, and 39.8% had no opinion on this topic. Dutch primary schools could play a more important role in fostering healthy eating habits among children. The school food policy could be improved by clearly formulating food rules, simplifying

  2. CASE STUDY CRITIQUE; UPPER CLINCH CASE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case study critique: Upper Clinch case study (from Research on Methods for Integrating Ecological Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment: A Trade-off Weighted Index Approach to Integrating Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment). This critique answers the questions: 1) does ...

  3. A Dutch study of the effects of primary nursing on job characteristics and organizational processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumans, N P; Landeweerd, J A

    1996-07-01

    In an 850-bed Dutch hospital a study was carried out to evaluate the effects of the implementation of a Dutch form of primary nursing on five job characteristics (viz. autonomy, responsibility, feedback/clarity, complexity/difficulty and job demands) and on the communication and power processes in the organization of the nursing unit. The study consisted of three measuring moments: one pre-intervention (t1, March 1992) and two post-intervention moments (t2, November 1992 & t3, May 1993). Primary nursing was introduced in the two experimental units (the experimental group) after t1. No changes were made to the control group. After t2, this quasi-experimental design changed, because primary nursing was also implemented in the three original control units (the control group) after this moment. The research variables were measured by means of questionnaires. No significant effects were found for the five job characteristics. Only the improvement in the communication with the team head and the decrease in the influence of physicians on patient care in the experimental group and the improved communication with physicians in the control group were in line with expectations. Changes in the amount of influence of different groups on patient care were inconsistent with what had been expected: according to the nurses the influence of the nursing management increased, whereas the influence of the nurses decreased and the influence of the patients did not change. In other words, the shift of power was not in the expected direction.

  4. Lesjes van de Nederlanders: Little Lessons from the Dutch to Promote Educational Quality. AIR 1995 Annual Forum Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Barbara H.

    This study explored quality assessment and accountability in Dutch university education using a case study approach. The Dutch national system of quality assurance is described, and developments since the mid-1980s are traced. The university case studies illustrate models which are being employed to implement the quality assurance system including…

  5. The Dutch 'Focus on Strength' intervention study protocol: programme design and production, implementation and evaluation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hoor, G A; Kok, G; Rutten, G M; Ruiter, R A C; Kremers, S P J; Schols, A M J W; Plasqui, G

    2016-06-10

    Overweight youngsters are better in absolute strength exercises than their normal-weight counterparts; a physiological phenomenon with promising psychological impact. In this paper we describe the study protocol of the Dutch, school-based program 'Focus on Strength' that aims to improve body composition of 11-13 year old students, and with that to ultimately improve their quality of life. The development of this intervention is based on the Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol, which starts from a needs assessment, uses theory and empirical research to develop a detailed intervention plan, and anticipates program implementation and evaluation. This novel intervention targets first year students in preparatory secondary vocational education (11-13 years of age). Teachers are the program implementers. One part of the intervention involves a 30 % increase of strength exercises in the physical education lessons. The other part is based on Motivational Interviewing, promoting autonomous motivation of students to become more physically active outside school. Performance and change objectives are described for both teachers and students. The effectiveness of the intervention will be tested in a Randomized Controlled Trial in 9 Dutch high schools. Intervention Mapping is a useful framework for program planning a school-based program to improve body composition and motivation to exercise in 11-13 year old adolescents by a "Focus on Strength". NTR5676 , registered 8 February 2016 (retrospectively registered).

  6. The Vicious Cycle of Stigma and Disclosure in "Self-Management": A Study Among the Dutch HIV Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Daniel H; Koppen, Luca; Lopez, Adolfo Mejia; Foppen, Reina

    2016-12-01

    Though HIV has become a chronic disease, HIV-related stigma has remained. This article reports on a study that asked how Dutch people living with HIV-AIDS (PLWHA) experienced stigmatization and devised self-management strategies. We used qualitative findings from a survey questionnaire conducted among 468 Dutch HIV-positive people (3% of the population), using a stratified research sample. Findings show how respondents experience relatively high public (30%), self- (26%) and structural (15%) stigma. At the same time, results show the importance of selective disclosure as a self-management strategy. About half the respondents disclose selectively, while 16% does not disclose at all. We conclude that many Dutch PLHWA remain caught up in a vicious cycle of stigma and nondisclosure. To break the cycle, respondents point at the importance of stigma reduction campaigns using actual PLWHA. We highlight the importance of workplace programs and training of medical professionals.

  7. [Ethnic differences in forensic psychiatry: an exploratory study at a Dutch forensic psychiatric centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Stoep, T

    Compared to the percentage of ethnic minorities in the general population, ethnic minorities are overrepresented in forensic psychiatry. If these minorities are to be treated successfully, we need to know more about this group. So far, however, little is known about the differences between mental disorders and types of offences associated with patients of non-Dutch descent and those associated with patients of Dutch descent. AIM: To take the first steps to obtain the information we need in order to provide customised care for patients of non-Dutch descent. METHOD: It proved possible to identify differences between patients of Dutch and non-Dutch descent with regard to treatment, diagnosis and offences committed within a group of patients who were admitted to the forensic psychiatric centre Oostvaarderskliniek during the period 2001 - 2014. RESULTS: The treatment of patients of non-Dutch descent lasted longer than the treatment of patients of Dutch descent (8.5 year versus 6.6 year). Furthermore, patients from ethnic minority groups were diagnosed more often with schizophrenia (49.1% versus 21.4%), but less often with pervasive developmental disorders or sexual disorders. Patients of non-Dutch descent were more often convicted for sexual crimes where the victim was aged 16 years or older, whereas patients of Dutch descent were convicted of sexual crimes where the victim was under 16. CONCLUSION: There are differences between patients of Dutch and non-Dutch descent with regard to treatment duration, diagnosis and offences they commit. Future research needs to investigate whether these results are representative for the entire field of forensic psychiatry and to discover the reasons for these differences.

  8. Performance management in Dutch central government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Nico P.; de Kruijf, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    This article investigates how and to what extent performance indicators in Dutch central government are actually embedded in performance management. In a case study encompassing 12 government organizations, the relevance of the indicators presented is analysed in three stages: (1) with respect to

  9. Infrastructure protection in the Dutch financial sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oers, M.H.M.; Strous, L.; Berndsen, R.J.; Butts, J.; Shenoi, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of critical infrastructure protection in the Dutch financial sector. The organizational structures are examined to discern the roles and functions that facilitate public-private cooperation. An assessment of the organizational structures is provided along with a

  10. Impact of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing by Dutch general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meer, Saskia; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Hirdes, Willem H.; Steffens, Martijn G.; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; Nijman, Rien M.; Blanker, Marco H.

    Objective To determine the impact of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) publication in 2009 on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level testing by Dutch general practitioners (GPs) in men aged 40 years. Materials and Methods Retrospective study with a Dutch insurance

  11. Testing a Dutch web-based tailored lifestyle programme among adults: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Osch Liesbeth ADM

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking, high alcohol consumption, unhealthy eating habits and physical inactivity often lead to (chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Tailored online interventions have been proven to be effective in changing health behaviours. The aim of this study is to test and compare the effectiveness of two different tailoring strategies for changing lifestyle compared to a control group using a multiple health behaviour web-based approach. Methods In our Internet-based tailored programme, the five lifestyle behaviours of smoking, alcohol intake, fruit consumption, vegetable consumption, and physical activity are addressed. This randomized controlled trial, conducted among Dutch adults, includes two experimental groups (i.e., a sequential behaviour tailoring condition and a simultaneous behaviour tailoring condition and a control group. People in the sequential behaviour tailoring condition obtain feedback on whether their lifestyle behaviours meet the Dutch recommendations. Using a step-by-step approach, they are stimulated to continue with a computer tailored module to change only one unhealthy behaviour first. In the course of the study, they can proceed to change a second behaviour. People in the simultaneous behaviour tailoring condition receive computer tailored feedback about all their unhealthy behaviours during their first visit as a stimulation to change all unhealthy behaviours. The experimental groups can re-visit the website and can then receive ipsative feedback (i.e., current scores are compared to previous scores in order to give feedback about potential changes. The (difference in effectiveness of the different versions of the programme will be tested and compared to a control group, in which respondents only receive a short health risk appraisal. Programme evaluations will assess satisfaction with and appreciation and personal relevance of the intervention among the respondents. Finally

  12. Familial occurrence of epilepsy in children with newly diagnosed multiple seizures : Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Geerts, AT; Arts, WFM; van Donselaar, CA; Peters, A.C. Boudewyn; Stroink, H; Brouwer, OF

    Purpose: To study the familial occurrence of epilepsy in children with newly diagnosed multiple unprovoked seizures. Methods: Between August 1988 and September 1992, 462 children with two or more unprovoked seizures were included in the prospective Dutch Study of Epilepsy in Childhood. Seizures and

  13. Adherence to the 2015 Dutch dietary guidelines and risk of non-communicable diseases and mortality in the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G. Voortman (Trudy); J.C. Kiefte-de Jong (Jessica); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); L. Lahousse (Lies); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.D. Schoufour (Josje)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWe aimed to evaluate the criterion validity of the 2015 food-based Dutch dietary guidelines, which were formulated based on evidence on the relation between diet and major chronic diseases. We studied 9701 participants of the Rotterdam Study, a population-based prospective cohort in

  14. The importance of gender-stratified antibiotic resistance surveillance of unselected uropathogens: a Dutch nationwide extramural surveillance study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, C.D.J. den; Penders, J.; Donker, G.A.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have been performed on urinary tract infections (UTIs) in men. In the present study, general practitioners (n = 42) from the Dutch Sentinel General Practice Network collected urinary samples from 560 male patients (≥18 years) suspected of UTI and recorded prescribed antibiotic treatment.

  15. Coping styles relate to health and work environment of Norwegian and Dutch hospital nurses : A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, Jolanda A. H.; Roelen, Corne A. M.; Groothoff, Johan W.; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Mageroy, Nils; Pallesen, Stale; Bjorvatn, Bjorn; Moen, Bente E.

    2012-01-01

    Nurses exposed to high nursing stress report no health complaints as long as they have high coping abilities. The purpose of this study was to investigate coping styles in relation to the health status and work environment of Norwegian and Dutch hospital nurses. This comparative study included a

  16. Strategies to Promote Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Applied by Dutch HIV Nurse Consultants : A Descriptive Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, Sigrid C. J. M.; Grypdonck, Mieke H. F.; Dijkstra, Boukje M.; Hazelzet, Esther E. B.; Fledderus, Bert; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes strategies used by Dutch HIV nurse consultants to promote adherence to anti retroviral therapy (ART) and the assumptions on which these strategies were based. The study used a descriptive qualitative design with individual and focus group interviews. Individual semi-structured

  17. Food insecurity among Dutch food bank recipients: a cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neter, J.E.; Dijkstra, S.C.; Visser, M.; Brouwer, I.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of (very) low food security among Dutch food bank recipients, and to identify potential demographic, lifestyle and nutrition-related factors associated with (very) low food security. Setting: 11 of 135 Dutch food banks were selected throughout the Netherlands.

  18. Residual circulation and freshwater transport in the Dutch Wadden Sea: a numerical modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duran-Matute, M.; Gerkema, T.; de Boer, G.J.; Nauw, J.; Grawe, U.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch Wadden Sea is a region of intertidal flats located between the chain of Wadden Islands and the Dutch mainland. We present numerical model results on the tidal prisms and residual flows through the tidal inlets and across one of the main watersheds. The model also provides insight into the

  19. Speaking one’s second language under time pressure : An ERP study on verbal self-monitoring in German-Dutch bilinguals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiller, N.O.

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses how verbal self-monitoring and the Error-Related Negativity (ERN) are affected by time pressure when a task is performed in a second language as opposed to performance in the native language. German–Dutch bilinguals were required to perform a phoneme-monitoring task in Dutch

  20. The Dutch East India Company's tea trade with China, 1757-1781

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yong

    2006-01-01

    This case study of the tea trade of the Dutch East India Company with China deals with its most profitable phase, when a direct shipping link was established between Canton and the Dutch Republic in the second half of the eighteenth century. It focuses on the questions why and how the tea trade was

  1. Determinants of HPV vaccination intentions among Dutch girls and their mothers: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Keulen Hilde M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dutch government recently added universal Human Papilloma Virus (HPV vaccination for 12-year-old girls to the existing national immunization program. The participation rate for the initial catch-up campaign for girls aged 13 to 16 years in 2009 was lower (47% than expected (70%. To inform future HPV information campaigns, this paper examines the social and psychological determinants of the HPV vaccination intentions of girls aged 13 to 16 years and their mothers who were targeted by the Dutch catch-up campaign of 2009. Methods A random sample of girls and their mothers was chosen from the Dutch vaccination register and received a letter inviting them to participate (n = 5,998 mothers and daughters. In addition, a random sample was recruited via an online panel by a marketing research company (n = 650 mothers; n = 350 daughters. Both groups were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire with questions on social demographic characteristics, social-psychological factors and HPV vaccination intention. Backward linear regression analyses were conducted to examine which social-psychological factors were most dominantly associated with vaccination intention. Results Data from 952 mothers (14% and 642 daughters (10% were available for the intended analyses. The contribution of social demographic variables to the explained variance of HPV vaccination intention was small but significant for mothers (ΔR2 = .01; p = .007, but not significant for daughters (ΔR2 = .02; p = .17 after controlling for HPV vaccination uptake and the sample. In addition, social-psychological determinants largely contributed to the explained variance of HPV vaccination intention of mothers (ΔR2 = .35; p 2 = .34; p Conclusions Because of the large contribution of social-psychological variables to the explained variance of HPV vaccination intentions among the mothers and daughters, future communication strategies targeting HPV vaccination uptake should

  2. Determinants of HPV vaccination intentions among Dutch girls and their mothers: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Dutch government recently added universal Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination for 12-year-old girls to the existing national immunization program. The participation rate for the initial catch-up campaign for girls aged 13 to 16 years in 2009 was lower (47%) than expected (70%). To inform future HPV information campaigns, this paper examines the social and psychological determinants of the HPV vaccination intentions of girls aged 13 to 16 years and their mothers who were targeted by the Dutch catch-up campaign of 2009. Methods A random sample of girls and their mothers was chosen from the Dutch vaccination register and received a letter inviting them to participate (n = 5,998 mothers and daughters). In addition, a random sample was recruited via an online panel by a marketing research company (n = 650 mothers; n = 350 daughters). Both groups were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire with questions on social demographic characteristics, social-psychological factors and HPV vaccination intention. Backward linear regression analyses were conducted to examine which social-psychological factors were most dominantly associated with vaccination intention. Results Data from 952 mothers (14%) and 642 daughters (10%) were available for the intended analyses. The contribution of social demographic variables to the explained variance of HPV vaccination intention was small but significant for mothers (ΔR2 = .01; p = .007), but not significant for daughters (ΔR2 = .02; p = .17) after controlling for HPV vaccination uptake and the sample. In addition, social-psychological determinants largely contributed to the explained variance of HPV vaccination intention of mothers (ΔR2 = .35; p vaccination intentions. Conclusions Because of the large contribution of social-psychological variables to the explained variance of HPV vaccination intentions among the mothers and daughters, future communication strategies targeting HPV vaccination uptake should address

  3. How Ghanaian, African-Surinamese and Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Haafkens, Joke A.; Agyemang, Charles; Schuster, John S.; Willems, Dick L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare how Ghanaian, African-Surinamese (Surinamese), and White-Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: Qualitative study was conducted using detailed interviews with a purposive sample of 46 hypertensive

  4. Palliative sedation in Dutch general practice from 2005 to 2011: a dynamic cohort study of trends and reasons.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Slotman, F.G.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Francke, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the quantity and reasons for use of palliative sedation in general practice. Aim: To gain more insight into the trends of and reasons for palliative sedation in Dutch general practice. Design and setting: Dynamic cohort study using registrations and questionnaire

  5. Palliative sedation in Dutch general practice from 2005 to 2011: a dynamic cohort study of trends and reasons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Slotman, F.G.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Francke, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the quantity and reasons for use of palliative sedation in general practice. Aim: To gain more insight into the trends of and reasons for palliative sedation in Dutch general practice. Design and setting: Dynamic cohort study using registrations and questionnaire

  6. Socio-cultural factors and school engagement : A study among Turkish, Moroccan, Assyrian and native Dutch youth in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, I.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the impact of socio-cultural factors on school engagement of minority students in Dutch secondary schools. This question was raised because studies that focus on the impact of structural or institutional factors were often left with an 'ethnic residual'. This ethnic

  7. Associations between company at dinner and daily diet quality in Dutch men and women from the NQplus study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, van L.; Geelen, M.M.E.E.; Hooft Van Huysduynen, E.J.C.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Veer, van 't P.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Consuming the evening meal in the company of others has been associated with overall diet quality. Nevertheless, studies on the association between type of company at dinner and diet quality in adults are scarce.
    SUBJECTS/METHODS: Dutch men (n = 895) and women (n = 845)

  8. The Vicious Cycle of Stigma and Disclosure in “Self-Management” : A Study among the Dutch HIV Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, D.H.; Koppen, L.; Mejia Lopez, A.; Foppen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Though HIV has become a chronic disease, HIV-related stigma has remained. This article reports on a study that asked how Dutch people living with HIV-AIDS (PLWHA) experienced stigmatization and devised self-management strategies. We used qualitative findings from a survey questionnaire conducted

  9. Dialogue for emergent order : an empirical study of the development of the organisational mind in a Dutch manufacturing firm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnatten, van F.M.; Dijkstra, L.; van Galen, M.C.; Boiset, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper contains an empirical study about the introduction of dialogue as a new mode of communication in a Dutch capital-equipment manufacturing firm. The goal of the project is to increase levels of self-organisation, self-reference, and self-transcendence in the company. Over a period of one

  10. Preventing ventriculostomy-related infections with antibiotic-impregnated drains in hospitals : a two-centre Dutch study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, J. D M; Berkelbach vd Sprenkel, J. W; Arts, M. P.; Dennesen, P. J W; Bonten, M. J M; van Mourik, M. S M

    2016-01-01

    This observational cohort study assessed the effect of the introduction of antibiotic-impregnated external ventricular drains (AI-EVDs), as opposed to plain silicone EVDs, on the occurrence of ventriculostomy-related infections (VRIs) in two Dutch hospitals, with no other changes to their clinical

  11. Cohort Profile of the Goals Study: A Large-Scale Research of Physical Activity in Dutch Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Renate H. M.; van Dijk, Martin L.; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The GOALS study (Grootschalig Onderzoek naar Activiteiten van Limburgse Scholieren [Large-scale Research of Activities in Dutch Students]) was set up to investigate possible associations between different forms of physical activity and inactivity with cognitive performance, academic achievement and mental well-being. It was conducted at a…

  12. The Internet as a parameter of strategic planning: A study of E-Marketing practices of Dutch SMBs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for the identification and evaluation of Internet-based strategies and examines the role of the Internet as element of the strategic planning of Small and Medium Businesses (SMBs) from a variety of Dutch industrial sectors. The study has an explorative character and

  13. Genetic and social influences on starting to smoke: a study of Dutch adolescent twins and their parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, D.I.; Koopmans, J.R.; van Doornen, L.J.P.; Orlebeke, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    In a study of 1600 Dutch adolescent twin pairs we found that 59% of the inter‐individual variation in smoking behaviour could be attributed to shared environmental influences and 31% to genetic factors. The magnitude of the genetic and environmental effects did not differ between boys and girls.

  14. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.I.; Tromp, F.; Zuithoff, N.P.; Pieters, R.H.; Damoiseaux, R.A.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the

  15. How Ghanaian, African-Surinamese and Dutch patients percieve and manage antihypertensive drug treatment: A qualitive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, E.J.; Haafkens, J.; Agyeman, Ch.; Schuster, J.; Willems, D.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare how Ghanaian, African-Surinamese (Surinamese), and White-Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: Qualitative study was conducted using detailed interviews with a purposive sample of 46 hypertensive

  16. Between local governments and communities: Knowledge exchange and mutual learning in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Turkish municipal partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    van Ewijk, E.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on mutual learning processes of governmental and non-governmental actors involved in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Turkish municipal partnerships in the period 2007-2011. These partnerships aim at strengthening local governance in Morocco and Turkey as well as in the Netherlands. The research focuses on five case studies and indicate the partnerships lead to important forms of learning at both sides, including strengthening service delivery and working in multi-actor ...

  17. Exploring Dutch surgeons' views on volume-based policies: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesman, Roos; Faber, Marjan J; Westert, Gert P; Berden, Bart

    2018-01-01

    Objective In many countries, the evidence for volume-outcome associations in surgery has been transferred into policy. Despite the large body of research that exists on the topic, qualitative studies aimed at surgeons' views on, and experiences with, these volume-based policies are lacking. We interviewed Dutch surgeons to gain more insight into the implications of volume-outcome policies for daily clinical practice, as input for effective surgical quality improvement. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 purposively selected surgeons from a stratified sample for hospital type and speciality. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and underwent inductive content analysis. Results Two overarching themes were inductively derived from the data: (1) minimum volume standards and (2) implications of volume-based policies. Although surgeons acknowledged the premise 'more is better', they were critical about the validity and underlying evidence for minimum volume standards. Patients often inquire about caseload, which is met with both understanding and discomfort. Surgeons offered many examples of controversies surrounding the process of determining thresholds as well as the ways in which health insurers use volume as a purchasing criterion. Furthermore, being held accountable for caseload may trigger undesired strategic behaviour, such as unwarranted operations. Volume-based policies also have implications for the survival of low-volume providers and affect patient travel times, although the latter is not necessarily problematic in the Dutch context. Conclusions Surgeons in this study acknowledged that more volume leads to better quality. However, validity issues, undesired strategic behaviour and the ways in which minimum volume standards are established and applied have made surgeons critical of current policy practice. These findings suggest that volume remains a controversial quality measure and causes polarization that is not

  18. Urban Vitality in Dutch and Chinese New Towns. A comparative study between Almere and Tongzhou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhou

    2017-11-01

    of urban vitality are the co-presence of people as well as the social, cultural and economic activities in public spaces. The primary conditions are categorized as attractor-determinism, space-determinism and people-determinism. In regard to the spatial factors, the focus is on the spatial configuration of street networks, the composition of urban blocks and neighborhoods, as well as the value of details on small scales. The non-spatial factors primarily include the changing urban planning and governance approaches. The systems approach of planning and control, and the decentralization of decision-making powers are of particular importance to the topic. Various urban vitality evaluation criteria are derived, and then applied and tested in the comparative case studies. The Dutch new town Almere and the Chinese new town Tongzhou are both important new towns in their regions. They are selected based on their contrasting features as planned and market-driven, self-organized new towns, and the resultant differences in the level and character of their urban vitality. It is believed that their governments could gain inspiration from each other’s experiences for the future development of the towns. The key analytical approach of the case studies is to overlap multiple layers of top-down socio-spatial analyses with the actual space use from the bottom-up field investigations. The spatial analysis focuses on finding relations between the distribution of the planned and unplanned socioeconomic activities and the spatial configuration of different elements on different scales. Space syntax is adopted as one of the key analytical tools. The field study tasks include registering people’s movement of flows through static snapshots method, the mapping of self-organized small-businesses, activities and space appropriations, and conducting interviews and surveys of city officials, local people and shop owners. The results of the comparative case studies show that there is a strong

  19. Assessing the impact of cancer among Dutch non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors compared with their American counterparts: a cross-national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerlemans, Simone; Smith, Sophia K; Crespi, Catherine M; Zimmerman, Sheryl; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Ganz, Patricia A

    2013-06-01

    To understand cultural differences in the impact of cancer (IOC) by (i) performing an independent psychometric evaluation of the Dutch version of the Impact of Cancer Scale version 2 (IOCv2) in a non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) sample and (ii) examining differences between Dutch and American NHL survivors in perceived IOC and identifying associations with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Data collected from 491 Dutch and 738 American NHL survivors were used in this study. IOCv2 responses were obtained from all survivors; the Dutch survivors also completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core questionnaire, which measures quality of life. Exploratory factor analysis of the Dutch version yielded a factor solution similar to the American structure but with some subscales merging into single factors. Internal consistency was good; Cronbach's alpha was 0.88 for the Positive and 0.94 for the Negative summary scales. Large differences were observed between survivors, whereby Dutch survivors reported fewer Positive (Δ -0.4, p Dutch sample, providing evidence that IOCv2 scales measure common and important survivor concerns across two different Western nations. Higher positive impacts for US survivors might be explained by more personal control and availability of supportive services. Future research should focus on determinants of the IOC in both Dutch and American survivors to gain better understanding of the factors that might improve it and suggest how health care may be modified toward that end. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Project management case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kerzner, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    A new edition of the most popular book of project management case studies, expanded to include more than 100 cases plus a ""super case"" on the Iridium Project Case studies are an important part of project management education and training. This Fourth Edition of Harold Kerzner''s Project Management Case Studies features a number of new cases covering value measurement in project management. Also included is the well-received ""super case,"" which covers all aspects of project management and may be used as a capstone for a course. This new edition:Contains 100-plus case studies drawn from re

  1. Case Study Research Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Widdowson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Commenting on the lack of case studies published in modern psychotherapy publications, the author reviews the strengths of case study methodology and responds to common criticisms, before providing a summary of types of case studies including clinical, experimental and naturalistic. Suggestions are included for developing systematic case studies and brief descriptions are given of a range of research resources relating to outcome and process measures. Examples of a pragmatic case study design and a hermeneutic single-case efficacy design are given and the paper concludes with some ethical considerations and an exhortation to the TA community to engage more widely in case study research.

  2. Portraying the nature of corruption: Using an explorative case-study design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, G.; Huberts, L.W.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    What is the nature of corruption in Western democracies? To answer this research question, the authors study 10 Dutch corruption cases in depth, looking at confidential criminal files. The cases allow them to sketch a general profile of a corruption case. The authors offer nine propositions to

  3. Evaluation and perceived results of moral case deliberation: A mixed methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, R.; van Zadelhoff, E.; van Loo, G.; Widdershoven, G.A.; Molewijk, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Moral case deliberation is increasingly becoming part of various Dutch healthcare organizations. Although some evaluation studies of moral case deliberation have been carried out, research into the results of moral case deliberation within aged care is scarce. Research questions: How did

  4. Income smoothing by Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boterenbrood, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that hospitals manage their earnings. However, these findings might be influenced by methodological issues. In this study, I exploit specific features of Dutch hospitals to study income smoothing while limiting these methodological issues. The managers of Dutch hospitals have the

  5. The role of patient advocacy organisations in neuromuscular disease R&D - The case of the Dutch neuromuscular disease association VSN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, W.P.C.; Broekgaarden, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates to what extent patient advocacy organisations play a role in influencing R&D and policymaking for rare neuromuscular diseases. The Dutch neuromuscular disease organisation VSN is studied in depth. A brief history of the VSN is sketched along with the international

  6. Quantifying the residual volume transport through a multiple-inlet system in response to wind forcing: The case of the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duran-Matute, M.; Gerkema, T.; Sassi, M.

    2016-01-01

    In multiple-inlet coastal systems like the western Dutch Wadden Sea, the tides (and their interaction with the bathymetry), the fresh water discharge, and the wind drive a residual flow through the system. In the current paper, we study the effect of the wind on the residual volume transport through

  7. Will Dutch Become Flemish? Autonomous Developments in Belgian Dutch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Hans; Kissine, Mikhail; Tops, Evie; van der Harst, Sander; van Hout, Roeland

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a series of studies of standard Dutch pronunciation in Belgium and the Netherlands is presented. The research is based on two speech corpora: a diachronic corpus of radio speech (1935-1995) and a synchronic corpus of Belgian and Netherlandic standard Dutch from different regions at the turn of the millennium. It is shown that two…

  8. Cross-sectional study on factors hampering implementation of measles pre- and postexposure measures in Dutch hospitals during the 2013-2014 measles outbreak.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fievez, L C R; Wong, A; Ruijs, W L M; Meerstadt-Rombach, F S; Timen, A

    2017-01-01

    This study examined adherence to national recommendations on measles pre- and postexposure measures, including immunization of health care workers (HCWs) in Dutch hospitals, during a national outbreak of measles in The Netherlands. This study also investigated which hospital characteristics and

  9. Occupational asbestos exposure: how to deal with suspected mesothelioma cases--the Dutch approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P.; van 't Hullenaar, N.; Wagenaar, J.; Kaajan, J. P. G.; Koolen, M.; Schrijver, M.; Schlösser, N.; Burgers, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with asbestos-related diseases, such as malignant mesothelioma (MM), are not uniformly treated in Europe when they apply for compensation. In The Netherlands, the Institute of Asbestos Victims (IAV) acts on behalf of patients with a malignant mesothelioma. In the majority of cases, the

  10. Training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators : evaluation of a Dutch training programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Mirjam; Molewijk, Bert; de Bree, Menno; Moraal, Marloes; Verkerk, Marian; Widdershoven, Guy A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, moral case deliberation (MCD) sessions have mostly been facilitated by external experts, mainly professional ethicists. We have developed a train the facilitator programme for healthcare professionals aimed at providing them with the competences needed for being an MCD facilitator.

  11. Training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators: evaluation of a Dutch training programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, M.; Molewijk, A.C.; de Bree, M.; Moraal, M.; Verkerk, M.; Widdershoven, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, moral case deliberation (MCD) sessions have mostly been facilitated by external experts, mainly professional ethicists. We have developed a train the facilitator programme for healthcare professionals aimed at providing them with the competences needed for being an MCD facilitator.

  12. Institutional and Strategic Barriers to Public-Private Partnership: An Analysis of Dutch Cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans); G.R. Teisman (Geert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPublic Private Partnerships (PPP) have been much discussed throughout Europe, but does the practice match the idea of cooperating actors who achieve added value together and share risks? An analysis of three cases of PPP in The Netherlands suggests that practice tends to be less ideal

  13. Diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups and outpatient clinics: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J E; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2014-08-07

    In recent years, most Dutch general practitioners started working under the umbrella of diabetes care groups, responsible for the organisation and coordination of diabetes care. The quality management of these new organisations receives growing interest, although its association with quality of diabetes care is yet unclear. The best way to measure quality management is unknown and it has not yet been studied at the level of outpatient clinics or care groups. We aimed to assess quality management of type 2 diabetes care in care groups and outpatient clinics. Quality management was measured with online questionnaires, containing six domains (see below). They were divided into 28 subdomains, with 59 (care groups) and 57 (outpatient clinics) questions respectively. The mean score of the domains reflects the overall score (0-100%) of an organisation. Two quality managers of all Dutch care groups and outpatient clinics were invited to fill out the questionnaire.Sixty care groups (response rate 61.9%) showed a mean score of 59.6% (CI 57.1-62.1%). The average score in 52 outpatient clinics (response rate 50.0%) was 61.9% (CI 57.5-66.8%).Mean scores on the six domains for care groups and outpatient clinics respectively were: 'organisation of care' 71.9% (CI 68.8-74.9%), 76.8% (CI 72.8-80.7%); 'multidisciplinary teamwork' 67.1% (CI 62.4-71.9%), 71.5% (CI 65.3-77.8%); 'patient centeredness' 46.7% (CI 42.6-50.7%), 62.5% (CI 57.7-67.2%); 'performance management' 63.3% (CI 61.2-65.3%), 50.9% (CI 44.2-57.5%); 'quality improvement policy' 52.6% (CI 49.2-56.1%), 50.9% (CI 44.6-57.3%); and 'management strategies' 56.0% (CI 51.4-60.7%), 59.0% (CI 52.8-65.2%). On subdomains, care groups scored highest on 'care program' (83.3%) and 'measured outcomes' (98.3%) and lowest on 'patient safety' (15.1%) and 'patient involvement' (17.7%). Outpatient clinics scored high on the presence of a 'diabetic foot team' (81.6%) and the support in 'self-management' (81.0%) and low on 'patient

  14. Participative business modelling to support strategic decision making in operations : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a case study in which a consultancy method based on participative business modelling was used to support strategic decision making in the field of operations. In this case study the Dutch client company faced serious logical and financial problems after an attempt to attain competitive

  15. Hb Nouakchott [α114(GH2)Pro→Leu; HBA1: c.344C>T], A Second and Third Case Described in Two Unrelated Dutch Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondman, Kirsten M; Brinkman, Jacoline W; van der Straaten, Hanneke M; Stroobants, An K; Harteveld, Cornelis L

    2018-01-01

    We report two families, members of which are carriers of a hemoglobin (Hb) variant previously described as Hb Nouakchott [α114(GH2)Pro→Leu; HBA1: c.344C>T; p.Pro115Leu]. In the first family of Dutch origin, the proband, a 32-year-old male and his 65-year-old father, were both carriers of Hb Nouakchott. Of the second family we tested, only the proband, a 56-year-old Dutch female was a Hb Nouakchott carrier. Hematological analyses of these cases showed the anomaly behaves as a silent Hb variant without clinical consequences. The Hb variant remained unnoticed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while an additional peak was detected by capillary electrophoresis (CE). These independent findings of Hb Nouakchott indicate that this Hb variant might not be very rare, but simply remains under diagnosed depending on the Hb separation technique used.

  16. Study on flexibility in the Dutch and NW European power market in 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    There has been a debate in the Netherlands about the compatibility of new investment by individual utilities in the thermal plant park with Government policy to have 12 GW of onshore and offshore wind generation capacity installed by the year 2020. The key areas of concern are: (a) whether sufficient flexibility will exist in the power system to permit uncertain, intermittent wind generation output to be accommodated; and (b) whether the available sources of flexibility will be accessible by relevant market participants. In this context, EnergieNed asked Frontier Economics to carry out a study of the year 2020 for the Dutch and North West European power system. The requirement was to undertake quantitative modelling and qualitative analysis of the system in the year 2020 under a small number of scenarios in order to answer a series of specific questions. Frontier Economics was also asked to look at experience in Denmark and other countries with high wind and combined heat and power plant (CHP) penetration.

  17. How Ghanaian, African-Surinamese and Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Beune, E.J.A.J.; Haafkens, J.A.; Agyemang, C.; Schuster, J.S.; Willems, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare how Ghanaian, African-Surinamese (Surinamese), and White-Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: Qualitative study was conducted using detailed interviews with a purposive sample of 46 hypertensive patients without comorbidity who were prescribed antihypertensives. RESULTS: Patients in all the ethnic groups actively decided how to manage their prescribed antihypertensive regimens. In all the ...

  18. First Quantification of Calcium Intake from Calcium-Dense Dairy Products in Dutch Fracture Patients (The Delft Cohort Study)

    OpenAIRE

    van den Berg, Peter; van Haard, Paul M. M.; van den Bergh, Joop P. W.; Niesten, Dieu Donné; van der Elst, Maarten; Schweitzer, Dave H.

    2014-01-01

    Recommendations for daily calcium intake from dairy products are variable and based on local consensus. To investigate whether patients with a recent fracture complied with these recommendations, we quantified the daily dairy calcium intake including milk, milk drinks, pudding, yoghurt, and cheese in a Dutch cohort of fracture patients and compared outcomes with recent data of a healthy U.S. cohort (80% Caucasians). An observational study analyzed dairy calcium intakes of 1526 female and 372 ...

  19. Study on profits and the financial position of the Dutch power transmission system operator Tennet 2005-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    A study has been conducted into the profits of the grid operator of the Dutch national high-voltage power transmission system operator TenneT in the years 2005 to 2009. Also attention is paid to the financial position of TenneT. These results are taken into account with regard to method decisions for TenneT in the fifth regulatory period. [nl

  20. HowNutsAreTheDutch (HoeGekIsNL): A crowdsourcing study of mental symptoms and strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieke, Lian Van Der; Jeronimus, Bertus F; Blaauw, Frank J; Wanders, Rob B K; Emerencia, Ando C; Schenk, Hendrika M; Vos, Stijn De; Snippe, Evelien; Wichers, Marieke; Wigman, Johanna T W; Bos, Elisabeth H; Wardenaar, Klaas J; Jonge, Peter De

    2016-06-01

    HowNutsAreTheDutch (Dutch: HoeGekIsNL) is a national crowdsourcing study designed to investigate multiple continuous mental health dimensions in a sample from the general population (n = 12,503). Its main objective is to create an empirically based representation of mental strengths and vulnerabilities, accounting for (i) dimensionality and heterogeneity, (ii) interactivity between symptoms and strengths, and (iii) intra-individual variability. To do so, HowNutsAreTheDutch (HND) makes use of an internet platform that allows participants to (a) compare themselves to other participants via cross-sectional questionnaires and (b) to monitor themselves three times a day for 30 days with an intensive longitudinal diary study via their smartphone. These data enable for personalized feedback to participants, a study of profiles of mental strengths and weaknesses, and zooming into the fine-grained level of dynamic relationships between variables over time. Measuring both psychiatric symptomatology and mental strengths and resources enables for an investigation of their interactions, which may underlie the wide variety of observed mental states in the population. The present paper describes the applied methods and technology, and presents the sample characteristics. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Dutch citizens of Turkish origin who utilize healthcare services in Turkey: a qualitative study on motives and contextual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şekercan, Aydın; Woudstra, Anke J; Peters, Ron J G; Lamkaddem, Majda; Akgün, Seval; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2018-04-17

    Dutch residents of Turkish origin frequently utilize healthcare in Turkey. To investigate their motives for doing so, we conducted a qualitative study among these healthcare users using semi-structured interviews. We complemented this with informal conversations with Turkish healthcare providers and observations at the registration offices and waiting rooms of outpatient clinics in several Turkish hospitals. Respondents believed their perceived needs for referral to specialist care and diagnostic assessments to quantify their health were not being met in the Netherlands. These mismatches in expectations of what constitutes "good care" led to dissatisfaction with Dutch primary care. Consequently, respondents utilized healthcare in Turkey if the opportunity arose, and were encouraged in this by their social networks. Establishing cross-border communication between healthcare providers is necessary, because there is currently no continuity of care for cross-border patients.

  2. 451 Case studies Cardiac

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marinda

    Case Studies. 29 ... A case of a 26-year-old ASA I physical status male undergoing septoplasty had an abrupt ... myocardial infarction, severe hypertensive crisis, cerebral .... or no formal management is required in an ASA I patient.8 One.

  3. How is a Judicial Decision Made in Parental Religious Disputes? An analysis of determining factors in Dutch and European Court of Human Rights case law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jet Tigchelaar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades courts have been confronted with a variety of cases concerning the effects of the religious views and practices of parents on their children. In the Netherlands, family law courts, for example, have had to decide on the choice between secular or religious schooling, on religious rituals like circumcision and baptism, and on the exposure of children to (non-religious practices, when dealing with the contact arrangements. The case law of the European Court of Human Rights shows that family law courts in several other European countries have also had to rule on the impact of parents’ religious practices on their children in the context of parental rights, such as custody and contact rights. In this contribution we investigate the factors used by Dutch judges to assess the best interests of the child in cases on religious disputes between parents. Furthermore, we analyse whether the Dutch case law concerning this topic is in conformity with the case law of the European Court of Human Rights. Therefore, we present which types of factors can be found and in which way these factors are assessed in the case law of the European Court of Human Rights.

  4. Study protocol of a Dutch smoking cessation e-health program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolman Catherine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study aims to test the differential effects of a web-based text and a web-based video-driven computer-tailored approach for lower socio-economic status (LSES and higher socio-economic status (HSES smokers which incorporate multiple computer-tailored feedback moments. The two programs differ only in the mode of delivery (video- versus text-based messages. The paper aims to describe the development and design of the two computer-tailored programs. Methods/design Respondents who smoked at the time of the study inclusion, who were motivated to quit within the following six months and who were aged 18 or older were included in the program. The study is a randomized control trial with a 2 (video/text * 2(LSES/HSES design. Respondents were assigned either to one of the intervention groups (text versus video tailored feedback or to the control group (non-tailored generic advice. In all three conditions participants were asked to fill in the baseline questionnaire based on the I-Change model. The questionnaire assessed socio-demographics, attitude towards smoking, knowledge, self-efficacy, social influence, depression, level of addiction, action planning, goal actions, intention to quit smoking, seven-day point prevalence and continued abstinence. Follow-up measurements were conducted at six and twelve months after baseline. Discussion The present paper describes the development of the two computer-tailored smoking cessation programs, their components and the design of the study. The study results reveal different working mechanisms of multiple tailored smoking cessation interventions and will help us to gain more insight into effective strategies to target different subgroups, especially smokers with a lower socio-economic status. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR3102

  5. Project STARS (Studies on Trajectories of Adolescent Relationships and Sexuality) : A longitudinal, multi-domain study on sexual development of Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitz, Ellen; van de Bongardt, Daphne; Baams, Laura; Doornwaard, Suzan; Dalenberg, Wieke; Dubas, Judith; van Aken, Marcel; Overbeek, Geertjan; ter Bogt, Tom; van den Eijnden, Regina; Vanwesenbeeck, Wilhelmina; Kunnen, Saskia; Timmerman, Greetje; van Geert, Paul; Deković, Maja

    2015-01-01

    This study gives an overview of Project STARS (Studies on Trajectories of Adolescent Relationships and Sexuality), a four-wave longitudinal study of 1297 Dutch adolescents. First, the sample, measures and four sub-projects are described. Second, hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to

  6. Project STARS (Studies on Trajectories of Adolescent Relationships and Sexuality): A longitudinal, multi-domain study on sexual development of Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitz, E.; van de Bongardt, D.; Baams, L.; Doornwaard, S.; Dalenberg, W.; Dubas, J.; van Aken, M.; Overbeek, G.; ter Bogt, T.; van der Eijnden, R.; Vanwesenbeeck, I.; Kunnen, S.; Timmerman, G.; van Geert, P.; Deković, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study gives an overview of Project STARS (Studies on Trajectories of Adolescent Relationships and Sexuality), a four-wave longitudinal study of 1297 Dutch adolescents. First, the sample, measures and four sub-projects are described. Second, hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to

  7. Effectiveness of test driven development and continuous integration - a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrit, Chintan; Meijberg, Yoni

    2018-01-01

    In this article we describe the implementation of hybrid agile practices, namely Test Driven Development (TDD) and Continuous Integration (CI) at a Dutch SME. The quality and productivity outcomes of the case study were compared to a performance baseline set by a reference case, a preceding

  8. First Quantification of Calcium Intake from Calcium-Dense Dairy Products in Dutch Fracture Patients (The Delft Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter van den Berg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recommendations for daily calcium intake from dairy products are variable and based on local consensus. To investigate whether patients with a recent fracture complied with these recommendations, we quantified the daily dairy calcium intake including milk, milk drinks, pudding, yoghurt, and cheese in a Dutch cohort of fracture patients and compared outcomes with recent data of a healthy U.S. cohort (80% Caucasians. An observational study analyzed dairy calcium intakes of 1526 female and 372 male Dutch fracture patients older than 50. On average, participants reported three dairy servings per day, independently of age, gender or population density. Median calcium intake from dairy was 790 mg/day in females and males. Based on dairy products alone, 11.3% of women and 14.2% of men complied with Dutch recommendations for calcium intake (adults ≤ 70 years: 1100 mg/day and >70 years: 1200 mg/day. After including 450 mg calcium from basic nutrition, compliance raised to 60.5% and 59.1%, respectively, compared to 53.2% in the U.S. cohort. Daily dairy calcium intake is not associated with femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD T-scores or WHO Fracture Assessment Tool (FRAX risk scores for major fracture or hip fracture. However, when sub analyzing the male cohort, these associations were weakly negative. The prevalence of maternal hip fracture was a factor for current fracture risks, both in women and men. While daily dairy calcium intake of Dutch fracture patients was well below the recommended dietary intake, it was comparable to intakes in a healthy U.S. cohort. This questions recommendations for adding more additional dairy products to preserve adult skeletal health, particularly when sufficient additional calcium is derived from adequate non-dairy nutrition.

  9. First quantification of calcium intake from calcium-dense dairy products in Dutch fracture patients (the Delft cohort study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Peter; van Haard, Paul M M; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Niesten, Dieu Donné; van der Elst, Maarten; Schweitzer, Dave H

    2014-06-23

    Recommendations for daily calcium intake from dairy products are variable and based on local consensus. To investigate whether patients with a recent fracture complied with these recommendations, we quantified the daily dairy calcium intake including milk, milk drinks, pudding, yoghurt, and cheese in a Dutch cohort of fracture patients and compared outcomes with recent data of a healthy U.S. cohort (80% Caucasians). An observational study analyzed dairy calcium intakes of 1526 female and 372 male Dutch fracture patients older than 50. On average, participants reported three dairy servings per day, independently of age, gender or population density. Median calcium intake from dairy was 790 mg/day in females and males. Based on dairy products alone, 11.3% of women and 14.2% of men complied with Dutch recommendations for calcium intake (adults ≤ 70 years: 1100 mg/day and >70 years: 1200 mg/day). After including 450 mg calcium from basic nutrition, compliance raised to 60.5% and 59.1%, respectively, compared to 53.2% in the U.S. cohort. Daily dairy calcium intake is not associated with femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) T-scores or WHO Fracture Assessment Tool (FRAX) risk scores for major fracture or hip fracture. However, when sub analyzing the male cohort, these associations were weakly negative. The prevalence of maternal hip fracture was a factor for current fracture risks, both in women and men. While daily dairy calcium intake of Dutch fracture patients was well below the recommended dietary intake, it was comparable to intakes in a healthy U.S. cohort. This questions recommendations for adding more additional dairy products to preserve adult skeletal health, particularly when sufficient additional calcium is derived from adequate non-dairy nutrition.

  10. Normative studies with the Scale for Interpersonal Behaviour (SIB): II. US students. A cross-cultural comparison with Dutch data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrindell, W A; Bridges, K R; van der Ende, J; St Lawrence, J S; Gray-Shellberg, L; Harnish, R; Rogers, R; Sanderman, R

    2001-12-01

    The Scale for Interpersonal Behaviour (SIB), a multidimensional, self-report measure of state assertiveness, was administered to a nationwide sample of 2375 undergraduates enrolled at 11 colleges and universities across the USA. The SIB was developed in the Netherlands for the independent assessment of both distress associated with self-assertion in a variety of social situations and the likelihood of engaging in a specific assertive response. This is done with four factorially-derived, first-order dimensions: (i) Display of negative feelings (Negative assertion); (ii) Expression of and dealing with personal limitations; (iii) Initiating assertiveness; and (iv) Praising others and the ability to deal with compliments/praise of others (Positive assertion). The present study was designed to determine the cross-national invariance of the original Dutch factors and the construct validity of the corresponding dimensions. It also set out to develop norms for a nationwide sample of US students. The results provide further support for the reliability, factorial and construct validity of the SIB. Compared to their Dutch equivalents, US students had meaningfully higher distress in assertiveness scores on all SIB scales (medium to large effect sizes), whereas differences on the performance scales reflected small effect sizes. The cross-national differences in distress scores were hypothesized to have originated from the American culture being more socially demanding with respect to interpersonal competence than the Dutch, and from the perceived threats and related cognitive appraisals that are associated with such demands.

  11. Emotional Learning and Identity Development in Medicine: A Cross-Cultural Qualitative Study Comparing Taiwanese and Dutch Medical Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Yeh, Huei-Ming; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; de Vries, Joy; Fu-Chang Tsai, Daniel; Dornan, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Current knowledge about the interplay between emotions and professional identity formation is limited and largely based on research in Western settings. This study aimed to broaden understandings of professional identity formation cross-culturally. In fall 2014, the authors purposively sampled 22 clinical students from Taiwan and the Netherlands and asked them to keep audio diaries, narrating emotional experiences during clerkships using three prompts: What happened? What did you feel/think/do? How does this interplay with your development as a doctor? Dutch audio diaries were supplemented with follow-up interviews. The authors analyzed participants' narratives using a critical discourse analysis informed by Figured Worlds theory and Bakhtin's concept of dialogism, according to which people's spoken words create identities in imagined future worlds. Participants talked vividly, but differently, about their experiences. Dutch participants' emotions related to individual achievement and competence. Taiwanese participants' rich, emotional language reflected on becoming both a good person and a good doctor. These discourses constructed doctors' and patients' autonomy in culturally specific ways. The Dutch construct centered on "hands-on" participation, which developed the identity of a technically skilled doctor, but did not address patients' self-determination. The Taiwanese construct located physicians' autonomy within moral values more than practical proficiency, and gave patients agency to influence doctor-patient relationships. Participants' cultural constructs of physician and patient autonomy led them to construct different professional identities within different imagined worlds. The contrasting discourses show how medical students learn about different meanings of becoming doctors in culturally specific contexts.

  12. Barriers in access to home care services among ethnic minority and Dutch elderly--a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suurmond, Jeanine; Rosenmöller, Doenja L; El Mesbahi, Hakima; Lamkaddem, Majda; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2016-02-01

    Ethnic minority elderly have a high prevalence of functional limitations and chronic conditions compared to Dutch elderly. However, their use of home care services is low compared to Dutch elderly. Explore the barriers to access to home care services for Turkish, Moroccan Surinamese and ethnic Dutch elderly. Qualitative semi-structured group interviews and individual interviews. The Netherlands. Seven group interviews (n=50) followed by individual interviews (n=5) were conducted, in the preferred language of the participants. Results were ordered and reported according to a framework of access to health care services. This framework describes five dimensions of accessibility to generate access to health care services, from the perspective of the users: ability to perceive health needs, ability to seek health care, ability to reach, ability to pay and ability to engage. This study shows that while barriers are common among all groups, several specific barriers in access to home care services exist for ethnic minority elderly. Language and communication barriers as well as limited networks and a preference for informal care seem to mutually enforce each other, resulting in many barriers during the navigation process to home care. In order to provide equal access to home care for all who need it, the language and communication barriers should be tackled by home care services and home care nurses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Family communication as strategy in diabetes prevention: an observational study in families with Dutch and Surinamese South-Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, Suzanne C M; Cornel, Martina C; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, Petronella H L M; Snoek, Frank J

    2012-04-01

    To explore the possibility of utilizing family communication as a diabetes prevention strategy, specifically targeting high-risk families with South-Asian ancestry in The Netherlands. In a cross-sectional study, type 2 diabetes patients from Dutch (n=311) and Surinamese South-Asian (n=157) origin filled in a questionnaire assessing socio-demographic characteristics, beliefs and concerns about familial diabetes risk, primary prevention, and diabetes-related family communication. Discussing diabetes is regarded acceptable in most families. Especially Surinamese South-Asian patients (68%) seemed motivated to convey risk messages to their relatives; they reported a higher risk perception and expressed more concern than Dutch patients. While 40% in both groups thought relatives are able to prevent developing diabetes, 46% in Dutch and 33% in Surinamese South-Asian patients were unsure. Promoting family communication appears a feasible strategy in diabetes prevention in high-risk (Surinamese South-Asian) families. Health care providers should address patients' concern and emphasize opportunities for prevention. Findings favor training of clinicians in utilizing a family approach as prevention strategy. Patients (particularly Surinamese South-Asians) are in need of professional help in the process of family risk disclosure. (Online) Educational tools should be made available at which patients can refer their relatives. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulatory Impacts on Sustainable Drinking Water Supply: A Comparative Study on Dutch Water Companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalhuisen, J.M.; Nijkamp, P.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory changes have exerted deep impacts on public service provision. This paper aims to disentangle recent differences in the external production circumstances of Dutch regional water companies in order to identify the crucial regulatory factors influencing the supply of water to various users

  15. Regulatory Impacts on Sustainable Drinking Water Supply: A Comparative Study on Dutch Water Companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalhuisen, J.M.; Nijkamp, P.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory changes have exerted deep impacts on public service provision. This paper aims to disentangle recent differences in the external production circumstances of Dutch regional water companies in order to identify the crucial regulatory factors influencing the supply of water to various users

  16. Hepatitis B in Moroccan-Dutch: a quantitative study into determinants of screening participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdiui, N.; Stein, M.L.; Timen, A.; Timmermans, D.; Wong, A.; Muijsenbergh, M.E.T.C. van den; Steenbergen, J.E. van

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In November 2016, the Dutch Health Council recommended hepatitis B (HBV) screening for first-generation immigrants from HBV endemic countries. However, these communities show relatively low attendance rates for screening programmes, and our knowledge on their participation behaviour is

  17. Management of children's urinary tract infections in Dutch family practice: a cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Wolters, R.J.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal clinical management of childhood urinary tract infections (UTI) potentiates long-term positive health effects. Insight into the quality of care in Dutch family practices for UTIs was limited, particularly regarding observation periods of more than a year. Our aim was to describe

  18. Management of children's urinary tract infections in Dutch family practice: A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Harmsen (Mirjam); M.E. Wensing (Michel); J.C.C. Braspenning (Jozé); R.J. Wolters (René); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans); R.P.T.M. Grol (Richard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Optimal clinical management of childhood urinary tract infections (UTI) potentiates long-term positive health effects. Insight into the quality of care in Dutch family practices for UTIs was limited, particularly regarding observation periods of more than a year. Our aim was

  19. Quality of weight-loss counseling by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of weight-loss counseling provided by Dutch primary care practice nurses (PNs) to overweight and obese patients including both PNs' compliance with the Five A's Model for behavioral counseling in primary care, and the use of different communication styles.

  20. Epidemiological and birth weight characteristics of triplets: a study from the Dutch twin register

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlebeke, J.F.; Boomsma, D.I.; Eriksson, A.W.

    1993-01-01

    From 112 triplet sets, born in The Netherlands from the end of 1986 to the beginning of 1991 and registered in the Dutch Twin Register, several details such as birth weight, gestational age, zygosity, and etiology were assessed by questionnaire, which was filled out by the mother. For 33 triplet

  1. Research framework for an experimental study on phase change materials in scaled models of dutch dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muthing, F.; Entrop, A.G.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2009-01-01

    In modern Dutch dwellings, about 10% of the annual use of primary energy is used for cooling, whereas about 50% of the primary energy is used for heating. With the technology of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) energy savings can be made in both areas. PCMs are materials with a high latent heat

  2. Research framework for an experimental study on phase change materials in scaled models of Dutch dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müthing, F.; Entrop, Alexis Gerardus; Brouwers, Jos; Durmisevic, Elma

    2009-01-01

    In modern Dutch dwellings, about 10% of the annual use of primary energy is used for cooling, whereas about 50% of the primary energy is used for heating. With the technology of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) energy savings can be made in both areas. PCMs are materials with a high latent heat

  3. Precursors of developmental dyslexia: an overview of the longitudinal Dutch Dyslexia Programme study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, A.; van Bergen, E.; van Zuijen, T.; de Jong, P.; Maurits, N.; Maassen, B.

    2013-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that developmental dyslexia is a neurobiological disorder, characterized by deficits in the auditory, visual, and linguistic domains. In the longitudinal project of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme, 180 children with a familial risk of dyslexia (FR) and a comparison group of

  4. Has the Study of Philosophy at Dutch Universities Changed under Economic and Political Pressures?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Barend; Leydesdorff, Loet

    1991-01-01

    From 1980 until 1985, the Dutch Faculties of Philosophy went through a period of transition. First, in 1982 the national government introduced a new system of financing research at the universities. This was essentially based on the natural sciences and did not match philosophers' work organization.

  5. Microglia in diffuse plaques in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch). An immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat-Schieman, M. L.; Rozemuller, A. J.; van Duinen, S. G.; Haan, J.; Eikelenboom, P.; Roos, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    In hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch) (HCHWA-D) beta/A4 amyloid deposition is found in meningocortical blood vessels and in diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex. Diffuse plaques putatively represent early stages in the formation of senile plaques. Microglia are intimately

  6. Transparency, market operation and trust in the Dutch construction industry: an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, Johan; Nijhof, A.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    After the discovery of illegal price agreements in the Dutch construction industry, the government and major players in the sector have initiated a transition process towards more professional commercial relations. In the transition process transparency plays an important part, as it is a

  7. Trends in suicidal behaviour in Dutch general practice 1983–2013: a retrospective observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D.P. de; Hooiveld, M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Donker, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To analyse trends in suicidal behaviour as reported by the Dutch sentinel general practices from 1983 to 2013. Second, to examine the relationship between suicidal behaviour and several patient characteristics. Finally, to compare the relationship between suicidal

  8. Personality Traits Are Associated with Research Misbehavior in Dutch Scientists: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri K Tijdink

    Full Text Available Personality influences decision making and ethical considerations. Its influence on the occurrence of research misbehavior has never been studied. This study aims to determine the association between personality traits and self-reported questionable research practices and research misconduct. We hypothesized that narcissistic, Machiavellianistic and psychopathic traits as well as self-esteem are associated with research misbehavior.Included in this cross-sectional study design were 535 Dutch biomedical scientists (response rate 65% from all hierarchical layers of 4 university medical centers in the Netherlands. We used validated personality questionnaires such as the Dark Triad (narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, the Publication Pressure Questionnaire (PPQ, and also demographic and job-specific characteristics to investigate the association of personality traits with a composite research misbehavior severity score.Machiavellianism was positively associated (beta 1.28, CI 1.06-1.53 with self-reported research misbehavior, while narcissism, psychopathy and self-esteem were not. Exploratory analysis revealed that narcissism and research misconduct were more severe among persons in higher academic ranks (i.e., professors (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively, and self-esteem scores and publication pressure were lower (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively as compared to postgraduate PhD fellows.Machiavellianism may be a risk factor for research misbehaviour. Narcissism and research misbehaviour were more prevalent among biomedical scientists in higher academic positions. These results suggest that personality has an impact on research behavior and should be taken into account in fostering responsible conduct of research.

  9. Consumer behaviour towards vegetables: a study on domestic processing of broccoli and carrots by Dutch households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongoni, R; Verkerk, R; Dekker, M; Steenbekkers, L P A

    2015-06-01

    Preferences for sensory properties (e.g. taste and texture) are assumed to control cooking behaviour with respect to vegetables. Conditions such as the cooking method, amount of water used and the time-temperature profile determine the nutritional quality (e.g. vitamins and phytochemicals) of cooked vegetables. Information on domestic processing and any underlying motives can be used to inform consumers about cooking vegetables that are equally liked and are nutrient-rich. Two online self-reporting questionnaires were used to identify domestic processing conditions of broccoli and carrots by Dutch households. Questions on various aspects of domestic processing and consumer motives were included. Descriptive data analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were performed for both vegetables, separately, to group consumers with similar motives and behaviour towards vegetables. Approximately 70% of consumers boiled vegetables, 8-9% steamed vegetables, 10-15% stir fried raw vegetables and 8-10% stir fried boiled vegetables. Mainly texture was used as a way to decide the 'doneness' of the vegetables. For both vegetables, three clusters of consumers were identified: texture-orientated, health-orientated, or taste-orientated. The texture-orientated consumers are identified as the most prevalent (56-59%) group in the present study. Statistically significant associations are found between domestic processing conditions and clusters, whereas no such association are found between demographic details and clusters. A wide variation in domestic processing of broccoli and carrots is found in the present study. Mainly sensory properties (i.e. texture and taste) determined the domestic processing conditions. The findings of the present study can be used to optimise cooking to yield vegetables that meet consumer's specific sensory preference and are higher in nutrients, and as well as to communicate with target consumer groups. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  10. Children's hand hygiene behaviour and available facilities: an observational study in Dutch day care centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beeck, A H Elise; Zomer, Tizza P; van Beeck, Eduard F; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Voeten, Helene A C M; Erasmus, Vicki

    2016-04-01

    Children attending day care centres are at increased risk of infectious diseases, in particular gastrointestinal and respiratory infections. Hand hygiene of both caregivers and children is an effective prevention measure. This study examined hand hygiene behaviour of children attending day care centres, and describes hygiene facilities at day care centres. Data were collected at 115 Dutch day care centres, among 2318 children cared for by 231 caregivers (August to October 2010). Children's hand hygiene behaviour was observed and data on hand hygiene facilities of the day care centres collected by direct unobtrusive observation. National guidelines indicate hand hygiene is required before eating, after toilet use and after playing outside. Among 1930 observed hand hygiene opportunities for children, overall adherence to hand hygiene guidelines was 31% (95% CI: 29-33%). Adherence after both toilet use and playing outside was 48%. Hands were less frequently washed before eating, where guideline adherence was 15%. In 38% of the playrooms there was no soap within reach of children and 17% had no towel facilities. In over 40% of the playrooms, appropriate hand hygiene facilities for children were lacking. Adequate hand washing facilities were available for children in only half of the participating day care centres in our study and children washed their hands in only 15-48% of the occasions defined by official guidelines. More attention is needed to hand hygiene of children attending day care centres in the prevention of infectious diseases. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  11. Microglia in diffuse plaques in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch). An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat-Schieman, M L; Rozemuller, A J; van Duinen, S G; Haan, J; Eikelenboom, P; Roos, R A

    1994-09-01

    In hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch) (HCHWA-D) beta/A4 amyloid deposition is found in meningocortical blood vessels and in diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex. Diffuse plaques putatively represent early stages in the formation of senile plaques. Microglia are intimately associated with congophilic plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but microglial involvement in diffuse plaque formation is controversial. Therefore, we studied the relationship between microglia and diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex of four patients with HCHWA-D using a panel of macrophage/microglia markers (mAbs LCA, LeuM5, LeuM3, LN3, KP1, OKIa, CLB54, Mac1, Ki-M6, AMC30 and the lectin RCA-1). Eight AD patients, one demented Down's syndrome (DS) patient and four non-demented controls were included for comparison. In controls and HCHWA-D patients ramified or "resting" microglia formed a reticular array in cortical gray and subcortical white matter. Microglial cells in or near HCHWA-D diffuse plaques retained their normal regular spacing and ramified morphology. In AD/DS gray matter more microglial cells were stained than in controls and HCHWA-D patients. Intensely immunoreactive microglia with enlarged cell bodies and short, thick processes clustered in congophilic plaques. In contrast to the resting microglia, these "activated microglia" strongly expressed class II major histocompatibility complex antigen, HLA-DR, and were AMC30-immunoreactive. These findings support the view that microglia play a role in the formation of congophilic plaques but do not initiate diffuse plaque formation. Another finding in this study is the presence of strong monocyte/macrophage marker immunoreactivity in the wall of cortical congophilic blood vessels in HCHWA-D.

  12. The impact of EU referenda on national electoral politics: evidence from the Dutch case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the issue of increasing contention regarding European matters in national arenas. Specifically, it focuses on the impact of European Union referenda on national elections. EU referenda have two important consequences for national politics: they increase inter-party conflict

  13. Estimating the risk of dengue transmission from Dutch blood donors travelling to Suriname and the Dutch Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, W; Lieshout-Krikke, R W; Kretzschmar, M E; Zaaijer, H L; Coutinho, R A; Eersel, M; Jubithana, B; Halabi, Y; Gerstenbluth, I; Maduro, E; Tromp, M; Janssen, M P

    2016-05-01

    The risk of dengue transmitted by travellers is known. Methods to estimate the transmission by transfusion (TT) risk from blood donors travelling to risk areas are available, for instance, the European Up-Front Risk Assessment Tool (EUFRAT). This study aimed to validate the estimated risk from travelling donors obtained from EUFRAT. Surveillance data on notified dengue cases in Suriname and the Dutch Caribbean islands (Aruba, Curaçao, St. Maarten, Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba) in 2001-2011 was used to calculate local incidence rates. Information on travel and donation behaviour of Dutch donors was collected. With the EUFRAT model, the TT risks from Dutch travelling donors were calculated. Model estimates were compared with the number of infections in Dutch travellers found by laboratory tests in the Netherlands. The expected cumulative number of donors becoming infected during travels to Suriname and the Dutch Caribbean from 2001 to 2011 was estimated at 5 (95% CI, 2-11) and 86 (45-179), respectively. The infection risk inferred from the laboratory-based study was 19 (9-61) and 28 (14-92). Given the independence of the data sources, these estimates are remarkably close. The model estimated that 0·02 (0·001-0·06) and 0·40 (0·01-1·4) recipients would have been infected by these travelling donors. The EUFRAT model provided an estimate close to actual observed number of dengue infections. The dengue TT risk among Dutch travelling donors can be estimated using basic transmission, travel and donation information. The TT risk from Dutch donors travelling to Suriname and the Dutch Caribbean is small. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  14. Enacting Fit in Work Organization and Occupational Structure Design : The Case of Intermediary Occupations in a Dutch Hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Offenbeek, M.A.G.; Sorge, A.; Knip, Marrig

    2009-01-01

    We report and interpret findings from an investigation of work redesign and the introduction of a new occupational position, nurse practitioner (NP), in four different subunits in a large Dutch university hospital. Full development of the new position and its contribution to performance crucially

  15. The link between entrepreneurial attributes and SME ecosystem orchestration: A case from the Dutch HR services industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, Oana-Maria; Roijakkers, Nadine; Rus, Diana; Hins, Marjolein; Vanhaverbeke, Wim; Frattini, Federico; Roijakkers, Nadine; Usman, Muhammad

    This chapter provides a detailed account of the evolution and internal dynamics (network relationships) at Q-Search, a Dutch ecosystem of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) active in the human resources services industry. More specifically, the chapter explores how the personality of the

  16. The Use of Organic vs. Chemical Fertilizer with a Mineral Losses Tax: The Case of Dutch Arable Farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feinerman, E.; Komen, M.H.C.

    2005-01-01

    The paper focuses on farm-level nitrogen fertilization strategies of Dutch arable farmers for analyzing the substitution of organic fertilizers (manure) with chemical fertilizers. The model developed investigates the impact of the major parameters affecting the inferiority of manure compared with

  17. Government Policy and the Planning and Production of Bilingual Dictionaries: the Dutch Approach as a Case in Point.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, W.J.R.

    2007-01-01

    In 1993 the Ministers of Education in the Netherlands and Flanders decided to install a binational committee of experts in order to co-ordinate, streamline, improve and stimulate the production of bilingual dictionaries and lexical databases with Dutch as a source or target language. This committee,

  18. [Case and studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, András

    2015-11-15

    Case studies and case reports form an important and ever growing part of scientific and scholarly literature. The paper deals with the share and citation rate of these publication types on different fields of research. In general, evidence seems to support the opinion that an excessive number of such publications may negatively influence the impact factor of the journal. In the literature of scientometrics, case studies (at least the presence of the term "case study" in the titles of the papers) have a moderate share, but their citation rate is practically equal to that of other publication types.

  19. Prenatal famine, birthweight, reproductive performance and age at menopause: the Dutch hunger winter families study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarde, F; Broekmans, F J M; van der Pal-de Bruin, K M; Schönbeck, Y; te Velde, E R; Stein, A D; Lumey, L H

    2013-12-01

    Is there an association between acute prenatal famine exposure or birthweight and subsequent reproductive performance and age at menopause? No association was found between intrauterine famine exposure and reproductive performance, but survival analysis showed that women exposed in utero were 24% more likely to experience menopause at any age. Associations between prenatal famine and subsequent reproductive performance have been examined previously with inconsistent results. Evidence for the effects of famine exposure on age at natural menopause is limited to one study of post-natal exposure. This cohort study included men and women born around the time of the Dutch famine of 1944-1945. The study participants (n = 1070) underwent standardized interviews on reproductive parameters at a mean age of 59 years. The participants were grouped as men and women with prenatal famine exposure (n = 407), their same-sex siblings (family controls, n = 319) or other men and women born before or after the famine period (time controls, n = 344). Associations of famine exposure with reproductive performance and menopause were analysed using logistic regression and survival analysis with competing risk, after controlling for family clustering. Gestational famine exposure was not associated with nulliparity, age at birth of first child, difficulties conceiving or pregnancy outcome (all P> 0.05) in men or women. At any given age, women were more likely to experience menopause after gestational exposure to famine (hazard ratio 1.24; 95% CI 1.03, 1.51). The association was not attenuated with an additional control for a woman's birthweight. In this study, there was no association between birthweight and age at menopause after adjustment for gestational famine exposure. Age at menopause was self-reported and assessed retrospectively. The study power to examine associations with specific gestational periods of famine exposure and reproductive function was limited. Our findings support

  20. Experience and Enlightenment of Dutch Agricultural Research and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Zhen, Zhen; Hu, D.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the achievements of agricultural science and technology, the reform of agricultural research system and technology transfer system of agricultural in the Netherlands. With case studies, it tries to find the mode of Dutch agricultural research and technology transfer system, and aims to provide suggestions to optimize agricultural research and technology transfer system in China.

  1. Experience and Enlightenment of Dutch Agricultural Research and Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu Zhen, Zhen; Hu, D.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the achievements of agricultural science and technology, the reform of agricultural research system and technology transfer system of agricultural in the Netherlands. With case studies, it tries to find the mode of Dutch agricultural research and technology transfer system, and

  2. Case Studies and Monitoring of Deep Excavations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korff, M.

    2017-01-01

    Several case histories from Dutch underground deep excavation projects are presented in this paper, including the lessons learned and the learning processes involved. The focus of the paper is on how the learning takes places and how it is documented. It is necessary to learn in a systematic and

  3. Prayer Healing: A Case Study Research Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijthoff, D.J.; van der Kooi, C.; Glas, Gerrit; Abma, Tineke A

    2017-01-01

    Context • Prayer healing is a common practice in many religious communities around the world. Even in the highly secularized Dutch society, cases of prayer healing are occasionally reported in the media, often generating public attention. There is an ongoing debate regarding whether such miraculous

  4. 'All those things together made me retire': qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeuwijk, Kerstin G; de Wind, Astrid; Westerman, Marjan J; Ybema, Jan Fekke; van der Beek, Allard J; Geuskens, Goedele A

    2013-05-28

    Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early retirement have been identified in quantitative research, but little is known on why and how these factors influence early retirement. The present qualitative study investigated which non-health related factors influence early retirement, and why and how these factors influence early retirement. A qualitative study among 30 Dutch employees (60-64 years) who retired early, i.e. before the age of 65, was performed by means of face-to-face interviews. Participants were selected from the cohort Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM). For most employees, a combination of factors played a role in the transition from work to early retirement, and the specific factors involved differed between individuals. Participants reported various factors that pushed towards early retirement ('push factors'), including organizational changes at work, conflicts at work, high work pressure, high physical job demands, and insufficient use of their skills and knowledge by others in the organization. Employees who reported such push factors towards early retirement often felt unable to find another job. Factors attracting towards early retirement ('pull factors') included the wish to do other things outside of work, enjoy life, have more flexibility, spend more time with a spouse or grandchildren, and care for others. In addition, the financial opportunity to retire early played an important role. Factors influenced early retirement via changes in the motivation, ability and opportunity to continue working or retire early. To support the prolongation of working life, it seems important to improve the fit between the physical and psychosocial job characteristics on the one hand, and

  5. Health and Economic Burden of Running-Related Injuries in Dutch Trailrunners: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespanhol Junior, Luiz Carlos; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert

    2017-02-01

    Trailrunning is becoming very popular. However, the risk and burden of running-related injuries (RRI) in trailrunning is not well established. To investigate the prevalence, injury rate, severity, nature, and economic burden of RRIs in Dutch trailrunners. This prospective cohort study included 228 trailrunners aged 18 years or over (range 23-67), and was conducted between October 2013 and December 2014. After completing the baseline questionnaire, the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Questionnaire on Health Problems was administered every 2 weeks to collect data on RRIs. Participants who reported RRIs were asked about healthcare utilization (direct costs) and absenteeism from paid work (indirect costs). RRI was defined as disorders of the musculoskeletal system or concussions experienced or sustained during participation in running. The mean prevalence of RRIs measured over time was 22.4 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 20.9-24.0], and the injury rate was 10.7 RRIs per 1000 h of running (95 % CI 9.4-12.1). The prevalence was higher for overuse (17.7 %; 95 % CI 15.9-19.5) than for acute (4.1 %; 95 % CI 3.3-5.0) RRIs. Also, the injury rate was higher for overuse (8.1; 95 % CI 6.9-9.3) than for acute (2.7; 95 % CI 2.0-3.4) RRIs. The median of the severity score was 35.0 [25-75 %, interquartile range (IQR) 22.0-55.7], and the median of the duration of RRIs was 2.0 weeks (IQR 2.0-6.0) during the study. The total economic burden of RRIs was estimated at €172.22 (95 % CI 117.10-271.74) per RRI, and €1849.49 (95 % CI 1180.62-3058.91) per 1000 h of running. An RRI was estimated to have a direct cost of €60.92 (95 % CI 45.11-94.90) and an indirect cost of €111.30 (95 % CI 61.02-192.75). The health and economic burden of RRIs presented in this study are significant for trailrunners and for society. Therefore, efforts should be made in order to prevent RRIs in trailrunners.

  6. Dutch Divergence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boter, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Women’s work has never been a linear process of extending participation. Instead, female labour force participation (FLFP) has extended and curtailed throughout time. This dissertation studies a period of contraction: the nineteenth-century Netherlands. This country makes an important case study

  7. Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.Y. Kwok (Wing-Yee); M.C. Kwaadsteniet (Marjolein); M. Harmsen (Mirjam); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); F.G. Schellevis (François); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections. METHOD: During one calendar year, 195

  8. Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwok, W.Y.; Kwaadsteniet, M.C. de; Harmsen, M.; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W. van; Schellevis, F.G.; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections. METHOD: During one calendar year, 195 general

  9. Vaginal symptoms of unknown etiology - a study in dutch general-practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Janny H.; Boeke, A. Joan P.; Janssens, J; van Eijk, J.Th.M.

    Vaginal symptoms are frequently presented by women to general practitioners. In many cases, the aetiology of these symptoms remains unknown. This study focused on the factors associated with microbiologically unexplained vaginal symptoms, the course of symptoms and signs in these cases, and factors

  10. Motivations to eat healthily in older Dutch adults--a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, S Coosje; Neter, Judith E; Brouwer, Ingeborg A; Huisman, Martijn; Visser, Marjolein

    2014-11-18

    To influence dietary behaviors, more insight in food choice motivations is necessary. This study identified what motivations older adults have to eat healthily and investigated to what extent these motivations are particular to specific subgroups according to socio-economic position and other demographic, lifestyle and health characteristics. We used data from 1,050 older Dutch adults who participated in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (65-80 years, independently living, normal cognitive status). Motivations to eat healthily and characteristics were measured with a self-reported questionnaire. We used logistic regression analyses to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI for the association between subgroups and motivations to eat healthily. The most reported motivations to eat healthily were: "feeling fit" (51.7%), "current health" (49.7%) and "body weight" (39.2%). Multivariate analyses showed that older adults with chronic diseases (≥2 vs. no chronic disease OR: 4.41, 95% CI: 2.31-8.44) and a poor self-rated health (poor vs. good OR: 2.31, 95% CI: 1.22-3.73) were more likely to report "current disease" as a motivation to eat healthily. Groups from lower socio-economic positions were less likely to report "to prevent diseases" (low income vs. high OR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.32-0.86, low education vs. high OR: 0.43, 95% CI: 0.27-0.70) and older adults with obesity were less likely to report "current health" (obese vs. normal weight OR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.32-0.69) as motivations to eat healthily. Multivariate analyses showed that the presence of a disease in older adults is an important motivation for them to eat healthily, which might indicate that older adults with health problems are aware of the link between their disease and nutrition. Older adults from lower socio-economic positions or those with obesity require a specific approach because disease prevention seems to be of lesser importance for these groups, even though a healthy diet could improve their health

  11. Implementation of the external cephalic version in breech delivery. Dutch national implementation study of external cephalic version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlemmix, Floortje; Rosman, Ageeth N; Fleuren, Margot A H; Rijnders, Marlies E B; Beuckens, Antje; Haak, Monique C; Akerboom, Bettina M C; Bais, Joke M J; Kuppens, Simone M I; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Opmeer, Brent C; van der Post, Joris A M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Kok, Marjolein

    2010-05-10

    Breech presentation occurs in 3 to 4% of all term pregnancies. External cephalic version (ECV) is proven effective to prevent vaginal breech deliveries and therefore it is recommended by clinical guidelines of the Royal Dutch Organisation for Midwives (KNOV) and the Dutch Society for Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG). Implementation of ECV does not exceed 50 to 60% and probably less.We aim to improve the implementation of ECV to decrease maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality due to breech presentations. This will be done by defining barriers and facilitators of implementation of ECV in the Netherlands. An innovative implementation strategy will be developed based on improved patient counselling and thorough instructions of health care providers for counselling. The ultimate purpose of this implementation study is to improve counselling of pregnant women and information of clinicians to realize a better implementation of ECV.The first phase of the project is to detect the barriers and facilitators of ECV. The next step is to develop an implementation strategy to inform and counsel pregnant women with a breech presentation, and to inform and educate care providers. In the third phase, the effectiveness of the developed implementation strategy will be evaluated in a randomised trial. The study population is a random selection of midwives and gynaecologists from 60 to 100 hospitals and practices. Primary endpoints are number of counselled women. Secondary endpoints are process indicators, the amount of fetes in cephalic presentation at birth, complications due to ECV, the number of caesarean sections and perinatal condition of mother and child. Cost effectiveness of the implementation strategy will be measured. This study will provide evidence for the cost effectiveness of a structural implementation of external cephalic versions to reduce the number of breech presentations at term. Dutch Trial Register (NTR): 1878.

  12. Implementation of the external cephalic version in breech delivery. Dutch national implementation study of external cephalic version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papatsonis Dimitri N

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breech presentation occurs in 3 to 4% of all term pregnancies. External cephalic version (ECV is proven effective to prevent vaginal breech deliveries and therefore it is recommended by clinical guidelines of the Royal Dutch Organisation for Midwives (KNOV and the Dutch Society for Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG. Implementation of ECV does not exceed 50 to 60% and probably less. We aim to improve the implementation of ECV to decrease maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality due to breech presentations. This will be done by defining barriers and facilitators of implementation of ECV in the Netherlands. An innovative implementation strategy will be developed based on improved patient counselling and thorough instructions of health care providers for counselling. Method/design The ultimate purpose of this implementation study is to improve counselling of pregnant women and information of clinicians to realize a better implementation of ECV. The first phase of the project is to detect the barriers and facilitators of ECV. The next step is to develop an implementation strategy to inform and counsel pregnant women with a breech presentation, and to inform and educate care providers. In the third phase, the effectiveness of the developed implementation strategy will be evaluated in a randomised trial. The study population is a random selection of midwives and gynaecologists from 60 to 100 hospitals and practices. Primary endpoints are number of counselled women. Secondary endpoints are process indicators, the amount of fetes in cephalic presentation at birth, complications due to ECV, the number of caesarean sections and perinatal condition of mother and child. Cost effectiveness of the implementation strategy will be measured. Discussion This study will provide evidence for the cost effectiveness of a structural implementation of external cephalic versions to reduce the number of breech presentations at term. Trial

  13. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Score: a study protocol for the translation and validation of the Dutch language version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lieshout, Esther M M; De Boer, A Siebe; Meuffels, Duncan E; Den Hoed, P Ted; Van der Vlies, Cornelis H; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; Verhofstad, Michael H J

    2017-02-27

    The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Score is among the most commonly used instruments for measuring the outcome of treatment in patients who sustained a complex ankle or hindfoot injury. It combines a clinician-reported and a patient-reported part. A valid Dutch version of this instrument is currently not available. Such a translated and validated instrument would allow objective comparison across hospitals or between patient groups, and with shown validity and reliability it may become a quality of care indicator in future. The main aims of this study are to translate and culturally adapt the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Score questionnaire into Dutch according to international guidelines, and to evaluate the measurement properties of the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Score-Dutch language version (DLV) in patients with a unilateral ankle or hindfoot fracture. The design of the study will be a multicentre prospective observational study (case series) in patients who presented to the emergency department with a unilateral ankle or hindfoot fracture or (fracture) dislocation. A research physician or research assistant will complete the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Score-DLV based on interview for the subjective part and a physical examination for the objective part. In addition, patients will be asked to complete the Foot Function Index (FFI) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36). Descriptive statistics (including floor and ceiling effects), internal consistency, construct validity, reproducibility (ie, test-retest reliability, agreement and smallest detectable change) and responsiveness will be assessed for the AOFAS DLV. This study has been exempted by the Medical Research Ethics Committee (MREC) Erasmus MC (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). Each participant will provide written consent to participate and remain anonymised during the study. The results of the study are planned to be published in an international, peer-reviewed journal. NTR5613. pre-result. Published

  14. Physicians' willingness to grant requests for assistance in dying for children: a study of hypothetical cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrakking, A.M.; Heide, van der A.; Looman, C.W.; Delden, van J.J.M.; Philipsen, B.D.; Maas, van der P.J.; Wal, van der G.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the willingness of Dutch physicians to use potentially life-shortening or lethal drugs for severely ill children. STUDY DESIGN: We asked 63 pediatricians about their approach to 10 hypothetical cases of children with cancer. The age of the child (15, 11, or 6 years), the child's

  15. Breast cancer screening halves the risk of breast cancer death: a case-referent study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, Ellen; Verbeek, André L. M.; Botterweck, Anita A. M.; van Doorne-Nagtegaal, Heidi J.; Imhof-Tas, Mechli; de Koning, Harry J.; Otto, Suzie J.; de Munck, Linda; van der Steen, Annemieke; Holland, Roland; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale epidemiologic studies have consistently demonstrated the effectiveness of mammographic screening programs, however the benefits are still subject to debate. We estimated the effect of the Dutch screening program on breast cancer mortality. In a large multi-region case-referent study, we

  16. Septic Systems Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collection of septic systems case studies to help community planners, elected officials, health department staff, state officials, and interested citizens explore alternatives for managing their decentralized wastewater treatment systems.

  17. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  18. A Psychobiographical Case Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    man, and cancer fighter. This psychobiographical case study entailed a psychosocial-historical ... does not draw more attention as a research method, as this approach has .... of the applied Levinsonian theory to the life of Jobs against the ...

  19. Qualitative Case Study Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction to Sociological Methods. 2nd ed. New York, McGraw-Hill 14. Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln , Y. S. (2011) The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative...The Art of Science. In: Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln , Y. S. (eds.) Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, Sage 19. GAO (1990) Case Study...Rinehart & Winston 39. Stake, R. E. (1994) Case Studies. In: Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln , Y. S. (eds.) Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, Sage

  20. Going Dutch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoorn, C.

    2002-09-07

    The proposal by the Dutch to extract natural gas from the 40 billion cubic metres beneath the Wadden Sea has been cited as a serious cause for concern by environmentalists. The new right wing government is less concerned than was the recently ousted left wing government and stands to gain directly through increased revenue. The Wadden Sea is a vast area of tidal channels, mudflats, shifting sandbanks, salt marshes, wet meadows and dunes, and provides a safe haven for numerous protected plants and animals. It is also a sanctuary for migrating birds and a feeding ground for herring, sole and plaice. Subsidence is cited by the environmentalists as a major potential problem and pollution is said to be always a risk.

  1. Going Dutch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoorn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The proposal by the Dutch to extract natural gas from the 40 billion cubic metres beneath the Wadden Sea has been cited as a serious cause for concern by environmentalists. The new right wing government is less concerned than was the recently ousted left wing government and stands to gain directly through increased revenue. The Wadden Sea is a vast area of tidal channels, mudflats, shifting sandbanks, salt marshes, wet meadows and dunes, and provides a safe haven for numerous protected plants and animals. It is also a sanctuary for migrating birds and a feeding ground for herring, sole and plaice. Subsidence is cited by the environmentalists as a major potential problem and pollution is said to be always a risk

  2. Societal goals, STI policies and socio-technical transitions : the case of the Dutch smart mobility policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salas Girones, E.

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the potential value of incorporating a transition perspective in terms of goal setting, rationales, and instruments used in STI policies using the smart mobility policy in the Netherlands as a case study.

  3. Strategies for using international domain standards within a national context: The case of the Dutch temporary staffing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, Erwin Johan Albert; van Bekkum, Michael; Verhoosel, Jack

    2009-01-01

    This paper will discuss strategies for using international domain standards within a national context. The various strategies are illustrated by means of a case study of the temporary staffing industry.

  4. Sustainability in Electricity Markets. Study for the Dutch Transition Platform on Sustainable Electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    The current energy system is not sustainable. This situation is liable to lead to serious and costly consequences in the long term. The two most important themes to be addressed are climate change and securing energy supplies, particularly in view of the increasing dependency on fossil fuels from geo-politically unstable regions. That is why the Dutch government has decided to strive for a transition towards a Sustainable Energy System. The aim of the energy transition is to transform the current energy system over the coming decades into a sustainable energy system. The participants in this Energy Transition have established six themes for achieving a sustainable energy economy within 50 years. Within these themes experiments are being conducted, experiments that ensure that the final aims become clearer and feasible. Market participants, scientific and civil organizations, and government agencies are taking the lead in each of the six themes: (a) Green raw materials; (b) Sustainable Mobility; (c) Chain Efficiency; (d) New Gas; (e) Sustainable Electricity; (f) Energy in the built environment. This document provides input for the theme on Sustainable Electricity. The Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs together with SenterNovem is preparing a Platform Renewable Electricity Supply. In this Platform representatives from different stakeholders are to take part. The platform is meant to stimulate concrete actions/initiatives towards sustainable electricity supply. SenterNovem has asked PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) to make an international inventory of electricity market developments, with a focus on the impact for future sustainable electricity supply. The question which options for electricity generation are the most suitable for a sustainable electricity supply will be dealt with by KEMA (a Dutch research institute for the electric power industry)

  5. Cross national study of leisure-time physical activity in Dutch and English populations with ethnic group comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munter, Jeroen S L; Agyemang, Charles; van Valkengoed, Irene G M; Bhopal, Raj; Zaninotto, Paola; Nazroo, James; Kunst, Anton E; Stronks, Karien

    2013-06-01

    Variations between countries in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) can be used to test the convergence thesis, which expects that ethnic minority groups change towards the LTPA levels of the native population of host countries. The aim of this study was to test whether similar differences in LTPA between the native populations of England and the Netherlands are also observed among the Indian and African descent groups living in these countries. We used English and Dutch population-based health surveys that included participants aged 35-60 years of European (n(english) = 14,723, n(dutch) = 567), Indian (n(english) = 1264, n(dutch) = 370) and African-Caribbean (n(english) = 1112, n(dutch) = 689) descent. Levels of LTPA (30-minute walking, any reported cycling, gardening, dancing and playing sports) were estimated with age-sex-standardized prevalence rates. Comparisons among groups were made using adjusted Prevalence Ratios (PRs). Within both countries and compared with the European group, Indian and African groups had lower levels of gardening and cycling, whereas the African groups had higher levels of dancing. Between countries, among the European groups, the Netherlands showed higher prevalence of cycling than England, PR = 2.26 (95% CI: 2.06-2.48), and this was 2.85 (1.94-4.19) among Indian descent, and 2.77 (2.05-3.73) among African descent. For playing sports, this was PR = 1.30 (1.23-1.38), 1.43 (1.24-1.66) and 1.22 (1.10-1.34), whereas for gardening this was PR = 0.71 (0.65-0.78), 0.65 (0.52-0.81) and 0.75 (0.62-0.90), respectively. Walking and dancing showed inconsistent differences between the countries and ethnic groups. This cross-national comparison supports the expectation that LTPA of Indian and African descent groups converge towards the national levels of England and the Netherlands respectively.

  6. Meet meat: An explorative study on meat and cultured meat as seen by Chinese, Ethiopians and Dutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Gerben A; Tobi, Hilde; Fischer, Arnout R H

    2017-07-01

    In this cross-cultural study we investigated how study participants from China, Ethiopia and the Netherlands operationalize the concept of meat and to what extent cultured meat fits or does not fit into this operationalization. We argue that combining the conceptual approaches symbolic boundaries and theory of social practices helps to better understand the possibly culturally dependent operationalization of the concept meat. Ten visiting graduate students from China, 10 from Ethiopia and 10 native Dutch graduate students completed freelist tasks, a pile sort task, interview and essay task, during a single session. We found that butchered animals are at the center of the concept of meat, although depending on culture not all animals are a source of meat. Symbolic boundaries were restricted or stretched depending on social practices within countries. Ethiopian participants applied strictly defined symbolic boundaries, where Chinese and Dutch participants used more broadly defined symbolic boundaries. Cultured meat was seen as a technology for the future and was positioned across the symbolic boundaries of meat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring cultural differences in feedback processes and perceived instructiveness during clerkships: replicating a Dutch study in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; van Hell, Elisabeth A; Prihatiningsih, Titi S; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2014-03-01

    Cultural differences between countries may entail differences in feedback processes. By replicating a Dutch study in Indonesia, we analysed whether differences in processes influenced the perceived instructiveness of feedback. Over a two-week period, Indonesian students (n = 215) recorded feedback moments during clerkships, noting who provided the feedback, whether the feedback was based on observations, who initiated the feedback, and its perceived instructiveness. Data were compared with the earlier Dutch study and analysed with χ(2) tests, t-tests and multilevel techniques. Cultural differences were explored using Hofstede's Model, with Indonesia and the Netherlands differing on "power distance" and "individualism." Perceived instructiveness of feedback did not differ significantly between both countries. However, significant differences were found in feedback provider, observation and initiative. Indonesian students perceived feedback as more instructive if provided by specialists and initiated jointly by the supervisor and student (βresidents = -0.201, p culture. Further research is necessary to unravel other possible influences of culture in implementing feedback procedures in different countries.

  8. Environmental impacts of international shipping. A case study of the port of Rotterdam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Boer, E.; Verbraak, G.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the project 'Environmental Impacts of International Shipping: the role of ports' of the Working Group on Transport under OECD's Environment Policy Committee, CE Delft carried out this case study focusing on how the port of Rotterdam and the Dutch authorities address the environmental impacts of the port and its interactions with the hinterlands.

  9. Analyzing the contributions of a government-commissioned research project: A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegger, I.; Janssen, S.W.J.; Keijsers, J.F.E.M.; Schuit, A.J.; Oers, H.A.M. van

    2014-01-01

    Background: It often remains unclear to investigators how their research contributes to the work of the commissioner. We initiated the 'Risk Model' case study to gain insight into how a Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) project and its knowledge products

  10. Migration and Multilingualism in Western Europe: A Case Study of the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extra, Guus; Vallen, Ton

    1997-01-01

    Reviews demographic and linguistic consequences of recent processes of migration and minority group influx in Western Europe and describes the case of the Netherlands to illustrate these effects. Highlights first- and second-language studies of immigrant and ethnic minority groups and notes resulting major demographic trends in Dutch society and…

  11. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: a multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; Dijk, L. van; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  12. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: A multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; van Dijk, L.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  13. Analyzing the contributions of a government-commissioned research project : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegger, I.; Janssen, S.W.J.; Keijsers, J.F.E.M.; Schuit, A.J.; van Oers, J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It often remains unclear to investigators how their research contributes to the work of the commissioner. We initiated the ‘Risk Model’ case study to gain insight into how a Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) project and its knowledge products contribute

  14. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace : A multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; van Dijk, L.; Groenewegen, P. P.; Francke, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  15. Dutch euthanasia revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenigsen, R

    1997-01-01

    The results of a follow-up study of euthanasia by the Dutch government, five years after the first study, were published on November 26, 1996. This article provides a detailed review of the two reports comparing and contrasting the statistics cited therein. The author notes that the "rules of careful conduct" proposed by the courts and by the Royal Dutch Society of Medicine were frequently disregarded. Special topics included for the first time in the second study were the notification and non-prosecution procedure, euthanasia of newborns and infants, and assisted suicide in psychiatric practice. The authors of the follow-up report state that it would be desirable to reduce the number of "terminations of life without patients' request," but this must be the common responsibility of the doctor and the patient. They suggest that the person who does not wish to have his life terminated should declare this clearly, in advance, verbally and in writing, preferably in the form of a living will. Involuntary euthanasia was rampant in 1990 and equally rampant in 1995. The author concludes that Dutch doctors who practice euthanasia are not on the slippery slope. From the very beginning, they have been at the bottom.

  16. Early user involvement and participation in employee self-service application deployment: theory and evidence from four Dutch governmental cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, G.; Batenburg, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper theoretically and empirically addresses the notion that user participation and involvement is one of the important factors for IS success. Different models and studies are reviewed to define and classify types of early end-user involvement and participation. Next, five case studies are

  17. Emigrants’ Remittances and the “Dutch Disease” in Small Transition Economies: the Case Of Albania and Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Nikas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An exogenous inflow of foreign exchange can lead to an appreciation of the currency of the receiving country, a deterioration of its competitiveness and a fall in net exports. Economic theory identifies this as the “Dutch Disease” although it is more often observed in emerging economies. The origin of the real exchange rate appreciation can differ from country to country but the inflow of remittances, the main and clearer gain for the emigration countries, has been accused for such an outcome. This paper tests the applicability of the “Dutch Disease” for two small transition economies under a free floating exchange rate regime, namely Albania and Moldova. In recent years, these countries have experienced impressive outflows of emigrants and even more impressive inflows of remittances. However, the econometric results, based on the ordinary least squares fixed effects, show that the impact of the workers’ remittances on the real exchange rate varies among the countries examined. The results confirm that the macroeconomic implications of these large capital inflows have been actually different between the countries.

  18. Objectivist case study research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Fachner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    be achieved through the use of objectivist case study research. The strength of the case study design is that it allows for uncovering or suggesting causal relationships in real-life settings through an intensive and rich collection of data. According to Hilliard (1993), the opposite applies for extensive......In order to comprehend the impact of music therapy or music therapy processes, a researcher might look for an approach where the topic under investigation can be understood within a broader context. This calls for a rich inclusion of data and consequently a limited number of participants and may...... designs, in which a small amount of data is gathered on a large number of subjects. With the richness of data, the intensive design is ―the primary pragmatic reason for engaging in single-case or small N research‖ (p. 374) and for working from an idiographic rather than a nomothetic perspective....

  19. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.

  20. Nuclear forensics case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedchenko, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to share three case studies from the Institute of Transuranium Elements (ITU) which describe the application of nuclear forensics to events where nuclear and other radioactive material was found to be out of regulatory control

  1. SCA12 case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 88; Issue 1. Utilizing linkage disequilibrium information from Indian Genome Variation Database for mapping mutations: SCA12 case study. Samira Bahl Ikhlak Ahmed The Indian Genome Variation Consortium Mitali Mukerji. Research Article Volume 88 Issue 1 April 2009 pp 55- ...

  2. national Case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This national case study reports on the development of a national network, ... system under the new policy), tends to be limited by content on problems and ... 20 credit programme; and within two Post Graduate Certificate of Education contexts, ...... descriptive with an issues focus (empirical) towards awareness production to.

  3. Heritability of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in a Dutch Twin-family study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.M.; Sadrzadeh, S.; Lambalk, C.B.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders among women of reproductive age. There is evidence for a genetic component in PCOS based on familial clustering of cases. Objective: In the present study, the heritability of PCOS was estimated.

  4. MRI case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggett, S.; Barber, J.

    1989-01-01

    Three case studies are presented to show the value of magnetic resonance imaging used in conjunction with other imaging techniques. In each case MRI proved a vital diagnostic tool and superior to CT in showing firstly the haematoma in a patient with aphasia and right-sided weakness, secondly the size of the disc herniation in a patient with severe leg and ankle pains and thirdly the existence of a metastatic lesion in a patient with a previous history of breast cancer. 11 figs

  5. Dutch taboo norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Sander A; Visser, Tessa A; Zeelenberg, René

    2018-04-01

    This article provides norms for general taboo, personal taboo, insult, valence, and arousal for 672 Dutch words, including 202 taboo words. Norms were collected using a 7-point Likert scale and based on ratings by psychology students from the Erasmus University Rotterdam in The Netherlands. The sample consisted of 87 psychology students (58 females, 29 males). We obtained high reliability based on split-half analyses. Our norms show high correlations with arousal and valence ratings collected by another Dutch word-norms study (Moors et al.,, Behavior Research Methods, 45, 169-177, 2013). Our results show that the previously found quadratic relation (i.e., U-shaped pattern) between valence and arousal also holds when only taboo words are considered. Additionally, words rated high on taboo tended to be rated low on valence, but some words related to sex rated high on both taboo and valence. Words that rated high on taboo rated high on insult, again with the exception of words related to sex many of which rated low on insult. Finally, words rated high on taboo and insult rated high on arousal. The Dutch Taboo Norms (DTN) database is a useful tool for researchers interested in the effects of taboo words on cognitive processing. The data associated with this paper can be accessed via the Open Science Framework ( https://osf.io/vk782/ ).

  6. The observation of mental disorder and dangerousness in arsonists : a contemporary appraisal of changes in Dutch forensic mental health cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalhuisen, Lydia; Koenraadt, Frans

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands pre-trial forensic mental health assessments are conducted to examine whether a mental disorder was present at the time of the offence that affected the free will of a person, in which case criminal accountability is considered diminished or absent. This study aims to investigate

  7. If Parents Establish a No-Smoking Agreement with Their Offspring, Does This Prevent Adolescents from Smoking? Findings from Three Dutch Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Exter Blokland, Endy A. W.; Engels, Rutger C.; Harakeh, Zeena; Hale, William W., III.; Meeus, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Data from three studies were used to investigate whether the establishment of a no-smoking agreement is related to lower odds of adolescent smoking. The prevalence of a no-smoking agreement was first explored by using a national sample involving 4,501 Dutch adolescents. Second, data from a longitudinal study among 595 early adolescents and their…

  8. Prevalence of common mental disorders among Dutch medical students and related use and need of mental health care: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaspersz, Roxanne; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess common mental disorders and the related use and need for mental health care among clinically not yet active and clinically active medical students. All medical students (n=2266) at one Dutch medical university were approached. Students from study years 1-4 were

  9. Estimating the incidence of influenza-virus infections in Dutch weaned piglets using blood samples from a cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, W.L.A.; Nodelijk, G.; Heinen, P.P.; Leengoed, van L.A.M.G.; Hunneman, W.A.; Verheijden, J.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out on 32 Dutch breeding herds to estimate the incidence of influenza-virus infections in piglets before the start of the finishing period, at the age of approximately 10 weeks. Longitudinal studies on two herds (8 and 10 litters, respectively) were done to obtain

  10. Implementation of the external cephalic version in breech delivery. Dutch national implementation study of external cephalic version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlemmix, F.; Rosman, A N; Fleuren, M A H; Rijnders, M E B; Beuckens, A.; Haak, M.C.; Akerboom, B.M.C.; Bais, J.M.J.; Kuppens, S M I; Papatsonis, D.N.M.; Opmeer, Brent C; van der Post, J.A.M.; Mol, B.W.J.; Kok, M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Breech presentation occurs in 3 to 4% of all term pregnancies. External cephalic version (ECV) is proven effective to prevent vaginal breech deliveries and therefore it is recommended by clinical guidelines of the Royal Dutch Organisation for Midwives (KNOV) and the Dutch Society for

  11. Implementation of the external cephalic version in breech delivery Dutch national implementation study of external cephalic version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlemmix, Floortje; Rosman, Ageeth N.; Fleuren, Margot A. H.; Rijnders, Marlies E. B.; Beuckens, Antje; Haak, Monique C.; Akerboom, Bettina M. C.; Bais, Joke M. J.; Kuppens, Simone M. I.; Papatsonis, Dimitri N.; Opmeer, Brent C.; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Kok, Marjolein

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Breech presentation occurs in 3 to 4 % of all term pregnancies. External cephalic version (ECV) is proven effective to prevent vaginal breech deliveries and therefore it is recommended by clinical guidelines of the Royal Dutch Organisation for Midwives (KNOV) and the Dutch

  12. Ethnic identity, externalizing problem behaviour and the mediating role of self-esteem among Dutch, Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, I.B.; Deković, M.; Yağmur, S.; Stams, G.J.; de Haan, M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined whether self-esteem mediates the relationship between two aspects of ethnic identity (i.e. ethnic identity exploration and ethnic identity commitment-affirmation) and externalizing problem behaviour in Dutch, Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch adolescents living in the

  13. Ethnic Identity, Externalizing Problem Behaviour and the Mediating Role of Self-Esteem among Dutch, Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissink, Inge B.; Dekovic, Maja; Yagmur, Sengul; Stams, Geert Jan; de Haan, Mariette

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined whether self-esteem mediates the relationship between two aspects of ethnic identity (i.e. ethnic identity exploration and ethnic identity commitment-affirmation) and externalizing problem behaviour in Dutch, Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch adolescents living in the Netherlands. A total number of 345 adolescents (115…

  14. Estimating study costs for use in VOI, a study of dutch publicly funded drug related research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Asselt, A.D.; Ramaekers, B.L.; Corro Ramos, I.; Joore, M.A.; Al, M.J.; Lesman-Leegte, I.; Postma, M.J.; Vemer, P.; Feenstra, T.F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To perform value of information (VOI) analyses, an estimate of research costs is needed. However, reference values for such costs are not available. This study aimed to analyze empirical data on research budgets and, by means of a cost tool, provide an overview of costs of several types

  15. Case study - Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, P.

    1986-01-01

    In the lecture Case Study - Czechoslovakia with the sub-title 'Unified System of Personnel Preparation for Nuclear Programme in Czechoslovakia' the actual status and the current experience of NPP personnel training and preparation in Czechoslovakia are introduced. The above mentioned training system is presented and demonstrated by the story of a proxy person who is going to become shift engineer in a nuclear power plant in Czechoslovakia. (orig./HP)

  16. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  17. Marxism and the 'Dutch miracle': the Dutch Republic and the transition-debate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandon, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch Republic holds a marginal position in the debate on the transition from feudalism to capitalism, despite its significance in the early stage of the development of global capitalism. While the positions of those Marxists who did consider the Dutch case range from seeing it as the first

  18. Supportive care for children with acute leukemia - Report of a survey on supportive care by the Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group. Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, A; Van Leeuwen, EF; Gerritsen, EJA; Roord, JJ; De vries-Hospers, HG

    1998-01-01

    The Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group celebrated its 20th anniversary by conducting a nationwide survey on supportive care for children with leukemia. Pediatricians were asked about daily practice and current perceptions with regard to supportive care. The results are discussed and compared to

  19. Identification of familial colorectal cancer and hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes through the Dutch population-screening program : Results ofa pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, Sanne J H; Leicher, Laura W; Hennink, Simone D; Ghorbanoghli, Zeinab; Breg, Simone A C; Morreau, Hans; Nielsen, Maartje; Hardwick, James C H; Roukema, J.A.; Langers, Alexandra M J; Cappel, Wouter H de Vos Tot Nederveen; Vasen, Hans F A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In 2014, a population-screening program using immuno-faecal occult blood testing (I-FOBT) has started in the Netherlands. The aims of this study were to evaluate the proportion of individuals in the Dutch screening program with a positive I-FOBT that fulfill the criteria for familial

  20. Nonsymptomatic generalized epilepsy in children younger than six years : Excellent prognosis, but classification should be reconsidered after follow-up: The Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, CM; Geerts, AT; Stroink, H; van Donselaar, CA; Arts, WFM

    Purpose: To assess the prognosis and the accuracy of the epilepsy classification in young children with nonsymptomatic generalized epilepsy. Methods: Of the cohort of the Dutch Study of Epilepsy in Childhood (n = 466), all children younger than 6 years with a diagnosis of idiopathic (IGE) or

  1. Metacognitive and language-specific knowledge in native and foreign language reading comprehension: an emprical study among Dutch students in grades 6, 8 and 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonen, R.; Hulstijn, J.; Bossers, B.

    1998-01-01

    This article gives the results of a study among 685 students in grades 6, 8 and 10 in the Netherlands to whom we administered grade-appropriate measures of reading comprehension and vocabulary knowledge in their native language (NL), Dutch, as well as, in grades 8 and 10, in English as a foreign

  2. Reliability of exophthalmos measurement and the exophthalmometry value distribution in a healthy Dutch population and in Graves' patients. An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. P.; Lombardo, S. H. C.; van der Sluijs, F. A.; Fenton, S.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to test the reliability of an exophthalmometer commonly used in the Netherlands; to determine the exophthalmometry value distribution with this instrument and to assess the upper exophthalmometry limits of normal in a healthy, adult, Caucasian, Dutch population.

  3. Reading in Two Orthographies: A Cross-Linguistic Study of Dutch Average and Poor Readers Who Learn English as a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfidi, Eleni; van der Leij, Aryan; de Jong, Peter F.; Scheltinga, Femke; Bekebrede, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the reading of secondary school students in their first and second language (L1, L2). Twenty-six average and twenty-six poor readers matched on age, gender, listening and reading comprehension participated. They were native Dutch speakers who started learning English at secondary school (grade 7). We examined whether…

  4. Exploring facilitating factors and barriers to the nationwide dissemination of a Dutch school-based obesity prevention program "DOiT": a study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nassau, F.; Singh, A.S.; van Mechelen, W.; Paulussen, T.G.; Brug, J.; Chinapaw, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The evidence-based Dutch Obesity Intervention in Teenagers (DOiT) program is a school-based obesity prevention program for 12 to 14-year olds attending the first two years of prevocational education. This paper describes the study protocol applied to evaluate (a) the nationwide

  5. Dutch adolescents' motives, perceptions and reflections toward sex-related Internet use : Results of a web-based focus-group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornwaard, S.M.; den Boer, Fedde; Vanwesenbeeck, W.M.A.; van Nijnatten, C.H.C.J.; ter Bogt, T.F.M.; van den Eijnden, R.J.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The Internet offers adolescents unique opportunities to actively shape their own sexual media environment. The aim of this study was to gain in-depth insight into Dutch adolescents’ motives, perceptions, and reflections toward Internet use for (a) finding information or advice related to romance and

  6. Attitude disentangled: a cross-sectional study into the factors underlying attitudes of nurses in Dutch rehabilitation centers toward patients with comorbid mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluit, M.J. van der; Goossens, P.J.J.; Leeuw, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    In rehabilitation centers, many patients suffer a comorbid mental illness. Nurses have different attitudes toward these patients. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study among nurses in Dutch rehabilitation centers was undertaken to clarify the factors that underlie attitudes toward patients

  7. Effect of the Dutch school-based education programme ‘Taste Lessons’ on behavioural determinants of taste acceptance and healthy eating: a quasi-experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battjes-Fries, M.C.E.; Haveman-Nies, A.; Renes, R.J.; Meester, H.J.; Veer, van 't P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the Dutch school-based education programme ‘Taste Lessons’ on children’s behavioural determinants towards tasting unfamiliar foods and eating healthy and a variety of foods. Design In a quasi-experimental study design, data on behavioural determinants were collected

  8. The Dutch Cannabis Dependence (CanDep) study on the course of frequent cannabis use and dependence: objectives, methods and sample characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, P.; Liebregts, N.; de Graaf, R.; Korf, D.J.; van den Brink, W.; van Laar, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the prospective cohort design of the Dutch Cannabis Dependence (CanDep) study, which investigates (i) the three-year natural course of frequent cannabis use (≥ three days per week in the past 12 months) and cannabis dependence; and (ii) the factors involved in the

  9. Understanding the use of email consultation in primary care using a retrospective observational study with data of Dutch electronic health records.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huygens, M.W.J.; Swinkels, I.C.S.; Verheij, R.A.; Friele, R.; Schayck, O.C.P. van; Witte, L.P. de

    2018-01-01

    Objectives It is unclear why the use of email consultation is not more widespread in Dutch general practice, particularly because, since 2006, its costs can be reimbursed. To encourage further implementation, it is needed to understand the current use of email consultations. This study aims to

  10. The Influence of Chorion Type on Health Measures at Birth and Dental Development in Australian and Dutch Twins: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihailidis, S.; Bockmann, M.; McConnell, E.; Hughes, T.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Boomsma, D.I.; McMaster, M.T.; Townsend, G.

    2015-01-01

    Chorion type may significantly influence the prenatal environment of twins. This study explored the associations between chorion type and gestational age, birth weight, birth length, and the timing of emergence of the first primary tooth in two populations of twins, Australian and Dutch.

  11. Case Study - Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Leybourne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study was developed from an actual scenario by Dr. Steve Leybourne of Boston University.  The case documents the historical evolution of an organization, and has been used successfully in courses dealing with organizational and cultural change, and the utilization of ‘soft skills’ in project-based management. This is a short case, ideal for classroom use and discussion.  The issues are easily accessible to students, and there is a single wide ranging question that allows for the inclusion of many issues surrounding strategic decision-making, and behavioural and cultural change. Alpha was one of the earlier companies in the USA to invest in large, edge-of-town superstores, with plentiful free vehicle parking, selling food and related household products. Alpha was created in the 1950s as a subsidiary of a major publicly quoted retail group.  It started business by opening a string of very large discount stores in converted industrial and warehouse premises in the south of the United States. In the early days shoppers were offered a limited range of very competitively priced products. When Alpha went public in 1981 it was the fourth largest food retailer in the US, selling an ever-widening range of food and non-food products.  Its success continued to be based on high volume, low margins and good value for money, under the slogan of ‘Alpha Price.’

  12. Application of hierarchical genetic models to Raven and WAIS subtests: a Dutch twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijsdijk, Frühling V; Vernon, P A; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2002-05-01

    Hierarchical models of intelligence are highly informative and widely accepted. Application of these models to twin data, however, is sparse. This paper addresses the question of how a genetic hierarchical model fits the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) subtests and the Raven Standard Progressive test score, collected in 194 18-year-old Dutch twin pairs. We investigated whether first-order group factors possess genetic and environmental variance independent of the higher-order general factor and whether the hierarchical structure is significant for all sources of variance. A hierarchical model with the 3 Cohen group-factors (verbal comprehension, perceptual organisation and freedom-from-distractibility) and a higher-order g factor showed the best fit to the phenotypic data and to additive genetic influences (A), whereas the unique environmental source of variance (E) could be modeled by a single general factor and specifics. There was no evidence for common environmental influences. The covariation among the WAIS group factors and the covariation between the group factors and the Raven is predominantly influenced by a second-order genetic factor and strongly support the notion of a biological basis of g.

  13. The silent burden of stigmatisation: a qualitative study among Dutch people with a low socioeconomic position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Audrey M W; Houkes, Inge; Koster, Annemarie; Groffen, Daniëlle A I; Bosma, Hans

    2018-04-03

    In-depth qualitative research into perceived socioeconomic position-related stigmatisation among people living at the lower end of our socioeconomic hierarchy is necessary for getting more insight in the possible downside of living in an increasingly meritocratic and individualistic society. Seventeen interviews were conducted among a group of Dutch people with a low socioeconomic position to examine their experiences with stigmatisation, how they coped with it and what they perceived as consequences. Social reactions perceived by participants related to being inferior, being physically recognisable as a poor person, and being responsible for their own financial problems. Participants with less experience of living in poverty, a heterogeneous social network and greater sense of financial responsibility seemed to be more aware of stigmas than people with long-term experience of poverty, a homogeneous social network and less sense of financial responsibility. Perceived stigmatisation mainly had emotional consequences. To maintain a certain level of self-respect, participants tried to escape from reality, showed their strengths or confronted other people who expressed negative attitudes towards them. Despite the good intentions of policies to enhance self-reliance, responsibility and active citizenship, these policies and related societal beliefs might affect people at the lower end of our socioeconomic hierarchies by making them feel inferior, ashamed and blamed, especially when they cannot meet societal expectations or when they feel treated disrespectfully, unjustly or unequally by social workers or volunteers of charity organisations.

  14. The implementation of a quality system in the Dutch GP specialty training: barriers and facilitators; a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwalda, Nienke; Braspenning, Jozé; van Roosmalen, Sanne; van Dijk, Nynke; Visser, Mechteld

    2017-07-21

    Quality assurance programs in medical education are introduced to gain insight into the quality of such programs and to trigger improvements. Although of utmost importance, research on the implementation of such programs is scarce. The Dutch General Practice (GP) specialty training institutes used an implementation strategy to implement a quality system (QS), and we aimed to study the success of this strategy and to learn about additional facilitators and barriers. Seventeen structured interviews were conducted with the directors and quality coordinators (QCs) of the eight Dutch GP training institutes. A five-stage process model of implementation was used to structure these interviews and analyze the data. Two researchers analyzed the data with a framework approach. The strategy supported the institutes in implementing the QS. However, after the introduction of the QS, staff experienced the QS as demanding, although they noticed almost no concrete short-term results. Moreover, they experienced difficulties in integrating the QS into their local situation. Collectively working with the QS and following common deadlines did create a sense of commitment towards each other that appeared to be a true stimulus to the introduction of the QS. The implementation strategy focused mainly on the introduction of the QS in the GP specialty training, and it was, as such, rather successful. An important barrier concerned the acceptance of the QS and the integration of the QS into local structures, which suggests that there is a need for guidance on the translation of the QS to local contexts. All in all, we recommend more focus on the benefits of a QS.

  15. NOx trade. Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Some of the questions with respect to the trade of nitrogen oxides that businesses in the Netherlands have to deal with are dealt with: should a business buy or sell rights for NOx emission; which measures must be taken to reduce NOx emission; how much must be invested; and how to deal with uncertainties with regard to prices. Simulations were carried out with the MOSES model to find the answers to those questions. Results of some case studies are presented, focusing on the chemical sector in the Netherlands. Finally, the financial (dis)advantages of NOx trade and the related uncertainties for a single enterprise are discussed [nl

  16. OBSESSIONS: CASE REPORT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Židanik

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obsessions are one of the most refractory psychiatric disorders. The therapeutic guidelines include a psychopharmacotherapy and the use of behavioural and supportive psychotherapy.Methods. This case report study presents a patient with a homicide obsessions at the forefront and narcissistic personality disorder in background. The use of analytical oriented psychotherapy, which helped to resolve axis-1 symptoms, is described.Conclusions. In the therapy of patients it is important to have the knowledge about the national therapeutic guidelines and critical distance toward them as well. Which therapy to use should be decided by the individual patient’s needs.

  17. Lexical preferences in Dutch verbal cluster ordering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, J.; Bellamy, K.; Karvovskaya, E.; Kohlberger, M.; Saad, G.

    2016-01-01

    This study discusses lexical preferences as a factor affecting the word order variation in Dutch verbal clusters. There are two grammatical word orders for Dutch two-verb clusters, with no clear meaning difference. Using the method of collostructional analysis, I find significant associations

  18. Losses on Dutch residential mortgage insurances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, M.K.; Schilder, F.P.W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to study the data on losses on mortgage insurance in the Dutch housing market to find the key drivers of the probability of loss. In 2013, 25 per cent of all Dutch homeowners were "under water": selling the property will not cover the outstanding mortgage debt. The

  19. The Dutch private company: successfully relaunched?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, C.F.; Vermeulen, E.P.M.; De Cordt, Y.; Navez, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    This Chapter in a comparative book on private limited liability companies starts with an illustration of the former success of the Dutch limited liability company (BV). Next it addresses the competitive European legal environment within which the Dutch BV has to operate. The study shows how the

  20. Cross-Language Measurement Equivalence of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale in Systemic Sclerosis: A Comparison of Canadian and Dutch Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakkenbos, Linda; Arthurs, Erin; van den Hoogen, Frank H. J.; Hudson, Marie; van Lankveld, Wim G. J. M.; Baron, Murray; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Thombs, Brett D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Increasingly, medical research involves patients who complete outcomes in different languages. This occurs in countries with more than one common language, such as Canada (French/English) or the United States (Spanish/English), as well as in international multi-centre collaborations, which are utilized frequently in rare diseases such as systemic sclerosis (SSc). In order to pool or compare outcomes, instruments should be measurement equivalent (invariant) across cultural or linguistic groups. This study provides an example of how to assess cross-language measurement equivalence by comparing the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale between English-speaking Canadian and Dutch SSc patients. Methods The CES-D was completed by 922 English-speaking Canadian and 213 Dutch SSc patients. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to assess the factor structure in both samples. The Multiple-Indicator Multiple-Cause (MIMIC) model was utilized to assess the amount of differential item functioning (DIF). Results A two-factor model (positive and negative affect) showed excellent fit in both samples. Statistically significant, but small-magnitude, DIF was found for 3 of 20 items on the CES-D. The English-speaking Canadian sample endorsed more feeling-related symptoms, whereas the Dutch sample endorsed more somatic/retarded activity symptoms. The overall estimate in depression scores between English and Dutch was not influenced substantively by DIF. Conclusions CES-D scores from English-speaking Canadian and Dutch SSc patients can be compared and pooled without concern that measurement differences may substantively influence results. The importance of assessing cross-language measurement equivalence in rheumatology studies prior to pooling outcomes obtained in different languages should be emphasized. PMID:23326538

  1. Insurance problems among inflammatory bowel disease patients: results of a Dutch population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, M G V M; Ryan, B M; Dagnelie, P C; de Rooij, M; Sijbrandij, J; Feleus, A; Hesselink, M; Muris, J W; Stockbrugger, R

    2003-03-01

    The majority of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a normal life expectancy and therefore should not be weighted when applying for life assurance. There is scant literature on this topic. In this study our aim was to document and compare the incidence of difficulties in application for life and medical insurance in a population based cohort of IBD patients and matched population controls. A population based case control study of 1126 IBD patients and 1723 controls. Based on a detailed questionnaire, the frequency and type of difficulties encountered when applying for life and medical insurance in matched IBD and control populations were appraised. In comparison with controls, IBD patients had an 87-fold increased risk of encountering difficulties when applying for life assurance (odds ratio (OR) 87 (95% confidence interval (CI) 31-246)), with a heavily weighted premium being the most common problem. Patients of high educational status, with continuous disease activity, and who smoked had the highest odds of encountering such problems. Medical insurance difficulties were fivefold more common in IBD patients compared with controls (OR 5.4 (95% CI 2.3-13)) although no specific disease or patient characteristics were identified as associated with such difficulties. This is the first detailed case control study that has investigated insurance difficulties among IBD patients. Acquiring life and medical insurance constituted a major problem for IBD patients in this study. These results are likely to be more widely representative given that most insurance companies use international guidelines for risk assessment. In view of the recent advances in therapy and promising survival data on IBD patients, evidence based guidelines for risk assessment of IBD patients by insurance companies should be drawn up to prevent possible discriminatory practices.

  2. Precursors of developmental dyslexia: an overview of the longitudinal Dutch Dyslexia Programme study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Leij, Aryan; van Bergen, Elsje; van Zuijen, Titia; de Jong, Peter; Maurits, Natasha; Maassen, Ben

    2013-11-01

    Converging evidence suggests that developmental dyslexia is a neurobiological disorder, characterized by deficits in the auditory, visual, and linguistic domains. In the longitudinal project of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme, 180 children with a familial risk of dyslexia (FR) and a comparison group of 120 children without FR (noFR) were followed from the age of 2 months up to 9 years. Children were assessed on (1) auditory, speech, and visual event-related potentials every half year between 2 and 41 months; (2) expressive and receptive language, motor development, behaviour problems, and home-literacy environment by questionnaires at the age of 2 and 3; (3) speech-language and cognitive development from 47 months onwards; and (4) preliteracy and subskills of reading, and reading development during kindergarten and Grades 2 and 3. With regard to precursors of reading disability, first analyses showed specific differences between FR and noFR children in neurophysiological, cognitive, and early language measures. Once reading tests administered from age 7 to 9 years were available, the children were divided into three groups: FR children with and without dyslexia, and controls. Analyses of the differences between reading groups yielded distinct profiles and developmental trajectories. On early speech and visual processing, and several cognitive measures, performance of the non-dyslexic FR group differed from the dyslexic FR group and controls, indicating continuity of the influence of familial risk. Parental reading and rapid naming skills appeared to indicate their offspring's degree of familial risk. Furthermore, on rapid naming and nonverbal IQ, the non-dyslexic FR group performed similarly to the controls, suggesting protective factors. There are indications of differences between the FR and control groups, irrespective of reading outcome. These results contribute to the distinction between the deficits correlated to dyslexia as a manifest reading disorder

  3. Reconstruction of historical atmospheric Pb using Dutch urban lake sediments: A Pb isotope study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walraven, N., E-mail: n.walraven@geoconnect.nl [GeoConnect, Meester Dekkerstraat 4, 1901 PV Castricum (Netherlands); Os, B.J.H. van, E-mail: b.vanos@rce.nl [Rijksdienst voor Archeologie, Cultuurlandschap en Monumenten, P.O. Box 1600, 3800 BP Amersfoort (Netherlands); Klaver, G.Th., E-mail: g.klaver@brgm.nl [BRGM, 3 avenue Claude-Guillemin, BP 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Middelburg, J.J., E-mail: j.b.m.middelburg@uu.nl [University Utrecht, Faculty of Geosciences, P.O. Box 80021, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Davies, G.R., E-mail: g.r.davies@vu.nl [VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Petrology, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Lake sediments provide a record of atmospheric Pb deposition and changes in Pb isotope composition. To our knowledge, such an approach has not previously been performed in The Netherlands or linked to national air monitoring data. Results are presented for Pb content and isotope composition of {sup 137}Cs dated lake sediments from 2 Dutch urban lakes. Between 1942 and 2002 A.D. anthropogenic atmospheric Pb deposition rates in the two lakes varied from 12 ± 2 to 69 ± 16 μg cm{sup −2} year{sup −1}. The rise and fall of leaded gasoline is clearly reflected in the reconstructed atmospheric Pb deposition rates. After the ban on leaded gasoline, late 1970s/early 1980s, atmospheric Pb deposition rates decreased rapidly in the two urban lakes and the relative contributions of other anthropogenic Pb sources — incinerator ash (industrial Pb) and coal/galena — increased sharply. Atmospheric Pb deposition rates inferred from the lake record a clear relationship with nearby measured annual mean air Pb concentrations. Based on this relationship it was estimated that air Pb concentrations between 1942 and 2002 A.D. varied between 5 and 293 ng/m{sup 3}. - Highlights: • Sixty years of atmospheric Pb was reconstructed using urban lake sediments. • Stable Pb isotopes were applied to determine Pb sources in urban lakes. • The rise and fall of leaded gasoline is clearly reflected in the lake sediments. • Other dominant anthropogenic Pb sources are incinerator ash and coal/galena. • The lake Pb record shows a clear relationship with measured air Pb concentrations.

  4. Dietary glycemic load and glycemic index and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in Dutch men and women: the EPIC-MORGEN study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koert N J Burger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The associations of glycemic load (GL and glycemic index (GI with the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD are not well-established, particularly in men, and may be modified by gender. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether high dietary GL and GI increase the risk of CVD in men and women. METHODS: A large prospective cohort study (EPIC-MORGEN was conducted within the general Dutch population among 8,855 men and 10,753 women, aged 21-64 years at baseline (1993-1997 and free of diabetes and CVD. Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food-frequency questionnaire and GI and GL were calculated using Foster-Powell's international table of GI. Information on morbidity and mortality was obtained through linkage with national registries. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs for incident coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke, while adjusting for age, CVD risk factors, and dietary factors. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 11.9 years, 581 CHD cases and 120 stroke cases occurred among men, and 300 CHD cases and 109 stroke cases occurred among women. In men, GL was associated with an increased CHD risk (adjusted HR per SD increase, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.02-1.35], while no significant association was found in women (1.09 [0.89-1.33]. GI was not associated with CHD risk in both genders, while it was associated with increased stroke risk in men (1.27 [1.02-1.58] but not in women (0.96 [0.75-1.22]. Similarly, total carbohydrate intake and starch intake were associated with a higher CHD risk in men (1.23 [1.04-1.46]; and 1.24 [1.07-1.45], but not in women. CONCLUSION: Among men, high GL and GI, and high carbohydrate and starch intake, were associated with increased risk of CVD.

  5. Vegetable and animal products as determinants of colon cancer risk in Dutch men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, E.; Verhoeven, D.; Sloots, L.; Veer, P. van 't

    1995-01-01

    To examine the relationship between colon cancer and food groups from vegetable or animal sources and their possible interactions with gender, we analyzed data from a Dutch case-control study. Dietary patterns were assessed for 232 colon cancer cases and 259 population controls. In multivariate

  6. Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections. Method During one calendar year, 195 general practitioners in 104 practices in the Netherlands registered all their patient contacts. This study was performed by the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL in 2001. Of 82,053 children aged 0 to 18 years, the following variables were collected: number of episodes per patient, number of contacts per episode, month of the year in which the diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made, age, gender, urbanisation level, drug prescription and referral. Results The overall incidence rate was 19 episodes per 1000 person years. The incidence rate in girls was 8 times as high as in boys. The incidence rate in smaller cities and rural areas was 2 times as high as in the three largest cities. Throughout the year, incidence rates varied with a decrease in summertime for children at the age of 0 to 12 years. Of the prescriptions, 66% were in accordance with current guidelines, but only 18% of the children who had an indication were actually referred. Conclusion This study shows that incidence rates of urinary tract infections are not only related to gender and season, but also to urbanisation. General practitioners in the Netherlands frequently do not follow the clinical guidelines for urinary tract infections, especially with respect to referral.

  7. Unravelling fears of genetic discrimination: an exploratory study of Dutch HCM families in an era of genetic non-discrimination acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, Els; Horstman, Klasien; Marcelis, Carlo L M; Doevendans, Pieter A; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2012-10-01

    Since the 1990s, many countries in Europe and the United States have enacted genetic non-discrimination legislation to prevent people from deferring genetic tests for fear that insurers or employers would discriminate against them based on that information. Although evidence for genetic discrimination exists, little is known about the origins and backgrounds of fears of discrimination and how it affects decisions for uptake of genetic testing. The aim of this article is to gain a better understanding of these fears and its possible impact on the uptake of testing by studying the case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In a qualitative study, we followed six Dutch extended families involved in genetic testing for HCM for three-and-a-half years. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 57 members of these families. Based on the narratives of the families, we suggest that fears of discrimination have to be situated in the broader social and life-course context of family and kin. We describe the processes in which families developed meaningful interpretations of genetic discrimination and how these interpretations affected family members' decisions to undergo genetic testing. Our findings show that fears of genetic discrimination do not so much stem from the opportunity of genetic testing but much more from earlier experiences of discrimination of diseased family members. These results help identify the possible limitations of genetic non-discrimination regulations and provide direction to clinicians supporting their clients as they confront issues of genetic testing and genetic discrimination.

  8. Incidence rates and management of urinary tract infections among children in Dutch general practice: results from a nation-wide registration study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Wing-Yee; de Kwaadsteniet, Marjolein CE; Harmsen, Mirjam; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette WA; Schellevis, François G; van der Wouden, Johannes C

    2006-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate incidence rates of urinary tract infections in Dutch general practice and their association with gender, season and urbanisation level, and to analyse prescription and referral in case of urinary tract infections. Method During one calendar year, 195 general practitioners in 104 practices in the Netherlands registered all their patient contacts. This study was performed by the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL) in 2001. Of 82,053 children aged 0 to 18 years, the following variables were collected: number of episodes per patient, number of contacts per episode, month of the year in which the diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made, age, gender, urbanisation level, drug prescription and referral. Results The overall incidence rate was 19 episodes per 1000 person years. The incidence rate in girls was 8 times as high as in boys. The incidence rate in smaller cities and rural areas was 2 times as high as in the three largest cities. Throughout the year, incidence rates varied with a decrease in summertime for children at the age of 0 to 12 years. Of the prescriptions, 66% were in accordance with current guidelines, but only 18% of the children who had an indication were actually referred. Conclusion This study shows that incidence rates of urinary tract infections are not only related to gender and season, but also to urbanisation. General practitioners in the Netherlands frequently do not follow the clinical guidelines for urinary tract infections, especially with respect to referral. PMID:16584577

  9. Globalisation of the National Judiciary and the Dutch Constitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Mak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the changing practices of the Dutch highest courts, the Hoge Raad and the Afdeling bestuursrechtspraak van de Raad van State, under the influence of globalisation, and the constitutional implications of this development. The increasing intertwinement of legal systems and the increasing possibilities for judges to interact with courts in foreign jurisdictions have stimulated the consideration of foreign legislation and case law in judicial decision-making in individual cases. An empirical study clarifies how the Dutch judges perceive the usefulness of legal comparisons in this context and how foreign law is used in deliberations and judgments. The constitutional implications of the changing practices of the courts are analysed in light of three aspects of the constitutional normative framework for judicial decision-making: the democratic justification of judicial decisions; legal tradition and the nature of cases; and the effectiveness and efficiency of judicial decision-making.

  10. Examining the cross-cultural sensitivity of the Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F and validation of a Dutch version.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Stes

    Full Text Available The Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F is used to examine students' study approaches in higher education. The questionnaire assumes to measure two factors: a deep and a surface study approach. Analyses into the validity and reliability of the original English R-SPQ-2F yielded positive results. In this study, we examined the degree to which these positive results can also be found for the Dutch version that we developed. By comparing our results with the results of earlier studies in different cultures, we conclude cross-cultural sensitivity is an important point to be borne in mind when using the R-SPQ-2F. Our research supports the validity and reliability of our Dutch version of the R-SPQ-2F.

  11. Work environment characteristics associated with quality of care in Dutch nursing homes: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Ramona; Rossum, Erik van; Verbeek, Hilde; Halfens, Ruud J G; Tan, Frans E S; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2017-01-01

    A lack of relationship between direct care staffing levels and quality of care, as found in prior studies, underscores the importance of considering the quality of the work environment instead of only considering staff ratios. Only a few studies, however, have combined direct care staffing with work environment characteristics when assessing the relationship with quality of care in nursing homes. To examine the relationship between direct care staffing levels, work environment characteristics and perceived quality of care in Dutch nursing homes. Cross-sectional, observational study in cooperation with the Dutch Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems. Twenty-four somatic and 31 psychogeriatric wards from 21 nursing homes in the Netherlands. Forty-one ward managers and 274 staff members (registered nurses or certified nurse assistants) from the 55 participating wards. Ward rosters were discussed with managers to obtain an insight into direct care staffing levels (i.e, total direct care staff hours per resident per day). Participating staff members completed a questionnaire on work environment characteristics (i.e., ward culture, team climate, communication and coordination, role model availability, and multidisciplinary collaboration) and they rated the quality of care in their ward. Data were analyzed using multilevel linear regression analyses (random intercept). Separate analyses were conducted for somatic and psychogeriatric wards. In general, staff members were satisfied with the quality of care in their wards. Staff members from psychogeriatric wards scored higher on the statement 'In the event that a family member had to be admitted to a nursing home now, I would recommend this ward'. A better team climate was related to better perceived quality of care in both ward types (p≤0.020). In somatic wards, there was a positive association between multidisciplinary collaboration and agreement by staff of ward recommendation for a family member (p=0.028). In

  12. Goiania incident case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petterson, J.S.

    1988-06-01

    The reasons for wanting to document this case study and present the findings are simple. According to USDOE technical risk assessments (and our own initial work on the Hanford socioeconomic study), the likelihood of a major accident involving exposure to radioactive materials in the process of site characterization, construction, operation, and closure of a high-level waste repository is extremely remote. Most would agree, however, that there is a relatively high probability that a minor accident involving radiological contamination will occur sometime during the lifetime of the repository -- for example, during transport, at an MRS site or at the permanent site itself during repacking and deposition. Thus, one of the major concerns of the Yucca Mountain Socioeconomic Study is the potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential accident scenarios have been under consideration (such as a transportation or other surface accident which results in a significant decline in tourism, the number of conventions, or the selection of Nevada as a retirement residence). The results of the work in Goiania make it clear, however, that such a significant shift in established social patterns and trends is not likely to occur as a direct outcome of a single nuclear-related accident (even, perhaps, a relatively major one), but rather, are likely to occur as a result of the enduring social interpretations of such an accident -- that is, as a result of the process of understanding, communicating, and socially sustaining a particular set of associations with respect to the initial incident

  13. FMCT verification: Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui Zhang

    2001-01-01

    Full text: How to manage the trade-off between the need for transparency and the concern about the disclosure of sensitive information would be a key issue during the negotiations of FMCT verification provision. This paper will explore the general concerns on FMCT verification; and demonstrate what verification measures might be applied to those reprocessing and enrichment plants. A primary goal of an FMCT will be to have the five declared nuclear weapon states and the three that operate unsafeguarded nuclear facilities become parties. One focus in negotiating the FMCT will be verification. Appropriate verification measures should be applied in each case. Most importantly, FMCT verification would focus, in the first instance, on these states' fissile material production facilities. After the FMCT enters into force, all these facilities should be declared. Some would continue operating to produce civil nuclear power or to produce fissile material for non- explosive military uses. The verification measures necessary for these operating facilities would be essentially IAEA safeguards, as currently being applied to non-nuclear weapon states under the NPT. However, some production facilities would be declared and shut down. Thus, one important task of the FMCT verifications will be to confirm the status of these closed facilities. As case studies, this paper will focus on the verification of those shutdown facilities. The FMCT verification system for former military facilities would have to differ in some ways from traditional IAEA safeguards. For example, there could be concerns about the potential loss of sensitive information at these facilities or at collocated facilities. Eventually, some safeguards measures such as environmental sampling might be seen as too intrusive. Thus, effective but less intrusive verification measures may be needed. Some sensitive nuclear facilities would be subject for the first time to international inspections, which could raise concerns

  14. Patient safety in primary allied health care: what can we learn from incidents in a Dutch exploratory cohort study?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dulmen, Simone A; Tacken, Margot A J B; Staal, J Bart; Gaal, Sander; Wensing, Michel; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2011-12-01

    Research on patient safety in allied healthcare is scarce. Our aim was to document patient safety in primary allied healthcare in the Netherlands and to identify factors associated with incidents. DESIGN AND SUBJECT: A retrospective study of 1000 patient records in a representative sample of 20 allied healthcare practices was combined with a prospective incident-reporting study. All records were reviewed by trained researchers to identify patient safety incidents. The incidents were classified and analyzed, using the Prevention and Recovery Information System for Monitoring and Analysis method. Factors associated with incidents were examined in a logistic regression analysis. In 18 out of 1000 (1.8%; 95% confidence interval: 1.0-2.6) records an incident was detected. The main causes of incidents were related to errors in clinical decisions (89%), communication with other healthcare providers (67%), and monitoring (56%). The probability of incidents was higher if more care providers had been involved and if patient records were incomplete (37% of the records). No incidents were reported in the prospective study. The absolute number of incidents was low, which could imply a low risk of harm in Dutch primary allied healthcare. Nevertheless, incompleteness of the patient records and the fact that incidents were mainly caused through human actions suggest that a focus on clinical reasoning and record keeping is needed to further enhance patient safety. Improvements in record keeping will be necessary before accurate incident reporting will be feasible and valid.

  15. Rhythms and Rhymes of Life. Music and Identification processes of Dutch-Moroccan youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazzah, M.

    2008-01-01

    Rhythms and Rhymes of Life: Music and Identification Processes of Dutch-Moroccan Youth is a comprehensive anthropological study of the social significance of music among Dutch-Moroccan youth. In the Netherlands, a Dutch-Moroccan music scene has emerged, including events and websites. Dutch-Moroccan

  16. Picking up the pace – legal slowness and the authority of the judiciary in the acceleration society (a Dutch case study) : A Dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francot, Lyana; Mommers, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    This paper inquires into the nature of the crisis haunting the judiciary in our contemporary society. Drawing upon the work of Hartmut Rosa, it is stated that our society is an acceleration society and that this puts the judiciary under great pressure. The resulting crisis is twofold since it is

  17. Dutch museum marks Einstein anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Calmthout, Matijn

    2016-01-01

    A new painting of Albert Einstein's field equation from his 1915 general theory of relativity was unveiled in a ceremony in November 2015 by the Dutch physicist Robbert Dijkgraaf, who is director of the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study in the US.

  18. The importance of job characteristics in determining medical care-seeking in the Dutch working population, a longitudinal survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbeek, Romy

    2012-08-31

    The working population is ageing, which will increase the number of workers with chronic health complaints, and, as a consequence, the number of workers seeking health care. It is very important to understand factors that influence medical care-seeking in order to control the costs. I will investigate which work characteristics independently attribute to later care-seeking in order to find possibilities to prevent unnecessary or inefficient care-seeking. Data were collected in a longitudinal two-wave study (n = 2305 workers). The outcome measures were visits (yes/no and frequency) to a general practitioner (GP), a physical therapist, a medical specialist and/or a mental health professional. Multivariate regression analyses were carried out separately for men and women for workers with health complaints. In the Dutch working population, personal, health, and work characteristics, but not sickness absence, were associated with later care-seeking. Work characteristics independently attributed to medical care-seeking but only for men and only for the frequency of visits to the GP. Women experience more health complaints and seek health care more often than men. For women, experiencing a work handicap (health complaints that impede work performance) was the only work characteristic associated with more care-seeking (GP). For men, work characteristics that led to less care-seeking were social support by colleagues (GP frequency), high levels of decision latitude (GP frequency) and high levels of social support by the supervisor (medical specialist). Other work characteristics led to more care-seeking: high levels of engagement (GP), full time work (GP frequency) and experiencing a work handicap (physical therapist). We can conclude that personal and health characteristics are most important when explaining medical care-seeking in the Dutch working population. Work characteristics independently attributed to medical care-seeking but only for men and only for the

  19. Final report on case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungberg, Daniel; McKelvey, Maureen; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2012-01-01

    Case study as a research design means investigating a single or multiple instance(s) or setting(s) (i.e. a case) and its entire context to explain a phenomenon and its processes. This is achieved through detailed understanding, usually comprised of multiple sources of information. In this way, case...... studies attempt to provide as a complete an understanding of a (complex) phenomenon as possible. Within the AEGIS project, survey and case study research are complementary. They are complementary in the sense that the former can provide more generalizable evidence on a phenomenon in terms of cross......-sectional data, while the latter can provide more in-depth (qualitative) understanding on specific issues. In systematically examining the case studies, however, this report goes beyond a typical single case study. Here we provide a synthesis of 86 case studies. Multiple case studies, following similar focus...

  20. Strategy Implementation through Hierarchical Couplings in a Management Control Package: An Explorative Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    van der Kolk, Berend; Schokker, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We examine how couplings of management control (MC) elements help to implement an organization’s strategy. Despite prior research stating that couplings between MC elements form fruitful soil for further research, empirical studies in this area are still scarce. We draw on coupling theory to explore three hierarchical relations between MC elements, and examine how these couplings help to implement the organization’s strategy. We conducted a single case study in a medium-sized Dutch municipali...

  1. 425 Case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marinda

    Anaesthesia management of acute aortic dissection type B in ... of a severe, constant abdominal and chest pain radiating to the ... Continuous spinal anaesthesia was induced ... these cases surgical intervention is critical.1,2 Type B of AAD is.

  2. Eating style, overeating and weight gain. A prospective 2-year follow-up study in a representative Dutch sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Strien, Tatjana; Herman, C Peter; Verheijden, Marieke W

    2012-12-01

    This study examined which individuals are particularly at risk for developing overweight and whether there are behavioral lifestyle factors that may attenuate this susceptibility. A prospective study with a 2-year follow-up was conducted in a sample representative of the general population of The Netherlands (n=590). Body mass change (self-reported) was assessed in relation to overeating and change in physical activity (both self-reported), dietary restraint, emotional eating, and external eating, as assessed by the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire. There was a consistent main (suppressive) effect of increased physical activity on BMI change. Only emotional eating and external eating moderated the relation between overeating and body mass change. However, the interaction effect of external eating became borderline significant with Yes or No meaningful weight gain (weight gain >3%) as dependent variable. It was concluded that whilst increasing physical activity may attenuate weight gain, particularly high emotional eaters seem at risk for developing overweight, because overconsumption seems to be more strongly related to weight gain in people with high degrees of emotional eating. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. How to implement process-oriented care: a case study on the implementation of process-oriented in-hospital stroke care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.; Oostenbrugge, R.J. van; Limburg, M.; Merode, G.G. van; Groothuis, S.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch hospitals are in the midst of a transition towards process-oriented organisation to realise optimal and undisturbed care processes. Between 2004 and 2007, the University Hospital of Maastricht conducted a case study implementing process-oriented in-hospital stroke unit care. The case study

  4. Exporting climate change and environmental degradation. How Dutch public money is used to finance the oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.; Stockman, L.; Muttitt, G.; Horta, K.; Kochladze, M.; Lisitsyn, D.; Barannikova, N.

    2005-06-01

    According to this report Dutch public money is being used to support oil production in developing countries through Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) such as the World Bank and European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), and other International Financial Institutions (IFIs) such as Atradius (the Dutch Export Credit Agency) and the European Investment Bank (EIB). The Dutch government contributes to MDBs in two ways: through financial contributions using public money and by voting on the boards of the banks. This report demonstrates the need for far greater parliamentary oversight over the Dutch role in MDBs to keep the use of Dutch public money in line with Dutch government policy. Three case studies illustrate that recent oil projects financed and supported by MDBs and other Dutch government departments are failing the poor and undermining national and international targets on development and climate change: the Cameroon Pipeline in West Africa; the Baku-T'bilisi-Ceyhan pipeline system in the South Caucasus and the Sakhalin-II Oil and Gas Project in far eastern Russia.

  5. Engaging cultural resources to promote mental health in Dutch LSES neighborhoods: study of a community-based participatory media project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, Mare; de Vries, Marten; Horstman, Klasien

    2017-06-01

    Community-based participatory media projects form a promising new strategy for mental health promotion that can help address the mental health-gap identified by the World Health Organization. (2008b) mhGAP, Mental Health Gap Action Programme: Scaling Up Care for Mental, Neurological and Substance Use Disorders. World Health Organization, Geneva. In this article we present an ethnographic study about a participatory media project that was developed to promote mental health in selected Dutch low socio-economic status neighborhoods. Through narrowcastings (group film viewings), participant observation and interviews we mapped the ways in which the media project effected and facilitated the collective sense-making process of the audience with regard to sources of stress impacting mental health and opportunities for action. These determinants of mental health are shaped by cultural dimensions, since the cultural context shapes everyday experiences of stress as well as the resources and skills to manage them. Our analysis shows that the media project engaged cultural resources to challenge stressful social scripts. We conclude that more attention should be paid to cultural narratives in a community to understand how health promotion strategies can support social resilience. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Opinions about euthanasia and advanced dementia: a qualitative study among Dutch physicians and members of the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenhoven, Pauline S C; Raijmakers, Natasja J H; van Delden, Johannes J M; Rietjens, Judith A C; van Tol, Donald G; van de Vathorst, Suzanne; de Graeff, Nienke; Weyers, Heleen A M; van der Heide, Agnes; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W

    2015-01-28

    The Dutch law states that a physician may perform euthanasia according to a written advance euthanasia directive (AED) when a patient is incompetent as long as all legal criteria of due care are met. This may also hold for patients with advanced dementia. We investigated the differing opinions of physicians and members of the general public on the acceptability of euthanasia in patients with advanced dementia. In this qualitative study, 16 medical specialists, 19 general practitioners, 16 elderly physicians and 16 members of the general public were interviewed and asked for their opinions about a vignette on euthanasia based on an AED in a patient with advanced dementia. Members of the general public perceived advanced dementia as a debilitating and degrading disease. Physicians emphasized the need for direct communication with the patient when making decisions about euthanasia. Respondent from both groups acknowledged difficulties in the assessment of patients' autonomous wishes and the unbearableness of their suffering. Legally, an AED may replace direct communication with patients about their request for euthanasia. In practice, physicians are reluctant to forego adequate verbal communication with the patient because they wish to verify the voluntariness of patients' request and the unbearableness of suffering. For this reason, the applicability of AEDs in advanced dementia seems limited.

  7. Dutch voices: exploring the role of oral history in Dutch secondary history teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, Tim; Holthuis, Paul; Trškan, Danijela

    2016-01-01

    Oral history may enhance students’ historical content knowledge, historical reasoning competencies, and motivation to learn history. However, little is known regarding the role of oral history in Dutch history education. This study therefore explores the role of oral history in Dutch history

  8. Perceived antecedents of marital satisfaction among Turkish, Turkish-Dutch, and Dutch couples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celenk, O.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    We studied mainstream couples in The Netherlands and Turkey as well as Turkish-Dutch immigrant couples to address cultural factors associated with marital satisfaction. A total of 13 Turkish (mainstream couples living in Turkey), 19 Turkish-Dutch (Turkish immigrant couples living in The

  9. Prayer Healing: A Case Study Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijthoff, Dirk J; van der Kooi, Cornelis; Glas, Gerrit; Abma, Tineke A

    2017-01-01

    Context • Prayer healing is a common practice in many religious communities around the world. Even in the highly secularized Dutch society, cases of prayer healing are occasionally reported in the media, often generating public attention. There is an ongoing debate regarding whether such miraculous cures do actually occur and how to interpret them. Objective • The aim of the article was to present a research protocol for the investigation of reported cases of remarkable and/or unexplained healing after prayer. Design • The research team developed a method to perform a retrospective, case-based study of prayer healing. Reported prayer healings can be investigated systematically in accordance with a step-by-step methodology. The focus is on understanding the healing by studying it from multiple perspectives, using both medical judgment and patients' narratives collected by qualitative methods Setting • The study occurred at Vrije Universiteit (VU) and VU Medical Center (Amsterdam, Netherlands) as well as the general medical practice of the first author. Participants • Potential participants could be any individuals in the Netherlands or neighboring countries who claim to have been healed through prayer. The reports of healing came from multiple sources, including the research team's medical practices and their direct vicinities, newspaper articles, prayer healers, and medical colleagues. Outcome Measures • Medical data were obtained before and after prayer. Subsequently, a member of a research team and of a medical assessment committee made a standardized judgment that evaluated whether a cure was clinically remarkable or scientifically unexplained. The participants' experiences and insider perspectives were studied, using in-depth interviews in accordance with a qualitative research methodology, to gain insight into the perceptions and explanations of the cures that were offered by participants and by the members of the medical assessment committee. The

  10. The Dutch nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering Services Ltd. has, in fulfillment of its contractual commitment to the Dutch Industrial Council for Energy and Environment Technology (IREM), investigated the broad capability of the Dutch industry in playing a major role in the supply of goods and services for the construction of nuclear plants in the Netherlands. The findings are summarized in this document. 5 tabs

  11. Dutch elm disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Walters

    1992-01-01

    Since its discovery in the United States in 1930, Dutch elm disease has killed thousands of native elms. The three native elms, American, slippery, and rock, have little or no resistance to Dutch elm disease, but individual trees within each species vary in susceptibility to the disease. The most important of these, American elm, is scattered in upland stands but is...

  12. Do patients in Dutch nursing homes have more pressure ulcers than patients in German nursing homes? A prospective multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesterberends, Esther; Halfens, Ruud J G; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; Ambergen, Ton A W; Lohrmann, Christa; Neyens, Jacques C L; Schols, Jos M G A

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the incidence of pressure ulcers in nursing homes in the Netherlands and Germany differs and, if so, to identify resident-related risk factors, nursing-related interventions, and structural factors associated with pressure ulcer development in nursing home residents. A prospective multicenter cohort study. Ten nursing homes in the Netherlands and 11 nursing homes in Germany (around Berlin and Brandenburg). A total of 547 newly admitted nursing home residents, of which 240 were Dutch and 307 were German. Residents had an expected length of stay of 12 weeks or longer. Data were collected for each resident over a 12-week period and included resident characteristics (eg, demographics, medical history, Braden scale scores, nutritional factors), pressure ulcer prevention and treatment characteristics, staffing ratios and other structural nursing home characteristics, and outcome (pressure ulcer development during the study). Data were obtained by trained research assistants. A significantly higher pressure ulcer incidence rate was found for the Dutch nursing homes (33.3%) compared with the German nursing homes (14.3%). Six factors that explain the difference in pressure ulcer incidence rates were identified: dementia, analgesics use, the use of transfer aids, repositioning the residents, the availability of a tissue viability nurse on the ward, and regular internal quality controls in the nursing home. The pressure ulcer incidence was significantly higher in Dutch nursing homes than in German nursing homes. Factors related to residents, nursing care and structure explain this difference in incidence rates. Continuous attention to pressure ulcer care is important for all health care settings and countries, but Dutch nursing homes especially should pay more attention to repositioning residents, the necessity and correct use of transfer aids, the necessity of analgesics use, the tasks of the tissue viability nurse, and the performance of regular

  13. The Dutch Healthy Diet index as assessed by 24 h recalls and FFQ: associations with biomarkers from a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lee, Linde; Feskens, Edith J M; Hooft van Huysduynen, Eveline J C; de Vries, Jeanne H M; van 't Veer, Pieter; Geelen, Anouk

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch Healthy Diet index (DHD-index) was developed using data from two 24 h recalls (24hR) and appeared useful to evaluate diet quality in Dutch adults. As many epidemiologic studies use FFQ, we now estimated the DHD-index score using FFQ data. We compared whether this score showed similar associations with participants' characteristics, micronutrient intakes, and biomarkers of intake and metabolism compared with the DHD-index using 24hR data. Data of 121 Dutch participants of the European Food Consumption Validation study were used. Dietary intake was assessed by two 24hR and a 180-item FFQ. Biomarkers measured were serum total cholesterol and carotenoids, EPA + DHA in plasma phospholipids and 24 h urinary Na. A correlation of 0·48 (95 % CI 0·33, 0·61) was observed between the DHD-index score based on 24hR data and on FFQ data. Classification of participants into the same tertiles of the DHD-index was achieved for 57 %. Women showed higher DHD-index scores. Energy intake was inversely associated with both DHD-index scores. Furthermore, age and intakes of folate, Fe, Mg, K, vitamin B6 and vitamin C were positively associated with both DHD-index scores. DHD-index scores showed acceptable correlations with the four combined biomarkers taking energy intake into account (r 24hR 0.55; r FFQ 0.51). In conclusion, the DHD-index score based on FFQ data shows similar associations with participants' characteristics, energy intake, micronutrient intake and biomarkers compared with the score based on 24hR data. Furthermore, ranking of participants was acceptable for both methods. FFQ data may therefore be used to assess diet quality using the DHD-index in Dutch populations.

  14. The Factor Structure, Predictors, and Percentile Norms of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D Scale in the Dutch-speaking Adult Population of Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D is a commonly used self-report scale to measure depressive symptoms in the general population. In the present study, the Dutch version of the CES-D was administered to a sample of 837 Dutch-speaking adults of Belgium to examine the factor structure of the scale. Using confirmatory factory analysis (CFA, four first-order models and two second-order models were tested, and the second-order factor model with three pairs of correlated error terms provided the best fit to the data. Second, five socio-demographic variables (age, gender, education level, relation status, and family history of depression were included as covariates to the second-order factor model to explore the associations between background characteristics and the latent factor depression using a multiple indicators and multiple causes (MIMIC approach. Age had a significantly negative effect on depression, but the effect was not substantial. Female gender, lower education level, being single or widowed, and having a family history of depression were found to be significant predictors of higher levels of depression symptomatology. Finally, percentile norms on the CES-D raw scores were provided for subgroups of gender by education level for the general Dutch-speaking adult population of Belgium.

  15. Self-reported eating rate is associated with weight status in a Dutch population: a validation study and a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boer, Janet H W; Kranendonk, Jentina; van de Wiel, Anne; Feskens, Edith J M; Geelen, Anouk; Mars, Monica

    2017-09-08

    Observational studies performed in Asian populations suggest that eating rate is related to BMI. This paper investigates the association between self-reported eating rate (SRER) and body mass index (BMI) in a Dutch population, after having validated SRER against actual eating rate. Two studies were performed; a validation and a cross-sectional study. In the validation study SRER (i.e., 'slow', 'average', or 'fast') was obtained from 57 participants (men/women = 16/41, age: mean ± SD = 22.6 ± 2.8 yrs., BMI: mean ± SD = 22.1 ± 2.8 kg/m 2 ) and in these participants actual eating rate was measured for three food products. Using analysis of variance the association between SRER and actual eating rate was studied. The association between SRER and BMI was investigated in cross-sectional data from the NQplus cohort (i.e., 1473 Dutch adults; men/women = 741/732, age: mean ± SD = 54.6 ± 11.7 yrs., BMI: mean ± SD = 25.9 ± 4.0 kg/m 2 ) using (multiple) linear regression analysis. In the validation study actual eating rate increased proportionally with SRER (for all three food products P men and women (P = 0.03 and P men; self-reported fast-eating men had a 0.29 kg/m 2 (95% CI -0.22, 0.80) higher BMI compared to average-speed-eating men, after adjusting for confounders. These studies show that self-reported eating rate reflects actual eating rate on a group-level, and that a high self-reported eating rate is associated with a higher BMI in this Dutch population.

  16. Risk profiles of youth in pre-trial detention: a comparative study of Moroccan and Dutch male

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Moroccan male adolescents in the Netherlands are highly overrepresented in youth crime, compared to both native Dutch and other ethnic minority groups. The current thesis has been the first to examine the characteristics of Moroccan adolescent offenders in the Netherlands in relation to various

  17. An Explorative Study on the Connection between Ethical Leadership, Prototypicality and Organizational Misbehavior in a Dutch Fire Service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolde, A. de; Groenendaal, J.; Helsloot, I.; Schmidt, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine the relationship between ethical leadership and organizational misbehavior in a Dutch fire service and the extent to which prototypicality mediates this relationship. It is found that ethical leadership of battalion chiefs is statistically negatively related to the

  18. Dutch police officers' preparation and performance of their arrest and self-defence skills: A questionnaire study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renden, P.G.; Nieuwenhuys, A.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.; Oudejans, R.R.D.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how Dutch police officers perceive their preparation for arrest and self-defence skills (ASDS) and their ability to manage violence on duty. Furthermore, we assessed whether additional experience (i.e., by having encountered violence on duty or by practicing martial arts) and

  19. Systolic blood pressure reactions to acute stress are associated with future hypertension status in the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carroll, Douglas; Ginty, Annie T.; Painter, Rebecca C.; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Phillips, Anna C.; de Rooij, Susanne R.

    2012-01-01

    These analyses examined the association between blood pressure reactions to acute psychological stress and subsequent hypertension status in a substantial Dutch cohort. Blood pressure was recorded during a resting baseline and during three acute stress tasks, Stroop colour word, mirror tracing and

  20. Language development in deaf children’s interactions with deaf and hearing adults. A Dutch longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatter-Folmer, H.A.K.; Hout, R.W.N.M. van; Kolen, E.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2006-01-01

    The language development of two deaf girls and four deaf boys in Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) and spoken Dutch was investigated longitudinally. At the start, the mean age of the children was 3;5. All data were collected in video-recorded semistructured conversations between individual

  1. Dutch police officers’ preparation and performance of their arrest and self-defence skills: A questionnaire study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renden, P.G.; Nieuwenhuys, A.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.; Oudejans, R.R.D.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how Dutch police officers perceive their preparation for arrest and self-defence skills (ASDS) and their ability to manage violence on duty. Furthermore, we assessed whether additional experience (i.e., by having encountered violence on duty or by practicing martial arts) and

  2. Lipoprotein (a): relation to other risk factors and genetic heritability; results from a Dutch parent-twin study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, D.I.; Kaptein, A; Kempen, H.J.; Gevers Leuven, J.A.; Princen, H.M.

    1993-01-01

    We measured plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) in a sample of 152 Dutch adolescent mono- and dizygotic twin pairs and their parents. The distribution of Lp(a) levels was skewed, with the highest frequencies at low levels and was similar for adult men and women and their children. The

  3. The implementation of a quality system in the Dutch GP specialty training: barriers and facilitators; a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, N.; Braspenning, J.C.; Roosmalen, S. van; Dijk, N. van; Visser, Machteld

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality assurance programs in medical education are introduced to gain insight into the quality of such programs and to trigger improvements. Although of utmost importance, research on the implementation of such programs is scarce. The Dutch General Practice (GP) specialty training

  4. The implementation of a quality system in the Dutch GP specialty training: barriers and facilitators; a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, Nienke; Braspenning, Jozé; van Roosmalen, Sanne; van Dijk, Nynke; Visser, Mechteld

    2017-01-01

    Quality assurance programs in medical education are introduced to gain insight into the quality of such programs and to trigger improvements. Although of utmost importance, research on the implementation of such programs is scarce. The Dutch General Practice (GP) specialty training institutes used

  5. Flowers for food? : Scoping study on Dutch flower farms, land governance and local food security in Eastern Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirigia, Evans; Betsema, G.; van Westen, A.C.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068876572; Zoomers, E.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073723592

    2016-01-01

    The Netherlands is an important actor in the floriculture sector worldwide. Many Dutch flower companies have in recent years established businesses in the Global South as a result of favourable climatic conditions, available land and water resources, and the presence of cheap labour. With the aim to

  6. Emotion, Engagement, and Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Terry, David R.; Lemons, Paula; Armstrong, Norris; Brickman, Peggy; Ribbens, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Three college faculty taught large general biology classes using case studies and personal response systems (clickers). Each instructor taught the same eight cases in two different sections, except the questions within the cases differed. In one section the questions were lower order (LO) factual inquiries, and in the other they were largely…

  7. Prevalence and incidence of mental health problems among Dutch medical students and the study-related and personal risk factors: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Jorien M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2016-11-01

    A high prevalence of mental health problems (i.e. depression and/or anxiety) has been found in medical students in comparison with the general population. Therefore, the objective was first to study the prevalence and 1-year incidence of symptoms of depression, anxiety and any mental health problems among Dutch medical students and, second, to study which study-related and personal factors present a risk of these mental health problems. A 1-year prospective longitudinal study was performed among medical students of two medical faculties in the Netherlands (n=951). Health problems and study-related and personal factors were measured with an online questionnaire. Mental health problems were assessed by depression and/or anxiety symptoms (BSI-DEP and BSI-ANG). Univariate and multivariate hierarchical logistic regression analyses were performed to examine which of the study-related and personal factors predict mental health problems. At follow-up, 36%, 28% and 48% of the medical students reported symptoms of depression, anxiety and mental health problems, respectively. The incidence between 2010 and 2011 for depression was 20%, 17% for anxiety and 25% for mental health problems. Students who are worried about their own health during medical education are at an increased risk of future mental health problems (OR 2.0 [1.3-2.9], p=0.00). Excessive drinking behavior is a protective factor in this study (OR 0.7 [0.5-0.9], p=0.02). This study shows that only two out of nine factors are significantly associated with mental health problems among Dutch medical students, one risk factor and one protective factor.

  8. Governance of ecosystem services on small islands: three contrasting cases for St. Eustatius in the Dutch Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Polman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural ecosystems provide an attractive focus for tourism on small islands. But at the same time tourism and other human actions can be detrimental to these ecosystems especially because governance of the ecosystem may be difficult due to the limited resilience of small island ecosystems. In this paper, we focus on which conditions self-governance will be the appropriate governance mechanism of ecosystem services on small islands. We apply the Ostrom (2009 framework for common-pool resources in a social-ecological system, and select the relevant indicators for small islands. We scored these indicators for three cases (environmental issues in St. Eustatius. These cases show that self-organization of ecosystem services is not an outcome easily achieved. The unevenly distributed benefits of potential measures are found to decrease community support of measures that could reinforce these ecosystem services.

  9. Cancer patients use hospital-based care until death: a further analysis of the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeuse, Jan J; van der Linden, Yvette M; Post, Wendy J; Wanders, Rinus; Gans, Rijk O B; Leer, Jan Willem H; Reyners, Anna K L

    2011-10-01

    To describe health care utilization (HCU) at the end of life in cancer patients. These data are relevant to plan palliative care services, and to develop training programs for involved health care professionals. The Dutch Bone Metastasis Study (DBMS) was a nationwide study proving equal effectiveness of single fraction palliative radiotherapy compared with multiple fractions for painful bone metastases in 1157 patients. The 860 (74%) patients who died during follow-up were included in the current analysis. The main outcome was the frequency of hospital-based (outpatient contact or admission) and/or general practitioner (GP) contact during the last 12 weeks of life. Changes in HCU towards death were related to data on quality of life and pain intensity using a multilevel regression model. Hospital-based HCU was reported in 1801 (63%) returned questionnaires, whereas GP contact was stated in 1246 (43%). In 573 (20%) questionnaires, both types of HCU were reported. In multilevel regression analyses, the frequency of outpatient contacts remained constant during the weeks towards death, whereas the frequency of GP contacts increased. Lower valuation of quality of life was related to both GP- and hospital-based HCU. There was a high consumption of hospital-based HCU in the last 12 weeks of life of cancer patients with bone metastases. Hospital-based HCU did not decrease during the weeks towards death, despite an increase in GP contacts. Future planning of palliative care and training programs should encompass close collaboration between medical specialists and GPs to optimize end-of-life care.

  10. How Ghanaian, African-Surinamese and Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beune, Erik J A J; Haafkens, Joke A; Agyemang, Charles; Schuster, John S; Willems, Dick L

    2008-04-01

    To explore and compare how Ghanaian, African-Surinamese (Surinamese), and White-Dutch patients perceive and manage antihypertensive drug treatment in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Qualitative study was conducted using detailed interviews with a purposive sample of 46 hypertensive patients without comorbidity who were prescribed antihypertensives. Patients in all the ethnic groups actively decided how to manage their prescribed antihypertensive regimens. In all the groups, confidence in the doctor and beneficial effects of medication were reasons for taking prescribed antihypertensive dosage. Particularly, ethnic-minority patients reported lowering or leaving off the prescribed medication dosage. Explanations for altering prescribed dosage comprised disliking chemical medications, fear of side effects and preference for alternative treatment. Surinamese and Ghanaian men also worried about the negative effects of antihypertensives on their sexual performance. Some Ghanaians mentioned fear of addiction or lack of money as explanations for altering prescribed dosage. Surinamese and Ghanaians often discontinued medication when visiting their homeland. Some respondents from all ethnic groups preferred natural treatments although treatment type varied. Patients' explanations for their decisions regarding the use of antihypertensives are often influenced by sociocultural issues and in ethnic-minority groups also by migration-related issues. Self-alteration of prescribed medication among Surinamese and Ghanaians may contribute to the low blood pressure (BP) control rate and high rate of malignant hypertension reported among these populations in the Netherlands. This study provides new information, which can help clinicians to understand how patients of diverse ethnic populations think about managing antihypertensive drug treatment and to address ethnic disparities in medication adherence and BP control.

  11. Association between quality management and performance indicators in Dutch diabetes care groups: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J E; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Klomp, Maarten L H; Romeijnders, Arnold C M; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2015-05-11

    To enhance the quality of diabetes care in the Netherlands, so-called care groups with three to 250 general practitioners emerged to organise and coordinate diabetes care. This introduced a new quality management level in addition to the quality management of separate general practices. We hypothesised that this new level of quality management might be associated with the aggregate performance indicators on the patient level. Therefore, we aimed to explore the association between quality management at the care group level and its aggregate performance indicators. A cross-sectional study. All Dutch care groups (n=97). 23 care groups provided aggregate register-based performance indicators of all their practices as well as data on quality management measured with a questionnaire filled out by 1 or 2 of their quality managers. The association between quality management, overall and in 6 domains ('organisation of care', 'multidisciplinary teamwork', 'patient centredness', 'performance management', 'quality improvement policy' and 'management strategies') on the one hand and 3 process indicators (the percentages of patients with at least 1 measurement of glycated haemoglobin, lipid profile and systolic blood pressure), and 3 intermediate outcome indicators (the percentages of patients with glycated haemoglobin below 53 mmol/mol (7%); low-density lipoprotein cholesterol below 2.5 mmol/L; and systolic blood pressure below 140 mm Hg) by weighted univariable linear regression. The domain 'management strategies' was significantly associated with the percentage of patients with a glycated haemoglobin quality management were not associated with aggregate process or outcome indicators. This first exploratory study on quality management showed weak or no associations between quality management of diabetes care groups and their performance. It remains uncertain whether this second layer on quality management adds to better quality of care. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  12. A competency based selection procedure for Dutch postgraduate GP training: a pilot study on validity and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Margit I; Tromp, Fred; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Pieters, Ron H M; Damoiseaux, Roger A M J; Kuyvenhoven, Marijke M

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Background: Historically, semi-structured interviews (SSI) have been the core of the Dutch selection for postgraduate general practice (GP) training. This paper describes a pilot study on a newly designed competency-based selection procedure that assesses whether candidates have the competencies that are required to complete GP training. The objective was to explore reliability and validity aspects of the instruments developed. The new selection procedure comprising the National GP Knowledge Test (LHK), a situational judgement tests (SJT), a patterned behaviour descriptive interview (PBDI) and a simulated encounter (SIM) was piloted alongside the current procedure. Forty-seven candidates volunteered in both procedures. Admission decision was based on the results of the current procedure. Study participants did hardly differ from the other candidates. The mean scores of the candidates on the LHK and SJT were 21.9 % (SD 8.7) and 83.8% (SD 3.1), respectively. The mean self-reported competency scores (PBDI) were higher than the observed competencies (SIM): 3.7(SD 0.5) and 2.9(SD 0.6), respectively. Content-related competencies showed low correlations with one another when measured with different instruments, whereas more diverse competencies measured by a single instrument showed strong to moderate correlations. Moreover, a moderate correlation between LHK and SJT was found. The internal consistencies (intraclass correlation, ICC) of LHK and SJT were poor while the ICC of PBDI and SIM showed acceptable levels of reliability. Findings on content validity and reliability of these new instruments are promising to realize a competency based procedure. Further development of the instruments and research on predictive validity should be pursued.

  13. Building theories from case study research: the progressive case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Meredith (1998) argues for more case and field research studies in the field of operations management. Based on a literature review, we discuss several existing approaches to case studies and their characteristics. These approaches include; the Grounded Theory approach which proposes no prior

  14. Theory Testing Using Case Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ann-Kristina Løkke; Dissing Sørensen, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The appropriateness of case studies as a tool for theory testing is still a controversial issue, and discussions about the weaknesses of such research designs have previously taken precedence over those about its strengths. The purpose of the paper is to examine and revive the approach of theory...... testing using case studies, including the associated research goal, analysis, and generalisability. We argue that research designs for theory testing using case studies differ from theorybuilding case study research designs because different research projects serve different purposes and follow different...... research paths....

  15. Sandstone compaction under actively controlled uniaxial strain conditions - an experimental study on the causes of subsidence in the Dutch Wadden Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, Sander; Mossop, Antony; van der Linden, Arjan; Zuiderwijk, Pedro; Makurat, Axel; van Eijs, Rob

    2016-04-01

    simultaneously operating elastic and inelastic processes. The measured strains are slightly higher for samples with higher porosity, but seem rather insensitive to temperature, and pore fluid composition. Even given the fast depletion in our experiments compared to the field case, we find that most of the strain response in the rock is close to instantaneous. A comparison of micrographs before and after testing show that the rock material contains up to 22% more cracked grains after testing, from which we infer that significant deformation occurs due to grain cracking and re-arrangement mechanisms. However, a comparison with independently generated compressive strength data demonstrates that the cracking effects do not alter the inherent strength of the rock. We conclude that progressive microscale damage and re-arrangement is responsible for the majority of the inelastic strain measured, and that these mechanisms are closely similar to those operating under triaxial stress conditions, but that the orientation of the damage is, in our case, consistent with the directionality in the effective stress increase. Acknowledgements: We thank Patrick Baud, Rune Holt, Robert Zimmerman, and the other members of the Waddenacademie, an advisory committee under the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences (KNAW), for their helpful suggestions and support during the course of this study. Ruud van Boom and Eilard Hoogerduijn-Strating, at NAM, are thanked for their continuing support.

  16. Personality traits are associated with research misbehavior in Dutch scientists : A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdink, Joeri; Bouter, Lex; Veldkamp, C.L.S.; van de Ven, Peter; Wicherts, J.M.; Smulders, Yvo; Dorta-González, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Personality influences decision making and ethical considerations. Its influence on the occurrence of research misbehavior has never been studied. This study aims to determine the association between personality traits and self-reported questionable research practices and research

  17. Air Pollution and Mortality in Seven Million Adults : The Dutch Environmental Longitudinal Study (DUELS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Paul H; Marra, Marten; Ameling, Caroline B; Hoek, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069553475; Beelen, Rob|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483100X; de Hoogh, Kees; Breugelmans, Oscar; Kruize, Hanneke; Janssen, Nicole A H; Houthuijs, Danny

    BACKGROUND: Long-term exposure to air pollution has been associated with mortality in urban cohort studies. Few studies have investigated this association in large-scale population registries, including non-urban populations. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between

  18. Doing masculinity, not doing health? a qualitative study among dutch male employees about health beliefs and workplace physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Rijk Angelique

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being female is a strong predictor of health promoting behaviours. Workplaces show great potential for lifestyle interventions, but such interventions do not necessarily take the gendered background of lifestyle behaviours into account. A perspective analyzing how masculine gender norms affect health promoting behaviours is important. This study aims to explore men's health beliefs and attitudes towards health promotion; in particular, it explores workplace physical activity in relation to masculine ideals among male employees. Methods In the Fall of 2008, we interviewed 13 white Dutch male employees aged 23-56 years. The men worked in a wide range of professions and occupational sectors and all interviewees had been offered a workplace physical activity program. Interviews lasted approximately one to one-and-a-half hour and addressed beliefs about health and lifestyle behaviours including workplace physical activity, as well as normative beliefs about masculinity. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Two normative themes were found: first, the ideal man is equated with being a winner and real men are prepared to compete, and second, real men are not whiners and ideally, not vulnerable. Workplace physical activity is associated with a particular type of masculinity - young, occupied with looks, and interested in muscle building. Masculine norms are related to challenging health while taking care of health is feminine and, hence, something to avoid. Workplace physical activity is not framed as a health measure, and not mentioned as of importance to the work role. Conclusions Competitiveness and nonchalant attitudes towards health shape masculine ideals. In regards to workplace physical activity, some men resist what they perceive to be an emphasis on muscled looks, whereas for others it contributes to looking self-confident. In order to establish a greater reach among vulnerable employees such as ageing men

  19. Doing masculinity, not doing health? A qualitative study among Dutch male employees about health beliefs and workplace physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Petra; Seesing, Hannes; de Rijk, Angelique

    2010-11-19

    Being female is a strong predictor of health promoting behaviours. Workplaces show great potential for lifestyle interventions, but such interventions do not necessarily take the gendered background of lifestyle behaviours into account. A perspective analyzing how masculine gender norms affect health promoting behaviours is important. This study aims to explore men's health beliefs and attitudes towards health promotion; in particular, it explores workplace physical activity in relation to masculine ideals among male employees. In the Fall of 2008, we interviewed 13 white Dutch male employees aged 23-56 years. The men worked in a wide range of professions and occupational sectors and all interviewees had been offered a workplace physical activity program. Interviews lasted approximately one to one-and-a-half hour and addressed beliefs about health and lifestyle behaviours including workplace physical activity, as well as normative beliefs about masculinity. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Two normative themes were found: first, the ideal man is equated with being a winner and real men are prepared to compete, and second, real men are not whiners and ideally, not vulnerable. Workplace physical activity is associated with a particular type of masculinity - young, occupied with looks, and interested in muscle building. Masculine norms are related to challenging health while taking care of health is feminine and, hence, something to avoid. Workplace physical activity is not framed as a health measure, and not mentioned as of importance to the work role. Competitiveness and nonchalant attitudes towards health shape masculine ideals. In regards to workplace physical activity, some men resist what they perceive to be an emphasis on muscled looks, whereas for others it contributes to looking self-confident. In order to establish a greater reach among vulnerable employees such as ageing men, worksite health promotion programs including workplace physical

  20. Cultural Hybridity Reconsidered : Religious Visual Culture and the Dutch Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronks, E.

    2012-01-01

    This article engages with the overriding tendency to see cultural hybridity as a progressive force in the Dutch Republic, focusing on the case of Dutch religious literature. It is a puzzling fact that in the literary realm, processes of cultural hybridity were put on hold between 1560 and 1680. In

  1. Overcoming marginalisation? Gender and ethnic segregation in the Dutch construction, health, IT and printing industries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, M.; Roosblad, J.

    2004-01-01

    It is common knowledge that indigenous men generally have a better position in the labour market than women and ethnic minorities. This study deals with the question why this is the case in certain sectors of the Dutch economy. The text discusses the labour market attainment for women and ethnic

  2. Overcoming marginalisation? Gender and ethnic segregation in the Dutch construction, health, IT and printing industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, M.; Roosblad, J.

    2004-01-01

    It is common knowledge that indigenous men generally have a better position in the labour market than women and ethnic minorities. This study deals with the question why this is the case in certain sectors of the Dutch economy. The text discusses the labour market attainment for women and ethnic

  3. Goal orientations, beliefs about success, and performance improvement among young elite Dutch soccer players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, Nico W.; Duda, Joan L.

    1999-01-01

    Extending past work testing goal perspective theory in sport, one purpose of this study was to examine, via a longitudinal design, the relationship of goal orientations to the beliefs about the causes of success in the case of elite male Dutch soccer players. A second purpose was to determine the

  4. Studies in cow’s milk allergy: results from the Dutch EuroPrevall birth cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrus, N.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Cow’s milk allergy is a common disease in infancy. However, until recently accurate numbers were not available. To investigate how many infants suffered from cow’s milk allergy, the EuroPrevall study was designed. In this European, multicentre study, nine European hospitals followed over 12,000

  5. Study Protocol- An exploratory trial on health promoting schools at Dutch secondary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, Vincent; Leeuw, Rob J. de; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent studies show adolescent health-related behaviours to co-occur synergistically. This paper describes the study design for an exploratory trial on the effects of a comprehensive, whole-school health promoting school intervention. This intervention tackles seven different behavioural

  6. Prenatal undernutrition and leukocyte telomere length in late adulthood: the Dutch famine birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Susanne R.; van Pelt, Ans M. M.; Ozanne, Susan E.; Korver, Cindy M.; van Daalen, Saskia K. M.; Painter, Rebecca C.; Schwab, Matthias; Viegas, Marcelo H.; Roseboom, Tessa J.

    2015-01-01

    Energy restriction in prenatal life has detrimental effects on later life health and longevity. Studies in rats have shown that the shortening of telomeres in key tissues plays an important role in this association. The aim of the current study was to investigate leukocyte telomere length in

  7. Mortality risk in children with epilepsy : The Dutch Study of Epilepsy in Childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Westendorp, RGJ; Geerts, AT; Arts, WFM; Peeters, EAJ; van Donselaar, VA; Stroink, H; Brouwer, O.F.

    Objective. Long-term follow-up studies of patients with epilepsy have revealed an increased mortality risk compared with the general population. Mortality of children who have epilepsy in modern times is as yet unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine mortality of children

  8. Theory testing using case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing Sørensen, Pernille; Løkke Nielsen, Ann-Kristina

    2006-01-01

    on the strengths of theory-testing case studies. We specify research paths associated with theory testing in case studies and present a coherent argument for the logic of theoretical development and refinement using case studies. We emphasize different uses of rival explanations and their implications for research...... design. Finally, we discuss the epistemological logic, i.e., the value to larger research programmes, of such studies and, following Lakatos, conclude that the value of theory-testing case studies lies beyond naïve falsification and in their contribution to developing research programmes in a progressive......Case studies may have different research goals. One such goal is the testing of small-scale and middle-range theories. Theory testing refers to the critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the 'why' and 'how' of a specified phenomenon in a particular setting. In this paper, we focus...

  9. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in recalls from the Dutch breast cancer screening program: validation of results in a large multireader, multicase study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalji, U C; Houben, I P L; Prevos, R; Gommers, S; van Goethem, M; Vanwetswinkel, S; Pijnappel, R; Steeman, R; Frotscher, C; Mok, W; Nelemans, P; Smidt, M L; Beets-Tan, R G; Wildberger, J E; Lobbes, M B I

    2016-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a promising problem-solving tool in women referred from a breast cancer screening program. We aimed to study the validity of preliminary results of CESM using a larger panel of radiologists with different levels of CESM experience. All women referred from the Dutch breast cancer screening program were eligible for CESM. 199 consecutive cases were viewed by ten radiologists. Four had extensive CESM experience, three had no CESM experience but were experienced breast radiologists, and three were residents. All readers provided a BI-RADS score for the low-energy CESM images first, after which the score could be adjusted when viewing the entire CESM exam. BI-RADS 1-3 were considered benign and BI-RADS 4-5 malignant. With this cutoff, we calculated sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve. CESM increased diagnostic accuracy in all readers. The performance for all readers using CESM was: sensitivity 96.9 % (+3.9 %), specificity 69.7 % (+33.8 %) and area under the ROC curve 0.833 (+0.188). CESM is superior to conventional mammography, with excellent problem-solving capabilities in women referred from the breast cancer screening program. Previous results were confirmed even in a larger panel of readers with varying CESM experience. • CESM is consistently superior to conventional mammography • CESM increases diagnostic accuracy regardless of a reader's experience • CESM is an excellent problem-solving tool in recalls from screening programs.

  10. A nationwide Dutch study regarding treatment portals for elective neck irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dieren, E B [Integraal Kankercentrum, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Nowak, P J.C.M.; Van Soernsen de Koste, J.R.; Van Est, H; Heijmen, B J.M.; Levendag, P C

    1995-12-01

    The variation in treatment portals for elective radiotherapy of the neck, and the three-dimensional dosimetric consequences of this variation was assessed. Therefore, 16 experienced radiation oncologists from all major head and neck cooperative groups in the Netherlands (n=11) were asked to define RT-portals on a lateral and/or AP simulation film, for (routine) elective neck irradiation for a T2 tumor of the mobile tongue and a T3 tumor of the supraglottic larynx. Treatment portals were compared and evaluated using a three-dimensional treatment planning system and CT data with contoured critical structures and target volume. The CT-defined clinical target volume was mutually agreed upon by ENT-surgeons and radiation oncologists. Large differences were seen in treated volume (a factor of five). In addition, due to the variation in the cranial boundary of the RT-portals, the estimated NTCP varied considerably (0-50%). Moreover, several of the RT-portals did not adequately cover the CT-defined target volume. Even amongst experienced head and neck radiation oncologists, little agreement was observed with respect to treatment technique and size of the treatment portals in case of elective neck irradiation. This results in a considerable variation in treated volume. As a consequence, a large difference exists in the anticipated probability of normal tissue complication, and possibly in tumor control probability. Therefore, a definition of target volume and, consequently, a standardization of elective neck portals in mandatory. This is even more important if the primary tumor and clinically node-negative neck are to be treated by 3D conformal RT using multiple CT-slices for target delineation and positioning of BEV blocks in order to spare the normal tissue function with maximum tumor control probability.

  11. A nationwide Dutch study regarding treatment portals for elective neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dieren, E.B.; Nowak, P.J.C.M.; Van Soernsen de Koste, J.R.; Van Est, H.; Heijmen, B.J.M.; Levendag, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    The variation in treatment portals for elective radiotherapy of the neck, and the three-dimensional dosimetric consequences of this variation was assessed. Therefore, 16 experienced radiation oncologists from all major head and neck cooperative groups in the Netherlands (n=11) were asked to define RT-portals on a lateral and/or AP simulation film, for (routine) elective neck irradiation for a T2 tumor of the mobile tongue and a T3 tumor of the supraglottic larynx. Treatment portals were compared and evaluated using a three-dimensional treatment planning system and CT data with contoured critical structures and target volume. The CT-defined clinical target volume was mutually agreed upon by ENT-surgeons and radiation oncologists. Large differences were seen in treated volume (a factor of five). In addition, due to the variation in the cranial boundary of the RT-portals, the estimated NTCP varied considerably (0-50%). Moreover, several of the RT-portals did not adequately cover the CT-defined target volume. Even amongst experienced head and neck radiation oncologists, little agreement was observed with respect to treatment technique and size of the treatment portals in case of elective neck irradiation. This results in a considerable variation in treated volume. As a consequence, a large difference exists in the anticipated probability of normal tissue complication, and possibly in tumor control probability. Therefore, a definition of target volume and, consequently, a standardization of elective neck portals in mandatory. This is even more important if the primary tumor and clinically node-negative neck are to be treated by 3D conformal RT using multiple CT-slices for target delineation and positioning of BEV blocks in order to spare the normal tissue function with maximum tumor control probability

  12. Fuzzy-Set Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Kim Sass

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary case studies rely on verbal arguments and set theory to build or evaluate theoretical claims. While existing procedures excel in the use of qualitative information (information about kind), they ignore quantitative information (information about degree) at central points of the analysis. Effectively, contemporary case studies rely on…

  13. Methodology for the case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.J.W.; Woltjer, G.B.

    2017-01-01

    This document is about the methodology and selection of the case studies. It is meant as a guideline for the case studies, and together with the other reports in this work package can be a source of inform ation for policy officers, interest groups and researchers evaluating or performing impact

  14. Research Costs Investigated: A Study Into the Budgets of Dutch Publicly Funded Drug-Related Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Corro Ramos, Isaac; Joore, Manuela; Al, Maiwenn; Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne; Postma, Maarten; Vemer, Pepijn; Feenstra, Talitha

    2018-01-01

    The costs of performing research are an important input in value of information (VOI) analyses but are difficult to assess. The aim of this study was to investigate the costs of research, serving two purposes: (1) estimating research costs for use in VOI analyses; and (2) developing a costing tool to support reviewers of grant proposals in assessing whether the proposed budget is realistic. For granted study proposals from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw), type of study, potential cost drivers, proposed budget, and general characteristics were extracted. Regression analysis was conducted in an attempt to generate a 'predicted budget' for certain combinations of cost drivers, for implementation in the costing tool. Of 133 drug-related research grant proposals, 74 were included for complete data extraction. Because an association between cost drivers and budgets was not confirmed, we could not generate a predicted budget based on regression analysis, but only historic reference budgets given certain study characteristics. The costing tool was designed accordingly, i.e. with given selection criteria the tool returns the range of budgets in comparable studies. This range can be used in VOI analysis to estimate whether the expected net benefit of sampling will be positive to decide upon the net value of future research. The absence of association between study characteristics and budgets may indicate inconsistencies in the budgeting or granting process. Nonetheless, the tool generates useful information on historical budgets, and the option to formally relate VOI to budgets. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at creating such a tool, which can be complemented with new studies being granted, enlarging the underlying database and keeping estimates up to date.

  15. Study Protocol - an exploratory trial on health promoting schools at Dutch secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Busch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies show adolescent health-related behaviours to co-occur synergistically. This paper describes the study design for an exploratory trial on the effects of a comprehensive, whole-school health promoting school intervention. This intervention tackles seven different behavioural domains simultaneously via a combination of education, creating a healthy environment and introducing healthy behavioural policies. Additionally, extensive partnerships are formed between schools, parents, neighbourhoods and youth health authorities to coordinate health promotion efforts.Study design and data collection methods: The intervention will be implemented at two secondary schools. Results will be compared with two control schools (n≈1500. The intervention's effectiveness in changing student behaviours as well as physical and psychosocial health status along with qualitative lessons learned on the integration of youth health care services and school health education practices are the main aimed outcomes of this study. Data are collected via a mixed methods design combining an annual youth health (behaviour monitor with a qualitative process evaluation via interviews with key stakeholders.Data analysis: A multilevel analysis is performed combined with a systematic analysis of qualitative interview data.Conclusions: This study will produce an evaluation of a comprehensive health promoting school intervention that combines an integrated approach of schools, neighbourhoods, families and youth health services to improve adolescent health.

  16. Case study - Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, E.

    1986-01-01

    Antecedents and experience of nuclear activities in Argentina; the Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). First development and research activities. Research reactors and radioisotopes plants. Health physics and safety regulations. - Feasibility studies for the first nuclear power plant. Awarding the first plant CNA I (Atucha I). Relevant data related to the different project stages. Plant performance. - Feasibility study for the second nuclear power plant. Awarding the second plant CNE (Central Nuclear Embalse). Relevant data related to established targets. Differences compared with the first station targets. Local participation. Plant performance. (orig./GL)

  17. Sexual history disclosure polygraph examinations with cybercrime offences: a first Dutch explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschman, Jos; Bogaerts, Stefan; Foulger, Sarah; Wilcox, Daniel; Sosnowski, Daniel; Cushman, Barry

    2010-06-01

    This article presents the first study on post-conviction polygraphy in the Netherlands. Importantly, it exclusively focuses on cybercrime offenders. The study is designed to systematically address the different child sexual behaviours exhibited by 25 participants who are in treatment for possessing child abuse images. The results indicate that post-conviction polygraphy can provide additional data to inform the development of theory in this area and contribute to the treatment, supervision, and more effective containment of offending behaviour and the reduction of future victimization.

  18. The conditional benefits of early user involvement at employee self-service applications in four Dutch ministries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, R.; Koopman, G.

    2010-01-01

    User participation and user involvement is generally accepted as one of the important factors for IS success. In this paper, several types of early end-user involvement are distinguished and empirically explored through four case studies. The cases concern four Dutch governmental organisations

  19. Speech motor coordination in Dutch-speaking children with DAS studied with EMMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, L.; Maassen, B.A.M.; Hulstijn, W.; Peters, H.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Developmental apraxia of speech (DAS) is generally classified as a 'speech motor' disorder. Direct measurement of articulatory movement is, however, virtually non-existent. In the present study we investigated the coordination between articulators in children with DAS using kinematic measurements.

  20. Why are Protestants more prosocial than Catholics? : A comparative study among orthodox Dutch believers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elk, M.; Rutjens, B.T.; van Harreveld, F.

    2017-01-01

    The present study sheds light on the contentious relation between religions and prosociality by comparing self-reported altruistic and prosocial behavior among a group of Catholic and Protestant believers. We found that denomination was strongly related to strength of religious beliefs, afterlife

  1. Treatment with rivastigmine or galantamine and risk of urinary incontinence : results from a Dutch database study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroger, Edeltraut; Van Marum, Rob; Souverein, Patrick; Carmichael, Pierre Hugues; Egberts, Toine

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD) with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) may increase the risk of urinary incontinence (UI). Objective: To assess whether ChEI use was associated with the risk of UI among older patients with AD. Methods: A crossover cohort study using the PHARMO Record Linkage

  2. Treatment with rivastigmine or galantamine and risk of urinary incontinence : Results from a Dutch database study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroger, Edeltraut; Van Marum, Rob; Souverein, Patrick; Carmichael, Pierre Hugues; Egberts, Toine

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD) with cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) may increase the risk of urinary incontinence (UI). Objective: To assess whether ChEI use was associated with the risk of UI among older patients with AD. Methods: A crossover cohort study using the PHARMO Record Linkage

  3. A study of a Dutch online decision aid for parents of children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossebaard, Hans Cornelis; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Sorbi, Marjolijn J.; Seydel, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    During a three-month study period, visitors to an online decision aid (DA) for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were invited to complete an online questionnaire before and after working through the DA. Some 75,000 unique visitors found their way to the page on DAs, although fewer than

  4. TIA, RIND, minor stroke: a continuum, or different subgroups? Dutch TIA Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, P. J.; van Gijn, J.; Frenken, C. W.; Hijdra, A.; Lodder, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Bulens, C.; Franke, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The results of CT were studied prospectively in 606 patients with a transient ischaemic attack (TIA), 422 patients with a reversible ischaemic neurological deficit (RIND), and 1054 patients with a minor stroke, were all entered into a multi-centre clinical trial. CT scanning showed a relevant

  5. Destination Syria : An Exploratory Study into the Daily Lives of Dutch 'Syria Travellers'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weggemans, D.; Peters, R.; Bakker, E.; Bont, de R.

    2016-01-01

    Destination Syria is an exploratory study providing insights on the daily lives of western citizens that have travelled to the area, torn by conflict to join jihadist groups like ISIS and Jabhat al-Nusra. Specific attention has been paid to daily life in ISIS territories and in areas controlled by

  6. Why more boys than girls with ADHD receive treatment: a study of Dutch twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, Eske M.; Hudziak, James J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2007-01-01

    More boys than girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receive treatment. One explanation for this bias may be that boys score higher on disruptive behavior scales than girls. Although this was supported by findings in clinical samples, recent studies in nonreferred samples showed

  7. Continuous improvement, burnout and job engagement: a study in a Dutch nursing department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benders, J.G.J.M.; Bleijerveld, H.; Schouteten, R.L.J.

    2017-01-01

    Continuous improvement (CI) programs are potentially powerful means to improve the quality of care. The more positive nurses perceive these programs' effects, the better they may be expected to cooperate. Crucial to this perception is how nurses' quality of working life is affected. We studied this

  8. The Impact of Institutional Differences on Derivatives Usage : A Comparative Study of US and Dutch Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodnar, G.M.; de Jong, A.; Macrae, V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper tests the influence of institutional differences on risk management practices.Several survey studies have investigated derivatives usage for risk management purposes in the US (see, among others, Bodnar, Hayt, Marston and Smithson, 1995 and Bodnar, Hayt and Marston, 1996, 1998).In this

  9. Graduates' personality characteristics and labor market entry an empirical study among dutch economics graduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semeijn, J; Boone, C; van der Velden, R; van Witteloostuijn, A; van Velden, R.K.W.

    In this study, we explore the value of personality characteristics in explaining success in labor market entry with a sample of graduates in economics from Maastricht University (the Netherlands). Specifically, the paper addresses the following twofold research question: does personality explain

  10. Research on atomoxetine in Dutch ASD/ADHD children : The RADAR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harfterkamp, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are frequently present in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In her study Myriam Harfterkamp showed that atomoxetine appears to be a promising treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents with ASD. Atomoxetine was superior to

  11. Prevalence and prognosis of synchronous colorectal cancer: a Dutch population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.F.; Kranse, R.; Damhuis, R.A.; Wilt, J.H. de; Ouwendijk, R.J.; Kuipers, E.J.; Leerdam, M.E. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A noticeable proportion of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients are diagnosed with synchronous CRC. Large population-based studies on the incidence, risk factors and prognosis of synchronous CRC are, however, scarce, and are needed for better determination of risks of synchronous CRC in

  12. Building automation and perceived control : a field study on motorized exterior blinds in Dutch offices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerbeek, B.W.; te Kulve, Marije; Gritti, T.; Aarts, M.P.J.; Loenen, van E.J.; Aarts, E.H.L.

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the technological advances and increasing focus on energy efficient buildings, simple forms of building automation including automatic motorized blinds systems found their ways into today's office environments. In a five-month field study, qualitative and quantitative methods were

  13. Healthy worker survivor analysis in an occupational cohort study of Dutch agricultural workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierenburg, E. A. J.; Smit, L. A. M.; Heederik, D.; Robbe, P.; Hylkema, M. N.; Wouters, I. M.

    High microbial exposures in farmers and agricultural workers are associated with less atopy. Although it has been speculated that healthy worker survival could be an explanation, this has not been studied so far. Therefore, we investigated the presence of healthy worker survival in a five-year

  14. The broad spectrum of unbearable suffering in end of life cancer studied in dutch primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, C.D.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; van der Wal, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Unbearable suffering most frequently is reported in end-of-life cancer patients in primary care. However, research seldom addresses unbearable suffering. The aim of this study was to comprehensively investigate the various aspects of unbearable suffering in end-of-life cancer patients

  15. Sleep habits and sleep disturbances in Dutch children: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Litsenburg, R.R.L.; Waumans, R.C.; van den Berg, G.; Gemke, R.J.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disorders can lead to significant morbidity. Information on sleep in healthy children is necessary to evaluate sleep disorders in clinical practice, but data from different societies cannot be simply generalized. The aims of this study were to (1) assess the prevalence of sleep disturbances in

  16. The potential for e-biking among the younger population: a study of Dutch students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plazier, Paul; Weitkamp, Gerd; Berg, van den A. E.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the benefits and limitations of e-bike use for students participating in a pilot in a university town in the Netherlands. It targets a gap in the literature regarding e-bike use in early adulthood. Thirty-seven pilot participants completed a survey on their e-bike experiences,

  17. Mathematics and science choice following introduction of compulsory study profiles into Dutch secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rekers-Mombarg, Lyset; Dekkers, Hetty; van Langen, A.

    2008-01-01

    Since 1998, upper level secondary education pupils in the Netherlands are required to choose one of four study profiles with their own specific and fixed combinations of final examination subjects. With the aid of multilevel analyses, the extent to which this situation has led to changes in the

  18. Dietary protein and risk of hypertension in a Dutch older population: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altorf-van der Kuil, W.; Engberink, M.F.; Rooij, van F.J.A.; Hofman, A.; Veer, van 't P.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    AB Background: Several observational studies suggest an inverse association of protein with blood pressure (BP). However, little is known about the role of dietary protein from specific sources in BP. Method: We examined the relation between several types of dietary protein (total, plant, animal,

  19. Impact of Urban Conditions of Firm Performance of Migrant Entrepreneurs: A Comparative Dutch - US Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahin, M.; Nijkamp, P.; Stough, R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies on ethnic entrepreneurship have pointed at an increasing share of migrants in urban small- and medium-sized entrepreneurial businesses. These migrant activities are crucial to the urban economy in many countries, as they employ a significant part of the workforce. The main objective

  20. Education through organised youth sport: The results of four Dutch studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, E.; Stams, G.J.; Deković, M.; Verweel, P.; Seghers, J.; Vangrunderbeek, H.

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of this series of four studies was to examine the contribution of organised youth sport to adolescents’ antisocial and prosocial behaviour, and to gain insight into educationally relevant factors that were hypothesized to explain differences in antisocial and prosocial behaviour among

  1. Research Costs Investigated: A Study Into the Budgets of Dutch Publicly Funded Drug-Related Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van Asselt (Thea); B.L.T. Ramaekers (Bram); I. Corro Ramos (Isaac); M.A. Joore (Manuela); M.J. Al (Maiwenn); Lesman-Leegte, I. (Ivonne); M.J. Postma (Maarten); P. Vemer (Pepijn); T.L. Feenstra (Talitha)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The costs of performing research are an important input in value of information (VOI) analyses but are difficult to assess. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the costs of research, serving two purposes: (1) estimating research costs for use in VOI analyses;

  2. Research Costs Investigated : A Study Into the Budgets of Dutch Publicly Funded Drug-Related Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Corro Ramos, Isaac; Joore, Manuela; Al, Maiwenn; Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne; Postma, Maarten; Vemer, Pepijn; Feenstra, Talitha

    BACKGROUND: The costs of performing research are an important input in value of information (VOI) analyses but are difficult to assess. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the costs of research, serving two purposes: (1) estimating research costs for use in VOI analyses; and (2)

  3. Practice, efficacy, and costs of thyroid nodule evaluation: a retrospective study in a Dutch university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, Lotty; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Boers, Maarten; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van Diest, Paul; Lips, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of thyroid nodules has markedly reduced the role of thyroid scintigraphy. This is often limited to nondiagnostic or follicular (tumor) FNA classifications. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and cost of such a strategy in a university center. From 1992-1998, 995

  4. Revisions and further developments of the occupational stress indicator: Lisrel results from four dutch studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, A.; Frese, M.; Cooper, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Occupational Stress Indicator (OSI) is a popular instrument for the diagnosis of stress and stress-related personality and outcome variables. However, one weakness of the OSI was the low reliability of some of its scales. This paper describes in a series of 4 studies improvements of the

  5. Pathways into adulthood: a comparative study on family life transitions among migrant and Dutch youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Valk, H.A.G.

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on intergenerational transmission in the parental family. Socialization has received a great deal of attention in social sciences. Initially most research and theory took modern Western society as its premise and focus. More recently, the cultural context has been included by

  6. Cooperation and organization in decision making : a more decisive road safety policy ? : results from a multiple case study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, C.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the administrative processes that led to the implementation of road safety measures in Dutch Regional Traffic and Transport Plans. The design of the study is a multiple case study in six regions in the Netherlands. The road safety policy is evaluated by looking at the

  7. Case Study: Shiraz Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Khajehnoori

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between lifestyle which seems as a scale of globalization process with body image. Required data was collected by systematic random sampling among 508 women in Shiraz. Based on existing theories and studies theoretical framework has constituted based on Giddens theory. Six hypotheses have been established. For collecting information, survey method and self reported questionnaire were used. In data analysis and explanation, multiple regression and unilateral dispersion analyses were used. The result showed that among effective factors on body image, modern musical lifestyle, religious' lifestyle, leisure lifestyle and participative lifestyle explained 23 percent of variations of body image. Among these variables, only religious lifestyle had negative relationship with body image and other variables had positive relationship with dependant variable.

  8. Centrifugal compressor case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, B.

    2010-10-15

    Three centrifugal compressors at a pipeline station were retrofitted with higher head impellers in 2008. The owners of the station experienced vibration problems over the following 2 years that caused transmitter and position failures that were assumed to be flow-induced pulsations. A vibration and pulsation analysis indicated that the shell mode piping vibration excited by the blade pass pulsation was responsible for the failures. This study outlined factors that contributed to the vibration problem. Interferences between the compressor and shell mode piping natural frequencies were predicted, and potential excitation sources were examined. The study demonstrated how centrifugal vibration analyses can be used during the design phase to avoid costly adjustments. Recommendations included the addition of stiffeners to alter the shell modes, and the addition of constrained layer damping material to reduce resonant responses. 2 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  9. Case study: Tourism marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Kennell, James

    2014-01-01

    Tourism can be a challenging subject for students because it is both dynamic and susceptible to economic turbulence and shifts in trends. Tourism: A Modern Synthesis is an essential textbook for tourism students looking for a clear and comprehensive introduction to their studies which helps overcome these challenges. The authors apply a strong business approach to the subject reflecting developments in the teaching and content of modern courses and the text covers both key principles and cont...

  10. MOOC Introduction to Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hollander, Franciscus; Piersma, Kristien

    Interview met Margriet Hidding, Birgit Lijmbach en Jeroen van Engen, medewerkers van het Talencentrum en de makers van de Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Introduction to Dutch over het grote succes van deze cursus

  11. Impact of external knowledge acquisition strategies on innovation: a comparative study based on Dutch and Swiss panel data

    OpenAIRE

    Arvanitis, S.; Lokshin, B.; Mohnen, P.; Wörter, M.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that firms increasingly adopt open innovation practices. In this paper we investigate the impact of two such external knowledge acquisition strategies, ‘buy’ and ‘cooperate’, on firm’s product innovation performance. Taking a direct (productivity)approach, we test for complementarity effects in the simultaneous use of the two strategies, and in the intensity of their use. Our results based on large panels of Dutch and Swiss innovating firms, suggest that while both ‘...

  12. Depression, anxiety and glucose metabolism in the general dutch population: the new Hoorn study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Bouwman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a well recognized association between depression and diabetes. However, there is little empirical data about the prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety among different groups of glucose metabolism in population based samples. The aim of this study was to determine whether the prevalence of increased levels of depression and anxiety is different between patients with type 2 diabetes and subjects with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM and normal glucose metabolism (NGM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cross-sectional data from a population-based cohort study of 2667 residents, 1261 men and 1406 women aged 40-65 years from the Hoorn region, the Netherlands. Depressive symptoms and anxiety were measured using the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, score >or=16 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale--Anxiety Subscale (HADS-A, score >or=8, respectively. Glucose metabolism status was determined by oral glucose tolerance test. In the total study population the prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety for the NGM, IGM and type 2 diabetes were 12.5, 12.2 and 21.0% (P = 0.004 and 15.0, 15.3 and 19.9% (p = 0.216, respectively. In men, the prevalence of depressive symptoms was 7.7, 9.5 and 19.6% (p<0.001, and in women 16.4, 15.8 and 22.6 (p = 0.318, for participants with NGM, IGM and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Anxiety was not associated with glucose metabolism when stratified for sex. Intergroup differences (NGM vs. IGM and IGM vs. type 2 diabetes revealed that higher prevalences of depressive symptoms are mainly manifested in participants with type 2 diabetes, and not in participants with IGM. CONCLUSIONS: Depressive symptoms, but not anxiety are associated with glucose metabolism. This association is mainly determined by a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms in participants with type 2 diabetes and not in participants with IGM.

  13. Evaluating an integrated neighbourhood approach to improve well-being of frail elderly in a Dutch community: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cramm Jane M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important condition for independent living is having a well-functioning social network to provide support. An Integrated Neighbourhood Approach (INA creates a supportive environment for the frail elderly, offering them tailored care in their local context that allows them to improve self-management abilities and well-being. The purpose of our research is to investigate how an INA can contribute to outcomes of frail elderly and the cost-effectiveness of such a program. The first central study question is: To what extent does INA contribute to (a continuous, demand-driven, coordinated care and support for the independently- living frail elderly; (b improvement of their well-being and self-management abilities; and (c reinforcement of their neighbourhood networks. The second central research question is: is the INA a cost-effective method to support the frail, independently- living elderly? Methods We investigate a Dutch INA. This transition experiment aims to facilitate the independently-living frail elderly (70+ to live the life they wish to live and improve their well-being. The study population consists of independently-living frail elderly persons in Rotterdam. The transition experiment starts in two Rotterdam districts and is later extended to two other districts. We propose a concurrent mixed methods design, that is, a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods to evaluate processes, effects and costs of INA. Such a design will provide insight into an on-going INA and demonstrate which of its elements are potentially (cost-effective for the frail elderly. Discussion We embrace a wide range of scientific methodologies to evaluate the INA project and obtain information on mechanisms and contexts that will be valuable for decision making on local and national levels. The study will lead to a better understanding of how to provide support via social networks for the frail elderly and add to the knowledge

  14. Pressure Relief, Visco-Elastic Foam with Inflated Air? A Pilot Study in a Dutch Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Van Leen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is still little evidence regarding the type of mattress that is the best for preventing pressure ulcers (PUs. In a Dutch nursing home, a new type of overlay mattress (air inflated visco-elastic foam was tested to analyze the opportunity for replacement of the normally used static air overlay mattress in its three-step PU prevention protocol In this small pilot the outcome measures were: healing of a category one pressure ulcer, new development or deterioration of a category one PU and need for repositioning. Methods: We included 20 nursing home residents with a new category one pressure ulcer, existing for no longer than 48 h following a consecutive sampling technic. All residents were staying for more than 30 days in the nursing home and were lying on a visco-elastic foam mattress without repositioning (step one of the 3-step protocol at the start of the pilot study. They had not suffered from a PU in the month before. The intervention involved use of an air inflated foam overlay instead of a static air overlay (normally step 2 of the 3-step protocol. At the start; the following data were registered: age; gender; main diagnosis and presence of incontinence. Thereafter; all participating residents were checked weekly for PU healing tendency; deterioration of PUs; new PUs and need of repositioning. Only when residents showed still a category one PU after 48 h or deterioration of an existing pressure ulcer or if there was development of a new pressure ulcer, repositioning was put into practice (step 3 of the PU protocol. All residents participated during 8 weeks. Results: Seven residents developed a new pressure ulcer category one and still had a category one pressure ulcer at the end of the study period. One resident developed a pressure ulcer category 2. Fifteen residents needed repositioning from one week after start of the study until the end of the study. Conclusions: Overall 40% of the residents developed a pressure ulcer

  15. Periictal and interictal headache including migraine in Dutch patients with epilepsy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, W A; Hageman, G; de Weerd, A W

    2015-03-01

    As early as in 1898, it was noted that there was a need to find "a plausible explanation of the long recognized affinities of migraine and epilepsy". However, results of recent studies are clearly conflicting on this matter. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to define the prevalence and characteristics of both seizure-related and interictal headaches in patients with epilepsy (5-75years) seeking help in the tertiary epilepsy clinic SEIN in Zwolle. Using a questionnaire, subjects were surveyed on the existence of headaches including characteristics, duration, severity, and accompanying symptoms. Furthermore, details on epilepsy were retrieved from medical records (e.g., syndrome, seizure frequency, and use of drugs). Diagnoses of migraine, tension-type headache, or unclassifiable headache were made based on criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Between March and December 2013, 29 children and 226 adults were evaluated, 73% of whom indicated having current headaches, which is significantly more often when compared with the general population (pheadache, while 29% had solely seizure-related headaches and 22% had both. Migraine occurs significantly more often in people with epilepsy in comparison with the general population (pheadaches conforms to results in the general population. These results show that current headaches are a significantly more frequent problem amongst people with epilepsy than in people without epilepsy. When comparing migraine prevalence, this is significantly higher in the population of patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Considerations on requests for euthanasia or assisted suicide; a qualitative study with Dutch general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, Katja; van Tol, Donald G; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2017-11-16

    In the Netherlands, euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) is neither a right of the patient nor a duty of the physician. Beside the legal requirements, physicians can weigh their own considerations when they decide on a request for EAS. We aim at a better understanding of the considerations that play a role when physicians decide on a request for EAS. This was a qualitative study. We analysed 33 interviews held with general practitioners (GPs) from various regions in the Netherlands. The considerations found can be divided in three main types. (i) Perceived legal criteria, (ii) individual interpretations of the legal criteria and (iii) considerations unrelated to the legal criteria. Considerations of this 3rd type have not been mentioned so far in the literature and the debate on EAS. Examples are: the family should agree to EAS, the patient's attitude must reflect resignation, or conflicts must be resolved. Our study feeds the ethical discussion on the tension that can arise between a physician's own views on death and dying, and the views and preferences of his patients. When considerations like 'no unresolved conflicts' or 'enough resignation' influence the decision to grant a request for EAS this poses questions from an ethical and professional point of view. We hypothesise that these considerations reflect GPs' views on what 'good dying' entails and we advocate further research on this topic. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The Dutch Economy 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    In the series 'The Dutch Economy' the Dutch Statistical Office describes and analyzes annual developments in enterprises, households and governments, and with respect to employment and the environment. One of the subjects is 'Economy and Environment' with the sub-topics 'Resources and Energy', 'Emissions' and 'Environmental Taxes'. Furthermore, in articles on specific themes current economic issues are discussed. One of those themes has the title 'Share of renewable energy in the Netherlands is still small'. [nl

  18. Continuous improvement, burnout and job engagement: a study in a Dutch nursing department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benders, Jos; Bleijerveld, Hans; Schouteten, Roel

    2017-10-01

    Continuous improvement (CI) programs are potentially powerful means to improve the quality of care. The more positive nurses perceive these programs' effects, the better they may be expected to cooperate. Crucial to this perception is how nurses' quality of working life is affected. We studied this in a nursing department, using the job demands-resources model. We found that two job demands improved, and none of the job resources. Job engagement did not change significantly, while the burnout risk decreased slightly. Overall, the nurses felt the impact to be small yet the changes were in a positive direction. CI can thus be used to improve nurses' working lives and, by restructuring the work processes, the quality of care. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Eating in moderation and the essential role of awareness. A Dutch longitudinal study identifying psychosocial predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthouwer, Michel Jean Louis; Oenema, Anke; Candel, Math; Lechner, Lilian; de Vries, Hein

    2015-04-01

    Eating in moderation, i.e. the attempt to monitor and limit the intake of energy-dense foods, is a promising strategy in the prevention of weight gain. The purpose of this study was to examine which psychosocial factors derived from the I-Change Model (ICM) were associated with eating in moderation, and whether these factors differed between adults with a correct (aware) or incorrect (unaware) perception of their dietary behaviour. This study used a longitudinal design with measurements at baseline (N = 483) and six-month follow-up (N = 379). Eating in moderation was defined as the average daily energy intake from energy-dense food products and was measured by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Linear regression analyses were used to assess the associations between the ICM factors and eating in moderation. The moderating role of awareness was examined by including interactions between awareness and the ICM factors in the regression analyses using the pick-a-point approach to further examine the associations for aware and unaware participants. Participants who were aware of their dietary behaviour had a significantly lower average daily energy intake compared to those who were unaware. Eating in moderation was predicted by awareness, risk perception, social influence and intention. Among the aware participants, eating in moderation was predicted by risk perception, attitude, social influence and intention. Among the unaware participants, only risk perception and self-efficacy were significantly associated with eating in moderation. Our findings show that psychosocial factors may only predict eating in moderation when people are aware of their risk behaviour. Therefore, interventions aimed at promoting complex behaviours, such as eating in moderation, should first focus on improving individuals' awareness of their risk behaviour before targeting motivational factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Perceptions of mental workload in Dutch university employees of different ages: a focus group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background As academic workload seems to be increasing, many studies examined factors that contribute to the mental workload of academics. Age-related differences in work motives and intellectual ability may lead to differences in experienced workload and in the way employees experience work features. This study aims to obtain a better understanding of age differences in sources of mental workload. 33 academics from one faculty discussed causes of workload during focus group interviews, stratified by age. Findings Among our participants, the influence of ageing seems most evident in employees’ actions and reactions, while the causes of workload mentioned seemed largely similar. These individual reactions to workload may also be driven by differences in tenure. Most positively assessed work characteristics were: interaction with colleagues and students and autonomy. Aspects most often indicated as increasing the workload, were organisational aspects as obstacles for ‘getting the best out of people’ and the feeling that overtime seems unavoidable. Many employees indicated to feel stretched between the ‘greediness’ of the organisation and their own high working standards, and many fear to be assigned even less time for research if they do not meet the rigorous output criteria. Moreover, despite great efforts on their part, promotion opportunities seem limited. A more pronounced role for the supervisor seems appreciated by employees of all ages, although the specific interpretation varied between individuals and career stages. Conclusions To preserve good working conditions and quality of work, it seems important to scrutinize the output requirements and tenure-based needs for employee supervision. PMID:23506458