WorldWideScience

Sample records for dust grain size

  1. Experimental Phase Functions of Millimeter-sized Cosmic Dust Grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Guirado, D.; Escobar-Cerezo, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Vargas-Martín, F. [Department of Electromagnetism and Electronics, University of Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain); Min, M. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sobornnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Hovenier, J. W. [Astronomical Institute “Anton Pannekoek,” University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-09-01

    We present the experimental phase functions of three types of millimeter-sized dust grains consisting of enstatite, quartz, and volcanic material from Mount Etna, respectively. The three grains present similar sizes but different absorbing properties. The measurements are performed at 527 nm covering the scattering angle range from 3° to 170°. The measured phase functions show two well-defined regions: (i) soft forward peaks and (ii) a continuous increase with the scattering angle at side- and back-scattering regions. This behavior at side- and back-scattering regions is in agreement with the observed phase functions of the Fomalhaut and HR 4796A dust rings. Further computations and measurements (including polarization) for millimeter-sized grains are needed to draw some conclusions about the fluffy or compact structure of the dust grains.

  2. Experimental Phase Functions of Millimeter-sized Cosmic Dust Grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Guirado, D.; Escobar-Cerezo, J.; Vargas-Martín, F.; Min, M.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    We present the experimental phase functions of three types of millimeter-sized dust grains consisting of enstatite, quartz, and volcanic material from Mount Etna, respectively. The three grains present similar sizes but different absorbing properties. The measurements are performed at 527 nm covering the scattering angle range from 3° to 170°. The measured phase functions show two well-defined regions: (i) soft forward peaks and (ii) a continuous increase with the scattering angle at side- and back-scattering regions. This behavior at side- and back-scattering regions is in agreement with the observed phase functions of the Fomalhaut and HR 4796A dust rings. Further computations and measurements (including polarization) for millimeter-sized grains are needed to draw some conclusions about the fluffy or compact structure of the dust grains.

  3. Effect of dust size distribution on ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas with different dust grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Dong-Ning; Yang, Yang; Yan, Qiang [Northwest Normal University, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering (China); Wang, Xiao-Yun [Lanzhou Jiao Tong University, Department of Mathematics and Physics (China); Duan, Wen-Shan, E-mail: duanws@126.com [Northwest Normal University, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering (China)

    2017-02-15

    Theoretical studies are carried out for ion acoustic solitons in multicomponent nonuniform plasma considering the dust size distribution. The Korteweg−de Vries equation for ion acoustic solitons is given by using the reductive perturbation technique. Two special dust size distributions are considered. The dependences of the width and amplitude of solitons on dust size parameters are shown. It is found that the properties of a solitary wave depend on the shape of the size distribution function of dust grains.

  4. Charging of Individual Micron-Size Interstellar/Planetary Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with UV/X-ray radiation, as well as by electron/ion impact. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of individual dust grains is required for understanding of the physical and dynamical processes in space environments and the role of dust in formation of stellar and planetary systems. In this paper, we discuss experimental results on dust charging by electron impact, where low energy electrons are scattered or stick to the dust grains, thereby charging the dust grains negatively, and at sufficiently high energies the incident electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly by low energy electron impact. Available theoretical models based on the Sternglass equation (Sternglass, 1954) are applicable for neutral, planar, and bulk surfaces only. However, charging properties of individual micron-size dust grains are expected to be different from the values measured on bulk materials. Our recent experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance facility (at NASA-MSFC) indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (e.g. Abbas et al, 2010). Here we discuss the complex nature of SEE charging properties of individual micron-size lunar dust grains and silica microspheres.

  5. Size Distribution and Rate of Dust Generated During Grain Elevator Handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dust generated during grain handling is an air pollutant that produces safety and health hazards. This study was conducted to characterize the particle size distribution (PSD) of dust generated during handling of wheat and shelled corn in the research elevator of the USDA Grain Marketing and Product...

  6. DUST DYNAMICS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISK WINDS DRIVEN BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE: A MECHANISM FOR FLOATING DUST GRAINS WITH CHARACTERISTIC SIZES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Tomoya; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro, E-mail: miyake.tomoya@e.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: stakeru@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2016-04-10

    We investigate the dynamics of dust grains of various sizes in protoplanetary disk winds driven by magnetorotational turbulence, by simulating the time evolution of the dust grain distribution in the vertical direction. Small dust grains, which are well-coupled to the gas, are dragged upward with the upflowing gas, while large grains remain near the midplane of a disk. Intermediate-size grains float near the sonic point of the disk wind located at several scale heights from the midplane, where the grains are loosely coupled to the background gas. For the minimum mass solar nebula at 1 au, dust grains with size of 25–45 μm float around 4 scale heights from the midplane. Considering the dependence on the distance from the central star, smaller-size grains remain only in an outer region of the disk, while larger-size grains are distributed in a broader region. We also discuss the implications of our result for observations of dusty material around young stellar objects.

  7. Effect of Different Size Dust Grains on the Properties of Solitary Waves in Space Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwakil, S.A.; Zahran, M.A.; El-Shewy, E.K.; Abdelwahed, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    Propagation of nonlinear dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an unmagnetized collisionless dusty plasma consisting of dust grains obey power law dust size distribution and nonthermal ions are investigated. For nonlinear DA waves, a reductive perturbation method was employed to obtain a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the first-order potential. The effects of a dust size distribution, dust radius and the non-thermal distribution of ions on the soliton amplitude, width and energy of electrostatic solitary structures are presented

  8. Grain-size signature of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean at 12°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Does, Michelle; Korte, Laura; Munday, Chris; Brummer, Geert-Jan; Stuut, Jan-Berend

    2015-04-01

    Every year, an estimated 200 million tons of Saharan dust are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean. On its way from source to sink, the dust can be influenced by many climatic processes, but it also affects climate itself in various ways that are far from understood. In order to constrain the relations between atmospheric dust and climate, we deployed ten submarine sediment traps along a transect in the Atlantic Ocean at 12˚N, at 1200m and 3500m water depth. These have been sampling Saharan dust settling in the ocean since October 2012. Samples of seven of these sediment traps have been successfully recovered during RV Pelagia cruise 64PE378 in November 2013. The transect also includes three floating dust collectors and two on-land dust collectors, and all the instruments lie directly underneath the largest dust plume originating from the African continent. This study focuses on the size of the dust particles, which can have an effect on the positive or negative radiation balance in the atmosphere. Small particles in the high atmosphere can reflect incoming radiation and therefore have a cooling effect on climate. Large particles in the lower atmosphere have the opposite effect by absorbing reflected radiation from the Earth's surface. Mineral dust also affects carbon export to the deep ocean by providing mineral ballast for organic particles, and the size of the dust particles directly relates to the downward transport velocity. Here I will present the measured grain-size distributions of samples from seven sediment traps recovered from the 12°N-latitude transect. The data show seasonal variations, with finer grained dust particles during winter and spring, and coarser grained particles during summer and fall. Samples from multiple years should give more details about the dust's seasonality. Also a fining trend of the grain sizes of the dust particles from source (Africa) to sink (Caribbean) is observed, which is also expected due to intuitive relationships between

  9. Size and density sorting of dust grains in SPH simulations of protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatale, F. C.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Cuello, Nicolas; Bourdon, Bernard; Fitoussi, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    The size and density of dust grains determine their response to gas drag in protoplanetary discs. Aerodynamical (size × density) sorting is one of the proposed mechanisms to explain the grain properties and chemical fractionation of chondrites. However, the efficiency of aerodynamical sorting and the location in the disc in which it could occur are still unknown. Although the effects of grain sizes and growth in discs have been widely studied, a simultaneous analysis including dust composition is missing. In this work, we present the dynamical evolution and growth of multicomponent dust in a protoplanetary disc using a 3D, two-fluid (gas+dust) smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the dust vertical settling is characterized by two phases: a density-driven phase that leads to a vertical chemical sorting of dust and a size-driven phase that enhances the amount of lighter material in the mid-plane. We also see an efficient radial chemical sorting of the dust at large scales. We find that dust particles are aerodynamically sorted in the inner disc. The disc becomes sub-solar in its Fe/Si ratio on the surface since the early stage of evolution but sub-solar Fe/Si can be also found in the outer disc-mid-plane at late stages. Aggregates in the disc mimic the physical and chemical properties of chondrites, suggesting that aerodynamical sorting played an important role in determining their final structure.

  10. Effect of particles attachment to multi-sized dust grains present in electrostatic sheaths of discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaham, B.; Tahraoui, A.; Chekour, S.; Benlemdjaldi, D.

    2014-01-01

    The loss of electrons and ions due to their attachment to a Gauss-distributed sizes of dust grains present in electrostatic sheaths of discharge plasmas is investigated. A uni-dimensional, unmagnetized, and stationary multi-fluid model is proposed. Forces acting on the dust grain along with its charge are self-consistently calculated, within the limits of the orbit motion limited model. The dynamic analysis of dust grains shows that the contribution of the neutral drag force in the net force acting on the dust grain is negligible, whereas the contribution of the gravity force is found considerable only for micrometer particles. The dust grains trapping is only possible when the electrostatic force is balanced by the ion drag and the gravity forces. This trapping occurs for a limited radius interval of micrometer dust grains, which is around the most probable dust grain radius. The effect of electron temperature and ion density at the sheath edge is also discussed. It is shown that the attachment of particles reduces considerably the sheath thickness and induces dust grain deceleration. The increase of the lower limit as well as the upper limit of the dust radius reduces also the sheath thickness

  11. Effect of particles attachment to multi-sized dust grains present in electrostatic sheaths of discharge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaham, B. [Quantum Electronics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, U.S.T.H.B. BP 32 El-Alia Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Faculté des Sciences et des Sciences Appliquées, Université de Bouira Rue Drissi Yahia 10000 Bouira (Algeria); Tahraoui, A., E-mail: alatif-tahraoui@yahoo.fr; Chekour, S. [Quantum Electronics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, U.S.T.H.B. BP 32 El-Alia Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Benlemdjaldi, D. [Quantum Electronics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, U.S.T.H.B. BP 32 El-Alia Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Département de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure BP 92 Vieux-Kouba, Algiers 16050 (Algeria)

    2014-12-15

    The loss of electrons and ions due to their attachment to a Gauss-distributed sizes of dust grains present in electrostatic sheaths of discharge plasmas is investigated. A uni-dimensional, unmagnetized, and stationary multi-fluid model is proposed. Forces acting on the dust grain along with its charge are self-consistently calculated, within the limits of the orbit motion limited model. The dynamic analysis of dust grains shows that the contribution of the neutral drag force in the net force acting on the dust grain is negligible, whereas the contribution of the gravity force is found considerable only for micrometer particles. The dust grains trapping is only possible when the electrostatic force is balanced by the ion drag and the gravity forces. This trapping occurs for a limited radius interval of micrometer dust grains, which is around the most probable dust grain radius. The effect of electron temperature and ion density at the sheath edge is also discussed. It is shown that the attachment of particles reduces considerably the sheath thickness and induces dust grain deceleration. The increase of the lower limit as well as the upper limit of the dust radius reduces also the sheath thickness.

  12. Size distribution of dust grains: A problem of self-similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, TH.; Dorschner, J.; Guertler, J.

    1989-01-01

    Distribution functions describing the results of natural processes frequently show the shape of power laws. It is an open question whether this behavior is a result simply coming about by the chosen mathematical representation of the observational data or reflects a deep-seated principle of nature. The authors suppose the latter being the case. Using a dust model consisting of silicate and graphite grains Mathis et al. (1977) showed that the interstellar extinction curve can be represented by taking a grain radii distribution of power law type n(a) varies as a(exp -p) with 3.3 less than or equal to p less than or equal to 3.6 (example 1) as a basis. A different approach to understanding power laws like that in example 1 becomes possible by the theory of self-similar processes (scale invariance). The beta model of turbulence (Frisch et al., 1978) leads in an elementary way to the concept of the self-similarity dimension D, a special case of Mandelbrot's (1977) fractal dimension. In the frame of this beta model, it is supposed that on each stage of a cascade the system decays to N clumps and that only the portion beta N remains active further on. An important feature of this model is that the active eddies become less and less space-filling. In the following, the authors assume that grain-grain collisions are such a scale-invarient process and that the remaining grains are the inactive (frozen) clumps of the cascade. In this way, a size distribution n(a) da varies as a(exp -(D+1))da (example 2) results. It seems to be highly probable that the power law character of the size distribution of interstellar dust grains is the result of a self-similarity process. We can, however, not exclude that the process leading to the interstellar grain size distribution is not fragmentation at all

  13. Grain-size dependence of the magnetic properties of street dusts from Warsaw, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dytłow, Sylwia; Winkler, Aldo; Sagnotti, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, in connection with a substantial development of transportation in urban areas, vehicular traffic increased its importance as source of pollution and consequent cause of health problems in urban environments. In fact, it is well established that the concentration and size of pollution related particulate matter (PM) are important factors affecting human health. The aim of this study is to identify the variations of the magnetic properties and of the chemical composition of different granulometric fractions from street dusts collected at four locations in Warsaw: the city center, a suburb, a tramline and a big crossroad. Dust samples were mechanically sieved and classified using the laboratory shaker with a standard sieve set (0.5 mm, 0.25 mm, 0.1 mm and 0.071 mm). Data show a distribution of magnetic susceptibility (χ) in the wide range of 80-370 × 10-8 m3kg-1. Comparison of magnetic parameters shows that the street dust contains the pollution characteristics for air and soil. The samples were characterized by uniform magnetic mineralogy, typical for fine-grained magnetite, in a grain size range between pseudo-single-domain and fine multi-domain, with a small contribution from ultrafine superparamagnetic particles (~2-3.5 %). The street dust contains, as usual for the urban areas, spherical magnetic particles produced by fossil fuel combustion processes and mixture of irregular angular iron-oxides grains containing other elements. The magnetic susceptibility and hysteresis properties of the dusts have been analyzed in detail; the temperature variation of the saturation of remanent magnetization and of the magnetic susceptibility revealed that the main magnetic mineral, for all the fractions, is almost stoichiometric magnetite, with the finest fractions (d=0.1 mm, 0.071 mm and d

  14. Downwind changes in grain size of aeolian dust; examples from marine and terrestrial archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend; Prins, Maarten

    2013-04-01

    Aeolian dust in the atmosphere may have a cooling effect when small particles in the high atmosphere block incoming solar energy (e.g., Claquin et al., 2003) but it may also act as a 'greenhouse gas' when larger particles in the lower atmosphere trap energy that was reflected from the Earth's surface (e.g., Otto et al., 2007). Therefore, it is of vital importance to have a good understanding of the particle-size distribution of aeolian dust in space and time. As wind is a very size-selective transport mechanism, the sediments it carries typically have a very-well sorted grain-size distribution, which gradually fines from proximal to distal deposition sites. This fact has been used in numerous paleo-environmental studies to both determine source-to-sink changes in the particle size of aeolian dust (e.g., Weltje and Prins, 2003; Holz et al., 2004; Prins and Vriend, 2007) and to quantify mass-accumulation rates of aeolian dust (e.g., Prins and Weltje 1999; Stuut et al., 2002; Prins et al., 2007; Prins and Vriend, 2007; Stuut et al., 2007; Tjallingii et al., 2008; Prins et al., 2009). Studies on modern wind-blown particles have demonstrated that particle size of dust not only is a function of lateral but also vertical transport distance (e.g., Torres-Padron et al., 2002; Stuut et al., 2005). Nonetheless, there are still many unresolved questions related to the physical properties of wind-blown particles like e.g., the case of "giant" quartz particles found on Hawaii (Betzer et al., 1988) that can only originate from Asia but have a too large size for the distance they travelled through the atmosphere. Here, we present examples of dust particle-size distributions from terrestrial (loess) as well as marine (deep-sea sediments) sedimentary archives and their spatial and temporal changes. With this contribution we hope to provide quantitative data for the modelling community in order to get a better grip on the role of wind-blown particles in the climate system. Cited

  15. The Importance of Physical Models for Deriving Dust Masses and Grain Size Distributions in Supernova Ejecta. I. Radiatively Heated Dust in the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 Solar Mass, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 micron. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in

  16. Heavy metal speciation in various grain sizes of industrially contaminated street dust using multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Gülşen; Tokalıoğlu, Şerife

    2016-02-01

    A total of 36 street dust samples were collected from the streets of the Organised Industrial District in Kayseri, Turkey. This region includes a total of 818 work places in various industrial areas. The modified BCR (the European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure was applied to evaluate the mobility and bioavailability of trace elements (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in street dusts of the study area. The BCR was classified into three steps: water/acid soluble fraction, reducible and oxidisable fraction. The remaining residue was dissolved by using aqua regia. The concentrations of the metals in street dust samples were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Also the effect of the different grain sizes (Cu (48.9)>Pb (42.8)=Cr (42.1)>Ni (41.4)>Zn (40.9)>Co (36.6)=Mn (36.3)>Fe (3.1). No significant difference was observed among metal partitioning for the three particle sizes. Correlation, principal component and cluster analysis were applied to identify probable natural and anthropogenic sources in the region. The principal component analysis results showed that this industrial district was influenced by traffic, industrial activities, air-borne emissions and natural sources. The accuracy of the results was checked by analysis of both the BCR-701 certified reference material and by recovery studies in street dust samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pseudopotential approach for dust acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with kappa-distributed ions and electrons and dust grains having power law size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Gadadhar; Maitra, Sarit [Department of Mathematics, National Institute of Technology Durgapur, Durgapur (India)

    2015-04-15

    Sagdeev's pseudopotential method is used to study small as well as arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic solitons in a dusty plasma with kappa distributed electrons and ions with dust grains having power law size distribution. The existence of potential well solitons has been shown for suitable parametric region. The criterion for existence of soliton is derived in terms of upper and lower limit for Mach numbers. The numerical results show that the size distribution can affect the existence as well as the propagation characteristics of the dust acoustic solitons. The effect of kappa distribution is also highlighted.

  18. Terrestrial in situ sampling of dust devils (relative particle loads and vertical grain size distributions) as an equivalent for martian dust devils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raack, J.; Dennis, R.; Balme, M. R.; Taj-Eddine, K.; Ori, G. G.

    2017-12-01

    Dust devils are small vertical convective vortices which occur on Earth and Mars [1] but their internal structure is almost unknown. Here we report on in situ samples of two active dust devils in the Sahara Desert in southern Morocco [2]. For the sampling we used a 4 m high aluminium pipe with sampling areas made of removable adhesive tape. We took samples between 0.1-4 m with a sampling interval of 0.5 m and between 0.5-2 m with an interval of 0.25 m, respectively. The maximum diameter of all particles of the different sampling heights were then measured using an optical microscope to gain vertical grain size distributions and relative particle loads. Our measurements imply that both dust devils have a general comparable internal structure despite their different strengths and dimensions which indicates that the dust devils probably represents the surficial grain size distribution they move over. The particle sizes within the dust devils decrease nearly exponential with height which is comparable to results by [3]. Furthermore, our results show that about 80-90 % of the total particle load were lifted only within the first meter, which is a direct evidence for the existence of a sand skirt. If we assume that grains with a diameter dust coverage is larger [5], although the atmosphere can only suspend smaller grain sizes ( dust devils each day which were up to several hundred meters tall and had diameters of several tens of meters. This implies a much higher input of fine grained material into the atmosphere (which will have an influence on the climate, weather, and human health [7]) compared to the relative small dust devils sampled during our field campaign. [1] Thomas and Gierasch (1985) Science 230 [2] Raack et al. (2017) Astrobiology [3] Oke et al. (2007) J. Arid Environ. 71 [4] Balme and Greeley (2006) Rev. Geophys. 44 [5] Christensen (1986) JGR 91 [6] Newman et al. (2002) JGR 107 [7] Gillette and Sinclair (1990) Atmos. Environ. 24

  19. [Effects of the grain size and thickness of dust deposits on soil water and salt movement in the hinterland of the Taklimakan Desert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Wei; Li, Sheng-Yu; Xu, Xin-Wen; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Li, Ying

    2009-08-01

    By using mcirolysimeter, a laboratory simulation experiment was conducted to study the effects of the grain size and thickness of dust deposits on the soil water evaporation and salt movement in the hinterland of the Taklimakan Desert. Under the same initial soil water content and deposition thickness condition, finer-textured (soil water evaporation, deeper soil desiccation, and surface soil salt accumulation, while coarse-textured (0.063-2 mm) deposits inhibited soil water evaporation and decreased deeper soil water loss and surface soil salt accumulation. The inhibition effect of the grain size of dust deposits on soil water evaporation had an inflection point at the grain size 0.20 mm, i. e., increased with increasing grain size when the grain size was 0.063-0.20 mm but decreased with increasing grain size when the grain size was > 0.20 mm. With the increasing thickness of dust deposits, its inhibition effect on soil water evaporation increased, and there existed a logarithmic relationship between the dust deposits thickness and water evaporation. Surface soil salt accumulation had a negative correlation with dust deposits thickness. In sum, the dust deposits in study area could affect the stability of arid desert ecosystem.

  20. Modelling dust processing and the evolution of grain sizes in the ISM using the method of moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Lars

    2016-11-01

    Interstellar dust grains do not have a single well-defined origin. Stars are demonstrably dust producers, but also efficient destroyers of cosmic dust. Dust destruction in the ISM is believed to be the result of SN shocks hitting the ambient ISM gas (and dust) and lead to an increased rate of ion sputtering, which reduces the dust mass. Grains located in cold molecular clouds can on the other hand grow by condensation, thus providing a replenishment mechanism or even a dominant channel of dust formation. In dense environments grains may coagulate and form large composite grains and aggregates and if grains collide with large enough energies they may be shattered, forming a range of smaller debris grains. The present paper presents a statistical modelling approach using the method of moments, which is computationally very inexpensive and may therefore be an attractive option when combining dust processing with, e.g., detailed simulations of interstellar gas dynamics. A solar-neighbourhood-like toy model of interstellar dust evolution is presented as an example.

  1. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.; Peng, R. D.; Liu, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Ye, M. F.; Wang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  2. Effect of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation on dust ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation of dust grains on the small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust ion-acoustic shock waves, in an unmagnetized multi-ion dusty plasma which contains negative ions, positive ions and electrons, are studied in this paper. A Burgers equation and its stationary ...

  3. THE FORMATION OF THE PRIMITIVE STAR SDSS J102915+172927: EFFECT OF THE DUST MASS AND THE GRAIN-SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovino, S.; Banerjee, R. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Grassi, T. [Niels Bohr Institute and Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Øster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schleicher, D. R. G., E-mail: stefano.bovino@uni-hamburg.de [Departamento de Astronomía, Facultad Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Av. Esteban Iturra s/n Barrio Universitario, Casilla 160, Concepción (Chile)

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the formation of the extremely metal-poor star SDSS J102915+172927 is of fundamental importance to improve our knowledge on the transition between the first and second generation of stars in the universe. In this paper, we perform three-dimensional cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of dust-enriched halos during the early stages of the collapse process including a detailed treatment of the dust physics. We employ the astrochemistry package krome coupled with the hydrodynamical code enzo assuming grain-size distributions produced by the explosion of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) of 20 and 35 M {sub ⊙} primordial stars, which are suitable to reproduce the chemical pattern of the SDSS J102915+172927 star. We find that the dust mass yield produced from Population III SNe explosions is the most important factor that drives the thermal evolution and the dynamical properties of the halos. Hence, for the specific distributions relevant in this context, the composition, the dust optical properties, and the size range have only minor effects on the results due to similar cooling functions. We also show that the critical dust mass to enable fragmentation provided by semi-analytical models should be revised, as we obtain values one order of magnitude larger. This determines the transition from disk fragmentation to a more filamentary fragmentation mode, and suggests that likely more than one single SN event or efficient dust growth should be invoked to get such high dust content.

  4. Glacial and interglacial eolian dust dispersal patterns across the Chinese Loess Plateau inferred from decomposed loess grain-size records.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Vriend, M.G.A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that a genetically meaningful decomposition (unmixing) of loess grainsize distributions can be accomplished with the end-member modeling algorithm EMMA. The independent decomposition of two series of loess grain-size records from the NE Tibetan Plateau and Loess

  5. Simulating grain size estimation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saxl, Ivan; Sülleiová, K.; Ponížil, P.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2001), s. 396-409 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/99/0269 Keywords : grain size estimation% ASTM standards%Voronoi tessellations Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.343, year: 2001

  6. Computer simulation of dust grain evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liffman, K.

    1989-01-01

    The latest results are reported from a Monte Carlo code that is being developed at NASA Ames. The goal of this program, is to derive from the observed and presumed properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) the following information: (1) the size spectrum of interstellar dust; (2) the chemical structure of interstellar dust; (3) interstellar abundances; and (4) the lifetime of a dust grain in the ISM. Presently this study is restricted to refractory interstellar material, i.e., the formation and destruction of ices are not included in the program. The program is embedded in an analytic solution for the bulk chemical evolution of a two-phase interstellar medium in which stars are born in molecular clouds, but new nucleosynthesis products and stellar return are entered into a complementary intercloud medium. The well-mixed matter of each interstellar phase is repeatedly cycled stochastically through the complementary phase and back. Refractory dust is created by thermal condensation as stellar matter flows away from sites of nucleosynthesis such as novae and supernovae and/or from the matter returned from evolved intermediate stars. The history of each particle is traced by standard Monte Carlo techniques as it is sputtered and fragmented by supernova shock waves in the intercloud medium. It also accretes an amorphous mantle of gaseous refractory atoms when its local medium joins with the molecular cloud medium. Finally it encounters the possibility of astration (destruction by star formation) within the molecular clouds.

  7. Computer simulation of dust grain evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liffman, K.

    1989-01-01

    The latest results are reported from a Monte Carlo code that is being developed at NASA Ames. The goal of this program, is to derive from the observed and presumed properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) the following information: (1) the size spectrum of interstellar dust; (2) the chemical structure of interstellar dust; (3) interstellar abundances; and (4) the lifetime of a dust grain in the ISM. Presently this study is restricted to refractory interstellar material, i.e., the formation and destruction of ices are not included in the program. The program is embedded in an analytic solution for the bulk chemical evolution of a two-phase interstellar medium in which stars are born in molecular clouds, but new nucleosynthesis products and stellar return are entered into a complementary intercloud medium. The well-mixed matter of each interstellar phase is repeatedly cycled stochastically through the complementary phase and back. Refractory dust is created by thermal condensation as stellar matter flows away from sites of nucleosynthesis such as novae and supernovae and/or from the matter returned from evolved intermediate stars. The history of each particle is traced by standard Monte Carlo techniques as it is sputtered and fragmented by supernova shock waves in the intercloud medium. It also accretes an amorphous mantle of gaseous refractory atoms when its local medium joins with the molecular cloud medium. Finally it encounters the possibility of astration (destruction by star formation) within the molecular clouds

  8. Disintegration of Dust Aggregates in Interstellar Shocks and the Lifetime of Dust Grains in the ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, C.; Jones, A. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Cuzzi, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Interstellar grains are destroyed by shock waves moving through the ISM. In fact, the destruction of grains may be so effective that it is difficult to explain the observed abundance of dust in the ISM as a steady state between input of grains from stellar sources and destruction of grains in shocks. This is especially a problem for the larger grains. Therefore, the dust grains must be protected in some way. Jones et al. have already considered coatings and the increased post-shock drag effects for low density grains. In molecular clouds and dense clouds, coagulation of grains is an important process, and the largest interstellar grains may indeed be aggregates of smaller grains rather than homogeneous particles. This may provide a means to protect the larger grains, in that, in moderate velocity grain-grain collisions in a shock the aggregates may disintegrate rather than be vaporized. The released small particles are more resilient to shock destruction (except in fast shocks) and may reform larger grains later, recovering the observed size distribution. We have developed a model for the binding forces in grain aggregates and apply this model to the collisions between an aggregate and fast small grains. We discuss the results in the light of statistical collision probabilities and grain life times.

  9. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y J; Tielens, A G; Werner, M W

    1990-01-20

    We have developed a model for reflection nebulae around luminous infrared sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The aim of this study is to determine the sizes of the scattering grains. In our analysis, we have adopted an MRN-like power-law size distribution (Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck) of graphite and silicate grains, but other current dust models would give results which were substantially the same. In the optically thin limit, the intensity of the scattered light is proportional to the dust column density, while in the optically thick limit, it reflects the grain albedo. The results show that the shape of the infrared spectrum is the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of our model results with infrared observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse interstellar medium, or one consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains (approximately 5000 angstroms). By adding water ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, we have modeled the 3.08 micrometers ice band feature, which has been observed in the spectra of several infrared reflection nebulae. We show that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains. We show that the shape of the ice band is diagnostic of the presence of large grains, as previously suggested by Knacke and McCorkle. Comparison with observations of the BN/KL reflection nebula in the OMC-1 cloud shows that large ice grains (approximately 5000 angstroms) contribute substantially to the scattered light.

  10. Stochastic charging of dust grains in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin Ashrafi, Khandaker; Esparza, Samuel; Xiang, Chuchu; Matthews, Lorin; Carballido, Augusto; Hyde, Truell

    2017-06-01

    Micron-sized dust grains are abundant in the early stages of protoplanetary disks. Not only do such solid particles provide the seeds for planetesimal formation through collisional growth and collective effects, they also modify the overall ionization levels of the surrounding plasma through the accumulation of charge. If the local dust density is large enough that charge is removed from the nebular gas through deposition on grain surfaces, magnetic fields can detach from the gas making the MRI process inoperative. For highly porous dust aggregates, MRI quenching can become even more efficient since porous aggregates accumulate charge more efficiently than do compact spherical grains having the same mass. The primary goal of this work is to develop a numerical model of dust coagulation and charging in a magnetized protoplanetary disk to answer the question: What role does the porosity and/or electrical charge state of dust aggregates play in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) structure of protoplanetary disks? The collisional charging of a grain is affected by its surface area and morphology. Here we compare the electron and ion currents incident on micron and submicron aggregate grains made of spherical monomers to the currents incident on spherical grains of equivalent mass. The electrons and ions are absorbed on the dust grain surface at random times; as a result charge fluctuates stochastically. We calculate the average charge and charge probability distribution for (i) aggregates composed of monomers of 10 nm, 20 nm and 50 nm monomers with an effective aggregate radius of 0.1 m, and (ii) aggregates consisting of up to 100 monomers with monomer radius of 0.1 micron. The implications of our results for non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics in protoplanetary disks are briefly discussed in terms of the effect of disk ionization fraction and chemical networks.

  11. GRAIN SIZE CONSTRAINTS ON HL TAU WITH POLARIZATION SIGNATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Dullemond, Cornelis P [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Muto, Takayuki [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Momose, Munetake; Tsukagoshi, Takashi, E-mail: kataoka@uni-heidelberg.de [College of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan)

    2016-03-20

    The millimeter-wave polarization of the protoplanetary disk around HL Tau has been interpreted as the emission from elongated dust grains aligned with the magnetic field in the disk. However, the self-scattering of thermal dust emission may also explain the observed millimeter-wave polarization. In this paper, we report a modeling of the millimeter-wave polarization of the HL Tau disk with the self-polarization. Dust grains are assumed to be spherical and to have a power-law size distribution. We change the maximum grain size with a fixed dust composition in a fixed disk model to find the grain size to reproduce the observed signature. We find that the direction of the polarization vectors and the polarization degree can be explained with the self-scattering. Moreover, the polarization degree can be explained only if the maximum grain size is ∼150 μm. The obtained grain size from the polarization is different from that which has been previously expected from the spectral index of the dust opacity coefficient (a millimeter or larger) if the emission is optically thin. We discuss that porous dust aggregates may solve the inconsistency of the maximum grain size between the two constraints.

  12. TRAJECTORIES AND DISTRIBUTION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST GRAINS IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavin, Jonathan D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS 83, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Frisch, Priscilla C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5460 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Mueller, Hans-Reinhard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Pogorelov, Nikolai V. [Department of Physics and Center for Space Physics and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Reach, William T. [Universities Space Research Association, MS 211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Zank, Gary [Department of Physics and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    The solar wind carves a bubble in the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) known as the heliosphere. Charged interstellar dust grains (ISDG) encountering the heliosphere may be diverted around the heliopause or penetrate it depending on their charge-to-mass ratio. We present new calculations of trajectories of ISDG in the heliosphere, and the dust density distributions that result. We include up-to-date grain charging calculations using a realistic UV radiation field and full three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic fluid + kinetic models for the heliosphere. Models with two different (constant) polarities for the solar wind magnetic field (SWMF) are used, with the grain trajectory calculations done separately for each polarity. Small grains a {sub gr} {approx}< 0.01 {mu}m are completely excluded from the inner heliosphere. Large grains, a {sub gr} {approx}> 1.0 {mu}m, pass into the inner solar system and are concentrated near the Sun by its gravity. Trajectories of intermediate size grains depend strongly on the SWMF polarity. When the field has magnetic north pointing to ecliptic north, the field de-focuses the grains resulting in low densities in the inner heliosphere, while for the opposite polarity the dust is focused near the Sun. The ISDG density outside the heliosphere inferred from applying the model results to in situ dust measurements is inconsistent with local ISM depletion data for both SWMF polarities but is bracketed by them. This result points to the need to include the time variation in the SWMF polarity during grain propagation. Our results provide valuable insights for interpretation of the in situ dust observations from Ulysses.

  13. Stochastic histories of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liffman, K.; Clayton, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to study an evolving system of refractory dust grains within the Interstellar Medium (ISM). This is done via a combination of Monte Carlo processes and a system of partial differential equations, where refractory dust grains formed within supernova remnants and ejecta from high mass loss stars are subjected to the processes of sputtering and collisional fragmentation in the diffuse media and accretion within the cold molecular clouds. In order to record chemical detail, the authors take each new particle to consist of a superrefractory core plus a more massive refractory mantle. The particles are allowed to transfer to and fro between the different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM) - on a time scale of 10(exp 8) years - until either the particles are destroyed or the program finishes at a Galaxy time of 6x10(exp 9) years. The resulting chemical and size spectrum(s) are then applied to various astrophysical problems with the following results. For an ISM which has no collisional fragmentation of the dust grains, roughly 10 percent by mass of the most refractory material survives the rigors of the ISM intact, which leaves open the possibility that fossilized isotopically anomalous material may have been present within the primordial solar nebula. Stuctured or layered refractory dust grains within the model cannot explain the observed interstellar depletions of refractory material. Fragmentation due to grain-grain collisions in the diffuse phase plus the accretion of material in the molecular cloud phase can under certain circumstances cause a bimodal distribution in grain size

  14. Experimental Investigation of Charging Properties of Interstellar Type Silica Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging processes in astrophysical and planetary environments. Incident low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grains, leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available classical theoretical models for calculations of SEE yields are generally applicable for neutral, planar, or bulk surfaces. These models, however, are not valid for calculations of the electron impact charging properties of electrostatically charged micron/submicron-size dust grains in astrophysical environments. Rigorous quantum mechanical models are not yet available, and the SEE yields have to be determined experimentally for development of more accurate models for charging of individual dust grains. At the present time, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly for low energy electron impact. The experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated carried out by us in a unique facility at NASA-MSFC, based on an electrodynamic balance, indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (Abbas et al, 2010, 2012). In this paper, we discuss SEE charging properties of individual micron-size silica microspheres that are believed to be analogs of a class of interstellar dust grains. The measurements indicate charging of the 0.2m silica particles when exposed to 25 eV electron beams and discharging when exposed to higher energy electron beams. Relatively large size silica particles (5.2-6.82m) generally discharge to lower equilibrium potentials at both electron energies

  15. Prevalence of IgE antibodies to grain and grain dust in grain elevator workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.M.; Romeo, P.A.; Olenchock, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    IgE-mediated allergic reactions have been postulated to contribute to respiratory reactions seen in workers exposed to grain dusts. In an attempt better to define the prevalence of IgE antibodies in workers exposed to grain dusts, we performed the radioallergosorbent test (RAST) on worker sera using both commercial allergens prepared from grain and worksite allergens prepared from grain dust samples collected at the worksite. We found that the two types of reagents identified different populations with respect to the specificity of IgE antibodies present. The RAST assay performed using worksite allergens correlated well with skin test procedures. These results may allow us to gain better understanding of allergy associated with grain dust exposure, and document the utility of the RAST assay in assessment of occupational allergies

  16. PROPERTIES OF DUST GRAINS PROBED WITH EXTINCTION CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, Takaya; Fukugita, Masataka [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-06-10

    Modern data of the extinction curve from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared are revisited to study properties of dust grains in the Milky Way (MW) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We confirm that the graphite-silicate mixture of grains yields the observed extinction curve with the simple power-law distribution of the grain size but with a cutoff at some maximal size: the parameters are tightly constrained to be q = 3.5 {+-} 0.2 for the size distribution a {sup -q} and the maximum radius a{sub max} = 0.24 {+-} 0.05 {mu}m, for both MW and SMC. The abundance of grains, and hence the elemental abundance, is constrained from the reddening versus hydrogen column density, E(B - V)/N{sub H}. If we take the solar elemental abundance as the standard for the MW, >56% of carbon should be in graphite dust, while it is <40% in the SMC using its available abundance estimate. This disparity and the relative abundance of C to Si explain the difference of the two curves. We find that 50%-60% of carbon may not necessarily be in graphite but in the amorphous or glassy phase. Iron may also be in the metallic phase or up to {approx}80% in magnetite rather than in silicates, so that the Mg/Fe ratio in astronomical olivine is arbitrary. With these substitutions, the parameters of the grain size remain unchanged. The mass density of dust grains relative to hydrogen is {rho}{sub dust}/{rho}{sub H}= 1 / (120{sup +10}{sub -16}) for the MW and 1 / (760{sup +70}{sub -90}) for the SMC under the elemental abundance constraints. We underline the importance of the wavelength dependence of the extinction curve in the near-infrared in constructing the dust model: if A{sub {lambda}}{proportional_to}{lambda}{sup -{gamma}} with {gamma} {approx_equal} 1.6, the power-law grain-size model fails, whereas it works if {gamma} {approx_equal} 1.8-2.0.

  17. Dust grain characterization — Direct measurement of light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    BartoÅ, P.; Pavlů, J.

    2018-01-01

    Dust grains play a key role in dusty plasma since they interact with the plasma we can use them to study plasma itself. The grains are illuminated by visible light (e.g., a laser sheet) and the situation is captured with camera. Despite of simplicity, light scattering on similar-to-wavelength sized grains is complex phenomenon. Interaction of the electromagnetic wave with material has to be computed with respect to Maxwell equations — analytic solution is nowadays available only for several selected shapes like sphere, coated sphere, or infinite cylinder. Moreover, material constants needed for computations are usually unknown. For computation result verification and material constant determination, we designed and developed a device directly measur­ing light scattering profiles. Single dust grains are trapped in the ultrasonic field (so called "acoustic levitation") and illuminated by the laser beam. Scattered light is then measured by a photodiode mounted on rotating platform. Synchronous detection is employed for a noise reduction. This setup brings several benefits against conventional methods: (1) it works in the free air, (2) the measured grain is captured for a long time, and (3) the grain could be of arbitrary shape.

  18. Cometary dust size distributions from flyby spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, N.

    1988-01-01

    Pior to the Halley flybys in 1986, the distribution of cometary dust grains with particle size were approximated using models which provided reasonable fits to the dynamics of dust tails, anti-tails, and infrared spectra. These distributions have since been improved using fluence data (i.e., particle fluxes integrated over time along the flyby trajectory) from three spacecraft. The fluence derived distributions are appropriate for comparison with simultaneous infrared photometry (from Earth) because they sample the particles in the same way as the IR data do (along the line of sight) and because they are directly proportional to the concentration distribution in that region of the coma which dominates the IR emission

  19. A COMPACT CONCENTRATION OF LARGE GRAINS IN THE HD 142527 PROTOPLANETARY DUST TRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casassus, Simon; Marino, Sebastian; Pérez, Sebastian; Christiaens, Valentin; Plas, Gerrit van der [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Wright, Chris M. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW Canberra, P.O. Box 7916, Canberra BC 2610 (Australia); Maddison, Sarah T. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Wootten, Al [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Roman, Pablo; Moral, Victor [Millennium Nucleus “Protoplanetary Disks,” Santiago (Chile); Pinilla, Paola [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Wyatt, Mark [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ménard, Francois [UMI-FCA, CNRS/INSU France (UMI 3386), at Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Cieza, Lucas [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-10-20

    A pathway to the formation of planetesimals, and eventually giant planets, may occur in concentrations of dust grains trapped in pressure maxima. Dramatic crescent-shaped dust concentrations have been seen in recent radio images at submillimeter wavelengths. These disk asymmetries could represent the initial phases of planet formation in the dust trap scenario, provided that grain sizes are spatially segregated. A testable prediction of azimuthal dust trapping is that progressively larger grains should be more sharply confined and should follow a distribution that is markedly different from the gas. However, gas tracers such as {sup 12}CO and the infrared emission from small grains are both very optically thick where the submillimeter continuum originates, so previous observations have been unable to test the trapping predictions or to identify compact concentrations of larger grains required for planet formation by core accretion. Here we report multifrequency observations of HD 142527, from 34 to 700 GHz, that reveal a compact concentration of grains approaching centimeter sizes, with a few Earth masses, embedded in a large-scale crescent of smaller, submillimeter-sized particles. The emission peaks at wavelengths shorter than ∼1 mm are optically thick and trace the temperature structure resulting from shadows cast by the inner regions. Given this temperature structure, we infer that the largest dust grains are concentrated in the 34 GHz clump. We conclude that dust trapping is efficient enough for grains observable at centimeter wavelengths to lead to compact concentrations.

  20. Grain Size Measurements of Eolian Ripples in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, C. M.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Lapotre, M. G. A.; Rowland, S. K.; Edgett, K. S.; Grant, J. A., III; Yingst, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Curiosity rover team has explored several different eolian sand targets in Gale crater, including dunes and ripples. Using Curiosity's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), we measured the size of grains on or near ripple crests within dunes, ripple fields, and in isolated ripples. The Barby target (Sol 1184) is on the crest of a ripple on the lower stoss slope of the barchan High dune. Flume Ridge (Sol 1604) and Avery Peak (Sol 1651) are smaller ripples on the Nathan Bridges and Mount Desert Island linear dunes. Schoolhouse Ledge (Sol 1688) is an isolated megaripple not associated with either a dune or ripple field. Enchanted Island (Sol 1751) is a ripple contained within a larger ripple field near the Vera Rubin Ridge. Our results show the grains of the Avery Peak and Flume Ridge targets are mostly 75-150 µm in size and grain motion was observed during each MAHLI imaging sequence. Barby is dominated by 250-450 µm grains assumed to be active based upon the lack of a dust coating, though grain motion was not observed. The Enchanted Island target has slightly larger grains than Barby, with most between 300-500 µm. The grains have some dust aggregates on their surfaces, suggesting they have been less active in recent months or years relative to the ripples examined within the Bagnold dune field. Finally, grains along the crest of Schoolhouse Ledge are the largest, 400-600 µm, and all of the grain surfaces have a thin dust coating, indicating the ripple is not currently active. Some of the ripple crests have similar grain sizes on both the stoss and lee sides (Schoolhouse Ledge, Barby) whereas other ripples showed larger grains concentrated on the stoss side (Enchanted Island, Avery Peak, Flume Ridge). Scuffing by the rover's front wheel revealed both Schoolhouse Ledge and Enchanted Island had coarser grains dominating the ripple surface with finer grains within the ripple interior. In general, the surfaces of active sand ripples have smaller grains compared to the

  1. Effect of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation on dust ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-17

    Jun 17, 2016 ... Dusty plasma; dust-acoustic shock wave; dust size distribution; adiabatic dust charge variation; negative ions. PACS Nos 52.27.Lw; 52.35.Tc; 52.35.Mw. 1. Introduction. The low-frequency dust ion-acoustic waves are typi- cal acoustic modes in unmagnetized and collisionless dusty plasma with a weak ...

  2. Grain size of fine-grained windblown sediment: a powerful proxy for process identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenberghe, J.

    2013-01-01

    Dust transport by the wind is not a uniform process but may occur in different modes according to source area conditions and transport height and distance. Subsequently, these differences are expressed in terms of grain-size and fluxes of the aeolian deposits. Transport distances may vary from

  3. Rapid and cyclic dust accumulation during MIS 2 in Central Asia inferred from loess OSL dating and grain-size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Song, Yougui; Lai, Zhongping; Han, Li; An, Zhisheng

    2016-09-02

    Due to lack of reliable proxies from the Westerlies-dominant region, the strength change of Northern Hemisphere Westerlies remains poorly understood. The aim of this study is to provide a reliable paleoclimatic proxy about the Northern Hemisphere Westerlies change. Here we report a 30.7 m thick loess section from the Ili basin directly controlled by the Westerlies. Based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and high resolution grain-size records, we reconstruct the change history of the Westerlies strength during the last glacial period (mainly Marine Isotope Stages 2, MIS2), being similar with the Westerlies index recorded in the Qinghai Lake sediments. Within error limits, all ages are in stratigraphic order. We further compare the climatic records among the Ili loess, Qinghai Lake and the NGRIP, their similarity shows a good climatic coupling relationship among the Central Asia, East Asia and the North Atlantic, and the Westerlies plays a critical influence in transporting the North Atlantic signal to Central and East Asia.

  4. The grain charging and the dust acoustic wave instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, Ram K.

    2001-01-01

    The stability of the steady charging state of the assembly of dust grains in a plasma is analyzed using, besides the equations of continuity and momentum balance, also the equations of thermal energy balance with the grain charging terms for both the electron and ion species. The grain charging terms account for the energy exchange between the dust grains and the electron and ion fluids. The grains are taken to be immobile for the purpose of this analysis. Two limiting cases are analyzed: (i) f(≡4πn d λ D 2 a) >1 (n d is the dust number density, λ D plasma Debye length, and a, the grain radius). The steady grain charge state is found to be stable in the case f o is unaffected. On the other hand, in the limit f>>1, the state is found to be unstable provided γ q (≡q o e/aT e ) e -T i )/T e (T e , T i are electron and ion temperatures). A coherent charging of the dust grains results as a consequence of this instability until γ q ≅(1/2) (T e -T i )/T i . Next, by letting the grain charges be mobile, so that the perturbation of dust number density is nonzero, we examine the stability of the dust-acoustic wave (DAW). The DAW is found to be unstable, also in the f>>1 case, while stable in the f<<1. The instability of the DAW also implies a concomitant grain charge growth, which would again be of a coherent nature

  5. Physicochemical properties of respirable-size lunar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D. S.; Cooper, B. L.; Taylor, L. A.; James, J. T.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Pieters, C. M.; Wentworth, S. J.; Wallace, W. T.; Lee, T. S.

    2015-02-01

    We separated the respirable dust and other size fractions from Apollo 14 bulk sample 14003,96 in a dry nitrogen environment. While our toxicology team performed in vivo and in vitro experiments with the respirable fraction, we studied the size distribution and shape, chemistry, mineralogy, spectroscopy, iron content and magnetic resonance of various size fractions. These represent the finest-grained lunar samples ever measured for either FMR np-Fe0 index or precise bulk chemistry, and are the first instance we know of in which SEM/TEM samples have been obtained without using liquids. The concentration of single-domain, nanophase metallic iron (np-Fe0) increases as particle size diminishes to 2 μm, confirming previous extrapolations. Size-distribution studies disclosed that the most frequent particle size was in the 0.1-0.2 μm range suggesting a relatively high surface area and therefore higher potential toxicity. Lunar dust particles are insoluble in isopropanol but slightly soluble in distilled water (~0.2 wt%/3 days). The interaction between water and lunar fines, which results in both agglomeration and partial dissolution, is observable on a macro scale over time periods of less than an hour. Most of the respirable grains were smooth amorphous glass. This suggests less toxicity than if the grains were irregular, porous, or jagged, and may account for the fact that lunar dust is less toxic than ground quartz.

  6. Dust Particle Size Distributions during Spring in Yinchuan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiangfeng Shao; Jiandong Mao

    2016-01-01

    Dust particle size distributions in Yinchuan, China, were measured during March and April 2014, using APS-3321 sampler. The distributions were measured under different dust conditions (background, floating dust, blowing dust, and dust storm) and statistical analyses were performed. The results showed that, under different dust conditions, the instantaneous number concentrations of dust particles differed widely. For example, during blowing sand and dust storm conditions, instantaneous dust pa...

  7. Conception, definition, measuring procedure of grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1976-12-01

    The conception, definition, measuring procedure of ''Grain Size'' were surveyed. A concept ''grain diameter'' was introduced after deriving a calculation formula for the grain diameter for using the Comparison (simple) and Intercept(detailed) procedure. As an example and putting into practice, the grain diameter determination was carried out by means of the Comparison procedure for a UO 2 pellet used in a densification experiment. (auth.)

  8. The effects of variable dust size and charge on dust acoustic waves propagating in a hybrid Cairns–Tsallis complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taibany, W. F.; El-Siragy, N. M.; Behery, E. E.; Elbendary, A. A.; Taha, R. M.

    2018-05-01

    The propagation characteristics of dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in a dusty plasma consisting of variable size dust grains, hybrid Cairns-Tsallis-distributed electrons, and nonthermal ions are studied. The charging of the dust grains is described by the orbital-motion-limited theory and the size of the dust grains obeys the power law dust size distribution. To describe the nonlinear propagation of the DAWs, a Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived using a reductive perturbation method. It is found that the nonthermal and nonextensive parameters influence the main properties of DAWs. Moreover, our results reveal that the rarefactive waves can propagate mainly in the proposed plasma model while compressive waves can be detected for a very small range of the distribution parameters of plasma species, and the DAWs are faster and wider for smaller size dust grains. Applications of the present results to dusty plasma observations are briefly discussed.

  9. The NGDC Seafloor Sediment Grain Size Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGDC (now NCEI) Seafloor Sediment Grain Size Database contains particle size data for over 17,000 seafloor samples worldwide. The file was begun by NGDC in 1976...

  10. Methods of assessing grain-size distribution during grain growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tweed, Cherry J.; Hansen, Niels; Ralph, Brian

    1985-01-01

    This paper considers methods of obtaining grain-size distributions and ways of describing them. In order to collect statistically useful amounts of data, an automatic image analyzer is used, and the resulting data are subjected to a series of tests that evaluate the differences between two related...... distributions (before and after grain growth). The distributions are measured from two-dimensional sections, and both the data and the corresponding true three-dimensional grain-size distributions (obtained by stereological analysis) are collected. The techniques described here are illustrated by reference...

  11. Nonlinear screening of dust grains and structurization of dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsytovich, V. N., E-mail: tsytov@lpi.ru; Gusein-zade, N. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    A review of theoretical ideas on the physics of structurization instability of a homogeneous dusty plasma, i.e., the formation of zones with elevated and depressed density of dust grains and their arrangement into different structures observed in laboratory plasma under microgravity conditions, is presented. Theoretical models of compact dust structures that can form in the nonlinear stage of structurization instability, as well as models of a system of voids (both surrounding a compact structure and formed in the center of the structure), are discussed. Two types of structures with very different dimensions are possible, namely, those smaller or larger than the characteristic mean free path of ions in the plasma flow. Both of them are characterized by relatively regular distributions of dust grains; however, the first ones usually require external confinement, while the structures of the second type can be self-sustained (which is of particular interest). In this review, they are called dust clusters and self-organized dust structures, respectively. Both types of the structures are characterized by new physical processes that take place only in the presence of the dust component. The role of nonlinearities in the screening of highly charged dust grains that are often observed in modern laboratory experiments turns out to be great, but these nonlinearities have not received adequate study as of yet. Although structurization takes place upon both linear and nonlinear screening, it can be substantially different under laboratory and astrophysical conditions. Studies on the nonlinear screening of large charges in plasma began several decades ago; however, up to now, this effect was usually disregarded when interpreting the processes occurring in laboratory dusty plasma. One of the aims of the present review was to demonstrate the possibility of describing the nonlinear screening of individual grains and take it into account with the help of the basic equations for the

  12. Tsunami sediments and their grain size characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulastya Putra, Purna

    2018-02-01

    Characteristics of tsunami deposits are very complex as the deposition by tsunami is very complex processes. The grain size characteristics of tsunami deposits are simply generalized no matter the local condition in which the deposition took place. The general characteristics are fining upward and landward, poor sorting, and the grain size distribution is not unimodal. Here I review the grain size characteristics of tsunami deposit in various environments: swale, coastal marsh and lagoon/lake. Review results show that although there are similar characters in some environments and cases, but in detail the characteristics in each environment can be distinguished; therefore, the tsunami deposit in each environment has its own characteristic. The local geological and geomorphological condition of the environment may greatly affect the grain size characteristics.

  13. How micron-sized dust particles determine the chemistry of our Universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulieu, Francois; Congiu, Emanuele; Noble, Jennifer; Baouche, Saoud; Chaabouni, Henda; Moudens, Audrey; Minissale, Marco; Cazaux, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In the environments where stars and planets form, about one percent of the mass is in the form of micro-meter sized particles known as dust. However small and insignificant these dust grains may seem, they are responsible for the production of the simplest (H-2) to the most complex (amino-acids)

  14. THE JCMT GOULD BELT SURVEY: EVIDENCE FOR DUST GRAIN EVOLUTION IN PERSEUS STAR-FORMING CLUMPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Michael Chun-Yuan; Francesco, J. Di; Johnstone, D.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8P 1A1 (Canada); Sadavoy, S. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Hatchell, J. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Mottram, J. C.; Hogerheijde, M. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kirk, H. [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Buckle, J.; Salji, C. [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Berry, D. S.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 North A‘ohōkū Place, University Park, Hilo, HI-96720 (United States); Fich, M.; Tisi, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Nutter, D.; Quinn, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Pattle, K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Pineda, J. E. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Garching (Germany); and others

    2016-07-20

    The dust emissivity spectral index, β , is a critical parameter for deriving the mass and temperature of star-forming structures and, consequently, their gravitational stability. The β value is dependent on various dust grain properties, such as size, porosity, and surface composition, and is expected to vary as dust grains evolve. Here we present β , dust temperature, and optical depth maps of the star-forming clumps in the Perseus Molecular Cloud determined from fitting spectral energy distributions to combined Herschel and JCMT observations in the 160, 250, 350, 500, and 850 μ m bands. Most of the derived β and dust temperature values fall within the ranges of 1.0–2.7 and 8–20 K, respectively. In Perseus, we find the β distribution differs significantly from clump to clump, indicative of grain growth. Furthermore, we also see significant localized β variations within individual clumps and find low- β regions correlate with local temperature peaks, hinting at the possible origins of low- β grains. Throughout Perseus, we also see indications of heating from B stars and embedded protostars, as well evidence of outflows shaping the local landscape.

  15. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); D' Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Espaillat, C. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sargent, B. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Watson, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Hernández, J., E-mail: melisma@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: p.dalessio@astrosmo.unam.mx, E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: baspci@rit.edu, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: hernandj@cida.ve [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía (CIDA), Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10{sup –8} to 10{sup –10} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ∼3 to 0.5 μm. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10{sup –4} of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 μm silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

  16. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L.; D'Alessio, P.; Espaillat, C.; Sargent, B.; Watson, D. M.; Hernández, J.

    2013-01-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10 –8 to 10 –10 M ☉ yr –1 , the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ∼3 to 0.5 μm. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10 –4 of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 μm silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system

  17. Grain size estimation in anisotropic materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saxl, Ivan; Ponížil, P.; Sülleiová, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 482, - (2005), s. 239-242 ISSN 0255-5476 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/03/0946 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : 3D grain size * profile count * intercept count Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2005

  18. Grain Size Estimation in Anisotropic Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, J.; Ponížil, P.; Saxl, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 568, č. 2 (2008), s. 285-288 ISSN 0255-5476 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/06/0302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : grain size estimation * anisotropy * planmar sections Subject RIV: JP - Industrial Processing

  19. Wavelength-Dependent Extinction and Grain Sizes in "Dippers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Michael; Russell, Ray W.; Long, Zachary; Bayyari, Ammar; Assani, Korash; Grady, Carol; Lisse, Carey Michael; Marengo, Massimo; Wisniewski, John

    2018-01-01

    We have examined inter-night variability of K2-discovered "Dippers" that are not close to being viewed edge-on (as determined from previously-reported ALMA images) using the SpeX spectrograph on NASA's Infrared Telescope facility (IRTF). The three objects observed were EPIC 203850058, EPIC 205151387, and EPIC 204638512 ( = 2MASS J16042165-2130284). Using the ratio of the fluxes from 0.7-2.4 microns between two successive nights, we find that in at least two cases, the extinction increased toward shorter wavelengths. In the case of EPIC 204638512, we find that the properties of the dust differ from that seen in the diffuse interstellar medium and denser molecular clouds. However, the grain properties needed to explain the extinction does resemble those used to model the disks of many young stellar objects. The best fit to the data on EPIC 204638512 includes grains at least 500 microns in size, but lacks grains smaller than 0.25 microns. Since EPIC 204638512 is seen nearly face-on, it is possible the grains are entrained in an accretion flow that preferentially destroys the smallest grains. However, we have no indication of significant gas accretion onto the star in the form of emission lines observed in young low-mass stars. But the He I line at 1.083 microns was seen to change from night to night, and showed a P Cygni profile on one night, suggesting the gas might be outflowing from regions near the star.

  20. Properties and Alignment of Interstellar Dust Grains toward Type Ia Supernovae with Anomalous Polarization Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Thiem, E-mail: thiemhoang@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    Recent photometric and polarimetric observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show unusually low total-to-selective extinction ratios ( R {sub V} < 2) and wavelengths of maximum polarization ( λ{sub max} < 0.4 μ m) for several SNe Ia, which indicates peculiar properties of interstellar (IS) dust in the SN-hosted galaxies and/or the presence of circumstellar (CS) dust. In this paper, we use an inversion technique to infer the best-fit grain size distribution and the alignment function of interstellar grains along the lines of sight toward four SNe Ia with anomalous extinction and polarization data (SN 1986G, SN 2006X, SN 2008fp, and SN 2014J). We find that to reproduce low values of R{sub V}, a significant enhancement in the mass of small grains of radius a < 0.1 μ m is required. For SN 2014J, a simultaneous fit to its observed extinction and polarization is unsuccessful if all the data are attributed to IS dust (model 1), but a good fit is obtained when accounting for the contribution of CS dust (model 2). For SN 2008fp, our best-fit results for model 1 show that in order to reproduce an extreme value of λ{sub max} ∼ 0.15 μ m, small silicate grains must be aligned as efficiently as big grains. For this case, we suggest that strong radiation from the SN can induce efficient alignment of small grains in a nearby intervening molecular cloud via the radiative torque (RAT) mechanism. The resulting time dependence polarization from this RAT alignment model can be tested by observing at ultraviolet wavelengths.

  1. Potential around a dust grain in collisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulick, R.; Goswami, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    The ion neutral collision can lead to interesting phenomena in dust charging, totally different from the expectations based on the traditional orbit motion limited theory. The potential around a dust grain is investigated for the collisional plasma considering the presence of ion neutral collisions. Fluid equations are solved for the one dimensional radial coordinate. It is observed that with the gradual increase in ion neutral collision, the potential structure around the dust grain changes its shape and is different from the usual Debye-Hückel potential. The shift however starts from a certain value of ion neutral collision and the electron-ion density varies accordingly. The potential variation is interesting and reconfirms the fact that there exists a region of attraction for negative charges. The collision modeling is done for the full range of plasma, i.e., considering the bulk and the sheath jointly. The potential variation with collision is also shown explicitly and the variation is found to cope up with the earlier observations

  2. Material grain size and crack size influences on cleavage fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Ronald W

    2015-03-28

    A review is given of the analogous dependence on reciprocal square root of grain size or crack size of fracture strength measurements reported for steel and other potentially brittle materials. The two dependencies have much in common. For onset of cleavage in steel, attention is focused on relationship of the essentially athermal fracture stress compared with a quite different viscoplastic yield stress behaviour. Both grain-size-dependent stresses are accounted for in terms of dislocation pile-up mechanics. Lowering of the cleavage stress occurs in steel because of carbide cracking. For crack size dependence, there is complication of localized crack tip plasticity in fracture mechanics measurements. Crack-size-dependent conventional and indentation fracture mechanics measurements are described also for results obtained on the diverse materials: polymethylmethacrylate, silicon crystals, alumina polycrystals and WC-Co (cermet) composites. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Dust Particle Size Distributions during Spring in Yinchuan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangfeng Shao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dust particle size distributions in Yinchuan, China, were measured during March and April 2014, using APS-3321 sampler. The distributions were measured under different dust conditions (background, floating dust, blowing dust, and dust storm and statistical analyses were performed. The results showed that, under different dust conditions, the instantaneous number concentrations of dust particles differed widely. For example, during blowing sand and dust storm conditions, instantaneous dust particles concentrations varied substantially, while, under floating dust conditions, concentration differences were relatively small. The average dust particles size distributions were unimodal under all dust conditions, but the average surface area and mass size distributions were all bimodal. These distributions had peaks in different locations under different dust conditions. Under different dust conditions, wind speed and humidity were very important factors for particles size distributions. With increasing wind speed and decreasing humidity, fine particles were dominant in the atmosphere and the number and mass distributions of the coarse particles were indicative of long-range transport from surrounding deserts. Different dust conditions had different influences on PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 concentrations.

  4. Catalysis by Dust Grains in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Monika E.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1996-01-01

    In order to determine whether grain-catalyzed reactions played an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula, we have applied our time-dependent model of methane formation via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis to pressures from 10(exp -5) to 1 bar and temperatures from 450 to 650 K. Under these physical conditions, the reaction 3H2 + CO yields CH4 + H2O is readily catalyzed by an iron or nickel surface, whereas the same reaction is kinetically inhibited in the gas phase. Our model results indicate that under certain nebular conditions, conversion of CO to methane could be extremely efficient in the presence of iron-nickel dust grains over timescales very short compared to the lifetime of the solar nebula.

  5. DELIVERY OF DUST GRAINS FROM COMET C/2013 A1 (SIDING SPRING) TO MARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricarico, Pasquale; Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Sykes, Mark V.; Li, Jian-Yang; Farnham, Tony L.; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Farnocchia, Davide; Stevenson, Rachel; Bauer, James M.; Lock, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will have a close encounter with Mars on 2014 October 19. We model the dynamical evolution of dust grains from the time of their ejection from the comet nucleus to the close encounter with Mars, and determine the flux at Mars. Constraints on the ejection velocity from Hubble Space Telescope observations indicate that the bulk of the grains will likely miss Mars, although it is possible that a few percent of the grains with higher velocities will reach Mars, peaking approximately 90-100 minutes after the close approach of the nucleus, and consisting mostly of millimeter-radius grains ejected from the comet nucleus at a heliocentric distance of approximately 9 AU or larger. At higher velocities, younger grains from submillimeter to several millimeters can also reach Mars, although an even smaller fraction of grains is expected have these velocities, with negligible effect on the peak timing. Using NEOWISE observations of the comet, we can estimate that the maximum fluence will be of the order of 10 –7 grains m –2 . We include a detailed analysis of how the expected fluence depends on the grain density, ejection velocity, and size-frequency distribution, to account for current model uncertainties and in preparation of possible refined model values in the near future

  6. Dust coagulation and fragmentation in molecular clouds I. How collisions between dust aggregates alter the dust size distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, C. W.; Paszun, D.; Dominik, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    The cores in molecular clouds are the densest and coldest regions of the interstellar medium (ISM). In these regions ISM-dust grains have the potential to coagulate. This study investigates the collisional evolution of the dust population by combining two models: a binary model that simulates the

  7. Technology and Policy for Suppressing Grain Dust Explosions in Storage Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1995-01-01

    To ensure workplace safety, grain handling facilities engage in a variety of activities to control the accumulation of grain dust, such as good housekeeping practices, pneumatic systems, and liquid additives...

  8. Cycloid motions of grains in a dust plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Liang, Zhang; Fan, Feng; Fu-Cheng, Liu; Li-Fang, Dong; Ya-Feng, He

    2016-02-01

    Hypocycloid and epicycloid motions of irregular grains (pine pollen) are observed for the first time in a dust plasma in a two-dimensional (2D) horizontal plane. These cycloid motions can be regarded as a combination of a primary circle and a secondary circle. An inverse Magnus force originating from the spin of the irregular grain gives rise to the primary circle. Radial confinement resulting from the electrostatic force and the ion drag force, together with inverse Magnus force, plays an important role in the formation of the secondary circle. In addition, the cyclotron radius is seen to change periodically during the cycloid motion. Force analysis and comparison experiments have shown that the cycloid motions are distinctive features of an irregular grain immersed in a plasma. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. A2011201006 and A2012201015), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. Y2012009), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project.

  9. From Dust Grains to Planetesimals: The Importance of the Streaming Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Youdin, Andrew N.; Li, Rixin

    2016-01-01

    Planetesimals are the precursors to planets, and understanding their formation is an essential step towards developing a complete theory of planet formation. For small solid particles (e.g., dust grains) to coagulate into planetesimals, however, requires that these particles grow beyond centimeter sizes; with traditional coagulation physics, this is very difficult. The streaming instability, which is a clumping process akin to the pile-up of cars in a traffic jam, generates sufficiently high solid densities that the mutual gravity between the clumped particles eventually causes their collapse towards planetesimal mass and size scales. Exploring this transition from dust grains to planetesimals is still in its infancy but is extremely important if we want to understand the basics of planet formation. Here, I present a series of high resolution, first principles numerical simulations of protoplanetary disk gas and dust to study the clumping of particles via the streaming instability and the subsequent collapse towards planetesimals. These simulations have been employed to characterize the planetesimal population as a function of radius in protoplanetary disks. The results of these simulations will be crucial for planet formation models to correctly explain the formation and configuration of solar systems.

  10. Bimodal grain-size distribution of Chinese loess, and its palaeoclimatic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, D.G.; Bloemendal, J.; Rea, D.K.; An, Z.S.; Vandenberghe, J.; Lu, H.; Su, R.; Liu, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Grain-size analysis indicates that Chinese loess generally shows a bimodal distribution with a coarse and a fine component. The coarse component, comprising the main part of the loess, has pronounced kurtosis and is well sorted, which is interpreted to be the product of dust storms generated by

  11. Laboratory-based grain-shape models for simulating dust infrared spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutschke, H.; Min, M.; Tamanai, A.

    2009-01-01

    Context. Analysis of thermal dust emission spectra for dust mineralogy and physical grain properties depends on comparison spectra, which are either laboratory-measured infrared extinction spectra or calculated extinction cross sections based on certain grain models. Often, the agreement between

  12. Water formation on bare grains : When the chemistry on dust impacts interstellar gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cazaux, S.; Cobut, V.; Marseille, M.; Spaans, M.; Caselli, P.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Water and O(2) are important gas phase ingredients for cooling dense gas when forming stars. On dust grains, H(2)O is an important constituent of the icy mantle in which a complex chemistry is taking place, as revealed by hot core observations. The formation of water can occur on dust grain

  13. The Evidence of Radio Polarization Induced by the Radiative Grain Alignment and Self-scattering of Dust Grains in a Protoplanetary Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Pohl, Adriana; Muto, Takayuki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Stephens, Ian W.; Tomisaka, Kohji; Momose, Munetake

    2017-07-01

    The mechanisms causing millimeter-wave polarization in protoplanetary disks are under debate. To disentangle the polarization mechanisms, we observe the protoplanetary disk around HL Tau at 3.1 mm with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), which had the polarization detected with CARMA at 1.3 mm. We successfully detect the ring-like azimuthal polarized emission at 3.1 mm. This indicates that dust grains are aligned with the major axis being in the azimuthal direction, which is consistent with the theory of radiative alignment of elongated dust grains, where the major axis of dust grains is perpendicular to the radiation flux. Furthermore, the morphology of the polarization vectors at 3.1 mm is completely different from those at 1.3 mm. We interpret the polarization at 3.1 mm to be dominated by the grain alignment with the radiative flux producing azimuthal polarization vectors, while the self-scattering dominates at 1.3 mm and produces the polarization vectors parallel to the minor axis of the disk. By modeling the total polarization fraction with a single grain population model, the maximum grain size is constrained to be 100 μ {{m}}, which is smaller than the previous predictions based on the spectral index between ALMA at 3 mm and the Very Large Array at 7 mm.

  14. The effect of a dust size distribution on electrostatic sheaths in unmagnetized dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benlemdjaldi, D.; Tahraoui, A.; Hugon, R.; Bougdira, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the structure of plasma sheaths in presence of dust particles with different sizes is investigated numerically in a multifluid framework, where the dust size distribution is modeled by Gauss' law. For this, we have established a 1D, stationary, unmagnetized, and weakly collisional electronegative dusty plasma sheath model. The electrons and negative ions are considered in a local thermodynamic equilibrium, therefore, described by a Boltzmann distribution. On the other hand, positive ions and dust grains are described by fluid equations. The charging process is described by the orbit motion limited model. It is shown that taking into account dust grains with different sizes reduces considerably the sheath thickness. The behavior of dust surface potential is not affected, but the dust charge number is reduced, as well as the electrostatic force. It results in a decrease of layered structure. The presence of negative ions makes the structure of the electrostatic potential more oscillatory. The other physical parameters are also analyzed and discussed.

  15. Particle size traces modern Saharan dust transport and deposition across the equatorial North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van der Does

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust has a large impact on regional and global climate, depending on its particle size. Especially in the Atlantic Ocean downwind of the Sahara, the largest dust source on earth, the effects can be substantial but are poorly understood. This study focuses on seasonal and spatial variations in particle size of Saharan dust deposition across the Atlantic Ocean, using an array of submarine sediment traps moored along a transect at 12° N. We show that the particle size decreases downwind with increased distance from the Saharan source, due to higher gravitational settling velocities of coarse particles in the atmosphere. Modal grain sizes vary between 4 and 32 µm throughout the different seasons and at five locations along the transect. This is much coarser than previously suggested and incorporated into climate models. In addition, seasonal changes are prominent, with coarser dust in summer and finer dust in winter and spring. Such seasonal changes are caused by transport at higher altitudes and at greater wind velocities during summer than in winter. Also, the latitudinal migration of the dust cloud, associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, causes seasonal differences in deposition as the summer dust cloud is located more to the north and more directly above the sampled transect. Furthermore, increased precipitation and more frequent dust storms in summer coincide with coarser dust deposition. Our findings contribute to understanding Saharan dust transport and deposition relevant for the interpretation of sedimentary records for climate reconstructions, as well as for global and regional models for improved prediction of future climate.

  16. Attempt to detect diamagnetic anisotropy of dust-sized crystal orientated to investigate the origin of interstellar dust alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Hisayoshi, K.; Uyeda, C.

    2013-03-01

    Diamagnetic anisotropy Δ χ dia was detected on a submillimeter-sized calcite crystal by observing the rotational oscillation of its magnetically stable axis with respect to the magnetic field direction. The crystal was released in an area of microgravity generated by a 1.5-m-long drop shaft. When the oscillations are observable, the present method can measure Δ χ dia of crystal grains irrespective of how small they are without measuring the sample mass. In conventional Δ χ measurements, the background signal from the sample holder and the difficulty in measuring the sample mass prevent measurement of Δ χ dia for small samples. The present technique of observing Δ χ dia of a submillimeter-sized single crystal is a step toward realizing Δ χ dia measurements of micron-sized grains. The Δ χ dia values of single micron-sized grains can be used to assess the validity of a dust alignment model based on magnetic torque that originates from the Δ χ dia of individual dust particles.

  17. Rapid formation of large dust grains in the luminous supernova 2010jl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Christa; Hjorth, Jens; Watson, Darach; Dwek, Eli; Maund, Justyn R; Fox, Ori; Leloudas, Giorgos; Malesani, Daniele; Day-Jones, Avril C

    2014-07-17

    The origin of dust in galaxies is still a mystery. The majority of the refractory elements are produced in supernova explosions, but it is unclear how and where dust grains condense and grow, and how they avoid destruction in the harsh environments of star-forming galaxies. The recent detection of 0.1 to 0.5 solar masses of dust in nearby supernova remnants suggests in situ dust formation, while other observations reveal very little dust in supernovae in the first few years after explosion. Observations of the spectral evolution of the bright SN 2010jl have been interpreted as pre-existing dust, dust formation or no dust at all. Here we report the rapid (40 to 240 days) formation of dust in its dense circumstellar medium. The wavelength-dependent extinction of this dust reveals the presence of very large (exceeding one micrometre) grains, which resist destruction. At later times (500 to 900 days), the near-infrared thermal emission shows an accelerated growth in dust mass, marking the transition of the dust source from the circumstellar medium to the ejecta. This provides the link between the early and late dust mass evolution in supernovae with dense circumstellar media.

  18. Grain-size distribution of volcaniclastic rocks 2: Characterizing grain size and hydraulic sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzeler, Martin; McPhie, Jocelyn; Allen, Sharon R.; Proussevitch, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantification of the grain size distribution of sediments allows interpretation of processes of transport and deposition. Jutzeler et al. (2012) developed a technique to determine grain size distribution of consolidated clastic rocks using functional stereology, allowing direct comparison between unconsolidated sediments and rocks. Here, we develop this technique to characterize hydraulic sorting and infer transport and deposition processes. We compare computed grain size and sorting of volcaniclastic rocks with field-based characteristics of volcaniclastic facies for which transport and depositional mechanisms have been inferred. We studied pumice-rich, subaqueous facies of volcaniclastic rocks from the Oligocene Ohanapecosh Formation (Ancestral Cascades, Washington, USA), Pliocene Dogashima Formation (Izu Peninsula, Honshu, Japan), Miocene Manukau Subgroup (Northland, New Zealand) and the Quaternary Sierra La Primavera caldera (Jalisco State, Mexico). These sequences differ in bed thickness, grading and abundance of matrix. We propose to evaluate grain size and sorting of volcaniclastic deposits by values of their modes, matrix proportion (< 2 mm; F-1) and D16, instead of median diameter (D50) and standard deviation parameters. F-1 and D16 can be uniformly used to characterize and compare sieving and functional stereology data. Volcaniclastic deposits typically consist of mixtures of particles that vary greatly in density and porosity. Hydraulic sorting ratios can be used to test whether mixed clast populations of pumice and dense clasts are hydraulically sorted with each other, considering various types of transport underwater. Evaluation of this ratio for our samples shows that most studied volcaniclastic facies are deposited by settling from density currents, and that basal dense clast breccias are emplaced by shear rolling. These hydraulic sorting ratios can be applied to any type of clastic rocks, and indifferently on consolidated and unconsolidated samples.

  19. Effect of size distribution and grain growth on the formation of molecules in star forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the effects of grain size distribution and grain growth on molecular abundances during the chemical evolution of a cold dense interstellar cloud using a gas-grain numerical code. Dense interstellar clouds are the birth place of stellar systems like ours. Most models with grain surface chemistry have used so-called classical grains with canonical dust to gas ratio as 1:100, characterized by a radius of 0.1 μm and number density of 1.33 × 10-12 ηH, where ηH is the number density of hydrogen in all forms. We considered two different size distributions based on earliermodels and compared our findingswith classical grains. To incorporate different granular sizes, we divided the distribution of grain sizes into numbers of logarithmically equally-spaced ranges, integrated over each range to find its total granular number density, and assigned that number density to an average size in that range. Then we calculated rate coefficients for accretion, surface reactions and desorption as a function of grain size. We then followed the chemical evolution of the surface populations of these grains along with the gas phase chemistry for 10 Million years. We found that the effective surface area of a grain size (product of number density and grain cross section) is an important parameter. The fractional abundances of surface species on grains within a given distribution scale with the effective surface areas of the grain distribution components in the absence of grain growth. We found that the grain growth increases the grain size considerably which in turn increases the rate of depletion of molecules (due to higher accretion rate), such as CO, produced in the gas phase, which results in lower gas-phase abundances and higher surface abundances. For the first time, these results helps to verify the quality of the classical grain approximation for cold cloud models. Further, it also provides an important basis for future study that may require size distributions.

  20. Coarse-grained Mineral Dust Deposition in Alpine Lake Sediments: Implications for Regional Drought Patterns and Land-use Changes in the Southwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, A.; Kingsley, C.; Marchitto, T. M., Jr.; Lora, J. M.; Pollen, A.; Vollmer, T.; Leithold, E. L.; Mitchell, J.; Tripati, A. K.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral dust accumulation is often causally associated with aridity. However, the relation might not be as straightforward. Consideration of grain sizes and geochemical fingerprinting of the coarse grain fraction will clearly have an impact on how we interpret the sedimentary record of mineral dust in depositional environments e.g. coarse grain fractions of mineral dust would most certainly be transported over relatively short distances and as such in depositional environments, the depositional rate of coarse grains must be determined in order to reliably understand erosional patterns associated with meteorological events (such as frequency of intense wind events such as tornadoes), climatological phenomenon (such as regional droughts) as well as more recently land-use changes. In this study we separate the two size fractions of mineral dust accumulation- fine fraction (typically 25 microns using grain size analysis from well-studied cores collected from several lake sites distributed across the western southwestern and the Great Plain regions; furthermore we use trace element analysis in each size fraction to identify contributing source regions. We find evidence that the coarser-grain size fraction in the studied lake cores could be of regional origin (and not just local in orgin);. the coarser fraction also appears to be related to intense meteorological events (i.e., the occurrence of cyclones). Analysis is underway to understand the impact of land-use changes on coarse grain fraction

  1. Comet C2012 S1 (ISON)s Carbon-rich and Micron-size-dominated Coma Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D.; De Buizer, J.; Kelley, M.; Sitko, M.; Woodward, C.; Harker, D.; Reach, W.; Russell, R.; Kim, D.; Yanamadra-Fisher, P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was unique in that it was a dynamically new comet derived from the Nearly Isotropic Oort cloud reservoir of comets with a sun-grazing orbit. We present thermal models for comet ISON (rh approx.1.15 AU, 2013-Oct-25 11:30 UT) that reveal comet ISON's dust was carbon-rich and dominated by a narrow size distribution dominated by approx. micron-sized grains. We constrained the models by our SOFIA FORCAST photometry at 11.1, 19.7 and 31.5 microns and by a silicate feature strength of approx.1.1 and an 8-13microns continuum greybody color temperature of approx. 275-280 K (using Tbb ? r-0.5 h and Tbb approx. 260-265 K from Subaru COMICS, 2013-Oct-19 UT)[1,2]. N-band spectra of comet ISON with the BASS instrument on the NASA IRTF (2013-Nov-11-12 UT) show a silicate feature strength of approx. 1.1 and an 11.2microns forsterite peak.[3] Our thermal models yield constraints the dust composition as well as grain size distribution parameters: slope, peak grain size, porosity. Specifically, ISON's dust has a low silicate-to- amorphous carbon ratio (approx. 1:9), and the coma size distribution has a steep slope (N4.5) such that the coma is dominated by micron-sized, moderately porous, carbon-rich dust grains. The N-band continuum color temperature implies submicronto micron-size grains and the steep fall off of the SOFIA far-IR photometry requires the size distribution to have fewer relative numbers of larger and cooler grains compared to smaller and hotter grains. A proxy for the dust production rate is f? approx.1500 cm, akin to Af?. ISON has a moderate-to-low dust-to-gas ratio. Comet ISON's dust grain size distribution does not appear similar to the few well-studied long-period Nearly Isotropic Comets (NICs), namely C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) that had smaller and/or more highly porous grains and larger sizes, or C/2007 N4 (Lulin) and C/2006 P1 (McNaught) that had large and/or compact grains. Radial transport to comet-forming disk distances

  2. The Smallest Lunar Grains: Analytical TEM Characterization of the Sub-micron Size Fraction of a Mare Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M.; Christoffersen, R.

    2010-01-01

    The chemical composition, mineralogical type, and morphology of lunar regolith grains changes considerably with decreasing size, and below the approx.25 m size range the correlation between these parameters and remotely-sensed lunar surface properties connected to space weathering increases significantly. Although trends for these parameters across grain size intervals greater than 20 m are now well established, the 0 to 20 m size interval remains relatively un-subdivided with respect to variations in grain modal composition, chemistry and microstructure. Of particular interest in this size range are grains in the approximate fundamental properties are now the focus of lunar research pertaining to electrostatic grain transport, dusty plasmas, and lunar dust effects on crew health and exploration systems. In this study we have used analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the mineralogy, microstructure and major element composition of grains below the 1 m size threshold in lunar soil 10084.

  3. Size modification of recent pollen grains under different treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, Tj.

    1969-01-01

    The effect of various chemicals on the size of recent pollen grains of Corylus avellana L. and Quercus robur L. was studied. The size of acetolysed grains was affected by the treatment prior to acetolysis and moreover by the duration of acetolysis. Preparation methods, which produce comparable sizes

  4. On the anomalous grain size dependence of spall strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Justin; Ramesh, Kt

    2017-06-01

    Experimental studies have identified an anomalous grain size dependence of spall strength in a few face-centered cubic metals. Here we derive the first quantitative theory capable of explaining this phenomena. The theory agrees well with experimental measurements and atomistic calculations over a very wide range of conditions. Utilizing this theory, we are able to map out three distinct regimes in which spall strength (i) increases with decreasing grain size in accordance with conventional wisdom, (ii) non-intuitively decreases with decreasing grain size, and (iii) is independent of grain size. The theory also predicts microscopic characteristics of the spall fracture surface, which agree with available data.

  5. Competing Grain Boundary and Interior Deformation Mechanisms with Varying Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei [University of Tennessee (UT); Gao, Yanfei [ORNL; Nieh, T. G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2018-01-01

    In typical coarse-grained alloys, the dominant plastic deformations are dislocation gliding or climbing, and material strengths can be tuned by dislocation interactions with grain boundaries, precipitates, solid solutions, and other defects. With the reduction of grain size, the increase of material strengths follows the classic Hall-Petch relationship up to nano-grained materials. Even at room temperatures, nano-grained materials exhibit strength softening, or called the inverse Hall-Petch effect, as grain boundary processes take over as the dominant deformation mechanisms. On the other hand, at elevated temperatures, grain boundary processes compete with grain interior deformation mechanisms over a wide range of the applied stress and grain sizes. This book chapter reviews and compares the rate equation model and the microstructure-based finite element simulations. The latter explicitly accounts for the grain boundary sliding, grain boundary diffusion and migration, as well as the grain interior dislocation creep. Therefore the explicit finite element method has clear advantages in problems where microstructural heterogeneities play a critical role, such as in the gradient microstructure in shot peening or weldment. Furthermore, combined with the Hall-Petch effect and its breakdown, the above competing processes help construct deformation mechanism maps by extending from the classic Frost-Ashby type to the ones with the dependence of grain size.

  6. Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Chunlei; Koval, Vladimir; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; McKinnon, Ruth; Viola, Giuseppe; Yan, Haixue

    2015-01-01

    Grain size effects on the physical properties of polycrystalline ferroelectrics have been extensively studied for decades; however there are still major controversies regarding the dependence of the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties on the grain size. Dense BaTiO3 ceramics with different grain sizes were fabricated by either conventional sintering or spark plasma sintering using micro- and nano-sized powders. The results show that the grain size effect on the dielectric permittivity is nearly independent of the sintering method and starting powder used. A peak in the permittivity is observed in all the ceramics with a grain size near 1 μm and can be attributed to a maximum domain wall density and mobility. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 and remnant polarization Pr show diverse grain size effects depending on the particle size of the starting powder and sintering temperature. This suggests that besides domain wall density, other factors such as back fields and point defects, which influence the domain wall mobility, could be responsible for the different grain size dependence observed in the dielectric and piezoelectric/ferroelectric properties. In cases where point defects are not the dominant contributor, the piezoelectric constant d33 and the remnant polarization Pr increase with increasing grain size. PMID:25951408

  7. Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Chunlei; Koval, Vladimir; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; McKinnon, Ruth; Viola, Giuseppe; Yan, Haixue

    2015-05-07

    Grain size effects on the physical properties of polycrystalline ferroelectrics have been extensively studied for decades; however there are still major controversies regarding the dependence of the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties on the grain size. Dense BaTiO3 ceramics with different grain sizes were fabricated by either conventional sintering or spark plasma sintering using micro- and nano-sized powders. The results show that the grain size effect on the dielectric permittivity is nearly independent of the sintering method and starting powder used. A peak in the permittivity is observed in all the ceramics with a grain size near 1 μm and can be attributed to a maximum domain wall density and mobility. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 and remnant polarization Pr show diverse grain size effects depending on the particle size of the starting powder and sintering temperature. This suggests that besides domain wall density, other factors such as back fields and point defects, which influence the domain wall mobility, could be responsible for the different grain size dependence observed in the dielectric and piezoelectric/ferroelectric properties. In cases where point defects are not the dominant contributor, the piezoelectric constant d33 and the remnant polarization Pr increase with increasing grain size.

  8. Shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of dusts from swine confinement and grain facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Boissy

    Full Text Available Inhalation of agricultural dusts causes inflammatory reactions and symptoms such as headache, fever, and malaise, which can progress to chronic airway inflammation and associated diseases, e.g. asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Although in many agricultural environments feed particles are the major constituent of these dusts, the inflammatory responses that they provoke are likely attributable to particle-associated bacteria, archaebacteria, fungi, and viruses. In this study, we performed shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of DNA from dusts from swine confinement facilities or grain elevators, with comparisons to dusts from pet-free households. DNA sequence alignment showed that 19% or 62% of shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic DNA sequence reads from swine facility or household dusts, respectively, were of swine or human origin, respectively. In contrast only 2% of such reads from grain elevator dust were of mammalian origin. These metagenomic shotgun reads of mammalian origin were excluded from our analyses of agricultural dust microbiota. The ten most prevalent bacterial taxa identified in swine facility compared to grain elevator or household dust were comprised of 75%, 16%, and 42% gram-positive organisms, respectively. Four of the top five swine facility dust genera were assignable (Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, and Eubacterium, ranging from 4% to 19% relative abundance. The relative abundances of these four genera were lower in dust from grain elevators or pet-free households. These analyses also highlighted the predominance in swine facility dust of Firmicutes (70% at the phylum level, Clostridia (44% at the Class level, and Clostridiales at the Order level (41%. In summary, shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of agricultural dusts show that they differ qualitatively and quantitatively at the level of microbial taxa present, and that the

  9. Pantoea agglomerans : a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part II. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens – focus on grain dust, other agricultural dusts and wood dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pantoea agglomerans , a Gram-negative bacterium developing in a variety of plants as epiphyte or endophyte is particularly common in grain and grain dust, and has been identified by an interdisciplinary group from Lublin, eastern Poland, as a causative agent of work-related diseases associated with exposure to grain dust and other agricultural dusts. The concentration of [i]P. agglomerans[/i] in grain as well as in the settled grain and flour dust was found to be high, ranging from 10 4 –10 8 CFU/g, while in the air polluted with grain or flour dust it ranged from 10 3 –10 5 CFU/m 3 and formed 73.2–96% of the total airborne Gram-negative bacteria. The concentration of P. agglomerans was also relatively high in the air of the facilities processing herbs and other plant materials, while it was lower in animal farms and in wood processing facilities. Pantoea agglomerans produces a biologically-potent endotoxin (cell wall lipopolysaccharide, LPS. The significant part of this endotoxin occurs in dusts in the form of virus-sized globular nanoparticles measuring 10–50 nm that could be described as the ‘endotoxin super-macromolecules’. A highly significant relationship was found (R=0.804, P=0.000927 between the concentration of the viable P. agglomerans in the air of various agricultural and wood industry settings and the concentration of bacterial endotoxin in the air, as assessed by the Limulus test. Although this result may be interfered by the presence of endotoxin produced by other Gram-negative species, it unequivocally suggests the primary role of the P. agglomerans endotoxin as an adverse agent in the agricultural working environment, causing toxic pneumonitis (ODTS. Numerous experiments by the inhalation exposure of animals to various extracts of P. agglomerans strains isolated from grain dust, including endotoxin isolated with trichloroacetic acid (LPS-TCA, endotoxin nanoparticles isolated in sucrose gradient (VECN, and mixture of

  10. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part II--Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens--focus on grain dust, other agricultural dusts and wood dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Skórska, Czesława; Góra-Florek, Anna; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans, a Gram-negative bacterium developing in a variety of plants as epiphyte or endophyte is particularly common in grain and grain dust, and has been identified by an interdisciplinary group from Lublin, eastern Poland, as a causative agent of work-related diseases associated with exposure to grain dust and other agricultural dusts. The concentration of P. agglomerans in grain as well as in the settled grain and flour dust was found to be high, ranging from 10(4)-10(8) CFU/g, while in the air polluted with grain or flour dust it ranged from 10(3)-10(5) CFU/m(3) and formed 73.2-96% of the total airborne Gram-negative bacteria. The concentration of P. agglomerans was also relatively high in the air of the facilities processing herbs and other plant materials, while it was lower in animal farms and in wood processing facilities. Pantoea agglomerans produces a biologically-potent endotoxin (cell wall lipopolysaccharide, LPS). The significant part of this endotoxin occurs in dusts in the form of virus-sized globular nanoparticles measuring 10-50 nm that could be described as the 'endotoxin super-macromolecules'. A highly significant relationship was found (R=0.804, P=0.000927) between the concentration of the viable P. agglomerans in the air of various agricultural and wood industry settings and the concentration of bacterial endotoxin in the air, as assessed by the Limulus test. Although this result may be interfered by the presence of endotoxin produced by other Gram-negative species, it unequivocally suggests the primary role of the P. agglomerans endotoxin as an adverse agent in the agricultural working environment, causing toxic pneumonitis (ODTS). Numerous experiments by the inhalation exposure of animals to various extracts of P. agglomerans strains isolated from grain dust, including endotoxin isolated with trichloroacetic acid (LPS-TCA), endotoxin nanoparticles isolated in sucrose gradient (VECN), and mixture of proteins and endotoxin obtained

  11. Static Recrystallized Grain Size of Coarse-Grained Austenite in an API-X70 Pipeline Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Qingyun; Li, Guiyan; Li, Dahang

    2013-12-01

    The effects of initial grain size and strain on the static recrystallized grain size of coarse-grained austenite in an API-X70 steel microalloyed with Nb, V, and Ti were investigated using a Gleeble-3800 thermomechanical simulator. The results indicate that the static recrystallized grain size of coarse-grained austenite decreases with decreasing initial grain size and increasing applied strain. The addition of microalloying elements can lead to a smaller initial grain size for hot deformation due to the grain growth inhibition during reheating, resulting in decreasing of static recrystallized grain size. Based on the experimental data, an equation for the static recrystallized grain size was derived using the least square method. The grain sizes calculated using this equation fit well with the measured ones compared with the equations for fine-grained austenite and for coarse-grained austenite of Nb-V microalloyed steel.

  12. Photoelectric emission measurements on the analogs of individual cosmic dust grains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Camata, R. P.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in

  13. Properties of dust grains in planetary nebulae. I. The ionized region of NGC 6445

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, PAM; Van de Steene, GC; Beintema, DA; Martin, PG; Pottasch, [No Value

    2000-01-01

    One of the factors influencing the spectral evolution of a planetary nebula is the fate of the dust grains that are emitting the infrared continuum. Several processes have been proposed that either destroy the grains or remove them from the ionized region. To test whether these processes are

  14. Grain size of loess and paleosol samples: what are we measuring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, György; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán; Újvári, Gábor

    2017-04-01

    Particle size falling into a particularly narrow range is among the most important properties of windblown mineral dust deposits. Therefore, various aspects of aeolian sedimentation and post-depositional alterations can be reconstructed only from precise grain size data. Present study is aimed at (1) reviewing grain size data obtained from different measurements, (2) discussing the major reasons for disagreements between data obtained by frequently applied particle sizing techniques, and (3) assesses the importance of particle shape in particle sizing. Grain size data of terrestrial aeolian dust deposits (loess and paleosoil) were determined by laser scattering instruments (Fritsch Analysette 22 Microtec Plus, Horiba Partica La-950 v2 and Malvern Mastersizer 3000 with a Hydro Lv unit), while particles size and shape distributions were acquired by Malvern Morphologi G3-ID. Laser scattering results reveal that the optical parameter settings of the measurements have significant effects on the grain size distributions, especially for the fine-grained fractions (slide with a consistent orientation with their largest area facing to the camera. However, this is only one outcome of infinite possible projections of a three-dimensional object and it cannot be regarded as a representative one. The third (height) dimension of the particles remains unknown, so the volume-based weightings are fairly dubious in the case of platy particles. Support of the National Research, Development and Innovation Office (Hungary) under contract NKFI 120620 is gratefully acknowledged. It was additionally supported (for G. Varga) by the Bolyai János Research Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  15. Supercube grains leading to a strong cube texture and a broad grain size distribution after recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, F.X.; Zhang, Y. B.; Pantleon, W.

    2015-01-01

    growth rates. However, most other cube grains do not grow preferentially. Because of the few supercube grains, the grain size distribution after recrystallization is broad. Reasons for the higher growth rates of supercube grains are discussed, and are related to the local deformed microstructure.......This work revisits the classical subject of recrystallization of cold-rolled copper. Two characterization techniques are combined: three-dimensional X-ray diffraction using synchrotron X-rays, which is used to measure the growth kinetics of individual grains in situ, and electron backscatter...... diffraction, which is used for statistical analysis of the microstructural evolution. As the most striking result, the strong cube texture after recrystallization is found to be related to a few super large cube grains, which were named supercube grains. These few supercube grains become large due to higher...

  16. The Evolution of Dust in the Multiphase ISM: Grain Destruction Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfire, Mark

    1999-01-01

    This proposal covered year one of a long term project in which we acquired the necessary hardware and softwaxe needed to calculate grain destruction processes in the interstellar medium (ISM). The long term goal of this research is to develop a model for the dust evolution in the ISM capable of explaining observations of elemental depletions, the grain size distribution, and the emission characteristics of the ISM from the X-ray through the FIR. We purchased a SUN Ultra 10 workstation and peripheral devices including an Exabyte Tape drive, HP Laser Printer, and Seagate External Hard Disk. The PI installed the hardware and Solaris operating system on the workstation and integrated the hardware into the network. Software was also purchased to enable connections to the workstation from a PC (Hummingbird Exceed). Additional freeware required to carry out the proposed program was installed on the system including compilers (g77, gcc, g++), editors (emacs), a markup language (LaTeX), and display programs (WIP, XV, SAOtng). We have also successfully modified the required plot files to work with our system which display the results of grain processing.

  17. THE EFFECT OF SEDIMENT GRAIN SIZE ON HEAVY METAL CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Maslennikova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the natural surroundings tectonical, climatological, dynamic and physico-chemical conditions of sedimentation are the crucial factors in the process of sediment composition formation. Grain size is one of the most investigated reasons of space and temporary variability in heavy metal concentration. In general, the data on grain size measurement afford to appreciate sorption capacity of sediments and arrange them. The dependence heavy metal content on grain size of sediments has been examined in the enormous amount of research works. The main conclusion is that if grain size decreases, metal content increases.We have carried out sediment grain size measurement of two lakes (Chebachje Lake, Piketnoye Lake located in the South of Western Siberia, Russia. To define grain size of these sediments the sorting of samples collected layer-by-layer has been conducted by nest of sieves (from 43 to 1000 µm. Accomplished examinations allow to state that layer-by-layer grain size measurement of sediments has significant importance in reconstruction of paleoecologic peculiarities and also influences organic and inorganic matter concentrating in the sediments in dynamics

  18. Size Dependence of Dust Distribution around the Earth Orbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Taku [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kondo, Toru; Kaneda, Hidehiro, E-mail: t.ueda@geo.titech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8602 (Japan)

    2017-05-01

    In the solar system, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating mainly from asteroid collisions and cometary activities drift to Earth orbit due to Poynting–Robertson drag. We analyzed the thermal emission from IDPs that was observed by the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, AKARI . The observed surface brightness in the trailing direction of the Earth orbit is 3.7% greater than that in the leading direction in the 9 μ m band and 3.0% in the 18 μ m band. In order to reveal dust properties causing leading–trailing surface brightness asymmetry, we numerically integrated orbits of the Sun, the Earth, and a dust particle as a restricted three-body problem including radiation from the Sun. The initial orbits of particles are determined according to the orbits of main-belt asteroids or Jupiter-family comets. Orbital trapping in mean motion resonances results in a significant leading–trailing asymmetry so that intermediate sized dust (∼10–100 μ m) produces a greater asymmetry than zodiacal light. The leading–trailing surface brightness difference integrated over the size distribution of the asteroidal dust is obtained to be 27.7% and 25.3% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively. In contrast, the brightness difference for cometary dust is calculated as 3.6% and 3.1% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively, if the maximum dust radius is set to be s {sub max} = 3000 μ m. Taking into account these values and their errors, we conclude that the contribution of asteroidal dust to the zodiacal infrared emission is less than ∼10%, while cometary dust of the order of 1 mm mainly accounts for the zodiacal light in infrared.

  19. Size Dependence of Dust Distribution around the Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kondo, Toru; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2017-05-01

    In the solar system, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating mainly from asteroid collisions and cometary activities drift to Earth orbit due to Poynting-Robertson drag. We analyzed the thermal emission from IDPs that was observed by the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, AKARI. The observed surface brightness in the trailing direction of the Earth orbit is 3.7% greater than that in the leading direction in the 9 μm band and 3.0% in the 18 μm band. In order to reveal dust properties causing leading-trailing surface brightness asymmetry, we numerically integrated orbits of the Sun, the Earth, and a dust particle as a restricted three-body problem including radiation from the Sun. The initial orbits of particles are determined according to the orbits of main-belt asteroids or Jupiter-family comets. Orbital trapping in mean motion resonances results in a significant leading-trailing asymmetry so that intermediate sized dust (˜10-100 μm) produces a greater asymmetry than zodiacal light. The leading-trailing surface brightness difference integrated over the size distribution of the asteroidal dust is obtained to be 27.7% and 25.3% in the 9 μm and 18 μm bands, respectively. In contrast, the brightness difference for cometary dust is calculated as 3.6% and 3.1% in the 9 μm and 18 μm bands, respectively, if the maximum dust radius is set to be s max = 3000 μm. Taking into account these values and their errors, we conclude that the contribution of asteroidal dust to the zodiacal infrared emission is less than ˜10%, while cometary dust of the order of 1 mm mainly accounts for the zodiacal light in infrared.

  20. GIADA On-Board Rosetta: Early Dust Grain Detections and Dust Coma Characterization of Comet 67P/C-G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, A.; Della Corte, V.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Sordini, R.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Fulle, M.; Bussoletti, E.; Crifo, J. F.; Esposito, F.; Green, S.; Grün, E.; Lamy, P. L.; McDonnell, T.; Mennella, V.; Molina, A.; Moreno, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Palomba, E.; Perrin, J. M.; Rodrigo, R.; Weissman, P. R.; Zakharov, V.; Zarnecki, J.

    2014-12-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) flying on-board Rosetta is devoted to study the cometary dust environment of 67P/Churiumov-Gerasimenko. GIADA is composed of 3 sub-systems: the GDS (Grain Detection System), based on grain detection through light scattering; an IS (Impact Sensor), giving momentum measurement detecting the impact on a sensed plate connected with 5 piezoelectric sensors; the MBS (MicroBalances System), constituted of 5 Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), giving cumulative deposited dust mass by measuring the variations of the sensors' frequency. The combination of the measurements performed by these 3 subsystems provides: the number, the mass, the momentum and the velocity distribution of dust grains emitted from the cometary nucleus.No prior in situ dust dynamical measurements at these close distances from the nucleus and starting from such large heliocentric distances are available up to date. We present here the first results obtained from the beginning of the Rosetta scientific phase. We will report dust grains early detection at about 800 km from the nucleus in August 2014 and the following measurements that allowed us characterizing the 67P/C-G dust environment at distances less than 100 km from the nucleus and single grains dynamical properties. Acknowledgements. GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF-Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developped from a PI proposal supported by the University of Kent; sci. & tech. contribution given by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank the RSGS/ESAC, RMOC/ESOC & Rosetta Project

  1. Tailoring and patterning the grain size of nanocrystalline alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detor, Andrew J.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline alloys that exhibit grain boundary segregation can access thermodynamically stable or metastable states with the average grain size dictated by the alloying addition. Here we consider nanocrystalline Ni-W alloys and demonstrate that the W content controls the grain size over a very broad range: ∼2-140 nm as compared with ∼2-20 nm in previous work on strongly segregating systems. This trend is attributed to a relatively weak tendency for W segregation to the grain boundaries. Based upon this observation, we introduce a new synthesis technique allowing for precise composition control during the electrodeposition of Ni-W alloys, which, in turn, leads to precise control of the nanocrystalline grain size. This technique offers new possibilities for understanding the structure-property relationships of nanocrystalline solids, such as the breakdown of Hall-Petch strength scaling, and also opens the door to a new class of customizable materials incorporating patterned nanostructures

  2. Planck early results. XX. New light on anomalous microwave emission from spinning dust grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, A.; Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.

    2011-01-01

    by a combination of free-free radiation, cosmic microwave background, thermal dust, and electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The spinning dust spectra are the most precisely measured to date, and show the high frequency side clearly for the first time. The spectra have a peak in the range 20......-40 GHz and are detected at high significances of 17.1σ for Perseus and 8.4σ for ρ Ophiuchi. In Perseus, spinning dust in the dense molecular gas can account for most of the AME; the low density atomic gas appears to play a minor role. In ρ Ophiuchi, the ~30 GHz peak is dominated by dense molecular gas...... of the synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust. We present spectra for two of the candidates; S140 and S235 are bright Hii regions that show evidence for AME, and are well fitted by spinning dust models. © ESO, 2011....

  3. Micrometer size grains of hot isostatically pressed alumina and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The. Vickers hardness in 5⋅5 μm grain microstructure is around 20 GPa in comparison to about 18 GPa in micro- structure with smaller grains of 2⋅2 μm size. Keywords. Alumina ... the technology of alumina ceramics (Munro 1997; Raha- man et al 2007) by purer ... reported interface-reaction-controlled kinetics of HIPing.

  4. The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study, Grain Size Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study was funded by NOAA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Program. Dr. L.J. Doyle produced grain size analyses in the...

  5. Unraveling the Anomalous Grain Size Dependence of Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, J. W.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2016-11-01

    Experimental studies have identified an anomalous grain size dependence associated with the critical tensile pressure that a metal may sustain before catastrophic failure by cavitation processes. Here we derive the first quantitative theory (and its associated closed-form solution) capable of explaining this phenomena. The theory agrees well with experimental measurements and atomistic calculations over a very wide range of conditions. Utilizing this theory, we are able to map out three distinct regimes in which the critical tensile pressure for cavitation failure (i) increases with decreasing grain size in accordance with conventional wisdom, (ii) nonintuitively decreases with decreasing grain size, and (iii) is independent of grain size. The theory also predicts microscopic signatures of the cavitation process which agree with available data.

  6. Microhardness and grain size of disordered nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatnikov, V.N.; Zueva, L.V.; Gusev, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Effect of the disordered nonstoichiometric titanium carbide on its microhardness and grain size is studied. It is established that decrease in defectiveness of carbon sublattice of disordered carbide is accompanied by microhardness growth and decrease in grain size. Possible causes of the TiC y microhardness anomalous behaviour in the area 0.8 ≤ y ≤ 0.9 connected with plastic deformation mechanism conditioned by peculiarities of the electron-energetic spectrum of nonstoichiometric carbide are discussed [ru

  7. THE STRUCTURE OF PRE-TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. AZIMUTHAL ASYMMETRIES, DIFFERENT RADIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF LARGE AND SMALL DUST GRAINS IN PDS 70 {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, J.; Wisniewski, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Tsukagoshi, T. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Brown, J. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dong, R. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Muto, T. [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Zhu, Z. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ohashi, N.; Kudo, T.; Egner, S.; Guyon, O. [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Kusakabe, N.; Akiyama, E. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Abe, L. [Laboratoire Hippolyte Fizeau, UMR6525, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 28, avenue Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Brandner, W.; Carson, J.; Feldt, M. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brandt, T. [Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Currie, T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON (Canada); Grady, C. A., E-mail: jun.hashimoto@ou.edu [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96002 (United States); and others

    2015-01-20

    The formation scenario of a gapped disk, i.e., transitional disk, and its asymmetry is still under debate. Proposed scenarios such as disk-planet interaction, photoevaporation, grain growth, anticyclonic vortex, eccentricity, and their combinations would result in different radial distributions of the gas and the small (sub-μm size) and large (millimeter size) dust grains as well as asymmetric structures in a disk. Optical/near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations and (sub-)millimeter interferometry can trace small and large dust grains, respectively; therefore multi-wavelength observations could help elucidate the origin of complicated structures of a disk. Here we report Submillimeter Array observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm and {sup 12}CO J = 2 → 1 line emission of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the solar-mass star PDS 70. PDS 70, a weak-lined T Tauri star, exhibits a gap in the scattered light from its disk with a radius of ∼65 AU at NIR wavelengths. However, we found a larger gap in the disk with a radius of ∼80 AU at 1.3 mm. Emission from all three disk components (the gas and the small and large dust grains) in images exhibits a deficit in brightness in the central region of the disk, in particular, the dust disk in small and large dust grains has asymmetric brightness. The contrast ratio of the flux density in the dust continuum between the peak position to the opposite side of the disk reaches 1.4. We suggest the asymmetries and different gap radii of the disk around PDS 70 are potentially formed by several (unseen) accreting planets inducing dust filtration.

  8. Grain size, stress and creep in polycrystalline solids

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available creep. Fig. 3. Diagram for aluminum augmented by the line w(s ) determining the dislocation cell size. Where w < L, power- law breakdown occurs at a stress independent of grain size. PHYSICS OF THE SOLID STATE Vol. 42 No. 8 2000 GRAIN SIZE...-7834/00/4208- $20.00 ? 2000 MAIK ?Nauka/Interperiodica? Physics of the Solid State, Vol. 42, No. 8, 2000, pp. 1456?1459. From Fizika Tverdogo Tela, Vol. 42, No. 8, 2000, pp. 1417?1419. Original English Text Copyright ? 2000 by Nabarro. 1. DIFFUSIONAL CREEP...

  9. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  10. Laboratory experiments on rotation and alignment of the analogs of interstellar dust grains by radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, MM; Craven, PD; Spann, JF; Tankosic, D; LeClair, A; Gallagher, DL; West, EA; Weingartner, JC; Witherow, WK; Tielens, AGGM

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models, and

  11. Nonplanar electrostatic shock waves in an opposite polarity dust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Amina

    2017-05-30

    May 30, 2017 ... clouds, interstellar media, and nebula [1–3], dusty plasma has become a very interesting field of study. Sev- eral processes are responsible for charging of dust grains. [4,5]. The charge of the dust grains highly depends on the size of the dust surface; larger dust grains are found to be negatively charged ...

  12. Yield stress of ultrafine-grained or nanocrystalline materials with a bimodal grain size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, C. S.; DeGiorgi, V. G.; E Moser, A.

    2018-02-01

    An attractive processing route for enhancing the yield strength of high-strength nanocrystalline metals and alloys while maintaining high ductility is to develop a bimodal grain size distribution (GSD), in which, supposedly, the finer grains provide strength, and the coarser grains maintain or even enhance ductility. We present a theoretical model predicting the strength of such a system, and show, analytically, how the yield stress is related to the various parameters of the bimodal GSD, such as volume fraction of the two components of the bimodal distribution and their standard deviations.

  13. Universal scaling of grain size distributions during dislocation creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupart, Claire; Dunkel, Kristina G.; Angheluta, Luiza; Austrheim, Håkon; Ildefonse, Benoît; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-04-01

    Grain size distributions are major sources of information about the mechanisms involved in ductile deformation processes and are often used as paleopiezometers (stress gauges). Several factors have been claimed to influence the stress vs grain size relation, including the water content (Jung & Karato 2001), the temperature (De Bresser et al., 2001), the crystal orientation (Linckens et al., 2016), the presence of second phase particles (Doherty et al. 1997; Cross et al., 2015), and heterogeneous stress distributions (Platt & Behr 2011). However, most of the studies of paleopiezometers have been done in the laboratory under conditions different from those in natural systems. It is therefore essential to complement these studies with observations of naturally deformed rocks. We have measured olivine grain sizes in ultramafic rocks from the Leka ophiolite in Norway and from Alpine Corsica using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data, and calculated the corresponding probability density functions. We compared our results with samples from other studies and localities that have formed under a wide range of stress and strain rate conditions. All distributions collapse onto one universal curve in a log-log diagram where grain sizes are normalized by the mean grain size of each sample. The curve is composed of two straight segments with distinct slopes for grains above and below the mean grain size. These observations indicate that a surprisingly simple and universal power-law scaling describes the grain size distribution in ultramafic rocks during dislocation creep irrespective of stress levels and strain rates. Cross, Andrew J., Susan Ellis, and David J. Prior. 2015. « A Phenomenological Numerical Approach for Investigating Grain Size Evolution in Ductiley Deforming Rocks ». Journal of Structural Geology 76 (juillet): 22-34. doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2015.04.001. De Bresser, J. H. P., J. H. Ter Heege, and C. J. Spiers. 2001. « Grain Size Reduction by Dynamic

  14. Colour characteristics of winter wheat grits of different grain size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horváth Zs. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, wheat has spread all over the world due to its extensive usability. The colour of wheat grits is very important for the milling and baking industry because it determines the colour of the products made from it. The instrumental colour measuring is used, first of all, for durum wheat. We investigated the relationship between colour characteristics and grain size in the case of different hard aestivum wheats. We determined the colour using the CIE (Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage 1976 L*, a*, b* colour system measured by MINOLTA CR-300 tristimulus colorimeter. After screening the colour of the wheat fractions of different grain size, grits was measured wet and dry. We determined the L*, a*, b* colour co-ordinates and the whiteness index, too. To evaluate the values we had obtained, we used analysis of variance and regression analysis. We pointed out that the colour of wheat grits of different grain size is dependent on the hardness index of wheat. The lightness co-ordinate (L* of grits of the harder wheat is smaller, while a* and b* co-ordinates are higher. We also found that while grain size rises, the L* co-ordinate decreases and a*, b* values increase in the case of every type of wheat. The colour of grits is determined by the colour of fractions of 250-400 μm in size, independently from the average grain size. The whiteness index and the L* colour co-ordinate have a linear relation (R2 = 0.9151; so, the determination of whiteness index is not necessary. The L* value right characterizes the whiteness of grits.

  15. Temperature Spectra of Interstellar Dust Grains Heated by Cosmic Rays. I. Translucent Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvāns, Juris

    2016-06-01

    Heating of whole interstellar dust grains by cosmic-ray (CR) particles affects the gas-grain chemistry in molecular clouds by promoting molecule desorption, diffusion, and chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The frequency of such heating, f T , s-1, determines how often a certain temperature T CR, K, is reached for grains hit by CR particles. This study aims to provide astrochemists with a comprehensive and updated data set on CR-induced whole-grain heating. We present calculations of f T and T CR spectra for bare olivine grains with radius a of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 μm and such grains covered with ice mantles of thickness 0.1a and 0.3a. Grain shape and structure effects are considered, as well as 30 CR elemental constituents with an updated energy spectrum corresponding to a translucent cloud with A V = 2 mag. Energy deposition by CRs in grain material was calculated with the srim program. We report full T CR spectra for all nine grain types and consider initial grain temperatures of 10 K and 20 K. We also provide frequencies for a range of minimum T CR values. The calculated data set can be simply and flexibly implemented in astrochemical models. The results show that, in the case of translucent clouds, the currently adopted rate for heating of whole grains to temperatures in excess of 70 K is underestimated by approximately two orders of magnitude in astrochemical numerical simulations. Additionally, grains are heated by CRs to modest temperatures (20-30 K) with intervals of a few years, which reduces the possibility of ice chemical explosions.

  16. The effect of surface albedo and grain size distribution on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sand dams are very useful in arid and semi arid lands (ASALs) as facilities for water storage and conservation. Soils in ASALs are mainly sandy and major water loss is by evaporation and infiltration. This study investigated the effect of sand media characteristics, specifically surface albedo, grain size and stratification on ...

  17. Sediment grain size and hydrodynamics in Mediterranean coastal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Integrated classification maps were produced by combining sediment grain-size and hydrological data (water renewal time, WRT) from two Mediterranean lagoons, Lesina (LL) and Varano (LV), Italy. The geophysical characteristics of the two basins, derived from detailed bathymetric charts, are quite distinct: ∼30% of LL ...

  18. Prediction of grain size evolution for low alloyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dub, Vladimir; Churyumov, Alexandr; Rodin, Alexey; Belikov, Sergey; Barbolin, Alexey

    2018-03-01

    The microstructure of the low alloyed steels after hot plastic deformation and high temperature annealing was described for different regimes of treatment. It was shown, that using of the Avrami- Kolmogorov type equation allows to predict the grain size with accuracy about 7%.

  19. Effects of grain size and grain boundaries on defect production in nanocrystalline 3C-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, N.; Kamenski, Paul J.; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    Cascade simulations in single crystal and nanocrystalline SiC have been conducted in order to determine the role of grain boundaries and grain size on defect production during primary radiation damage. Cascades are performed with 4 and 10 keV silicon as the primary knock-on atom (PKA). Total defect production is found to increase with decreasing grain size, and this effect is shown to be due to increased production in grain boundaries and changing grain boundary volume fraction. In order to consider in-grain defect production, a new mapping methodology is developed to properly normalize in-grain defect production rates for nanocrystalline materials. It is shown that the presence of grain boundaries does not affect the total normalized in-grain defect production significantly (the changes are lower than ∼20%) for the PKA energies considered. Defect production in the single grain containing the PKA is also studied and found to increase for smaller grain sizes. In particular, for smaller grain sizes the defect production decreases with increasing distance from the grain boundary while for larger grain sizes the presence of the grain boundaries has negligible effect on defect production. The results suggest that experimentally observed changes in radiation resistance of nanocrystalline materials may be due to long-term damage evolution rather than changes in defect production rates from primary damage.

  20. Grain-size distributions and grain boundaries of chalcopyrite-type thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Ras, D.; Schorr, S.; Schock, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    CuInSe 2 , CuGaSe 2 , Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 and CuInS 2 thin-film solar absorbers in completed solar cells were studied in cross section by means of electronbackscatter diffraction. From the data acquired, grain-size distributions were extracted, and also the most frequent grain boundaries were determined. The grain-size distributions of all chalcopyrite-type thin films studied can be described well by lognormal distribution functions. The most frequent grainboundary types in these thin films are 60 - left angle 221 right angle tet and 71 - left angle 110 right angle tet (near) Σ3 twin boundaries. These results can be related directly to the importance of {112} tet planes during the topotactical growth of chalcopyrite-type thin films. Based on energetic considerations, it is assumed that the most frequent twin boundaries exhibit a 180 - left angle 221 right angle tet constellation. (orig.)

  1. Does the size distribution of mineral dust aerosols depend on the wind speed at emission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Kok

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The size distribution of mineral dust aerosols partially determines their interactions with clouds, radiation, ecosystems, and other components of the Earth system. Several theoretical models predict that the dust size distribution depends on the wind speed at emission, with larger wind speeds predicted to produce smaller aerosols. The present study investigates this prediction using a compilation of published measurements of the size-resolved vertical dust flux emitted by eroding soils. Surprisingly, these measurements indicate that the size distribution of naturally emitted dust aerosols is independent of the wind speed. The recently formulated brittle fragmentation theory of dust emission is consistent with this finding, whereas other theoretical models are not. The independence of the emitted dust size distribution with wind speed simplifies both the interpretation of geological records of dust deposition and the parameterization of dust emission in atmospheric circulation models.

  2. Gas-Grain Chemical Models: Inclusion of a Grain Size Distribution and a Study Of Young Stellar Objects in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Tyler Andrew

    2017-06-01

    Computational models of interstellar gas-grain chemistry have aided in our understanding of star-forming regions. Chemical kinetics models rely on a network of chemical reactions and a set of physical conditions in which atomic and molecular species are allowed to form and react. We replace the canonical single grain-size in our chemical model MAGICKAL with a grain size distribution and analyze the effects on the chemical composition of the gas and grain surface in quiescent and collapsing dark cloud models. We find that a grain size distribution coupled with a temperature distribution across grain sizes can significantly affect the bulk ice composition when dust temperatures fall near critical values related to the surface binding energies of common interstellar chemical species. We then apply the updated model to a study of ice formation in the cold envelopes surrounding massive young stellar objects in the Magellanic Clouds. The Magellanic Clouds are local satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, and they provide nearby environments to study star formation at low metallicity. We expand the model calculation of dust temperature to include a treatment for increased interstellar radiation field intensity; we vary the radiation field to model the elevated dust temperatures observed in the Magellanic Clouds. We also adjust the initial elemental abundances used in the model, guided by observations of Magellanic Cloud HII regions. We are able to reproduce the relative ice fractions observed, indicating that metal depletion and elevated grain temperature are important drivers of the envelope ice composition. The observed shortfall in CO in Small Magellanic Cloud sources can be explained by a combination of reduced carbon abundance and increased grain temperatures. The models indicate that a large variation in radiation field strength is required to match the range of observed LMC abundances. CH 3OH abundance is found to be enhanced (relative to total carbon abundance) in

  3. Grain size evaluation of metallic specimens using laser-ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chung Soo; Park, Hyung Kook; Jeon, Hyung Ha; Kim, Dal Woo; Oh, Ki Jang; Hong, Soon Taek

    2002-01-01

    The laser-ultrasonics inspection techniques for the measurement of grain size have been developed in this study. The ultrasonics are generated by pulsed Nd:YAG laser and the pulse energy is 300 mJ and wavelength is 1064 nm. Since the frequency bandwidth of laser-ultrasonics generated by pulsed laser is extremely broad, this laser-ultrasonics are suitable for analysis of frequency dependence of ultrasonic attenuation. The attenuation coefficients (α) in thick steel plates are measured by using laser-ultrasonics of 15 MHz and 30 MHz, which is probed by confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. The results show that the attenuation coefficients are closely related with grain size and high frequency ultrasonics are more effective to measure the fine pain size. According to the experimental results of this study, we can conclude that laser-ultrasonics inspection is effective method for grain size measurement. The confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer has been developed for non-contact measurement of laser-ultrasonics. The transmittance characteristic of interferometer has been studied experimentally with CW single-mode laser system. The results show that the Fabry-Perot interferometer is a very effective tool for the measurement of ultrasonics. Using the developed Fabry-Perot interferometer, we have measured ultrasonic signals of high temperature specimen up to 1200 degrees C.

  4. A pretreatment method for grain size analysis of red mudstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zaixing; Liu, Li'an

    2011-11-01

    Traditional sediment disaggregation methods work well for loose mud sediments, but not for tightly cemented mudstones by ferric oxide minerals. In this paper, a new pretreatment method for analyzing the grain size of red mudstones is presented. The experimental samples are Eocene red mudstones from the Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin. The red mudstones are composed mainly of clay minerals, clastic sediments and ferric oxides that make the mudstones red and tightly compacted. The procedure of the method is as follows. Firstly, samples of the red mudstones were crushed into fragments with a diameter of 0.6-0.8 mm in size; secondly, the CBD (citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite) treatment was used to remove ferric oxides so that the cementation of intra-aggregates and inter-aggregates became weakened, and then 5% dilute hydrochloric acid was added to further remove the cements; thirdly, the fragments were further ground with a rubber pestle; lastly, an ultrasonicator was used to disaggregate the samples. After the treatment, the samples could then be used for grain size analysis or for other geological analyses of sedimentary grains. Compared with other pretreatment methods for size analysis of mudstones, this proposed method is more effective and has higher repeatability.

  5. A grain of sand or a handful of dust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Fabian

    2013-03-01

    The recent paper by Girod et al (2013) analyses the implications of stringent global GHG mitigation targets for the intensities of, inter alia , broad consumption categories like food, shelter and transport. This type of scenario modeling analysis and inverse reasoning helps us to better understand the potential or required contribution of changes in consumption patterns to mitigation. This is welcome because while there is a growing literature on the behavioral and consumption dimensions of mitigation, there is still no widely accepted framework for studying systematically the interactions between supply and demand, behavior and technology, production and consumption. So we are left with the question: what do we need to do exactly to stabilize GHG concentrations? Intuitively, we take our cue from Aristotelian logic: if A implies B, then in order to avoid B we had better prevent A. At this level it is clear that we need either to decarbonize our energy systems to start with, or to suck out CO2 from the atmosphere. When multiple causes are at work, however, our neat Aristotelian picture is no longer appropriate (Cartwright 2003). Leaving capturing and storage aside, we need to decarbonize our systems, but we also need to reduce the energy intensity, change our personal habits, eat less meat, use more public transportation, etc. What is the right balance between these factors? Can we do just one thing, say, eat less meat, but not another, and still achieve some pretty ambitious mitigation goals? In other words, what are necessary and what are sufficient sets of measures to reach these goals? Let us first look at the question of necessary measures. This gets tricky when applied to individual consumers: it is somewhat akin to the notorious question whether a heap of sand is still a heap when you take away one grain (Sainsbury 2011). If you are inclined to say yes, think once more. What happens when you take away another one, and another one, and another one, and so

  6. Size effect in tension perpendicular to the grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Clorius, Christian Odin; Damkilde, Lars

    1999-01-01

    The strength in tension perpendicular to the grain is known to decrease with an increase in the stressed volume. Usually this size effect is explained on a stochastic basis, that is an explanation relying on an increased probability of encountering a strength reducing flaw when the volume...... of the material under stress is increased. This paper presents a small experimental investigation on specimens with well defined structural orientation of the material. The experiments exhibit a larger size effect than expected and furthermore the data and the nature of the failures encountered suggest...

  7. Dust exposure in workers from grain storage facilities in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Zamora, María G; Medina-Escobar, Lourdes; Mora, Glend; Zock, Jan-Paul; van Wendel de Joode, Berna; Mora, Ana M

    2017-08-01

    About 12 million workers are involved in the production of basic grains in Central America. However, few studies in the region have examined the occupational factors associated with inhalable dust exposure. (i) To assess the exposure to inhalable dust in workers from rice, maize, and wheat storage facilities in Costa Rica; (ii) to examine the occupational factors associated with this exposure; and (iii) to measure concentrations of respirable and thoracic particles in different areas of the storage facilities. We measured inhalable (Costa Rica. We also measured respirable (<4μm) and thoracic (<10μm) dust particles in several areas of the storage facilities. Geometric mean (GM) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) inhalable dust concentrations were 2.0mg/m 3 and 7.8 (range=<0.2-275.4mg/m 3 ). Personal inhalable dust concentrations were associated with job category [GM for category/GM for administrative staff and other workers (95% CI)=4.4 (2.6, 7.2) for packing; 20.4 (12.3, 34.7) for dehulling; 109.6 (50.1, 234.4) for unloading in flat bed sheds; 24.0 (14.5, 39.8) for unloading in pits; and 31.6 (18.6, 52.5) for drying], and cleaning task [15.8 (95% CI: 10.0, 26.3) in workers who cleaned in addition to their regular tasks]. Higher area concentrations of thoracic dust particles were found in wheat (GM and GSD=4.3mg/m 3 and 4.5) and maize (3.0mg/m 3 and 3.9) storage facilities, and in grain drying (2.3mg/m 3 and 3.1) and unloading (1.5mg/m 3 and 4.8) areas. Operators of grain storage facilities showed elevated inhalable dust concentrations, mostly above international exposure limits. Better engineering and administrative controls are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of grain size on the high temperature mechanical properties of type 316LN stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Lee, Y. S.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Cho, H. D.; Han, C. H

    2001-02-01

    Nitrogen increases the high temeprature mechanical properties and decreases grain size. The effect of nitrogen on the high temperature mechanical properties was investigated in the viewpoint of grain size. Tensile strength increases with the decrease of grain size and agrees with the Hall-Petch relationship. Effect of grain size on the low cycle fatigue life properties were investigated as measuring the fatigue life from the results which had been obtained by the constant strain rate and various strain range. There was no effect on the low cycle fatigue properties by the grain size. The time to rupture decreased with the increase of grain size. The steady state creep rate decreased to a minimum and then increased as the grain size increased. This result agrees with the result predicted from Garofalo equation. The rupture elongation at the intermediate grain size showed a minimum due to the cavity formed easily by carbide precipitates in the grain boundaries.

  9. Influence of grain size in the near-micrometre regime on the deformation microstructure in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, G.M.; Godfrey, A.; Hansen, N.; Liu, W.; Winther, G.; Huang, X.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of grain size on deformation microstructure formation in the near-micrometre grain size regime has been studied using samples of aluminium prepared using a spark plasma sintering technique. Samples in a fully recrystallized grain condition with average grain sizes ranging from 5.2 to 0.8 μm have been prepared using this technique. Examination in the transmission electron microscope of these samples after compression at room temperature to approximately 20% reduction reveals that grains larger than 7 μm are subdivided by cell block boundaries similar to those observed in coarse-grained samples, with a similar dependency on the crystallographic orientation of the grains. With decreasing grain size down to approx. 1 μm there is a gradual transition from cell block structures to cell structures. At even smaller grain sizes of down to approx. 0.5 μm the dominant features are dislocation bundles and random dislocations, although at a larger compressive strain of 30% dislocation rotation boundaries may also be found in the interior of grains of this size. A standard 〈1 1 0〉 fibre texture is found for all grain sizes, with a decreasing sharpness with decreasing grain size. The structural transitions with decreasing grain size are discussed based on the general principles of grain subdivision by deformation-induced dislocation boundaries and of low-energy dislocation structures as applied to the not hitherto explored near-micrometre grain size regime

  10. The grain size(s of Black Hills Quartzite deformed in the dislocation creep regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Heilbronner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available General shear experiments on Black Hills Quartzite (BHQ deformed in the dislocation creep regimes 1 to 3 have been previously analyzed using the CIP method (Heilbronner and Tullis, 2002, 2006. They are reexamined using the higher spatial and orientational resolution of EBSD. Criteria for coherent segmentations based on c-axis orientation and on full crystallographic orientations are determined. Texture domains of preferred c-axis orientation (Y and B domains are extracted and analyzed separately. Subdomains are recognized, and their shape and size are related to the kinematic framework and the original grains in the BHQ. Grain size analysis is carried out for all samples, high- and low-strain samples, and separately for a number of texture domains. When comparing the results to the recrystallized quartz piezometer of Stipp and Tullis (2003, it is found that grain sizes are consistently larger for a given flow stress. It is therefore suggested that the recrystallized grain size also depends on texture, grain-scale deformation intensity, and the kinematic framework (of axial vs. general shear experiments.

  11. The grain size(s) of Black Hills Quartzite deformed in the dislocation creep regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronner, Renée; Kilian, Rüdiger

    2017-10-01

    General shear experiments on Black Hills Quartzite (BHQ) deformed in the dislocation creep regimes 1 to 3 have been previously analyzed using the CIP method (Heilbronner and Tullis, 2002, 2006). They are reexamined using the higher spatial and orientational resolution of EBSD. Criteria for coherent segmentations based on c-axis orientation and on full crystallographic orientations are determined. Texture domains of preferred c-axis orientation (Y and B domains) are extracted and analyzed separately. Subdomains are recognized, and their shape and size are related to the kinematic framework and the original grains in the BHQ. Grain size analysis is carried out for all samples, high- and low-strain samples, and separately for a number of texture domains. When comparing the results to the recrystallized quartz piezometer of Stipp and Tullis (2003), it is found that grain sizes are consistently larger for a given flow stress. It is therefore suggested that the recrystallized grain size also depends on texture, grain-scale deformation intensity, and the kinematic framework (of axial vs. general shear experiments).

  12. Particle size distribution of brominated flame retardants in house dust from Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Kajiwara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to examine the concentrations, profiles, and mass distributions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs, and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PBDD/Fs based on the particle sizes of house dust samples from five homes in Japan. After removal of impurities from house dust from vacuum cleaner bags, selected indoor dust samples were size fractionated (>2 mm, 1–2 mm, 0.5–1 mm, 250–500 μm, 106–250 μm, 53–106 μm, and 250 μm in size and fluffy dust were included. The conclusion is that particulate dust <250 μm in size without fluffy dust should be used to analyze dust for brominated flame retardants.

  13. Enforcing dust mass conservation in 3D simulations of tightly-coupled grains with the PHANTOM SPH code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabio, G.; Dipierro, G.; Veronesi, B.; Lodato, G.; Hutchison, M.; Laibe, G.; Price, D. J.

    2018-03-01

    We describe a new implementation of the one-fluid method in the SPH code PHANTOM to simulate the dynamics of dust grains in gas protoplanetary discs. We revise and extend previously developed algorithms by computing the evolution of a new fluid quantity that produces a more accurate and numerically controlled evolution of the dust dynamics. Moreover, by limiting the stopping time of uncoupled grains that violate the assumptions of the terminal velocity approximation, we avoid fatal numerical errors in mass conservation. We test and validate our new algorithm by running 3D SPH simulations of a large range of disc models with tightly- and marginally-coupled grains.

  14. Grain-to-Grain Variations in NbC Particle Size Distributions in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Claire; Ralph, B.; Silverman, B.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative information has been obtained concerning the size distributions of NbC precipitate particles in different grains in a deformed and aged austenitic stainless steel specimen. The precipitate size distributions obtained differ from one grain to another. The average disparity measured...... between the mean precipitate sizes was a function of the distance betwen the grains compared. The results obtained are considered in terms of differences in precipitation behaviour due to variations in the levels of plastic strain in constituent grains of the deformed specimen....

  15. Developing ISM Dust Grain Models with Precision Elemental Abundances from IXO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencic, L. A.; Smith, R. K.; Juet, A.

    2009-01-01

    The exact nature of interstellar dust grains in the Galaxy remains mysterious, despite their ubiquity. Many viable models exist, based on available IR-UV data and assumed elemental abundances. However, the abundances, which are perhaps the most stringent constraint, are not well known: modelers must use proxies in the absence of direct measurements for the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Recent revisions of these proxy values have only added to confusion over which is the best representative for the diffuse ISM, and highlighted the need for direct, high signal-to-noise measurements from the ISM itself. The International X-ray Observatory's superior facilities will enable high-precision elemental abundance measurements. We ill show how these results will measure both the overall ISM abundances and challenge dust models, allowing us to construct a more realistic picture of the ISM.

  16. Calculated Grain Size-Dependent Vacancy Supersaturation and its Effect on Void Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Foreman, A. J. E.

    1974-01-01

    In order to study the effect of grain size on void formation during high-energy electron irradiations, the steady-state point defect concentration and vacancy supersaturation profiles have been calculated for three-dimensional spherical grains up to three microns in size. In the calculations...... of vacancy supersaturation as a function of grain size, the effects of internal sink density and the dislocation preference for interstitial attraction have been included. The computations show that the level of vacancy supersaturation achieved in a grain decreases with decreasing grain size. The grain size...... dependence of the maximum vacancy supersaturation in the centre of the grains is found to be very similar to the grain size dependence of the maximum void number density and void volume swelling measured in the central regions of austenitic stainless steel grains. This agreement reinforces the interpretation...

  17. The surface reactivity of acrylonitrile with oxygen atoms on an analogue of interstellar dust grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Helen J.; Toscano, Jutta; Price, Stephen D.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments designed to reveal the low temperature reactivity on the surfaces of interstellar dust grains are used to probe the heterogeneous reaction between oxygen atoms and acrylonitrile (C2H3CN, H2C = CH-CN). The reaction is studied at a series of fixed surface temperatures between 14 K and 100 K. After dosing the reactants onto the surface, temperature programmed desorption, coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, reveals the formation of a product with the molecular formula C3H3NO. This product results from the addition of a single oxygen atom to the acrylonitrile reactant. The oxygen atom attack appears to occur exclusively at the C = C double bond, rather than involving the cyano (-CN) group. The absence of reactivity at the cyano site hints that full saturation of organic molecules on dust grains may not always occur in the interstellar medium. Modelling the experimental data provides a reaction probability of 0.007 ± 0.003 for a Langmuir-Hinshelwood style (diffusive) reaction mechanism. Desorption energies for acrylonitrile, oxygen atoms and molecular oxygen, from the multilayer mixed ice their deposition forms, are also extracted from the kinetic model and are 22.7 ± 1.0 kJ mol-1 (2730 ± 120 K), 14.2 ± 1.0 kJ mol-1 (1710 ± 120 K) and 8.5 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1 (1020 ± 100 K) respectively. The kinetic parameters we extract from our experiments indicate that the reaction between atomic oxygen and acrylonitrile could occur on interstellar dust grains on an astrophysical time scale.

  18. Perfluorinated surfactants (PFSs) in size-fractionated street dust in Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Michio; Takada, Hideshige

    2008-11-01

    We investigated perfluorinated surfactants (PFSs) in size-fractionated street dust to identify their occurrence, contributions from traffic, and potential routes of entry into waters. Street dust was collected from residential areas and heavily trafficked areas in Tokyo and sorted into fine (fine fractions, PFS contents were significantly higher in heavily trafficked street dust than in residential street dust, but in coarse fractions, no significant differences were observed. Additionally, in heavily trafficked areas, PFS contents were significantly higher in fine fractions than in coarse fractions, but in residential areas, no significant differences were observed. PFS compositions differed between size fractions, not locations, indicating differences in sources between size fractions. Fine particles from traffic contributed to PFSs in street dust. Street dust possibly acts as the origin of PFSs in street runoff and eventually enters waters. This is the first report of PFSs in street dust.

  19. A grain size distribution model for non-catalytic gas-solid reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1993-01-01

    A new model to describe the non-catalytic conversion of a solid by a reactant gas is proposed. This so-called grain size distribution (GSD) model presumes the porous particle to be a collection of grains of various sizes. The size distribution of the grains is derived from mercury porosimetry

  20. Collision rate coefficient for charged dust grains in the presence of linear shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2017-09-01

    Like and oppositely charged particles or dust grains in linear shear flows are often driven to collide with one another by fluid and/or electrostatic forces, which can strongly influence particle-size distribution evolution. In gaseous media, collisions in shear are further complicated because particle inertia can influence differential motion. Expressions for the collision rate coefficient have not been developed previously which simultaneously account for the influences of linear shear, particle inertia, and electrostatic interactions. Here, we determine the collision rate coefficient accounting for the aforementioned effects by determining the collision area, i.e., the area of the plane perpendicular to the shear flow defining the relative initial locations of particles which will collide with one another. Integration of the particle flux over this area yields the collision rate. Collision rate calculations are parametrized as an enhancement factor, i.e., the ratio of the collision rate considering potential interactions and inertia to the traditional collision rate considering laminar shear only. For particles of constant surface charge density, the enhancement factor is found dependent only on the Stokes number (quantifying particle inertia), the electrostatic energy to shear energy ratio, and the ratio of colliding particle radii. Enhancement factors are determined for Stokes numbers in the 0-10 range and energy ratios up to 5. Calculations show that the influences of both electrostatic interactions and inertia are significant; for inertialess (St =0 ) equal-sized and oppositely charged particles, we find that even at energy ratios as low as 0.2, enhancement factors are in excess of 2. For the same situation but like-charged particles, enhancement factors fall below 0.5. Increasing the Stokes number acts to mitigate the influence of electrostatic potentials for both like and oppositely charged particles; i.e., inertia reduces the enhancement factor for

  1. Awns reduce grain number to increase grain size and harvestable yield in irrigated and rainfed spring wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebetzke, G J; Bonnett, D G; Reynolds, M P

    2016-04-01

    Genotypic variation in ear morphology is linked to differences in photosynthetic potential to influence grain yield in winter cereals. Awns contribute to photosynthesis, particularly under water-limited conditions when canopy assimilation is restricted. We assessed performance of up to 45 backcross-derived, awned-awnletted NILs representing four diverse genetic backgrounds in 25 irrigated or rainfed, and droughted environments in Australia and Mexico. Mean environment grain yields were wide-ranging (1.38-7.93 t ha(-1)) with vegetative and maturity biomass, plant height, anthesis date, spike number, and harvest index all similar (P >0.05) for awned and awnletted NILs. Overall, grain yields of awned-awnletted sister-NILs were equivalent, irrespective of yield potential and genetic background. Awnletted wheats produced significantly more grains per unit area (+4%) and per spike (+5%) reflecting more fertile spikelets and grains in tertiary florets. Increases in grain number were compensated for by significant reductions in grain size (-5%) and increased frequency (+0.8%) of small, shrivelled grains ('screenings') to reduce seed-lot quality of awnletted NILs. Post-anthesis canopies of awnletted NILs were marginally warmer over all environments (+0.27 °C) but were not different and were sometimes cooler than awned NILs at cooler air temperatures. Awns develop early and represented up to 40% of total spikelet biomass prior to ear emergence. We hypothesize that the allocation of assimilate to large and rapidly developing awns decreases spikelet number and floret fertility to reduce grain number, particularly in distal florets. Individual grain size is increased to reduce screenings and to increase test weight and milling quality, particularly in droughted environments. Despite the average reduction in grain size, awnless lines could be identified that combined higher grain yield with larger grain size, increased grain protein concentration, and reduced screenings. © The

  2. Quantifying dust plume formation and aerosol size distribution during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in North Africa

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Basit Ali

    2015-01-01

    Dust particles mixed in the free troposphere have longer lifetimes than airborne particles near the surface. Their cumulative radiative impact on earth’s meteorological processes and climate might be significant despite their relatively small contribution to total dust abundance. One example is the elevated dust--laden Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over the equatorial North Atlantic, which cools the sea surface and likely suppresses hurricane activity. To understand the formation mechanisms of SAL, we combine model simulations and dust observations collected during the first stage of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM--I), which sampled dust events that extended from Morocco to Portugal, and investigated the spatial distribution and the microphysical, optical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan mineral dust. We employed the Weather Research Forecast model coupled with the Chemistry/Aerosol module (WRF--Chem) to reproduce the meteorological environment and spatial and size distributions of dust. The experimental domain covers northwest Africa including the southern Sahara, Morocco and part of the Atlantic Ocean with 5 km horizontal grid spacing and 51 vertical layers. The experiments were run from 20 May to 9 June 2006, covering the period of most intensive dust outbreaks. Comparisons of model results with available airborne and ground--based observations show that WRF--Chem reproduces observed meteorological fields as well as aerosol distribution across the entire region and along the airplane’s tracks. We evaluated several aerosol uplift processes and found that orographic lifting, aerosol transport through the land/sea interface with steep gradients of meteorological characteristics, and interaction of sea breezes with the continental outflow are key mechanisms that form a surface--detached aerosol plume over the ocean. Comparisons of simulated dust size distributions with airplane and ground--based observations are generally good, but suggest

  3. Non-thermal desorption from interstellar dust grains via exothermic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, R. T.; Wakelam, V.; Herbst, E.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The gas-phase abundance of methanol in dark quiescent cores in the interstellar medium cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. In fact, the only possible synthesis of this species appears to be production on the surfaces of dust grains followed by desorption into the gas. Yet, evaporation is inefficient for heavy molecules such as methanol at the typical temperature of 10 K. It is necessary then to consider non-thermal mechanisms for desorption. But, if such mechanisms are considered for the production of methanol, they must be considered for all surface species. Methods: Our gas-grain network of reactions has been altered by the inclusion of a non-thermal desorption mechanism in which the exothermicity of surface addition reactions is utilized to break the bond between the product species and the surface. Our estimated rate for this process derives from a simple version of classical unimolecular rate theory with a variable parameter only loosely constrained by theoretical work. Results: Our results show that the chemistry of dark clouds is altered slightly at times up to 106 yr, mainly by the enhancement in the gas-phase abundances of hydrogen-rich species such as methanol that are formed on grain surfaces. At later times, however, there is a rather strong change. Instead of the continuing accretion of most gas-phase species onto dust particles, a steady-state is reached for both gas-phase and grain-surface species, with significant abundances for the former. Nevertheless, most of the carbon is contained in an undetermined assortment of heavy surface hydrocarbons. Conclusions: The desorption mechanism discussed here will be better constrained by observational data on pre-stellar cores, where a significant accretion of species such as CO has already occurred.

  4. Experimental study of the effect of wearing dust-proof mask on inhaled aerosol particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Shunguang; Mei Chongsheng; Wu Yuangqing; Ren Liuan.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for measuring particle size of inhaled aerosol with a phantom of human head wearing dust-proof mask and a cascade impactor. The results showed that AMAD of inhaled aerosol was degraded and the size distribution of particles changed when the dust-proof mask was wearing. The leak rate of mask increased as the size of dust particles decreased. The results are applicable to estimate internal exposure dose and to evaluate the dust-proof capacity of mask

  5. The colour of the solar corona and dust grains in it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajmanov, A.K.; Nikolsky, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    The photometry of coronal negatives is carried out. The films were obtained at the March 7, 1970 and July 10, 1972 eclipses. A distribution of the coronal brightness in the red (635 mm), green (545 nm), and blue (455 nm) wavelength intervals up to distances of (6-7)Rsub(sun) is deduced (Figure 1). Colour indexes of the corona (the emission ratio red/blue-Csub(rb) and green/blue-Csub(gb)) have been obtained. We assume Csub(rb) = Csub(gb) = 1 in the inner corona ( = 1 μm. RED brightness is evaluated to be 4 x 10 -10 anti Bsub(sun). There is 1 grain of dust in the elementary volume with cross section of 1 cm 2 along the line of sight. The intensity of dust emission in wavelength interval 10 μm deduced by the authors is approximately 1 μ W cm -2 sm -1 . That is in agreement with Mankin et al. (1974) and Lena et al. (1974) observations. The whole dust mass of RED is -11 cm -3 . Determination of the colour of the solar corona have been made by a number of scientists (Tikhov, 1940, 1957; Allen, 1946; Blackwell, 1952; Michard, 1956; Sharonov, 1958; Nay et al. 1961). The corona colour was found to be somewhat redder than the Sun's. However this question is not finally settled to date. (orig.)

  6. The turbulent life of dust grains in the supernova-driven, multiphase interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas; Zhukovska, Svitlana; Naab, Thorsten; Girichidis, Philipp; Walch, Stefanie; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Clark, Paul C.; Seifried, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Dust grains are an important component of the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies. We present the first direct measurement of the residence times of interstellar dust in the different ISM phases, and of the transition rates between these phases, in realistic hydrodynamical simulations of the multiphase ISM. Our simulations include a time-dependent chemical network that follows the abundances of H+, H, H2, C+ and CO and take into account self-shielding by gas and dust using a tree-based radiation transfer method. Supernova explosions are injected either at random locations, at density peaks, or as a mixture of the two. For each simulation, we investigate how matter circulates between the ISM phases and find more sizeable transitions than considered in simple mass exchange schemes in the literature. The derived residence times in the ISM phases are characterized by broad distributions, in particular for the molecular, warm and hot medium. The most realistic simulations with random and mixed driving have median residence times in the molecular, cold, warm and hot phase around 17, 7, 44 and 1 Myr, respectively. The transition rates measured in the random driving run are in good agreement with observations of Ti gas-phase depletion in the warm and cold phases in a simple depletion model. ISM phase definitions based on chemical abundance rather than temperature cuts are physically more meaningful, but lead to significantly different transition rates and residence times because there is no direct correspondence between the two definitions.

  7. Dust plume formation in the free troposphere and aerosol size distribution during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in North Africa

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Basit Ali

    2015-11-27

    Dust particles mixed in the free troposphere have longer lifetimes than airborne particles near the surface. Their cumulative radiative impact on earth’s meteorological processes and climate might be significant despite their relatively small contribution to total dust abundance. One example is the elevated dust-laden Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic, which cools the sea surface. To understand the formation mechanisms of a dust layer in the free troposphere, this study combines model simulations and dust observations collected during the first stage of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM-I), which sampled dust events that extended from Morocco to Portugal, and investigated the spatial distribution and the microphysical, optical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan mineral dust. The Weather Research Forecast model coupled with the Chemistry/Aerosol module (WRF-Chem) is employed to reproduce the meteorological environment and spatial and size distributions of dust. The model domain covers northwest Africa and adjacent water with 5 km horizontal grid spacing and 51 vertical layers. The experiments were run from 20 May to 9 June 2006, covering the period of the most intensive dust outbreaks. Comparisons of model results with available airborne and ground-based observations show that WRF-Chem reproduces observed meteorological fields as well as aerosol distribution across the entire region and along the airplane’s tracks. Several mechanisms that cause aerosol entrainment into the free troposphere are evaluated and it is found that orographic lifting, and interaction of sea breeze with the continental outflow are key mechanisms that form a surface-detached aerosol plume over the ocean. The model dust emission scheme is tuned to simultaneously fit the observed total optical depth and the ratio of aerosol optical depths generated by fine and coarse dust modes. Comparisons of simulated dust size distributions with

  8. Image - Rice Grain Scanner: a three-dimensional fully automated assessment of grain size and quality traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Marschalek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Image is a scanner developed as a grain classifier for quality control at the rice industry based on Brazilian official norms. It orders the dehulled grains ensuring that each grain would pass individually, in free fall, while the grain is analysed from different sides, covering its whole surface. It ensures a precise three-dimensional measurement of grain size, chalkiness, defects of the grain, milling quality, given out a total of 39 traits/classes/defects/values, which are sent to a excel Microsoft spreadsheet. This is managed through a digital platform which analysis routine and layout were developed and designed by Selgron and Epagri to fit the needs of research. The scanner and its software reach outputs that enhance rice breeding efficiency for grain quality, performing it faster, precisely and with a high-throughput phenotyping than ever before, especially interesting in very early breeding generations.

  9. COMET 22P/KOPFF: DUST ENVIRONMENT AND GRAIN EJECTION ANISOTROPY FROM VISIBLE AND INFRARED OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Fernando; Pozuelos, Francisco; Aceituno, Francisco; Casanova, Victor; Sota, Alfredo [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Castellano, Julio; Reina, Esteban, E-mail: fernando@iaa.es [Amateur Association Cometas-Obs (Spain)

    2012-06-20

    We present optical observations and Monte Carlo models of the dust coma, tail, and trail structures of the comet 22P/Kopff during the 2002 and 2009 apparitions. Dust loss rates, ejection velocities, and power-law size distribution functions are derived as functions of the heliocentric distance using pre- and post-perihelion imaging observations during both apparitions. The 2009 post-perihelion images can be accurately fitted by an isotropic ejection model. On the other hand, strong dust ejection anisotropies are required to fit the near-coma regions at large heliocentric distances (both inbound at r{sub h} = 2.5 AU and outbound at r{sub h} = 2.6 AU) for the 2002 apparition. These asymmetries are compatible with a scenario where dust ejection is mostly seasonally driven, coming mainly from regions near subsolar latitudes at far heliocentric distances inbound and outbound. At intermediate to near-perihelion heliocentric distances, the outgassing would affect much more extended latitude regions, the emission becoming almost isotropic near perihelion. We derived a maximum dust production rate of 260 kg s{sup -1} at perihelion, and an averaged production rate over one orbit of 40 kg s{sup -1}. An enhanced emission rate, also accompanied by a large ejection velocity, is predicted at r{sub h} > 2.5 pre-perihelion. The model has also been extended to the thermal infrared in order to be applied to available trail observations of this comet taken with IRAS and Infrared Space Observatory spacecrafts. The modeled trail intensities are in good agreement with those observations, which is remarkable taking into account that those data are sensitive to dust ejection patterns corresponding to several orbits before the 2002 and 2009 apparitions.

  10. Exposure to dust and its particle size distribution in shoe manufacture and repair workplaces measured with GRIMM laser dust monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroszejn-Mrowca, Grazyna; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, Irena

    2003-01-01

    Owing to a diversified technological process and a great variety of products and materials used in shoe manufacture, workers may be exposed to dusts that contain different chemicals and particles of various shapes and sizes. The aim of this study was to assess the dust exposure, taking account of concentration of particular size fractions according to the European Standard Norm, and to analyze particle size distribution in inhalable dust at selected workplaces in a modern shoe manufacture plant and in a small shoe repair workshop in comparison with other industrial branches. In these two workplaces, the concentrations of dust, representing the inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions, were measured with the GRIMM 1.105 laser dust monitor. The particle size distribution in inhaled dust in the most characteristic workposts was analyzed. In the shoe manufacture plant, the concentrations ranged from 124 microg/m3 (leather cutting out) to 724 microg/m3 (scouring and milling of soles); concentrations of the thoracic and respirable fractions in the same workposts ranged from 74 microg/m3 to 412 microg/m3 and from 24 microg/m3 to 120 microg/m3, respectively. In the shoe repair workshop, the recorded concentrations were higher: the values ranged from 521 microg/m3 (gluing of shoes and soles, zipper exchange and heel abrasion) to 916 microg/m3 (uppers sewing and heel scouring) for the inhaled fraction; from 335 microg/m3 to 499 microg/m3 for the thoracic fraction; and from 88 microg/m3 to 120 microg/m3 for the respirable fraction. The mass median aerodynamic diameters of inhalable dust particles fell within the limits of 6.2-25.0 mm. Dust with the smallest particles (MMAD = 6.2 mm) was observed in shoe brushing and polishing, and with the largest particles (MMAD = 25.0 mm) in uppers sewing. The modern process of shoe manufacture is characterized by very low concentrations of inhalable dust and its fractions, they are considerably lower than occupational exposure limits

  11. Distinguishing the provenance of fine-grained eolian dust over the Chinese Loess Plateau from a modelling perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Zhengguo; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    The provenance of fine-grained eolian dust over East Asia is distinguished using a regional climate model. Five major source regions within China and Mongolia are considered: sandy lands in the northeastern China, deserts in the northern China, the Gobi deserts, the Taklimakan deserts in western China and deserts on the Tibet an Plateau. The contribution of each dust source is evaluated for the downwind eolian sediments in the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) and Japan Sea (JS). The results show t...

  12. On grain-size-dependent void swelling in pure copper irradiated with fission neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Zinkle, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of grain size on void swelling has its origin in the intrinsic property of grain boundaries as neutral and unsaturable sinks for both vacancies and self-interstitial atoms. The phenomenon had already been investigated in the 1970s and it was demonstrated that the grain-size-dependent v...

  13. The Size Distribution of Desert Dust and Its Impact on the Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahowald, N. M.; Albani, S.; Kok, J. F.; Engelstaedter, S.; Scanza, R.; Ward, D. S.; Flanner, M.

    2014-12-01

    The global cycle of desert dust aerosols responds strongly to climate and human perturbations, and, in turn, impacts climate and biogeochemistry. Here we focus on desert dust size distributions, how these are characterized, emitted from the surface, evolve in the atmosphere, and impact climate and biogeochemistry. Observations, theory and global model results are synthesized to highlight the evolution and impact of dust sizes. Individual particles sizes are, to a large extent, set by the soil properties and the mobilization process. The lifetime of different particle sizes controls the evolution of the size distribution as the particles move downwind, as larger particles fall out more quickly. The dust size distribution strongly controls the radiative impact of the aerosols, as well as their interactions with clouds. The size of particles controls how far downwind they travel, and thus their ability to impact biogeochemistry downwind of the source region.

  14. The size distribution of desert dust aerosols and its impact on the Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahowald, Natalie; Albani, Samuel; Kok, Jasper F.; Engelstaeder, Sebastian; Scanza, Rachel; Ward, Daniel S.; Flanner, Mark G.

    2014-12-01

    The global cycle of desert dust aerosols responds strongly to climate and human perturbations, and, in turn, impacts climate and biogeochemistry. Here we focus on desert dust size distributions, how these are characterized, emitted from the surface, evolve in the atmosphere, and impact climate and biogeochemistry. Observations, theory and global model results are synthesized to highlight the evolution and impact of dust sizes. Individual particles sizes are, to a large extent, set by the soil properties and the mobilization process. The lifetime of different particle sizes controls the evolution of the size distribution as the particles move downwind, as larger particles fall out more quickly. The dust size distribution strongly controls the radiative impact of the aerosols, as well as their interactions with clouds. The size of particles controls how far downwind they travel, and thus their ability to impact biogeochemistry downwind of the source region.

  15. Oil refinery dusts: morphological and size analysis by TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sielicki, Przemyslaw; Janik, Helena; Guzman, Agnieszka [Gdansk University of Technology, Department of Polymer Technology, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk (Poland); Broniszewski, Mieczyslaw [Environmental Protection Office, Lotos Group, Gdansk (Poland); Namiesnik, Jacek [Gdansk University of Technology, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-03-15

    The objectives of this work were to develop a means of sampling atmospheric dusts on the premises of an oil refinery for electron microscopic study to carry out preliminary morphological analyses and to compare these dusts with those collected at sites beyond the refinery limits. Carbon and collodion membranes were used as a support for collection of dust particles straight on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Micrographs of the dust particles were taken at magnifications from x 4,000 to x 80,000 with a Tesla BS500 transmission electron microscope. Four parameters were defined on the basis of the micrographs: surface area, Feret diameter, circumference, and shape coefficient. The micrographs and literature data were used to classify the atmospheric dusts into six groups: particles with an irregular shape and rounded edges; particles with an irregular shape and sharp edges; soot and its aggregates; spherical particles; singly occurring, ultrafine dust particles; and particles not allocated to any of the previous five groups. The types of dusts found in all the samples were similar, although differences did exist between the various morphological parameters. Dust particles with the largest Feret diameter were present in sample 3 (mean, 0.739 {mu}m) - these were collected near the refinery's effluent treatment plant. The particles with the smallest diameter were found in the sample that had been intended to be a reference sample for the remaining results (mean, 0.326 {mu}m). The dust particles collected in the refinery had larger mean Feret diameters, even 100% larger, than those collected beyond it. Particles with diameters from 0.1 to 0.2 {mu}m made up the most numerous group in all the samples collected in the refinery. (orig.)

  16. The role of grain size in He bubble formation: Implications for swelling resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Atwani, O.; Nathaniel, J. E.; Leff, A. C.; Muntifering, B. R.; Baldwin, J. K.; Hattar, K.; Taheri, M. L.

    2017-02-01

    Nanocrystalline metals are postulated as radiation resistant materials due to their high defect and particle (e.g. Helium) sink density. Here, the performance of nanocrystalline iron films is investigated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) using He irradiation at 700 K. Automated crystal orientation mapping is used in concert with in-situ TEM to explore the role of grain orientation and grain boundary character on bubble density trends. Bubble density as a function of three key grain size regimes is demonstrated. While the overall trend revealed an increase in bubble density up to a saturation value, grains with areas ranging from 3000 to 7500 nm2 show a scattered distribution. An extrapolated swelling resistance based on bubble size and areal density indicated that grains with sizes less than 2000 nm2 possess the greatest apparent resistance. Moreover, denuded zones are found to be independent of grain size, grain orientation, and grain boundary misorientation angle.

  17. Grain boundary character distributions of coincidence site lattice boundaries in WC-Co composites with different WC grain sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Xiaokun, E-mail: yuanxiaokun@bjut.edu.cn

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •GBCDs of two kinds of CSL boundaries in cemented carbides are examined. •Carbide mean grain size is determinant in controlling the populations of CSL boundaries. •Rapid decrease of sigma2 boundaries occurs at higher speed than the coarsening of carbide grains. -- Abstract: The grain boundary character distributions of sigma2 and sigma13 boundaries were investigated in cemented carbide samples with different carbide grain sizes. Samples were prepared with average carbide grain sizes of about 0.5 μm, 1 μm and 2 μm, respectively. The electron backscattered diffraction measurements show that with the increase of the carbide grain size, populations of both sigma2 and sigma13 boundaries decrease; in the meantime, the sigma2 twist and sigma13 twist boundaries keep as the most common boundary types. The results suggest that the carbide grain size could be determinant in controlling the populations of coincidence site lattice boundaries in WC-Co composites.

  18. Implications of Grain Size Evolution for the Effective Stress Exponent in Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behn, M. D.; Goldsby, D. L.; Hirth, G.

    2016-12-01

    Viscous flow in ice has typically been described by the Glen law—a non-Newtonian, power-law relationship between stress and strain-rate with a stress exponent n 3. The Glen law is attributed to grain-size-insensitive dislocation creep; however, laboratory and field studies demonstrate that deformation in ice is strongly dependent on grain size. This has led to the hypothesis that at sufficiently low stresses, ice flow is controlled by grain boundary sliding [1], which explicitly incorporates the grain-size dependence of ice rheology. Yet, neither dislocation creep (n 4), nor grain boundary sliding (n 1.8), have stress exponents that match the value of n 3 for the Glen law. Thus, although the Glen law provides an approximate description of ice flow in glaciers and ice sheets, its functional form cannot be explained by a single deformation mechanism. Here we seek to understand the origin of the n 3 dependence of the Glen law through a new model for grain-size evolution in ice. In our model, grain size evolves in response to the balance between dynamic recrystallization and grain growth. To simulate these processes we adapt the "wattmeter" [2], originally developed within the solid-Earth community to quantify grain size in crustal and mantle rocks. The wattmeter posits that grain size is controlled by a balance between the mechanical work required for grain growth and dynamic grain size reduction. The evolution of grain size in turn controls the relative contributions of dislocation creep and grain boundary sliding, and thus the effective stress exponent for ice flow. Using this approach, we first benchmark our grain size evolution model on experimental data and then calculate grain size in two end-member scenarios: (1) as a function of depth within an ice-sheet, and (2) across an ice-stream margin. We show that the calculated grain sizes match ice core observations for the interior of ice sheets. Furthermore, owing to the influence of grain size on strain rate, the

  19. Grain size effect of monolayer MoS2 transistors characterized by second harmonic generation mapping

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Chih-Pin

    2015-08-27

    We investigated different CVD-synthesized MoS2 films, aiming to correlate the device characteristics with the grain size. The grain size of MoS2 can be precisely characterized through nondestructive second harmonic generation mapping based on the degree of inversion symmetry. The devices with larger grains at the channel region show improved on/off current ratio, which can be explained by the less carrier scattering caused by the grain boundaries.

  20. A very long baseline search for correlated air showers from relativistic dust grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.L.; Rawat, H.S.; Razdan, H.; Sapru, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Two small air-shower arrays (threshold primary energy approx. 10 14 eV) have been operated simultaneously at the mountain stations of Gulmarg and Ootacammund, spaced approx. 2500 km apart. Data collected over 1076 h of overlapping observations have been searched for coincident events on time scales between 1 ms and 1 s and for time-correlated rate enhancements of duration 1, 10 and 60 s. None of these events occurred within +- 15 min of the six cosmic gamma-ray bursts recorded during the corresponding period (1 December 1980 to 28 January 1981) by the Pioneer-Venus mission. The results are discussed in terms of the model for the emission of relativistic dust grains from pulsars proposed by previous authors. (author)

  1. Creation of fully vectorized FORTRAN code for integrating the movement of dust grains in interplanetary environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquitt, W.

    1989-07-01

    The main objective is to improve the performance of a specific FORTRAN computer code from the Planetary Sciences Division of NASA/Johnson Space Center when used on a modern vectorizing supercomputer. The code is used to calculate orbits of dust grains that separate from comets and asteroids. This code accounts for influences of the sun and 8 planets (neglecting Pluto), solar wind, and solar light pressure including Poynting-Robertson drag. Calculations allow one to study the motion of these particles as they are influenced by the Earth or one of the other planets. Some of these particles become trapped just beyond the Earth for long periods of time. These integer period resonances vary from 3 orbits of the Earth and 2 orbits of the particles to as high as 14 to 13

  2. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Ian D. R.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mckay, David S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides.

  3. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Rietmeijer, F.J.M.; Mckay, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides

  4. Quantitative analysis of crystal/grain sizes and their distributions in 2D and 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver

    2011-01-01

    We review methods to estimate the average crystal (grain) size and the crystal (grain) size distribution in solid rocks. Average grain sizes often provide the base for stress estimates or rheological calculations requiring the quantification of grain sizes in a rock’s microstructure. The primary...... data for grain size data are either 1D (i.e. line intercept methods), 2D (area analysis) or 3D (e.g., computed tomography, serial sectioning). These data have been used for different data treatments over the years, whereas several studies assume a certain probability function (e.g., logarithm, square......-piezometers or grain size sensitive flow laws. Such compatibility is tested for different data treatments using one- and two-dimensional measurements. We propose an empirical conversion matrix for different datasets. These conversion factors provide the option to make different datasets compatible with each other...

  5. Inverse Relationship of Marine Aerosol and Dust in Antarctic Ice with Fine-Grained Sediment in the South Atlantic Ocean: Implications for Sea-Ice Coverage and Wind Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Kanfoush

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This research seeks to test the hypothesis that natural gamma radiation (NGR from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1094, which displays variability over the last glacial-interglacial cycle similar to dust in the Vostok ice core, reflects fine-grained terrigenous sediment delivered by eolian processes. Grain size was measured on 400 samples spanning 0–20 m in a composite core. Accumulation of the <63μ size fraction at Site 1094 and dust in Vostok exhibit a negative correlation, suggesting the fine sediments are not dominantly eolian. However the technique used for grain size measurements cannot distinguish between terrigenous and biogenous materials; therefore it is possible much fine-grained material is diatoms. An inverse correlation between fine sediments and NGR supports this interpretation, and implies terrigenous materials were at times diluted by microfossils from high biological productivity. Fine marine sediments correlate positively with temperature and negatively with marine aerosol Na+ in Vostok. One plausible explanation is extensive sea-ice of cold intervals steepened ocean-continent temperature gradients, intensified winds, and led to increased transport of dust and marine aerosol to Antarctica yet also reduced biological productivity at Site 1094. Such a reduction despite increases in NGR, potentially representing Fe-rich dust influx, would require light limitation or stratification associated with sea-ice.

  6. On the role of the grain size in the magnetic behavior of sintered permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiadis, K. G.; Ntallis, N.

    2018-02-01

    In this work the finite elements method is used to simulate, by micromagnetic modeling, the magnetic behavior of sintered anisotropic magnets. Hysteresis loops were simulated for different grain sizes in an oriented multigrain sample. By keeping out other parameters that contribute to the magnetic microstructure, such as the sample size, the grain morphology and the grain boundaries mismatch, it has been found that the grain size affects the magnetic properties only if the grains are exchange-decoupled. In this case, as the grain size decreases, a decrease in the nucleation field of a reverse magnetic domain is observed and an increase in the coercive field due to the pinning of the magnetic domain walls at the grain boundaries.

  7. The grain-size lineup: A test of a novel eyewitness identification procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horry, Ruth; Brewer, Neil; Weber, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    When making a memorial judgment, respondents can regulate their accuracy by adjusting the precision, or grain size, of their responses. In many circumstances, coarse-grained responses are less informative, but more likely to be accurate, than fine-grained responses. This study describes a novel eyewitness identification procedure, the grain-size lineup, in which participants eliminated any number of individuals from the lineup, creating a choice set of variable size. A decision was considered to be fine-grained if no more than 1 individual was left in the choice set or coarse-grained if more than 1 individual was left in the choice set. Participants (N = 384) watched 2 high-quality or low-quality videotaped mock crimes and then completed 4 standard simultaneous lineups or 4 grain-size lineups (2 target-present and 2 target-absent). There was some evidence of strategic regulation of grain size, as the most difficult lineup was associated with a greater proportion of coarse-grained responses than the other lineups. However, the grain-size lineup did not outperform the standard simultaneous lineup. Fine-grained suspect identifications were no more diagnostic than suspect identifications from standard lineups, whereas coarse-grained suspect identifications carried little probative value. Participants were generally reluctant to provide coarse-grained responses, which may have hampered the utility of the procedure. For a grain-size approach to be useful, participants may need to be trained or instructed to use the coarse-grained option effectively. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Impact of dust size parameterizations on aerosol burden and radiative forcing in RegCM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikerdekis, Athanasios; Zanis, Prodromos; Steiner, Allison L.; Solmon, Fabien; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marinou, Eleni; Katragkou, Eleni; Karacostas, Theodoros; Foret, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of aerosol representation in the regional climate model RegCM4 for two dust parameterizations for the period 2007-2014 over the Sahara and the Mediterranean. We apply two discretization methods of the dust size distribution keeping the total mass constant: (1) the default RegCM4 4-bin approach, where the size range of each bin is calculated using an equal, logarithmic separation of the total size range of dust, using the diameter of dust particles, and (2) a newly implemented 12-bin approach with each bin defined according to an isogradient method where the size ranges are dependent on the dry deposition velocity of dust particles. Increasing the number of transported dust size bins theoretically improves the representation of the physical properties of dust particles within the same size bin. Thus, more size bins improve the simulation of atmospheric processes. The radiative effects of dust over the area are discussed and evaluated with the CALIPSO dust optical depth (DOD). This study is among the first studies evaluating the vertical profile of simulated dust with a pure dust product. Reanalysis winds from ERA-Interim and the total precipitation flux from the Climate Research Unit (CRU) observational gridded database are used to evaluate and explain the discrepancies between model and observations. The new dust binning approach increases the dust column burden by 4 and 3 % for fine and coarse particles, respectively, which increases DOD by 10 % over the desert and the Mediterranean. Consequently, negative shortwave radiative forcing (RF) is enhanced by more than 10 % at the top of the atmosphere and by 1 to 5 % on the surface. Positive longwave RF locally increases by more than 0.1 W m-2 in a large portion of the Sahara, the northern part of the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East. The four-bin isolog method is to some extent numerically efficient, nevertheless our work highlights that the simplified representation of the four

  9. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  10. Long range transport of fine grained sediments on Mars: Atmospheric dust loading, as inferred from Viking Lander imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, J. B.; Colburn, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    During the first Viking year, two global dust storms occurred and they contributed about 90% of the dust suspended in the Martian atmosphere on a global average, over the course of this year. The remainder was due to the cumulative effect of local dust storms. When globally distributed, the amount of suspended dust introduced into the atmosphere this Martian year was about 5x10(-3) g/sq cm. This mass loading was derived from the incremental optical depths measured over this year and estimates of the mean size of the dust particles (2.5 microns). During the second Martian year, global dust storms were far more muted than during the first year. No near perihelion dust storm occurred, and a somewhat weaker dust storm may have occurred near the start of the spring season in the Southern Hemisphere, at about the same time that the first global dust storm of the first year occurred. Thus, the dust loading derived for the first Martian year may be somewhat higher than the average over many Martian years, a conclusion that appears to be supported by preliminary studies of Martian years beyond the second Viking year on Mars.

  11. The effect of grain size and cement content on index properties of weakly solidified artificial sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atapour, Hadi; Mortazavi, Ali

    2018-04-01

    The effects of textural characteristics, especially grain size, on index properties of weakly solidified artificial sandstones are studied. For this purpose, a relatively large number of laboratory tests were carried out on artificial sandstones that were produced in the laboratory. The prepared samples represent fifteen sandstone types consisting of five different median grain sizes and three different cement contents. Indices rock properties including effective porosity, bulk density, point load strength index, and Schmidt hammer values (SHVs) were determined. Experimental results showed that the grain size has significant effects on index properties of weakly solidified sandstones. The porosity of samples is inversely related to the grain size and decreases linearly as grain size increases. While a direct relationship was observed between grain size and dry bulk density, as bulk density increased with increasing median grain size. Furthermore, it was observed that the point load strength index and SHV of samples increased as a result of grain size increase. These observations are indirectly related to the porosity decrease as a function of median grain size.

  12. Particle Size Distribution in Milled Sorghum Grains of Different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sorghum bicolor (L) Moench] coded V3, V6 and V8 was determined by sieve analysis. The moisture content of the grains ranged between 9.83 and 10.60%, wet weight basis. The milling was carried out on whole grains using a laboratory pin mill ...

  13. Dust evolution, a global view: III. Core/mantle grains, organic nano-globules, comets and surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A P

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), this work explores the surface processes and chemistry relating to core/mantle interstellar and cometary grain structures and their influence on the nature of these fascinating particles. It appears that a realistic consideration of the nature and chemical reactivity of interstellar grain surfaces could self-consistently and within a coherent framework explain: the anomalous oxygen depletion, the nature of the CO dark gas, the formation of 'polar ice' mantles, the red wing on the 3 μm water ice band, the basis for the O-rich chemistry observed in hot cores, the origin of organic nano-globules and the 3.2 μm 'carbonyl' absorption band observed in comet reflectance spectra. It is proposed that the reaction of gas phase species with carbonaceous a-C(:H) grain surfaces in the interstellar medium, in particular the incorporation of atomic oxygen into grain surfaces in epoxide functional groups, is the key to explaining these observations. Thus, the chemistry of cosmic dust is much more intimately related with that of the interstellar gas than has previously been considered. The current models for interstellar gas and dust chemistry will therefore most likely need to be fundamentally modified to include these new grain surface processes.

  14. eblur/dust: a modular python approach for dust extinction and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-03-01

    I will present a library of python codes -- github.com/eblur/dust -- which calculate dust scattering and extinction properties from the IR to the X-ray. The modular interface allows for custom defined dust grain size distributions, optical constants, and scattering physics. These codes are currently undergoing a major overhaul to include multiple scattering effects, parallel processing, parameterized grain size distributions beyond power law, and optical constants for different grain compositions. I use eblur/dust primarily to study dust scattering images in the X-ray, but they may be extended to applications at other wavelengths.

  15. Solid Particle Erosion of Nanocrystalline Nickel Coatings: Influence of Grain Size and Adiabatic Shear Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasekar, Nitin P.; Haridoss, Prathap; Sundararajan, G.

    2018-02-01

    The primary objective of the present study is to investigate the influence of nanocrystalline grain size on the solid particle erosion behavior of nickel. For the above purpose, 450- μm-thick nanocrystalline Ni coatings having the average grain sizes of 21, 42, 70, and 195 nm were obtained using pulsed electrodeposition (PED). All these samples along with bulk annealed Ni samples (43 μm grain size) were subjected to solid particle erosion using SiO2 particles as an erodent at a constant impact velocity of 45 m/s and two impact angles (30 and 90 deg). Erosion results indicate that bulk Ni and PED Ni coatings of grain sizes 195 and 70 nm exhibit the same erosion rate, while PED Ni coatings of 42 and 21 nm grain size exhibit marginally higher erosion rates with a clear trend of increasing erosion rate with decreasing grain size. It was also observed that the higher erosion rates exhibited by 21- and 42-nm-grain size PED Ni samples were associated with the formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) originating from the eroded surface and propagating into the eroded sample. The experimental observations have been understood on the basis of a transition from a localization model for erosion for coarse-grained Ni (> 70 nm) to an ASB-induced erosion model for grain sizes less than 70 nm.

  16. The Effect of Grain Size on the Strain Hardening Behavior for Extruded ZK61 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Wencong; Chen, Wenzhen; Duan, Junpeng; Wang, Wenke; Wang, Erde

    2017-12-01

    The effects of grain size on the tensile and compressive strain hardening behaviors for extruded ZK61 alloys have been investigated by uniaxial tensile and compressive tests along the extrusion directions. Cylindrical tension and compression specimens of extruded ZK61 alloys with various sized grain were fabricated by annealing treatments. Tensile and compressive tests at ambient temperature were conducted at a strain rate of 0.5 × 10-3 s-1. The results indicate that both tensile strain hardening and compressive strain hardening of ZK61 alloys with different grain sizes have an athermal regime of dislocation accumulation in early deformation. The threshold stress value caused dynamic recovery is predominantly related to grain size in tensile strain hardening, but the threshold stress values for different grain sizes are almost identical in compressive strain hardening. There are obvious transition points on the tensile strain hardening curves which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX). The tensile strain hardening rate of the coarse-grained alloy obviously decreases faster than that of fine-grained alloys before DRX and the tensile strain hardening curves of different grain sizes basically tend to parallel after DRX. The compressive strain hardening rate of the fine-grained alloy obviously increases faster than that of coarse-grained alloy for twin-induced strain hardening, but compressive strain hardening curves also tend to parallel after twinning is exhausted.

  17. Use of fine-grained shredder dust as a cement admixture after a melting, rapid-cooling and pulverizing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakimoto, Kohji; Nakano, Yasuko; Yamasaki, Takehiro; Shimizu, Keisuke; Idemitsu, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Shredder dust is a residue, which is removed from valuable ferrous metals found in scrap automobile and electronic waste. It is also an industrial waste byproduct which, under legislation in place since April 1996, must be disposed of in landfill sites. One method of disposing shredder dust is by scorification, however, this is a costly process and therefore impractical. Costs could be reduced if the shredder dust had a valuable use, and, in this paper, the authors examine its effectiveness as a cement admixture. First, molten shredder dust was crushed for use as a cement admixture. However, it was difficult to crush it completely because metallic grains were mixed in with molten shredder dust. These particles were removed by sifting and the molten shredder dust was crushed once again. Eventually, a fine 75 μm and less powder type of slag was obtained. This slag was mixed with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) to form a cement mortar and subsequently a mortar test was conducted. From the test results, it was found that the long-term strength of the cement did not deteriorate even when it included 30% by weight of the pulverized molten shredder dust

  18. Use of fine-grained shredder dust as a cement admixture after a melting, rapid-cooling and pulverizing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, K. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Applied Chemistry; Nakano, Y. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School, Department of Engineering; Yamasaki, T.; Shimuzu, K.; Idemitsu, T. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukyoka (Japan). Department of Civil Engineering

    2004-12-01

    Shredder dust is a residue, which is removed from valuable ferrous metals found in scrap automobile and electronic waste. It is also an industrial waste byproduct which, under legislation in place since April 1996, must be disposed of in landfill sites. One method of disposing shredder dust is by scorification, however, this is a costly process and therefore impractical. Costs could be reduced if the shredder dust had a valuable use, and, in this paper, the authors examine its effectiveness as a cement admixture. First, molten shredder dust was crushed for use as a cement admixture. However, it was difficult to crush it completely because metallic grains were mixed in with molten shredder dust. These particles were removed by sifting and the molten shredder dust was crushed once again. Eventually, a fine 75 {mu}m and less powder type of slag was obtained. This slag was mixed with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) to form a cement mortar and subsequently a mortar test was conducted. From the test results, it was found that the long-term strength of the cement did not deteriorate even when it included 30% by weight of the pulverized molten shredder dust. (author)

  19. Particle size and metals concentrations of dust from a paint manufacturing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Siew Lai; Yin, Chun-Yang; Yap, Siaw Yang

    2010-02-15

    In this study, the particle size distribution and concentration of metallic elements of solvent- and water-based paint dust from bulk dust collected from dust-collecting hoppers were determined. The mean particle size diameter over a 12-week sampling period was determined using a particle size analyzer. The metals composition and concentration of the dust were determined via acid digestion technique followed by concentration analysis using inductively coupled plasma. The volume weighted mean particle diameters were found to be 0.941+/-0.016 and 8.185+/-0.201 microm for solvent- and water-based paint dust, respectively. The mean concentrations of metals in solvent-based paint dust were found to be 100+/-20.00 microg/g (arsenic), 1550+/-550.00 microg/g (copper), 15,680+/-11,780.00 microg/g (lead) and 30,460+/-10,580.00 microg/g (zinc) while the mean concentrations of metals in water-based paint dust were found to be 20.65+/-6.11 microg/g (arsenic), 9.14+/-14.65 microg/g (copper), 57.46+/-22.42 microg/g (lead) and 1660+/-1260 microg/g (zinc). Both paint dust types could be considered as hazardous since almost all of the dust particles were smaller than 10 microm. Particular emphasis on containment of solvent-based paint dust particles should be given since it was shown that they were very fine in size (<1 microm) and had high lead and zinc concentrations.

  20. Sediment grain size and hydrodynamics in Mediterranean coastal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Other freshwater ..... Cattle farm and aquaculture discharges: confinement. Varano. 1. 9. Medium- to fine-grained sand (150 µm) ..... Comparison of human impact across lagoons is hindered by high-scale variability of hydrographi- cal and ...

  1. Annually resolved Holocene record of dust deposition and size distribution from the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, A.; Koffman, B. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Osterberg, E. C.; Winski, D.; Ferris, D. G.; Cole-Dai, J.; Wells, M. L.; Handley, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ice cores offer insights into past changes in atmospheric composition and circulation at high temporal resolution. Dust particles preserved in ice cores provide information regarding the atmospheric burden of dust and associated trace elements, changes in atmospheric circulation, and variations in the climates of dust-producing regions. Well resolved ice core dust records, therefore, can be used to gain a better understanding of the dynamics affecting ocean overturning circulation, to constrain atmospheric nutrient deposition to ocean ecosystems, and to assess atmospheric albedo variations. Existing Antarctic ice core dust records are generally either low-resolution and long-duration (glacial/interglacial timescale), or high-resolution and short-duration (past 2400 years), but high-resolution and long-duration records are rare. Here we present a continuous high-resolution record of dust deposition, including particle size distribution (PSD) and concentration, from the South Pole Ice (SPICE) Core, the first Holocene dust record from this location. The SPICE core was drilled during 2014-2016, reaching a depth of 1751 m. Cores were melted and analyzed for particles (1.0-12 µm diameter) using a continuous-flow Abakus laser particle sensor at Dartmouth College. The current SPICE Core chronology is based on: 1) visual stratigraphy from 0-10.2 ka and 2) correlations to the IceCube dust log calibration beyond 10.2 ka. Annual layer counts of Mg, dust (1.0 µm and 2.4 µm), Na, and SO4 demonstrate that the dust record is annually resolved through most of the Holocene ( 10.3 ka), allowing us to assess dust/climate relationships at high temporal resolution. We use meteorological and reanalysis data to understand modern drivers of observed variability in particle concentration and size distribution, and compare the new SPICE dust record to available Antarctic dust records including from EPICA Dome C, WAIS Divide, Taylor Dome, Taylor Glacier, Talos Dome, Siple Dome, and EPICA

  2. Grain size dependence of coercivity of sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Weizhong; Zhou Shouzeng; Hu Bing

    1991-01-01

    The grain size dependence of intrinsic coercivity H c of sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets is investigated. It is confirmed that small grain sizes are connected with high Hc values, and that for magnets with different grain sizes, their coercivity can be expressed by the formula μ 0 H c =N c (kμ 0 H A -N i I s ), where H A and I s denote the magnetic anisotropy field and spontaneous magnetization of the hard magnetic Nd 2 Fe 14 B phase, respectively, and k and N i are thought to be two constants related to the perfectness and the demagnetization field of isolated grains, and N e a parameter inversely changing with the grain size. It is suggested that in analyzing the coercivity mechanism of the Nd-Fe-B magnets, the effect of magnetic interactions between individual magnetic grains should also be considered. (orig.)

  3. Analysis of "Midnight" Tracks in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector: Possible Discovery of a Contemporary Interstellar Dust Grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajit, S.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; hide

    2010-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2) day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques.

  4. Grain size mapping in shallow rivers using spectral information: a lab spectroradiometry perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroumand-Jadidi, Milad; Vitti, Alfonso

    2017-10-01

    Every individual attribute of a riverine environment defines the overall spectral signature to be observed by an optical sensor. The spectral characteristic of riverbed is influenced not only by the type but also the roughness of substrates. Motivated by this assumption, potential of optical imagery for mapping grain size of shallow rivers (channel. To address these drawbacks, this study examines the effectiveness of spectral information to make distinction among grain sizes for submerged substrates. Spectroscopic experiments are performed in controlled condition of a hydraulic lab. The spectra are collected over a water flume in a range of water depths and bottoms with several grain sizes. A spectral convolution is performed to match the spectra to WorldView-2 spectral bands. The material type of substrates is considered the same for all the experiments with only variable roughness/size of grains. The spectra observed over dry beds revealed that the brightness/reflectance increases with the grain size across all the spectral bands. Based on this finding, the above-water spectra over a river channel are simulated considering different grain sizes in the bottom. A water column correction method is then used to retrieve the bottom reflectances. Then the inferred bottom reflectances are clustered to segregate among grain sizes. The results indicate high potential of the spectral approach for clustering grain sizes (overall accuracy of 92%) which opens up some horizons for mapping this valuable attribute of rivers using remotely sensed data.

  5. grain size and heat source effect on the drying profile of cocoa bean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    L x W x H and one electric bulb with 100,200,300 and 400watts rating hoisted in each box interchangeably. Cocoa bean cleaned and sorted into four different grain sizes samples four different grain sizes samples (A, B, C, D) was subjected to drying till 13 subjected to drying till 13 subjected to drying till 13-14% moisture co.

  6. Eyewitness Recall: Regulation of Grain Size and the Role of Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nathan; Brewer, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Eyewitness testimony plays a critical role in Western legal systems. Three experiments extended M. Goldsmith, A. Koriat, and A. Weinberg-Eliezer's (2002) framework of the regulation of grain size (precision vs. coarseness) of memory reports to eyewitness memory. In 2 experiments, the grain size of responses had a large impact on memory accuracy.…

  7. Estimation of grain sizes and mixing ratios of fine powder mixtures of common geologic minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Takahiro; Pieters, Carle M.

    1994-01-01

    Two different approaches for modeling reflectance spectra of intimate mixtures, Hapke's model and the isograin model, are used to estimate grain sizes and mixing ratios of powder mixtures of three geologic minerals: olivine, orthopyroxene, and plagioclase. In Hapke's model, scattering and extinction effiencies are mixed separately, and both models employ semiempirical refractive index spectra for component minerals. Mixing ratios of mixtures of grain size 45-75 micrometers are well estimated by both models assuming a common grain size of 60 micrometers and optimizing the constants for the single-particle scattering. For each model, effective grain size ratios for mineral constituents in mixtures of grain size less than 25 micrometers, are derived successfully that allows mineral abundances to be accurately predicted within approximately 4 wt percent. On the other hand, neither model can accurately predict mineral reflectance spectra for its smaller grain sizes less than 25 and 25-45 micrometers using an absorption coefficient spectrum derived from a larger grain size (45-75 micrometers). The errors in both models are significantly reduced if surface roughness effects of the smaller grain-size fractions are modeled.

  8. The importance of grain size to mantle dynamics and seismological observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmoeller, R.; Dannberg, J.; Eilon, Z.; Faul, U.; Moulik, P.; Myhill, R.

    2017-12-01

    Grain size plays a key role in controlling the mechanical properties of the Earth's mantle, affecting both long-timescale flow patterns and anelasticity on the timescales of seismic wave propagation. However, dynamic models of Earth's convecting mantle usually implement flow laws with constant grain size, stress-independent viscosity, and a limited treatment of changes in mineral assemblage. We study grain size evolution, its interplay with stress and strain rate in the convecting mantle, and its influence on seismic velocities and attenuation. Our geodynamic models include the simultaneous and competing effects of dynamic recrystallization resulting from dislocation creep, grain growth in multiphase assemblages, and recrystallization at phase transitions. They show that grain size evolution drastically affects the dynamics of mantle convection and the rheology of the mantle, leading to lateral viscosity variations of six orders of magnitude due to grain size alone, and controlling the shape of upwellings and downwellings. Using laboratory-derived scaling relationships, we convert model output to seismologically-observable parameters (velocity, attenuation) facilitating comparison to Earth structure. Reproducing the fundamental features of the Earth's attenuation profile requires reduced activation volume and relaxed shear moduli in the lower mantle compared to the upper mantle, in agreement with geodynamic constraints. Faster lower mantle grain growth yields best fit to seismic observations, consistent with our re-examination of high pressure grain growth parameters. We also show that ignoring grain size in interpretations of seismic anomalies may underestimate the Earth's true temperature variations.

  9. Tungsten Carbide Grain Size Computation for WC-Co Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dongran; Cui, Haichao; Xu, Peiquan; Lu, Fenggui

    2016-06-01

    A "two-step" image processing method based on electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy was used to compute the tungsten carbide (WC) grain size distribution for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds and laser welds. Twenty-four images were collected on randomly set fields per sample located at the top, middle, and bottom of a cross-sectional micrograph. Each field contained 500 to 1500 WC grains. The images were recognized through clustering-based image segmentation and WC grain growth recognition. According to the WC grain size computation and experiments, a simple WC-WC interaction model was developed to explain the WC dissolution, grain growth, and aggregation in welded joints. The WC-WC interaction and blunt corners were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The WC grain size distribution and the effects of heat input E on grain size distribution for the laser samples were discussed. The results indicate that (1) the grain size distribution follows a Gaussian distribution. Grain sizes at the top of the weld were larger than those near the middle and weld root because of power attenuation. (2) Significant WC grain growth occurred during welding as observed in the as-welded micrographs. The average grain size was 11.47 μm in the TIG samples, which was much larger than that in base metal 1 (BM1 2.13 μm). The grain size distribution curves for the TIG samples revealed a broad particle size distribution without fine grains. The average grain size (1.59 μm) in laser samples was larger than that in base metal 2 (BM2 1.01 μm). (3) WC-WC interaction exhibited complex plane, edge, and blunt corner characteristics during grain growth. A WC ( { 1 {bar{{1}}}00} ) to WC ( {0 1 1 {bar{{0}}}} ) edge disappeared and became a blunt plane WC ( { 10 1 {bar{{0}}}} ) , several grains with two- or three-sided planes and edges disappeared into a multi-edge, and a WC-WC merged.

  10. Algorithm for repairing the damaged images of grain structures obtained from the cellular automata and measurement of grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-López, A.; Romero-Romo, M. A.; Muñoz-Negron, D.; López-Ramírez, S.; Escarela-Pérez, R.; Duran-Valencia, C.

    2012-10-01

    Computational models are developed to create grain structures using mathematical algorithms based on the chaos theory such as cellular automaton, geometrical models, fractals, and stochastic methods. Because of the chaotic nature of grain structures, some of the most popular routines are based on the Monte Carlo method, statistical distributions, and random walk methods, which can be easily programmed and included in nested loops. Nevertheless, grain structures are not well defined as the results of computational errors and numerical inconsistencies on mathematical methods. Due to the finite definition of numbers or the numerical restrictions during the simulation of solidification, damaged images appear on the screen. These images must be repaired to obtain a good measurement of grain geometrical properties. Some mathematical algorithms were developed to repair, measure, and characterize grain structures obtained from cellular automata in the present work. An appropriate measurement of grain size and the corrected identification of interfaces and length are very important topics in materials science because they are the representation and validation of mathematical models with real samples. As a result, the developed algorithms are tested and proved to be appropriate and efficient to eliminate the errors and characterize the grain structures.

  11. Preparation of bimodal grain size 7075 aviation aluminum alloys and their corrosion properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming TIAN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The bimodal grain size metals show improved strength and ductility compared to traditional metals; however, their corrosion properties are unknown. In order to evaluate the corrosion properties of these metals, the bimodal grain size 7075 aviation aluminum alloys containing different ratios of coarse (100 μm in diameter and fine (10 μm in diameter grains were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS. The effects of grain size as well as the mixture degree of coarse and fine grains on general corrosion were estimated by immersion tests, electrochemical measurements and complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope-energy disperse spectroscopy (TEM-EDS. The results show that, compared to fine grains, the coarse grains have a faster dissolution rate in acidic NaCl solution due to the bigger size, higher alloying elements content and larger area fraction of second phases in them. In coarse grains, the hydrogen ions have a faster reduction rate on cathodic second phases, therefore promoting the corrosion propagation. The mixture of coarse and fine grains also increases the electrochemical heterogeneity of alloys in micro-scale, and thus the increased mixture degree of these grains in metal matrix accelerates the corrosion rate of alloys in acidic NaCl solution.

  12. Effect of freeze-thaw cycling on grain size of biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon; Masiello, Caroline A; Wahab, Leila M; Gonnermann, Helge M; Nittrouer, Jeffrey A

    2018-01-01

    Biochar may improve soil hydrology by altering soil porosity, density, hydraulic conductivity, and water-holding capacity. These properties are associated with the grain size distributions of both soil and biochar, and therefore may change as biochar weathers. Here we report how freeze-thaw (F-T) cycling impacts the grain size of pine, mesquite, miscanthus, and sewage waste biochars under two drainage conditions: undrained (all biochars) and a gravity-drained experiment (mesquite biochar only). In the undrained experiment plant biochars showed a decrease in median grain size and a change in grain-size distribution consistent with the flaking off of thin layers from the biochar surface. Biochar grain size distribution changed from unimodal to bimodal, with lower peaks and wider distributions. For plant biochars the median grain size decreased by up to 45.8% and the grain aspect ratio increased by up to 22.4% after 20 F-T cycles. F-T cycling did not change the grain size or aspect ratio of sewage waste biochar. We also observed changes in the skeletal density of biochars (maximum increase of 1.3%), envelope density (maximum decrease of 12.2%), and intraporosity (porosity inside particles, maximum increase of 3.2%). In the drained experiment, mesquite biochar exhibited a decrease of median grain size (up to 4.2%) and no change of aspect ratio after 10 F-T cycles. We also document a positive relationship between grain size decrease and initial water content, suggesting that, biochar properties that increase water content, like high intraporosity and pore connectivity large intrapores, and hydrophilicity, combined with undrained conditions and frequent F-T cycles may increase biochar breakdown. The observed changes in biochar particle size and shape can be expected to alter hydrologic properties, and thus may impact both plant growth and the hydrologic cycle.

  13. Grain-size dependent accommodation due to intragranular distributions of dislocation loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richeton, T.; Berbenni, S.; Berveiller, M.

    2009-01-01

    A grain-size dependent accommodation law for polycrystals is deduced from an inclusion/matrix problem (i.e., each grain is seen as embedded in a homogeneous equivalent medium) where plastic strain inside the inclusion is given as a discrete distribution of circular coaxial glide dislocation loops. The loops are assumed constrained at spherical grain boundaries. From thermodynamic considerations specific to a process of identical plastification in all the loops (considered as 'super-dislocations'), an average back-stress over the grain is derived. In order to compute the very early stages of plastic deformation in a face-centred cubic polycrystal, this back-stress is incorporated into a diluted model in terms of concentration of plastic grains. Contrary to conventional mean-field approaches, a grain-size effect is obtained for the initial overall strain-hardening behaviour. This size effect results from an intrinsic contribution of intragranular slip heterogeneities on the kinematical hardening

  14. The effects of surface finish and grain size on the strength of sintered silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y. H.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, J. G.; Kim, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of surface treatment and microstructure, especially abnormal grain growth, on the strength of sintered SiC were studied. The surfaces of sintered SiC were treated with 400, 800 and 1200 grit diamond wheels. Grain growth was induced by increasing the sintering times at 2050 C. The beta to alpha transformation occurred during the sintering of beta-phase starting materials and was often accompanied by abnormal grain growth. The overall strength distributions were established using Weibull statistics. The strength of the sintered SiC is limited by extrinsic surface flaws in normal-sintered specimens. The finer the surface finish and grain size, the higher the strength. But the strength of abnormal sintering specimens is limited by the abnormally grown large tabular grains. The Weibull modulus increases with decreasing grain size and decreasing grit size for grinding.

  15. A statistical mixture model for estimating the proportion of unreduced pollen grains in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) via the size of pollen grains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.C.; Nijs, A.P.M. den

    1993-01-01

    The size of pollen grains is commonly used to indicate the ploidy level of pollen grains. In this paper observations of the diameter of pollen grains are evaluated from one diploid accession of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), which was expected to produce diploid (unreduced) pollen grains in

  16. Nano-Sized Grain Refinement Using Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    based on plastic deformation have been developed for grain refinement in Mg alloys such as rolling, Equal Channel Angular Processing ( ECAP ) and Equal...Research Laboratory. Introduction Magnesium ( Mg ) alloys have been widely used for structural components in the automotive, aerospace and...electronics industry due to their low density, high strength to stiffness ratio, good damping capacity, diecastability and recycling. However Mg alloys

  17. Environmental monitoring of Columbia River sediments: Grain-size distribution and contaminant association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanton, M.L.; Gardiner, W.W.; Dirkes, R.L.

    1995-04-01

    Based on the results of this study and literature review, the following conclusions can be made: Sediment grain size and TOC (total organic carbon) influence contaminant fate and transport (in general, sediments with higher TOC content and finer grain-size distribution can have higher contaminant burdens than sediments from a given river section that have less TOC and greater amounts of coarse-grained sediments). Physiochemical sediment characteristics are highly variable among monitoring sites along the Columbia River. Sediment grain characterization and TOC analysis should be included in interpretations of sediment-monitoring data

  18. Particle size fractionation and human exposure of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in indoor dust from Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua; Turyk, Mary; Cali, Salvatore; Dorevitch, Samuel; Erdal, Serap; Li, An

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the concentration level, the mass distribution based on dust particle size, and the associated human exposure of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in indoor dust. The total concentration of 13 PBDEs Sigma(13)(BDEs) was found to be 500-6,944 ng/g in indoor dusts, 4,000 ng/g in car interior dust, 260-300 ng/g in outdoor ambient air particles, 30 ng/g in carpet fibers, and as high as 0.5% in carpet padding. Selected dust samples were fractionated based on particle size, and over 80% of the Sigma(13)BDEs were associated with particles exposure of Americans to PBDEs via hand-to-mouth transfer of house dust was estimated under the central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure scenarios. The results suggest that ingestion of PBDE-laden house dust via hand-to-mouth contact is likely a significant exposure pathway, especially for children.

  19. Martensitic transformations in nanostructured nitinol: Finite element modeling of grain size and distribution effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hong-Sheng; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation, it was demonstra......A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation...... transformation are totally suppressed. Graded and localized distributions of grain sizes of nitinol were compared with nitinol samples with homogeneous grain size distribution. In the materials with localized region of small grains, it was observed that the martensite rich regions form first on the border...

  20. Grains size and shape dependence of luminescence efficiency of Lu2O3:Eu thin screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.E. Seferis

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to provide a comparative evaluation of luminescence efficiency of Lu2O3:Eu phosphors screens, in transmission mode, prepared with different grain shape and size, and manufactured by the sedimentation method. More specific, three screens were prepared with spherical grains of size 50 nm, 200 nm and 5 μm. Furthermore, two screens with rod-like shape grains and size of 500 nm and 1–8 μm. The behavior of Absolute Luminescence Efficiency (AE at low energy X-rays (50 kVp appeared to differ with the grains size and shape. Furthermore the rod-like grain screens appeared with reduced luminescence efficiency values.

  1. ON ESTIMATION AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING OF THE GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY THE SALTYKOV METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Gulbin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problem of validity of unfolding the grain size distribution with the back-substitution method. Due to the ill-conditioned nature of unfolding matrices, it is necessary to evaluate the accuracy and precision of parameter estimation and to verify the possibility of expected grain size distribution testing on the basis of intersection size histogram data. In order to review these questions, the computer modeling was used to compare size distributions obtained stereologically with those possessed by three-dimensional model aggregates of grains with a specified shape and random size. Results of simulations are reported and ways of improving the conventional stereological techniques are suggested. It is shown that new improvements in estimating and testing procedures enable grain size distributions to be unfolded more efficiently.

  2. Grain size effect on electrical resistivity of bulk nanograined Bi2Te3 material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Oleg; Maradudina, Oxana; Lyubushkin, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The bulk nanograined Bi 2 Te 3 material with various mean grain sizes changing from ~ 97 nm to ~ 51 nm was prepared by microwave assisted solvothermal method and hot pseudo-isostatic pressure. It was found that the specific electrical resistivity of the material increases as mean grain size decreases. Such kind of the grain effect on the resistivity can be attributed to enhanced electron scattering at the grain boundaries. The Mayadas–Shatzkes model was applied to explain experimental results. In this model the grain boundaries are regarded as potential barriers which have to be overcome by the electrons. The reflectivity R of the grain boundaries for the material under study was estimated to be equal to ~ 0.7. - Highlights: • The bulk nanograined Bi 2 Te 3 material with various mean grain sizes was prepared. • It was found that the electrical resistivity of the material increases as grain size decreases. • The Mayadas–Shatzkes model was applied to explain experimental results. • The reflectivity R of the grain boundaries was estimated to be equal to ~ 0.7

  3. The recrystallized grain size piezometer for quartz: An EBSD-based calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A. J.; Prior, D. J.; Stipp, M.; Kidder, S.

    2017-07-01

    We have reanalyzed samples previously used for a quartz recrystallized grain size paleopiezometer, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Recrystallized and relict grains are separated using their grain orientation spread, which acts as a measure of intragranular lattice distortion and a proxy for dislocation density. For EBSD maps made with a 1 μm step size, the piezometer relationship is D = 103.91 ± 0.41 • σ-1.41 ± 0.21 (for root-mean-square mean diameter values). We also present a "sliding resolution" piezometer relationship, D = 104.22 ± 0.51 • σ-1.59 ± 0.26, that combines 1 μm step size data at coarser grain sizes with 200 nm step size data at finer grain sizes. The sliding resolution piezometer more accurately estimates stress in fine-grained (<10 μm) samples. The two calibrations give results within 10% of each other for recrystallized grain sizes between 10 μm and 100 μm. Both piezometers match the original light optical microscopy quartz piezometer within error.

  4. Analysis of grain size in FePt films fabricated using remote plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskisson, D.; Zygridou, S.; Haigh, S. J.; Barton, C. W.; Nutter, P. W.; Thomson, T.

    2017-12-01

    Remote plasma sputtering (RPS) offers a high degree of control over the sputtering parameters used to deposit thin metallic films and has demonstrated a capability to control the media grain size distribution. Narrow grain size distributions remain a key requirement for future magnetic media. Here we report a comprehensive magnetometry, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study of how RPS affects the grain size distribution of continuous, non-segregated L10 FePt thin films. These provide a model medium for heat-assisted magnetic recording and more generally for spintronic devices such as magnetoresistive random access memory and spin torque oscillators, where very high perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy is required. Varying the target DC bias voltage, which in RPS can be tuned independently of the plasma generation, produces no meaningful, statistical change in average grain size, 6.5 ± 0.1 nm, for as-deposited, disordered FePt. Annealing at 800 °C creates the well-ordered L10 phase but results in an increased average grain size of 8.3-13.6 nm, and a significantly wider grain size distribution of 6.4-8.5 nm. These results show that whilst RPS is capable of producing well-ordered L10 FePt thin films, it does not offer an advantage in controlling the grain size of FePt, as reported in other thin film systems.

  5. The effect of grain size on dynamic tensile extrusion behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Leeju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE tests were conducted on coarse grained and ultrafine grained (UFG OFHC Cu, Interstitial free (IF Steel, and pure Ta. Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP of 16passes with Bc for Cu, IF Steel and 4 passes for Ta was employed to fabricated UFG materials. DTE tests were carried out by launching the sphere samples (Dia. 7.62 mm to the conical extrusion die at a speed of ∼500 m/sec. The fragmentation behavior of the soft-recovered fragments were examined and compared with each other. The DTE fragmentation behavior of CG and UFG was numerically simulated by the LS-DYNA FEM code.

  6. Fracture toughness of WWER Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with various grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivov, R.; Novikov, V.; Mikheev, E.; Fedotov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with grain sizes 13, 26, and 33 μm for WWER were investigated in the present work in order to determine crack formation and the fracture toughness.The investigation of crack formation in uranium oxide fuel pellets of the WWER-types showed that Young’s modulus and the microhardness of polycrystalline samples increase with increasing grain size, while the fracture toughness decreases. Characteristically, radial Palmqvist cracks form on the surface of uranium dioxide pellets for loads up to 1 kg. Transgranular propagation of cracks over distances several-fold larger than the length of the imprint diagonal is observed in pellets with large grains and small intragrain pores. Intergranular propagation of cracks along grain boundaries with branching occurs in pellets with small grains and low pore concentration on the grain boundaries. Blunting on large pores and at breaks in direction does not permit the cracks to reach a significant length

  7. Evaluation of Pure Aluminium Inoculated with Varying Grain Sizes of an Agro-waste based Inoculant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeyemi I. Olabisi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pure Aluminium and its alloy are widely utilized in Engineering and Industrial applications due to certain significant properties such as softness, ductility, corrosion resistance, and high electrical conductivity which it possesses. Addition of an agro-waste based grain refiner to the melt can alter the characteristics positively or negatively. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate the inoculating capability of an agro-waste based inoculant and the effect of adding varying sizes of its grains on some of the properties of pure aluminium after solidification. The beneficial outcome of this investigation would enhance the economic value of the selected agro-waste and also broaden the applications of aluminium in Engineering. The assessed properties include; microstructure, micro hardness, ductility, and tensile strength. The agro-waste used as the grain refiner is pulverised cocoa bean shells (CBS. Three sets of test samples were produced using dry sand moulding process, with each melt having a specified grain size of the inoculant added to it (150, 225 and 300microns respectively. Ladle inoculation method was adopted. The cast samples after solidification were machined to obtain various shapes/sizes for the different analysis. The microstructural examination showed that the mechanical properties are dependent on the matrix as the aluminium grains became more refined with increasing grain size of the inoculant. I.e. Due to increasing grain size of the inoculant, the micro hardness increased (56, 61, 72HB as the aluminium crystal size became finer. Meanwhile, the tensile strength (284, 251, 223N/mm2 and ductility (1.82, 0.91, 0.45%E decreased as grain size of the inoculant increased. The overall results showed that the used agro-waste based inoculant has the capability of refining the crystal size of pure aluminium as its grain size increases. This will make the resulting aluminium alloy applicable in areas where hardness is of

  8. The Relevance of Grain Dissection for Grain Size Reduction in Polar Ice: Insights from Numerical Models and Ice Core Microstructure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Steinbach

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The flow of ice depends on the properties of the aggregate of individual ice crystals, such as grain size or lattice orientation distributions. Therefore, an understanding of the processes controlling ice micro-dynamics is needed to ultimately develop a physically based macroscopic ice flow law. We investigated the relevance of the process of grain dissection as a grain-size-modifying process in natural ice. For that purpose, we performed numerical multi-process microstructure modeling and analyzed microstructure and crystallographic orientation maps from natural deep ice-core samples from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM project. Full crystallographic orientations measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD have been used together with c-axis orientations using an optical technique (Fabric Analyser. Grain dissection is a feature of strain-induced grain boundary migration. During grain dissection, grain boundaries bulge into a neighboring grain in an area of high dislocation energy and merge with the opposite grain boundary. This splits the high dislocation-energy grain into two parts, effectively decreasing the local grain size. Currently, grain size reduction in ice is thought to be achieved by either the progressive transformation from dislocation walls into new high-angle grain boundaries, called subgrain rotation or polygonisation, or bulging nucleation that is assisted by subgrain rotation. Both our time-resolved numerical modeling and NEEM ice core samples show that grain dissection is a common mechanism during ice deformation and can provide an efficient process to reduce grain sizes and counter-act dynamic grain-growth in addition to polygonisation or bulging nucleation. Thus, our results show that solely strain-induced boundary migration, in absence of subgrain rotation, can reduce grain sizes in polar ice, in particular if strain energy gradients are high. We describe the microstructural characteristics that can be

  9. Preliminary study of determination of UO2 grain size using X-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyana, T.; Sambodo, G. D.; Juanda, D.; Fatchatul, B.

    1998-01-01

    The determination of UO 2 grain size has accomplished using x-ray diffraction method. The UO 2 powder is obtained from sol-gel process. A copper target as radiation source in the x-ray diffractometer was used in this experiment with CμKα characteristic wavelength 1.54433 Angstrom. The result indicate that the UO 2 mean grain size on presintered (temperature 800 o C) has the value 456.8500 Angstrom and the UO 2 mean grain size on sintered (temperature 1700 o C) has value 651.4934 Angstrom

  10. Trends in Solidification Grain Size and Morphology for Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gockel, Joy; Sheridan, Luke; Narra, Sneha P.; Klingbeil, Nathan W.; Beuth, Jack

    2017-12-01

    Metal additive manufacturing (AM) is used for both prototyping and production of final parts. Therefore, there is a need to predict and control the microstructural size and morphology. Process mapping is an approach that represents AM process outcomes in terms of input variables. In this work, analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches are combined to provide a holistic view of trends in the solidification grain structure of Ti-6Al-4V across a wide range of AM process input variables. The thermal gradient is shown to vary significantly through the depth of the melt pool, which precludes development of fully equiaxed microstructure throughout the depth of the deposit within any practical range of AM process variables. A strategy for grain size control is demonstrated based on the relationship between melt pool size and grain size across multiple deposit geometries, and additional factors affecting grain size are discussed.

  11. Grain size effect on martensitic transformation behavior in Fe-Ni invar alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikawa, Yoshikazu [Metal Powder Manufacturing and Sales Division, Sanyo Special Steel Co., Ltd, 3007 Nakashima, Shikama-ku, Himeji 672-8677 (Japan); Terai, Tomoyuki; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the grain size effect on martensitic transformation behavior in Fe-30at.%Ni powder and ribbon specimens. The powder specimen with a particle size of 5 um does not show an athermal martensitic transformation but does show an isothermal martensitic transformation after an incubation time of about 10{sup 4} s at 205 K. On the other hand, the powder specimen with a particle size of 20 um shows an athermal martensitic transformation at 150 K. The value of M{sub s} is much lower than that of the single crystal and of bulk specimens. However, the M{sub s} temperature of a ribbon specimen with an average grain size of 15 um is found to be almost identical to that of the single crystal and of bulk specimens. Considering these results, the athermal martensitic transformation is suppressed by the decrease in particle size if grains do not have grain boundaries.

  12. Grain size effect on martensitic transformation behavior in Fe-Ni invar alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Yoshikazu; Terai, Tomoyuki; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the grain size effect on martensitic transformation behavior in Fe-30at.%Ni powder and ribbon specimens. The powder specimen with a particle size of 5 um does not show an athermal martensitic transformation but does show an isothermal martensitic transformation after an incubation time of about 104 s at 205 K. On the other hand, the powder specimen with a particle size of 20 um shows an athermal martensitic transformation at 150 K. The value of Ms is much lower than that of the single crystal and of bulk specimens. However, the Ms temperature of a ribbon specimen with an average grain size of 15 um is found to be almost identical to that of the single crystal and of bulk specimens. Considering these results, the athermal martensitic transformation is suppressed by the decrease in particle size if grains do not have grain boundaries.

  13. Grain size distribution and heat conductivity of copper processed by equal channel angular pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendelman, O.V.; Shapiro, M.; Estrin, Y.; Hellmig, R.J.; Lekhtmakher, S.

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of measurements of the grain size distribution function and the thermal conductivity of ultrafine-grained copper produced by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP), with special attention to the evolution of these quantities with the number of pressing cycles. To explain the experimental findings, the equilibrium grain size distribution function (GSDF) evolving during ECAP has been calculated on the basis of a simplified theoretical model. The model involves a single unknown physical parameter-the most probable grain size. With this parameter fitted to the experimental data the calculated GSDF fairly closely reproduces the experimental data. A model for thermal conductivity of ECAP processed copper has been proposed, which relates thermal conductivity to the GSDF parameters and the coefficient of electron reflection at grain boundaries

  14. Austenite Grain Size Estimtion from Chord Lengths of Logarithmic-Normal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian H.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Linear section of grains in polyhedral material microstructure is a system of chords. The mean length of chords is the linear grain size of the microstructure. For the prior austenite grains of low alloy structural steels, the chord length is a random variable of gamma- or logarithmic-normal distribution. The statistical grain size estimation belongs to the quantitative metallographic problems. The so-called point estimation is a well known procedure. The interval estimation (grain size confidence interval for the gamma distribution was given elsewhere, but for the logarithmic-normal distribution is the subject of the present contribution. The statistical analysis is analogous to the one for the gamma distribution.

  15. Study of Radon and Thoron exhalation from soil samples of different grain sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitra, N; Danalakshmi, B; Supriya, D; Vijayalakshmi, I; Sundar, S Bala; Sivasubramanian, K; Baskaran, R; Jose, M T

    2018-03-01

    The exhalation of radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) from a porous matrix depends on the emanation of them from the grains by the recoil effect. The emanation factor is a quantitative estimate of the emanation phenomenon. The present study is to investigate the effect of grain size of the soil matrix on the emanation factor. Soil samples from three different locations were fractionated into different grain size categories ranging from <0.1 to 2mm. The emanation factors of each of the grain size range were estimated by measuring the mass exhalation rates of radon and thoron and the activity concentrations of 226 Ra and 232 Th. The emanation factor was found to increase with decrease in grain size. This effect was made evident by keeping the parent radium concentration constant for all grain size fractions. The governing factor is the specific surface area of the soil samples which increases with decrease in grain size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of grain sizes on the quantitative concrete analysis using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, C.; Günther, T.; Wilsch, G.

    2018-04-01

    In civil engineering concrete is the most used building material for making infrastructures like bridges and parking decks worldwide. It is as a porous and multiphase material made of aggregates with a defined grain size distribution, cement and water as well as different additives and admixtures depending on the application. Different grain sizes are important to ensure the needed density and compressive strength. The resulting porous cement matrix contains a mixture of flour grains (aggregates with a grain size below 125 μm) and cement particles (particle size ≈ 50μm). Harmful species like chlorides may penetrate together with water through the capillary pore space and may trigger different damage processes. The damage assessment of concrete structures in Germany is estimated due to the quantification of harmful elements regarding to the cement content only. In the evaluation of concrete using LIBS a two-dimensional scanning is necessary to consider the heterogeneity caused by the aggregates. Therefore, a LIBS system operating with a low energy NdCr:YAG laser, a pulse energy of 3 mJ, a wavelength of 1064 nm, a pulse width of 1.5 ns and a repetition rate of 100 Hz has been used. Different Czerny-Turner spectrometers with CCD detectors in the UV and NIR range have been used for the detection. Large aggregates (macro-heterogeneity) can be excluded from the evaluation, whereas small aggregates in the range of the laser spot size (flour grains) cannot be spatially resolved. In this work the micro heterogeneity caused by flour grains and their impact on the quantification with LIBS will be discussed. To analyze the effect of changing grain sizes and ratios, the ablation behavior has been determined and compared. Samples with defined grain sizes were made and analyzed using LIBS. The grain size distributions were analyzed with laser diffraction (LDA).

  17. Variability of particle size-specific fractions of personal coal mine dust exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, N S; Hewett, P; Robins, T G; Haney, R

    1995-03-01

    This study estimated the ratio of the tracheo-bronchial dust fraction to the fraction collected by a respirable dust sampler for a variety of job classifications found in conventional, continuous, and longwall coal mining sections. The ratios could then be applied in epidemiologic studies to existing respirable dust measurements to estimate thoracic mass concentrations for evaluation of the relative importance of the respirable and thoracic dust fractions to obstructive lung disease. Data collected include particle size distributions from four U.S. underground coal mines using eight-stage personal cascade impactors. A total of 180 samples were examined by mine, occupation and occupations grouped by proximity to the mine face, and by mining technology. Several fractions--that collected by the 10-mm nylon cyclone, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists respirable and thoracic particulate mass fractions, and the estimated alveolar and tracheo-bronchial deposition fractions--were estimated. These were not significantly different when grouped by occupation, by proximity of work to the mine face, or by the type of mining technology in use. Distributions from one mine varied from the others, perhaps because it used diesel equipment in the haulage ways, which contributed to the fine aerosol fractions. Results suggest that although the tracheo-bronchial dust fraction may contribute to the development of obstructive lung disease, occupation-specific tracheo-bronchial dust fractions are not likely to produce stronger exposure-response estimates than the historically collected respirable dust concentrations.

  18. Dependency of annealing behaviour on grain size in Al–TiC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This work investigates the effect of grain size on annealing behaviour in both coarse-grained and ultrafinegrained Al–TiC composite processed by accumulative roll bonding (ARB). Microstructural analysis indicates that annealingbehaviour of the specimens are essentially determined by the level of strain accumulation or ...

  19. Optical dating of single sand-sized grains of quartz: Sources of variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements have been made of over 3000 sand-sized grains of quartz. Analysis at this scale highlights the variability in the luminescence sensitivity and the dose saturation characteristics of individual quartz grains. Using a new instrument capable of me...... intensity, dose saturation characteristics and instrument uncertainty in equivalent dose calculation. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Grain size and boundary-related effects on the properties of nanocrystalline barium titanate ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buscaglia, V.; Buscaglia, M. T.; Viviani, M.; Mitoseriu, L.; Nanni, P.; Trefiletti, V.; Piaggio, P.; Gregora, Ivan; Ostapchuk, Tetyana; Pokorný, Jan; Petzelt, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 26, - (2006), s. 2889-2898 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 525.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : grain size * grain boundaries * spectroscopy * dielectric properties * BaTiO 3 Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.576, year: 2006

  1. Cobble cam: Grain-size measurements of sand to boulder from digital photographs and autocorrelation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, J.A.; Rubin, D.M.; Ruggiero, P.; Harney, J.N.; Draut, A.E.; Buscombe, D.

    2009-01-01

    A new application of the autocorrelation grain size analysis technique for mixed to coarse sediment settings has been investigated. Photographs of sand- to boulder-sized sediment along the Elwha River delta beach were taken from approximately 1??2 m above the ground surface, and detailed grain size measurements were made from 32 of these sites for calibration and validation. Digital photographs were found to provide accurate estimates of the long and intermediate axes of the surface sediment (r2 > 0??98), but poor estimates of the short axes (r2 = 0??68), suggesting that these short axes were naturally oriented in the vertical dimension. The autocorrelation method was successfully applied resulting in total irreducible error of 14% over a range of mean grain sizes of 1 to 200 mm. Compared with reported edge and object-detection results, it is noted that the autocorrelation method presented here has lower error and can be applied to a much broader range of mean grain sizes without altering the physical set-up of the camera (~200-fold versus ~6-fold). The approach is considerably less sensitive to lighting conditions than object-detection methods, although autocorrelation estimates do improve when measures are taken to shade sediments from direct sunlight. The effects of wet and dry conditions are also evaluated and discussed. The technique provides an estimate of grain size sorting from the easily calculated autocorrelation standard error, which is correlated with the graphical standard deviation at an r2 of 0??69. The technique is transferable to other sites when calibrated with linear corrections based on photo-based measurements, as shown by excellent grain-size analysis results (r2 = 0??97, irreducible error = 16%) from samples from the mixed grain size beaches of Kachemak Bay, Alaska. Thus, a method has been developed to measure mean grain size and sorting properties of coarse sediments. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Modeling grain size variations of aeolian gypsum deposits at White Sands, New Mexico, using AVIRIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrefat, H.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Hubbard, B.E.; Langford, R.P.; Aldouri, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) (0.4-2.5????m) AVIRIS data, along with laboratory spectral measurements and analyses of field samples, were used to characterize grain size variations in aeolian gypsum deposits across barchan-transverse, parabolic, and barchan dunes at White Sands, New Mexico, USA. All field samples contained a mineralogy of ?????100% gypsum. In order to document grain size variations at White Sands, surficial gypsum samples were collected along three Transects parallel to the prevailing downwind direction. Grain size analyses were carried out on the samples by sieving them into seven size fractions ranging from 45 to 621????m, which were subjected to spectral measurements. Absorption band depths of the size fractions were determined after applying an automated continuum-removal procedure to each spectrum. Then, the relationship between absorption band depth and gypsum size fraction was established using a linear regression. Three software processing steps were carried out to measure the grain size variations of gypsum in the Dune Area using AVIRIS data. AVIRIS mapping results, field work and laboratory analysis all show that the interdune areas have lower absorption band depth values and consist of finer grained gypsum deposits. In contrast, the dune crest areas have higher absorption band depth values and consist of coarser grained gypsum deposits. Based on laboratory estimates, a representative barchan-transverse dune (Transect 1) has a mean grain size of 1.16 ??{symbol} (449????m). The error bar results show that the error ranges from - 50 to + 50????m. Mean grain size for a representative parabolic dune (Transect 2) is 1.51 ??{symbol} (352????m), and 1.52 ??{symbol} (347????m) for a representative barchan dune (Transect 3). T-test results confirm that there are differences in the grain size distributions between barchan and parabolic dunes and between interdune and dune crest areas. The t-test results

  3. Transport, retention, and size perturbation of graphene oxide in saturated porous media: Effects of input concentration and grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurately predicting the fate and transport of graphene oxide (GO) in porous media is critical to assess its environmental impact. In this work, sand column experiments were conducted to determine the effect of input concentration and grain size on transport, retention, and size perturbation of GO ...

  4. Interstellar Dust - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2012-01-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic materials. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar physics and chemistry and in the formation of organic materials, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. Laboratory experiments that are performed under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments to provide information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. A review of the properties of dust and of the laboratory experiments that are conducted to study the formation processes of dust grains from molecular precursors will be given.

  5. Effects of structural heterogeneity of nanostructured copper on the evolution of the sizes of recrystallized grains during annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fengxiang; Zhang, Yubin; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Recrystallization in copper deformed by dynamic plastic deformation was investigated using electron backscatter diffraction. The recrystallized grains show a broad size distribution. The kinetics of grains of different sizes is observed to be different: In the beginning of recrystallization, the ...

  6. Systematic Relationships Between Lidar Observables and Sizes And Mineral Composition Of Dust Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Stangl, Alexander; Perlwitz, Jan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Cairns, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of soil dust aerosol particles fundamentally affect their interaction with climate, including shortwave absorption and radiative forcing, nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, heterogeneous formation of sulfates and nitrates on the surface of dust particles, and atmospheric processing of iron into bioavailable forms that increase the productivity of marine phytoplankton. Lidar measurements, such as extinction-to-backscatter, color and depolarization ratios, are frequently used to distinguish between aerosol types with different physical and chemical properties. The chemical composition of aerosol particles determines their complex refractive index, hence affecting their backscattering properties. Here we present a study on how dust aerosol backscattering and depolarization properties at wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm are related to size and complex refractive index, which varies with the mineral composition of the dust. Dust aerosols are represented by collections of spheroids with a range of prolate and oblate aspect ratios and their optical properties are obtained using T-matrix calculations. We find simple, systematic relationships between lidar observables and the dust size and complex refractive index that may aid the use of space-based or airborne lidars for direct retrieval of dust properties or for the evaluation of chemical transport models using forward simulated lidar variables. In addition, we present first results on the spatial variation of forward-simulated lidar variables based on a dust model that accounts for the atmospheric cycle of eight different mineral types plus internal mixtures of seven mineral types with iron oxides, which was recently implemented in the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE2.

  7. Voronoi-Based DEM Simulation Approach for Sandstone Considering Grain Structure and Pore Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Konietzky, Heinz; Frühwirt, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a new procedure to create numerical models considering grain shape and size as well as pore size in an explicit and stochastic equivalent manner. Four shape factors are introduced to reproduce shape and size of grains and pores. Thin sections are used to analyze grain shape and pore size of rock specimen. First, a particle-based numerical model is set up by best fitted clumps from a shape library according to thin sections. Finally, an equivalent Voronoi-based discrete element model is set up based on the superimposed particle model. Uniaxial compression and tensile tests are simulated for validation. Both tests indicate that grain boundaries and pores provide preferred paths of weakness for crack propagation, but they also reveal significant differences in terms of intra- and inter-granular fracturing.

  8. Effect of graphene grains size on the microwave electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of graphene/polymer multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhir, Polina P.; Paddubskaya, Alesia G.; Volynets, Nadzeya I.; Batrakov, Konstantin G.; Maksimenko, Sergey A.; Golubeva, Elena N.; Valusis, Gintaras; Kaplas, Tommi; Reckinger, Nicolas; Lobet, Michael; Lambin, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    The influence of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grain size on the electromagnetic (EM) shielding performance of graphene/polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) multilayers in Ka-band was studied both experimentally and theoretically. We found that increasing the average graphene grain size from 20 to 400 μm does not change the EM properties of heterostructures consisting of graphene layers sandwiched between submicron thick PMMA spacers. The independence of EM interference shielding effectiveness on the graphene grain size between 20 and 400 μm allows one to use cheaper (or more convenient regimes of CVD) graphene samples with low crystallinity and small grain size in the development of new graphene-based passive EM devices operated at high frequencies.

  9. CLPX-Satellite: EO-1 Hyperion Surface Reflectance, Snow-Covered Area, and Grain Size

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of apparent surface reflectance, subpixel snow-covered area and grain size collected from the Hyperion hyperspectral imager. The Hyperion...

  10. National Marine Fisheries Service Grain Size Data from the Baltimore Canyon Trough

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Grain size analyses produced by Robert Reid of the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service for the NOAA/BLM Outer Continental Shelf Mid-Atlantic Project, Baltimore...

  11. Grain Size Data from the NOAA Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains grain size data from samples acquired under the NOAA Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from the Outer...

  12. Estimation of mean grain size of seafloor sediments using neural network

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, C.; Chakraborty, B.

    The feasibility of an artificial neural network based approach is investigated to estimate the values of mean grain size of seafloor sediments using four dominant echo features, extracted from acoustic backscatter data. The acoustic backscatter data...

  13. Grain size analysis of beach sediment along the barrier bar lagoon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grain size analysis of beach sediment along the barrier bar lagoon coastal system, Lagos, Nigeria; its implication on coastal erosion. R Abdulkarim, EA Akinnigbagbe, DO Imo, MT Imhansoloeva, VO Aniebone, MP Ibitola, BR Faleye, O Shonde, YJ Appia ...

  14. The influence of grain size, grain color, and suspended-sediment concentration on light attenuation: why fine-grained terrestrial sediment is bad for coral reef ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt; Norris, Benjamin; Rosenberger, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Sediment has been shown to be a major stressor to coral reefs globally. Although many researchers have tested the impact of sedimentation on coral reef ecosystems in both the laboratory and the field and some have measured the impact of suspended sediment on the photosynthetic response of corals, there has yet to be a detailed investigation on how properties of the sediment itself can affect light availability for photosynthesis. We show that finer-grained and darker-colored sediment at higher suspended-sediment concentrations attenuates photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) significantly more than coarser, lighter-colored sediment at lower concentrations and provide PAR attenuation coefficients for various grain sizes, colors, and suspended-sediment concentrations that are needed for biophysical modeling. Because finer-grained sediment particles settle more slowly and are more susceptible to resuspension, they remain in the water column longer, thus causing greater net impact by reducing light essential for photosynthesis over a greater duration. This indicates that coral reef monitoring studies investigating sediment impacts should concentrate on measuring fine-grained lateritic and volcanic soils, as opposed to coarser-grained siliceous and carbonate sediment. Similarly, coastal restoration efforts and engineering solutions addressing long-term coral reef ecosystem health should focus on preferentially retaining those fine-grained soils rather than coarse silt and sand particles.

  15. Autonomous bed-sediment imaging-systems for revealing temporal variability of grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel; Rubin, David M.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hatcher, Gerald; Chezar, Henry; Wyland, Robert; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a remotely operated video microscope system, designed to provide high-resolution images of seabed sediments. Two versions were developed, which differ in how they raise the camera from the seabed. The first used hydraulics and the second used the energy associated with wave orbital motion. Images were analyzed using automated frequency-domain methods, which following a rigorous partially supervised quality control procedure, yielded estimates to within 20% of the true size as determined by on-screen manual measurements of grains. Long-term grain-size variability at a sandy inner shelf site offshore of Santa Cruz, California, USA, was investigated using the hydraulic system. Eighteen months of high frequency (min to h), high-resolution (μm) images were collected, and grain size distributions compiled. The data constitutes the longest known high-frequency record of seabed-grain size at this sample frequency, at any location. Short-term grain-size variability of sand in an energetic surf zone at Praa Sands, Cornwall, UK was investigated using the ‘wave-powered’ system. The data are the first high-frequency record of grain size at a single location of a highly mobile and evolving bed in a natural surf zone. Using this technology, it is now possible to measure bed-sediment-grain size at a time-scale comparable with flow conditions. Results suggest models of sediment transport at sandy, wave-dominated, nearshore locations should allow for substantial changes in grain-size distribution over time-scales as short as a few hours.

  16. Standard test methods for determining average grain size using semiautomatic and automatic image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    1.1 These test methods are used to determine grain size from measurements of grain intercept lengths, intercept counts, intersection counts, grain boundary length, and grain areas. 1.2 These measurements are made with a semiautomatic digitizing tablet or by automatic image analysis using an image of the grain structure produced by a microscope. 1.3 These test methods are applicable to any type of grain structure or grain size distribution as long as the grain boundaries can be clearly delineated by etching and subsequent image processing, if necessary. 1.4 These test methods are applicable to measurement of other grain-like microstructures, such as cell structures. 1.5 This standard deals only with the recommended test methods and nothing in it should be construed as defining or establishing limits of acceptability or fitness for purpose of the materials tested. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user ...

  17. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Growth Restriction on Grain Size in Binary Cu Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Cziegler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Grain refinement by elemental addition has been extensively investigated within the last decades in Al or Mg alloys. In contrast, in the Cu system, the role of solute on grain size is less investigated. In this study, the grain refinement potency of several alloying elements of the Cu system was examined. To predict grain size depending on the growth restriction factor Q, grain size modelling was performed. The results obtained by the grain size model were compared to variations in the grain size of binary Cu alloys with increasing solute content under defined cooling conditions of the TP-1 grain refiner test of the Aluminium Association©. It was found that the experimental results differed significantly from the predicted grain size values for several alloying elements. A decreasing grain size with increasing alloy concentration was observed independently of the growth restriction potency of the alloying elements. Furthermore, excessive grain coarsening was found for several solutes beyond a transition point. It is assumed that contradictory variations in grain size result from a change in the nucleating particle density of the melt. Significant decreases in grain size are supposed to be due to the in-situ formation of potent nucleation sites. Excessive grain coarsening with increasing solute content may occur due to the removal of nucleating particles. The model shows that the difference in the actual number of particles before and beyond the transition point must be in the range of several orders of magnitude.

  18. Nano-scale machining of polycrystalline coppers - effects of grain size and machining parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Yachao; Yang, Xiaoping

    2013-11-22

    In this study, a comprehensive investigation on nano-scale machining of polycrystalline copper structures is carried out by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Simulation cases are constructed to study the impacts of grain size, as well as various machining parameters. Six polycrystalline copper structures are produced, which have the corresponding equivalent grain sizes of 5.32, 6.70, 8.44, 13.40, 14.75, and 16.88 nm, respectively. Three levels of depth of cut, machining speed, and tool rake angle are also considered. The results show that greater cutting forces are required in nano-scale polycrystalline machining with the increase of depth of cut, machining speed, and the use of the negative tool rake angles. The distributions of equivalent stress are consistent with the cutting force trends. Moreover, it is discovered that in the grain size range of 5.32 to 14.75 nm, the cutting forces and equivalent stress increase with the increase of grain size for the nano-structured copper, while the trends reserve after the grain size becomes even higher. This discovery confirms the existence of both the regular Hall-Petch relation and the inverse Hall-Petch relation in polycrystalline machining, and the existence of a threshold grain size allows one of the two relations to become dominant. The dislocation-grain boundary interaction shows that the resistance of the grain boundary to dislocation movement is the fundamental mechanism of the Hall-Petch relation, while grain boundary diffusion and movement is the reason of the inverse Hall-Petch relation.

  19. Cohesion of Mm- to Cm-Sized Asteroid Simulant Grains: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Julie; Colwell, Joshua E.; Dove, Adrienne; Jarmak, Stephanie; Anderson, Seamus

    2017-10-01

    The regolith covering the surfaces of asteroids and planetary satellites is very different from terrestrial soil particles and subject to environmental conditions very different from what is found on Earth. The loose, unconsolidated granular material has angular-shaped grains and a broad size distribution. On small and airless bodies (5g, g being the Earth surface gravity, the cohesion behavior of the regolith grains will dictate the asteroid’s surface morphology and its response to impact or spacecraft contact.Previous laboratory experiments on low-velocity impacts into regolith simulant with grain sizes <250 µm have revealed a transition of the grain behavior from a gravity-dominated regime to a cohesion-dominated regime when the local gravity level reaches values below 10-3g. This is in good agreement with analytical and simulation studies for these grain sizes. From the expected grain sizes at the surfaces of Ryugu and Bennu, we have now focused on larger grain sizes ranging from mm to cm. We have carried out a series of experiments to study the cohesion behavior of such larger grains of asteroid regolith simulant. The simulant used was CI Orgueil of Deep Space Industries. Experiments included laboratory tabletop avalanching, compression and shear force measurements, as well as low-velocity impacts under microgravity.Our goal is to determine if the grain size distribution has an influence on the cohesion behavior of the regolith and if we can validate numerical simulation results with experimental measurements. We will discuss the implications of our results for sample return or landing missions to small bodies such as asteroids or Martian moons.

  20. Dependence of corrosion properties of AISI 304L stainless steel on the austenite grain size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, Soheil; Rashtchi, Hamed; Eslami, Abdoulmajid; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Enayati, Mohammad Hossein; Raeissi, Keyvan; Imani, Reihane Faghih [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan [The Univ. of Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-07-15

    The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels is known to be hampered by the loss of chromium available for passive surface layer formation as a result of chromium carbide precipitation at austenite grain boundaries during annealing treatments. Although high-temperature annealing can promote carbide dissolution leading to better corrosion resistance, grain coarsening also results, which would lead to poorer mechanical properties. Processing methods to achieve both good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties are thus highly desirable for austenitic stainless steels. In the present study, we show that the corrosion resistance of AISI 304L stainless steel can be improved by grain refinement into the ultrafine-grained regime. Specifically, samples with different austenite grain sizes in the range of 0.65-12 μm were studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. All samples showed a typical passive behavior with similar corrosion potential, but the corrosion current density decreased significantly with decreasing grain size. The results show that the sample with the finest grain size had the best corrosion resistance due to a higher resistance of the passive layer to pitting attacks. This study indicates that grain refinement which improves mechanical properties can also significantly improve the corrosion resistance of AISI 304L stainless steel.

  1. Effect of initial grain size on dynamic recrystallization in high purity austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Wahabi, M. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB - Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain); Gavard, L. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Montheillet, F. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB - Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.maria.cabrera@upc.edu; Prado, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB - Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-15

    The influence of initial microstructure on discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) has been investigated by using high purity and ultra high purity austenitic stainless steels with various initial grain sizes. After uniaxial compression tests at constant strain rates and various temperatures, the steady state microstructure or the state corresponding to the maximum strain ({epsilon} = 1) attained in the test was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy aided with automated electron back scattering diffraction. Recrystallized grain size d {sub rec} and twin boundary fraction f {sub TB} measurements were carried out. The mechanical behavior was also investigated by comparing experimental stress-strain curves with various initial grain sizes. DDRX kinetics was described by the classical Avrami equation. It was concluded that larger initial grain sizes promoted a delay in the DDRX onset in the two alloys. It was also observed that the softening process progressed faster for smaller initial grain sizes. The effect of initial grain size is larger in the HP material and becomes more pronounced at low temperature.

  2. On the room temperature microstrain of vanadium of different grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, J.; Guttmann, V.

    1977-01-01

    The present work deals with the plastic behaviour of polycrystalline vanadium from the onset of plastic deformation to the upper yield point. The stress-strain relation was found to be omega approximately epsilonsub(p)sup(1/2). The influence of the grain size on stress followed a omega approximately d -1 relationship. The initial yield stress was independent of grain size. By means of optical and electron microscopy it was found, that the first dislocation movement starts at grain boundaries. (orig.) [de

  3. Grain-Size Analysis of Debris Flow Alluvial Fans in Panxi Area along Jinsha River, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic geometric parameters of 236 debris flow catchments were determined by interpreting SPOT5 remote sensing images with a resolution of 2.5 m in a 209 km section along the Jinsha River in the Panxi area, China. A total of 27 large-scale debris flow catchments were selected for detailed in situ investigation. Samples were taken from two profiles in the deposition zone for each debris flow catchment. The φ value gradation method of the grain size was used to obtain 54 histograms with abscissa in a logarithmic scale. Five types of debris flows were summarized from the outline of the histogram. Four grain size parameters were calculated: mean grain size, standard deviation, coefficient of skewness, and coefficient of kurtosis. These four values were used to evaluate the features of the histogram. The grain index that reflects the transport (kinetic energy information of debris flows was defined to describe the characteristics of the debris-flow materials. Furthermore, a normalized grain index based on the catchment area was proposed to allow evaluation of the debris flow mobility. The characteristics of the debris-flow materials were well-described by the histogram of grain-size distribution and the normalized grain index.

  4. A new look at grain size and load effects in the hardness of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krell, A. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Keramische Technologien und Sinterwerkstoffe (IKTS), Dresden (Germany)

    1998-05-01

    A simple model describes the load effect (size effect) in the hardness, assuming an increasing microplastic deformability, when the further extension of the plastic zone growth and multiplication of pre-existing elements of plasticity are more effective than the generation of new dislocations or twins in the virgin material around the indentation site. The model explains experiments with sintered alumina which indicate a reduced load effect in increasingly fine-grained microstructures due to a grain size effect that is more pronounced at higher testing loads (larger indents) than in the microhardness range. A large difference between the hardness of plastically deformed volumes in single crystals and in polycrystalline microstructures consisting of grains with the same size, respectively, reveals a substantial contribution of the grain boundaries to plastic deformation at the indentation site even at room temperature and even for coarser microstructures. (orig.) 18 refs.

  5. Effect of grain size on superelasticity in Fe-Mn-Al-Ni shape memory alloy wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Omori

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of grain size on superelastic properties in Fe-34Mn-15Al-7.5Ni alloy wires with a ⟨110⟩ fiber-texture were investigated by cyclic tensile tests. It was confirmed that the critical stress for induced martensitic transformation and the superelastic strain are functions of relative grain size d/D (d: mean grain diameter, D: wire diameter, and that the critical stress is proportional to (1–d/D2 as well as in Cu-based shape memory alloys. A large superelastic strain of about 5% was obtained in the specimen with a large relative grain size over d/D = 1.

  6. Grain size effect on transferability in micro-coining process assisted by ultrasonic vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Tetsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the assisting effect by the ultrasonic vibration in a micro-coining process. Particularly, we were focused on the grain size of the work material to study the scale dependency of transferability under the assistance of ultrasonic vibration. The pure copper plate of 0.3 mm in thickness was used as the working material. The micro-coining process was performed on the specimens with three different grain sizes which were obtained through an annealing process. The result showed that the vibration assisted effect on transferability becomes more significant for the material with larger grain sizes. Assisting effect of ultrasonic vibration for the coarse grained materials is also demonstrated.

  7. Deformation mechanisms and grain size evolution in the Bohemian granulites - a computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maierova, Petra; Lexa, Ondrej; Jeřábek, Petr; Franěk, Jan; Schulmann, Karel

    2015-04-01

    A dominant deformation mechanism in crustal rocks (e.g., dislocation and diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding, solution-precipitation) depends on many parameters such as temperature, major minerals, differential stress, strain rate and grain size. An exemplary sequence of deformation mechanisms was identified in the largest felsic granulite massifs in the southern Moldanubian domain (Bohemian Massif, central European Variscides). These massifs were interpreted to result from collision-related forced diapiric ascent of lower crust and its subsequent lateral spreading at mid-crustal levels. Three types of microstructures were distinguished. The oldest relict microstructure (S1) with large grains (>1000 μm) of feldspar deformed probably by dislocation creep at peak HT eclogite facies conditions. Subsequently at HP granulite-facies conditions, chemically- and deformation- induced recrystallization of feldspar porphyroclasts led to development of a fine-grained microstructure (S2, ~50 μm grain size) indicating deformation via diffusion creep, probably assisted by melt-enhanced grain-boundary sliding. This microstructure was associated with flow in the lower crust and/or its diapiric ascent. The latest microstructure (S3, ~100 μm grain size) is related to the final lateral spreading of retrograde granulites, and shows deformation by dislocation creep at amphibolite-facies conditions. The S2-S3 switch and coarsening was interpreted to be related with a significant decrease in strain rate. From this microstructural sequence it appears that it is the grain size that is critically linked with specific mechanical behavior of these rocks. Thus in this study, we focused on the interplay between grain size and deformation with the aim to numerically simulate and reinterpret the observed microstructural sequence. We tested several different mathematical descriptions of the grain size evolution, each of which gave qualitatively different results. We selected the two most

  8. Small angle neutron scattering from nanometer grain sized materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, J. E.; Siegel, R. W.

    1991-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering has been utilized, along with a number of complementary characterization methods suitable to the nanometer size scale, to investigate the structures of cluster-assembled nanophase materials. Results of these investigations are described and problems and opportunities in using small angle scattering for elucidating nanostructures are discussed.

  9. 3D ejection behavior of different sized particles in the grain-bed collision process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mao; He, Caiyun

    2013-04-01

    The impact-ejection process on a mixed-grain-size bed with granular packing was simulated with the discrete element method in order to understand the interaction between different sized grains in natural aeolian sand transport. In this model, the granular bed was formed by settling the randomly generated two-sized particles under gravity, and then a foreign particle was shot onto the granular bed at different speeds and angles. The recorded speed, direction and number of the ejected particles were then analyzed. It was found that the probability distributions of the ejection speed and angle for different sized particles are all identical to those for the single size grain-bed collision process, the mean ejection speeds of different sized particles are nearly equal, and the mean ejection angles of different sized particles are all equal to a constant of 60°. The average number of each size of ejected particles grows linearly with the increasing impact speed but remains invariant for various impact angles. Moreover, the smaller particles are preferentially ejected and the ratio between the mean numbers of different sized particles is independent of both the impact speed and angle. Additionally, the ejected particles were found to move in a 3D space, they become distributed symmetrically around the incident plane and jump not only forward but also backward. These results are critical to understanding the grain size-induced inhomogeneity in aeolian sand transport.

  10. Matrix and fine-grained rims in the unequilibrated CO3 chondrite, ALHA77307 - Origins and evidence for diverse, primitive nebular dust components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, Adrian J.

    1993-01-01

    SEM, TEM, and electron microprobe analysis were used to investigate in detail the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of dark matrix and fine-grained rims in the unequilibrated CO3 chondrite ALHA77307. Data obtained revealed that there was a remarkable diversity of distinct mineralogical components, which can be identified using their chemical and textural characteristics. The matrix and rim components in ALHA77307 formed by disequilibrium condensation process as fine-grained amorphous dust that is represented by the abundant amorphous component in the matrix. Subsequent thermal processing of this condensate material, in a variety of environments in the nebula, caused partial or complete recrystallization of the fine-grained dust.

  11. Particle size traces modern Saharan dust transport and deposition across the equatorial North Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Does, M.; Korte, L.F.; Munday, C.I.; Brummer, G.-J. A.; Stuut, J-B W.

    2016-01-01

    Mineral dust has a large impact on regional andglobal climate, depending on its particle size. Especially inthe Atlantic Ocean downwind of the Sahara, the largest dustsource on earth, the effects can be substantial but are poorlyunderstood. This study focuses on seasonal and spatial variationsin

  12. Effects of grain size on the quasi-static mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligda, Jonathan Paul

    The increase in strength due to the Hall-Petch effect, reduced strain hardening capacity, a reduced ductility, and changes in deformation mechanisms are all effects of reducing grain size (d) into the ultrafine-grained (UFG, 100 behavior of UFG/NC metals have been on face-centered cubic (FCC) metals. Of the few reports on UFG/NC body-centered cubic (BCC) metals, the interest is related to their increase in strength and reduced strain rate sensitivity. This combination increases their propensity to deform via adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) at high strain rates, which is a desired response for materials being considered as a possible replacement for depleted uranium in kinetic energy penetrators. However, an ideal replacement material must also plastically deform in tension under quasi-static rates to survive initial launch conditions. This raises the question: if the material forms ASBs at dynamic rates, will it also form shear bands at quasi-static isothermal rates? As well as, is there a specific grain size for a material that will plastically deform in tension at quasi-static rates but form adiabatic shear bands at dynamic rates? Using high pressure torsion, a polycrystalline bulk tantalum disk was refined into the UFG/NC regime. Using microscale mechanical testing techniques, such as nanoindentation, microcompression, and microtension, it is possible to isolate locations with a homogeneous grain size within the disk. Pillars are compressed using a nanoindenter with a flat punch tip, while "dog-bone" specimens were pulled in tension using a custom built in-situ tension stage within a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The observed mechanical behavior is related to the microstructure by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on the as-processed material and tested specimens. Synchrotron X-ray based texture analysis was also conducted on the disk to determine if any changes in the deformation texture occur during HPT processing. Nanoindentation data shows a

  13. Grain size effect on yield strength of titanium alloy implanted with aluminum ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikonenko, Elena, E-mail: vilatomsk@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yurev, Ivan, E-mail: yiywork@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kalashnikov, Mark, E-mail: kmp1980@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kurzina, Irina, E-mail: kurzina99@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the microstructure and phase state of commercially pure titanium VT1-0 implanted by aluminum ions. This study has been carried out before and after the ion implantation for different grain size, i.e. 0.3 µm (ultra-fine grain condition), 1.5 µm (fine grain condition), and 17 µm (polycrystalline condition). This paper presents details of calculations and analysis of strength components of the yield stress. It is shown that the ion implantation results in a considerable hardening of the entire thickness of the implanted layer in the both grain types. The grain size has, however, a different effect on the yield stress. So, both before and after the ion implantation, the increase of the grain size leads to the decrease of the alloy hardening. Thus, hardening in ultra-fine and fine grain alloys increased by four times, while in polycrystalline alloy it increased by over six times.

  14. Development of the nano-dust analyzer (NDA) for detection and compositional analysis of nanometer-size dust particles originating in the inner heliosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, L; Auer, S; Gemer, A; Grün, E; Horanyi, M; Juhasz, A; Kempf, S; Malaspina, D; Mocker, A; Moebius, E; Srama, R; Sternovsky, Z

    2014-03-01

    A linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer is developed for the detection and chemical analysis of nanometer-sized particles originating near the Sun. Nano-dust particles are thought to be produced by mutual collisions between interplanetary dust particles slowly spiraling toward the Sun and are accelerated outward to high velocities by interaction with the solar wind plasma. The WAVES instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft reported the detection, strong temporal variation, and potentially high flux of these particles. Here we report on the optimization and the results from the detailed characterization of the instrument's performance using submicrometer sized dust particles accelerated to 8-60 km/s. The Nano Dust Analyzer (NDA) concept is derived from previously developed detectors. It has a 200 cm(2) effective target area and a mass resolution of approximately m/Δm = 50. The NDA instrument is designed to reliably detect and analyze nanometer-sized dust particles while being pointed close to the Sun's direction, from where they are expected to arrive. Measurements by such an instrument will determine the size-dependent flux of the nano-dust particles and its variations, it will characterize the composition of the nano-dust and, ultimately, it may determine their source. The flight version of the NDA instrument is estimated to be <5 kg and requires <10 W for operation.

  15. Grain-size effects on PIXE and INAA analysis of IAEA-336 lichen reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A. P.; Freitas, M. C.; Wolterbeek, H. Th.; Verburg, T. G.; De Goeij, J. J. M.

    2007-02-01

    IAEA-336 lichen certified reference material was used to compare outcomes from INAA and PIXE elemental analyses, in relationship with grain size. The IAEA material (grain size lichen reference material's particle size distribution follows a bimodal distribution, which is turning more and more monomodal after further fine sieving. Replicates of each fraction were analysed by INAA and PIXE. Results for Cl, K, Mn, Fe and Zn by both techniques were compared by application of z-values tested against the criterion ∣ z∣ limited amount of lichen material as "seen" in the PIXE analysis and the grain size distribution in the lichen material were no causes of measurable differences between the results of both techniques. However, fractionation into smaller grain sizes showed to be associated with lower element content, for Na, Cl, K, Mn and Sr even up to a factor of 2. The observed increases of the proportion of algae in the smaller grain-size fractions and the possible accumulation capacity for certain elements in the fungal part of the lichen may explain the observed phenomenon. The sieving process and consequently the discarding of part of the material have lead to a change of the properties of the original sample, namely algae/fungus percentage and elemental contents.

  16. Surface Characterization and Grain Size Calculation of Silver Films Deposited by Thermal Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Muhammad; Khan, Tahirzeb

    Thin films of pure silver were deposited on glass substrate by thermal evaporation process at room temperature. Surface characterization of the films was performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Thickness of the films varied between 20 nm and 60 nm. XRD analysis provided a sharp peak at 38.75° from silver. These results indicated that the films deposited on glass substrates at room temperature are crystalline. 3D and top view pictures of the films were obtained by AFM to study the grain size and its dependency on various factors. Grain sizes were calculated using the XRD results and Scherer's formula. Average grain size increased with the thickness of the deposited films. A minimum grain size of 8 nm was obtained for 20 nm thick films, reaching a maximum value of 41.9 nm when the film size reaches 60 nm. We could not find any sequential variation in the grain size with the growth rate.

  17. Model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongxing; Long, Chongsheng; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The restructuring process of the high burnup structure (HBS) formation in UO2 fuel results in sub-micron size grains that accelerate the fission gas swelling, which will raise some concern over the safety of extended the nuclear fuel operation life in the reactor. A mechanistic and engineering model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel based on the experimental observations of the HBS in the literature is presented. The model takes into account dislocations evolution under irradiation and the grain subdivision occur successively at increasing local burnup. It is assumed that the original driving force for subdivision of grain in the HBS of UO2 fuel is the production and accumulation of dislocation loops during irradiation. The dislocation loops can also be annealed through thermal diffusion when the temperature is high enough. The capability of this model is validated by the comparison with the experimental data of temperature threshold of subdivision, dislocation density and sub-grain size as a function of local burnup. It is shown that the calculated results of the dislocation density and subdivided grain size as a function of local burnup are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Effect of texture and grain size on the residual stress of nanocrystalline thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Sengupta, Arkaprabha; Pantuso, Daniel; Koslowski, Marisol

    2017-10-01

    Residual stresses develop in thin film interconnects mainly as a result of deposition conditions and multiple thermal loading cycles during the manufacturing flow. Understanding the relation between the distribution of residual stress and the interconnect microstructure is of key importance to manage the nucleation and growth of defects that can lead to failure under reliability testing and use conditions. Dislocation dynamics simulations are performed in nanocrystalline copper subjected to cyclic loading to quantify the distribution of residual stresses as a function of grain misorientation and grain size distribution. The outcomes of this work help to evaluate the effect of microstructure in thin films failure by identifying potential voiding sites. Furthermore, the simulations show how dislocation structures are influenced by texture and grain size distribution that affect the residual stress. For example, when dislocation loops reach the opposite grain boundary during loading, these dislocations remain locked during unloading.

  19. On the importance of grain size in luminescence dating using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timar-Gabor, A.; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Guralnik, B.

    2017-01-01

    -grain (63-90 μm) quartz single aliquot regeneration protocol (SAR) ages has been reported previously for Romanian and Serbian loess >40 ka (De of ∼100 Gy), generally with fine-grain ages underestimating the depositional age. In this paper, we show a similar age pattern for two grain size fractions from...... the dose response curves of quartz from different sedimentary contexts around the world, using a range of grain sizes (diameters of 4-11 μm, 11-30 μm, 35-50 μm, 63-90μm, 90-125μm, 125-180 μm, and 180-250 μm). All dose response curves can be adequately described by a sum of two saturating exponential...

  20. Grain-size-independent plastic flow at ultrahigh pressures and strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H-S; Rudd, R E; Cavallo, R M; Barton, N R; Arsenlis, A; Belof, J L; Blobaum, K J M; El-dasher, B S; Florando, J N; Huntington, C M; Maddox, B R; May, M J; Plechaty, C; Prisbrey, S T; Remington, B A; Wallace, R J; Wehrenberg, C E; Wilson, M J; Comley, A J; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Farrell, M; Randall, G; Gray, G T

    2015-02-13

    A basic tenet of material science is that the flow stress of a metal increases as its grain size decreases, an effect described by the Hall-Petch relation. This relation is used extensively in material design to optimize the hardness, durability, survivability, and ductility of structural metals. This Letter reports experimental results in a new regime of high pressures and strain rates that challenge this basic tenet of mechanical metallurgy. We report measurements of the plastic flow of the model body-centered-cubic metal tantalum made under conditions of high pressure (>100  GPa) and strain rate (∼10(7)  s(-1)) achieved by using the Omega laser. Under these unique plastic deformation ("flow") conditions, the effect of grain size is found to be negligible for grain sizes >0.25  μm sizes. A multiscale model of the plastic flow suggests that pressure and strain rate hardening dominate over the grain-size effects. Theoretical estimates, based on grain compatibility and geometrically necessary dislocations, corroborate this conclusion.

  1. Grain-size dependence of mechanical properties in polycrystalline boron-nitride: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becton, Matthew; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-14

    The field of research in polycrystalline hexagonal boron nitride (PBN) has been enjoying extraordinary growth recently, in no small part due to the rise of graphene and the technical advancement of mass production in polycrystalline 2D materials. However, as the grain size in 2D materials can strongly affect their materials properties and the performance of their relevant devices, it is highly desirable to investigate this effect in PBN and leverage the service capability of PBN-based devices. Here we employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effects of grain size in PBN on its mechanical properties such as Young's modulus, yield strength, toughness, and energy release rate as well as its failure mechanism. By visualizing and comparing the tensile failure of PBN with and without a predefined crack we have shown that the grain size of PBN is positively correlated with its elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness. Through inclusion of a crack with varying length in the PBN samples, the energy release rate is determined for each grain size of PBN and it is concluded that the energy release rate increases with an increase in the average grain size of PBN. These findings offer useful insights into utilizing PBN for mechanical design in composite materials, abrasion resistance, and electronic devices etc.

  2. New laboratory techniques to determine the grain size distribution of a sandgravel bed surface and substrate (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orru, C.; Eleftherakis, D.; Blom, A.; Snellen, M.; Uijttewaal, W.S.J.; Simons, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Grain size changes in a river dominated by mixed sediment are the outcome of sedimentary grain sizeselective processes. Progress in the measurement techniques that define the spatial and temporal variation in grain size is necessary to provide new insights in this field. Techniques as image analysis

  3. Grain size, morphometry and mineralogy of airborne input in the Canary basin: evidence of iron particle retention in the mixed layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Jaramillo-Vélez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aeolian dust plays an important role in climate and ocean processes. Particularly, Saharan dust deposition is of importance in the Canary Current due to its content of iron minerals, which are fertilizers of the ocean. In this work, dust particles are characterized mainly by granulometry, morphometry and mineralogy, using image processing and scanning northern Mauritania and the Western Sahara. The concentration of terrigenous material was measured in three environments: the atmosphere (300 m above sea level, the mixed layer at 10 m depth, and 150 m depth. Samples were collected before and during the dust events, thus allowing the effect of Saharan dust inputs in the water column to be assessed. The dominant grain size was coarse silt. Dominant minerals were iron oxy-hydroxides, silicates and Ca-Mg carbonates. A relative increase of iron mineral particles (hematite and goethite was detected in the mixed layer, reflecting a higher permanence of iron in the water column despite the greater relative density of these minerals in comparison with the other minerals. This higher iron particle permanence does not appear to be explained by physical processes. The retention of this metal by colloids or microorganisms is suggested to explain its long residence time in the mixed layer.

  4. A new stochastic algorithm for inversion of dust aerosol size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Yang, Ma-ying

    2015-08-01

    Dust aerosol size distribution is an important source of information about atmospheric aerosols, and it can be determined from multiwavelength extinction measurements. This paper describes a stochastic inverse technique based on artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to invert the dust aerosol size distribution by light extinction method. The direct problems for the size distribution of water drop and dust particle, which are the main elements of atmospheric aerosols, are solved by the Mie theory and the Lambert-Beer Law in multispectral region. And then, the parameters of three widely used functions, i.e. the log normal distribution (L-N), the Junge distribution (J-J), and the normal distribution (N-N), which can provide the most useful representation of aerosol size distributions, are inversed by the ABC algorithm in the dependent model. Numerical results show that the ABC algorithm can be successfully applied to recover the aerosol size distribution with high feasibility and reliability even in the presence of random noise.

  5. Using NASA EOS in the Arabian and Saharan Deserts to Examine Dust Particle Size and Spectral Signature of Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, J. C.; Keeton, T.; Barrick, B.; Cowart, K.; Cooksey, K.; Florence, V.; Herdy, C.; Luvall, J. C.; Vasquez, S.

    2012-12-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of airborne particulate matter can have adverse effects on the human respiratory system. Ground-based studies conducted in Iraq have revealed the presence of potential human pathogens in airborne dust. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), airborne particulate matter below 2.5μm (PM2.5) can cause long-term damage to the human respiratory system. Given the relatively high incidence of new-onset respiratory disorders experienced by US service members deployed to Iraq, this research offers a new glimpse into how satellite remote sensing can be applied to questions related to human health. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) can be used to determine spectral characteristics of dust particles, the depth of dust plumes, as well as dust particle sizes. Comparing dust particle size from the Sahara and Arabian Deserts gives insight into the composition and atmospheric transport characteristics of dust from each desert. With the use of NASA SeaWiFS DeepBlue Aerosol, dust particle sizes were estimated using Angström exponent. Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD) equation was used to determine the distribution of particle sizes, the area of the dust storm, and whether silicate minerals were present in the dust. The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra satellite was utilized in calculating BTD. Minimal research has been conducted on the spectral characteristics of airborne dust in the Arabian and Sahara Deserts. Mineral composition of a dust storm that occurred 17 April 2008 near Baghdad was determined using imaging spectrometer data from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Spectral Library and EO-1 Hyperion data. Mineralogy of this dust storm was subsequently compared to that of a dust storm that occurred over the Bodélé Depression in the Sahara Desert on 7 June 2003.

  6. Composition and grain size effects on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr nanoglasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adibi, Sara; Branicio, Paulo S.; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoglasses (NGs), metallic glasses (MGs) with a nanoscale grain structure, have the potential to considerably increase the ductility of traditional MGs while retaining their outstanding mechanical properties. We investigated the effects of composition on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr NG films with grain sizes between 3 to 15 nm using molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate a transition from localized shear banding to homogeneous superplastic flow with decreasing grain size, although the critical average grain size depends on composition: 5 nm for Cu 36 Zr 64 and 3 nm for Cu 64 Zr 36 . The flow stress of the superplastic NG at different compositions follows the trend of the yield stress of the parent MG, i.e., Cu 36 Zr 64 yield/flow stress: 2.54 GPa/1.29 GPa and Cu 64 Zr 36 yield/flow stress: 3.57 GPa /1.58 GPa. Structural analysis indicates that the differences in mechanical behavior as a function of composition are rooted at the distinct statistics of prominent atomic Voronoi polyhedra. The mechanical behavior of NGs is also affected by the grain boundary thickness and the fraction of atoms at interfaces for a given average grain size. The results suggest that the composition dependence of the mechanical behavior of NGs follows that of their parent MGs, e.g., a stronger MG will generate a stronger NG, while the intrinsic tendency for homogeneous deformation occurring at small grain size is not affected by composition.

  7. A new database sub-system for grain-size analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckow, Axel

    2013-04-01

    Detailed grain-size analyses of large depth profiles for palaeoclimate studies create large amounts of data. For instance (Novothny et al., 2011) presented a depth profile of grain-size analyses with 2 cm resolution and a total depth of more than 15 m, where each sample was measured with 5 repetitions on a Beckman Coulter LS13320 with 116 channels. This adds up to a total of more than four million numbers. Such amounts of data are not easily post-processed by spreadsheets or standard software; also MS Access databases would face serious performance problems. The poster describes a database sub-system dedicated to grain-size analyses. It expands the LabData database and laboratory management system published by Suckow and Dumke (2001). This compatibility with a very flexible database system provides ease to import the grain-size data, as well as the overall infrastructure of also storing geographic context and the ability to organize content like comprising several samples into one set or project. It also allows easy export and direct plot generation of final data in MS Excel. The sub-system allows automated import of raw data from the Beckman Coulter LS13320 Laser Diffraction Particle Size Analyzer. During post processing MS Excel is used as a data display, but no number crunching is implemented in Excel. Raw grain size spectra can be exported and controlled as Number- Surface- and Volume-fractions, while single spectra can be locked for further post-processing. From the spectra the usual statistical values (i.e. mean, median) can be computed as well as fractions larger than a grain size, smaller than a grain size, fractions between any two grain sizes or any ratio of such values. These deduced values can be easily exported into Excel for one or more depth profiles. However, such a reprocessing for large amounts of data also allows new display possibilities: normally depth profiles of grain-size data are displayed only with summarized parameters like the clay

  8. eblur/dust: a modular Python approach to extinction and scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Lia Corrales

    2016-01-01

    I will present a library of python codes -- github.com/eblur/dust -- which calculate dust scattering and extinction properties from the IR to the X-ray. The modular interface allows for custom defined dust grain size distributions, optical constants, and scattering physics. These codes are currently undergoing a major overhaul to include multiple scattering effects, parallel processing, parameterized grain size distributions beyond power law, and optical constants for different grain...

  9. Statistical considerations for grain-size analyses of tills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A.M.

    1971-01-01

    Relative percentages of sand, silt, and clay from samples of the same till unit are not identical because of different lithologies in the source areas, sorting in transport, random variation, and experimental error. Random variation and experimental error can be isolated from the other two as follows. For each particle-size class of each till unit, a standard population is determined by using a normally distributed, representative group of data. New measurements are compared with the standard population and, if they compare satisfactorily, the experimental error is not significant and random variation is within the expected range for the population. The outcome of the comparison depends on numerical criteria derived from a graphical method rather than on a more commonly used one-way analysis of variance with two treatments. If the number of samples and the standard deviation of the standard population are substituted in a t-test equation, a family of hyperbolas is generated, each of which corresponds to a specific number of subsamples taken from each new sample. The axes of the graphs of the hyperbolas are the standard deviation of new measurements (horizontal axis) and the difference between the means of the new measurements and the standard population (vertical axis). The area between the two branches of each hyperbola corresponds to a satisfactory comparison between the new measurements and the standard population. Measurements from a new sample can be tested by plotting their standard deviation vs. difference in means on axes containing a hyperbola corresponding to the specific number of subsamples used. If the point lies between the branches of the hyperbola, the measurements are considered reliable. But if the point lies outside this region, the measurements are repeated. Because the critical segment of the hyperbola is approximately a straight line parallel to the horizontal axis, the test is simplified to a comparison between the means of the standard

  10. Quartz in coal dust deposited on internal surface of respirable size selective samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Taekhee; Kashon, Michael; Kusti, Mohannad; Harper, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to quantify quartz mass in coal dust deposited on the internal cassette surface of respirable size-selective samplers. Coal dust was collected with four different respirable size-selective samplers (10 mm Dorr-Oliver nylon [Sensidyne, St. Petersburg, Fla.], SKC Aluminum [SKC Inc., Eighty Four, Pa.], BGI4L [BGI USA Inc., Waltham, Mass.], and GK2.69 cyclones [BGI USA Inc.]) with two different cassette types (polystyrene and static-dissipative polypropylene cassettes). The coal dust was aerosolized in a calm air chamber by using a fluidized bed aerosol generator without neutralization under the assumption that the procedure is similar to field sampling conditions. The mass of coal dust was measured gravimetrically and quartz mass was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Manual of Analytical Methods, Method 7603. The mass fractions of the total quartz sample on the internal cassette surface are significantly different between polystyrene and static-dissipative cassettes for all cyclones (p quartz mass on cassette internal surface and coal dust filter mass was observed. The BGI4L cyclone showed a higher (but not significantly) and the GK2.69 cyclone showed a significantly lower (p quartz mass fraction for polystyrene cassettes compared to other cyclones. This study confirms previous observations that the interior surface deposits in polystyrene cassettes attached to cyclone pre-selectors can be a substantial part of the sample, and therefore need to be included in any analysis for accurate exposure assessment. On the other hand, the research presented here supports the position that the internal surface deposits in static-dissipative cassettes used with size-selective cyclones are negligible and that it is only necessary to analyze the filter catch.

  11. The equivalent dose comparison of different grain size quartz from lakeshore sediments in the arid region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yuxin; Chen Fahu; Zhao Hui

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of OSL dating of lakeshore sediments, equivalent dose (D e ) values of quartz fractions in different grain-size were measured using the 'Double-SAR' protocol of optical dating in four lakeshore sediments. There are two obvious different relations between D e values and grain sizes. The first situation is that the D e values are accordant with each other for fractions between 63 μm and 400 μm with a slightly decreasing tread of D e values as increasing of grain-size. The second situation is that the D e values are accordant to each other for fractions between 125 μm and 300 μm, while the D e values of the 63-90 μm fraction are obviously smaller than others. The first is consistent with those reported elsewhere, while the second can't be understood by the previous theory. (authors)

  12. Study on the Effect of Diamond Grain Size on Wear of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Cutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Rani, A. M.; Che Sidid, Adib Akmal Bin; Adzis, Azri Hamim Ab

    2018-03-01

    Drilling operation is one of the most crucial step in oil and gas industry as it proves the availability of oil and gas under the ground. Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) bit is a type of bit which is gaining popularity due to its high Rate of Penetration (ROP). However, PDC bit can easily wear off especially when drilling hard rock. The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between the grain sizes of the diamond and wear rate of the PDC cutter using simulation-based study with FEA software (ABAQUS). The wear rates of a PDC cutter with a different diamond grain sizes were calculated from simulated cuttings of cutters against granite. The result of this study shows that the smaller the diamond grain size, the higher the wear resistivity of PDC cutter.

  13. Spectral Profiler Probe for In Situ Snow Grain Size and Composition Stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Molotch, Noah P.; Painter, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    An ultimate goal of the climate change, snow science, and hydrology communities is to measure snow water equivalent (SWE) from satellite measurements. Seasonal SWE is highly sensitive to climate change and provides fresh water for much of the world population. Snowmelt from mountainous regions represents the dominant water source for 60 million people in the United States and over one billion people globally. Determination of snow grain sizes comprising mountain snowpack is critical for predicting snow meltwater runoff, understanding physical properties and radiation balance, and providing necessary input for interpreting satellite measurements. Both microwave emission and radar backscatter from the snow are dominated by the snow grain size stratigraphy. As a result, retrieval algorithms for measuring snow water equivalents from orbiting satellites is largely hindered by inadequate knowledge of grain size.

  14. Inhomogeneity of the grain size of aircraft engine turbine polycrystalline blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chmiela

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the behaviour of inhomogeneous materials with a complex microstructure requires taking into account the inhomogeneity of the grain size, as it is the basis for the process of designing and modelling effective behaviours. Therefore, the functional description of the inhomogeneity is becoming an important issue. The paper presents an analytical approach to the grain size inhomogeneity, based on the derivative of a logarithmic-logistic function. The solution applied enabled an effective evaluation of the inhomogeneity of two macrostructures of aircraft engine turbine blades, characterized by a high degree of diversity in the grain size. For the investigated single-modal and bimodal grain size distributions on a perpendicular projection and for grains with a non-planar surface, we identified the parameters that describe the degree of inhomogeneity of the constituents of weight distributions and we also derived a formula describing the overall degree of inhomogeneity of bimodal distributions. The solution presented in the paper is of a general nature and it can be used to describe the degree of inhomogeneity of multi-modal distributions. All the calculations were performed using the Mathematica® package.

  15. Passive acoustic measurement of bedload grain size distribution using self-generated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrut, Teodor; Geay, Thomas; Gervaise, Cédric; Belleudy, Philippe; Zanker, Sebastien

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring sediment transport processes in rivers is of particular interest to engineers and scientists to assess the stability of rivers and hydraulic structures. Various methods for sediment transport process description were proposed using conventional or surrogate measurement techniques. This paper addresses the topic of the passive acoustic monitoring of bedload transport in rivers and especially the estimation of the bedload grain size distribution from self-generated noise. It discusses the feasibility of linking the acoustic signal spectrum shape to bedload grain sizes involved in elastic impacts with the river bed treated as a massive slab. Bedload grain size distribution is estimated by a regularized algebraic inversion scheme fed with the power spectrum density of river noise estimated from one hydrophone. The inversion methodology relies upon a physical model that predicts the acoustic field generated by the collision between rigid bodies. Here we proposed an analytic model of the acoustic energy spectrum generated by the impacts between a sphere and a slab. The proposed model computes the power spectral density of bedload noise using a linear system of analytic energy spectra weighted by the grain size distribution. The algebraic system of equations is then solved by least square optimization and solution regularization methods. The result of inversion leads directly to the estimation of the bedload grain size distribution. The inversion method was applied to real acoustic data from passive acoustics experiments realized on the Isère River, in France. The inversion of in situ measured spectra reveals good estimations of grain size distribution, fairly close to what was estimated by physical sampling instruments. These results illustrate the potential of the hydrophone technique to be used as a standalone method that could ensure high spatial and temporal resolution measurements for sediment transport in rivers.

  16. The Strain and Grain Size Dependence of the Flow Stress of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Ralph, B.

    1982-01-01

    in terms of a Hall-Petch relationship. At low strains an inhomogeneous distribution of dislocations is seen whilst at higher strains (0.1–0.2) a more regular cell structure begins to develop. This tends to have a minimum size near to grain boundaries. These microstructural observations are correlated......Tensile stress strain data for 99.999% copper at room and liquid nitrogen temperature as a function of grain size are presented together with some microstructural observations made by transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that the flow stress data, at constant strain may be expressed...

  17. Incision and Landsliding Lead to Coupled Increase in Sediment Flux and Grain Size Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda-Boluda, D. C.; Brooke, S.; D'Arcy, M. K.; Whittaker, A. C.; Armitage, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    The rates and grain sizes of sediment fluxes modulate the dynamics and timing of landscape response to tectonics, and dictate the depositional patterns of sediment in basins. Over the last decades, we have gained a good quantitative understanding on how sediment flux and grain size may affect incision and basin stratigraphy. However, we comparably still have limited knowledge on how these variables change with varying tectonic rates. To address this question, we have studied 152 catchments along 8 normal fault-bounded ranges in southern Italy, which are affected by varying fault slip rates and experiencing a transient response to tectonics. Using a data set of 38 new and published 10Be erosion rates, we calibrate a sediment flux predictive equation (BQART), in order to estimate catchment sediment fluxes. We demonstrate that long-term sediment flux is governed by fault slip rates and the tectonically-controlled transient incision, and that sediment flux estimates from the BQART, steady-state assumptions, and incised volumes are highly correlated. This is supported by our 10Be erosion rates, which are controlled by fault slip and incision rates, and the associated landsliding. Based on a new landslide inventory, we show that erosion rate differences are likely due to differences in incision-related landslide activity across these catchments, and that landslides are a major component of sediment fluxes. From a data set of >13000 grain size counts on hillslope grain size supply and fluvial sediment at catchment outlets, we observe that landslides deliver material 20-200% coarser than other sediment sources, and that this coarse supply has an impact on the grain size distributions being exported from the catchments. Combining our sediment flux and grain size data sets, we are able to show that for our catchments, and potentially also for any areas that respond to changes in climate or tectonics via enhanced landsliding, sediment flux and grain size export increase

  18. Characterization of size, composition and origins of dust in fusion devices. Summary report of the 1. research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2009-03-01

    Nine experts on dust formation and their physical and behavioural characteristics attended the first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) on Characterization of Size, Composition and Origins of Dust in Fusion Devices held at IAEA Headquarters on 10-12 December 2008. Participants summarized recent relevant developments related to dust in fusion devices. The specific objectives of the CRP and a detailed work plan were formulated. Discussions, conclusions and recommendations of the RCM are briefly described in this report. (author)

  19. Grain-size effects on PIXE and INAA analysis of IAEA-336 lichen reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, A.P.; Freitas, M.C.; Wolterbeek, H.Th.; Verburg, T.G.; Goeij, J.J.M. de

    2007-01-01

    IAEA-336 lichen certified reference material was used to compare outcomes from INAA and PIXE elemental analyses, in relationship with grain size. The IAEA material (grain size <125 μm) was ground and sieved through nylon nets with 64 μm, 41 μm and 20 μm pores. Particle sizes were determined by Laser Light Scattering technique: the data indicate that, after sieving, the IAEA-336 lichen reference material's particle size distribution follows a bimodal distribution, which is turning more and more monomodal after further fine sieving. Replicates of each fraction were analysed by INAA and PIXE. Results for Cl, K, Mn, Fe and Zn by both techniques were compared by application of z-values tested against the criterion vertical bar z vertical bar < 3 for approval of results at the 99.7% confidence level. Under the conditions of this study, the limited amount of lichen material as 'seen' in the PIXE analysis and the grain size distribution in the lichen material were no causes of measurable differences between the results of both techniques. However, fractionation into smaller grain sizes showed to be associated with lower element content, for Na, Cl, K, Mn and Sr even up to a factor of 2. The observed increases of the proportion of algae in the smaller grain-size fractions and the possible accumulation capacity for certain elements in the fungal part of the lichen may explain the observed phenomenon. The sieving process and consequently the discarding of part of the material have lead to a change of the properties of the original sample, namely algae/fungus percentage and elemental contents

  20. Grain-size effects on PIXE and INAA analysis of IAEA-336 lichen reference material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, A.P. [ITN - Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: amarques@itn.pt; Freitas, M.C. [ITN - Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Wolterbeek, H.Th. [IRI - TU Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Verburg, T.G. [IRI - TU Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Goeij, J.J.M. de [IRI - TU Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    IAEA-336 lichen certified reference material was used to compare outcomes from INAA and PIXE elemental analyses, in relationship with grain size. The IAEA material (grain size <125 {mu}m) was ground and sieved through nylon nets with 64 {mu}m, 41 {mu}m and 20 {mu}m pores. Particle sizes were determined by Laser Light Scattering technique: the data indicate that, after sieving, the IAEA-336 lichen reference material's particle size distribution follows a bimodal distribution, which is turning more and more monomodal after further fine sieving. Replicates of each fraction were analysed by INAA and PIXE. Results for Cl, K, Mn, Fe and Zn by both techniques were compared by application of z-values tested against the criterion vertical bar z vertical bar < 3 for approval of results at the 99.7% confidence level. Under the conditions of this study, the limited amount of lichen material as 'seen' in the PIXE analysis and the grain size distribution in the lichen material were no causes of measurable differences between the results of both techniques. However, fractionation into smaller grain sizes showed to be associated with lower element content, for Na, Cl, K, Mn and Sr even up to a factor of 2. The observed increases of the proportion of algae in the smaller grain-size fractions and the possible accumulation capacity for certain elements in the fungal part of the lichen may explain the observed phenomenon. The sieving process and consequently the discarding of part of the material have lead to a change of the properties of the original sample, namely algae/fungus percentage and elemental contents.

  1. Low-velocity collision behaviour of clusters composed of sub-millimetre sized dust aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, J.; Heißelmann, D.; Kothe, S.; Weidling, R.; Blum, J.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The experiment results presented apply to the very first stages of planet formation, when small dust aggregates collide in the protoplanetary disc and grow into bigger clusters. In 2011, before flying on the REXUS 12 suborbital rocket in 2012, the Suborbital Particle and Aggregation Experiment (SPACE) performed drop tower flights. We present the results of this first microgravity campaign. Aims: The experiments presented aim to measure the outcome of collisions between sub-mm sized protoplanetary dust aggregate analogues. We also observed the clusters formed from these aggregates and their collision behaviour. Methods: The experiments were performed at the drop tower in Bremen. The protoplanetary dust analogue materials were micrometre-sized monodisperse and polydisperse SiO2 particles prepared into aggregates with sizes between 120 μm and 250 μm. One of the dust samples contained aggregates that were previously compacted through repeated bouncing. During three flights of 9 s of microgravity each, individual collisions between aggregates and the formation of clusters of up to a few millimetres in size were observed. In addition, the collisions of clusters with the experiment cell walls leading to compaction or fragmentation were recorded. Results: We observed collisions amongst dust aggregates and collisions between dust clusters and the cell aluminium walls at speeds ranging from about 0.1 cm s-1 to 20 cm s-1. The velocities at which sticking occurred ranged from 0.18 to 5.0 cm s-1 for aggregates composed of monodisperse dust, with an average value of 2.1 ± 0.9 cm s-1 for reduced masses ranging from 1.2 × 10-6 to 1.8 × 10-3 g with an average value of 2.2+16-2.1 × 10-4 g. The velocities at which bouncing occurred ranged from 1.9 to 11.9 cm s-1 for the same aggregates with an average of 5.9 ± 3.2 cm s-1 for reduced masses ranging from 2.1 × 10-6 to 2.4 × 10-4 with an average of 7.8 ± 2.4 × 10-5 g. The velocities at which fragmentation occurred

  2. The evolution of grain mantles and silicate dust growth at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Viti, Serena; Balucani, Nadia; Taquet, Vianney

    2018-05-01

    In dense molecular clouds, interstellar grains are covered by mantles of iced molecules. The formation of the grain mantles has two important consequences: it removes species from the gas phase and promotes the synthesis of new molecules on the grain surfaces. The composition of the mantle is a strong function of the environment that the cloud belongs to. Therefore, clouds in high-zeta galaxies, where conditions - like temperature, metallicity, and cosmic ray flux - are different from those in the Milky Way, will have different grain mantles. In the last years, several authors have suggested that silicate grains might grow by accretion of silicon-bearing species on smaller seeds. This would occur simultaneously with the formation of the iced mantles and be greatly affected by its composition as a function of time. In this work, we present a numerical study of the grain mantle formation in high-zeta galaxies, and we quantitatively address the possibility of silicate growth. We find that the mantle thickness decreases with increasing redshift, from about 120 to 20 layers for z varying from 0 to 8. Furthermore, the mantle composition is also a strong function of the cloud redshift, with the relative importance of CO, CO2, ammonia, methane, and methanol highly varying with z. Finally, being Si-bearing species always a very minor component of the mantle, the formation of silicates in molecular clouds is practically impossible.

  3. Influence of domain on grain size effects of the dielectric properties of BaTiO3 nanoceramics and nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chao; Chen Liangyan; Zhou Dongxiang

    2013-01-01

    The dielectric property of BaTiO 3 nanoparticles and nanoceramics has been studied on the basis of Ginsburg-Landau-Devonshire thermodynamic theory. In this paper, considering nanodomains, Landau coefficients have been written as a function of grain size, and the dielectric constant of the material has been calculated at a variety of temperatures and grain size. The results indicate that with decreasing grain size, the dielectric peak decreases. The two lower dielectric peaks of the orthorhombic-rhombohedral phase and tetragonal-orthorhombic phase move to higher temperature, while cubic-tetragonal phase dielectric peak moves to lower temperature. The dielectric constant of BaTiO 3 ceramics decreases with decreasing grain size. The dielectric constant peak at room temperature is at the grain size which is larger than the critical grain size 17-30 nm. The calculated result is consistent with the experimental data.

  4. Size matters: Influence of multiple scattering on CALIPSO light-extinction profiling in desert dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandinger, U.; Tesche, M.; Seifert, P.; Ansmann, A.; Müller, D.; Althausen, D.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the discrepancies in measurements of light extinction and extinction-to-backsatter ratio (lidar ratio) of desert dust with CALIPSO and ground-based lidar systems. Multiwavelength polarization Raman lidar measurements in the Saharan dust plume performed at Praia, Cape Verde, 15.0°N, 23.5°W, during SAMUM-2 in June 2008 were analyzed and compared to results of nearby CALIPSO overflights. The particle extinction coefficients and thus the optical depth are underestimated in the CALIPSO products by about 30% compared to Raman lidar measurements. A pre-defined lidar ratio of 40 sr at 532 nm is used for mineral dust in the CALIPSO algorithms in agreement with values of 41 ± 6 sr found from constrained retrievals. However, the ground-based lidar observations show much larger values of the order of 55 ± 10 sr. The discrepancies can be explained by the influence of multiple scattering which is ignored in the CALIPSO retrievals. Based on recent observations of the size distribution of dust particles from airborne in-situ observations during SAMUM-1, our model calculations show that the multiple-scattering-related underestimation of the extinction coefficient in the CALIPSO lidar signals ranges from 10%-40%. We propose a method to overcome this underestimation.

  5. Film Grain-Size Related Long-Term Stability of Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chien-Hung; Wu, Chun-Guey

    2016-09-22

    The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the perovskite solar cell is high enough to be commercially viable. The next important issue is the stability of the device. This article discusses the effect of the perovskite grain-size on the long-term stability of inverted perovskite solar cells. Perovskite films composed of various sizes of grains were prepared by controlling the solvent annealing time. The grain-size related stability of the inverted cells was investigated both in ambient atmosphere at relative humidity of approximately 30-40 % and in a nitrogen filled glove box (H 2 Operovskite film having the grain size larger than 1 μm (D-10) decreases less than 10 % with storage in a glove box and less than 15 % when it was stored under an ambient atmosphere for 30 days. However, the cell using the perovskite film composed of small (∼100 nm) perovskite grains (D-0) exhibits complete loss of PCE after storage under the ambient atmosphere for only 15 days and a PCE loss of up to 70 % with storage in the glove box for 30 days. These results suggest that, even under H 2 O-free conditions, the chemical- and thermal-induced production of pin holes at the grain boundaries of the perovskite film could be the reason for long-term instability of inverted perovskite solar cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in settled dust from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwen; Shen, Yang; Pi, Lu; Hu, Wenli; Chen, Mengqin; Luo, Yan; Li, Zhi; Su, Shijun; Ding, Sanglan; Gan, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    A total of 27 settled dust samples were collected from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China to investigate particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in different size fractions. Briefly, fine particle size fractions (dust samples, with mean percentages of 80.2%, 69.5%, and 77.2% for the urban roads, roofs, and the parks, respectively. Perchlorate was detected in all of the size-fractionated dust samples, with concentrations ranging from 73.0 to 6160 ng g(-1), and the median perchlorate levels increased with decreasing particle size. The perchlorate level in the finest fraction (dust intake is safe to both children and adults in Chengdu, China. However, due to perchlorate mainly existing in fine particles, there is a potential for perchlorate to transfer into surface water and the atmosphere by runoff and wind erosion or traffic emission, and this could act as an important perchlorate pollution source for the indoor environment, and merits further study.

  7. Effects of grain size distribution on the packing fraction and shear strength of frictionless disk packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Using discrete element methods, the effects of the grain size distribution on the density and the shear strength of frictionless disk packings are analyzed. Specifically, two recent findings on the relationship between the system's grain size distribution and its rheology are revisited, and their validity is tested across a broader range of distributions than what has been used in previous studies. First, the effects of the distribution on the solid fraction are explored. It is found that the distribution that produces the densest packing is not the uniform distribution by volume fractions as suggested in a recent publication. In fact, the maximal packing fraction is obtained when the grading curve follows a power law with an exponent close to 0.5 as suggested by Fuller and Thompson in 1907 and 1919 [Trans Am. Soc. Civ. Eng. 59, 1 (1907) and A Treatise on Concrete, Plain and Reinforced (1919), respectively] while studying mixtures of cement and stone aggregates. Second, the effects of the distribution on the shear strength are analyzed. It is confirmed that these systems exhibit a small shear strength, even if composed of frictionless particles as has been shown recently in several works. It is also found that this shear strength is independent of the grain size distribution. This counterintuitive result has previously been shown for the uniform distribution by volume fractions. In this paper, it is shown that this observation keeps true for different shapes of the grain size distribution.

  8. Discrimination of sediment provenance in the Yellow Sea: Secondary grain-size effect and REE proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hoi-Soo; Lim, Dhongil; Jeong, Do-Hyun; Xu, Zhaokai; Li, Tiegang

    2016-06-01

    This study analyzed grain size and elemental concentrations (Al, Mg, Fe, and rare earth elements (REEs)) in 91 surface sediments to elucidate sediment provenance in the Yellow Sea. Elemental concentrations were normalized by Al concentration (Celement/CAl) to minimize the sediment grain-size effect (GSE). However, noticeable linear relationships between Al concentration (or mean grain size) and the ratio (e.g., Mg/Al or Fe/Al) appeared unexpectedly in pair diagrams. The spatial distribution patterns of Fe/Al and Mg/Al ratios were also similar to the pattern of mean grain size. This implies that the GSE was not removed completely, even after the normalization process. Thus, great care must be taken when applying the ratios of Celement/CAl as a proxy of sediment provenance. To improve provenance discrimination of the sediments in the Yellow Sea, the difference between the REE distribution patterns of Chinese and Korean river sediments, expressed as δ (δ = REE∗(La) - REE∗(Lu)), was calculated, and the spatial distribution patterns of the δ values were mapped. The δ values gradually increased from the western to the eastern part of the Yellow Sea, except for low δ values in the southeastern part of the Yellow Sea. This result indicates that the majority of Chinese and Korean river sediments are accumulating near to their respective coasts, except for a deposit along the southwestern coast of Korea in which a considerable amount of sediment from Chinese rivers has been accumulating.

  9. Size estimation of uniform grain: Dispersion strengthened Cu-based system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Velgosová, O.; Saxl, Ivan; Besterci, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2003), s. 181-190 ISSN 1210-2717 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/99/0269 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905; CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : grain size estimation * w-s diagram Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  10. Anisotropic Grain Size Estimation Using Computer Simulations and w-s diagram

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponížil, P.; Procházka, J.; Čermák, R.; Saxl, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 7 (2005), s. 728-735 ISSN 1109-2750 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/03/0946 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : grain size estimation * anisotropic material * tessellation Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  11. Grain size distributions of chalk from image analysis of electron micrographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    In the chalk of the Ekofisk formation in the Chalk Group of the North Sea, substantial depth-related variations in porosityare observed. With the aim of obtaining a textural interpretation of these porositydata, we have developed a method to assess the grain size distribution of the chalk from...

  12. influence of delta ferrite on the flow stress grain size relationship of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    deviation from linear proportionality between flow stress and grain size in austenitic steels. This influence ... phases [12]. Delta ferrite contributes to the flow stress as well as t9 the tensile strength of austenitic steels. [13,14] However, for Cr-Ni-Mn steels, there is little information ... 1173K and 1473K or two hours followed by.

  13. Significant effect of grain size distribution on compaction rates in granular aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, André; Elsworth, Derek; Marone, Chris

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the role of pressure solution in deformation of upper- to mid-crustal rocks using aggregates of halite as a room temperature analog for fluid-assisted deformation processes in the Earth's crust. Experiments evaluate the effects of initial grain size distribution on macroscopic

  14. The use of statistical grain-size method in analysing borehole and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of statistical grain-size method in analysing borehole and evaluating aquifer parameters. A case study of ... The distribution of major geological units, well log data, static water level data, and surface features were found to have influenced groundwater occurrence and flow pattern in the study area. The lithological ...

  15. Effects of grain size on the spallation behavior of pure copper under plate-impact loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang ZhaoXiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of grain size on the dynamic tensile fracture (or spall response were investigated for high purity copper materials by plate-impact experiments. The spall strength estimated from the free surface velocity profile is nearly constant with no significant effect from the grain size. However, differences are observed in the acceleration rate of velocity rebound beyond the minima. This may be attributed to the effect of grain size on the growth rate of damage. Metallographic analyses of the fracture surface show that the characteristic feature of the fracture surface clearly depends on the grain size. In the smaller samples, the fracture surfaces are decorated with large, high-density ductile dimples suggesting that the preferential failure mode is ductile intergranular fracture. In the larger samples, the fracture surfaces have a rock candy appearance with small, brittle, high density dimples as well as large ductile dimples suggesting that the fracture mode is a mix of both brittle intergranular fracture and ductile transgranular fracture.

  16. grain size analysis of beach sediment along the barrier bar lagoon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    along the beaches are hence a result of complex interaction between sediment source, wave energy level and the general offshore slope on which the beach is constructed. The intensity of the wave action in the littoral zone generally redeposits and sort materials of all grain sizes. Thus, the composition of beach sediment is.

  17. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Negi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% differences. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broadband albedo. The retrieved snow grain sizes using different models based on the ART theory were compared for various snow types and it was observed that the grain size model using two channel method (one in visible and another in NIR region can work well for the Himalayan seasonal snow and it was found consistent with temporal changes in grain size. This method can work very well for clean, dry snow as in the upper Himalaya, but sometimes, due to the low reflectances (<20% using wavelength 1.24 μm, the ART theory cannot be applied, which is common in lower and middle Himalayan old snow. This study is important for monitoring the Himalayan cryosphere using air-borne or space-borne sensors.

  18. Influence of temperature, grain size and cobalt content on the hardness of WC-Co alloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Milman, YV

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available , grain size and cobalt content on the hardness of WC?Co alloys Yu.V. Milman a, S. Luyckx b,c, IT Northrop d a Institute of Problems in Materials Science, Kiev, Ukraine b School of Process and Materials Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand...

  19. Grain-size effects on thermal properties of BaTiO3 ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Grain-size effects on thermal properties of BaTiO3 ceramics. C J XIAO*, Z X LI and X R DENG. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou, China. MS received 5 January 2010. Abstract. Dense nanocrystalline BaTiO3 ceramics are successfully prepared by the high ...

  20. Optimal foraging in the thalassinidean shrimp Callianassa subterranea - Improving food quality by grain size selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamhuis, EJ; Videler, JJ; de Wilde, PAWJ

    1998-01-01

    The grain size distributions and organic content of habitat sediment, stomach content and faecal pellets of the endobenthic shrimp C. subterranea were analyzed to study food selection and its nutritional yield. Sub-samples of sediment from the shrimps' habitat and the stomach content were fractioned

  1. Modeling grain-size dependent bias in estimating forest area: a regional application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolan Zheng; Linda S. Heath; Mark J. Ducey

    2008-01-01

    A better understanding of scaling-up effects on estimating important landscape characteristics (e.g. forest percentage) is critical for improving ecological applications over large areas. This study illustrated effects of changing grain sizes on regional forest estimates in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan of the USA using 30-m land-cover maps (1992 and 2001)...

  2. Using LiDAR derivatives to estimate sediment grain size on beaches in False Bay

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burns, J

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available sediment grain size on beaches in False Bay James Burns (MSc) Melanie Lück-Vogel CSIR | Stellenbosch University 1 ISRSE-37 Symposium – Tshwane Wednesday 10 May 2017 Kogel Bay (SA) Strand (SA) Strand (SA) The coastal zone is an important asset...

  3. Hardening by ion implantation of VT1-0 alloy having different grain size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikonenko, Alisa, E-mail: aliska-nik@mail.ru; Kurzina, Irina, E-mail: kurzina99@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk Russia (Russian Federation); Nikonenko, Elena, E-mail: vilatomsk@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kalashnikov, Mark, E-mail: kmp1980@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk Russia (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the structural and phase state of commercially pure titanium implanted by aluminum ions. TEM study has been carried out for two types of grains, namely coarse (0.4 µm) and small (0.5 µm). This paper presents details of the yield stress calculations and the analysis of strength components for the both grain types in two areas of the modified layer: at a distance of 0-150 nm (surface area I) and ∼300 nm (central area II) from the irradiated surface. It is shown that the ion implantation results in a considerable hardening of the entire thickness of the implanted layer in the both grain types. The grain size has, however, a different effect on the yield stress in areas I and II. Thus, near the ion-alloyed layer, the yield stress decreases with the increase of the grain size, whilst area II demonstrates its increase. Moreover, the contribution to the general hardening of the alloy made by certain hardening mechanisms differs from contributions made by each of these mechanisms in each certain case.

  4. Study of variation grain size in desulfurization process of calcined petroleum coke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintowantoro, Sungging; Setiawan, Muhammad Arif; Abdul, Fakhreza

    2018-04-01

    Indonesia is a country with abundant natural resources, such as mineral mining and petroleum. In petroleum processing, crude oil can be processed into a source of fuel energy such as gasoline, diesel, oil, petroleum coke, and others. One of crude oil potentials in Indonesia is petroleum coke. Petroleum coke is a product from oil refining process. Sulfur reducing process in calcined petroleum cokes can be done by desulfurization process. The industries which have potential to become petroleum coke processing consumers are industries of aluminum smelting (anode, graphite block, carbon mortar), iron riser, calcined coke, foundry coke, etc. Sulfur reducing process in calcined petroleum coke can be done by thermal desulfurization process with alkaline substance NaOH. Desulfurization of petroleum coke process can be done in two ways, which are thermal desulfurization and hydrodesulphurization. This study aims to determine the effect of various grain size on sulfur, carbon, and chemical bond which contained by calcined petroleum coke. The raw material use calcined petroleum coke with 0.653% sulfur content. The grain size that used in this research is 50 mesh, then varied to 20 mesh and 100 mesh for each desulfurization process. Desulfurization are tested by ICP, UV-VIS, and FTIR to determine levels of sulfur, carbon, chemical bonding and sulfur dissolved water which contained in the residual washing of calcined petroleum coke. From various grain size that mentioned before, the optimal value is on 100 mesh grain size, where the sulfur content in petroleum coke is 0.24% and carbon content reaches the highest level of 97.8%. Meanwhile for grain size 100 mesh in the desulfurization process is enough to break the chemical bonds of organic sulfur in petroleum coke.

  5. Producing laminated NiAl with bimodal distribution of grain size by solid–liquid reaction treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, G.H.; Wang, Q.W.; Du, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The prospect of combining laminated structure design and grain size tailoring to toughen brittle materials is examined. Laminated NiAl consisting of coarse-grained layers and fine-grained layers was fabricated by solid–liquid reaction treatment of stacking Ni and Al foils. The fracture toughness ...

  6. The Effect of Grain Size and Strain on the Tensile Flow Stress of Aluminium at Room Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    1977-01-01

    Tensile-stress-strain data over a strain range from 0.2 to 30% were obtained at room temperature for 99.999 and 99.5% aluminium as a function of grain size. The yield stress-grain size relationship can be expressed by a Petch-Hall relation with approximately the same slope for the two materials....... The flow stress-grain size relationship can adequately be expressed by a modified Petch-Hall relation; for 99.999% aluminium material the slope increases with strain through a maximum around 15–20%, whereas for 99.5% aluminium the slope decreases with the strain to zero at strains about 10%. The flow...... stress-grain size relationship was analyzed in terms of matrix strengthening and grain boundary strengthening according to the dislocation concept of Ashby. At intermediate strains this approach gives a good description of the effect of strain, grain size and purity on the flow stress....

  7. Strain Amount Dependent Grain Size and Orientation Developments during Hot Compression of a Polycrystalline Nickel Based Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoai He

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Controlling grain size in polycrystalline nickel base superalloy is vital for obtaining required mechanical properties. Typically, a uniform and fine grain size is required throughout forging process to realize the superplastic deformation. Strain amount occupied a dominant position in manipulating the dynamic recrystallization (DRX process and regulating the grain size of the alloy during hot forging. In this article, the high-throughput double cone specimen was introduced to yield wide-range strain in a single sample. Continuous variations of effective strain ranging from 0.23 to 1.65 across the whole sample were achieved after reaching a height reduction of 70%. Grain size is measured to be decreased from the edge to the center of specimen with increase of effective strain. Small misorientation tended to generate near the grain boundaries, which was manifested as piled-up dislocation in micromechanics. After the dislocation density reached a critical value, DRX progress would be initiated at higher deformation region, leading to the refinement of grain size. During this process, the transformations from low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs to high angle grain boundaries (HAGBs and from subgrains to DRX grains are found to occur. After the accomplishment of DRX progress, the neonatal grains are presented as having similar orientation inside the grain boundary.

  8. On Techniques to Characterize and Correlate Grain Size, Grain Boundary Orientation and the Strength of the SiC Layer of TRISO Coated Particles: A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I.J.van Rooyen; J.L. Dunzik Gougar; T. Trowbridge; Philip M van Rooyen

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer of the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP) for high temperature gas reactors (HTGR) are performance parameters that have not yet been standardized by the international HTR community. Presented in this paper are the results of characterizing coated particles to reveal the effect of annealing temperature (1000 to 2100°C) on the strength and grain size of unirradiated coated particles. This work was further expanded to include possible relationships between the grain size and strength values. The comparative results of two strength measurement techniques and grain size measured by the Lineal intercept method are included. Preliminary grain boundary characterization results determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are included. These results are also important for future fission product transport studies, as grain boundary diffusion is identified as a possible mechanism by which 110mAg, one of the fission activation products, might be released through intact SiC layers. Temperature is a parameter known to influence the grain size of SiC and therefore it is important to investigate the effect of high temperature annealing on the SiC grain size. Recommendations and future work will also be briefly discussed.

  9. Evaluating the performance of species richness estimators: sensitivity to sample grain size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hortal, Joaquín; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Gaspar, Clara

    2006-01-01

    and several recent estimators [proposed by Rosenzweig et al. (Conservation Biology, 2003, 17, 864-874), and Ugland et al. (Journal of Animal Ecology, 2003, 72, 888-897)] performed poorly. 3.  Estimations developed using the smaller grain sizes (pair of traps, traps, records and individuals) presented similar....... Data obtained with standardized sampling of 78 transects in natural forest remnants of five islands were aggregated in seven different grains (i.e. ways of defining a single sample): islands, natural areas, transects, pairs of traps, traps, database records and individuals to assess the effect of using...

  10. Grain size distribution and annual variation along the beaches from Poompuhar to Nagoor, Tamilnadu, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandrasekaran, R.; Angusamy, N.; Manickaraj, D.S.; Loveson, V.J.; Gujar, A.R.; Chandrasekar, N.; Rajamanickam, G.V.

    with a concentration of 0.8 % (Tab.1). Both these values show an identical trend in shell content, silt+clay content. 3 At Chinnankudy High Tide (HT) region, there is an increase of silt and clay content by 1.09 %. In the berm samples, a general... (Tab.2). In the present study region, graphic mean size of the LT, HT samples of Poompuhar show that sediments are of medium grained in pre and post-tsunami whereas the berm samples display a change in characteristics from medium grained...

  11. GRAIN-SIZE MEASUREMENTS OF FLUVIAL GRAVEL BARS USING OBJECT-BASED IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Castro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional techniques for classifying the average grain size in gravel bars require manual measurements of each grain diameter. Aiming productivity, more efficient methods have been developed by applying remote sensing techniques and digital image processing. This research proposes an Object-Based Image Analysis methodology to classify gravel bars in fluvial channels. First, the study evaluates the performance of multiresolution segmentation algorithm (available at the software eCognition Developer in performing shape recognition. The linear regression model was applied to assess the correlation between the gravels’ reference delineation and the gravels recognized by the segmentation algorithm. Furthermore, the supervised classification was validated by comparing the results with field data using the t-statistic test and the kappa index. Afterwards, the grain size distribution in gravel bars along the upper Bananeiras River, Brazil was mapped. The multiresolution segmentation results did not prove to be consistent with all the samples. Nonetheless, the P01 sample showed an R2 =0.82 for the diameter estimation and R2=0.45 the recognition of the eliptical ft. The t-statistic showed no significant difference in the efficiencies of the grain size classifications by the field survey data and the Object-based supervised classification (t = 2.133 for a significance level of 0.05. However, the kappa index was 0.54. The analysis of the both segmentation and classification results did not prove to be replicable.

  12. Grain size effects on stability of nonlinear vibration with nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Minglu; Sun, Qingping

    2017-10-01

    Grain size effects on stability of thermomechanical responses for a nonlinear torsional vibration system with nanocrystalline superelastic NiTi bar are investigated in the frequency and amplitude domains. NiTi bars with average grain size from 10 nm to 100 nm are fabricated through cold-rolling and subsequent annealing. Thermomechanical responses of the NiTi bar as a softening nonlinear damping spring in the torsional vibration system are obtained by synchronised acquisition of rotational angle and temperature under external sinusoidal excitation. It is shown that nonlinearity and damping capacity of the NiTi bar decrease as average grain size of the material is reduced below 100 nm. Therefore jump phenomena of thermomechanical responses become less significant or even vanish and the vibration system becomes more stable. The work in this paper provides a solid experimental base for manipulating the undesired jump phenomena of thermomechanical responses and stabilising the mechanical vibration system through grain refinement of NiTi SMA.

  13. SPEED DEPENDENCE OF ACOUSTIC VIBRATION PROPAGATION FROM THE FERRITIC GRAIN SIZE IN LOW-CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is determining the nature of the ferrite grain size influence of low-carbon alloy steel on the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations. Methodology. The material for the research served a steel sheet of thickness 1.4 mm. Steel type H18T1 had a content of chemical elements within grade composition: 0, 12 % C, 17, 5 % Cr, 1 % Mn, 1, 1 % Ni, 0, 85 % Si, 0, 9 % Ti. The specified steel belongs to the semiferritic class of the accepted classification. The structural state of the metal for the study was obtained by cold plastic deformation by rolling at a reduction in the size range of 20-30 % and subsequent recrystallization annealing at 740 – 750 ° C. Different degrees of cold plastic deformation was obtained by pre-selection of the initial strip thickness so that after a desired amount of rolling reduction receives the same final thickness. The microstructure was observed under a light microscope, the ferrite grain size was determined using a quantitative metallographic technique. The using of X-ray structural analysis techniques allowed determining the level of second-order distortion of the crystal latitude of the ferrite. The speed propagation of acoustic vibrations was measured using a special device such as an ISP-12 with a working frequency of pulses 1.024 kHz. As the characteristic of strength used the hardness was evaluated by the Brinell’s method. Findings. With increasing of ferrite grain size the hardness of the steel is reduced. In the case of constant structural state of metal, reducing the size of the ferrite grains is accompanied by a natural increasing of the phase distortion. The dependence of the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations up and down the rolling direction of the ferrite grain size remained unchanged and reports directly proportional correlation. Originality. On the basis of studies to determine the direct impact of the proportional nature of the ferrite grain size on the rate of propagation of sound

  14. Effect of alloy grain size on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of the austenitic steel TP 347

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Braz Trindade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Generally, oxide scales formed on high Cr steels are multi-layered and the kinetics are strongly influenced by the alloy grain boundaries. In the present study, the oxidation behaviour of an austenite steel TP347 with different grain sizes was studied to identify the role of grain-boundaries in the oxidation process. Heat treatment in an inert gas atmosphere at 1050 °C was applied to modify the grain size of the steel TP347. The mass gain during subsequent oxidation was measured using a microbalance with a resolution of 10-5 g. The scale morphology was examined using SEM in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Oxidation of TP347 with a grain size of 4 µm at 750 °C in air follows a parabolic rate law. For a larger grain size (65 µm, complex kinetics is observed with a fast initial oxidation followed by several different parabolic oxidation stages. SEM examinations indicated that the scale formed on specimens with smaller grain size was predominantly Cr2O3, with some FeCr2O4 at localized sites. For specimens with larger grain size the main oxide is iron oxide. It can be concluded that protective Cr2O3 formation is promoted by a high density of fast grain-boundary diffusion paths which is the case for fine-grained materials.

  15. Grain growth across protoplanetary discs: 10 μm silicate feature versus millimetre slope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lommen, D.J.P.; van Dishoeck, E.F.; Wright, C.M.; Min, M.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Young stars are formed with dusty discs around them. The dust grains in the disc are originally of the same size as interstellar dust, i.e., of the order of 0.1 μm. Models predict that these grains will grow in size through coagulation. Observations of the silicate features around 10 and 20

  16. Effect of Coal Grain Size on Sorption Capacity with Respect to Propylene and Acetylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Dudzińska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Propylene and acetylene are released to mine air with the increase in the temperature of self-heating coal. Concentrations of these gases in mine air are applied as indicators of the progress of the self-heating process. Hydrocarbons emitted from the self-ignition center are sorbed on coal, while migrating through the mine workings. Coal crushed during the mining process is characterized by a high sorption capacity, which facilitates the sorption phenomena. This results in the decrease in hydrocarbons content in mine air, and in the subsequent incorrect assessment of the development of the self-heating process. The results of the experimental study on propylene and acetylene sorption on Polish coals acquired from operating coal mines are presented in this paper. Bituminous coal is characterized by a high sorption capacity with respect to unsaturated hydrocarbons, like propylene and acetylene. The sorbed volumes depend on the grade of metamorphism, porosity, and chemical characteristics of coal. Low level of metamorphism, increased porosity, and oxygen content result in higher sorption capacity of coals. The reduction in grain size of coals also results in the increased sorption capacity with respect to hydrocarbons. The most significant increase in the volumes of sorbed propylene and acetylene with the decrease in grain class was observed for coals of low porosity, high grade of metamorphism, and low to medium sorption capacities. The 10-fold decrease in coal grain size resulted in the 3 to 6-fold increase in the volume of sorbed propylene, and 2-fold increase for acetylene. The decrease in grain size results in higher accessibility of pore structure, increased pore volume and area, and higher number of active centers interacting with hydrocarbons of dipole characteristics. For coals with low grade metamorphism, high porosity, and high sorption capacity the volumes of sorbed propylene and acetylene increased only slightly with the decrease in

  17. Size distribution of possible dust carriers for the extended red emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, D. P.; Chutjian, A.; Machacek, J. R.; Mangina, R. S., E-mail: ara.chutjian@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Power-law size distributions expected to be applicable to possible carriers of extended red emission (ERE) have been examined using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Si nanoparticles and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon complexes such as oligoacene and oligorylenes with energy gaps close to 2 eV have been considered. In the simplest case of unit quantum efficiency, the MC-generated size distributions are used to obtain photoluminescence (PL) spectra that are then corrected for dust extinction and reddening effects for comparison with observed ERE spectra. It is shown that a power-law size distribution with a decay exponent of α = 7/2, which closely agrees with starlight extinction data, fails to produce an ERE-like spectrum. However, size distributions with decay exponents of α = 19/12 and 3/2 are found to lead to acceptable spectra. Results indicate that energetic photon-induced breakup and competing aggregation effects dominate collisional effects in producing the observed steady-state mass distribution. It is shown that the peak wavelength of emission critically depends on the band gap, rather than cluster mass, which for oligoacenes and oligorylenes is widely different. The peak wavelength is also shown to be insensitive to dust attenuation.

  18. Finite element modeling of grain size effects on the ultrasonic microstructural noise backscattering in polycrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, X; Tie, B; Schmitt, J-H; Aubry, D

    2018-07-01

    The correlation between ultrasonic wave propagation and polycrystalline microstructures has significant implications in nondestructive evaluation. An original numerical approach using the finite element method to quantify in both time and frequency domains the ultrasonic noise scattering due to the elastic heterogeneity of polycrystalline microstructures is presented. Based on the reciprocity theorem, it allows the scattering evaluation using mechanical data recorded only on the boundary of polycrystal instead of within its volume and is applicable to any polycrystalline aggregate regardless of its crystallographic or morphological characteristics. Consequently it gives a more realistic and accurate access of polycrystalline microstructures than the classical analytical models developed under the assumption of single scattering and the Born approximation. The numerical approach is proposed within the same unified theoretical framework as the classical analytical models, so it is possible to validate it in the cases of idealized microstructures for which the considered analytical models remain relevant. As an original result, assuming single phase, untextured and equiaxed microstructures, two-dimensional (2D) theoretical formulas are developed and a frequency-dependent coefficient is found compared to the classical three-dimensional (3D) formulas. 2D numerical simulations are then performed for idealized microstructures composed of hexagonal grains with a uniform grain-size. Three grain sizes are considered herein and involve different scattering regions. Good comparisons are obtained between theoretical and numerical estimates of the backscattering coefficient, which validate the numerical approach. Effects of the grain boundary orientations are analyzed by modeling an irregular hexagonal grain morphology and a random grain morphology generated by an established Voronoi approach. The origin of the significant oscillation level of backscattering is then investigated

  19. [Effects of irrigation scheme on the grain glutenin macropolymer's size distribution and the grain quality of winter wheat with strong gluten].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Jia, Dian-Yong; Dai, Xing-Long; He, Ming-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Taking two winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars (Gaocheng 8901 and Jimai 20) with high quality strong gluten as test materials, a 2-year field experiment was conducted to study the grain glutenin macropolymer (GMP)'s content and size distribution, grain quality, and grain yield under effects of different irrigation schemes. The schemes included no irrigation in whole growth period (W0), irrigation once at jointing stage (W1), irrigation two times at wintering and jointing stages (W2), respectively, and irrigation three times at wintering, jointing, and filling stages (W3), respectively, with the irrigation amount in each time being 675 m3 x hm(-2). Among the test irrigation schemes, W2 had the best effects on the dough development time, dough stability time, loaf volume, grain yield, GMP content, weighted average surface area of particle D(3,2), weighted average volume of particle D(4,3), and volume percent and surface area percent of particle size >100 microm of the two cultivars. The dough development time, dough stability time, and loaf volume were negatively correlated with the volume percent of GMP particle size 100 microm, D(3,2), and D(4,3). It was suggested that both water deficit and water excess had detrimental effects on the grain yield and grain quality, and irrigation level could affect the wheat grain quality through altering GMP particle size distribution.

  20. Can a grain size-dependent viscosity help yielding realistic seismic velocities of LLSVPs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierjott, J.; Cheng, K. W.; Rozel, A.; Tackley, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic studies show two antipodal regions of low shear velocity at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), one beneath the Pacific and one beneath Africa. These regions, called Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs), are thought to be thermally and chemically distinct and thus have a different density and viscosity. Whereas there is some general consensus about the density of the LLSVPs the viscosity is still a very debated topic. So far, in numerical studies the viscosity is treated as either depth- and/or temperature- dependent but the potential grain size- dependence of the viscosity is neglected most of the time. In this study we use a self-consistent convection model which includes a grain size- dependent rheology based on the approach by Rozel et al. (2011) and Rozel (2012). Further, we consider a primordial layer and a time-dependent basalt production at the surface to dynamically form the present-day chemical heterogeneities, similar to earlier studies, e.g by Nakagawa & Tackley (2014). With this model we perform a parameter study which includes different densities and viscosities of the imposed primordial layer. We detect possible thermochemical piles based on different criterions, compute their average effective viscosity, density, rheology and grain size and investigate which detecting criterion yields the most realistic results. Our preliminary results show that a higher density and/or viscosity of the piles is needed to keep them at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Relatively to the ambient mantle grain size is high in the piles but due to the temperature at the CMB the viscosity is not remarkably different than the one of ordinary plumes. We observe that grain size is lower if the density of the LLSVP is lower than the one of our MORB material. In that case the average temperature of the LLSVP is also reduced. Interestingly, changing the reference viscosity is responsible for a change in the average viscosity of the LLSVP but not for a different average

  1. Grain Size Distribution in Mudstones: A Question of Nature vs. Nurture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, J.

    2011-12-01

    Grain size distribution in mudstones is affected by the composition of the source material, the processes of transport and deposition, and post-depositional diagenetic modification. With regard to source, it does make a difference whether for example a slate belt is eroded vs a stable craton. The former setting tends to provide a broad range of detrital quartz in the sub 62 micron size range in addition to clays and greenschist grade rock fragments, whereas the latter may be biased towards coarser quartz silt (30-60 microns), in addition to clays and mica flakes. In flume experiments, when fine grained materials are transported in turbulent flows at velocities that allow floccules to transfer to bedload, a systematic shift of grain size distribution towards an increasingly finer grained suspended load is observed as velocity is lowered. This implies that the bedload floccules are initially constructed of only the coarsest clay particles at high velocities, and that finer clay particles become incorporated into floccules as velocity is lowered. Implications for the rock record are that clay beds deposited from decelerating flows should show subtle internal grading of coarser clay particles; and that clay beds deposited from continuous fast flows should show a uniform distribution of coarse clays. Still water settled clays should show a well developed lower (coarser) and upper (finer) subdivision. A final complication arises when diagenetic processes, such as the dissolution of biogenic silica, give rise to diagenetic quartz grains in the silt to sand size range. This diagenetic silica precipitates in fossil cavities and pore spaces of uncompacted muds, and on casual inspection can be mistaken for detrital quartz. In distal mudstone successions close to 100 % of "apparent" quartz silt can be of that origin, and reworking by bottom currents can further enhance a detrital perception by producing rippled and laminated silt beds. Although understanding how size

  2. MinSORTING: an Excel macro for modelling sediment composition and grain-size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resentini, Alberto; Malusà, Marco G.; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    Detrital mineral analyses are gaining increasing attention in the geosciences as new single-grain analytical techniques are constantly improving their resolution, and consequently widening their range of application, including sedimentary petrology, tectonic geomorphology and archaeology (Mange and Wright, 2007; von Eynatten and Dunkl, 2012). We present here MinSORTING, a new tool to quickly predict the size distribution of various minerals and rock fragments in detrital sediments, based on the physical laws that control sedimentation by tractive wind or water currents (Garzanti et al., 2008). The input values requested by the software are the sediment mean size, sorting, fluid type (seawater, freshwater, air) and standard sediment composition chosen from a given array including nine diverse tectonic settings. MinSORTING calculates the bulk sediment density and the settling velocity. The mean size of each single detrital component, assumed as lognormally-distributed, is calculated from its characteristic size-shift with respect to bulk sediment mean size, dependent in turn on its density and shape. The final output of MinSORTING is the distribution of each single detrital mineral in each size classes (at the chosen 0.25, 0.5 or 1 phi intervals). This allows geochronolgists to select the most suitable grain size of sediment to be sampled in the field, as well as the most representative size-window for analysis. Also, MinSORTING provides an estimate of the volume/weight of the fractions not considered in both sizes finer and coarser than the selected size-window. A beta version of the software is available upon request from: alberto.resentini@unimib.it Mange, M., and Wright, D. (eds), 2007. Heavy minerals in use. Developments in Sedimentology Series, 58. Elsevier, Amsterdam. Garzanti, E., Andò, S., Vezzoli, G., 2008. Settling-equivalence of detrital minerals and grain-size dependence of sediment composition. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 273, 138-151. von

  3. Estimating the settling velocity of bioclastic sediment using common grain-size analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Michael V. W.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Falter, James L.; Buscombe, Daniel D.

    2017-01-01

    Most techniques for estimating settling velocities of natural particles have been developed for siliciclastic sediments. Therefore, to understand how these techniques apply to bioclastic environments, measured settling velocities of bioclastic sedimentary deposits sampled from a nearshore fringing reef in Western Australia were compared with settling velocities calculated using results from several common grain-size analysis techniques (sieve, laser diffraction and image analysis) and established models. The effects of sediment density and shape were also examined using a range of density values and three different models of settling velocity. Sediment density was found to have a significant effect on calculated settling velocity, causing a range in normalized root-mean-square error of up to 28%, depending upon settling velocity model and grain-size method. Accounting for particle shape reduced errors in predicted settling velocity by 3% to 6% and removed any velocity-dependent bias, which is particularly important for the fastest settling fractions. When shape was accounted for and measured density was used, normalized root-mean-square errors were 4%, 10% and 18% for laser diffraction, sieve and image analysis, respectively. The results of this study show that established models of settling velocity that account for particle shape can be used to estimate settling velocity of irregularly shaped, sand-sized bioclastic sediments from sieve, laser diffraction, or image analysis-derived measures of grain size with a limited amount of error. Collectively, these findings will allow for grain-size data measured with different methods to be accurately converted to settling velocity for comparison. This will facilitate greater understanding of the hydraulic properties of bioclastic sediment which can help to increase our general knowledge of sediment dynamics in these environments.

  4. Effect of grain size and arrangement on dynamic damage evolution of ductile metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Mei-Lan; Zhong Sheng; Fan Duan; Zhao Li; He Hong-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Plate-impact experiments have been carried out to examine the effect of grain size and grain arrangement on the damage evolution of ultrapure aluminum. Two groups of samples, “cross-cut“ and “longitudinal-cut,“ are obtained from the rolled aluminum rod along different directions. The peak compressive stress is approximately 1.25 GPa−1.61 GPa, which can cause incipient spall damage that is correlated to the material microstructure. The metallographic analyses of all recovered samples show that nearly all damage nucleates at the grain boundaries, especially those with larger curvature. Moreover, under lower shock stress, the spall strength of the “longitudinal-cut“ sample is smaller than that of the “cross-cut“ sample, because the different grain sizes and arrangement of the two samples cause different nucleation, growth, and coalescence processes. In this study, the difference in the damage distribution between “longitudinal-cut“ and “cross-cut“ samples and the causes for this difference under lower shock-loading conditions are also analyzed by both qualitative and semi-quantitative methods. It is very important for these conclusions to establish a reasonable and perfect equation of damage evolution for ductile metals. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  5. Magnetic behaviour of sol–gel driven BiFeO{sub 3} thin films with different grain size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Shiwani [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004, Punjab (India); Saravanan, P. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500058 (India); Pandey, O.P. [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004, Punjab (India); Vinod, V.T.P.; Černík, Miroslav [Institute for Nanomaterials, Advanced Technologies and Innovation, Department of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Liberec, Studentská 1402/2, Liberec 1, 461 17 (Czech Republic); Sharma, Puneet, E-mail: puneet.sharma@thapar.edu [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004, Punjab (India)

    2016-03-01

    BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films with uniform thickness of ~200 nm were prepared by the sol–gel assisted spin coating method. Different grain size distributions in the as-grown BFO films were then induced by varying the annealing temperature between 525 and 600 °C. It is found that the grain size distribution become wider as the annealing temperature increases. All the films showed a well-saturated magnetization (M) versus magnetic field (H) hysteresis loops at 300 K. A strong dependence of M on the grain size distribution is observed. An optimal grain size distribution with average grain size ~90 nm is responsible for high M in the BFO films. The non-saturated M–H loops obtained at 10 K suggest the spin glass behaviour of BFO films. The zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) magnetization curves shows split at 300 K and a cusp at ~50 K in the ZFC curve, which further confirms the spin glass state of polycrystalline BFO thin films. - Highlights: • Effect of grain size distribution on magnetization of bismuth ferrite was investigated. • BiFeO{sub 3} thin films of uniform thickness with different grain size distribution were prepared by the sol–gel method. • Strong dependence of magnetization on grain size distribution is observed.

  6. Correlation Between Grain Size Distribution and Silicon and Oxygen Contents at Wadi Arar Sediments, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. M. Alghamdi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Quartz is the major mineral of Wadi Arar sediments. The top two elements contents are oxygen with 63.96 wt%, followed by silicon with 16.35 wt%. There is a positive, weak to medium correlation between grain size and silicon and oxygen contents. The correlation between oxygen and grain size is four times higher than that of silicon. At grain size ranges between 0.8 and 1.0 mm, both oxygen and silicon show the maximum correlation, which decrease gradually with finer and coarser grain sizes. For each element, the correlation between the element content and grain size is a fourth degree polynomial in the grain size. Theoretically, the best two math models that represent the relation between the grain size distribution and each of individual oxygen and silicon content are y=8.84∙ln(x+39.5 and y=2.26∙ln(x+10.1 respectively, where y represents the element content percentage and x represents the corresponding grain size in mm.

  7. Size, chlorophyll retention and protein and oil contents of grains from soybean plants grown in different spatial arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Werner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The spatial arrangement of soybean plants, determined by row spacing and seeding rate, affects the intraspecific competition for water, light, and nutrients, as well as plant architecture and grain development, quality, and chemical composition. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of row spacing and seeding rate on the grain size produced, and the influence of these three factors on chlorophyll retention and protein and oil content in grain. Two experiments were conducted in the 2013/14 and 2014/15 growing seasons, using a 4 × 3 factorial randomized block design with three replications. Four different row spacings [20 cm (narrow row, 50 cm (conventional, 20/80 cm (twin rows and crossed lines (50 cm] and three seeding rates (150, 300, and 450 thousand viable seeds ha-1 were evaluated. The grains were classified by size using oblong sieves and then the effects of spatial arrangements and size of grain on the percentage of green grains and protein and oil contents were evaluated. Higher plant densities were associated with larger grain size, whereas the effects of spacing between the rows on the grain size varied between growing seasons. The arrangement in cross-rows and high plant density produced a higher percentage of green grains under weather conditions favorable to the development of this attribute. The effects of plant spatial arrangements on the contents of protein and oil in grains were variable, and it was not possible to determine whether the spatial arrangement of plants had an effect on the levels of protein and oil in grains. Larger grains had higher protein content, but oil contents were not affected by grain size.

  8. Grain Size Analysis And Depositional Environment For Beach Sediments Along Abu Dhabi Coast United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Al Rashedi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper analysed the grain-size spectrum and textural parameters namely mean sorting skewness and kurtosis of Abu Dhabi coast in United Arab Emirates applying the ASTM sieves. For this purpose fifty seven samples were analysed. The results of the sieving analysis divulged that samples of the study area range between -2.63 pebble size to 2-39 Fine sands. The statistical analysis reveals that the sand is characteristically fine grained moderately well sorted to extremely poorly sorted. The sand distribution is strongly coarse and leptokurtic in nature. Abundance of the medium sand to fine sand shows the prevalence of comparatively moderate- to low-energy condition in the study area. Linear discriminate function of the samples indicates an Aeolian shallow marine deposition environment and less influence of fluvial 7 process.

  9. Factors influencing on the bioaccessibility of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in size-specific dust from air conditioner filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Yang, Dan; Wang, Xinxin; Huang, Ningbao; Zhang, Xinyu; Zhang, Dongping; Fu, Jiamo

    2013-11-01

    Size-specific concentrations and bioaccessibility of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in dust from air conditioner filters were measured, and the factors influencing the PBDE bioaccessibility were determined. Generally, the PBDE concentrations increased with decreasing dust particle size, and BDE209 (deca-BDE) was generally the predominant congener. The bioaccessibility ranged from 20.3% to 50.8% for tri- to hepta-BDEs, and from 5.1% to 13.9% for BDE209 in dust fractions of varied particle size. The bioaccessibility of most PBDE congeners decreased with increasing dust particle size. The way of being of PBDE (adsorbed to dust surface or incorporated into polymers) in dust significantly influenced the bioaccessibility. There was a significant negative correlation between the tri- to hepta-BDE bioaccessibility and organic matter (OM) contents in dust. Furthermore, tri- to hepta-BDE bioaccessibility increased with increasing polarity of OMs, while with decreasing aromaticity of OMs. The tri- to hepta-BDE bioaccessibility significantly positively correlated with the surface areas and pore volumes of dust. Using multiple linear regression analysis, it was found that the OM contents and pore volumes of dust were the most important factors to influence the tri- to hepta-BDE bioaccessibility and they could be used to estimate the bioaccessibility of tri- to hepta-BDEs according to the following equation: bioaccessibility (%)=45.05-0.49 × OM%+1.79 × pore volume. However, BDE209 bioaccessibility did not correlate to any of these factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  11. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

    OpenAIRE

    H. S. Negi; A. Kokhanovsky

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART) theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% measured error accuracy. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broa...

  12. Grain Size and Heat Source Effect on the Drying Profile of Cocoa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four sweat boxes were constructed with wooden material (0.95 x 0.25 x 0.25m) L x W x H and one electric bulb with 100,200,300 and 400watts rating hoisted in each box interchangeably. Cocoa bean cleaned and sorted into four different grain sizes samples (A, B, C, D) was subjected to drying till 13-14% moisture content ...

  13. Identifying grain-size dependent errors on global forest area estimates and carbon studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolan Zheng; Linda S. Heath; Mark J. Ducey

    2008-01-01

    Satellite-derived coarse-resolution data are typically used for conducting global analyses. But the forest areas estimated from coarse-resolution maps (e.g., 1 km) inevitably differ from a corresponding fine-resolution map (such as a 30-m map) that would be closer to ground truth. A better understanding of changes in grain size on area estimation will improve our...

  14. H2 formation on interstellar dust grains: The viewpoints of theory, experiments, models and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakelam, Valentine; Bron, Emeric; Cazaux, Stephanie; Dulieu, Francois; Gry, Cécile; Guillard, Pierre; Habart, Emilie; Hornekær, Liv; Morisset, Sabine; Nyman, Gunnar; Pirronello, Valerio; Price, Stephen D.; Valdivia, Valeska; Vidali, Gianfranco; Watanabe, Naoki

    2017-12-01

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the universe. It is the first one to form and survive photo-dissociation in tenuous environments. Its formation involves catalytic reactions on the surface of interstellar grains. The micro-physics of the formation process has been investigated intensively in the last 20 years, in parallel of new astrophysical observational and modeling progresses. In the perspectives of the probable revolution brought by the future satellite JWST, this article has been written to present what we think we know about the H2 formation in a variety of interstellar environments.

  15. Energy saving cement production by grain size optimisation of the raw meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Simons

    Full Text Available The production of cement clinker is an energy consuming process. At about 50% of the energy is associated with grinding and milling of the raw meal, that normally is in the range 100% <200 μm with 90% <90 μm. Question: is it possible to use coarser components of the raw meal without reducing the clinker quality. With synthetic raw meals of various grain sizes the clinker formation was studied at static (1100 - 1450°C and dynamic conditions (heating microscope. A routine to adjust the grain size of the components for industrial raw meals is developed. The fine fraction <90 μm should mainly contain the siliceous and argileous components, whereas the calcitic component can be milled separately to a grain size between 200-500 μm, resulting in lower energy consumption for milling. Considering the technical and economical realizability the relation fine/coarse should be roughly 1:1. The energy for milling can be reduced significantly, that in addition leads to the preservation of natural energy resources.

  16. Development Support Environment of Business ApplicationsBased on a Multi-Grain-Size Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Koichi; Izumi, Noriaki; Yamaguchi, Takahira

    In order to build the Web-based application as a shopping site on the Web, various ideas from the different viewpoints are required, such as enterprise modeling, workflow modeling, software development, and so on. From the above standpoint, this paper proposes an integrated environment to support the whole development process of analysis, design and implementation of business application. In order to reuse know-hows of various ideas in the business application development, we device a multi-grain-size repository, which consists of coarse-, middle-, and fine-grain-size repositories that correspond to the enterprise models, workflow models, and software models, respectively. We also provide a methodology that rebuilds heterogeneous information resources required for the business applications development into a multi-grain-size repository based on ontologies. The contents of the repositories are modeled by the is-a, has-a, and E-R relations, and described by the XML language. We have implemented Java-based prototype environment with the tools dealing with the multi-layered repository and confirmed that it supports us in various phases of business application development including business model manifestation, detailed business model definition and an implementation of business software applications.

  17. New empirical relationship between grain size distribution and hydraulic conductivity for ephemeral streambed sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Rosas, Jorge

    2014-07-19

    Grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were determined for 39 sediment samples collected from ephemeral streams (wadis) in western Saudi Arabia. The measured hydraulic conductivity values were then compared to values calculated using 20 different empirical equations commonly used to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain size analyses. It was found that most of the hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the empirical equations correlated very poorly with the measured hydraulic conductivity values. Modifications of the empirical equations, including changes to special coefficients and statistical offsets, were made to produce modified equations that considerably improved the hydraulic conductivity estimates from grain size data for wadi sediments. The Chapuis, Hazen, Kozeny, Slichter, Terzaghi, and Barr equations produced the best correlations, but still had relatively high predictive errors. The Chapius equation was modified for wadi sediments by incorporating mud percentage and the standard deviation (in phi units) into a new equation that reduced the predicted hydraulic conductivity error to ±14.1 m/day. The equation is best applied to ephemeral stream samples that have hydraulic conductive values greater than 2 m/day.

  18. Determination of hydraulic conductivity from grain-size distribution for different depositional environments

    KAUST Repository

    Rosas, Jorge

    2013-06-06

    Over 400 unlithified sediment samples were collected from four different depositional environments in global locations and the grain-size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured using standard methods. The measured hydraulic conductivity values were then compared to values calculated using 20 different empirical equations (e.g., Hazen, Carman-Kozeny) commonly used to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain-size distribution. It was found that most of the hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the empirical equations correlated very poorly to the measured hydraulic conductivity values with errors ranging to over 500%. To improve the empirical estimation methodology, the samples were grouped by depositional environment and subdivided into subgroups based on lithology and mud percentage. The empirical methods were then analyzed to assess which methods best estimated the measured values. Modifications of the empirical equations, including changes to special coefficients and addition of offsets, were made to produce modified equations that considerably improve the hydraulic conductivity estimates from grain size data for beach, dune, offshore marine, and river sediments. Estimated hydraulic conductivity errors were reduced to 6 to 7.1m/day for the beach subgroups, 3.4 to 7.1m/day for dune subgroups, and 2.2 to 11m/day for offshore sediments subgroups. Improvements were made for river environments, but still produced high errors between 13 and 23m/day. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  19. Thinning behavior of laminated sheets metal in warm deep-drawing process under various grain sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadkhodayan Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present research is to investigate the thickness distribution on the warm deep-drawing process of laminated sheets consisting of aluminum alloy series 1050, 5052 and stainless steel 304 (SUS, experimentally. Individually for each layer, the influences of blank temperature and grain size on thinning behavior are clearly demonstrated. In order to survey the thinning behavior in laminate sheet behavior during warm deep-drawing process; three blank temperatures namely, 25° C, 100° C and 160° C are examined. Moreover, to obtain different grain sizes, the aluminium sheets are annealed at 350° C, 400° C and 450° C for 1 hour. Results indicate that increasing temperature and grain size lead to maximum thinning in all layers in Al 1050/SUS and Al 5052/SUS specimens increase. In addition, the most susceptible zone to fracture in aluminum sheets (Al 1050 and Al 5052 is punch profile radius region; nevertheless, for stainless steel sheets this zone switch to central zone of formed cup. These can be attributed to the fact that the adhesive layer play a crucial role in thickness distribution of steel 304 layer, therefore the distribution of thickness strain for adhesive layer is also investigated.

  20. A visual basic program to generate sediment grain-size statistics and to extrapolate particle distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; Eliason, A.H.; Hastings, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Measures that describe and summarize sediment grain-size distributions are important to geologists because of the large amount of information contained in textural data sets. Statistical methods are usually employed to simplify the necessary comparisons among samples and quantify the observed differences. The two statistical methods most commonly used by sedimentologists to describe particle distributions are mathematical moments (Krumbein and Pettijohn, 1938) and inclusive graphics (Folk, 1974). The choice of which of these statistical measures to use is typically governed by the amount of data available (Royse, 1970). If the entire distribution is known, the method of moments may be used; if the next to last accumulated percent is greater than 95, inclusive graphics statistics can be generated. Unfortunately, earlier programs designed to describe sediment grain-size distributions statistically do not run in a Windows environment, do not allow extrapolation of the distribution's tails, or do not generate both moment and graphic statistics (Kane and Hubert, 1963; Collias et al., 1963; Schlee and Webster, 1967; Poppe et al., 2000)1.Owing to analytical limitations, electro-resistance multichannel particle-size analyzers, such as Coulter Counters, commonly truncate the tails of the fine-fraction part of grain-size distributions. These devices do not detect fine clay in the 0.6–0.1 μm range (part of the 11-phi and all of the 12-phi and 13-phi fractions). Although size analyses performed down to 0.6 μm microns are adequate for most freshwater and near shore marine sediments, samples from many deeper water marine environments (e.g. rise and abyssal plain) may contain significant material in the fine clay fraction, and these analyses benefit from extrapolation.The program (GSSTAT) described herein generates statistics to characterize sediment grain-size distributions and can extrapolate the fine-grained end of the particle distribution. It is written in Microsoft

  1. Collapse of passive margins by lithospheric damage and plunging grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Bercovici, David

    2018-02-01

    The collapse of passive margins has been proposed as a possible mechanism for the spontaneous initiation of subduction. In order for a new trench to form at the junction between oceanic and continental plates, the cold and stiff oceanic lithosphere must be weakened sufficiently to deform at tectonic rates. Such rates are especially hard to attain in the cold ductile portion of the lithosphere, at which the mantle lithosphere reaches peak strength. The amount of weakening required for the lithosphere to deform in this tectonic setting is dictated by the available stress. Stress in a cooling passive margin increases with time (e.g., due to ridge push), and is augmented by stresses present in the lithosphere at the onset of rifting (e.g., due to drag from underlying mantle flow). Increasing stress has the potential to weaken the ductile portion of the lithosphere by dislocation creep, or by decreasing grain size in conjunction with a grain-size sensitive rheology like diffusion creep. While the increasing stress acts to weaken the lithosphere, the decreasing temperature acts to stiffen it, and the dominance of one effect or the other determines whether the margin might weaken and collapse. Here, we present a model of the thermal and mechanical evolution of a passive margin, wherein we predict formation of a weak shear zone that spans a significant depth-range of the ductile portion of the lithosphere. Stiffening due to cooling is offset by weakening due to grain size reduction, driven by the combination of imposed stresses and grain damage. Weakening via grain damage is modest when ridge push is the only source of stress in the lithosphere, making the collapse of a passive margin unlikely in this scenario. However, adding even a small stress-contribution from mantle drag results in damage and weakening of a significantly larger portion of the lithosphere. We posit that rapid grain size reduction in the ductile portion of the lithosphere can enable, or at least

  2. A Simple Size Effect Model for Tension Perpendicular to the Grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M. U.; Clorius, Christian Odin; Damkilde, Lars

    2003-01-01

    The strength in tension perpendicular to the grain is known to decrease with an increase in the stressed volume. Usually this size effect is explained on a stochastic basis, that is, an explanation relying on the increased probability of encountering a strength reducing flaw when the volume of th...... on a deterministic basis. Arguments for such a simple deterministic explanation of size effect is found in finite element modelling, using the orthotropic stiffness characteristics in the transverse plane of wood.......The strength in tension perpendicular to the grain is known to decrease with an increase in the stressed volume. Usually this size effect is explained on a stochastic basis, that is, an explanation relying on the increased probability of encountering a strength reducing flaw when the volume...... of the material under stress is increased. This paper presents an experimental investigation on specimens with a well-defined structural orientation of the material. The experiments exhibit a large size effect and the nature of the failures encountered suggests that the size effect can be explained...

  3. Geochemical phase and particle size relationships of metals in urban road dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarathne, Ayomi; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Ayoko, Godwin A; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2017-11-01

    Detailed knowledge of the processes that metals undergo during dry weather periods whilst deposited on urban surfaces and their environmental significance is essential to predict the potential influence of metals on stormwater quality in order to develop appropriate stormwater pollution mitigation measures. However, very limited research has been undertaken in this area. Accordingly, this study investigated the geochemical phase and particle size relationships of seven metals which are commonly associated with urban road dust, using sequential extraction in order to assess their mobility characteristics. Metals in the sequentially extracted fractions of exchangeable, reducible, oxidisable and residual were found to follow a similar trend for different land uses even though they had variable accumulation loads. The high affinity of Cd and Zn for exchangeable reactions in both, bulk and size-fractionated solid samples confirmed their high mobility, while the significant enrichment of Ni and Cr in the stable residual fraction indicated a low risk of mobility. The study results also confirmed the availability of Cu, Pb and Mn in both, stable and mobile fractions. The fine fraction of solids (dust. The outcomes from this study are expected to contribute to the development of effective stormwater pollution mitigation strategies by taking into consideration the metal-particulate relationships. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Debris flow grain size scales with sea surface temperature over glacial-interglacial timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.; Araújo, João Paulo C.

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows are common erosional processes responsible for a large volume of sediment transfer across a range of landscapes from arid settings to the tropics. They are also significant natural hazards in populated areas. However, we lack a clear set of debris flow transport laws, meaning that: (i) debris flows remain largely neglected by landscape evolution models; (ii) we do not understand the sensitivity of debris flow systems to past or future climate changes; and (iii) it remains unclear how to interpret debris flow stratigraphy and sedimentology, for example whether their deposits record information about past tectonics or palaeoclimate. Here, we take a grain size approach to characterising debris flow deposits from 35 well-dated alluvial fan surfaces in Owens Valley, California. We show that the average grain sizes of these granitic debris flow sediments precisely scales with sea surface temperature throughout the entire last glacial-interglacial cycle, increasing by ~ 7 % per 1 ° C of climate warming. We compare these data with similar debris flow systems in the Mediterranean (southern Italy) and the tropics (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), and find equivalent signals over a total temperature range of ~ 14 ° C. In each area, debris flows are largely governed by rainfall intensity during triggering storms, which is known to increase exponentially with temperature. Therefore, we suggest that these debris flow systems are transporting predictably coarser-grained sediment in warmer, stormier conditions. This implies that debris flow sedimentology is governed by discharge thresholds and may be a sensitive proxy for past changes in rainfall intensity. Our findings show that debris flows are sensitive to climate changes over short timescales (≤ 104 years) and therefore highlight the importance of integrating hillslope processes into landscape evolution models, as well as providing new observational constraints to guide this. Finally, we comment on what grain size

  5. Crack Propagation Behavior of Alumina with Different Grain Sizes under Static and Cyclic Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Attaoui, H.; Saadaoui, M.; Chevalier, J.; Fantozzi, G.

    Crack propagation in high purity alumina ceramics with different grain sizes was investigated with the Double Torsion method during static and cyclic fatigue. Slow crack growth in alumina is due to stress corrosion by water molecules at the crack tip. However, the microstructure plays a significant role on V-KI laws (crack velocity versus stress intensity factor) under static loading: the higher the grain size, the larger the crack resistance. This increase in crack resistance with grain size is easily attributed to crack bridging mechanisms. A compliance function, based on the variation of compliance with bridging stresses, is applied here to quantify the amount of crack bridging. It is shown experimentally that the reinforcement due to crack bridging is proportional to the compliance function. Under cyclic fatigue, a reduction of crack bridging is observed, followed by a decrease of the compliance function. During crack propagation under cyclic loading, the compliance is affected by the frictional degradation of bridges (due to repeated unloading and loading). The amount of frictional degradation versus number of cycles is followed for different loading conditions. At low loads, the crack rate is initially equal to zero, but crack bridging decreases monotonically with the number of cycles. After an 'incubation' period, crack propagation initiates and new bridges are formed. This leads further to an equilibrium between crack shielding degradation and crack shielding accumulation. The equilibrium condition is obtained more rapidly for higher loads. In any case, the crack resistance at the equilibrium is always lower than that obtained under monotonic loading. This is particularly significant for coarse grain microstructures: the higher the crack resistance under monotonic loading, the higher the degradation under cyclic loading. This implies, that it is inappropriate to incorporate directly V-KI curves obtained from monotonic loading into a cyclic fatigue analysis

  6. The effect of current density and saccharin addition on the grain size of nickel coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Young Rang; Park, Keun Yung; Son, Kwang Jae; Shim, Young Ho; Choi, Sun Ju [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Recently, the main advantage of a radioisotope 'fuel' is concentrated, because it is 'burned' at the rate of the isotopes half life. In other words, given a half life of 100 years, a nuclear battery would still produce half of its initial starting power after 100 years. A speck of a radioisotope like nickel 63, for example, contains enough energy to power a nano nuclear battery for decades, and to do so safely. Ni 63, a beta radiation source, is prepared by electrical deposition of radioactive Ni 63 ions on thin non radioactive nickel foil. Ni 63 plating is similar to other electroplating processes that employ soluble metal anodes. It requires the passage of a direct current between two electrodes that are immersed in a conductive, aqueous solution of nickel salts. The charged Ni ions are formed by sulfate, sulfamate, chloride, and a Watts bath. However, the charged Ni 63 ions are formed by dissolving metal Ni 63. To establish the coating condition of Ni 63, non radioactive metal Ni particles were dissolved in an acid solution and electroplated on the Ni sheet. A continuous increase in the grain size versus current density has also been recognized in the direct current electrodeposition of nickel coating. On the other hand, A runa et al. reported that the current density has no significant effect on the grain size of nickel electro deposits. A review of the literature shows that saccharin has often been added to a nickel plating bath since the 1980s to improve the ductility and brightness, and in later periods as a grain refiner agent. In the present paper, not only the preparation of the Ni plating solution prepared by dissolving metal particles but also an optimization of the deposition conditions, such as the influence of current density and saccharin concentration on the grain size, was investigated. The proposed model can also be applied for radioactive Ni 63 electroplating.

  7. Characterization of Size, Composition and Origins of Dust in Fusion Devices. Summary Report of the Third Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.

    2013-02-01

    Twelve experts on processes of dust in fusion experiments met at IAEA Headquarters 30 November - 02 December 2011 for the 3rd Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on ''Characterization of size, composition and origins of dust in fusion devices.'' Participants reviewed their work done in the course of the CRP and the current state of knowledge, and they made plans for a dust database and a final CRP report. Presentations, discussions and recommendations of the RCM are summarized here. (author)

  8. Extracting lunar dust parameters from image charge signals produced by the Lunar Dust Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J.; Kempf, S.; Horanyi, M.; Szalay, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is an impact ionization dust detector used to characterize the lunar dust exosphere generated by the impacts of large interplanetary particles and meteor streams (Horanyi et al., 2015). In addition to the mass and speed of these lofted particles, LDEX is sensitive to their charge. The resulting signatures of impact events therefore provide valuable information about not only the ambient plasma environment, but also the speed vectors of these dust grains. Here, impact events produced from LDEX's calibration at the Dust Accelerator Laboratory are analyzed using an image charge model derived from the electrostatic simulation program, Coulomb. We show that parameters such as dust grain speed, size, charge, and position of entry into LDEX can be recovered and applied to data collected during LADEE's seven-month mission.

  9. The effect of grain size and phosphorous-doping of polycrystalline 3C-SiC on infrared reflectance spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooyen, I.J. van, E-mail: Isabella.vanRooyen@inl.gov [Fuel Performance and Design Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Engelbrecht, J.A.A. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Henry, A.; Janzen, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping 58183 (Sweden); Neethling, J.H. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Rooyen, P.M. van [Philip M van Rooyen Network Consultants, Midlands Estates (South Africa)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IR is investigated as a technique to measure grain size and P-doping of polycrystalline SiC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infrared plasma minima can be used to determine doping levels in 3C-SiC for doping levels greater than 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A linear relationship is found between FWHM and the inverse of grain size of 3C-SiC irrespective of P-doping level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is further found that {omega}{sub p} is not influenced by the grain size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P-doping level has no significant effect on the linear relationship between grain size and surface roughness. - Abstract: The effect of P-doping and grain size of polycrystalline 3C-SiC on the infrared reflectance spectra is reported. The relationship between grain size and full width at half maximum (FWHM) suggest that the behavior of the 3C-SiC with the highest phosphorous doping level (of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} at. cm{sup -3}) is different from those with lower doping levels (<6.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} at. cm{sup -3}). It is also further demonstrated that the plasma resonance frequency ({omega}{sub p}) is not influenced by the grain size.

  10. The effect of grain size and phosphorous-doping of polycrystalline 3C–SiC on infrared reflectance spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Engelbrecht, J.A.A.; Henry, A.; Janzén, E.; Neethling, J.H.; Rooyen, P.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► IR is investigated as a technique to measure grain size and P-doping of polycrystalline SiC. ► Infrared plasma minima can be used to determine doping levels in 3C–SiC for doping levels greater than 5 × 10 17 cm −3 . ► A linear relationship is found between FWHM and the inverse of grain size of 3C–SiC irrespective of P-doping level. ► It is further found that ω p is not influenced by the grain size. ► P-doping level has no significant effect on the linear relationship between grain size and surface roughness. - Abstract: The effect of P-doping and grain size of polycrystalline 3C–SiC on the infrared reflectance spectra is reported. The relationship between grain size and full width at half maximum (FWHM) suggest that the behavior of the 3C–SiC with the highest phosphorous doping level (of 1.2 × 10 19 at. cm −3 ) is different from those with lower doping levels ( 18 at. cm −3 ). It is also further demonstrated that the plasma resonance frequency (ω p ) is not influenced by the grain size.

  11. DEPENDENCE OF GRAIN SIZE OF AUSTENITE STEEL OF RAILWAY WHEEL FROM PARAMETERS OF HOT DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Vakulenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The estimation of heat temperature influence and degree of hot reduction of carbon steel on the size of grain аustenite at making of railway wheels. Methodology. The material for research was carbon steel, mark 60 with carbon content of 0,55 and 0,65 %, selected from the fragments of railway wheels. The size of grain аustenite depending on a temperature (from 800 to 1 150 ºC and degrees of hot deformation (10−50 % was determined. The size of grain was determined under a light microscope with the use of quantitative metallography methods. Findings. The use of cooling in the process of hot reduction of the railway wheel will allow dispergating the structure of аustenite on large distances from the surface of the rim. The reason for this is that the volumes of metal after cooling have an increased strength and will be exposed in less degree to the plastic deformation. To compare the cooling layers near-by with the surface of rim, they are more warmed-up in internal volumes of metal. In the conditions of continuity of plastic deformation distribution, having a high temperature, they will be exposed to the reduction on the large total degree of deformation. In consequence of the resulted decisions more even austenitic structure must be formed on the section of rim of railway wheel. To obtain the effect of disperse grain of аustenite at making of the whole-rolled railway wheels it is necessary to decrease the heat temperature of billet under rolling or increase the degree of reduction on the lasts stages of shape-generating deformation. The pause by duration of 1,5 min. after reduction of 20 % at a temperature 950 ºC is sufficiently for processes completion of dynamic and static recrystalization of аustenite carbon steel of the railway wheel. Originality. Increase of plastic deformation degree, especially in the central volumes of rim is accompanied by the decrease of heterogeneity of austenitic structure on his section. The

  12. Differences in particle size distributions collected by two wood dust samplers: preliminary findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campopiano, A.; Olori, A.; Basili, F.; Ramires, D.; Zakrzewska, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classification of wood dust as carcinogenic to humans, and the threshold limit value (TLV) of 5 mg/m 3 weighted over an 8-hour work day as defined by Italian legislation, have raised the issue of dust risk assessments in all woodworking environments. The aim is to characterize the particle size distribution for wood particles collected by two samplers used for collecting the inhalable fraction: the IOM sampler (Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, Scotland) and the conical sampler also known in Italy as conetto. These two sampling heads were chosen mainly because the Italian conical sampler, used in the past for total dust sampling, is the most widely used by the Italian Prevention Services and analysis laboratories in general, whereas the IOM sampler was specifically designed to collect the inhalable fraction of airborne particles. The devices were placed side by side within the worker's breathing zone. In addition, another IOM sampler not connected to the personal sampling pump was placed on the same worker, thus functioning as a passive sampler capable of collecting projectile particles normally produced during processing. A Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDAX) was used to count the number of particles collected on the sampling filters. The size of each particle identified by the SEM was determined by measuring its mean diameter. The SEM analysis revealed that the average size of the largest particles collected by the conetto sampler did not exceed 150 μm, whereas the size of particles collected by the IOM sampler was up to 350 μm. Indeed, the analysis of the filters of the passive IOM samplers showed that particles with mean diameters larger than 100 μm were collected, although the calculated percentage was very low (on average, approximately 1%). This does not mean that their gravimetric contribution is negligible; indeed, the weight of

  13. Grain size controls on sediment supply from debris-mantled dryland hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, K.

    2011-12-01

    Debris-mantled hillslopes are common in arid and semiarid environments where low rates of chemical weathering give rise to thin, non-cohesive soils mantled with a layer of coarse rock fragments derived from weathered bedrock that can reach boulder size. The grain size distributions (GSDs) on the surface of these hillslopes interact with different magnitudes and frequencies of runoff-producing rainfall events that selectively transport grain sizes of different classes depending on flow, grain position on the slope, and hillslope attributes. Sediment transport over many runoff events determines sediment delivery to the slope base, which ultimately modifies the GSD of valley floors. The relationship between hillslope attributes and sediment flux forms the basis of geomorphic transport laws used to model the topographic evolution of drainage basins over >104 y timescales, but the specific responses of sediment flux across the hillslope and the corresponding changes in GSDs to individual storm events are poorly understood. Sheetwash erosion of coarse fragments presents a particular set of conditions for sediment transport that is poorly resolved in current models. A particle-based model for sheetwash sediment transport on debris-mantled hillslopes was developed within a rainfall-runoff model. The rainfall-runoff model produces spatial values of flow depth and velocity which are used to drive a particle-by-particle force-balance model derived from first principles for grain sizes > 1 mm. Particles on the hillslope surface are represented explicitly and can be composed of mixed grain sizes of any distribution or of uniform sizes of any diameter. The model resolves all the forces on each particle at each time and space step based on the flow hydraulics acting on them, so no assumptions are made about incipient motion using Shield's criterion. This research examines how the interplay between hillslope GSD, hillslope attributes (gradient and length) and runoff

  14. Problems during the determination of grain-sizes in austenitic plates by the application of ultrasonic-backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, A.; Neumann, E.; Mundry, E.; Thiel, R.

    1980-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscattering makes possible the nondestructive determination of grain size in austenitic strips. In immersion technique a short pulse is sent into the material and the backscattered sound-amplitude is measured. When using a calibration curve, grain sizes can be calculated from the backscattered sound-amplitudes. There are problems in practical use because of mechanical and electronical data having an influence on the results of measurement. An exact determination of grain size depends on accurate mechanical adjustment and on stability of the electronical equipment, too. (orig.) [de

  15. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron–positron–ion–dust plasmas ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-09-19

    Sep 19, 2014 ... ever, Xue [19] and Tarsem et al [20] proved that the observed wave phenomena in the low-altitude and .... tot. ∫ amax amin a−β da, β is the power-law index. n(a) = 0 when aamax. If the dust grain size a<λDd, the mass of the dust grain can be given as mdj = kma3 j. , where km ≈ 4. 3 πρd (ρd is ...

  16. Effects of road dust on the growth characteristics of Sophora japonica L. seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Le; Qu, Laiye; Ma, Keming; Lin, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Road dust is one of the most common pollutants and causes a series of negative effects on plant physiology. Dust's impacts on plants can be regarded as a combination of load, composition and grain size impacts on plants; however, there is a lack of integrated dust effect studies involving these three aspects. In our study, Sophora japonica seedlings were artificially dusted with road dust collected from the road surface of Beijing so that we could study the impacts of this dust on nitrogen/carbon allocation, biomass allocation and photosynthetic pigments from the three aspects of composition, load and grain size. The results showed that the growth characteristics of S. japonica seedlings were mostly influenced by dust composition and load. Leaf N, root-shoot ratio and chlorophyll a/b were significantly affected by dust composition and load; leaf C/N, shoot biomass, total chlorophyll and carotenoid were significantly affected by dust load; stem N and stem C/N were significantly affected by dust composition; while the dust grain size alone did not affect any of the growth characteristics. Road dust did influence the growth characteristics more extensively than loam. Therefore, a higher dust load could increase the differences between road dust and loam treatments. The elements in dust are well correlated to the shoot N, shoot C/N, and root-shoot ratio of S. japonica seedlings. This knowledge could benefit the management of urban green spaces. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Grain-size-induced weakening of H2O ices I and II and associated anisotropic recrystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    Grain-size-dependent flow mechanisms tend to be favored over dislocation creep at low differential stresses and can potentially influence the rheology of low-stress, low-strain rate environments such as those of planetary interiors. We experimentally investigated the effect of reduced grain size on the solid-state flow of water ice I, a principal component of the asthenospheres of many icy moons of the outer solar system, using techniques new to studies of this deformation regime. We fabricated fully dense ice samples of approximate grain size 2 ?? 1 ??m by transforming "standard" ice I samples of 250 ?? 50 ??m grain size to the higher-pressure phase ice II, deforming them in the ice II field, and then rapidly releasing the pressure deep into the ice I stability field. At T ??? 200 K, slow growth and rapid nucleation of ice I combine to produce a fine grain size. Constant-strain rate deformation tests conducted on these samples show that deformation rates are less stress sensitive than for standard ice and that the fine-grained material is markedly weaker than standard ice, particularly during the transient approach to steady state deformation. Scanning electron microscope examination of the deformed fine-grained ice samples revealed an unusual microstructure dominated by platelike grains that grew normal to the compression direction, with c axes preferentially oriented parallel to compression. In samples tested at T ??? 220 K the elongation of the grains is so pronounced that the samples appear finely banded, with aspect ratios of grains approaching 50:1. The anisotropic growth of these crystallographically oriented neoblasts likely contributes to progressive work hardening observed during the transient stage of deformation. We have also documented remarkably similar microstructural development and weak mechanical behavior in fine-grained ice samples partially transformed and deformed in the ice II field.

  18. Particle size distribution of dust collected from Alcator C-MOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, S.V.; Carmack, W.J.; Hembree, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    There are important safety issues associated with tokamak dust, accumulated primarily from sputtering and disruptions. The dust may contain tritium, it may be activated, chemically toxic, and chemically reactive. The purpose of this paper is to present results from analyses of particulate collected from the Alcator C-MOD tokamak located at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The sample obtained from C-MOD was not originally intended for examination outside of MIT. The sample was collected with the intent of performing only a composition analysis. However, MIT provided the INEEL with this sample for particle analysis. The sample was collected by vacuuming a section of the machine (covering approximately 1/3 of the machine surface) with a coarse fiber filter as the collection surface. The sample was then analyzed using an optical microscope, SEM microscope, Microtrac FRA particle size analyzer. The data fit a log-normal distribution. The count median diameter (CMD) of the samples ranged from 0.3 microm to 1.1 microm with geometric standard deviations (GSD) ranging from 2.8 to 5.2 and a mass median diameter (MMD) ranging from 7.22 to 176 microm

  19. Migration of Artificially Introduced Micron Size Carbon Dust in the DIII-D Divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C; Brooks, N; Evans, T; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Krasheninnikov, S; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Pigarov, A Y; Solomon, W; Antar, G; Boedo, J; Doerner, R; Hollmann, E; Hyatt, A; Maingi, R; Moyer, R; Nagy, A; Nishino, N; Roquemore, L; Stangeby, P; Watkins, J

    2006-05-15

    Migration of pre-characterized carbon dust in a tokamak environment was studied by introducing about 30 milligrams of dust flakes 5-10 {micro}m in diameter in the lower divertor of DIII-D using the DiMES sample holder. The dust was exposed to high power ELMing Hmode discharges in lower-single-null magnetic configuration with the strike points swept across the divertor floor. When the outer strike point (OSP) passed over the dust holder exposing it to high particle and heat fluxes, part of the dust was injected into the plasma. In about 0.1 sec following the OSP pass over the dust, 1-2% of the total dust carbon content (2-4 x 10{sup 19} carbon atoms, equivalent to a few million dust particles) penetrated the core plasma, raising the core carbon density by a factor of 2-3. When the OSP was inboard of the dust holder, the dust injection continued at a lower rate. Individual dust particles were observed moving at velocities of 10-100 m/s, predominantly in the toroidal direction for deuteron flow to the outer divertor target, consistent with the ion drag force. The observed behavior of the dust is in qualitative agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code.

  20. Optically stimulated luminescence dating as a tool for calculating sedimentation rates in Chinese loess: comparisons with grain-size records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Thomas; Lu, HY

    2009-01-01

    over the late Pleistocene and Holocene. The results demonstrate that sedimentation rates are site specific, extremely variable over millennial timescales and that this variation is often not reflected in grain-size changes. In the central part of the Loess Plateau, the relationship between grain...

  1. Interstellar dust in and around the heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I.; Czechowski, A.

    The motion of the sun relative to the local interstellar medium causes a stream of interstellar medium dust toward the heliosphere. Small dust particles gain a high charge to mass ratio and are deflected from their original flow direction with the interstellar gas. The majority of interstellar dust particles of sizes below 0.1 micrometer are deflected from entering the heliosphere. A pile-up of interstellar dust similar to that of the hydrogen wall appears around the heliosphere, but is restricted to small grains. We use a simple model of the heliospheric transition region to calculate the velocity distributions of these interstellar grains in the neighborhood of the heliosphere. Different assumptions about the interstellar magnetic field and the structure of the plasma flow are considered. We find that the distributions are sensitive to the structure of the heliospheric transition region, in particular to the presence of a sharp bow shock. Larger interstellar dust particles enter the heliosphere where several deflection mechanisms selectively act on dust particles of certain sizes and properties. When considering the dynamics of small grains that have entered the heliosphere the effects of the heliospheric current sheet (downstream and upstream from the termination shock) and the solar cycle can facilitate the entry of charged grains into the inner solar system, although the unipolar field regions approaching the ecliptic act as an obstacle to it. The dust fluxes in the inner heliosphere also depend on the influence of radiation pressure and solar gravity. The influence of these forces can be seen in the mass distributions of interstellar dust measured in-situ from spacecraft at different locations. The conditions of dust dynamics depend on the initial velocity distribution of grains in the interstellar medium. Small dust particles are coupled to the gas of the interstellar medium while larger dust particles may not be coupled to the local interstellar cloud and

  2. Statistical Analysis of Streambed Sediment Grain Size Distributions: Implications for Environmental Management and Regulatory Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, B. J.; O'Connor, M. D.

    2003-12-01

    The status of fish habitat in cold water streams in western North America has, by most accounts, been degraded significantly by sedimentation. In particular, land management activities induce erosion that contributes excess sand-size and finer sediment to stream systems, which is believed to have caused increases in the proportion of fine sediment in spawning gravels. Many watershed studies and regulatory programs have, drawing on previous scientific investigations, set thresholds for fine sediment concentrations in spawning beds. This study examines data from gravel bed streams collected with a McNeil sampler in northern California (typically 25 kg), as well as bulk sediment samples from the Waipaoa River in New Zealand (typically 50 kg). Confidence intervals for various percentiles of the grain size distributions were computed from these data using a two-stage sampling approach. Accuracy and precision of data from these sampling programs were considered in relation to the biological/regulatory thresholds as well as the effort required to obtain, process and analyze grain size distributions. Typically, very large samples are required to obtain data with high precision, suggesting that in many circumstances, it may be difficult to assess whether regulatory thresholds are exceeded.

  3. Extending and simplifying the standard Köhn-pipette technique for grain size analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Florian; Raab, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Grain size distribution is a fundamental parameter to characterize physical properties of soils and sediments. Manifold approaches exist and according to the DIN ISO 11277 soil texture is analyzed by default with the combined pipette sieving and sedimentation method developed by Köhn. With this standard technique subfractions of sand and silt as well as the total clay content can be determined but the differentiation of clay subfractions is impossible. As the differentiation of the clay subfractions yields relevant information about pedogenesis, we present a protocol basing on standard techniques of granulometry with easy to handle and low cost equipment. The protocol was tested on a set of soil samples to cover the range of grain size distributions. We used a three-step procedure for achieving the grain size distribution of soil samples taking into account the subfractions of sand, silt and clay by a combination of sedimentation, centrifugal sedimentation and wet sieving. The pipetting was done with a piston-stroke pipette instead of the referred complex pipette from the DIN ISO 11277. Our first results show that the applied protocol is less prone to operating errors than the standard Köhn-pipette technique. Furthermore, even a less experienced laboratory worker can handle 10 samples in one day. Analyses of a luvisol profile, sampled in high spatial resolution, showed that the lessivation process is characterized by translocation of fine clay from the eluvial horizon to the illuvial horizon. Therefore our protocol is a fast alternative to detect lessivation, which is otherwise only clearly identifiable by micromorphological investigation and not by the standard Köhn-pipette technique.

  4. Comparison of different methods to retrieve optical-equivalent snow grain size in central Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Carlsen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical-equivalent snow grain size affects the reflectivity of snow surfaces and, thus, the local surface energy budget in particular in polar regions. Therefore, the specific surface area (SSA, from which the optical snow grain size is derived, was observed for a 2-month period in central Antarctica (Kohnen research station during austral summer 2013/14. The data were retrieved on the basis of ground-based spectral surface albedo measurements collected by the COmpact RAdiation measurement System (CORAS and airborne observations with the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART. The snow grain size and pollution amount (SGSP algorithm, originally developed to analyze spaceborne reflectance measurements by the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, was modified in order to reduce the impact of the solar zenith angle on the retrieval results and to cover measurements in overcast conditions. Spectral ratios of surface albedo at 1280 and 1100 nm wavelength were used to reduce the retrieval uncertainty. The retrieval was applied to the ground-based and airborne observations and validated against optical in situ observations of SSA utilizing an IceCube device. The SSA retrieved from CORAS observations varied between 27 and 89 m2 kg−1. Snowfall events caused distinct relative maxima of the SSA which were followed by a gradual decrease in SSA due to snow metamorphism and wind-induced transport of freshly fallen ice crystals. The ability of the modified algorithm to include measurements in overcast conditions improved the data coverage, in particular at times when precipitation events occurred and the SSA changed quickly. SSA retrieved from measurements with CORAS and MODIS agree with the in situ observations within the ranges given by the measurement uncertainties. However, SSA retrieved from the airborne SMART data slightly underestimated the ground-based results.

  5. Comparison of different methods to retrieve optical-equivalent snow grain size in central Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Tim; Birnbaum, Gerit; Ehrlich, André; Freitag, Johannes; Heygster, Georg; Istomina, Larysa; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Orsi, Anaïs; Schäfer, Michael; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-11-01

    The optical-equivalent snow grain size affects the reflectivity of snow surfaces and, thus, the local surface energy budget in particular in polar regions. Therefore, the specific surface area (SSA), from which the optical snow grain size is derived, was observed for a 2-month period in central Antarctica (Kohnen research station) during austral summer 2013/14. The data were retrieved on the basis of ground-based spectral surface albedo measurements collected by the COmpact RAdiation measurement System (CORAS) and airborne observations with the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART). The snow grain size and pollution amount (SGSP) algorithm, originally developed to analyze spaceborne reflectance measurements by the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), was modified in order to reduce the impact of the solar zenith angle on the retrieval results and to cover measurements in overcast conditions. Spectral ratios of surface albedo at 1280 and 1100 nm wavelength were used to reduce the retrieval uncertainty. The retrieval was applied to the ground-based and airborne observations and validated against optical in situ observations of SSA utilizing an IceCube device. The SSA retrieved from CORAS observations varied between 27 and 89 m2 kg-1. Snowfall events caused distinct relative maxima of the SSA which were followed by a gradual decrease in SSA due to snow metamorphism and wind-induced transport of freshly fallen ice crystals. The ability of the modified algorithm to include measurements in overcast conditions improved the data coverage, in particular at times when precipitation events occurred and the SSA changed quickly. SSA retrieved from measurements with CORAS and MODIS agree with the in situ observations within the ranges given by the measurement uncertainties. However, SSA retrieved from the airborne SMART data slightly underestimated the ground-based results.

  6. Characterization of Size, Composition and Origins of Dust in Fusion Devices. Summary Report of the Second Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.; Skinner, C.H.

    2010-11-01

    Eleven experts on processes of dust in fusion experiments met for the 2nd Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Characterization of size, composition and origins of dust in fusion devices' held at IAEA Headquarters 21-23 June 2010. Participants summarized their studies on dust in fusion experiments and reviewed progress made since the first RCM. Gaps in knowledge were identified and a plan of work for the remainder of the CRP was developed. Presentations, discussions and recommendations of the RCM are summarized in this report. Eleven experts on processes of dust in fusion experiments met for the 2nd Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Characterization of size, composition and origins of dust in fusion devices' held at IAEA Headquarters 21-23 June 2010. Participants summarized their studies on dust in fusion experiments and reviewed progress made since the first RCM. Gaps in knowledge were identified and a plan of work for the remainder of the CRP was developed. Presentations, discussions and recommendations of the RCM are summarized in this report. (author)

  7. Size distribution and diffuse pollution impacts of PAHs in street dust in urban streams in the Yangtze River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Yin, Chengqing; Chen, Meixue; Wang, Weidong; Jefferies, Chris; Shan, Baoqing

    2009-01-01

    Particles of dust washed off streets by stormwater are an important pathway of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into urban streams. This article presented a comprehensive assessment of the size distribution of PAHs in street dust particles, the potential risks of the particles in urban streams, and the sources and sinks of PAHs in the stream network. This assessment was based on measurements of 16 PAHs from the USEPA priority list in street dust particles and river sediments in Xincheng, China. The content of total PAHs ranged from 1629 to 8986 microg/kg in street dust particles, where smaller particles have a higher concentrations. Approximately 55% of the total PAHs were associated with particles less than 250 microm which accounted for 40% of the total mass of street dust. The PAH quantities increased from 2.41 to 46.86 microg/m2 in the sequence of new residential, rising through main roads, old town residential, commercial and industrial areas. The sediments in stream reaches in town were found to be sinks for street dust particle PAHs. The research findings suggested that particle size, land use and the hydrological conditions in the stream network were the factors which most influenced the total loads of PAH in the receiving water bodies.

  8. Orthographic consistency affects spoken word recognition at different grain-sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Nadya

    2014-01-01

    A number of previous studies found that the consistency of sound-to-spelling mappings (feedback consistency) affects spoken word recognition. In auditory lexical decision experiments, words that can only be spelled one way are recognized faster than words with multiple potential spellings. Previous.......g., lobe) faster than words with consistent rhymes where the vowel has a less typical spelling (e.g., loaf). The present study extends previous literature by showing that auditory word recognition is affected by orthographic regularities at different grain sizes, just like written word recognition...... and spelling. The theoretical and methodological implications for future research in spoken word recognition are discussed....

  9. Strengthening of Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys by grain size refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, A.; Masuya, T.; Kumai, S.; Inoue, A.

    2000-01-01

    Degree of the shape memory effect was measured either by bending, tensile and compression tests in the temperature range 77∝300 K. The yield stress increased substantially by the grain size refinement, yet maintaining a good shape memory effect. In addition to usual mentioned slow strain rate tests (about 10 -3 s -1 ), shape deformation was given at high strain rate (10 3 s -1 ) by hammering, in order to induce fine structure. It is also found that the shape memory effect under an opposing force was improved by the high-speed deformation. (orig.)

  10. A Genetic Based Neuro Fuzzy Technique for Process Grain Sized Scheduling of Parallel Jobs

    OpenAIRE

    Keppanagowder Thanushkodi; Sadasivam V. Sudha

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: In this study, we present the development of genetic algorithm based neuro fuzzy technique for process grain sized in scheduling of parallel jobs with the help of real lIfe workload data. Approach: The study uses the rule based scheduling strategy for the scheduling and classIfies all possible scheduling strategies. The rule bases are developed with the help of the neuro fuzzy system and with the genetic fuzzy system. From the comparison of the two classIfiers of the fuzzy ...

  11. Study of sandy soil grain-size distribution on its deformation properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antropova, L. B.; Gruzin, A. V.; Gildebrandt, M. I.; Malaya, L. D.; Nikulina, V. B.

    2018-04-01

    As a rule, new oil and gas fields' development faces the challenges of providing construction objects with material and mineral resources, for example, medium sand soil for buildings and facilities footings of the technological infrastructure under construction. This problem solution seems to lie in a rational usage of the existing environmental resources, soils included. The study was made of a medium sand soil grain-size distribution impact on its deformation properties. Based on the performed investigations, a technique for controlling sandy soil deformation properties was developed.

  12. Spinning Dust Radiation: A Review of the Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Ali-Haïmoud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current status of theoretical modeling of electric dipole radiation from spinning dust grains. The fundamentally simple problem of dust grain rotation appeals to a rich set of concepts of classical and quantum physics, owing to the diversity of processes involved. Rotational excitation and damping rates through various mechanisms are discussed, as well as methods of computing the grain angular momentum distribution function. Assumptions on grain properties are reviewed. The robustness of theoretical predictions now seems mostly limited by the uncertainties regarding the grains themselves, namely, their abundance, dipole moments, and size and shape distribution.

  13. The Role of Grain Size on Neutron Irradiation Response of Nanocrystalline Copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of grain size on the developed microstructure and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated nanocrystalline copper was investigated by comparing the radiation response of material to the conventional micrograined counterpart. Nanocrystalline (nc and micrograined (MG copper samples were subjected to a range of neutron exposure levels from 0.0034 to 2 dpa. At all damage levels, the response of MG-copper was governed by radiation hardening manifested by an increase in strength with accompanying ductility loss. Conversely, the response of nc-copper to neutron irradiation exhibited a dependence on the damage level. At low damage levels, grain growth was the primary response, with radiation hardening and embrittlement becoming the dominant responses with increasing damage levels. Annealing experiments revealed that grain growth in nc-copper is composed of both thermally-activated and irradiation-induced components. Tensile tests revealed minimal change in the source hardening component of the yield stress in MG-copper, while the source hardening component was found to decrease with increasing radiation exposure in nc-copper.

  14. Effect of Prior Austenite Grain Size on the Morphology of Nano-Bainitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kritika; Kumar, Avanish; Singh, Aparna

    2018-04-01

    The strength in nanostructured bainitic steels primarily arises from the fine platelets of bainitic ferrite embedded in carbon-enriched austenite. However, the toughness is dictated by the shape and volume fraction of the retained austenite. Therefore, the exact determination of processing-morphology relationships is necessary to design stronger and tougher bainite. In the current study, the morphology of bainitic ferrite in Fe-0.89C-1.59Si-1.65Mn-0.37Mo-1Co-0.56Al-0.19Cr (wt pct) bainitic steel has been investigated as a function of the prior austenite grain size (AGS). Specimens were austenitized at different temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1150 °C followed by isothermal transformation at 300 °C. Detailed microstructural characterization has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the bainitic laths transformed in coarse austenite grains are finer resulting in higher hardness, whereas smaller austenite grains lead to the formation of thicker bainitic laths with a large fraction of blocky type retained austenite resulting in lower hardness.

  15. Grain size refinement in nanocrystalline Hitperm-type glass-coated microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talaat, A.; Val, J.J. del; Zhukova, V.; Ipatov, M.; Klein, P.; Varga, R.; González, J.; Churyukanova, M.; Zhukov, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new-Fe 38.5 Co 38.5 B 18 Mo 4 Cu 1 Hitperm glass-coated microwires obtained by Taylor-Ulitovsky technique with nanocrystalline structure consisting of about 23 nm of BCC α-FeCo and an amorphous precursors in as-prepared samples. Annealing resulted in a considerable decrease of such nano-grains down to (11 nm). Obtained results are discussed in terms of the stress diffusion of limited crystalline growth and the chemical composition. Rectangular hysteresis loops have been observed on all annealed samples that are necessary conditions to obtain fast domain wall propagation. An enhancement of the domain wall velocity as well as mobility after annealing has been obtained due to the structural relaxation of such grains with positive magnetostriction. These structure benefits found in the nanocrystalline Hitperm glass-coated microwires are promising for developing optimal magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Grains size refinement upon annealing. • Enhancement of the domain wall velocity as well as mobility after annealing. • Nanocrystalline structure in as-prepared microwires.

  16. Relationship between casting modulus and grain size in cast A356 aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niklas, A; Abaunza, U; Fernández-Calvo, A I; Lacaze, J

    2012-01-01

    Microstructure of Al-Si alloy castings depends most generally on melt preparation and on the cooling rate imposed by the thermal modulus of the component. In the case of Al-Si alloys, emphasis is put during melt preparation on refinement of pro-eutectic (Al) grains and on modification of the Al-Si eutectic. Thermal analysis has been used since long to check melt preparation before casting, i.e. by analysis of the cooling curve during solidification of a sample cast in an instrumented cup. The conclusions drawn from such analysis are however valid for the particular cooling conditions of the cups. It thus appeared of interest to investigate how these conclusions could extrapolate to predict microstructure in complicated cast parts showing local changes in the solidification conditions. For that purpose, thermal analysis cups and instrumented sand and die castings with different thermal moduli and thus cooling rates have been made, and the whole set of cooling curves thus recorded has been analysed. A statistical analysis of the characteristic features of the cooling curves related to grain refinement in sand and die castings allowed determining the most significant parameters and expressing the cube of grain size as a polynomial of these parameters. After introduction of a further parameter quantifying melt refining an excellent correlation, with a R 2 factor of 0.99 was obtained.

  17. The Grain-size Patchiness of Braided Gravel-Bed Streams - example of the Urumqi River (northeast Tian Shan, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerit, L.; Barrier, L.; Narteau, C.; Métivier, F.; Liu, Y.; Lajeunesse, E.; Gayer, E.; Meunier, P.; Malverti, L.; Ye, B.

    2014-02-01

    In gravel-bed rivers, sediments are often sorted into patches of different grain-sizes, but in braided streams, the link between this sorting and the channel morpho-sedimentary elements is still unclear. In this study, the size of the bed sediment in the shallow braided gravel-bed Urumqi River is characterized by surface-count and volumetric sampling methods. Three morpho-sedimentary elements are identified in the active threads of the river: chutes at flow constrictions, which pass downstream to anabranches and bars at flow expansions. The surface and surface-layer grain-size distributions of these three elements show that they correspond to only two kinds of grain-size patches: (1) coarse-grained chutes, coarser than the bulk river bed, and (2) finer-grained anabranches and bars, consistent with the bulk river bed. In cross-section, the chute patches are composed of one coarse-grained top layer, which can be interpreted as a local armour layer overlying finer deposits. In contrast, the grain size of the bar-anabranch patches is finer and much more homogeneous in depth than the chute patches. Those patches, which are features of lateral and vertical sorting associated to the transport dynamics that build braided patterns, may be typical of active threads in shallow gravel-bed rivers and should be considered in future works on sorting processes and their geomorphologic and stratigraphic results.

  18. Effects of grain size and humidity on fretting wear in fine-grained alumina, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiC, and zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krell, A. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Ceramic Technologies and Sintered Materials, Dresden (Germany); Klaffke, D. [Federal Inst. for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany)

    1996-05-01

    Friction and wear of sintered alumina with grain sizes between 0.4 and 3 {micro}m were measured in comparison with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiC composites and with tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} (3 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The dependence on the grain boundary toughness and residual microstresses is investigated, and a hierarchical order of influencing parameters is observed. In air, reduced alumina grain sizes improve the micromechanical stability of the grain boundaries and the hardness, and reduced wear is governed by microplastic deformation, with few pullout events. Humidity and water slightly reduce the friction of all of the investigated ceramics. In water, this effect reduces the wear of coarser alumina microstructures. The wear of aluminas and of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiC composite is similar; it is lower than observed in zirconia, where extended surface cracking occurs at grain sizes as small as 0.3 {micro}m.

  19. Enhancement of coercivity with reduced grain size in CoCrPt film grown by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Q.; Hu, X.F.; Li, H.Q.; He, X.X.; Wang, Xiaoru; Zhang, W.

    2006-01-01

    We report a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) growth of VMn/CoCrPt bilayer with a magnetic coercivity (H c ) of 2.2 kOe and a grain size of 12 nm. The effects of VMn underlayer on magnetic properties of CoCrPt layer were studied. The coercivity, H c , and squareness, S, of VMn/CoCrPt bilayer, is dependent on the thickness of VMn. The grain size of the CoCrPt film can also be modified by laser parameters. High laser fluence used for CoCrPt deposition produces a smaller grain size. Enhanced H c and reduced grain size in VMn/CoCrPt is explained by more pronounced surface phase segregation during deposition at high laser fluence

  20. CLPX-Satellite: EO-1 Hyperion Surface Reflectance, Snow-Covered Area, and Grain Size, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of apparent surface reflectance, subpixel snow-covered area, and grain size collected from the Hyperion hyperspectral imager. The Hyperion...

  1. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmora, Adilson C. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Institute for Environmental Assessment and Water Studies (IDÆA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Teixeira, Elba C. [Fundação Estadual de Proteção Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Brum, Irineu A.S. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Metalurgia, Centro de Tecnologia, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500. Bairro Agronomia. CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano

  2. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Teixeira, Elba C; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; de Brum, Irineu A S; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in

  3. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmora, Adilson C.; Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S.; Teixeira, Elba C.; Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R.; Brum, Irineu A.S. de

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , and Fe 2 O 3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical

  4. Co-accretion of chondrules and dust in the solar nebula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, C. W.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2008-01-01

    We present a mechanism for chondrules to stick together by means of compaction of a porous dust rim they sweep up as they move through the dusty nebula gas. It is shown that dust aggregates formed out of micron-size grains stick to chondrules, forming a porous dust rim. When chondrules collide, this

  5. Spectro-Polarimetry of Fine-Grained Ice and Dust Surfaces Measured in the Laboratory to Study Solar System Objects and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, O.; Cerubini, R.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Schmid, H. M.; Potin, S.; Beck, P.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.; Carrasco, N.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.

    2017-12-01

    The polarization of the light is very sensitive to the size, morphology, porosity and composition of the scattering particles. As a consequence, polarimetric observations could significantly complement observations performed in total light intensity, providing additional constraints to interpret remote sensing observations of Solar System and extra-solar objects. This presentation will focus on measurements performed in the laboratory on carefully characterized surface samples, providing reference data that can be used to test theoretical models and predict or interpret spectro-polarimetric observations. Using methods developed in the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern, we produce well-characterized and reproducible surfaces made of water ice particles having different grain sizes and porosities, as well as mineral/organic dusts, pure or mixed together, as analogues of planetary or small bodies surfaces. These surface samples are illuminated with a randomly polarized light source simulating the Sun. The polarization of their scattered light is measured at multiple phase angles and wavelengths, allowing to study the shape of the polarimetric phase curves and their spectral dependence, with two recently developed setups: The POLarimeter for Icy Samples (POLICES), at the University of Bern, allows the measurement of the weak polarization of ice surfaces from 400 to 800 nm, with direct application to icy satellites. Using a precision Stokes polarimeter, this setup is also used to study the spectral variations of circular polarization in the light scattered by biotic versus abiotic surfaces. The Spectrogonio radiometer with cHanging Angles for Detection Of Weak Signals (SHADOWS), at IPAG (University of Grenoble Alpes), measures linear polarization spectra from 0.35 to 5 μm in the light scattered by dark meteorite powders or icy samples, with application to primitive objects of the Solar System (asteroids, comets).

  6. Influence of sieving time on the efficiency and accuracy of grain-size analysis of beach and dune sands

    OpenAIRE

    Román-Sierra, Jorge; Muñoz-Perez, Juan J.; Navarro-Pons, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Grain size is a fundamental property of sediments and is commonly used to describe sedimentary facies and classify sedimentary environments. Among the various conventional techniques utilized to determine grain-size frequency distributions, sieving is the most widely applied procedure. The accuracy of such analyses is, among other factors, strongly dependent on the sieving time. However, despite a substantial amount of research in this field, optimal sieving times for different types of sedim...

  7. Spectral- and size-resolved mass absorption efficiency of mineral dust aerosols in the shortwave spectrum: a simulation chamber study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponi, Lorenzo; Formenti, Paola; Massabó, Dario; Di Biagio, Claudia; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Pangui, Edouard; Chevaillier, Servanne; Landrot, Gautier; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kandler, Konrad; Piketh, Stuart; Saeed, Thuraya; Seibert, Dave; Williams, Earle; Balkanski, Yves; Prati, Paolo; Doussin, Jean-François

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents new laboratory measurements of the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) between 375 and 850 nm for 12 individual samples of mineral dust from different source areas worldwide and in two size classes: PM10. 6 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 10.6 µm) and PM2. 5 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 2.5 µm). The experiments were performed in the CESAM simulation chamber using mineral dust generated from natural parent soils and included optical and gravimetric analyses. The results show that the MAE values are lower for the PM10. 6 mass fraction (range 37-135 × 10-3 m2 g-1 at 375 nm) than for the PM2. 5 (range 95-711 × 10-3 m2 g-1 at 375 nm) and decrease with increasing wavelength as λ-AAE, where the Ångström absorption exponent (AAE) averages between 3.3 and 3.5, regardless of size. The size independence of AAE suggests that, for a given size distribution, the dust composition did not vary with size for this set of samples. Because of its high atmospheric concentration, light absorption by mineral dust can be competitive with black and brown carbon even during atmospheric transport over heavy polluted regions, when dust concentrations are significantly lower than at emission. The AAE values of mineral dust are higher than for black carbon (˜ 1) but in the same range as light-absorbing organic (brown) carbon. As a result, depending on the environment, there can be some ambiguity in apportioning the aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) based on spectral dependence, which is relevant to the development of remote sensing of light-absorbing aerosols and their assimilation in climate models. We suggest that the sample-to-sample variability in our dataset of MAE values is related to regional differences in the mineralogical composition of the parent soils. Particularly in the PM2. 5 fraction, we found a strong linear correlation between the dust light-absorption properties and elemental

  8. Spectral- and size-resolved mass absorption efficiency of mineral dust aerosols in the shortwave spectrum: a simulation chamber study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Caponi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new laboratory measurements of the mass absorption efficiency (MAE between 375 and 850 nm for 12 individual samples of mineral dust from different source areas worldwide and in two size classes: PM10. 6 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 10.6 µm and PM2. 5 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 2.5 µm. The experiments were performed in the CESAM simulation chamber using mineral dust generated from natural parent soils and included optical and gravimetric analyses. The results show that the MAE values are lower for the PM10. 6 mass fraction (range 37–135  ×  10−3 m2 g−1 at 375 nm than for the PM2. 5 (range 95–711  ×  10−3 m2 g−1 at 375 nm and decrease with increasing wavelength as λ−AAE, where the Ångström absorption exponent (AAE averages between 3.3 and 3.5, regardless of size. The size independence of AAE suggests that, for a given size distribution, the dust composition did not vary with size for this set of samples. Because of its high atmospheric concentration, light absorption by mineral dust can be competitive with black and brown carbon even during atmospheric transport over heavy polluted regions, when dust concentrations are significantly lower than at emission. The AAE values of mineral dust are higher than for black carbon (∼ 1 but in the same range as light-absorbing organic (brown carbon. As a result, depending on the environment, there can be some ambiguity in apportioning the aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD based on spectral dependence, which is relevant to the development of remote sensing of light-absorbing aerosols and their assimilation in climate models. We suggest that the sample-to-sample variability in our dataset of MAE values is related to regional differences in the mineralogical composition of the parent soils. Particularly in the PM2. 5 fraction, we found a strong

  9. Graphite grain-size spectrum and molecules from core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Meyer, Bradley S.

    2018-01-01

    Our goal is to compute the abundances of carbon atomic complexes that emerge from the C + O cores of core-collapse supernovae. We utilize our chemical reaction network in which every atomic step of growth employs a quantum-mechanically guided reaction rate. This tool follows step-by-step the growth of linear carbon chain molecules from C atoms in the oxygen-rich C + O cores. We postulate that once linear chain molecules reach a sufficiently large size, they isomerize to ringed molecules, which serve as seeds for graphite grain growth. We demonstrate our technique for merging the molecular reaction network with a parallel program that can follow 1017 steps of C addition onto the rare seed species. Due to radioactivity within the C + O core, abundant ambient oxygen is unable to convert C to CO, except to a limited degree that actually facilitates carbon molecular ejecta. But oxygen severely minimizes the linear-carbon-chain abundances. Despite the tiny abundances of these linear-carbon-chain molecules, they can give rise to a small abundance of ringed-carbon molecules that serve as the nucleations on which graphite grain growth builds. We expand the C + O-core gas adiabatically from 6000 K for 109 s when reactions have essentially stopped. These adiabatic tracks emulate the actual expansions of the supernova cores. Using a standard model of 1056 atoms of C + O core ejecta having O/C = 3, we calculate standard ejection yields of graphite grains of all sizes produced, of the CO molecular abundance, of the abundances of linear-carbon molecules, and of Buckminsterfullerene. None of these except CO was expected from the C + O cores just a few years past.

  10. Signal or noise? Separating grain size-dependent Nd isotope variability from provenance shifts in Indus delta sediments, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonell, T. N.; Li, Y.; Blusztajn, J.; Giosan, L.; Clift, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    Rare earth element (REE) radioisotope systems, such as neodymium (Nd), have been traditionally used as powerful tracers of source provenance, chemical weathering intensity, and sedimentary processes over geologic timescales. More recently, the effects of physical fractionation (hydraulic sorting) of sediments during transport have called into question the utility of Nd isotopes as a provenance tool. Is source terrane Nd provenance resolvable if sediment transport strongly induces noise? Can grain-size sorting effects be quantified? This study works to address such questions by utilizing grain size analysis, trace element geochemistry, and Nd isotope geochemistry of bulk and grain-size fractions (Standard deviations (2σ) indicate that bulk sediment uncertainties are no more than ±1.0 ɛNd points. This argues that excursions of ≥1.0 ɛNd points in any bulk Indus delta sediments must in part reflect an external shift in provenance irrespective of sample composition, grain size, and grain size distribution. Sample standard deviations (2s) estimate that any terrigenous bulk sediment composition should vary no greater than ±1.1 ɛNd points if provenance remains constant. Findings from this study indicate that although there are grain-size dependent Nd isotope effects, they are minimal in the Indus delta such that resolvable provenance-driven trends can be identified in bulk sediment ɛNd compositions over the last 20 k.y., and that overall provenance trends remain consistent with previous findings.

  11. Correlation of Grain Size, Stacking Fault Energy, and Texture in Cu-Al Alloys Deformed under Simulated Rolling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab A. El-Danaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of grain size and stacking fault energy (SFE on the strain hardening rate behavior under plane strain compression (PSC is investigated for pure Cu and binary Cu-Al alloys containing 1, 2, 4.7, and 7 wt. % Al. The alloys studied have a wide range of SFE from a low SFE of 4.5 mJm−2 for Cu-7Al to a medium SFE of 78 mJm−2 for pure Cu. A series of PSC tests have been conducted on these alloys for three average grain sizes of ~15, 70, and 250 μm. Strain hardening rate curves were obtained and a criterion relating twinning stress to grain size is established. It is concluded that the stress required for twinning initiation decreases with increasing grain size. Low values of SFE have an indirect influence on twinning stress by increasing the strain hardening rate which is reflected in building up the critical dislocation density needed to initiate mechanical twinning. A study on the effect of grain size on the intensity of the brass texture component for the low SFE alloys has revealed the reduction of the orientation density of that component with increasing grain size.

  12. Dominance of grain size impacts on seasonal snow albedo at open sites in New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Alden C.; Albert, Mary R.; Lazarcik, James; Dibb, Jack E.; Amante, Jacqueline M.; Price, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Snow cover serves as a major control on the surface energy budget in temperate regions due to its high reflectivity compared to underlying surfaces. Winter in the northeastern United States has changed over the last several decades, resulting in shallower snowpacks, fewer days of snow cover, and increasing precipitation falling as rain in the winter. As these climatic changes occur, it is imperative that we understand current controls on the evolution of seasonal snow albedo in the region. Over three winter seasons between 2013 and 2015, snow characterization measurements were made at three open sites across New Hampshire. These near-daily measurements include spectral albedo, snow optical grain size determined through contact spectroscopy, snow depth, snow density, black carbon content, local meteorological parameters, and analysis of storm trajectories using the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model. Using analysis of variance, we determine that land-based winter storms result in marginally higher albedo than coastal storms or storms from the Atlantic Ocean. Through multiple regression analysis, we determine that snow grain size is significantly more important in albedo reduction than black carbon content or snow density. And finally, we present a parameterization of albedo based on days since snowfall and temperature that accounts for 52% of variance in albedo over all three sites and years. Our improved understanding of current controls on snow albedo in the region will allow for better assessment of potential response of seasonal snow albedo and snow cover to changing climate.

  13. Control of thickness uniformity and grain size in graphene films for transparent conductive electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wei; Yu Qingkai; Pei, Shin-Shem; Peng Peng; Bao Jiming; Liu Zhihong

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale and transferable graphene films grown on metal substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) still hold great promise for future nanotechnology. To realize the promise, one of the key issues is to further improve the quality of graphene, e.g., uniform thickness, large grain size, and low defects. Here we grow graphene films on Cu foils by CVD at ambient pressure, and study the graphene nucleation and growth processes under different concentrations of carbon precursor. On the basis of the results, we develop a two-step ambient pressure CVD process to synthesize continuous single-layer graphene films with large grain size (up to hundreds of square micrometers). Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy characterizations confirm the film thickness and uniformity. The transferred graphene films on cover glass slips show high electrical conductivity and high optical transmittance that make them suitable as transparent conductive electrodes. The growth mechanism of CVD graphene on Cu is also discussed, and a growth model has been proposed. Our results provide important guidance toward the synthesis of high quality uniform graphene films, and could offer a great driving force for graphene based applications. (paper)

  14. Grain size indicators of sedimentary coupling between hillslopes and channels in a dryland basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollings, Rory; Michealides, Katerina; Bliss Singer, Michael

    2017-04-01

    In dryland landscapes, heterogeneous and short-lived rainstorms generate runoff on slopes and streamflow in channels, which drive sediment movement from hillslope surfaces to channels and the transport of bed material sediment within channels. Long-term topographic evolution of drainage basins is partly determined by the relative balance of hillslope sediment supply to channels and the evacuation of channel sediment. However, it is not clear whether supply or evacuation is dominant over longer timescales (>>100 y) within dryland basins. One important indicator of local cumulative sediment transport is grain size (GS). On dryland hillslopes, grain size is governed over long timescales by weathering, but on short time scales (events to decades), is controlled by event-driven transport of the debris mantle. In the channel, GS reflects the input of hillslope sediment and the selective transport of particles along the bed. It is currently unknown how these two processes are expressed systematically within GS distributions on slopes and in channels within drylands, but this information could be useful to explain the history of the relative balance between hillslope sediment supply to channels and net sediment transport in the channel. We investigate this problem by combining field measurements of surface sediment grain size distributions in channels and on hillslopes with 1m LiDAR topography, >60 years of rainfall and channel discharge data from the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in Arizona, and simple calculations of grain-sized based local stress distributions for various rainfall and discharge events. Hydrological scenarios of overland flow on hillslopes and channel flow conditions were derived from distributions of historic data at WGEW and were selected to reflect the wide range of storm intensities and durations, and channel discharges. 1) We used three quartiles of the entire distribution of measured discharge values for 80 locations throughout the

  15. The grain size distribution of settled sediment within storage reservoir Otmuchów

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Głowski Robert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The grain size distribution of settled sediment within storage reservoir Otmuchów. The river Nysa Kłodzka is flowing through the flat-reduction Otmuchów. There are localized two storage reservoirs Otmuchów and Nysa. The first of these reservoirs have been constructed in the period 1928-1933 and the filling was completed in 1934. Reservoir Nysa was completed in 1971. Both reservoirs are located within walking distance of each other, creating since 1971 cascade. Reservoir Otmuchów is located above the Nysa reservoir what cause, that in the bowl of the Otmuchów reservoir, the significant part of transported by Nysa Kłodzka sediments is deposited. When established after the 1997 flood damming levels, summer and winter, the length of the reservoir Otmuchów is suitably from 4.5 to 5 km. At the maximum impoundment level and a maximal capacity of 130.45 million m3 the reservoir length reach approx. 7 km. From the analysis of the satellite image can be seen advancing silting of the reservoir Otmuchów especially in the estuary zone of the Nysa Kłodzka. Obtained archival data about changes of the sediment grain size distribution in the longitudinal reservoir profile cover only the region of the still capacity extending a distance of 3 km from the cross-section of the dam. In this zone the fine particles of the suspended load with characteristic diameters ranging from 0.030 to 0.088 mm were embedded. In 2010, the authors presented the results of preliminary analysis of the silting process of the reservoir Otmuchów. The authors pointed out that there is a lack of the data about the dimension of the particles embedded in the usable capacity and flood capacity reserve (above 3 km from the dam causing visible on satellite photo silting. This paper presents the results of the sediment grain size distribution in the usable capacity of the reservoir and in the estuary region of the Nysa Kłodzka located in flood capacity reserve, obtained from the

  16. Microstructure and mechanical strength of near- and sub-micrometre grain size copper prepared by spark plasma sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, K. N.; Godfrey, A.; Hansen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been used to prepare fully dense samples of copper in a fully recrystallized condition with grain sizes in the near- and sub-micrometre regime. Two synthesis routes have been investigated to achieve grain size control: (i) SPS at different temperatures from 800 to...... been probed using hardness measurements and tensile testing, revealing an enhanced strength for samples with grain sizes less than ≈ 1 μm....... transmission electron microscope, and on electron back-scatter diffraction studies, confirms the samples are in a nearly fully recrystallized condition, with grains that are dislocation-free, and have a random texture, with a high fraction of high angle boundaries. The mechanical strength of the samples has...

  17. Influence of grain size on the mechanical properties of nano-crystalline copper; insights from molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rida, A.; Makke, A.; Rouhaud, E.; Micoulaut, M.

    2017-10-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanical properties of a columnar nanocrystalline copper with a mean grain size between 8.91 nm and 24 nm. The used samples were generated by using a melting cooling method. These samples were submitted to uniaxial tensile test. The results reveal the presence of a critical mean grain size between 16 and 20 nm, where there is an inversion in the conventional Hall-Petch tendency. This inversion is illustrated by the increase of flow stress with the increase of the mean grain size. This transition is caused by shifting of the deformation mechanism from dislocations to a combination of grain boundaries sliding and dislocations. Moreover, the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline copper has been investigated. The results show a decrease of the flow stress and Young's modulus when the temperature increases.

  18. Structure and strength of aluminum with sub-micrometer/micrometer grain size prepared by spark plasma sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, G.M.; Godfrey, A.; Hansen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    A spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique has been applied to prepare fully dense Al samples from Al powder. By applying a sintering temperature of 600°C and a loading pressure of 50MPa, fully recrystallized samples of nearly 100% density with average grain sizes of 5.2μm, 1.3μm and 0.8μm have been...... successfully prepared using a sintering time of less than 30min and without the need for a nitrogen atmosphere. A similarity between the grain size and powder particle size is found, which suggests a potential application of the SPS technique to prepare samples with a variety of grain sizes by tailoring...... the initial powder particle size. The SPS samples show higher strength than Al samples with an identical grain size prepared using thermo-mechanical processing, and a better strength-ductility combination, with the 1.3μm grain size sample showing a yield strength (σ0.2%) of 140MPa and a uniform elongation...

  19. Field test comparison of an autocorrelation technique for determining grain size using a digital 'beachball' camera versus traditional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P.L.; Rubin, D.M.; Harney, J.; Mustain, N.

    2007-01-01

    This extensive field test of an autocorrelation technique for determining grain size from digital images was conducted using a digital bed-sediment camera, or 'beachball' camera. Using 205 sediment samples and >1200 images from a variety of beaches on the west coast of the US, grain size ranging from sand to granules was measured from field samples using both the autocorrelation technique developed by Rubin [Rubin, D.M., 2004. A simple autocorrelation algorithm for determining grain size from digital images of sediment. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 74(1): 160-165.] and traditional methods (i.e. settling tube analysis, sieving, and point counts). To test the accuracy of the digital-image grain size algorithm, we compared results with manual point counts of an extensive image data set in the Santa Barbara littoral cell. Grain sizes calculated using the autocorrelation algorithm were highly correlated with the point counts of the same images (r2 = 0.93; n = 79) and had an error of only 1%. Comparisons of calculated grain sizes and grain sizes measured from grab samples demonstrated that the autocorrelation technique works well on high-energy dissipative beaches with well-sorted sediment such as in the Pacific Northwest (r2 ??? 0.92; n = 115). On less dissipative, more poorly sorted beaches such as Ocean Beach in San Francisco, results were not as good (r2 ??? 0.70; n = 67; within 3% accuracy). Because the algorithm works well compared with point counts of the same image, the poorer correlation with grab samples must be a result of actual spatial and vertical variability of sediment in the field; closer agreement between grain size in the images and grain size of grab samples can be achieved by increasing the sampling volume of the images (taking more images, distributed over a volume comparable to that of a grab sample). In all field tests the autocorrelation method was able to predict the mean and median grain size with ???96% accuracy, which is more than

  20. Downstream lightening and upward heavying, sorting of sediments of uniform grain size but differing in density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viparelli, E.; Solari, L.; Hill, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Downstream fining, i.e. the tendency for a gradual decrease in grain size in the downstream direction, has been observed and studied in alluvial rivers and in laboratory flumes. Laboratory experiments and field observations show that the vertical sorting pattern over a small Gilbert delta front is characterized by an upward fining profile, with preferential deposition of coarse particles in the lowermost part of the deposit. The present work is an attempt to answer the following questions. Are there analogous sorting patterns in mixtures of sediment particles having the same grain size but differing density? To investigate this, we performed experiments at the Hydrosystems Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. During the experiments a Gilbert delta formed and migrated downstream allowing for the study of transport and sorting processes on the surface and within the deposit. The experimental results show 1) preferential deposition of heavy particles in the upstream part of the deposit associated with a pattern of "downstream lightening"; and 2) a vertical sorting pattern over the delta front characterized by a pattern of "upward heavying" with preferential deposition of light particles in the lowermost part of the deposit. The observed downstream lightening is analogous of the downstream fining with preferential deposition of heavy (coarse) particles in the upstream part of the deposit. The observed upward heavying was unexpected because, considering the particle mass alone, the heavy (coarse) particles should have been preferentially deposited in the lowermost part of the deposit. Further, the application of classical fractional bedload transport relations suggests that in the case of mixtures of particles of uniform size and different densities equal mobility is not approached. We hypothesize that granular physics mechanisms traditionally associated with sheared granular flows may be responsible for the observed upward heavying and for the

  1. Comparing spatial grain-size trends inferred from textural parameters using percentile statistical parameters and those based on the log-hyperbolic method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Christiansen, C.; Pedersen, Jørn Bjarke Torp

    2007-01-01

    -size distributions, there seems to be a general defect in the log-hyperbolic approximation of the best represented tail. This makes ¿ less sensitive to indicate the correct sign of slightly skewed grain-size distributions than Sk. However, when examining trends, the relative change between ¿ and Sk by and large......, exclusively linked to dynamic sorting. In general, the F&W parameters reflect the observed grain-size trends far better than the corresponding log-hyperbolic parameters. The log-hyperbolic "typical log grain size", ¿, is sensitive to changes in skewness and cannot replace mean grain size, Mz, in grain......The Folk&Ward (F&W) and the log-hyperbolic methods are applied to a small - and easy to overlook - number of typical sand sized grain-size distributions from the Danish Wadden Sea. The sand originates from the same source, and the pattern of change in the grain-size distributions is, therefore...

  2. Size-segregated fluxes of mineral dust from a desert area of northern China by eddy covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fratini

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust emission accounts for a substantial portion of particles present in the troposphere. It is emitted mostly from desert areas, mainly through intense storm episodes. The aim of this work was to quantify size-segregated fluxes of mineral dust particles emitted during storm events occurring in desert areas of northern China (Alashan desert, Inner Mongolia, known to act as one of the strongest sources of mineral dust particles in the Asian continent. Long-range transport of mineral dust emitted in this area is responsible for the high particle concentrations reached in densely populated areas, including the city of Beijing. Based on a theoretical analysis, an eddy covariance system was built to get size-segregated fluxes of mineral dust particles with optical diameters ranging between 0.26 and 7.00 µm. The system was optimised to measure fluxes under intense storm event conditions. It was tested in two sites located in the Chinese portion of the Gobi desert. During the field campaign, an intense wind erosion event, classified as a "weak dust storm", was recorded in one of them. Data obtained during this event indicate that particle number fluxes were dominated by the finer fraction, whereas in terms of mass, coarser particle accounted for the largest portion. It was found that during the storm event, ratios of size-segregated particle mass fluxes remained substantially constant and a simple parameterization of particle emission from total mass fluxes was possible. A strong correlation was also found between particle mass fluxes and the friction velocity. This relationship is extremely useful to investigate mechanisms of particle formation by wind erosion.

  3. Expading fluvial remote sensing to the riverscape: Mapping depth and grain size on the Merced River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ryan T.

    This study builds upon recent research in the field of fluvial remote sensing by applying techniques for mapping physical attributes of rivers. Depth, velocity, and grain size are primary controls on the types of habitat present in fluvial ecosystems. This thesis focuses on expanding fluvial remote sensing to larger spatial extents and sub-meter resolutions, which will increase our ability to capture the spatial heterogeneity of habitat at a resolution relevant to individual salmonids and an extent relevant to species. This thesis consists of two chapters, one focusing on expanding the spatial extent over which depth can be mapped using Optimal Band Ratio Analysis (OBRA) and the other developing general relations for mapping grain size from three-dimensional topographic point clouds. The two chapters are independent but connected by the overarching goal of providing scientists and managers more useful tools for quantifying the amount and quality of salmonid habitat via remote sensing. The OBRA chapter highlights the true power of remote sensing to map depths from hyperspectral images as a central component of watershed scale analysis, while also acknowledging the great challenges involved with increasing spatial extent. The grain size mapping chapter establishes the first general relations for mapping grain size from roughness using point clouds. These relations will significantly reduce the time needed in the field by eliminating the need for independent measurements of grain size for calibrating the roughness-grain size relationship and thus making grain size mapping with SFM more cost effective for river restoration and monitoring. More data from future studies are needed to refine these relations and establish their validity and generality. In conclusion, this study adds to the rapidly growing field of fluvial remote sensing and could facilitate river research and restoration.

  4. Effect of non-metallic precipitates and grain size on core loss of non-oriented electrical silicon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayi; Ren, Qiang; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Lifeng

    2018-04-01

    In the current study, the number density and size of non-metallic precipitates and the size of grains on the core loss of the 50W800 non-oriented electrical silicon steel sheets were investigated. The number density and size of precipitates and grains were statistically analyzed using an automatic scanning electron microscope (ASPEX) and an optical microscope. Hypothesis models were established to reveal the physical feature for the function of grain size and precipitates on the core loss of the steel. Most precipitates in the steel were AlN particles smaller than 1 μm so that were detrimental to the core loss of the steel. These finer AlN particles distributed on the surface of the steel sheet. The relationship between the number density of precipitates (x in number/mm2 steel area) and the core loss (P1.5/50 in W/kg) was regressed as P1.5/50 = 4.150 + 0.002 x. The average grain size was approximately 25-35 μm. The relationship between the core loss and grain size (d in μm) was P1.5/50 = 3.851 + 20.001 d-1 + 60.000 d-2.

  5. Sr-Nd-Hf Isotopic Analysis of Dust Samples: Implications for Ice Core Dust Source Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Újvári, Gábor; Wegner, Wencke; Klötzli, Urs; Horschinegg, Monika; Hippler, Dorothee

    2018-01-01

    Combined Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data of two reference materials (AGV-1/BCR2) and 50, 10, and 5 mg aliquots of carbonate-free fine grain (China/BEI, USA/JUD) are presented. Good agreement between measured and reference Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions (ICs) demonstrate that robust isotopic ratios can be obtained from 5 to 10 mg size rock samples using the ion exchange/mass spectrometry techniques applied. While 87Sr/86Sr ratios of dust aluminosilicate fractions are affected by even small changes in pretreatments, Nd isotopic ratios are found to be insensitive to acid leaching, grain-size or weathering effects. However, the Nd isotopic tracer is sometimes inconclusive in dust source fingerprinting (BEI and NUS both close to ɛNd(0) -10). Hafnium isotopic values (dust dust from potential source areas to gain more insight into the origin of last glacial dust in Greenland ice cores.

  6. Nonplanar electrostatic shock waves in an opposite polarity dust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been carried out on the propagation of nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) dust-acoustic shock waves (DASHWs) in a collisionless four-component unmagnetized dusty plasmasystem containing massive, micron-sized, positively and negatively charged inertial dust grains along with ...

  7. Trace, isotopic analysis of micron-sized grains -- Mo, Zr analysis of stardust (SiC and graphite grains).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellin, M. J.; Nicolussi, G. K.

    1998-02-19

    Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry using resonant laser ionization can provide for both high useful yields and high discrimination while maintaining high lateral and depth resolutions. An example of the power of the method is measurement of the isotopic composition of Mo and Zr in 1-5 {micro}m presolar SiC and graphite grains isolated from the Murchison CM2 meteorite for the first time. These grains have survived the formation of the Solar System and isotopic analysis reveals a record of the stellar nucleosynthesis present during their formation. Mo and Zr, though present at less than 10 ppm in some grains, are particularly useful in that among their isotopes are members that can only be formed by distinct nucleosynthetic processes known as s-, p-, and r-process. Successful isotopic analysis of these elements requires both high selectivity (since these are trace elements) and high efficiency (since the total number of atoms available are limited). Resonant Ionization Spectroscopy is particularly useful and flexible in this application. While the sensitivity of this t.edmique has often been reported in the past, we focus hereon the very low noise properties of the technique. We further demonstrate the efficacy of noise removal by two complimentary methods. First we use the resonant nature of the signal to subtract background signal. Second we demonstrate that by choosing the appropriate resonance scheme background can often be dramatically reduced.

  8. Electric field and grain size dependence of Meyer–Neldel energy in C60 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mujeeb; Pivrikas, A.; Fishchuk, I.I.; Kadashchuk, A.; Stadler, P.; Simbrunner, C.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Sitter, H.

    2011-01-01

    Meyer–Neldel rule for charge carrier mobility measured in C60-based organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) at different applied source drain voltages and at different morphologies of semiconducting fullerene films was systematically studied. A decrease in the Meyer–Neldel energy EMN from 36 meV to 32 meV was observed with changing electric field in the channel. Concomitantly a decrease from 34 meV to 21 meV was observed too by increasing the grain size and the crystallinity of the active C60 layer in the device. These empiric findings are in agreement with the hopping-transport model for the temperature dependent charge carrier mobility in organic semiconductors with a Gaussian density of states (DOS). Experimental results along with theoretical descriptions are presented. PMID:21966084

  9. Grain size effect on lattice of ni nanocrystals prepared through polyol method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okram, G S; Devi, Kh Namrata; Sanatombi, H; Soni, Ajay; Ganesan, V; Phase, D M

    2008-08-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel powders were prepared with grain size 'd' in the range 40-100 nm diameters through polyol method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for characterization. XRD of the prepared samples consistently matched with standard fcc structure of nickel without any impurity peak. Detailed analysis and calculations using Scherrer equation for (111) peak revealed systematic increase in line width and peak shifting towards lower diffraction 2theta angles with decrease in nickel to ethylene glycol mole ratio. Different values of d estimated from various peaks of each sample suggested associated microstrains in the nanograins. Values of d estimated from X-ray diffraction patterns were compared with those obtained from atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy results, and discussed. Observed lattice expansion is explained, on the basis of a theoretical model of linear elasticity.

  10. Nanocrystalline growth and grain-size effects in Au-Cu electrodeposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Saw, Cheng K.; Harper, Jennifer F.; Vallier, Bobby F.; Ferreira, James L.; Hayes, Jeffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    The processing-structure-property relationship is investigated for electrodeposited foils of the gold-copper alloy system. A model is presented that relates the deposition process parameters to the nanocrystalline grain size. An activation energy of 1.52 eV atom -1 for growth is determined for a long-pulse (> 10 msec) mode, and is 0.16 eV atom -1 for short pulses ( 6 nm) is observed for Au-Cu samples with 1-12 wt.% Cu as tested in cross-section. The hardness increases three-fold from a rule-of-mixtures value < 1 GPa to a maximum of 2.9 GPa

  11. Variability of grain sizes in a beach nourishment programme for the Danish West Caost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Wahl, Niels Arne

    2007-01-01

    The coastal landscape in Denmark is characterized by multiple areas of geologic, biologic and recreational interests both national and international. In the later years several guidelines have been set up for the coastal protection area. The aims for the future are to ensure the presence...... of naturally shaped beaches while at the same time the risk for erosion is reduced. For this reason beach nourishment is used widely along the Danish North Sea coast (called West Coast) and this method is preferred in preference to put up solid constructions. Beach nourishment is the primary method used...... by the Danish Coastal Authority. However problems have occurred in describing the spatial distribution of medium grain size d50 and the gradation U of the sediment used for beach nourishment. At the same time the sedimentary composition determines how fast the nourished beach is eroded and how the beach...

  12. Regional Association Analysis of MetaQTLs Delineates Candidate Grain Size Genes in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag V. Daware

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mapping studies which aim to identify genetic basis of diverse agronomic traits are vital for marker-assisted crop improvement. Numerous Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs mapped in rice span long genomic intervals with hundreds to thousands of genes, which limits their utilization for marker-assisted genetic enhancement of rice. Although potent, fine mapping of QTLs is challenging task as it requires screening of large number of segregants to identify suitable recombination events. Association mapping offers much higher resolution as compared to QTL mapping, but detects considerable number of spurious QTLs. Therefore, combined use of QTL and association mapping strategies can provide advantages associated with both these methods. In the current study, we utilized meta-analysis approach to identify metaQTLs associated with grain size/weight in diverse Indian indica and aromatic rice accessions. Subsequently, attempt has been made to narrow-down identified grain size/weight metaQTLs through individual SNP- as well as haplotype-based regional association analysis. The study identified six different metaQTL regions, three of which were successfully revalidated, and substantially scaled-down along with GS3 QTL interval (positive control by regional association analysis. Consequently, two potential candidate genes within two reduced metaQTLs were identified based on their differential expression profiles in different tissues/stages of rice accessions during seed development. The developed strategy has broader practical utility for rapid delineation of candidate genes and natural alleles underlying QTLs associated with complex agronomic traits in rice as well as major crop plants enriched with useful genetic and genomic information.

  13. Retrieval of snow grain size and soot pollution on sea ice with the optical satellite remote sensing instrument MODIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Heidrun; Heygster, Georg [Institute for Environmental Physics, University of Bremen (Germany); Zege, Eleonora [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2009-07-01

    Snow fields have potentially significant effects on the planetary albedo and climate. Development of satellite remote sensing of snow is of a great importance particularly for monitoring of snow age, pollution, and grain sizes over the polar regions difficult to access. As it follows from numerous experimental studies of optical and microphysical snow properties, a snow layer is a multiple scattering close packed medium with irregular shaped non-uniform grains. The developed algorithm retrieves the effective snow grain size and pollution amount, which does not imply any specific snow model, do not use any a priori suggestions of snow grain shape, and uses the multi-spectral information provided by a satellite optical instrument MODIS. It is especially suitable for polar regions, as it provides a reliable retrieval even at low sun elevations.

  14. Predictability of seabed texture: spatial scaling of grain size and bathymetry on glaciated and non-glaciated shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostylev, V.

    2010-12-01

    In mapping seabed texture inherent predictability of sediment grain size is the key to the success of spatial interpolations. With low and stationary spatial variance the variable should be easy to predict while otherwise the results of interpolation are untrustworthy. Conceptual model known as 1/f^β noise offers a compelling way to describe predictability of environmental patterns. I have studied spatial spectra of mean grain size of surficial seabed sediments from two datasets roughly corresponding to glaciated (Canadian) and non-glaciated (US) shelves. Data for the Atlantic Canadian waters were obtained from Natural Resources Canada Expedition Database (23666 samples). For United States waters the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean coastal and offshore data (17765 samples) as well as Atlantic Coast offshore surficial sediment data (33907 samples) were obtained from the usSEABED database. Spatial variances of mean grain size were calculated for samples separated by distance bins ranging from 1 to 1000 km. On scales from kilometers to hundreds of kilometers power spectrum of mean grain size in the studied datasets may be characterized as white noise (β = 0), indistinguishable from uniform random distribution (β =0.097 for Canada and β =0.009 for US). Power spectrum of grain size co-varies with bathymetry in US dataset across all scales. In the Canadian dataset this relationship holds up to 100 km, after which bathymetric and grain size variability become dissociated, and bathymetric variability increasing while sediment variability being relatively constant. Variance of US grain size data exhibits rapid increase in spatial variance on scales of 100 km and higher (β = 1.501). This exponent value falls between pink (β = 1) and red (Brownian, β = 2) noise and indicates that spatial patterns at larger sample separations are more predictable. There are several possible explanations for high spatial variance in grain size at relatively small sample separation (1 - 100

  15. Significant contribution of stacking faults to the strain hardening behavior of Cu-15%Al alloy with different grain sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y Z; Zhao, L J; Chen, S; Shibata, A; Zhang, Z F; Tsuji, N

    2015-11-19

    It is commonly accepted that twinning can induce an increase of strain-hardening rate during the tensile process of face-centered cubic (FCC) metals and alloys with low stacking fault energy (SFE). In this study, we explored the grain size effect on the strain-hardening behavior of a Cu-15 at.%Al alloy with low SFE. Instead of twinning, we detected a significant contribution of stacking faults (SFs) irrespective of the grain size even in the initial stage of tensile process. In contrast, twinning was more sensitive to the grain size, and the onset of deformation twins might be postponed to a higher strain with increasing the grain size. In the Cu-15 at.%Al alloy with a mean grain size of 47 μm, there was a stage where the strain-hardening rate increases with strain, and this was mainly induced by the SFs instead of twinning. Thus in parallel with the TWIP effect, we proposed that SFs also contribute significantly to the plasticity of FCC alloys with low SFE.

  16. Effect of Grain Size on Void Formation during High-Energy Electron Irradiation of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain

    1974-01-01

    ’ model based on the property of grain boundaries as neutral and unsaturable sinks for vacancies and self-interstitials. It is suggested that even in the presence of sufficiently large amount of impurity gas atoms, a critical level of vacancy supersaturation is necessary to produce critically sized...... vacancy clusters which upon stabilization become viable void nuclei. It is concluded that the presence of stable and small grains improves the damage resistance of the material tremendously....

  17. Characterizing the Variable Dust Permeability of Planet-induced Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Philipp; Benítez-Llambay, Pablo; Gressel, Oliver; Krapp, Leonardo; Pessah, Martin E.

    2018-02-01

    Aerodynamic theory predicts that dust grains in protoplanetary disks will drift radially inward on comparatively short timescales. In this context, it has long been known that the presence of a gap opened by a planet can significantly alter the dust dynamics. In this paper, we carry out a systematic study employing long-term numerical simulations aimed at characterizing the critical particle size for retention outside a gap as a function of particle size, as well as various key parameters defining the protoplanetary disk model. To this end, we perform multifluid hydrodynamical simulations in two dimensions, including different dust species, which we treat as pressureless fluids. We initialize the dust outside of the planet’s orbit and study under which conditions dust grains are able to cross the gap carved by the planet. In agreement with previous work, we find that the permeability of the gap depends both on dust dynamical properties and the gas disk structure: while small dust follows the viscously accreting gas through the gap, dust grains approaching a critical size are progressively filtered out. Moreover, we introduce and compute a depletion factor that enables us to quantify the way in which higher viscosity, smaller planet mass, or a more massive disk can shift this critical size to larger values. Our results indicate that gap-opening planets may act to deplete the inner reaches of protoplanetary disks of large dust grains—potentially limiting the accretion of solids onto forming terrestrial planets.

  18. Development process for the stabilization of incinerator bottom ash and sizing baghouse dust material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, L.F.; Boehmer, A.M.

    1987-04-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho Inc. has initiated a program to develop safe, efficient, cost-effective treatment methods for the stabilization and subsequent disposal of some of the hazardous and mixed wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Lab-scale testing has shown that Extraction Procedure (EP) toxic wastes can be successfully stabilized by solidification, using various binders to produce nontoxic, stable waste forms for safe, long-term disposal. The purpose of this report is to present the results of drum-scale testing of WERF incinerator bottom ash and WERF sizing baghouse dust. The drum-scale test program was conducted to determine if a production procedure that would produce a waste form which was suitable for disposal as a low-level radioactive waste could be developed. The use of 71-gallon square drums for solidification processing were also evaluated. During the test program, eleven drums of ash material were solidified. All of the samples from all of the drums passed the EPA leach test criteria. Although there is a distinct weight addition associated with the solidification process, there is no relative volume increase. 4 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  19. Analysis of the grain size evolution for ferrite formation in Fe-C-Mn steels using a 3D model under a mixed-mode interface condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, H.; Mecozzi, M.G.; Brück, E.H.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N.H.

    2018-01-01

    A 3D model has been developed to predict the average ferrite grain size and grain size distribution for an austenite-to-ferrite phase transformation during continuous cooling of an Fe-C-Mn steel. Using a Voronoi construction to represent the austenite grains, the ferrite is assumed to nucleate at

  20. COLLISIONAL GROOMING MODELS OF THE KUIPER BELT DUST CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchner, Marc J.; Stark, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    We modeled the three-dimensional structure of the Kuiper Belt (KB) dust cloud at four different dust production rates, incorporating both planet-dust interactions and grain-grain collisions using the collisional grooming algorithm. Simulated images of a model with a face-on optical depth of ∼10 -4 primarily show an azimuthally symmetric ring at 40-47 AU in submillimeter and infrared wavelengths; this ring is associated with the cold classical KB. For models with lower optical depths (10 -6 and 10 -7 ), synthetic infrared images show that the ring widens and a gap opens in the ring at the location of Neptune; this feature is caused by trapping of dust grains in Neptune's mean motion resonances. At low optical depths, a secondary ring also appears associated with the hole cleared in the center of the disk by Saturn. Our simulations, which incorporate 25 different grain sizes, illustrate that grain-grain collisions are important in sculpting today's KB dust, and probably other aspects of the solar system dust complex; collisions erase all signs of azimuthal asymmetry from the submillimeter image of the disk at every dust level we considered. The model images switch from being dominated by resonantly trapped small grains ('transport dominated') to being dominated by the birth ring ('collision dominated') when the optical depth reaches a critical value of τ ∼ v/c, where v is the local Keplerian speed.

  1. Collisional Grooming Models of the Kuiper Belt Dust Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc J.; Stark, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    We modeled the three-dimensional structure of the Kuiper Belt (KB) dust cloud at four different dust production rates, incorporating both planet-dust interactions and grain-grain collisions using the collisional grooming algorithm. Simulated images of a model with a face-on optical depth of approximately 10 (exp -4) primarily show an azimuthally- symmetric ring at 40-47 AU in submillimeter and infrared wavelengths; this ring is associated with the cold classical KB. For models with lower optical depths (10 (exp -6) and 10 (exp-7)), synthetic infrared images show that the ring widens and a gap opens in the ring at the location of Neptune; this feature is caused by trapping of dust grains in Neptune's mean motion resonances. At low optical depths, a secondary ring also appears associated with the hole cleared in the center of the disk by Saturn. Our simulations, which incorporate 25 different grain sizes, illustrate that grain-grain collisions are important in sculpting today's KB dust, and probably other aspects of the solar system dust complex; collisions erase all signs of azimuthal asymmetry from the submillimeter image of the disk at every dust level we considered. The model images switch from being dominated by resonantly trapped small grains ("transport dominated") to being dominated by the birth ring ("collision dominated") when the optical depth reaches a critical value of r approximately v/c, where v is the local Keplerian speed.

  2. Evolution of grain sizes and orientations during phase transitions in hydrous Mg2SiO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Angelika D.; Hilairet, Nadège; Ghosh, Sujoy; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Garbarino, Gaston; Merkel, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Transformation microstructures in mantle minerals, such as (Mg,Fe)2SiO4, are critical for predicting the rheological properties of rocks and the interpretation of seismic observations. We present in situ multigrain X-ray diffraction experiments on hydrous Mg2SiO4 at the P/T conditions relevant for deep cold subducting slabs (up to 40 GPa and 850°C) at a low experimental strain rate ( 4 * 10-6s-1). We monitor the orientations of hundreds of grains and grain size variations during the series of α-β-γ (forsterite-wadsleyite-ringwoodite) phase transformations. Microtextural results indicate that the β and an intermediate γ* phase grow incoherently relatively to the host α phase consistent with a nucleation and growth model. The β and γ phases exhibit orientation relationships which are in agreement with previous ex situ observations. The β and intermediate γ* show texturing due to moderate differential stress in the sample. Both the α-β and α-γ transformation induce significant reductions of the mean sample grain size of up to 90% that starts prior to the appearance of the daughter phase. Apart from the γ*, in the newly formed β and γ phases, the nucleation rate is faster than the growth rate, inhibiting the formation of large grains. These results on grain orientations and grain size reductions in relation to transformation kinetics should allow refining existing slab strength models.

  3. Pearl millet grain size and hardness in relation to resistance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grain hardness was measured using the sodium nitrate specific gravity floaters test. In general, larger and softer grains supported more weevils. However, there seems to be a good spread of variability for weevil progeny production within the large grain fraction, suggesting the possibility of selecting for resistance among ...

  4. Size distribution and optical properties of mineral dust aerosols transported in the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Denjean

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents in situ aircraft measurements of Saharan mineral dust transported over the western Mediterranean basin in June–July 2013 during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region airborne campaign. Dust events differing in terms of source region (Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco, time of transport (1–5 days and height of transport were sampled. Mineral dust were transported above the marine boundary layer, which conversely was dominated by pollution and marine aerosols. The dust vertical structure was extremely variable and characterized by either a single layer or a more complex and stratified structure with layers originating from different source regions. Mixing of mineral dust with pollution particles was observed depending on the height of transport of the dust layers. Dust layers carried a higher concentration of pollution particles below 3 km above sea level (a.s.l. than above 3 km a.s.l., resulting in a scattering Ångström exponent up to 2.2 below 3 km a.s.l. However, the optical properties of the dust plumes remained practically unchanged with respect to values previously measured over source regions, regardless of the altitude. Moderate absorption of light by the dust plumes was observed with values of aerosol single scattering albedo at 530 nm ranging from 0.90 to 1.00. Concurrent calculations from the aerosol chemical composition revealed a negligible contribution of pollution particles to the absorption properties of the dust plumes that was due to a low contribution of refractory black carbon in regards to the fraction of dust and sulfate particles. This suggests that, even in the presence of moderate pollution, likely a persistent feature in the Mediterranean, the optical properties of the dust plumes could be assumed similar to those of native dust in radiative transfer simulations, modelling

  5. Analysis of Grain Size Distribution and Hydraulic Conductivity for a Variety of Sediment Types with Application to Wadi Sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Rosas Aguilar, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    Grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity from over 400 unlithified sediment samples were analized. The measured hydraulic conductivity values were then compared to values calculated using 20 different empirical equations commonly used to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain size analyses. It was found that most of the hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the empirical equations correlated very poorly to the measured hydraulic conductivity values. Modifications of the empirical equations, including changes to special coefficients and statistical off sets, were made to produce modified equations that considerably improve the hydraulic conductivity estimates from grain size data for beach, dune, off shore marine, and wadi sediments. Expected hydraulic conductivity estimation errors were reduced. Correction factors were proposed for wadi sediments, taking mud percentage and the standard deviation (in phi units) into account.

  6. A Conceptual Model for Spatial Grain Size Variability on the Surface of and within Beaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Gallagher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Grain size on the surface of natural beaches has been observed to vary spatially and temporally with morphology and wave energy. The stratigraphy of the beach at Duck, North Carolina, USA was examined using 36 vibracores (~1–1.5 m long collected along a cross-shore beach profile. Cores show that beach sediments are finer (~0.3 mm and more uniform high up on the beach. Lower on the beach, with more swash and wave action, the sand is reworked, segregated by size, and deposited in layers and patches. At the deepest measurement sites in the swash (~−1.4 to −1.6 m NAVD88, which are constantly being reworked by the energetic shore break, there is a thick layer (60–80 cm of very coarse sediment (~2 mm. Examination of two large trenches showed that continuous layers of coarse and fine sands comprise beach stratigraphy. Thicker coarse layers in the trenches (above mean sea level are likely owing to storm erosion and storm surge elevating the shore break and swash, which act to sort the sediment. Those layers are buried as water level retreats, accretion occurs and the beach recovers from the storm. Thinner coarse layers likely represent similar processes acting on smaller temporal scales.

  7. Differentially Accumulated Proteins in Coffea arabica Seeds during Perisperm Tissue Development and Their Relationship to Coffee Grain Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Leonardo Cardoso; Magalhães, Diogo Maciel De; Labate, Mônica Teresa Veneziano; Guidetti-Gonzalez, Simone; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Sera, Tumoru; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio

    2016-02-24

    Coffee is one of the most important crops for developing countries. Coffee classification for trading is related to several factors, including grain size. Larger grains have higher market value then smaller ones. Coffee grain size is determined by the development of the perisperm, a transient tissue with a highly active metabolism, which is replaced by the endosperm during seed development. In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify differentially accumulated proteins during perisperm development in two genotypes with regular (IPR59) and large grain sizes (IPR59-Graudo) in three developmental stages. Twenty-four spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, corresponding to 15 proteins. We grouped them into categories as follows: storage (11S), methionine metabolism, cell division and elongation, metabolic processes (mainly redox), and energy. Our data enabled us to show that perisperm metabolism in IPR59 occurs at a higher rate than in IPR59-Graudo, which is supported by the accumulation of energy and detoxification-related proteins. We hypothesized that grain and fruit size divergences between the two coffee genotypes may be due to the comparatively earlier triggering of seed development processes in IPR59. We also demonstrated for the first time that the 11S protein is accumulated in the coffee perisperm.

  8. Grain size-dependent strength of phyllosilicate-rich gouges in the shallow crust: Insights from the SAFOD site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Noah John; White, Joseph Clancy

    2017-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling project directly sampled a transitional (between creeping and locked) segment of the San Andreas Fault at 2.7 km depth. At the site, changes in strain rate occur between periods of coseismic slip (>10-7 s-1) and interseismic creep (10-10 s-1) over decadal scales ( 30 years). Microstructural observations of core retrieved from the SAFOD site show throughgoing fractures and gouge-rich cores within the fractures, evidence of predominantly brittle deformation mechanisms. Within the gouge-rich cores, strong phases show evidence of deformation by pressure solution once the grain size is reduced to a critical effective grain size. Models of pressure solution-accommodated creep for quartz-phyllosilicate mixtures indicate that viscous weakening of quartz occurs during the interseismic period once a critical effective grain size of 1 μm is achieved, consistent with microstructural observations. This causes pronounced weakening, as the strength of the mixture is then controlled by the frictional properties of the phyllosilicate phases. These results have pronounced implications for the internal deformation of fault zones in the shallow crust, where at low strain rates, deformation is accommodated by both viscous and brittle deformation mechanisms. As strain rates increase, the critical effective grain size for weakening decreases, localizing deformation into the finest-grained gouges until deformation can no longer be accommodated by viscous processes and purely brittle failure occurs.

  9. Dust Growth in Astrophysical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, R.; Tsytovich, V. N.

    2002-12-01

    Dust formation in space is important in diverse environments such as dust molecular clouds, proto-planetary nebulae, stellar outbursts, and supernova explosions. The formation of dust proceeds the formation of stellar objects and planets. In all these environments the dust particles interact with both neutral and plasma particles as well as with (ultraviolet) radiation and cosmic rays. The conventional view of grain growth is one based on accretion by the Van der Waals and chemical forces [Watson and Salpeter [14] considered in detail both theoretically and numerically (Kempf at all [6],Meaking [7]( and confirmed recently by micro-gravity experiments Blum et all [2]). The usual point of view is that the dust grow is occurring in dust molecular clouds at very low temperatures ~ (10 - 30)° K and is a slow process - dust grows to a size of about 0.1 μm in 106 - 109 years. This contradicts recent observations of dust growing in winds of C-stars in about 10 years and behind the supernova SN1987A shock in about 500 days. Also recent observation of star formation at the edge of irradiated dust clouds suggests that new plasma mechanism operates in star formation. Dusty plasma mechanisms of agglomeration are analyzed as an explanation of the new astrophysical observation. New micro-gravity experiments are proposed for observing the plasma mechanisms of dust agglomeration at gas pressures substantially higher than used in ([2]. Calculations for the growth rates of dust agglomeration due to plasma mechanisms are presented. It is shown that at large neutral gas densities the dust plasma attraction provides an explanation of dust grow in about 10 days observed in H-star winds. Ionization by cosmic rays and by radioactive dust can provide the dust attraction necessary for forming dust clumping observed in molecular clouds and the fractal plasma clumping can enhance the time to reach the gravitational contraction phase operating at the final stage of star formation. A new

  10. Small grain size zirconium-based coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, O., E-mail: omar.jimenez.udg@gmail.com [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, AP 307, CP 45101 Zapopan, Jal (Mexico); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Audronis, M.; Leyland, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Flores, M.; Rodriguez, E. [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, AP 307, CP 45101 Zapopan, Jal (Mexico); Kanakis, K.; Matthews, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-30

    Hard, partly amorphous, ZrTiB(N) coatings were deposited by Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) onto (111) silicon wafers at low substrate temperatures of 85 and 110 °C using Closed Field Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering. A segmented rectangular sputter target composed of three pieces (Zr/TiB{sub 2}/Zr) was used as the source of evaporation of coating components. Two different substrate biases (i.e. floating potential and − 50 V) and N{sub 2} reactive-gas flow rates of 2, 4 and 6 sccm were employed as the main deposition parameter variables. The chemical composition, structure, morphology and mechanical properties were investigated using a variety of analytical techniques such as Glow-Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy, cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction (GAXRD) and nanoindentation. With other parameters fixed, coating properties were found to be dependent on the substrate negative bias and nitrogen flow rate. Linear scan profiles and SEM imaging revealed that all coatings were smooth, dense and featureless (in fracture cross section) with no apparent columnar morphology or macro-defects. GAXRD structural analysis revealed that mostly metallic phases were formed for coatings containing no nitrogen, whereas a solid solution (Zr,Ti)N single phase nitride was found in most of the reactively deposited coatings — exhibiting a very small grain size due to nitrogen and boron grain refinement effects. Hardness values from as low as 8.6 GPa up to a maximum of 25.9 GPa are related mainly to solid solution strengthening effects. The measured elastic moduli correlated with the trends in hardness behaviour; values in the range of 120–200 GPa were observed depending on the selected deposition parameters. Also, high H/E values (> 0.1) were achieved with several of the coatings.

  11. Small grain size zirconium-based coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, O.; Audronis, M.; Leyland, A.; Flores, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Kanakis, K.; Matthews, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hard, partly amorphous, ZrTiB(N) coatings were deposited by Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) onto (111) silicon wafers at low substrate temperatures of 85 and 110 °C using Closed Field Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering. A segmented rectangular sputter target composed of three pieces (Zr/TiB 2 /Zr) was used as the source of evaporation of coating components. Two different substrate biases (i.e. floating potential and − 50 V) and N 2 reactive-gas flow rates of 2, 4 and 6 sccm were employed as the main deposition parameter variables. The chemical composition, structure, morphology and mechanical properties were investigated using a variety of analytical techniques such as Glow-Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy, cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction (GAXRD) and nanoindentation. With other parameters fixed, coating properties were found to be dependent on the substrate negative bias and nitrogen flow rate. Linear scan profiles and SEM imaging revealed that all coatings were smooth, dense and featureless (in fracture cross section) with no apparent columnar morphology or macro-defects. GAXRD structural analysis revealed that mostly metallic phases were formed for coatings containing no nitrogen, whereas a solid solution (Zr,Ti)N single phase nitride was found in most of the reactively deposited coatings — exhibiting a very small grain size due to nitrogen and boron grain refinement effects. Hardness values from as low as 8.6 GPa up to a maximum of 25.9 GPa are related mainly to solid solution strengthening effects. The measured elastic moduli correlated with the trends in hardness behaviour; values in the range of 120–200 GPa were observed depending on the selected deposition parameters. Also, high H/E values (> 0.1) were achieved with several of the coatings.

  12. Grain Refinement and Mechanical Properties of Cu-Cr-Zr Alloys with Different Nano-Sized TiCp Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Bai, Fang; Wang, Yong; Wang, Jinguo; Wang, Wenquan

    2017-08-08

    The TiC p /Cu master alloy was prepared via thermal explosion reaction. Afterwards, the nano-sized TiC p /Cu master alloy was dispersed by electromagnetic stirring casting into the melting Cu-Cr-Zr alloys to fabricate the nano-sized TiC p -reinforced Cu-Cr-Zr composites. Results show that nano-sized TiC p can effectively refine the grain size of Cu-Cr-Zr alloys. The morphologies of grain in Cu-Cr-Zr composites changed from dendritic grain to equiaxed crystal because of the addition and dispersion of nano-sized TiC p . The grain size decreased from 82 to 28 μm with the nano-sized TiC p content. Compared with Cu-Cr-Zr alloys, the ultimate compressive strength (σ UCS ) and yield strength (σ 0.2 ) of 4 wt% TiC p -reinforced Cu-Cr-Zr composites increased by 6.7% and 9.4%, respectively. The wear resistance of the nano-sized TiCp-reinforced Cu-Cr-Zr composites increased with the increasing nano-sized TiCp content. The wear loss of the nano-sized TiC p -reinforced Cu-Cr-Zr composites decreased with the increasing TiC p content under abrasive particles. The eletrical conductivity of Cu-Cr-Zr alloys, 2% and 4% nano-sized TiCp-reinforced Cu-Cr-Zr composites are 64.71% IACS, 56.77% IACS and 52.93% IACS, respectively.

  13. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution using finite difference equations and estimation of the grain size during friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.S.; Singh, H.; Dhindaw, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Magnesium alloy AE42 was friction stir processed under different cooling conditions. ► Heat flow model was developed using finite difference heat equations. ► Generalized MATLAB code was developed for solving heat flow model. ► Regression equation for estimation of grain size was developed. - Abstract: The present investigation is aimed at developing a heat flow model to simulate temperature history during friction stir processing (FSP). A new approach of developing implicit form of finite difference heat equations solved using MATLAB code was used. A magnesium based alloy AE42 was friction stir processed (FSPed) at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions. Temperature history was continuously recorded in the nugget zone during FSP using data acquisition system and k type thermocouples. The developed code was validated at different FSP parameters and cooling conditions during FSP experimentation. The temperature history at different locations in the nugget zone at different instants of time was further utilized for the estimation of grain growth rate and final average grain size of the FSPed specimen. A regression equation relating the final grain size, maximum temperature during FSP and the cooling rate was developed. The metallurgical characterization was done using optical microscopy, SEM, and FIB-SIM analysis. The simulated temperature profiles and final average grain size were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The presence of fine precipitate particles generated in situ in the investigated magnesium alloy also contributed in the evolution of fine grain structure through Zener pining effect at the grain boundaries.

  14. Modeling the Effect of Grain Size Mixing on Thermal Inertia Values Derived from Diurnal and Seasonal THEMIS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, C.; Moersch, J.

    2017-12-01

    Sedimentary processes have slowed over Mars' geologic history. Analysis of the surface today can provide insight into the processes that may have affected it over its history. Sub-resolved checkerboard mixtures of materials with different thermal inertias (and therefore different grain sizes) can lead to differences in thermal inertia values inferred from night and day radiance observations. Information about the grain size distribution of a surface can help determine the degree of sorting it has experienced or it's geologic maturity. Standard methods for deriving thermal inertia from measurements made with THEMIS can give values for the same location that vary by as much as 20% between scenes. Such methods make the assumption that each THEMIS pixel contains material that has uniform thermophysical properties. Here we propose that if a mixture of small and large particles is present within a pixel, the inferred thermal inertia will be strongly dominated by whichever particle is warmer at the time of the measurement because the power radiated by a surface is proportional (by the Stefan-Boltzmann law) to the fourth power of its temperature. This effect will result in a change in thermal inertia values inferred from measurements taken at different times of day and night. Therefore, we expect to see correlation between the magnitude of diurnal variations in inferred thermal inertia values and the degree of grain size mixing for a given pixel location. Preliminary work has shown that the magnitude of such diurnal variation in inferred thermal inertias is sufficient to detect geologically useful differences in grain size distributions. We hypothesize that at least some of the 20% variability in thermal inertias inferred from multiple scenes for a given location could be attributed to sub-pixel grain size mixing rather than uncertainty inherent to the experiment, as previously thought. Mapping the difference in inferred thermal inertias from day and night THEMIS

  15. Grain size effect on the structural parameters of the stress induced epsilonhcp: martensite in iron-based shape memory alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Cristina Nascimento

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of austenitic grain size (GS reduction on the structural parameters of the epsilonhcp - martensite in stainless shape memory alloy (SMA. Rietveld refinement data showed an expansion in c-axis and a reduction in a and b-axis with thermo-mechanical cycles for all samples analyzed. Samples with 75 < GS (µm < 129 were analyzed. It was also observed an increase of the unit cell volume in this phase with GS reduction. The smallest grain size sample (GS = 75 µm presented a c/a ratio of 1.649, and approximately 90% of total shape memory recovery.

  16. Grain-size segregation and levee formation in geophysical mass flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.G.; Kokelaar, B.P.; Iverson, Richard M.; Logan, M.; LaHusen, R.G.; Gray, J.M.N.T.

    2012-01-01

    Data from large-scale debris-flow experiments are combined with modeling of particle-size segregation to explain the formation of lateral levees enriched in coarse grains. The experimental flows consisted of 10 m3 of water-saturated sand and gravel, which traveled ∼80 m down a steeply inclined flume before forming an elongated leveed deposit 10 m long on a nearly horizontal runout surface. We measured the surface velocity field and observed the sequence of deposition by seeding tracers onto the flow surface and tracking them in video footage. Levees formed by progressive downslope accretion approximately 3.5 m behind the flow front, which advanced steadily at ∼2 m s−1during most of the runout. Segregation was measured by placing ∼600 coarse tracer pebbles on the bed, which, when entrained into the flow, segregated upwards at ∼6–7.5 cm s−1. When excavated from the deposit these were distributed in a horseshoe-shaped pattern that became increasingly elevated closer to the deposit termination. Although there was clear evidence for inverse grading during the flow, transect sampling revealed that the resulting leveed deposit was strongly graded laterally, with only weak vertical grading. We construct an empirical, three-dimensional velocity field resembling the experimental observations, and use this with a particle-size segregation model to predict the segregation and transport of material through the flow. We infer that coarse material segregates to the flow surface and is transported to the flow front by shear. Within the flow head, coarse material is overridden, then recirculates in spiral trajectories due to size-segregation, before being advected to the flow edges and deposited to form coarse-particle-enriched levees.

  17. Collisions between grains in a turbulent gas. [in interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelk, H. J.; Morfill, G. E.; Roeser, S.; Jones, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Turbulent gas motions will induce random velocities of small dust grains that are imbedded in the gas. Within large eddies the friction forces from the gas lead to strongly correlated velocities for neighboring grains, whereas small eddies cause uncorrelated grain motions. The nonlinear response of a grain to eddy motion is calculated. This leads to a turbulent pressure within the dust component as well as to collisions between pairs of grains. The results are evaluated numerically for a Kolmogoroff spectrum and turbulent collision rates are calculated for molecular clouds and protostellar environments. Whereas grain-grain collisions should not modify the initial size distribution in molecular clouds to a significant extent, they will lead to an entirely different grain population in protostars.

  18. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  19. Influence of Grain Growth Inhibitors and Powder Size on the Properties of Ultrafine and Nanostructured Cemented Carbides Sintered in Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Aleksandrov Fabijanić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of grain growth inhibitors and powder size on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine and nanostructured cemented carbides was researched. Three different WC powders, with an addition of different type and content of grain growth inhibitors GGIs, VC and Cr3C2 and with dBET grain sizes in the range from 95 to 150 nm were selected as starting powders. Four different mixtures with 6 and 9 wt. % Co were prepared. The consolidated samples are characterized by different microstructural and mechanical properties with respect to the characteristics of starting powders. Increased sintering temperatures led to microstructural irregularities in the form of a discontinuous WC growth, carbide agglomerates and abnormal grain growth as a consequence of coalescence via grain boundary elimination. The addition of 0.45% Cr3C2 contributed to microstructure homogeneity, reduced discontinuous and continuous grain growth, and increased Vickers hardness by approximately 70 HV and fracture toughness by approximately 0.15 MN/m3/2. The reduction of the starting powder to a real nanosize of 95 nm resulted in lower densities, and significant hardness increase, with a simultaneously small increase in fracture toughness. The consolidation of real nanopowders (dBET < 100 nm solely by conventional sintering in hydrogen without isostatic pressing is not preferred.

  20. A Visual Basic program to plot sediment grain-size data on ternary diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; Eliason, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Sedimentologic datasets are typically large and compiled into tables or databases, but pure numerical information can be difficult to understand and interpret. Thus, scientists commonly use graphical representations to reduce complexities, recognize trends and patterns in the data, and develop hypotheses. Of the graphical techniques, one of the most common methods used by sedimentologists is to plot the basic gravel, sand, silt, and clay percentages on equilateral triangular diagrams. This means of presenting data is simple and facilitates rapid classification of sediments and comparison of samples.The original classification scheme developed by Shepard (1954) used a single ternary diagram with sand, silt, and clay in the corners and 10 categories to graphically show the relative proportions among these three grades within a sample. This scheme, however, did not allow for sediments with significant amounts of gravel. Therefore, Shepard's classification scheme was later modified by the addition of a second ternary diagram with two categories to account for gravel and gravelly sediment (Schlee, 1973). The system devised by Folk (1954, 1974)\\ is also based on two triangular diagrams, but it has 21 categories and uses the term mud (defined as silt plus clay). Patterns within the triangles of both systems differ, as does the emphasis placed on gravel. For example, in the system described by Shepard, gravelly sediments have more than 10% gravel; in Folk's system, slightly gravelly sediments have as little as 0.01% gravel. Folk's classification scheme stresses gravel because its concentration is a function of the highest current velocity at the time of deposition as is the maximum grain size of the detritus that is available; Shepard's classification scheme emphasizes the ratios of sand, silt, and clay because they reflect sorting and reworking (Poppe et al., 2005).The program described herein (SEDPLOT) generates verbal equivalents and ternary diagrams to

  1. INFLUENCE OF AUSTENITE GRAIN SIZE TO DEVELOPMENT OF DECARBONIZATION IN PRODUCTION OF ROLLED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARUSOV E. V.

    2016-08-01

    ]. The paper [11] acknowledges the influence of micro-additives of boron on changes in the austenite grain size and accordingly the length of borders in high-carbon steels with austenitizing temperature increase within the range of 900…1 100ºС. The purpose of work is to research the effect of austenite grain size on the decarburization depth in carbon (base steel and boron micro-alloyed steel.

  2. THE INFLUENCE MECHANISM OF FERRITE GRAIN SIZE ON STRENGTH STRESS AT THE FATIGUE OF LOW-CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Explanation of the influence mechanism of ferrite grain size on the fatigue strength of low-carbon steel. Methodology. Material for research is the low-carbon steel with 0.1% of carbon contnent. The different size of ferrite grain was obtained due to varying the degree of cold plastic deformation and temperature of annealing. The estimation of grain size was conducted using methodologies of quantitative metallography. The microstructure of metal was investigated under a light microscope with increase up to 1500 times. As a fatigue response the fatigue strength of metal – a maximal value of load amplitude with endless endurance limit of specimen was used. Fatigue tests were carried out using the test machine «Saturn-10», at the symmetric cycle of alternating bend loading. Findings. On the basis of research the dependence for fatigue strength of low-carbon steel, which is based on an additive contribution from hardening of solid solution by the atoms of carbon, boundary of the ferrite grain and amount of mobile dislocations was obtained. It was established that as the grainy structure of low-carbon steel enlarges, the influence of grain size on the fatigue strength level is reduced. For the sizes of grains more than 100 mcm, basic influence on fatigue strength begins to pass to the solid solution hardening, which is determined by the state of solid solution of introduction. Originality. From the analysis of the obtained dependences it ensues that with the increase of ferrite grain size the required amount of mobile dislocations for maintenance of conditions for spreading plastic deformation becomes less dependent from the scheme of metal loading. Practical value. The obtained results present certain practical interest when developing of recommendations, directed on the increase of resource of products work from low-carbon steels in the conditions of cyclic loading. Estimation of separate contribution of the studied processes of

  3. Heavy metal concentrations in particle size fractions from street dust of Murcia (Spain) as the basis for risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acosta, J.A.; Faz, A.; Kalbitz, K.; Jansen, B.; Martínez-Martínez, S.

    2011-01-01

    Street dust has been sampled from six different types of land use of the city of Murcia (Spain). The samples were fractionated into eleven particle size fractions (<2, 2-10, 10-20, 20-50, 50-75, 75-106, 106-150, 150-180, 180-425, 425-850 μm and 850-2000 μm) and analyzed for Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd. The

  4. Influence of domain on grain size effects of the dielectric properties of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoceramics and nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Chao, E-mail: yyohjh@sina.com [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan 430023 (China); Chen Liangyan [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan 430023 (China); Zhou Dongxiang [Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan City Hubei Province 430074 (China)

    2013-01-15

    The dielectric property of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles and nanoceramics has been studied on the basis of Ginsburg-Landau-Devonshire thermodynamic theory. In this paper, considering nanodomains, Landau coefficients have been written as a function of grain size, and the dielectric constant of the material has been calculated at a variety of temperatures and grain size. The results indicate that with decreasing grain size, the dielectric peak decreases. The two lower dielectric peaks of the orthorhombic-rhombohedral phase and tetragonal-orthorhombic phase move to higher temperature, while cubic-tetragonal phase dielectric peak moves to lower temperature. The dielectric constant of BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics decreases with decreasing grain size. The dielectric constant peak at room temperature is at the grain size which is larger than the critical grain size 17-30 nm. The calculated result is consistent with the experimental data.

  5. Grain Size and Interface Dependence of Bias Stress Stability of n-Type Organic Field Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Simbrunner, Clemens; Baig, M A; Sitter, H

    2015-10-14

    The effect of grain size and interface dependence of bias stress stability of C60-based n-type organic field effect transistors (OFETs) has been studied. It has been realized that, with increasing grain size of C60, the bias stress induced threshold voltage shift can be controlled and this effect is mainly attributed to the mechanism of charge trapping at grain boundaries. It is further studied that the growth of C60 on the surface of parylene at elevated substrate temperature leads to the creation of radicals at the interface between the active layer and the gate dielectric. These radicals help to improve the bias stress stability of C60-based n-type OFETs. For achieving the bias stress stability, we have presented a procedure of creation of radicals at the interface between C60 and parylene in single gate OFETs instead of dual gate OFETs.

  6. Critical current density versus normal-state resistivity in granular high-temperature superconductors with different average grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curras, S.R.; Veira, J.A.; Maza, J.; Vidal, Felix

    2000-01-01

    The resistivity, ρ, and the critical current density at zero applied magnetic field, J c , of ceramic Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ samples with different average grain size, a (from 5 to 14 μm), are reported. These results show that at a given temperature J c depends only on the specific contact resistance of the average grain boundary junction, ρ□, so that the product J c ρ□ is sample independent. The relevance of ρ□ and not of a on J c has been further tested on a subset of samples having very different average grain size but similar ρ□ for which negligible variations of J c are observed. (author)

  7. A procedure for partitioning bulk sediments into distinct grain-size fractions for geochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanti, A.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1993-01-01

    A method to separate sediments into discrete size fractions for geochemical analysis has been tested. The procedures were chosen to minimize the destruction or formation of aggregates and involved gentle sieving and settling of wet samples. Freeze-drying and sonication pretreatments, known to influence aggregates, were used for comparison. Freeze-drying was found to increase the silt/clay ratio by an average of 180 percent compared to analysis of a wet sample that had been wet sieved only. Sonication of a wet sample decreased the silt/clay ratio by 51 percent. The concentrations of metals and organic carbon in the separated fractions changed depending on the pretreatment procedures in a manner consistent with the hypothesis that aggregates consist of fine-grained organic- and metal-rich particles. The coarse silt fraction of a freeze-dried sample contained 20–44 percent higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and organic carbon than the coarse silt fraction of the wet sample. Sonication resulted in concentrations of these analytes that were 18–33 percent lower in the coarse silt fraction than found in the wet sample. Sonication increased the concentration of lead in the clay fraction by an average of 40 percent compared to an unsonicated sample. Understanding the magnitude of change caused by different analysis protocols is an aid in designing future studies that seek to interpret the spatial distribution of contaminated sediments and their transport mechanisms.

  8. Cross-linguistic transfer in bilinguals reading in two alphabetic orthographies: The grain size accommodation hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallier, Marie; Carreiras, Manuel

    2018-02-01

    Reading acquisition is one of the most complex and demanding learning processes faced by children in their first years of schooling. If reading acquisition is challenging in one language, how is it when reading is acquired simultaneously in two languages? What is the impact of bilingualism on the development of literacy? We review behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from alphabetic writing systems suggesting that early bilingualism modulates reading development. Particularly, we show that cross-linguistic variations and cross-linguistic transfer affect bilingual reading strategies as well as their cognitive underpinnings. We stress the fact that the impact of bilingualism on literacy acquisition depends on the specific combination of languages learned and does not manifest itself similarly across bilingual populations. We argue that these differences can be explained by variations due to orthographic depth in the grain sizes used to perform reading and reading-related tasks. Overall, we propose novel hypotheses to shed light on the behavioral and neural variability observed in reading skills among bilinguals.

  9. Grain size effect on trace metals distribution in sediments from two coastal areas of Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. De Gregori, H.; H. Pinochet, C.; M. Arancibia, J.; A. Vidal, B. [Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla (Chile)

    1996-07-01

    Marine environment contamination by trace metals has received increased global attention during recent years. Presently it is widely recognized that marine ecosystem can become contaminated by trace metals from numerous and diverse sources. However, anthropogenic activities, such as mining and industrial processing of ores and metals, still remain the principal cause of the increased amount of heavy metals which have been dumped into oceans. After entering the aquatic environment trace metals are distributed among water, biotic and sediment compartments, this latter serving as a final sink for metal pollutants. The magnitude of this scavenging action of sediments depends on the physical, chemical and biological properties of the sediments. Concentrations of trace metals in sediments are usually of a greater magnitude order than concentrations in water. Sediments were considered as an important indicator for environmental pollution, they act as permanent or temporary traps for material spread into the environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the grain size effect on the copper, cadmium and zinc levels distribution in surface marine sediments along the Chilean Coast. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Importance of the surface size distribution of erodible material: an improvement on the Dust Entrainment And Deposition (DEAD) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, M.; Gomes, L.; Tulet, P.; Rezoug, T.

    2012-05-01

    This paper is based on dust aerosol cycle modelling in the atmospheric model ALADIN (Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement InterNational) coupled with the EXternalised SURFace scheme SURFEX. Its main goal is to create an appropriate mineral dust emission parameterization compatible with the global database of land surface parameters ECOCLIMAP, and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil type database in SURFEX. An improvement on the Dust Entrainment And Deposition scheme (DEAD) is proposed in this paper by introducing the geographical variation of surface soil size distribution, the Marticorena and Bergametti (1995) formulation of horizontal saltation flux and the Shao et al. (1996) formulation of sandblasting efficiency α. To show the importance of the modifications introduced in the DEAD, both sensitivity and comparative studies are conducted in 0 dimensions (0-D) and then in 3 dimensions (3-D) between the old DEAD and the new DEAD. The results of the 0-D simulations indicate that the revised DEAD scheme represents the dust source emission better, particularly in the Bodélé depression, and provides a reasonable friction threshold velocity. In 3-D simulations, small differences are found between the DEAD and the revised DEAD for the simulated Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) compared with the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) photometer measurements available in the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) databases. For the surface concentration, a remarkable improvement is noted for the revised DEAD scheme.

  11. Importance of the surface size distribution of erodible material: an improvement of the Dust Entrainment And Deposition DEAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, M.; Gomes, L.; Tulet, P.; Rezoug, T.

    2011-11-01

    This paper is based on dust aerosol cycle modelling in the atmospheric model ALADIN (Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement InterNational) coupled with the EXternalised SURFace scheme SURFEX. Its main goal is to create a global mineral dust emission parameterization compatible with the global database of land surface parameters ECOCLIMAP and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil type database in SURFEX, based on both Shao (1993) and Marticorena and Bergametti (1995) parameterizations. An arrangement on the Dust Entrainment And Deposition scheme (DEAD) is proposed in this paper by introducing the geographic variation of surface size distribution, the Marticorena and Bergametti (1995) formulation of horizontal saltation flux and the Shao (2001) formulation of sandblasting efficiency α. To show the importance of the modifications introduced in the code DEAD, both sensitivity and comparative studies are realized in 0 dimensions (0-D) and then in 3 dimensions (3-D) between the old DEAD and that developed in this paper. The results in the 0-D simulations indicate that the developed DEAD scheme represents the dust source emission better, particularly in the Bodélé depression and provides a reasonable friction threshold velocity. In 3-D simulations, small differences are found between the DEAD and developed DEAD schemes for the simulated Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) compared with the photometer AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) measurements available in the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) databases. But, for the surface concentration a remarkable improvement is noted for the developed DEAD scheme.

  12. Modeling grain size adjustments in the downstream reach following run-of-river development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Theodore K.; Venditti, Jeremy G.; Nelson, Peter A.; Palen, Wendy J.

    2016-04-01

    Disruptions to sediment supply continuity caused by run-of-river (RoR) hydropower development have the potential to cause downstream changes in surface sediment grain size which can influence the productivity of salmon habitat. The most common approach to understanding the impacts of RoR hydropower is to study channel changes in the years following project development, but by then, any impacts are manifest and difficult to reverse. Here we use a more proactive approach, focused on predicting impacts in the project planning stage. We use a one-dimensional morphodynamic model to test the hypothesis that the greatest risk of geomorphic change and impact to salmon habitat from a temporary sediment supply disruption exists where predevelopment sediment supply is high and project design creates substantial sediment storage volume. We focus on the potential impacts in the reach downstream of a powerhouse for a range of development scenarios that are typical of projects developed in the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia. Results indicate that increases in the median bed surface size (D50) are minor if development occurs on low sediment supply streams (<1 mm for supply rates 1 × 10-5 m2 s-1 or lower), and substantial for development on high sediment supply streams (8-30 mm for supply rates between 5.5 × 10-4 and 1 × 10-3 m2 s-1). However, high sediment supply streams recover rapidly to the predevelopment surface D50 (˜1 year) if sediment supply can be reestablished.

  13. Grain-size analysis and sediment dynamics of hurricane-induced event beds in a coastal New England pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagno, K. A.; Ruehr, S. A.; Donnelly, J. P.; Woodruff, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal populations have grown increasingly susceptible to the impacts of tropical cyclone events as they grow in size, wealth, and infrastructure. Changes in tropical cyclone frequency and intensity, augmented by a changing climate, pose an increasing threat of property damage and loss of life. Reconstructions of intense-hurricane landfalls from a series of southeastern New England sediment cores identify a series of events spanning the past 2,000 years. Though the frequency of these landfalls is well constrained, the intensity of these storms, particularly those for which no historical record exists, is not. This study analyzes the grain-size distribution of major storm event beds along a transect of sediment cores from a kettle pond in Falmouth, MA. The grain-size distribution of each event is determined using an image processing, size, and shape analyzer. The depositional patterns and changes in grain-size distribution in these fine-grained systems may both spatially and temporally reveal characteristics of both storm intensity and the nature of sediment deposition. An inverse-modeling technique using this kind of grain-size analysis to determine past storm intensity has been explored in back-barrier lagoon systems in the Caribbean, but limited research has assessed its utility to assess deposits from back-barrier ponds in the northeastern United States. Increases in hurricane intensity may be closely tied to increases in sea surface temperature. As such, research into these prehistoric intervals of increased frequency and/or intensity provides important insight into the current and future hurricane risks facing coastal communities in New England.

  14. Effects of γ' Precipitation, Dislocation Density, and Grain Size on Stress-Relaxation Properties of INCONEL X-750 Helical Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jeong Won; Seong, Baek Seok; Woo, Wanchuck; Jeong, Hi Won; Choi, Yoon Suk; Kang, Namhyun

    2017-08-01

    INCONEL X-750 specimens were manufactured into helical springs by drawing and coiling followed by aging. They were subsequently subjected to stress-relaxation tests. Stress relaxation is the important property of springs that are compressed at elevated temperatures. To understand stress relaxation, this study investigated the effect of the drawing ratio (DR) on the γ' size and volume fraction, grain size, carbide volume fraction, and dislocation density. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to measure the size and volume fraction of γ' phase, and X-ray diffraction was employed to analyze the dislocation density in the springs as a function of the DR. The smallest DR specimen (DR0) had a longer free length than the larger DR specimens (DR17 and DR42) after the stress-relaxation test was completed at 773 K (500 °C) for 300 hours. However, the size and volume fraction of γ', along with the dislocation density, had no influence on the stress relaxation of the INCONEL X-750 springs. The decreased grain size ( d) due to an increase in the DR was the main factor in the increase in the stress relaxation of the springs. The decrease in grain size displayed a nonlinear relationship with the increase in stress relaxation. The stress-relaxation behavior relationship was d -3. Grain boundaries were determined to play a role in dislocation sink via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. Grain boundary diffusion accommodated by slip was responsible for the stress-relaxation properties of the spring at an elevated temperature (773 K = 500 °C).

  15. Effect of corn grain particle size on ruminal fermentation and blood metabolites of Holstein steers fed total mixed ration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Hyung Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was conducted to investigate the effect of corn grain particle size on ruminant fermentation and blood metabolites in Holstein steers fed total mixed ration (TMR as a basal diet to explain fundamental data of corn grain for cattle in Korea. Methods Four ruminally cannulated Holstein steers (body weight 592±29.9 kg fed TMR as a basal diet were housed individually in an auto temperature and humidity modulated chamber (24°C and 60% for 22 h/d. Treatments in a 4×4 Latin square design were TMR only (control, TMR with whole corn grain (WC, coarsely ground corn grain (CC, and finely ground corn grain (FC, respectively. The corn feeds substituted for 20% energy intake of TMR intake. To measure the ruminal pH, ammonia N, and volatile fatty acids (VFA, ruminal digesta was sampled through ruminal cannula at 1 h intervals after the morning feeding to determine ruminal fermentation characteristics. Blood was sampled via the jugular vein after the ruminal digesta sampling. Results There was no difference in dry matter (DM intake between different corn particle size because the DM intake was restricted to 1.66% of body weight. Different corn particle size did not change mean ammonia N and total VFA concentrations whereas lower (p<0.05 ruminal pH and a ratio of acetate to propionate, and higher (p<0.05 propionate concentration were noted when the steers consumed CC compared with WC and FC. Concentration of blood metabolites were not affected by different particle size of corn grain except for blood triglyceride concentration, which was significantly (p<0.05 increased by FC. Conclusion Results indicate that feeding CC may increase feed digestion in the rumen, whereas the FC group seemed to obtain inadequate corn retention time for microbial degradation in the rumen.

  16. Tectonic and climatic controls on provenance changes of fine-grained dust on the Chinese Loess Plateau since the late Oligocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Ma, Long; Sun, Youbin

    2017-03-01

    Provenance variations of Late Cenozoic aeolian deposits on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) were closely associated with regional tectonic activity and climatic change. Previous studies, however, have not reached a consensus regarding the nature and origin of past variations in source. This study presents the results of oxygen isotope (δ18O) analyses of fine-grained quartz (dust sources and previous provenance studies of the same aeolian sequences, we identify three significant composition changes of the dust source system at around 20, 12, and 2.6 Ma. The dust source system was also rather unstable at 25-20, 12-7 and 1.2-0 Ma, while three stable stages occurred at 20-12, 7-2.6, and 2.6-1.2 Ma. The correlation between the provenance changes and paleoclimatic and tectonic evidence suggests that both tectonic and climatic factors were important in driving the observed stepwise provenance changes. However, the changes were mainly constrained by Tibetan Plateau uplift prior to the Quaternary, and by global climate change thereafter.

  17. Effect of the Grain Size of the Initial Structure of 1565chM Alloy on the Structure and Properties of the Joints Fabricated by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Drits, A. M.; Gureeva, M. A.; Malov, D. V.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of the initial grain size in the structure of the aluminum 1565chM alloy on the mechanical properties of the welded joints formed by friction stir welding and on the grain size in the weld core is studied. It is shown that the design of tool and, especially, the parameters of a screw groove exert a great effect on the grain size in the weld core.

  18. The mean grain size determination of boron carbide (B4C)-aluminium (Al) and boron carbide (B4C)-nickel (Ni) composites by ultrasonic velocity technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Ridvan; Sarpuen, Ismail H.; Yalim, H. Ali; Erol, Ayhan; Ozdemir, Tuba; Tuncel, Sabri

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the mean grain size of ceramic-metal composites, made from boron carbide (B 4 C)-aluminium (Al)-nickel (Ni) powders, has been determined with ultrasonic velocity technique by using a 2 MHz transducer. An ultrasonic velocity-grain size master graph was plotted using a 4 MHz ultrasonic transducer. The results were compared to the mean grain size obtained from SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) images

  19. Mean grain size detection of DP590 steel plate using a corrected method with electromagnetic acoustic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Xiaokai; Hua, Lin; Li, Juanjuan; Xiang, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) is a considerable method to determine the mean grain size of the metal material with a high precision. The basic ultrasonic attenuation theory used for the mean grain size detection of EMAR is come from the single phase theory. In this paper, the EMAR testing was carried out based on the ultrasonic attenuation theory. The detection results show that the double peaks phenomenon occurs in the EMAR testing of DP590 steel plate. The dual phase structure of DP590 steel is the inducement of the double peaks phenomenon in the EMAR testing. In reaction to the phenomenon, a corrected method with EMAR was put forward to detect the mean grain size of dual phase steel. Compared with the traditional attenuation evaluation method and the uncorrected method with EMAR, the corrected method with EMAR shows great effectiveness and superiority for the mean grain size detection of DP590 steel plate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Analysis of grain size effects on transformation-induced plasticity based on a discrete dislocation-transformation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, J.; Turteltaub, S.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2010-01-01

    There is much interest recently in the possibility of combining two strengthening effects, namely the reduction of grain size (Hall-Fetch effect) and the transformation-induced plasticity effect (strengthening due to a martensitic transformation). The present work is concerned with the analysis of

  1. Grain size distribution of soils within the Cordillera Blanca, Peru: An indicator of basic mechanical properties for slope stability evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, J.; Klimeš, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2014), s. 563-577 ISSN 1672-6316 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : moraines * grain size distribution * shear strength * hydraulic conductivity * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2014

  2. Snow Grain Size Retrieval over the Polar Ice Sheets with the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Han, Mei; Palm, Stephen P.; Harding, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Snow grain size is an important parameter for cryosphere studies. As a proof of concept, this paper presents an approach to retrieve this parameter over Greenland, East and West Antarctica ice sheets from surface reflectances observed with the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) at 1064 nanometers. Spaceborne lidar observations overcome many of the disadvantages in passive remote sensing, including difficulties in cloud screening and low sun angle limitations; hence tend to provide more accurate and stable retrievals. Results from the GLAS L2A campaign, which began on 25 September and lasted until 19 November, 2003, show that the mode of the grain size distribution over Greenland is the largest (approximately 300 microns) among the three, West Antarctica is the second (220 microns) and East Antarctica is the smallest (190 microns). Snow grain sizes are larger over the coastal regions compared to inland the ice sheets. These results are consistent with previous studies. Applying the broadband snow surface albedo parameterization scheme developed by Garder and Sharp (2010) to the retrieved snow grain size, ice sheet surface albedo is also derived. In the future, more accurate retrievals can be achieved with multiple wavelengths lidar observations.

  3. Inert gases in a terra sample - Measurements in six grain-size fractions and two single particles from Lunar 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, D.; Lakatos, S.; Walton, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of inert gas measurements performed on six grain-size fractions and two single particles from four samples of Luna 20 material. Presented and discussed data include the inert gas contents, element and isotope systematics, radiation ages, and Ar-36/Ar-40 systematics.

  4. Impacts of grain size sorting and chemical weathering on the geochemistry of Jingyuan loess in the northwestern Chinese Loess Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, L.; Sun, Y.; Beets, C.J.; Prins, M.A.; Wu, F.; Vandenberghe, J.

    2013-01-01

    Major and trace elemental compositions of loess samples collected from the Jingyuan section in the northwestern Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) were analyzed to investigate the potential impacts of grain size sorting and chemical weathering on the loess geochemistry and to extract appropriate

  5. Ultrasonic attenuation as a function of heat treatment and grain size in 79Ni--6Mo--15Fe alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieske, J.H.

    1978-03-01

    A pulse echo ultrasonic technique was used to measure the attenuation coefficient for 79Ni-6Mo-15Fe alloy specimens. The attenuation coefficient was determined using a 25 MHz ultrasonic transducer for specimens which had undergone different time-temperature heat treatments. The ultrasonic attenuation data versus heat treat time was used to assess grain size growth in the specimens

  6. Semi-empirical relationship between the hardness, grain size and mean free path of WC-Co

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makhele-Lekala, L

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vickers hardness of several well-characterized grades of WC-Co (23 in total) was measured. The mean grain size of these samples ranged from 0.6 to 5.0 mums and the cobalt content from 6 to 50 wt%. An empirical formula between hardness of WC...

  7. Elastic–plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Shalpegin, A.; Vignitchouk, L.; De Angeli, M.; Bykov, I.; Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Brochard, F.; Ripamonti, D.; Harder, N. den; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust

  8. Elastic–plastic adhesive impacts of tungsten dust with metal surfaces in plasma environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratynskaia, S., E-mail: svetlana.ratynskaia@ee.kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Tolias, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Shalpegin, A. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Vignitchouk, L. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); De Angeli, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Bykov, I. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Association EUROfusion-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Brochard, F. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Harder, N. den; De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Dust-surface collisions impose size selectivity on the ability of dust grains to migrate in scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas and to adhere to plasma-facing components. Here, we report first experimental evidence of dust impact phenomena in plasma environments concerning low-speed collisions of tungsten dust with tungsten surfaces: re-bouncing, adhesion, sliding and rolling. The results comply with the predictions of the model of elastic-perfectly plastic adhesive spheres employed in the dust dynamics code MIGRAINe for sub- to several meters per second impacts of micrometer-range metal dust.

  9. Potential source regions of dust accumulated in northern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasowska, S.; Woronko, B.

    2012-04-01

    Sahara is the largest source of the dust in the world. The material sampled from dust storms in Tunisia (Nefta Oasis, El Kantoui Harbor), north Egypt (Alexandria) and Morocco (Mhamid Oasis) (March 2001, March and April 2009) was taken to identify the potential sources of dust accumulation and transport paths in North Africa. The samples were analyzed on grain size, micromorphology of silt grain surfaces in Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), elemental composition of grains and their surface crusts, loss on ignition, mineralogical composition of samples and carbonate content. Additionally the meteorological situation was analyzed during the dust storm occurrences and preceding periods. The results of grain size analyses show that all studied sediments belong to the small dust type, and dust accumulated in Mhamid is the clay mineral agglomerated (CMA) dust. The source of the CMA are the old dry lake beds. Dust particles are mobilized as aggregates of clay minerals, what is controlled by structure (particle packing) of the original lake sediment, and accumulation is dry and wet as well. The results of the analysis of the quartz grain surface micromorphology, the elemental composition and loss on ignition indicate that dust accumulated in Morocco originated from a relatively homogenous sediment source and, on the other hand, dust found in Alexandria comes from a diversified source. Dust sampled in Tunisia is characterized by the highest content of carbonates and organic matter which suggests the intensive dispelling acting on the weathered material from carbonate rocks and local Mediterranean soil covers rich in CaCO3. The analyses of meteorological conditions during the dust storms and the analyses of the textural characteristics of deposits show that it is highly probable that analysed aeolian dust was transported both for shorter and longer distances. Hypothetic source areas of dust accumulated in Mhamid could be the old ergs, some located 300-500 km away like

  10. Simulation of W dust transport in the KSTAR tokamak, comparison with fast camera data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Autricque

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, dust transport in tokamak plasmas is studied through both experimental and modeling aspects. Image processing routines allowing dust tracking on CCD camera videos are presented. The DUMPRO (DUst Movie PROcessing code features a dust detection method and a trajectory reconstruction algorithm. In addition, a dust transport code named DUMBO (DUst Migration in a plasma BOundary is briefly described. It has been developed at CEA in order to simulate dust grains transport in tokamaks and to evaluate the contribution of dust to the impurity inventory of the plasma. Like other dust transport codes, DUMBO integrates the Orbital Motion Limited (OML approach for dust/plasma interactions modeling. OML gives direct expressions for plasma ions and electrons currents, forces and heat fluxes on a dust grain. The equation of motion is solved, giving access to the dust trajectory. An attempt of model validation is made through comparison of simulated and measured trajectories on the 2015 KSTAR dust injection experiment, where W dust grains were successfully injected in the plasma using a gun-type injector. The trajectories of the injected particles, estimated using the DUMPRO routines applied on videos from the fast CCD camera in KSTAR, show two distinct general dust behaviors, due to different dust sizes. Simulations were made with DUMBO to match the measurements. Plasma parameters were estimated using different diagnostics during the dust injection experiment plasma discharge. The experimental trajectories show longer lifetimes than the simulated ones. This can be due to the substitution of a boiling/sublimation point to the usual vaporization/sublimation cooling, OML limitations (eventual potential barriers in the vicinity of a dust grain are neglected and/or to the lack of a vapor shielding model in DUMBO.

  11. On the importance of grain size in luminescence dating using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timar-Gabor, A.; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Guralnik, B.

    2017-01-01

    Chinese loess, thus pointing to a potential worldwide phenomenon. While age underestimation is often attributed to signal saturation problems, this is not the case for fine grain material, which saturates at higher doses than coarse grains, yet begins to underestimate true ages earlier. Here we examine...

  12. Characterization of water repellency for hydrophobized grains with different geometries and sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijewardana, N S; Kawamoto, K.; Møldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    hydrophobized grains. To characterize the water repellency (WR) of dry and wet hydrophobized grains, initial solid-water contact angles (αi) were measured using the sessile drop method (SDM). Based on SDM results from the αi–HA content and αi–θg curves, useful WR indices were introduced as “Area_dry” and “Area...

  13. Grain size stability and hardness in nanocrystalline Cu–Al–Zr and Cu–Al–Y alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.; Mahesh, B.V.; Atwater, M.A.; Chan, T.E.; Scattergood, R.O.; Koch, C.C.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic high energy ball milling has been used to synthesize nanocrystalline Cu–14Al, Cu–12Al–2Zr and Cu–12Al–2Y alloys by mechanical alloying. The alloys were studied with the aim of comparing the effect of substituting Y and Zr in place of Al, in Cu–Al alloys, on the grain size stability at elevated temperatures. The as-milled alloys were subjected to annealing at various temperatures between 200 and 900 °C and the resulting grain morphology has been studied using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The addition of Y results in significantly reduced susceptibility to grain growth whereas in case of CuAl and CuAlZr alloys, the susceptibility to grain growth was much higher. The hardness is substantially increased due to Zr and Y addition in the as-milled CuAl powders. However, the hardness of Cu–12Al–2Zr gradually decreases and approaches that of Cu–14Al alloy after the annealing treatment whereas in case of Cu–12Al–2Y alloy, the relative drop in the hardness is much lower after annealing. Accordingly, the efficacy of grain size stabilization by Y addition at high homologous temperatures has been explained on the basis of a recent thermodynamic stabilization models

  14. Grain size stability and hardness in nanocrystalline Cu–Al–Zr and Cu–Al–Y alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, D., E-mail: droy2k6@gmail.com [Material Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Department, NIFFT, Ranchi 834003 (India); Mahesh, B.V. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University (Australia); Atwater, M.A. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, RDRL-WMM-F, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Chan, T.E.; Scattergood, R.O.; Koch, C.C. [Material Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Cryogenic high energy ball milling has been used to synthesize nanocrystalline Cu–14Al, Cu–12Al–2Zr and Cu–12Al–2Y alloys by mechanical alloying. The alloys were studied with the aim of comparing the effect of substituting Y and Zr in place of Al, in Cu–Al alloys, on the grain size stability at elevated temperatures. The as-milled alloys were subjected to annealing at various temperatures between 200 and 900 °C and the resulting grain morphology has been studied using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The addition of Y results in significantly reduced susceptibility to grain growth whereas in case of CuAl and CuAlZr alloys, the susceptibility to grain growth was much higher. The hardness is substantially increased due to Zr and Y addition in the as-milled CuAl powders. However, the hardness of Cu–12Al–2Zr gradually decreases and approaches that