WorldWideScience

Sample records for dust foreground diffuse

  1. Dust Temperature Distribution in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium: Modeling the CMB Dust Foreground to Sub-Percent Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan

    Measurements of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a critical test of the inflationary paradigm. Gravity waves excited during an inflationary epoch in the early universe interact with the CMB to impart a characteristic signal in linear polarization. The distinctive spatial pattern and frequency dependence of the inflationary signal provide a unique signature to characterize physics at energies approaching Grand Unification, a trillion times beyond the energies accessible to particle accelerators. At millimeter wavelengths where the CMB is brightest, the dominant foreground is thermal emission from interstellar dust. As highlighted by the recent BICEP2 and Planck results, dust emission is brighter than the anticipated inflationary signal even in the cleanest regions of the sky, and is 1-2 orders of magnitude brighter over most of the sky. Robust detection and characterization of the primordial signal requires subtracting the dust foreground to sub-percent accuracy. Despite the importance of dust to CMB measurements, far-IR dust emission is poorly constrained. Popular phenomenological models treat the dust as a superposition of components at one or two temperatures although the actual temperature distribution must be more complex. Disturbingly, use of these models can bias the inflationary CMB results at levels large compared to planned sensitivities, despite fitting the combined sky emission to sub-percent precision. Foreground models must be accurate as well as precise. We propose to use archival data at millimeter through far-IR wavelengths to improve models of far-IR dust emission, explicitly deriving the temperature distribution within the diffuse dust cirrus to separate temperature effects from intrinsic emission effects (spectral index). The proposed analysis is tightly focused and likely to succeed. Simple toy models demonstrate that far-IR data such as FIRAS can distinguish the temperature distribution within the diffuse

  2. Joint 3D modelling of the polarized Galactic synchrotron and thermal dust foreground diffuse emission

    CERN Document Server

    Fauvet, L; Aumont, J; Désert, F X; Jaffe, T R; Banday, A J; Tristram, M; Waelkens, A H; Santos, D

    2010-01-01

    We present for the first time a coherent model of the polarized Galactic synchrotron and thermal dust emissions which are the main diffuse foreground for the measurement of the polarized power spectra of the CMB fluctuations with the Planck satellite mission. We produce 3D models of the Galactic magnetic field including regular and turbulent components, and of the distribution of matter in the Galaxy, relativistic electrons and dust grains. By integrating along the line of sight we construct maps of the polarized Galactic synchrotron and thermal dust emission for each of these models and compare them to currently available data. We consider the 408 MHz all-sky continuum survey, the 23 GHz band of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and the 353 GHz Archeops data.}{The best-fit parameters obtained are consistent with previous estimates in the literature based only on synchrotron emission and pulsar rotation measurements. They allows us to reproduce the large scale structures observed on the data. Poorly un...

  3. Planck 2015 results. XXV. Diffuse low-frequency Galactic foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Alves, M.I.R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A.W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vidal, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-01-01

    (abridged) We discuss the Galactic foreground emission between 20 and 100GHz based on observations by Planck/WMAP. The Commander component-separation tool has been used to separate the various astrophysical processes in total intensity. Comparison with RRL templates verifies the recovery of the free-free emission along the Galactic plane. Comparison of the high-latitude Halpha emission with our free-free map shows residuals that correlate with dust optical depth, consistent with a fraction (~30%) of Halpha having been scattered by high-latitude dust. We highlight a number of diffuse spinning dust morphological features at high latitude. There is substantial spatial variation in the spinning dust spectrum, with the emission peak ranging from below 20GHz to more than 50GHz. There is a strong tendency for the spinning dust component near many prominent HII regions to have a higher peak frequency, suggesting that this increase in peak frequency is associated with dust in the photodissociation regions around the n...

  4. Strategy to minimize dust foregrounds in B -mode searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovetz, Ely D.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2015-04-01

    The Planck satellite has identified several patches of sky with low polarized dust emission, obvious targets for searches for the cosmic microwave background B -mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. Still, given the Planck measurement uncertainties, the polarized dust foregrounds in these different candidate patches may differ by an order of magnitude or more. Here we show that a brief initial experiment to map these candidate patches more deeply at a single high frequency can efficiently zero in on the cleanest patch(es) and thus improve significantly the sensitivity of subsequent B -mode searches. A ground-based experiment with current detector technology operating at ≳220 GHz for three months can efficiently identify a low-dust-amplitude patch and thus improve by up to a factor 2 or 3 on the sensitivity to cosmic B modes of the subsequent lower-frequency deep integration. A balloon experiment with current detector sensitivities covering the set of patches and operating at ˜350 GHz can reach a similar result in less than two weeks. This strategy may prove crucial in accessing the smallest gravitational-wave signals possible in large-field inflation. The high-frequency data from this exploratory experiment should also provide valuable foreground templates to subsequent experiments that integrate on any of the candidate patches explored.

  5. Statistical simulations of the dust foreground to CMB polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Vansyngel, Flavien; Ghosh, Tuhin; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Aumont, Jonathan; Bracco, Andrea; Levrier, François; Martin, Peter G; Montier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of the dust polarization foreground to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is a necessary step towards the detection of the B-mode signal associated with primordial gravitational waves. We present a method to simulate maps of polarized dust emission on the sphere, similarly to what is done for the CMB anisotropies. This method builds on the understanding of Galactic polarization stemming from the analysis of Planck data. It relates the dust polarization sky to the structure of the Galactic magnetic field and its coupling with interstellar matter and turbulence. The Galactic magnetic field is modelled as a superposition of a mean uniform field and a random component with a power-law power spectrum of exponent $\\alpha_{\\rm M}$. The model parameters are constrained to fit the power spectra of dust polarization EE, BB and TE measured using Planck data. We find that the slopes of the E and B power spectra of dust polarization are matched for $\\alpha_{\\rm M} = -2.5$. The model allows us to co...

  6. Planck 2015 results. X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz in temperature and seven bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive a consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-year WMAP sky maps and the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided with angular resolutions varying between 7.5 arcmin and 1 deg. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, wi...

  7. Dust in a compact, cold, high-velocity cloud: A new approach to removing foreground emission

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Daniel; Kerp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Because isolated high-velocity clouds (HVCs) are found at great distances from the Galactic radiation field and because they have subsolar metallicities, there have been no detections of dust in these structures. A key problem in this search is the removal of foreground dust emission. Using the Effelsberg-Bonn HI Survey and the Planck far-infrared data, we investigate a bright, cold, and clumpy HVC. This cloud apparently undergoes an interaction with the ambient medium and thus has great potential to form dust. To remove the local foreground dust emission we used a regularised, generalised linear model and we show the advantages of this approach with respect to other methods. To estimate the dust emissivity of the HVC, we set up a simple Bayesian model with mildly informative priors to perform the line fit instead of an ordinary linear least-squares approach. We find that the foreground can be modelled accurately and robustly with our approach and is limited mostly by the cosmic infrared background. Despite t...

  8. Planck 2015 results: XXV. Diffuse low-frequency Galactic foregrounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I R

    2016-01-01

    component-separation tool has been used to separate the various astrophysical processes in total intensity. Comparison with radio recombination line templates verifies the recovery of the free-free emission along the Galactic plane. Comparison of the high-latitude Hα emission with our free-free map shows...... the nebulae. The emissivity of spinning dust in these diffuse regions is of the same order as previous detections in the literature. Over the entire sky, the Commander solution finds more anomalous microwave emission (AME) than the WMAP component maps, at the expense of synchrotron and free-free emission....... This can be explained by the difficulty in separating multiple broadband components with a limited number of frequency maps. Future surveys, particularly at 5-20 GHz, will greatly improve the separation by constraining the synchrotron spectrum. We combine Planck and WMAP data to make the highest signal...

  9. Planck 2015 results. X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in temperature over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz and in polarization over seven frequency bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive an internally consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. Component separation dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstruction is described in a companion paper. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps and the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided for each component, with an angular resolution varying between 7.´5 and 1deg. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, with rms temperature residuals smaller than 4μK over 93% of the sky for all Planck frequencies up to 353 GHz, and fractional errors smaller than 1% in the remaining 7% of the sky. The main limitations of the temperature model at the lower frequencies are internal degeneracies among the spinning dust, free-free, and synchrotron components; additional observations from external low-frequency experiments will be essential to break these degeneracies. The main limitations of the temperature model at the higher frequencies are uncertainties in the 545 and 857 GHz calibration and zero-points. For polarization, the main outstanding issues are instrumental systematics in the 100-353 GHz bands on large angular scales in the form of temperature

  10. Foreground Bias From Parametric Models of Far-IR Dust Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A

    2016-01-01

    We use simple toy models of far-IR dust emission to estimate the accuracy to which the polarization of the cosmic microwave background can be recovered using multi-frequency fits, if the parametric form chosen for the fitted dust model differs from the actual dust emission. Commonly used approximations to the far-IR dust spectrum yield CMB residuals comparable to or larger than the sensitivities expected for the next generation of CMB missions, despite fitting the combined CMB + foreground emission to precision 0.1% or better. The Rayleigh-Jeans approximation to the dust spectrum biases the fitted dust spectral index by Delta beta_d = 0.2 and the inflationary B-mode amplitude by Delta r = 0.03. Fitting the dust to a modified blackbody at a single temperature biases the best-fit CMB by Delta r > 0.003 if the true dust spectrum contains multiple temperature components. A 13-parameter model fitting two temperature components reduces this bias by an order of magnitude if the true dust spectrum is in fact a simple...

  11. Diffuse radio foregrounds: all-sky polarisation and anomalous microwave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Navarro, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    plane. We study the foreground contamination in a region of the sky. We also discuss some properties of the diffuse synchrotron emission observed on the Galactic plane by QUIET.Using interferometric observations at 31 GHz, we studied AME in the translucent cloud LDN 1780. Interferometric data at 31 GHz and different ancillary data were used. We study the connection between the radio emission and the interstellar dust present in the cloud. The spinning dust hypothesis for the origin of AME is tested and we conclude that it can explain the radio properties observed in this cloud.

  12. CMB foregrounds - A brief review

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    CMB foregrounds consist of all radiation between the surface of last scattering and the detectors, which can interfere with the cosmological interpretation of CMB data. Fortunately, in temperature (intensity), even though the foregrounds are complex they can relatively easily be mitigated. However, in polarization, diffuse Galactic radiation (synchrotron and thermal dust) can be polarized at a level of >10 % making it more of a challenge. In particular, CMB B-modes, which are a smoking-gun signature of inflation, will be dominated by foregrounds. Component separation will therefore be critical for future CMB polarization missions, requiring many channels covering a wide range of frequencies, to ensure that foreground modelling errors are minimised.

  13. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XX. Dust and gas in the foreground Galactic cirrus

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, S; Smith, M W L; Fritz, J; Davies, J I; Haynes, M P; Giovanelli, R; Baes, M; Bocchio, M; Boissier, S; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Casasola, V; Clark, C J R; De Looze, I; Alighieri, S di Serego; Grossi, M; Jones, A P; Hughes, T M; Hunt, L K; Madden, S; Magrini, L; Pappalardo, C; Ysard, N; Zibetti, S

    2016-01-01

    We study the correlation between far-infared/submm dust emission and atomic gas column density in order to derive the properties of the high Galactic latitude, low density, Milky Way cirrus in the foreground of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. Dust emission maps from 60 to 850 um are obtained from SPIRE observations carried out within the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, complemented by IRAS-IRIS and Planck-HFI maps. Data from the Arecibo legacy Fast ALFA Survey is used to derive atomic gas column densities for two broad velocity components, low and intermediate velocity clouds. Dust emissivities are derived for each gas component and each far-infared/submm band. For the low velocity clouds, we measure an average emissivity 0.79 +/- 0.08 times 1E-20 MJy sr^-1 cm^2 at 250 um. After fitting a modified blackbody to the available bands, we estimated a dust absorption cross-section 0.49 +/- 0.13 times 1E-25 cm^2 H^-1 at 250 um (with dust temperature T = 20.4 +/- 1.5 K and spectral index beta = 1.53 +/- 0.17). The resu...

  14. Statistical simulations of the dust foreground to cosmic microwave background polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansyngel, F.; Boulanger, F.; Ghosh, T.; Wandelt, B.; Aumont, J.; Bracco, A.; Levrier, F.; Martin, P. G.; Montier, L.

    2017-07-01

    The characterization of the dust polarization foreground to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a necessary step toward the detection of the B-mode signal associated with primordial gravitational waves. We present a method to simulate maps of polarized dust emission on the sphere that is similar to the approach used for CMB anisotropies. This method builds on the understanding of Galactic polarization stemming from the analysis of Planck data. It relates the dust polarization sky to the structure of the Galactic magnetic field and its coupling with interstellar matter and turbulence. The Galactic magnetic field is modeled as a superposition of a mean uniform field and a Gaussian random (turbulent) component with a power-law power spectrum of exponent αM. The integration along the line of sight carried out to compute Stokes maps is approximated by a sum over a small number of emitting layers with different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field. The model parameters are constrained to fit the power spectra of dust polarization EE, BB, and TE measured using Planck data. We find that the slopes of the E and B power spectra of dust polarization are matched for αM = -2.5, an exponent close to that measured for total dust intensity but larger than the Kolmogorov exponent - 11/3. The model allows us to compute multiple realizations of the Stokes Q and U maps for different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field, and to quantify the variance of dust polarization spectra for any given sky area outside of the Galactic plane. The simulations reproduce the scaling relation between the dust polarization power and the mean total dust intensity including the observed dispersion around the mean relation. We also propose a method to carry out multifrequency simulations, including the decorrelation measured recently by Planck, using a given covariance matrix of the polarization maps. These simulations are well suited to optimize

  15. A Strategy to Minimize Dust Foregrounds in B-mode Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Kovetz, Ely D

    2015-01-01

    The Planck satellite has identified several patches of sky with low polarized dust emission, obvious targets for searches for the cosmic-microwave-background (CMB) B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. Still, given the Planck measurement uncertainties, the polarized dust foregrounds in these different candidate patches may differ by an order of magnitude or more. Here we show that a brief initial experiment to map these candidate patches more deeply at a single high frequency can efficiently zero in on the cleanest patch(es) and thus improve significantly the sensitivity of subsequent B-mode searches. A ground-based experiment with current detector technology operating at >~220 GHz for 3 months can efficiently identify a low-dust-amplitude patch and thus improve by up to 20%-60% on the sensitivity to cosmic B modes of the subsequent lower-frequency deep integration. A balloon experiment with current detector sensitivities covering the set of patches and operating at ~350 GHz can reach a similar...

  16. Maps of Dust IR Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and CMBR Foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Schlegel, D J; Davis, M; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davis, Marc

    1997-01-01

    We present a full sky 100 micron map that is a reprocessed composite of the COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA maps, with the zodiacal foreground and confirmed point sources removed. Before using the ISSA maps, we remove the remaining artifacts from the IRAS scan pattern. Using the DIRBE 100 micron and 240 micron data, we have constructed a map of the dust temperature, so that the 100mu map can be converted to a map proportional to dust column density. The result of these manipulations is a map with DIRBE-quality calibration and IRAS resolution. A wealth of filamentary detail is apparent on many different scales at all Galactic latitudes. To generate the full sky dust maps, we must first remove zodiacal light contamination as well as a possible cosmic infrared background (CIB). This is done via a regression analysis of the 100mu DIRBE map against the Leiden-Dwingeloo map of \\HI emission, with corrections for the zodiacal light via a suitable expansion of the DIRBE 25mu flux. For the 100\\mu map no significant CIB is det...

  17. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XX. Dust and gas in the foreground Galactic cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, S.; Giovanardi, C.; Smith, M. W. L.; Fritz, J.; Davies, J. I.; Haynes, M. P.; Giovanelli, R.; Baes, M.; Bocchio, M.; Boissier, S.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Casasola, V.; Clark, C. J. R.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Grossi, M.; Jones, A. P.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S.; Magrini, L.; Pappalardo, C.; Ysard, N.; Zibetti, S.

    2017-01-01

    We study the correlation between far-infrared/submm dust emission and atomic gas column density in order to derive the properties of the high Galactic latitude, low density, Milky Way cirrus in the foreground of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. Dust emission maps from 60 to 850 μm are obtained from observations with the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and carried out within the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS); these are complemented by IRAS and Planck maps. Data from the Arecibo legacy Fast ALFA Survey is used to derive atomic gas column densities for two broad velocity components: low and intermediate velocity clouds. Dust emissivities are derived for each gas component and each far-infrared/submm band. For the low velocity clouds, we measure an average emissivity ɛLVCν = (0.79 ± 0.08) × 10-20 MJy sr-1 cm2 at 250 μm. After fitting a modified blackbody to the available bands, we estimated a dust absorption cross section of τLVCν/NH i = (0.49 ± 0.13) × 10-25 cm2 H-1 at 250 μm (with dust temperature T = 20.4 ± 1.5 K and spectral index β = 1.53 ± 0.17). The results are in excellent agreement with those obtained by Planck over a much larger coverage of the high Galactic latitude cirrus (50% of the sky versus 0.2% in our work). For dust associated with intermediate velocity gas, we confirm earlier Planck results and find a higher temperature and lower emissivity and cross section. After subtracting the modeled components, we find regions at scales smaller than 20' in which the residuals deviate significantly from the average scatter, which is dominated by cosmic infrared background. These large residuals are most likely due to local variations in the cirrus dust properties or to high-latitude molecular clouds with average NH2 ≲ 1020 cm-2. We find no conclusive evidence for intracluster dust emission in Virgo. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and

  18. The clustering of merging star-forming haloes: dust emission as high frequency arcminute CMB foreground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2008-02-01

    Context: Future observations of CMB anisotropies will be able to probe high multipole regions of the angular power spectrum, corresponding to a resolution of a few arcminutes. Dust emission from merging haloes is one of the foregrounds that will affect such very small scales. Aims: We estimate the contribution to CMB angular fluctuations from objects that are bright in the sub-millimeter band due to intense star formation bursts following merging episodes. Methods: We base our approach on the Lacey-Cole merger model and on the Kennicutt relation which connects the star formation rate in galaxies with their infrared luminosity. We set the free parameters of the model in order to not exceed the SCUBA source counts, the Madau plot of star formation rate in the universe and COBE/FIRAS data on the intensity of the sub-millimeter cosmic background radiation. Results: We show that the angular power spectrum arising from the distribution of such star-forming haloes will be one of the most significant foregrounds in the high frequency channels of future CMB experiments, such as PLANCK, ACT and SPT. The correlation term, due to the clustering of multiple haloes at redshift z ~ 2-6, is dominant in the broad range of angular scales 200 ⪉ l ⪉ 3000. Poisson fluctuations due to bright sub-millimeter sources are more important at higher l, but since they are generated from the bright sources, such contribution could be strongly reduced if bright sources are excised from the sky maps. The contribution of the correlation term to the angular power spectrum depends strongly on the redshift evolution of the escape fraction of UV photons and the resulting temperature of the dust. The measurement of this signal will therefore give important information about the sub-millimeter emission and the escape fraction of UV photons from galaxies, in the early stage of their evolution.

  19. The clustering of merging star-forming haloes: dust emission as high frequency arcminute CMB foreground

    CERN Document Server

    Righi, M; Sunyaev, R

    2007-01-01

    Future observations of CMB anisotropies will be able to probe high multipole regions of the angular power spectrum, corresponding to a resolution of a few arcminutes. Dust emission from merging haloes is one of the foregrounds that will affect such very small scales. We estimate the contribution to CMB angular fluctuations from objects which are bright in the sub-millimeter band due to intense star formation bursts following merging episodes. We also consider the effect of the intergalactic dust expelled from galaxies by strong winds and AGN activity. We base our approach on the Lacey-Cole merger model and on the Kennicutt relation which connects the star formation rate in galaxies with their infrared luminosity. We set the free parameters of the model in order to not exceed the SCUBA source counts, the Madau plot of star formation rate in the universe and COBE/FIRAS data on the intensity of the sub-millimeter cosmic background radiation. We show that the angular power spectrum arising from the distribution o...

  20. Maps of Dust Infrared Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davis, Marc

    1998-06-01

    We present a full-sky 100 μm map that is a reprocessed composite of the COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA maps, with the zodiacal foreground and confirmed point sources removed. Before using the ISSA maps, we remove the remaining artifacts from the IRAS scan pattern. Using the DIRBE 100 and 240 μm data, we have constructed a map of the dust temperature so that the 100 μm map may be converted to a map proportional to dust column density. The dust temperature varies from 17 to 21 K, which is modest but does modify the estimate of the dust column by a factor of 5. The result of these manipulations is a map with DIRBE quality calibration and IRAS resolution. A wealth of filamentary detail is apparent on many different scales at all Galactic latitudes. In high-latitude regions, the dust map correlates well with maps of H I emission, but deviations are coherent in the sky and are especially conspicuous in regions of saturation of H I emission toward denser clouds and of formation of H2 in molecular clouds. In contrast, high-velocity H I clouds are deficient in dust emission, as expected. To generate the full-sky dust maps, we must first remove zodiacal light contamination, as well as a possible cosmic infrared background (CIB). This is done via a regression analysis of the 100 μm DIRBE map against the Leiden-Dwingeloo map of H I emission, with corrections for the zodiacal light via a suitable expansion of the DIRBE 25 μm flux. This procedure removes virtually all traces of the zodiacal foreground. For the 100 μm map no significant CIB is detected. At longer wavelengths, where the zodiacal contamination is weaker, we detect the CIB at surprisingly high flux levels of 32 +/- 13 nW m-2 sr-1 at 140 μm and of 17 +/- 4 nW m-2 sr-1 at 240 μm (95% confidence). This integrated flux ~2 times that extrapolated from optical galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field. The primary use of these maps is likely to be as a new estimator of Galactic extinction. To calibrate our maps, we assume a

  1. The local dust foregrounds in the microwave sky: I. Thermal emission spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Dikarev, V; Solanki, S; Krüger, H; Krivov, A

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps made by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have revealed anomalies not predicted by the standard inflationary cosmology. In particular, the power of the quadrupole moment of the CMB fluctuations is remarkably low, and the quadrupole and octopole moments are aligned mutually and with the geometry of the Solar system. It has been suggested in the literature that microwave sky pollution by an unidentified dust cloud in the vicinity of the Solar system may be the cause for these anomalies. In this paper, we simulate the thermal emission by clouds of spherical homogeneous particles of several materials. Spectral constraints from the WMAP multi-wavelength data and earlier infrared observations on the hypothetical dust cloud are used to determine the dust cloud's physical characteristics. In order for its emissivity to demonstrate a flat, CMB-like wavelength dependence over the WMAP wavelengths (3 through 14 mm), and to be invisible in the...

  2. Dusting off the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Baron, Dalya; Watson, Darach; Yao, Yushu; Prochaska, J Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Using over a million and a half extragalactic spectra we study the properties of the mysterious Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) in the Milky Way. These data provide us with an unprecedented sampling of the skies at high Galactic-latitude and low dust-column-density. In this first paper we present our method, study the correlation of the equivalent width of 12 DIBs with dust extinction and with a few atomic species, and the distribution of four DIBs over nearly 15,000 square degrees. As previously found, DIBs strengths correlate with extinction and therefore inevitably with each other. However, we find that DIBs can exist even in dust free areas. Furthermore, we find that the DIBs correlation with dust varies significantly over the sky. DIB under- or over-densities, relative to the expectation from dust, are often spread over hundreds of square degrees. These patches are different for the four DIBs, showing that they are unlikely to originate from the same carrier.

  3. Planck 2015 results: X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.;

    2016-01-01

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in temperature over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz and in polarization over seven frequency bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps wi...

  4. DIFFUSE EXTRAPLANAR DUST IN NGC 891

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seon, Kwang-il; Shinn, Jong-ho; Kim, Il-joong [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Witt, Adolf N., E-mail: kiseon@kasi.re.kr [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We report the detection of vertically extended far-ultraviolet and near-UV emissions in an edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891, which we interpret as being due to dust-scattered starlight. Three-dimensional radiative transfer models are used to investigate the content of the extraplanar dust that is required to explain the UV emission. The UV halos are well reproduced by a radiative transfer model with two exponential dust disks, one with a scale height of ≈0.2-0.25 kpc and the other with a scale height of ≈1.2-2.0 kpc. The central face-on optical depth of the geometrically thick disk is found to be τ{sub B}{sup thick}≈0.3--0.5 at the B band. The results indicate that the dust mass at |z| > 2 kpc is ≈3%-5% of the total dust mass, which is in good accordance with the recent Herschel submillimeter observation. Our results, together with the recent discovery of the UV halos in other edge-on galaxies, suggest the widespread existence of a geometrically thick dust layer above the galactic plane in spirals.

  5. Analysis of the diffuse near-IR emission from 2MASS deep integration data foregrounds vs the cosmic infrared background

    CERN Document Server

    Odenwald, S; Mather, J C; Skrutskie, M F; Cutri, R M

    2003-01-01

    This is one of two papers in which we report the detection of structure in the cosmic infrared background (CIB) between 1.25 - 2.2 micron through the use of data from the Two Micron Sky Survey (2MASS). This paper concentrates on data assembly, analysis and the estimate of the various foreground contributions; the companion paper (Kashlinsky, Odenwald, Mather, Skrutskie, Cutri 2002, hereafter KOMSC) presents the cosmological results for the CIB fluctuations and their implications. By using repeated observations of a specific calibration star field, we were able to achieve integration times in excess of 3900 seconds compared to the 7.8 seconds in the standard 2MASS data product. This yielded a point source detection limit (3 \\sigma) of +18.5^m in K_s band. The resulting co-added images were processed to remove point sources to a limiting surface brightness of +20^m/arcsec$^2 or 40 nW/m^2/sr. The remaining maps contained over 90% of the pixels and were Fourier transformed to study the spatial structure of the di...

  6. Impact of modelling foreground uncertainties on future CMB polarization satellite experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervías-Caimapo, Carlos; Bonaldi, Anna; Brown, Michael L.

    2017-07-01

    We present an analysis of errors on the tensor-to-scalar ratio due to residual diffuse foregrounds. We use simulated observations of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization satellite, the Cosmic Origins Explorer (COrE), using the specifications of the version proposed to ESA in 2010. We construct a full pipeline from microwave sky maps to r likelihood, using two models of diffuse Galactic foregrounds with different complexity and assuming component separation with varying degrees of accuracy. Our pipeline uses a linear mixture (generalized least squares) solution for component separation, and a hybrid approach for power spectrum estimation, with a quadratic maximum likelihood estimator at low ℓs and a pseudo-Cℓ deconvolution at high ℓs. In the likelihood for r, we explore modelling foreground residuals as nuisance parameters. Our analysis aims at measuring the bias introduced in r by mismodelling the foregrounds and to determine what error is tolerable while still successfully detecting r. We find that r = 0.01 can be measured successfully even for a complex sky model and in the presence of foreground parameters error. However, the detection of r = 0.001 is a lot more challenging, as inaccurate modelling of the foreground spectral properties may result in a biased measurement of r. Once biases are eliminated, the total error on r allows setting an upper limit rather than a detection, unless the uncertainties on the foreground spectral indices are very small, i.e. equal or better than 0.5 per cent error for both dust and synchrotron. This emphasizes the need for pursuing research on component separation and foreground characterization in view of next-generation CMB polarization experiments.

  7. Dust models post-Planck: constraining the far-infrared opacity of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciullo, L.; Guillet, V.; Aniano, G.; Jones, A. P.; Ysard, N.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Boulanger, F.; Köhler, M.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We compare the performance of several dust models in reproducing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) per unit extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We use our results to constrain the variability of the optical properties of big grains in the diffuse ISM, as published by the Planck collaboration. Methods: We use two different techniques to compare the predictions of dust models to data from the Planck HFI, IRAS, and SDSS surveys. First, we fit the far-infrared emission spectrum to recover the dust extinction and the intensity of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Second, we infer the ISRF intensity from the total power emitted by dust per unit extinction, and then predict the emission spectrum. In both cases, we test the ability of the models to reproduce dust emission and extinction at the same time. Results: We identify two issues. Not all models can reproduce the average dust emission per unit extinction: there are differences of up to a factor ~2 between models, and the best accord between model and observation is obtained with the more emissive grains derived from recent laboratory data on silicates and amorphous carbons. All models fail to reproduce the variations in the emission per unit extinction if the only variable parameter is the ISRF intensity: this confirms that the optical properties of dust are indeed variable in the diffuse ISM. Conclusions: Diffuse ISM observations are consistent with a scenario where both ISRF intensity and dust optical properties vary. The ratio of the far-infrared opacity to the V band extinction cross-section presents variations of the order of ~20% (40-50% in extreme cases), while ISRF intensity varies by ~30% (~60% in extreme cases). This must be accounted for in future modelling. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-01-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current (DC) glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self excited dust acoustic waves and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust par...

  9. Dust models post-Planck: constraining the far-infrared opacity of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fanciullo, Lapo; Aniano, Gonzalo; Jones, Anthony P; Ysard, Nathalie; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Boulanger, François; Köhler, M

    2015-01-01

    We compare the performance of several dust models in reproducing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) per unit extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We use our results to constrain the variability of the optical properties of big grains in the diffuse ISM, as published by the Planck collaboration. We use two different techniques to compare the predictions of dust models to data from the Planck HFI, IRAS and SDSS surveys. First, we fit the far-infrared emission spectrum to recover the dust extinction and the intensity of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF). Second, we infer the ISRF intensity from the total power emitted by dust per unit extinction, and then predict the emission spectrum. In both cases, we test the ability of the models to reproduce dust emission and extinction at the same time. We identify two issues. Not all models can reproduce the average dust emission per unit extinction: there are differences of up to a factor $\\sim2$ between models, and the best accord between ...

  10. BFORE: The B-mode Foreground Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Niemack, Michael D; de Bernardis, Francesco; Boulanger, Francois; Bryan, Sean; Devlin, Mark; Dunkley, Joanna; Eales, Steve; Gomez, Haley; Groppi, Chris; Henderson, Shawn; Hillbrand, Seth; Hubmayr, Johannes; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Novak, Giles; Scott, Douglas; Soler, Juan; Tucker, Carole

    2015-01-01

    The B-mode Foreground Experiment (BFORE) is a proposed NASA balloon project designed to make optimal use of the sub-orbital platform by concentrating on three dust foreground bands (270, 350, and 600 GHz) that complement ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) programs. BFORE will survey ~1/4 of the sky with 1.7 - 3.7 arcminute resolution, enabling precise characterization of the Galactic dust that now limits constraints on inflation from CMB B-mode polarization measurements. In addition, BFORE's combination of frequency coverage, large survey area, and angular resolution enables science far beyond the critical goal of measuring foregrounds. BFORE will constrain the velocities of thousands of galaxy clusters, provide a new window on the cosmic infrared background, and probe magnetic fields in the interstellar medium. We review the BFORE science case, timeline, and instrument design, which is based on a compact off-axis telescope coupled to >10,000 superconducting detectors.

  11. BFORE: The B-mode Foreground Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemack, Michael D.; Ade, Peter; de Bernardis, Francesco; Boulanger, Francois; Bryan, Sean; Devlin, Mark; Dunkley, Joanna; Eales, Steve; Gomez, Haley; Groppi, Chris; Henderson, Shawn; Hillbrand, Seth; Hubmayr, Johannes; Mauskopf, Philip; McMahon, Jeff; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Novak, Giles; Scott, Douglas; Soler, Juan; Tucker, Carole

    2016-08-01

    The B-mode Foreground Experiment (BFORE) is a proposed NASA balloon project designed to make optimal use of the sub-orbital platform by concentrating on three dust foreground bands (270, 350, and 600 GHz) that complement ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) programs. BFORE will survey ˜ 1/4 of the sky with 1.7-3.7 arcminute resolution, enabling precise characterization of the Galactic dust that now limits constraints on inflation from CMB B-mode polarization measurements. In addition, BFORE's combination of frequency coverage, large survey area, and angular resolution enables science far beyond the critical goal of measuring foregrounds. BFORE will constrain the velocities of thousands of galaxy clusters, provide a new window on the cosmic infrared background, and probe magnetic fields in the interstellar medium. We review the BFORE science case, timeline, and instrument design, which is based on a compact off-axis telescope coupled to {>}10,000 superconducting detectors.

  12. Coal Mine Dust Desquamative Chronic Interstitial Pneumonia: A Precursor of Dust-Related Diffuse Fibrosis and of Emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav M Jelic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diseases associated with coal mine dust continue to affect coal miners. Elucidation of initial pathological changes as a precursor of coal dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema, may have a role in treatment and prevention. Objective: To identify the precursor of dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. Methods: Birefringent silica/silicate particles were counted by standard microscope under polarized light in the alveolar macrophages and fibrous tissue in 25 consecutive autopsy cases of complicated coal worker's pneumoconiosis and in 21 patients with tobacco-related respiratory bronchiolitis. Results: Coal miners had 331 birefringent particles/high power field while smokers had 4 (p<0.001. Every coal miner had intra-alveolar macrophages with silica/silicate particles and interstitial fibrosis ranging from minimal to extreme. All coal miners, including those who never smoked, had emphysema. Fibrotic septa of centrilobular emphysema contained numerous silica/silicate particles while only a few were present in adjacent normal lung tissue. In coal miners who smoked, tobacco-associated interstitial fibrosis was replaced by fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. Conclusion: The presence of silica/silicate particles and anthracotic pigment-laden macrophages inside the alveoli with various degrees of interstitial fibrosis indicated a new disease: coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, a precursor of both dust-related diffuse fibrosis and emphysema. In studied coal miners, fibrosis caused by smoking is insignificant in comparison with fibrosis caused by silica/silicate particles. Counting birefringent particles in the macrophages from bronchioalveolar lavage may help detect coal mine dust desquamative chronic interstitial pneumonia, and may initiate early therapy and preventive measures.

  13. Microbial degradation of street dust polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in microcosms simulating diffuse pollution of urban soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anders R; de Lipthay, Julia R; Sørensen, Søren J

    2006-01-01

    Diffuse pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of topsoil in urban regions has caused increasing concerns in recent years. We simulated diffuse pollution of soil in microcosms by spiking sandy topsoil (A-horizon) and coarse, mineral subsoil (C-horizon) with street dust (PM63...... for the persistence and low bioaccessibility of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in diffusely polluted soil.......) isolated from municipal street sweepings from central Copenhagen. The microbial communities adapted to PAH degradation in microcosms spiked with street dust in both A-horizon and C-horizon soils, in spite of low PAH-concentrations. The increased potential for PAH degradation was demonstrated on several...

  14. Variations between Dust and Gas in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Reach, William T; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Using the Planck far-infrared and Arecibo GALFA 21-cm line surveys, we identified a set of isolated interstellar clouds (approximately degree-sized on the sky and comprising 100 solar masses) and assessed the ratio of gas mass to dust mass. Significant variations of the gas-to-dust ratio are found both from cloud to cloud and within regions of individual clouds; within the clouds, the atomic gas per unit dust decreases by more than a factor of 3 compared to the standard gas-to-dust ratio. Three hypotheses are considered. First, the apparently low gas-to-dust ratio could be due to molecular gas. Comparing to Planck CO maps, the brightest clouds have a H2/CO ratio comparable to galactic plane clouds, but a strong lower limit is placed on the ratio for other clouds, such that the required amount of molecular gas is far higher than would be expected based on the CO upper limits. Second, we consider self-absorbed 21-cm lines and find the optical depth must be approximately 3, significantly higher than found from s...

  15. Planck early results. XXIV. Dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and the Galactic halo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    of this study is to estimate the far-infrared to sub-millimeter (submm) emissivity of dust in the diffuse local interstellar medium (ISM) and in the intermediate-velocity (IVC) and high-velocity clouds (HVC) of the Galactic halo. Galactic dust emission for fields with average Hi column density lower than 2...... × 1020 cm-2 is well correlated with 21-cm emission because in such diffuse areas the hydrogen is predominantly in the neutral atomic phase. The residual emission in these fields, once the Hi-correlated emission is removed, is consistent with the expected statistical properties of the cosmic infrared...

  16. Dust variations in the diffuse interstellar medium: constraints on Milky Way dust from Planck-HFI observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ysard, N; Jones, A; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Abergel, A; Fanciullo, L

    2015-01-01

    The Planck-HFI all-sky survey from 353 to 857GHz combined with the 100 microns IRAS show that the dust properties vary in the diffuse ISM at high Galactic latitude (1e19dust model. It consists of small aromatic-rich carbon grains, larger amorphous carbon grains with aliphatic-rich cores and aromatic-rich mantles, and amorphous silicates with Fe/FeS nano-inclusions covered by aromatic-rich carbon mantles. We explore whether variations in the radiation field or in the gas density distribution in the diffuse ISM could explain the observations. The dust properties are also varied in terms of mantle thickness, Fe/FeS inclusions, carbon abundance, and size distribution. Variations in the radiation field intensity and gas density distribution cannot explain the observed variations but radiation fields harder than the standard ISRF may participate in crea...

  17. Interstellar gas, dust and diffuse bands in the SMC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, N.L.J.; Cordiner, M.A.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kaper, L.; Sarre, P.J.; Foing, B.H.; Spaans, M.; Cami, J.; Sofia, U.J.; Clayton, G.C.; Gordon, K.D.; Salama, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims.In order to gain new insight into the unidentified identity of the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) carriers, this paper describes research into possible links between the shape of the interstellar extinction curve (including the 2175 Å bump and far-UV rise), the presence or absence of DIBs, and

  18. Foregrounding Theory and Fiction Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨阳

    2014-01-01

    Foregrounding is a concept that originally introduced from pictorial art. The function of foregrounding is to attract the audiences' attention so as to achieve certain expected artistic effects with the rest persons or things backgrounded.For a long time, foregrounding theory has been widely applied to linguistics, stylistics, literary creation and research whereas rarely being employed to translation activities. Not until late 19th century did Ye Zinan proposed that this theory could be applied to translation practice. He only put forward the relevant assumption on foregrounding theory. Based on English linguist Geoffrey Leech's deviation theory and Ye Zinan's assumption on the application of foregrounding theory to translation practice, this paper aims to draw translators' attention to foregrounding factors concealed in literary works, especially in novels, and to provide some basic means for them to render these foregrounding features into the relevant foregrounding expressions in the target language.

  19. Quantifying the Magnetic Alignment of Hi and Dust in the Diffuse ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. E.; Peek, J. E. G.; Hill, J. Colin; Putman, M. E.

    Sensitive, high resolution observations of Galactic neutral hydrogen (Hi) reveal an intricate network of slender linear features, much as sensitive surveys of dust in Galactic molecular clouds reveal ubiquitous filamentary structure. Across the high Galactic latitude sky, diffuse Histructures are aligned with the interstellar magnetic field, as revealed by background starlight polarization (Clark, Peek, & Putman 2014) and by Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission (Clark et al. 2015). These discoveries were enabled by the Rolling Hough Transform, a recently developed, open source machine vision algorithm.

  20. Spectroscopy of diffuse light in dust clouds. Scattered light and the solar neighbourhood radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtinen, K

    2012-01-01

    The optical surface brightness of dark nebulae is mainly due to scattering of integrated starlight by classical dust grains. It contains information on the impinging interstellar radiation field, cloud structure, and grain scattering properties. We have obtained spectra of the scattered light from 3500 to 9000 Angstrom in two globules, the Thumbprint Nebula and DC303.8-14.2. We use observations of the scattered light to study the impinging integrated starlight spectrum as well as the scattered H-alpha and other line emissions from all over the sky. We search also for the presence of other than scattered light in the two globules. We obtained long-slit spectra encompassing the whole globule plus adjacent sky in a one-slit setting, thus enabling efficient elimination of airglow and other foreground sky components. We calculated synthetic integrated starlight spectra for the solar neighbourhood using HIPPARCOS-based stellar distributions and the spectral library of Pickles. Spectra are presented separately for t...

  1. Dust in the diffuse interstellar medium: Extinction, emission, linear and circular polarisation

    CERN Document Server

    Siebenmorgen, R; Bagnulo, S

    2013-01-01

    We present a model for the diffuse interstellar dust that explains the observed wavelength-dependence of extinction, emission, linear and circular polarisation of light. The model is set-up with a small number of parameters. It consists of a mixture of amorphous carbon and silicate grains with sizes from the molecular domain of 0.5 up to about 500nm. Dust grains with radii larger than 6nm are spheroids. Spheroidal dust particles have a factor 1.5 - 3 larger absorption cross section in the far IR than spherical grains of the same volume. Mass estimates derived from submillimeter observations that ignore this effect are overestimated by the same amount. In the presence of a magnetic field, spheroids may be partly aligned and polarise light. We find that polarisation spectra help to determine the upper particle radius of the otherwise rather unconstrained dust size distribution. Stochastically heated small grains of graphite, silicates and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are included. We tabulate paramet...

  2. Magnetically Aligned HI and Dust: New insights into the physical properties of the diffuse ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan E.; Peek, Joshua E. G.; Hill, J. Colin; Putman, Mary; Schudel, Lowell E.

    2015-08-01

    Sensitive, high resolution observations of Galactic HI reveal an intricate network of slender linear features, much as sensitive surveys of dust in Galactic molecular clouds reveal ubiquitous filamentary structure. Across the high Galactic latitude sky, diffuse HI structures are aligned with the interstellar magnetic field, as revealed by background starlight polarization (Clark, Peek, Putman 2014). We present the discovery that the orientation of HI structures traces the Planck 353 GHz polarization angle measurements with extraordinary accuracy. We explore the physical properties of the HI structures, and the physical mechanisms responsible for their alignment, by examining the HI structures across a range of densities and environments. We discuss the insights that may be gained from a deeper understanding of the interplay between gas, dust, and magnetic fields in the ISM.

  3. Microbial degradation of street dust polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in microcosms simulating diffuse pollution of urban soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Anders R; de Lipthay, Julia R; Sørensen, Søren J; Ekelund, Flemming; Christensen, Peter; Andersen, Ole; Karlson, Ulrich; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2006-03-01

    Diffuse pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of topsoil in urban regions has caused increasing concerns in recent years. We simulated diffuse pollution of soil in microcosms by spiking sandy topsoil (A-horizon) and coarse, mineral subsoil (C-horizon) with street dust (PM63) isolated from municipal street sweepings from central Copenhagen. The microbial communities adapted to PAH degradation in microcosms spiked with street dust in both A-horizon and C-horizon soils, in spite of low PAH-concentrations. The increased potential for PAH degradation was demonstrated on several levels: by slowly diminishing PAH-concentrations, increased mineralization of 14C-PAHs, increasing numbers of PAH degraders and increased prevalence of nah and pdo1 PAH degradation genes, i.e. the microbial communities quickly adapted to PAH degradation. Three- and 4-ring PAHs from the street dust were biodegraded to some extent (10-20%), but 5- and 6-ring PAHs were not biodegraded in spite of frequent soil mixing and high PAH degradation potentials. In addition to biodegradation, leaching of 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs from the A-horizon to the C-horizon seems to reduce PAH-levels in surface soil. Over time, levels of 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs in surface soil may reach equilibrium between input and the combination of biodegradation and leaching. However, levels of the environmentally critical 5- and 6-ring PAHs will probably continue to rise. We presume that sorption to black carbon particles is responsible for the persistence and low bioaccessibility of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in diffusely polluted soil.

  4. Particle pair diffusion of inertial particles such as dust in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nadeem; Tereda, Yoseph; Usama, Syed

    2016-04-01

    The transport of particles in turbulent flows is ubiquitous in industrial applications and also in nature such as in dust storms and pollens. The mathematical equations that describe the motion of individual inertial particles (i.e. particles with weight and friction) is not fully developed yet, although simplified descriptions in specific contexts have been proposed, such as by Maxey and Riley [1]. The relative motion of groups of particles is equally important to understand, and this can usually be related to the relative motion of two particles, or pair diffusion. In 1926 Richardson [2] proposed a pioneering theory of pair diffusion of fluid particles based upon the idea of a separation dependent pair diffusivity, K(l), where l is the distance between two particles. Richardson advanced the theory based on a locality hypothesis in which only energy in the turbulent scales similar to the pair separation l is effective in further increasing the pair separation, leading to the famous 4/3-scaling, K˜ l4/3. Recent studies in turbulent particle pair diffusion [3] has suggested that both local and non-local effects govern the pair diffusion process inside the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number turbulence containing generalised power-law energy spectra, E(k)˜ k-p with 1

  5. NARROW DUST JETS IN A DIFFUSE GAS COMA: A NATURAL PRODUCT OF SMALL ACTIVE REGIONS ON COMETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Rubin, M.; Fougere, N.; Gombosi, T. I., E-mail: mcombi@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    Comets often display narrow dust jets but more diffuse gas comae when their eccentric orbits bring them into the inner solar system and sunlight sublimates the ice on the nucleus. Comets are also understood to have one or more active areas covering only a fraction of the total surface active with sublimating volatile ices. Calculations of the gas and dust distribution from a small active area on a comet's nucleus show that as the gas moves out radially into the vacuum of space it expands tangentially, filling much of the hemisphere centered on the active region. The dust dragged by the gas remains more concentrated over the active area. This explains some puzzling appearances of comets having collimated dust jets but more diffuse gaseous atmospheres. Our test case is 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the Rosetta mission target comet, whose activity is dominated by a single area covering only 4% of its surface.

  6. Ice Formation via Deposition Mode Nucleation Onto Dust Particulates: The University of Toronto Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Z. A.; Abbatt, J. P.; Cotton, R.; Demott, P.; Jones, H.; Möhler, O.; Stetzer, O.

    2008-12-01

    Laboratory studies are described whereby the heterogeneous ice nucleating ability of various dust samples were studied, for particles suspended in a newly built thermal gradient continuous flow diffusion chamber (TG-CFDC). Ice formation is observed using an optical particle counter (OPC) and the relative humidity (RH) and temperature conditions of the flow system are validated by observing homogenous freezing of H2SO4 aerosols. At the Fourth International Ice Nucleation Workshop (ICIS 07) in Karslruhe, Germany this system was used to investigate ice nucleation primarily in the vapor deposition mode, for Arizona Test Dust (ATD), Israeli Desert Dust (ID), Canary Island Dust (CID), Saharan Dust (SD), Graphite Spark Soot, Snomax® (dead bacteria) and live bacteria. The aerosol size was in the submicron range with an approximate cut off of 700 nm and a mode of 350 nm. Temperatures for nucleation were varied from 265 - 230 K. The dust aerosols were generally found to be more efficient than soot. At warmer temperatures (263 K) the bacteria were found to be active in the deposition mode which was not the case for dusts. Among the various dust types at 248 K, the CID was more efficient than ATD at nucleating ice when efficiency is based on lowest onset RH conditions for ice formation in our chamber. We also present preliminary results for the effect of total surface area versus size of aerosols on ice nucleation using ATD as a surrogate for naturally occurring mineral dust.

  7. Dust in the diffuse emission of the galactic plane - The Herschel/Spitzer SED fitting

    CERN Document Server

    Compiegne, M; Noriega-Crespo, A; Martin, P G; Bernard, J -P; Paladini, R; Molinari, S

    2010-01-01

    The first Herschel Hi-Gal images of the galactic plane unveil the far-infrared diffuse emission of the interstellar medium with an unprecedented angular resolution and sensitivity. In this paper, we present the first analysis of these data in combination with that of Spitzer Glimpse & Mipsgal. We selected a relatively diffuse and low excitation region of the l~59\\,^{\\circ} Hi-Gal Science Demonstration Phase field to perform a pixel by pixel fitting of the 8 to 500 microns SED using the DustEM dust emission model. We derived maps of the Very Small Grains (VSG) and PAH abundances from the model. Our analysis allows us to illustrate that the Aromatic Infrared Bands (AIB) intensity does not trace necessarily the PAH abundance but rather the product of "abundance x column density x intensity of the exciting radiation field". We show that the spatial structure of PACS70microns map resembles the shorter wavelengths (e.g. IRAC8microns) maps, because they trace both the intensity of exciting radiation field and co...

  8. CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF WETLAND'S INFLOW DRY DIFFUSE DUST AND DIRT FROM IMPERVIOUS SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Azam Khan; Saadat Ashraf

    2005-01-01

    This paper presented chemical characteristics of wetland inflow diffuse dust and dirt. Single land use impervious areas (parking and roads) were observed and analyzed in commercial and residential areas for organic matters, phosphorus and heavy metals. The buildup data were collected for approximately six months from December to June. The frequency of monitoring was observed daily for the first two months, twice a week for the next two months and once a week for the last two months. The results indicated significant variations in the organic matters and heavy metals strength and total accumulation among the observed areas. High pollutants strength was associated with smaller dust and dirt (DD) particles. Concentrations of phosphorus varied between 5.1 μg/g and 8.3 μg/g in DD particle less than 75 μm and account for 35%-60% of the total phosphorus. The organic matter accumulation rate associated with particles less than 600 μm and greater than 600 μm was 0.1-1 g·(curb-m)-1·d-1 and 0.1-1.5 g·(curb-m)-1·d-1 , respectively. DD particles greater than 600 μm consist of 70%-90% of leaves and other plant residues. The strength of heavy metals was more at road compared to parking areas both in commercial and residential areas. Percentage of Zn, Cu and Pb attached with particles less than 200 μm were in the range of 50%-70% in parking, 45%-90% on smooth roads and 30%-80% on rough roads. All the dust and dirt exhibited rising trend with time. Dust and dirt buildup data follow a non-linear accumulation function and can be presented better either by an exponential or power function.

  9. Planck intermediate results XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    The polarized thermal emission from diffuse Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100 GHz. In this paper we exploit the uniqueness of the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353 GHz...... to measure the polarized dust angular power spectra C-l(EE) and C-l(BB) over the multipole range 40 CMB polarization...... dust column densities. We show that even in the faintest dust-emitting regions there are no "clean" windows in the sky where primordial CMB B-mode polarization measurements could be made without subtraction of foreground emission. Finally, we investigate the level of dust polarization in the specific...

  10. Variations between Dust and Gas in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium. 2. Search for Cold Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Reach, William T; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The content of interstellar clouds, in particular the inventory of diffuse molecular gas, remains uncertain. We identified a sample of isolated clouds, approximately 100 solar masses in size, and used the dust content to estimate the total amount of gas. In Paper 1, the total inferred gas content was found significantly larger than that seen in 21-cm emission measurements of H~I. In this paper we test the hypothesis that the apparent excess `dark' gas is cold H~I, which would be evident in absorption but not in emission due to line saturation. The results show there is not enough 21-cm absorption toward the clouds to explain the total amount of `dark' gas.

  11. Variations between Dust and Gas in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium. II. Search for Cold Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reach, William T.; Heiles, Carl; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The content of interstellar clouds, in particular the inventory of diffuse molecular gas, remains uncertain. We identified a sample of isolated clouds, approximately 100 M⊙ in size, and used the dust content to estimate the total amount of gas. In Paper I, the total inferred gas content was found significantly larger than that seen in 21 cm emission measurements of H i. In this paper we test the hypothesis that the apparent excess “dark” gas is cold H i, which would be evident in absorption but not in emission due to line saturation. The results show that there is not enough 21 cm absorption toward the clouds to explain the total amount of “dark” gas.

  12. CH^+ Spectrum and Diffuse Interstellar Bands Toward Herschel 36 Excited by Dust Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Julie; Oka, Takeshi; Johnson, Sean; Welty, Daniel E.; Hobbs, Lew M.; York, Donald G.

    2012-06-01

    All electronic CH^+ interstellar absorption lines so far observed had been limited to the R(0) transition starting from the J = 0 ground level; this is because of the very rapid J = 1 → 0 spontaneous emission with the life time of ˜ 140 s. We have observed the R(1) and Q(1) lines of the A^1π ← X^1Σ band from the excited J = 1 level 40.08 K (27.86 cm-1) above the J = 0 level toward Herschel 36 indicating high radiative temperature of T_r = 17.5 K. The high temperature is most likely due to far infrared dust emission from the Her 36 SE. We have also observed the R_1(3/2) line of CH starting from the excited fine structure level J = 3/2 which is 25.76 - 25.57 K above the J = 1/2 level. The effect of high radiative temperature is also noticed as unique lineshapes of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) observed toward Her 36. We have examined seven DIBs including λ 5780.5, λ 5797.1, λ 6190.0, and λ 6613.0 that are correlated with each other with correlation coefficients > 0.93. While for ordinary sightlines the lineshapes of these DIBs are more or less symmetric, those toward Her 36 show a long tail toward the red. This is due to far infrared pumping of high J rotational levels of polar carriers of the DIBs by the dust emission. We have developed a model calculation of relaxation taking into account of both radiative and collisional processes. A linear molecule with about 6 carbon atoms can explain some of the DIBs. For the DIBs we have examined, probably the carriers are of this size since we cannot explain the large difference between the DIBs toward ordinary sightlines and toward Her 36 with larger molecules. Goto, M., Stecklum, B., Linz, H., Feldt, M., Henning, Th., Pascucci, I., and Usuda, T. 2006, ApJ, {649} 299.

  13. PIPER and Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David

    2009-01-01

    In addition to probing inflationary cosmology, PIPER will measure the polarized dust emission from the Galaxy. PIPER will be capable of full (I,0,U,V) measurement over four frequency bands ' These measurements will provide insight into the physics of dust grains and a probe of the Galactic magnetic field on large and intermediate scales.

  14. PIPER and Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David

    2009-01-01

    In addition to probing inflationary cosmology, PIPER will measure the polarized dust emission from the Galaxy. PIPER will be capable of full (I,0,U,V) measurement over four frequency bands ' These measurements will provide insight into the physics of dust grains and a probe of the Galactic magnetic field on large and intermediate scales.

  15. Dust Diffusion and Settling in the Presence of Collisions: Trapping (sub)micron Grains in the Midplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijt, Sebastiaan; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2016-05-01

    In protoplanetary disks, the distribution and abundance of small (sub)micron grains are important for a range of physical and chemical processes. For example, they dominate the optical depth at short wavelengths and their surfaces are the sites of many important chemical reactions, such as the formation of water. Based on their aerodynamical properties (i.e., their strong dynamical coupling with the surrounding gas) it is often assumed that these small grains are well-mixed with the gas. Our goal is to study the vertical (re)distribution of grains taking into account settling, turbulent diffusion, and collisions with other dust grains. Assuming a fragmentation-limited background dust population, we developed a Monte Carlo approach that follows single monomers as they move through a vertical column of gas and become incorporated in different aggregates as they undergo sticking and fragmenting collisions. We find that (sub)micron grains are not necessarily well-mixed vertically, but can become trapped in a thin layer with a scale height that is significantly smaller than that of the gas. This collisional trapping occurs when the timescale for diffusion is comparable to or longer than the collision timescale in the midplane and its effect is strongest when the most massive particles in the size distribution show significant settling. Based on simulations and analytical considerations, we conclude that for typical dust-to-gas ratios and turbulence levels, the collisional trapping of small grains should be a relatively common phenomenon. The absence of trapping could then indicate a low dust-to-gas ratio, possibly because a large portion of the dust mass has been removed through radial drift or is locked up in planetesimals.

  16. Evaluation of Diffuse Reflection Infrared Spectrometry for End-of-Shift Measurement of α-quartz in Coal Dust Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Arthur L; Murphy, Nathaniel C; Bayman, Sean J; Briggs, Zachary P; Kilpatrick, Andrew D; Quinn, Courtney A; Wadas, Mackenzie R; Cauda, Emanuele G; Griffiths, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    The inhalation of toxic substances is a major threat to the health of miners, and dust containing respirable crystalline silica (α-quartz) is of particular concern, due to the recent rise in cases of coal workers' pneumoconiosis and silicosis in some U.S. mining regions. Currently, there is no field-portable instrument that can measure airborne α-quartz and give miners timely feedback on their exposure. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is therefore conducting studies to investigate technologies capable of end-of-shift or real-time measurement of airborne quartz. The present study focuses on the potential application of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry conducted in the diffuse reflection (DR) mode as a technique for measuring α-quartz in respirable mine dust. A DR accessory was used to analyze lab-generated respirable samples of Min-U-Sil 5 (which contains more than 90% α-quartz) and coal dust, at mass loadings in the ranges of 100-600 μg and 600-5300 μg, respectively. The dust samples were deposited onto three different types of filters, borosilicate fiberglass, nylon, and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The reflectance, R, was calculated by the ratio of a blank filter and a filter with deposited mine dust. Results suggest that for coal and pure quartz dusts deposited on 37 mm PVC filters, measurements of -log R correlate linearly with known amounts of quartz on filters, with R(2) values of approximately 0.99 and 0.94, respectively, for samples loaded up to ∼4000 μg. Additional tests were conducted to measure quartz in coal dusts deposited onto the borosilicate fiberglass and nylon filter media used in the NIOSH-developed Personal Dust Monitor (PDM). The nylon filter was shown to be amenable to DR analysis, but quantification of quartz is more accurate when the filter is "free," as opposed to being mounted in the PDM filter holder. The borosilicate fiberglass filters were shown to produce excessive

  17. Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP1) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, B.; Bennett, C.L.; Larson, D.; Hill, R.S.; Odegard, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Hinshaw, G.; Kogut, A.; Wollack, E.; Page, L.; hide

    2008-01-01

    We present a new estimate of foreground emission in the WMAP data, using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The new technique delivers maps of each foreground component for a variety of foreground models, error estimates of the uncertainty of each foreground component, and provides an overall goodness-of-fit measurement. The resulting foreground maps are in broad agreement with those from previous techniques used both within the collaboration and by other authors. We find that for WMAP data, a simple model with power-law synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust components fits 90% of the sky with a reduced X(sup 2) (sub v) of 1.14. However, the model does not work well inside the Galactic plane. The addition of either synchrotron steepening or a modified spinning dust model improves the fit. This component may account for up to 14% of the total flux at Ka-band (33 GHz). We find no evidence for foreground contamination of the CMB temperature map in the 85% of the sky used for cosmological analysis.

  18. Planck Early Results: Dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and the Galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Abergel, A; Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Blagrave, K; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cantalupo, C M; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cayon, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Desert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Donzelli, S; Dore, O; Dorl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Ensslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Heraud, Y; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Gorski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versille, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Joncas, G; Jones, A; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihanen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Linden-Vornle, M; Lockman, F J; Lopez-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macias-Perez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Norgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Goncalves, D Pinheiro; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Prezeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubino-Martin, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, P; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of comparison of Planck along with IRAS data with Green Bank Telescope 21 cm observations in 14 fields covering more than 800 square degrees at high Galactic latitude. Galactic dust emission for fields with average column density lower than 2 x 10^20 cm^-2 is well correlated with 21 cm emission. The residual emission in these fields, once the HI-correlated emission is removed, is consistent with the expected statistical properties of the cosmic infrared background fluctuations. Fields with larger average column densities show significant excess dust emission compared to the HI column density. Regions of excess lie in organized structures that suggest the presence of hydrogen in molecular form, though they are not always correlated with CO emission. Dust emission from intermediate-velocity clouds is detected by this correlation analysis with high significance. Its spectral properties are consistent with, compared to the local ISM values, significantly hotter dust (T ~ 20 K...

  19. Lifetime occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes is associated with bronchitis symptoms and higher diffusion capacity in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Esther; Ferrer, Jaume; Zock, Jan-Paul; Serra, Ignasi; Antó, Josep M; de Batlle, Jordi; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Donaire-González, David; Benet, Marta; Balcells, Eva; Monsó, Eduard; Gayete, Angel; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes has been associated with reduced FEV1 and sputum production in COPD patients. The effect of occupational exposure on other characteristics of COPD, especially those reflecting emphysema, has not been studied in these patients. We studied 338 patients hospitalized for a first exacerbation of COPD in 9 Spanish hospitals, obtaining full occupational history in a face-to-face interview; job codes were linked to a job exposure matrix for semi-quantitative estimation of exposure to mineral/biological dust, and gases/fumes for each job held. Patients underwent spirometry, diffusing capacity testing and analysis of gases in stable conditions. Quality of life, dyspnea and chronic bronchitis symptoms were determined with a questionnaire interview. A high- resolution CT scan was available in 133 patients. 94% of the patients included were men, with a mean age of 68(8.5) years and a mean FEV1% predicted 52 (16). High exposure to gases or fumes was associated with chronic bronchitis, and exposure to mineral dust and gases/fumes was associated with higher scores for symptom perception in the St. George's questionnaire. No occupational agent was associated with a lower FEV1. High exposure to all occupational agents was associated with better lung diffusion capacity, in long-term quitters. In the subgroup with CT data, patients with emphysema had 18% lower DLCO compared to those without emphysema. In our cohort of COPD patients, high exposure to gases or fumes was associated with chronic bronchitis, and high exposure to all occupational agents was consistently associated with better diffusion capacity in long-term quitters.

  20. Lifetime occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes is associated with bronchitis symptoms and higher diffusion capacity in COPD patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Rodríguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes has been associated with reduced FEV1 and sputum production in COPD patients. The effect of occupational exposure on other characteristics of COPD, especially those reflecting emphysema, has not been studied in these patients. METHODS: We studied 338 patients hospitalized for a first exacerbation of COPD in 9 Spanish hospitals, obtaining full occupational history in a face-to-face interview; job codes were linked to a job exposure matrix for semi-quantitative estimation of exposure to mineral/biological dust, and gases/fumes for each job held. Patients underwent spirometry, diffusing capacity testing and analysis of gases in stable conditions. Quality of life, dyspnea and chronic bronchitis symptoms were determined with a questionnaire interview. A high- resolution CT scan was available in 133 patients. RESULTS: 94% of the patients included were men, with a mean age of 68(8.5 years and a mean FEV1% predicted 52 (16. High exposure to gases or fumes was associated with chronic bronchitis, and exposure to mineral dust and gases/fumes was associated with higher scores for symptom perception in the St. George's questionnaire. No occupational agent was associated with a lower FEV1. High exposure to all occupational agents was associated with better lung diffusion capacity, in long-term quitters. In the subgroup with CT data, patients with emphysema had 18% lower DLCO compared to those without emphysema. CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort of COPD patients, high exposure to gases or fumes was associated with chronic bronchitis, and high exposure to all occupational agents was consistently associated with better diffusion capacity in long-term quitters.

  1. Galactic foreground contribution to the BEAST CMB Anisotropy Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Mejia, J; Burigana, C; Childers, J; Figueiredo, N; Kangas, M; Lubin, P; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Marvil, J; Meinhold, P; O'Dwyer, I; O'Neill, H; Platania, P; Seiffert, M; Stebor, N; Tello, C A S; Villela, T; Wandelt, B; Wünsche, C A; Mej\\'{\\i}a, Jorge; Bersanelli, Marco; Burigana, Carlo; Childers, Jeff; Figueiredo, Newton; Kangas, Miikka; Lubin, Philip; Maino, Davide; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Josh; Meinhold, Peter; Dwyer, Ian O'; Neill, Hugh O'; Platania, Paola; Seiffert, Michael; Stebor, Nathan; Tello, Camilo; Villela, Thyrso; Wandelt, Benjamin; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    We report limits on the Galactic foreground emission contribution to the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) Ka- and Q-band CMB anisotropy maps. We estimate the contribution from the cross-correlations between these maps and the foreground emission templates of an H${\\alpha}$ map, a de-striped version of the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, and a combined 100 $\\mu$m IRAS/DIRBE map. Our analysis samples the BEAST $\\sim10^\\circ$ declination band into 24 one-hour (RA) wide sectors with $\\sim7900$ pixels each, where we calculate: (a) the linear correlation coefficient between the anisotropy maps and the templates; (b) the coupling constants between the specific intensity units of the templates and the antenna temperature at the BEAST frequencies and (c) the individual foreground contributions to the BEAST anisotropy maps. The peak sector contributions of the contaminants in the Ka-band are of 56.5% free-free with a coupling constant of $8.3\\pm0.4$ $\\mu$K/R, and 67.4% dust with $45.0\\pm2.0$ $\\mu$K/...

  2. Foreground removal from CMB temperature maps using an MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, H.E.

    2008-01-01

    One of the main obstacles for extracting the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) signal from observations in the mm-submm range is the foreground contamination by emission from Galactic components: mainly synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust emission. Due to the statistical nature of the intrinsic...

  3. Foreground removal from WMAP 5 yr temperature maps using an MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    Aims. One of the main obstacles for extracting the cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal from observations in the mm/sub-mm range is the foreground contamination by emission from Galactic component: mainly synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust emission. The statistical nature of the intrinsic...

  4. Development of newly engineering technology based on computer analysis for dust diffusion; Funjin kakusan kaiseki gijutsu wo kihon to shita atarashii engineering gijutsu no tenkai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K.; Murahashi, Y.; Kawakami, H.; Tanaka, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-07-30

    Nippon Steel has made a comprehensive survey of the space environment designing technology that can precisely cope with the needs required for a space in a plant in a very wide range from the ventilation problem in steel mill to the turbulence problem in semiconductor plant, through accomplishing the development of computer analysis technology for dust diffusion that can estimate and control `air flow` and `dust movement` in an electric angstrom [furnace plant]. This paper describes the basic concept for establishing the computer analysis technology for dust diffusion and the concrete measures to solve accompanying problems, and further enters into details how the new engineering technology has innovated technical measures to solve problems, the new engineering technology which introduces a concept of both estimation and control to attain objects such as to curtail the equipment cost and so by estimating the `air flow` and `dust movement` to create both a new flow and movement depending on needs. 3 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Contamination of the Epoch of Reionization power spectrum in the presence of foregrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Sims, Peter H.; Lentati, Lindley; Alexander, Paul; Carilli, Chris L.

    2016-01-01

    We construct foreground simulations comprising spatially correlated extragalactic and diffuse Galactic emission components and calculate the `intrinsic' (instrument-free) two-dimensional spatial power spectrum and the cylindrically and spherically averaged three-dimensional k-space power spectra of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and our foreground simulations using a Bayesian power spectral estimation framework. This leads us to identify a model dependent region of optimal signal estimation ...

  6. CMBPol Mission Concept Study: Foreground Science Knowledge and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Fraisse, A A; Dobler, G; Dotson, J L; Draine, B T; Frisch, P C; Haverkorn, M; Hirata, C M; Jansson, R; Lazarian, A; Magalhães, A M; Waelkens, A; Wolleben, M

    2008-01-01

    We report on our knowledge of Galactic foregrounds, as well as on how a CMB satellite mission aiming at detecting a primordial B-mode signal (CMBPol) will contribute to improving it. We review the observational and analysis techniques used to constrain the structure of the Galactic magnetic field, whose presence is responsible for the polarization of Galactic emissions. Although our current understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium is somewhat limited, dramatic improvements in our knowledge of its properties are expected by the time CMBPol flies. Thanks to high resolution and high sensitivity instruments observing the whole sky at frequencies between 30 GHz and 850 GHz, CMBPol will not only improve this picture by observing the synchrotron emission from our galaxy, but also help constrain dust models. Polarized emission from interstellar dust indeed dominates over any other signal in CMBPol's highest frequency channels. Observations at these wavelengths, combined with ground-based studies of starlig...

  7. Measuring the Largest Angular Scale CMB B-mode Polarization with Galactic Foregrounds on a Cut Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, Duncan J; Marriage, Tobias A; Abitbol, Maximilian H; Appel, John W; Bennett, Charles L; Chuss, David T; Eimer, Joseph R; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Miller, Nathan J; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    We consider the effectiveness of foreground cleaning in the recovery of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization sourced by gravitational waves for tensor-to-scalar ratios in the range $0diffuse Galactic thermal dust and synchrotron foregrounds, and Gaussian white noise. We use linear combinations (LCs) of the simulated multifrequency data to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of $r$, the relative scalar amplitude $s$, and LC coefficients. We find that for 10,000 simulations of a CLASS-like experiment using only measurements of the reionization peak ($\\ell\\leq23$), there is a 95% C.L. upper limit of $r<0.017$ in the case of no primordial gravitational waves. For simulations with $r=0.01$, we recover at 68% C.L. $r=0.012^{+0.011}_{-0.006}$. The reioniza...

  8. The properties of diffuse interstellar dust clouds as determined from GALEX and infrared (IRAS, Herschel) observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengot, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    Dust grain properties are known to vary in the interstellar medium depending on the density, the ultraviolet radiation field and the local abundances of metal elements. Though there are plenty of studies addressing the atomic and molecular gas component or the infrared radiation of dust grains, there are very few studies that address the spatial distribution of small large grains and large molecules such as the Polyaromathic Hydrocarbons (PAHs).In this work, we make use of the GALEX survey of the Galaxy to identify the absorption produced in the GALEX far UV (write in the spectral range) and new UV (write in the spectral range) by well know infrared cirrus and compare the absorption produced in the UV by the thin cirrus with the infrared dust emissivity in various bands; (describe the IRAS bands used and whether there is any Herschel band in this study). As the spatial resolution of GALEX images is significantly larger than that of IRAS images data handling has required mosaicking and and rescaling GALEX data as well as transforming the images form equinox 1950 to equinox 2000. We describe in this work the computational procedures used to generate the ultraviolet and infrared maps. Also we present our first results that show there is an anticorrelation between UV and infrared (IR) emission, as other wise expected. The largest concentrations of dust grains radiate IR photons and absorb UV photons.

  9. Planck early results. XXIV. Dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and the Galactic halo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2011-01-01

    background fluctuations. The brighter fields in our sample, with an average Hi column density greater than 2 × 1020 cm -2, show significant excess dust emission compared to the Hi column density. Regions of excess lie in organized structures that suggest the presence of hydrogen in molecular form, though...

  10. First Detection of Polarization of the Submillimetre Diffuse Galactic Dust Emission by Archeops

    CERN Document Server

    Benoît, A; Amblard, A; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bargot, S; Bartlett, J G; Bernard, J P; Bhatia, R S; Blanchard, A; Bock, J J; Boscaleri, A; Bouchet, F R; Bourrachot, A; Camus, P; Couchot, F; De Bernardis, P; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F X; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dumoulin, L; Dupac, X; Filliatre, P; Fosalba, P; Ganga, K; Gannaway, F; Gautier, B; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gispert, R; Guglielmi, L; Hamilton, J C; Hanany, S; Henrot-Versillé, S; Kaplan, J; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J M; Lange, A E; Macias-Perez, J F; Madet, K; Maffei, B; Magneville, C; Marrone, D P; Masi, S; Mayet, F; Murphy, A; Naraghi, F; Nati, F; Patanchon, G; Perrin, G; Piat, M; Ponthieu, N; Prunet, S; Puget, J L; Renault, C; Rosset, C; Santos, D; Starobinsky, A A; Strukov, I; Sudiwala, R V; Teyssier, R; Tristram, M; Tucker, C; Vanel, J C; Vibert, D; Wakui, E; Yvon, D; Magneville, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first determination of the Galactic polarized emission at 353 GHz by Archeops. The data were taken during the Arctic night of February 7, 2002 after the balloon--borne instrument was launched by CNES from the Swedish Esrange base near Kiruna. In addition to the 143 GHz and 217 GHz frequency bands dedicated to CMB studies, Archeops had one 545 GHz and six 353 GHz bolometers mounted in three polarization sensitive pairs that were used for Galactic foreground studies. We present maps of the I, Q, U Stokes parameters over 17% of the sky and with a 13 arcmin resolution at 353 GHz (850 microns). They show a significant Galactic large scale polarized emission coherent on the longitude ranges [100, 120] and [180, 200] deg. with a degree of polarization at the level of 4-5%, in agreement with expectations from starlight polarization measurements. Some regions in the Galactic plane (Gem OB1, Cassiopeia) show an even stronger degree of polarization in the range 10-20%. Those findings provide strong eviden...

  11. Isotropy-violation diagnostics for B-mode polarization foregrounds to the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotti, Aditya; Huffenberger, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Isotropy-violation statistics can highlight polarized galactic foregrounds that contaminate primordial B-modes in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We propose a particular isotropy-violation test and apply it to polarized Planck 353 GHz data, constructing a map that indicates B-mode foreground dust power over the sky. We build our main isotropy test in harmonic space via the bipolar spherical harmonic basis, and our method helps us to identify the least-contaminated directions. By this measure, there are regions of low foreground in and around the BICEP field, near the South Galactic Pole, and in the Northern Galactic Hemisphere. There is also a possible foreground feature in the BICEP field. We compare our results to those based on the local power spectrum, which is computed on discs using a version of the method of Planck Int. XXX (2016). The discs method is closely related to our isotropy-violation diagnostic. We pay special care to the treatment of noise, including chance correlations with the foregrounds. Currently we use our isotropy tool to assess the cleanest portions of the sky, but in the future such methods will allow isotropy-based null tests for foreground contamination in maps purported to measure primordial B-modes, particularly in cases of limited frequency coverage.

  12. Contamination of the Epoch of Reionization power spectrum in the presence of foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Sims, Peter H; Alexander, Paul; Carilli, Chris L

    2016-01-01

    We construct foreground simulations comprising spatially correlated extragalactic and diffuse Galactic emission components and calculate the `intrinsic' (instrument-free) two-dimensional spatial power spectrum and the cylindrically and spherically averaged three-dimensional k-space power spectra of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and our foreground simulations using a Bayesian power spectral estimation framework. This leads us to identify a model dependent region of optimal signal estimation for our foreground and EoR models, within which the spatial power in the EoR signal relative to foregrounds is maximised. We identify a target field dependent region, in k-space, of intrinsic foreground power spectral contamination at low k_perp and k_parallel and a transition to a relatively foreground-free intrinsic EoR window in the complement to this region. The contaminated region of k-space demonstrates that simultaneous estimation of the EoR and foregrounds is important for obtaining statistically robust estimates ...

  13. Contamination of the Epoch of Reionization power spectrum in the presence of foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Peter H.; Lentati, Lindley; Alexander, Paul; Carilli, Chris L.

    2016-11-01

    We construct foreground simulations comprising spatially correlated extragalactic and diffuse Galactic emission components and calculate the `intrinsic' (instrument-free) two-dimensional spatial power spectrum and the cylindrically and spherically averaged three-dimensional k-space power spectra of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and our foreground simulations using a Bayesian power spectral estimation framework. This leads us to identify a model-dependent region of optimal signal estimation for our foreground and EoR models, within which the spatial power in the EoR signal relative to the foregrounds is maximized. We identify a target field-dependent region, in k-space, of intrinsic foreground power spectral contamination at low k⊥ and k∥ and a transition to a relatively foreground-free intrinsic EoR window in the complement to this region. The contaminated region of k-space demonstrates that simultaneous estimation of the EoR and foregrounds is important for obtaining statistically robust estimates of the EoR power spectrum; biased results will be obtained from methodologies that ignore their covariance. Using simulated observations with frequency-dependent uv-coverage and primary beam, with the former derived for the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array in 37-antenna and 331-antenna configuration, we recover instrumental power spectra consistent with their intrinsic counterparts. We discuss the implications of these results for optimal strategies for unbiased estimation of the EoR power spectrum.

  14. Perpendicular diffusion of a dilute beam of charged dust particles in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2014-06-01

    The diffusion of projectiles drifting through a target of strongly coupled dusty plasma is investigated in a simulation. A projectile's drift is driven by a constant force F. We characterize the random walk of the projectiles in the direction perpendicular to their drift. The perpendicular diffusion coefficient Dp⊥ is obtained from the simulation data. The force dependence of Dp⊥ is found to be a power law in a high force regime, but a constant at low forces. A mean kinetic energy Wp for perpendicular motion is also obtained. The diffusion coefficient is found to increase with Wp with a linear trend at higher energies, but an exponential trend at lower energies.

  15. Dust diffusion and settling in the presence of collisions: Trapping (sub)micron grains in the midplane

    CERN Document Server

    Krijt, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    In protoplanetary disks, the distribution and abundance of small (sub)micron grains are important for a range of physical and chemical processes. For example, they dominate the optical depth at short wavelengths and their surfaces are the sites of many important chemical reactions such as the formation of water. Based on their aerodynamical properties (i.e., their strong dynamical coupling with the surrounding gas) it is often assumed that these small grains are well-mixed with the gas. Our goal is to study the vertical (re)distribution of grains taking into account settling, turbulent diffusion, as well as collisions with other dust grains. Assuming a fragmentation-limited background dust population, we developed a Monte Carlo approach that follows single monomers as they move through a vertical column of gas and become incorporated in different aggregates as they undergo sticking and fragmenting collisions. We find that (sub)micron grains are not necessarily well-mixed vertically, but can become trapped in ...

  16. Bayesian CMB foreground separation with a correlated log-normal model

    CERN Document Server

    Oppermann, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The extraction of foreground and CMB maps from multi-frequency observations relies mostly on the different frequency behavior of the different components. Existing Bayesian methods additionally make use of a Gaussian prior for the CMB whose correlation structure is described by an unknown angular power spectrum. We argue for the natural extension of this by using non-trivial priors also for the foreground components. Focusing on diffuse Galactic foregrounds, we propose a log-normal model including unknown spatial correlations within each component and cross-correlations between the different foreground components. We present case studies at low resolution that demonstrate the superior performance of this model when compared to an analysis with flat priors for all components.

  17. Planck intermediate results. XII: Diffuse Galactic components in the Gould Belt System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the diffuse low-frequency Galactic components in the Southern part of the Gould Belt system (130^\\circ\\leq l\\leq 230^\\circ and -50^\\circ\\leq b\\leq -10^\\circ). Strong ultra-violet (UV) flux coming from the Gould Belt super-association is responsible for bright diffuse...... separate diffuse free-free emission and AME from synchrotron emission and thermal dust emission by using Planck data, complemented by ancillary data, using the "Correlated Component Analysis" (CCA) component separation method and we compare with the results of cross-correlation of foreground templates...

  18. Wave Propagation and Diffusive Transition of Oscillations in Pair Plasmas with Dust Impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Atamaniuk, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    In view of applications to electron-positron pair-plasmas and fullerene pair-ion-plasmas containing charged dust impurities a thorough discussion is given of three-component Plasmas. Space-time responses of multi-component linearized Vlasov plasmas on the basis of multiple integral equations are invoked. An initial-value problem for Vlasov-Poisson -Ampere equations is reduced to the one multiple integral equation and the solution is expressed in terms of forcing function and its space-time convolution with the resolvent kernel. The forcing function is responsible for the initial disturbance and the resolvent is responsible for the equilibrium velocity distributions of plasma species. By use of resolvent equations, time-reversibility, space-reflexivity and the other symmetries are revealed. The symmetries carry on physical properties of Vlasov pair plasmas, e.g., conservation laws. Properly choosing equilibrium distributions for dusty pair plasmas, we can reduce the resolvent equation to: (i) the undamped disp...

  19. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Errard, Josquin; Peiris, Hiranya V; Jaffe, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the result...

  20. Foreground Cleaning for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimeters in the Presence of Instrumental Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chaoyun

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) B-mode polarization signal offers a direct probe of inflation, a period of exponential expansion in the extreme early universe. The inflationary CMB B-mode polarization signal, however, is subject to the contamination of polarized galactic thermal dust foreground emission. A robust foreground cleaning method is essential for CMB polarimeters targeting the inflationary B-mode signal. In this thesis I present my work on developing foreground cleaning algorithms particularly in the presence of instrumental effects. One of the instrumental effects I focus on in this work is the frequency dependent polarization rotation effect such as the one caused by an achromatic half-wave plate (AHWP). As an example, I use the AHWP of the E and B Experiment (EBEX) in this work and study the relation between the frequency dependent rotation effect and the characteristic parameters of the AHWP. To address the effect of an AHWP while removing galactic dust foreground contamination, I developed two foreground cleaning algorithms: a simple method that assumes perfect knowledge of the AHWP and a few simplifying assumptions, and a more sophisticated algorithm based on maximum likelihood method. Based on simulation results, the maximum likelihood foreground cleaning algorithm can recover CMB B-mode signal without any bias in the presence of band shape uncertainty, frequency dependent rotation effect and instrumental noise with realistic measurement accuracy of instrumental parameters. In this thesis I also present my work on calculating the atmospheric loading in the millimeter wave regime for sub-orbital CMB experiments such as EBEX. Having a proper prediction of the atmospheric loading is an important input to detector designs for CMB experiments.

  1. Detectability of tensor modes in the presence of foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Amarie, M; Seljak, U; Amarie, Mihail; Hirata, Christopher; Seljak, Uros

    2005-01-01

    In inflationary models, gravitational waves are produced and generate B-type polarization in the CMB. Since B polarization is only generated by gravity waves it does not suffer from the cosmic variance. A perfect decomposition of the CMB into B-modes and E-modes would require data from the entire sky, which in practice is not possible because of the foreground contaminants. This leads to mixing of E polarization into B, which introduces cosmic variance conta- mination of B polarization and reduces sensitivity to gravity wave amplitude even in absence of detector noise. We present numerical results for the uncertainty in the tensor-to-scalar ratio using the Fisher matrix formalism for various resolutions, using foreground models based on dust maps and assuming 90 GHz operating frequency. We find that the usual scaling delta(T/S) ~ f_sky^(-1/2) is significantly degraded and becomes delta(T/S) ~ f_sky^(-2) for f_sky>0.7. This dependence is affected only weakly by the choice of sky cuts. To achieve a T/S=10^(-3) ...

  2. Science teachers’ foreground for continued professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Peer

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of studies that are dedicated to qualify our understanding of the significance of lived experiences as well as foregrounds for science teachers’ participation in professional development. Seven Danish science teachers were interviewed and observed. Three of these teachers exemplify...... how present experience contributes to aspired career foregrounds. Birger’s focus on the academic basis of the in-service program reflects his aspiration to become a teacher educator. Poul is focused on improving his present teaching and aspires to keep on teaching science. Karl is focused on how...

  3. The foregrounding of place in Trainspotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Cassandra; Jensen, Marie Møller; Thiesson, Tine Myrup

    2017-01-01

    (2003), Johnstone (2009, 2010, 2013), and Eckert’s (2008) work on indexicality, we argue that these linguistic features in Trainspotting function as indexical markers connecting the characters and the novel to place, more specifically to Scotland. In the analysis, we explore three channels through which......, place becomes foregrounded through the discourse surrounding language in the novel; throughout the novel, several characters comment on their own styles of speech and linguistic abilities, which highlights the focus on language and directs the reader’s attention hereto. Finally, the foregrounding...

  4. Planck intermediate results: XVII. Emission of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium from the far-infrared to microwave frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Delabrouille, J.

    2014-01-01

    from 23 to 353 GHz, which separate dust and anomalous microwave emission (AME). We show that the flattening of the dust SED can be accounted for with an additional component with a blackbody spectrum. This additional component, which accounts for (26 ± 6)% of the dust emission at 100GHz, could...... of the dust-Hi correlation. We identify a Galactic contribution to these residuals, which we model with variations of the dust emissivity on angular scales smaller than that of our correlation analysis. This model of the residuals is used to quantify uncertainties of the CIB power spectrum in a companion...

  5. Residence Times of Particles in Diffusive Protoplanetary Disk Environments II. Radial Motions and Applications to Dust Annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Ciesla, Fred J

    2011-01-01

    The origin of crystalline grains in comets and the outer regions of protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. It has been suggested that such grains form via annealing of amorphous precursors in the hot, inner region of a protoplanetary disk, where the temperatures needed for such transformations were found, and were then transported outward by some dynamical means. Here we develop a means of tracking the paths that dust grains would have taken through a diffusive protoplanetary disk and examine the types and ranges of environments that particles would have seen over a 10$^{6}$ year time period in the dynamic disk. We then combine this model with three annealing laws to examine how the dynamic evolution of amorphous grains would have led to their physical restructuring and their delivery to various regions of the disk. It is found that "sibling particles"-- those particles that reside at the same location at a given period of time--take a wide range of unique and independent paths through the disk to arrive the...

  6. Blind foreground subtraction for intensity mapping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, David; Bull, Philip; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santos, Mário G.

    2015-02-01

    We make use of a large set of fast simulations of an intensity mapping experiment with characteristics similar to those expected of the Square Kilometre Array in order to study the viability and limits of blind foreground subtraction techniques. In particular, we consider three different approaches: polynomial fitting, principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). We review the motivations and algorithms for the three methods, and show that they can all be described, using the same mathematical framework, as different approaches to the blind source separation problem. We study the efficiency of foreground subtraction both in the angular and radial (frequency) directions, as well as the dependence of this efficiency on different instrumental and modelling parameters. For well-behaved foregrounds and instrumental effects, we find that foreground subtraction can be successful to a reasonable level on most scales of interest. We also quantify the effect that the cleaning has on the recovered signal and power spectra. Interestingly, we find that the three methods yield quantitatively similar results, with PCA and ICA being almost equivalent.

  7. Foreground extraction for moving RGBD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junejo, Imran N.; Ahmed, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple method to perform foreground extraction for a moving RGBD camera. These cameras have now been available for quite some time. Their popularity is primarily due to their low cost and ease of availability. Although the field of foreground extraction or background subtraction has been explored by the computer vision researchers since a long time, the depth-based subtraction is relatively new and has not been extensively addressed as of yet. Most of the current methods make heavy use of geometric reconstruction, making the solutions quite restrictive. In this paper, we make a novel use RGB and RGBD data: from the RGB frame, we extract corner features (FAST) and then represent these features with the histogram of oriented gradients (HoG) descriptor. We train a non-linear SVM on these descriptors. During the test phase, we make used of the fact that the foreground object has distinct depth ordering with respect to the rest of the scene. That is, we use the positively classified FAST features on the test frame to initiate a region growing to obtain the accurate segmentation of the foreground object from just the RGBD data. We demonstrate the proposed method of a synthetic datasets, and demonstrate encouraging quantitative and qualitative results.

  8. The opacity of Spiral Disks IV : Radial Extinction Profiles from Counts of Distant Galaxies seen through Foreground Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, B. W.; González, R. A.; Allen, R. J.; Kruit, P.C. van der

    2004-01-01

    Dust extinction can be determined from the number of distant field galaxies seen through a spiral disk. To calibrate this number for the crowding and confusion introduced by the foreground image, Gonzalez et al. (1998) and Holwerda et al. (2005a) developed the ``Synthetic Field Method'' (SFM), which

  9. The opacity of spiral galaxy disks. IV. Radial extinction profiles from counts of distant galaxies seen through foreground disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, BW; Gonzalez, RA; Allen, RJ; van der Kruit, PC

    2005-01-01

    Dust extinction can be determined from the number of distant field galaxies seen through a spiral disk. To calibrate this number for the crowding and confusion introduced by the foreground image, Gonzalez et al. and Holwerda et al. developed the Synthetic Field Method (SFM), which analyzes synthetic

  10. Attenuation Modified by DIG and Dust as Seen in M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomičić, Neven; Kreckel, Kathryn; Groves, Brent; Schinnerer, Eva; Sandstrom, Karin; Kapala, Maria; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Leroy, Adam

    2017-08-01

    The spatial distribution of dust in galaxies affects the global attenuation, and hence inferred properties, of galaxies. We trace the spatial distribution of dust in five approximately kiloparsec fields of M31 by comparing optical attenuation with the total dust mass distribution. We measure the attenuation from the Balmer decrement using Integral Field Spectroscopy and the dust mass from Herschel far-IR observations. Our results show that M31's dust attenuation closely follows a foreground screen model, contrary to what was previously found in other nearby galaxies. By smoothing the M31 data, we find that spatial resolution is not the cause for this difference. Based on the emission-line ratios and two simple models, we conclude that previous models of dust/gas geometry need to include a weakly or non-attenuated diffuse ionized gas (DIG) component. Due to the variation of dust and DIG scale heights with galactic radius, we conclude that different locations in galaxies will have different vertical distributions of gas and dust and therefore different measured attenuation. The difference between our result in M31 with that found in other nearby galaxies can be explained by our fields in M31 lying at larger galactic radii than the previous studies that focused on the centers of galaxies.

  11. Foreground removal of 21 cm fluctuation with multifrequency fitting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ping He

    2009-01-01

    The 21 centimeter (21 cm) line emission from neutral hydrogen in the inter-galactic medium (IGM) at high redshifts is strongly contaminated by foreground sources such as the diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission and free-free emission from the Galaxy, as well as emission from extragalactic radio sources, thus making its observation very complicated. However, the 21 cm signal can be recovered through its structure in fre-quency space, as the power spectrum of the foreground contamination is expected to be smooth over a wide band in frequency space while the 21 cm fluctuations vary signifi-cantly. We use a simple polynomial fitting to reconstruct the 21 cm signal around four frequencies 50, 100, 150 and 200 MHz with an especially small channel width of 20 kHz. Our calculations show that this multifrequency fitting approach can effectively recover the 21 cm signal in the frequency range 100 ~ 200 MHz. However, this method doesn't work well around 50 MHz because of the low intensity of the 21 cm signal at this frequency. We also show that the fluctuation of detector noise can be suppressed to a very low level by taking long integration times, which means that we can reach a sensitivity of ≈ 10 mK at 150 MHz with 40 antennas in 120 hours of observations.

  12. A Literature Review of the Research On Foregrounding in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨凡

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to make a concise summary of the research on foregrounding in China over the past decade.The research on foregrounding in China can be mainly classified into four categories according to different focuses.

  13. Studying Interstellar Dust Grain Composition with X-ray Spectroscopic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia; Garcia, Javier; Smith, Randall; Wilms, Joern; Schulz, Norbert; Nowak, Mike; Baganoff, Frederick

    2015-10-01

    Interstellar dust in the foreground of bright point sources will scatter X-rays over arcminute scales, producing a diffuse halo image. The scattering halo intensity is strongly sensitive to the dust grain size distribution, spatial distribution, and composition of dust on the sight line. Currently, Chandra's spatial resolution makes it the best detector available for studying X-ray scattering halos from the diffuse ISM. A Chandra successor with similar resolution but larger effective area will lend a greater opportunity to study scattering echoes from low column densities of the diffuse interstellar or intergalactic medium. More importantly, the combination of high resolution spectroscopy with imaging is uniquely suited to studying the composition of dust grains. At soft energies in particular, the spectrum of scattered light is likely to have significant features at the 0.3 keV C-K and 0.5 O-K photoelectric absorption edges. This direct probe of ISM dust grain elements will be important for i understanding the relative abundances of graphitic grains or PAHs versus silicates, and ii measuring the depletion of gas phase elements into solid form.

  14. Multi-wavelength analysis of the dust emission in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Bot, C; Lagache, G; Cambresy, L; Egret, D

    2004-01-01

    We present an analysis of dust grain emission in the diffuse interstellar medium of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). This study is motivated by the availability of 170 microns ISOPHOT data covering a large part of the SMC, with a resolution enabling to disentangle the diffuse medium from the star forming regions. After data reduction and subtraction of Galactic foreground emission, we used the ISOPHOT data together with HiRes IRAS data and ATCA/Parkes combined HI column density maps to determine dust properties for the diffuse medium. We found a far infrared emissivity per hydrogen atom 30 times lower than the Solar Neighborhood value. The modeling of the spectral energy distribution of the dust, taking into account the enhanced interstellar radiation field, gives a similar conclusion for the smallest grains (PAHs and very small grains) emitting at shorter wavelength. Assuming Galactic dust composition in the SMC, this result implies a difference in the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) 3 times larger than the differe...

  15. A new thermal gradient ice nucleation diffusion chamber instrument: design, development and first results using Saharan mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kulkarni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Thermal Gradient ice nucleation Diffusion Chamber (TGDC capable of investigating ice nucleation efficiency of atmospherically important aerosols, termed Ice Nuclei (IN, has been designed, constructed and validated. The TGDC can produce a range of supersaturations with respect to ice (SSi over the temperature range of −10 to −34°C for sufficiently long time needed to observe the ice nucleation by the aerosol particles. The novel aspect of this new TGDC is that the chamber is run in static mode with aerosol particles supported on a Teflon substrate, which can be raised and lowered in a controlled way through the SSi profile within the chamber, and nucleation events are directly observed using digital photography. The TGDC consists of two ice coated plates to which a thermal gradient is applied to produce the range of SSi. The design of the TGDC gives the ability to understand time-related ice nucleation event information and to perform experiments at different temperatures and SSi conditions for different IN without changing the thermal gradient within the TGDC. The temperature and SSi conditions of the experimental system are validated by observing (NH42SO4 deliquescence and the results are in good agreement with the literature data. First results are presented of the onset ice nucleation for mineral dust sampled from the Saharan Desert, including images of nucleation and statistical distributions of onset ice nucleation SSi as a function of temperature. This paper illustrates how useful this new TGDC is for process level studies of ice nucleation and more experimental investigations are needed to better quantify the role of ice formation in the atmosphere.

  16. A new thermal gradient ice nucleation diffusion chamber instrument: design, development and first results using Saharan mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. McQuaid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new Thermal Gradient ice nucleation Diffusion Chamber (TGDC capable of investigating ice nucleation efficiency of atmospherically important aerosols, termed Ice Nuclei (IN, has been designed, constructed and validated. The TGDC can produce a range of supersaturations with respect to ice (SSi over the temperature range of −10 to −34°C for sufficiently long time needed to observe the ice nucleation by the particles. The novel aspect of this new TGDC is that the chamber is run in static mode with aerosol particles supported on a Teflon substrate, which can be raised and lowered in a controlled way through the SSi profile within the chamber, and nucleation events are directly observed using digital photography. The TGDC consists of two ice coated plates to which a thermal gradient is applied to produce the range of SSi. The design of the TGDC gives the ability to understand time-related ice nucleation event information and to perform experiments at different temperatures and SSi conditions for different IN without changing the thermal gradient within the TGDC. The temperature and SSi conditions of the experimental system are validated by observing (NH42SO4 deliquescence and the results are in good agreement with the literature data. First results are presented of the onset ice nucleation for mineral dust sampled from the Saharan Desert, including images of nucleation and statistical distributions of onset ice nucleation SSi as a function of temperature. This paper illustrates how useful this new TGDC is for process level studies of ice nucleation and more experimental investigations are needed to better quantify the role of ice formation in the atmosphere.

  17. Robust Abandoned Object Detection Using Dual Foregrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Haga

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to the tracking-based approaches that heavily depend on accurate detection of moving objects, which often fail for crowded scenarios, we present a pixelwise method that employs dual foregrounds to extract temporally static image regions. Depending on the application, these regions indicate objects that do not constitute the original background but were brought into the scene at a subsequent time, such as abandoned and removed items, illegally parked vehicles. We construct separate long- and short-term backgrounds that are implemented as pixelwise multivariate Gaussian models. Background parameters are adapted online using a Bayesian update mechanism imposed at different learning rates. By comparing each frame with these models, we estimate two foregrounds. We infer an evidence score at each pixel by applying a set of hypotheses on the foreground responses, and then aggregate the evidence in time to provide temporal consistency. Unlike optical flow-based approaches that smear boundaries, our method can accurately segment out objects even if they are fully occluded. It does not require on-site training to compensate for particular imaging conditions. While having a low-computational load, it readily lends itself to parallelization if further speed improvement is necessary.

  18. Isotropy-Violation Diagnostics for $B$-mode Polarization Foregrounds to the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Rotti, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Isotropy-violation statistics can highlight polarized galactic foregrounds that contaminate primordial $B$-modes in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We propose a particular isotropy-violation test and apply it to polarized Planck 353 GHz data, constructing an map that indicates $B$-mode foreground dust power over the sky. We build our main isotropy test in harmonic space via the bipolar spherical harmonic basis, and our method helps us to identify the least-contaminated directions. By this measure, there are regions of low foreground in and around the BICEP field, near the South Galactic Pole, and in the Northern Galactic Hemisphere. There is also a possible foreground feature in the BICEP field. We compare our results to those based on the local power spectrum, which is computed on discs using a version of the method of Planck Int.~XXX (2016). The discs method is closely related to our isotropy-violation diagnostic. We pay special care to the treatment of noise, including chance correlations with the f...

  19. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  20. Size distribution and diffuse pollution impacts of PAHs in street dust in urban streams in the Yangtze River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hongtao; YIN Chengqing; CHEN Meixue; WANG Weidong; Jefferies Chris; SHAN Baoqing

    2009-01-01

    Particles of dust washed off streets by stormwater are an important pathway of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into urban streams.This paper presents a comprehensive assessment of the size distribution of PAHs in street dust particles, the potential risks of the particles in urban streams, and the sources and sinks of PAHs in the stream network.This assessment is based on measurements of 16 PAHs from the USEPA priority list in street dust particles and river sediments in Xincheng, China.The content of total PAHs ranged from 1,629 to 8,986 μg/kg in street dust particles, where smaller particles have a higher concentrations.Approximately 55% of the total PAHs were associated with particles less than 250 μm which accounted for 40% of the total mass of street dust.The PAH quantities increased from 2.41 to 46.86 μg/m2 in the sequence of new residential, rising through main roads, old town residential, commercial and industrial areas.The sediments in stream reaches in town were found to be sinks for street dust particle PAHs.The research findings suggest that particle size, land use and the hydrological conditions in the stream network were the factors which most influenced the total loads of PAH in the receiving water bodies.

  1. Size distribution and diffuse pollution impacts of PAHs in street dust in urban streams in the Yangtze River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Yin, Chengqing; Chen, Meixue; Wang, Weidong; Jefferies, Chris; Shan, Baoqing

    2009-01-01

    Particles of dust washed off streets by stormwater are an important pathway of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into urban streams. This article presented a comprehensive assessment of the size distribution of PAHs in street dust particles, the potential risks of the particles in urban streams, and the sources and sinks of PAHs in the stream network. This assessment was based on measurements of 16 PAHs from the USEPA priority list in street dust particles and river sediments in Xincheng, China. The content of total PAHs ranged from 1629 to 8986 microg/kg in street dust particles, where smaller particles have a higher concentrations. Approximately 55% of the total PAHs were associated with particles less than 250 microm which accounted for 40% of the total mass of street dust. The PAH quantities increased from 2.41 to 46.86 microg/m2 in the sequence of new residential, rising through main roads, old town residential, commercial and industrial areas. The sediments in stream reaches in town were found to be sinks for street dust particle PAHs. The research findings suggested that particle size, land use and the hydrological conditions in the stream network were the factors which most influenced the total loads of PAH in the receiving water bodies.

  2. Foreground removal from Planck Sky Model temperature maps using a MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Hebert, K.

    2009-01-01

    Unfortunately, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is contaminated by emission originating in the Milky Way (synchrotron, free-free and dust emission). Since the cosmological information is statistically in nature, it is essential to remove this foreground emission and leave the CMB...... with no systematic errors. To demonstrate the feasibility of a simple multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network for extracting the CMB temperature signal, we have analyzed a specific data set, namely the Planck Sky Model maps, developed for evaluation of different component separation methods before including them...... in the Planck data analysis pipeline. It is found that a MLP neural network can provide a CMB map of about 80% of the sky to a very high degree uncorrelated with the foreground components. Also the derived power spectrum shows little evidence for systematic errors....

  3. Microwave Emission from Aligned Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2003-01-01

    Polarized microwave emission from dust is an important foreground that may contaminate polarized CMB studies unless carefully accounted for. We discuss potential difficulties associated with this foreground, namely, the existence of different grain populations with very different emission/polarization properties and variations of the polarization yield with grain temperature. In particular, we discuss observational evidence in favor of rotational emission from tiny PAH particles with dipole moments, i.e. ``spinning dust'', and also consider magneto-dipole emission from strongly magnetized grains. We argue that in terms of polarization, the magneto-dipole emission may dominate even if its contribution to total emissivity is subdominant. Addressing polarized emission at frequencies larger than approsimately 100 GHz, we discuss the complications arising from the existence of dust components with different temperatures and possibly different alignment properties.

  4. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Misawa, R; Ade, P; Andre, Y; deBernardis, P; Bouzit, M; Charra, M; Crane, B; Dubois, J P; Engel, C; Griffin, M; Hargrave, P; Leriche, B; Longval, Y; Maes, S; Marty, C; Marty, W; Masi, S; Mot, B; Narbonne, J; Pajot, F; Pisano, G; Ponthieu, N; Ristorcelli, I; Rodriguez, L; Roudil, G; Salatino, M; Savini, G; Tucker, C

    2014-01-01

    Future cosmology space missions will concentrate on measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, which potentially carries invaluable information about the earliest phases of the evolution of our universe. Such ambitious projects will ultimately be limited by the sensitivity of the instrument and by the accuracy at which polarized foreground emission from our own Galaxy can be subtracted out. We present the PILOT balloon project which will aim at characterizing one of these foreground sources, the polarization of the dust continuum emission in the diffuse interstellar medium. The PILOT experiment will also constitute a test-bed for using multiplexed bolometer arrays for polarization measurements. We present the results of ground tests obtained just before the first flight of the instrument.

  5. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, J.-Ph.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Bautista, L.; Bray, N.; Bernardis, P. de; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P.; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Longval, Y.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Mot, B.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-08-01

    Future cosmology space missions will concentrate on measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, which potentially carries invaluable information about the earliest phases of the evolution of our universe. Such ambitious projects will ultimately be limited by the sensitivity of the instrument and by the accuracy at which polarized foreground emission from our own Galaxy can be subtracted out. We present the PILOT balloon project, which aims at characterizing one of these foreground sources, the polarized continuum emission by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The PILOT experiment also constitutes a test-bed for using multiplexed bolometer arrays for polarization measurements. This paper presents the instrument and its expected performances. Performance measured during ground calibrations of the instrument and in flight will be described in a forthcoming paper.

  6. Robust video foreground segmentation and face recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Ye-peng

    2009-01-01

    Face recognition provides a natural visual interface for human computer interaction (HCI) applications.The process of face recognition,however,is inhibited by variations in the appearance of face images caused by changes in lighting,expression,viewpoint,aging and introduction of occlusion.Although various algorithms have been presented for face recognition,face recognition is still a very challenging topic.A novel approach of real time face recognition for HCI is proposed in the paper.In view of the limits of the popular approaches to foreground segmentation,wavelet multi-scale transform based background subtraction is developed to extract foreground objects.The optimal selection of the threshold is automatically determined,which does not require any complex supervised training or manual experimental calibration.A robust real time face recognition algorithm is presented,which combines the projection matrixes without iteration and kernel Fisher discriminant analysis (KFDA) to overcome some difficulties existing in the real face recognition.Superior performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by comparing with other algorithms through experiments.The proposed algorithm can also be applied to the video image sequences of natural HCI.

  7. Adaptive Contour Model for Real-Time Foreground Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ying; DING Xiaoqing

    2005-01-01

    A multiscale foreground detection method was developed to segment moving objects from a stationary background. The algorithm is based on a fixed-mesh-based contour model, which starts at the bounding box of the difference map between an input image and its background and ends at a final contour. An adaptive algorithm was developed to calculate an appropriate energy threshold to control the contours to identify the foreground silhouettes. Experiments show that this method more successfully ignores the negative influence of image noise to obtain an accurate foreground map than other foreground detection algorithms. Most shadow pixels are also eliminated by this method.

  8. Lifetime occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes is associated with bronchitis symptoms and higher diffusion capacity in COPD patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, E.; Ferrer, J.; Zock, J.P.; Serra, I.; Antó, J.M.; Batlle, J. de; Kromhout, H.; Vermeulen, R.; Donaire-Gonzalez, D.; Benet, M.; Balcells, E.; Monso, E.; Gayete, A.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes has been associated with reduced FEV1 and sputum production in COPD patients. The effect of occupational exposure on other characteristics of COPD, especially those reflecting emphysema, has not been studied in these patients. Methods: We s

  9. Lifetime occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes is associated with bronchitis symptoms and higher diffusion capacity in COPD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Esther; Ferrer, Jaume; Zock, Jan Paul; Serra, Ignasi; Antó, Josep M.; De Batlle, Jordi; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Donaire-González, David; Benet, Marta; Balcells, Eva; Monsó, Eduard; Gayete, Àngel; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Guerra, Stefano; Gea, Joaquim; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Vollmer, Ivan; Barberà, Joan Albert; Gómez, Federico P.; Paré, Carles; Roca, Josep; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Agustí, Àlvar; Freixa, Xavier; Rodriguez, Diego A.; Gimeno, Elena; Portillo, Karina; Andreu, Jordi; Pallissa, Esther; Casan, Pere; Güell, Rosa; Giménez, Ana; Marín, Alicia; Morera, Josep; Farrero, Eva; Escarrabill, Joan; Ferrer, Antoni; Sauleda, Jaume; Togores, Bernat; Gáldiz, Juan Bautista; López, Lorena; Belda, José

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes has been associated with reduced FEV1 and sputum production in COPD patients. The effect of occupational exposure on other characteristics of COPD, especially those reflecting emphysema, has not been studied in these patients.\

  10. Lifetime occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes is associated with bronchitis symptoms and higher diffusion capacity in COPD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Esther; Ferrer, Jaume; Zock, Jan Paul; Serra, Ignasi; Antó, Josep M.; De Batlle, Jordi; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Donaire-González, David; Benet, Marta; Balcells, Eva; Monsó, Eduard; Gayete, Àngel; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Guerra, Stefano; Gea, Joaquim; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Vollmer, Ivan; Barberà, Joan Albert; Gómez, Federico P.; Paré, Carles; Roca, Josep; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Agustí, Àlvar; Freixa, Xavier; Rodriguez, Diego A.; Gimeno, Elena; Portillo, Karina; Andreu, Jordi; Pallissa, Esther; Casan, Pere; Güell, Rosa; Giménez, Ana; Marín, Alicia; Morera, Josep; Farrero, Eva; Escarrabill, Joan; Ferrer, Antoni; Sauleda, Jaume; Togores, Bernat; Gáldiz, Juan Bautista; López, Lorena; Belda, José

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes has been associated with reduced FEV1 and sputum production in COPD patients. The effect of occupational exposure on other characteristics of COPD, especially those reflecting emphysema, has not been studied in these patients.\

  11. Compressive Background Modeling for Foreground Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust and efficient foreground extraction is a crucial topic in many computer vision applications. In this paper, we propose an accurate and computationally efficient background subtraction method. The key idea is to reduce the data dimensionality of image frame based on compressive sensing and in the meanwhile apply sparse representation to build the current background by a set of preceding background images. According to greedy iterative optimization, the background image and background subtracted image can be recovered by using a few compressive measurements. The proposed method is validated through multiple challenging video sequences. Experimental results demonstrate the fact that the performance of our approach is comparable to those of existing classical background subtraction techniques.

  12. A 100-3000 GHz model of thermal dust emission observed by Planck, DIRBE and IRAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. (1999) two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck HFI maps. This parametrization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single modified blackbody (MBB) dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. (1999) based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.1' resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.1' FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration (2013) single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anistropy on small angular scales. We have recently released maps and associated software utilities for obtaining thermal dust emission and reddening predictions using our Planck-based two-component model.

  13. Robust Background Subtraction with Foreground Validation for Urban Traffic Video

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, S S; Kamath, C

    2004-01-15

    Identifying moving objects in a video sequence is a fundamental and critical task in many computer-vision applications. Background subtraction techniques are commonly used to separate foreground moving objects from the background. Most background subtraction techniques assume a single rate of adaptation, which is inadequate for complex scenes such as a traffic intersection where objects are moving at different and varying speeds. In this paper, we propose a foreground validation algorithm that first builds a foreground mask using a slow-adapting Kalman filter, and then validates individual foreground pixels by a simple moving object model, built using both the foreground and background statistics as well as the frame difference. Ground-truth experiments with urban traffic sequences show that our proposed algorithm significantly improves upon results using only Kalman filter or frame-differencing, and outperforms other techniques based on mixture of Gaussians, median filter, and approximated media filter.

  14. Statistical Diagnostics to Identify Galactic Foregrounds in B -Mode Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D.

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in the search for inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background polarization motivate the search for new diagnostics to distinguish the Galactic foreground contribution to B modes from the cosmic signal. We show that B modes from these foregrounds should exhibit a local hexadecapolar departure in power from statistical isotropy (SI). We present a simple algorithm to search for a uniform SI violation of this sort, as may arise in a sufficiently small patch of sky. We then show how to search for these effects if the orientation of the SI violation varies across the survey region, as is more likely to occur in surveys with more sky coverage. If detected, these departures from Gaussianity would indicate some level of Galactic foreground contamination in the B -mode maps. Given uncertainties about foreground properties, though, caution should be exercised in attributing a null detection to an absence of foregrounds.

  15. Foregrounds in Wide-Field Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Bowman, Judd D; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bernardi, G; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Dillon, Joshua S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P; Kratzenberg, E; Lenc, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B; Pober, J C; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, Shiv K; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Sullivan, I S; Tegmark, M; Tingay, S J; Trott, C M; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S B

    2015-01-01

    Detection of 21 cm emission of HI from the epoch of reionization, at redshifts z>6, is limited primarily by foreground emission. We investigate the signatures of wide-field measurements and an all-sky foreground model using the delay spectrum technique that maps the measurements to foreground object locations through signal delays between antenna pairs. We demonstrate interferometric measurements are inherently sensitive to all scales, including the largest angular scales, owing to the nature of wide-field measurements. These wide-field effects are generic to all observations but antenna shapes impact their amplitudes substantially. A dish-shaped antenna yields the most desirable features from a foreground contamination viewpoint, relative to a dipole or a phased array. Comparing data from recent Murchison Widefield Array observations, we demonstrate that the foreground signatures that have the largest impact on the HI signal arise from power received far away from the primary field of view. We identify diffu...

  16. Extended Anomalous Foreground Emission in the WMAP 3-Year Data

    CERN Document Server

    Dobler, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    We study the spectral and morphological characteristics of the diffuse Galactic emission in the WMAP temperature data using a template-based multi-linear regression, and obtain the following results. 1. We confirm previous observations of a bump in the dust-correlated spectrum, consistent with the Draine & Lazarian spinning dust model. 2. We also confirm the "haze" signal in the inner Galaxy, and argue that it does not follow a free-free spectrum as first thought, but instead is synchrotron emission from a hard electron cosmic-ray population. 3. In a departure from previous work, we allow the spectrum of Halpha-correlated emission (which is used to trace the free-free component) to float in the fit, and find that it does not follow the expected free-free spectrum. Instead there is a bump near 50 GHz, modifying the spectrum at the 20% level, which we speculate is caused by spinning dust in the warm ionized medium. 4. The derived cross-correlation spectra are not sensitive to the map zero points, but are se...

  17. Some Doubts on the Validity of the Foreground Galactic Contribution Subtraction from Microwave Anisotropies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Martín López-Corredoira

    2007-06-01

    The Galactic foreground contamination in CMBR anisotropies, especially from the dust component, is not easily separable from the cosmological or extragalactic component. In this paper, some doubts will be raised concerning the validity of the methods used until now to remove Galactic dust emission and will show that none of them achieves its goal. First, I review the recent bibliography on the topic and discuss critically the methods of foreground subtraction: the cross-correlation with templates, analysis assuming the spectral shape of the Galactic components, the ``maximum entropy method”, ``internal linear combination”, and ``wavelet-based high resolution fitting of internal templates”. Second, I analyse the Galactic latitude dependence from WMAP data. The frequency dependence is discussed with data in the available literature. The result is that all methods of subtracting the Galactic contamination are inaccurate. The Galactic latitude dependence analysis or the frequency dependence of the anisotropies in the range 50–250 GHz put a constraint on the maximum Galactic contribution in the power spectrum to be less than ∼ 10% (68% C. L.) for an ∼ 1 degree scale, and possibly higher for larger scales. The origin of most of the signals in the CMBR anisotropies is not Galactic. In any case, the subtraction of the galaxy is not accurate enough to allow a ``precision Cosmology”; other sources of contamination (extragalactic, solar system) are also present.

  18. Connecting The Interstellar Gas And Dust Properties Of Distant Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varsha

    The properties of interstellar gas and dust in distant galaxies are fundamental parameters in constraining galaxy evolution models. Quasar absorption systems (QASs), which trace intervening galaxies along the sightlines to luminous background quasars, provide invaluable tools to directly study gas and dust in distant normal galaxies. Recent studies of QASs have found interesting trends in both gas and dust properties, such as correlations in metallicity with redshift and dust depletions. Our Spitzer spectroscopic studies also indicate that silicate dust grains are present in QASs, and in fact, at a level higher than expected for diffuse gas in the Milky Way. Moreover, the silicate dust grains in these distant galaxies may be substantially more crystalline than those in the Milky Way interstellar medium. We now propose a comprehensive study of the gas and dust properties of all QASs with strong Ly-alpha and/or metal absorption lines that have adequate archival IR data to probe the study of dust. Our analysis will include data primarily from the NASA-supported Spitzer, Herschel, HST, and Keck Observatory archives, along with a small amount of VLT/SDSS archival data. Our specific goals are as follows: (1) We will measure a large range of metal absorption lines in high-resolution quasar spectra from Keck, HST, and VLT archives to uniformly determine the metallicity, dust depletions, ionization, and star formation rates in the foreground QASs. In particular, we will study the variations in these quantities with gas velocity, using Voigt profile fitting techniques to determine the velocity structure. This analysis will also allow us to quantify the kinematics of the absorbing gas. (2) We will use archival Spitzer IRS quasar spectra to search for and measure the strengths of the 10 and 18 micron silicate dust absorption features for a much larger sample of QASs than previously studied. (3) We will fit the observed silicate absorption features in the Spitzer archival

  19. Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The polarized thermal emission from diffuse Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100 GHz. In this paper we exploit the uniqueness of the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353 GHz to measure the polarized dust angular power spectra CℓEE and CℓBB over the multipole range 40 <ℓ< 600 well away from the Galactic plane. These measurements will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and allow a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. Despite the non-Gaussian and anisotropic nature of Galactic dust, we show that general statistical properties of the emission can be characterized accurately over large fractions of the sky using angular power spectra. The polarization power spectra of the dust are well described by power laws in multipole, Cℓ ∝ ℓα, with exponents αEE,BB = -2.42 ± 0.02. The amplitudes of the polarization power spectra vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity power spectra. The frequency dependence of the dust polarization spectra is consistent with modified blackbody emission with βd = 1.59 and Td = 19.6 K down to the lowest Planck HFI frequencies. We find a systematic difference between the amplitudes of the Galactic B- and E-modes, CℓBB/CℓEE = 0.5. We verify that these general properties are preserved towards high Galactic latitudes with low dust column densities. We show that even in the faintest dust-emitting regions there are no "clean" windows in the sky where primordial CMB B-mode polarization measurements could be made without subtraction of foreground emission. Finally, we investigate the level of dust polarization in the specific field recently targeted by the BICEP2 experiment. Extrapolation of the Planck 353 GHz data to 150 GHz gives a dust power 𝒟ℓBB ≡ ℓ(ℓ+1)CℓBB/(2π) of 1.32 × 10-2 μKCMB2 over the multipole range

  20. Modeling Thermal Dust Emission with Two Components: Application to the Planck High Frequency Instrument Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales.

  1. Toward an Understanding of Foreground Emission in the BICEP2 Region

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    BICEP2 has reported the detection of a degree-scale B-mode polarization pattern in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and has interpreted the measurement as evidence for primordial gravitational waves. Motivated by the profound importance of the discovery of gravitational waves from the early Universe, I will discuss to what extent a combination of Galactic foregrounds and lensed E-modes could be responsible for the signal. I will present independent estimates of the dust polarization signal in the BICEP2 region using several different approaches. These estimates of the dust polarization signal in the BICEP2 region are consistent with each other, but the expected amplitude of the dust polarization power spectrum is uncertain by about a factor of three. The lower end of the prediction leaves room for a primordial contribution, but at the higher end the dust in combination with the standard CMB lensing signal could account for the BICEP2 observations, without requiring the existence of primordial gravitatio...

  2. Dust evolution, a global view: II. Top-down branching, nanoparticle fragmentation and the mystery of the diffuse interstellar band carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The origin of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), one of the longest-standing mysteries of the interstellar medium (ISM), is explored within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS). The likely nature of the DIB carriers and their evolution is here explored within the framework of the structures and sub-structures inherent to doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon grains in the ISM. Based on the natural aromatic-rich moieties (asphaltenes) recovered from coal and oil, the likely structure of their interstellar analogues is investigated within the context of the diffuse band problem. It is here proposed that the top-down evolution of interstellar carbonaceous grains, and, in particular, a-C(:H) nanoparticles, is at the heart of the formation and evolution of the DIB carriers and their associations with small molecules and radicals, such as C2, C3, CH and CN. It is most probable that the DIBs are carried by dehydrogenated, ionized, hetero-cyclic, olefinic and aromatic-rich moieties that form an integral part of the contiguous structure of hetero-atom-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles and their daughter fragmentation products. Within this framework, it is proposed that polyene structures in all their variants could be viable DIB carrier candidates.

  3. Optimization of the Regularization in Background and Foreground Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Qi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and foreground modeling is a typical method in the application of computer vision. The current general “low-rank + sparse” model decomposes the frames from the video sequences into low-rank background and sparse foreground. But the sparse assumption in such a model may not conform with the reality, and the model cannot directly reflect the correlation between the background and foreground either. Thus, we present a novel model to solve this problem by decomposing the arranged data matrix D into low-rank background L and moving foreground M. Here, we only need to give the priori assumption of the background to be low-rank and let the foreground be separated from the background as much as possible. Based on this division, we use a pair of dual norms, nuclear norm and spectral norm, to regularize the foreground and background, respectively. Furthermore, we use a reweighted function instead of the normal norm so as to get a better and faster approximation model. Detailed explanation based on linear algebra about our two models will be presented in this paper. By the observation of the experimental results, we can see that our model can get better background modeling, and even simplified versions of our algorithms perform better than mainstream techniques IALM and GoDec.

  4. POTENTIAL APPLICATION FOREGROUND OF OCEAN MODE IN NAVY OCEANOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ocean mode (or quasigeostrophic wave) analysis is one of the key data processing technique in Oceanic Acoustic Tomography Experiment. In this paper, a primary study on its application foreground in Navy Oceanography is put forward with CTD data and Carton oceanic assimilation data. It shows that the sound speed mode is not well orthogonal to each other, so that it is practically no use. However, the current mode calculated from the CTD data collected in summer at the position with weak stochastic processes and strong geostrophic balance is well orthogonal to each other, it can be used everywhere in the ocean of the similar water mass at any time as long as the basic condition serves. It can be used for decomposition and reconstruction of dynamic or quasi-dynamic factors such as seawater temperature, from which and average of salinity the sound speed profile can be composed. It also shows that the monthly James Carton assimilation data is well consistent with observation in subsurface layer in the region with weak current speed but not well below subsurface layer or near the Kuroshio in the western Pacific. By running a nested ocean general circulation model with adjusted vertical eddy diffusivity to do data assimilation again and applying current mode analysis to reconstruct or compose related factors, it is hopefully possible to improve the precision and space resolution of the oceanic assimilation data. So that, it is definitely possible to obtain the three dimensional high resolution distribution of ocean sound speed in real time with the satellite SST and surface wind fields only.

  5. Postmortem endogenous ethanol production and diffusion from the lung due to aspiration of wood chip dust in the work place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumiya, Junichi; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Akinori; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki

    2011-07-01

    We report an autopsy case of postmortem ethanol diffusion into the cardiac blood after aspiration of wood chips, although antemortem ethanol consumption was not evident. A man in his twenties, who was loading a truck with small wood chips in a hot, humid storehouse, was accidentally buried in a heap of chips. At the time the body was discovered, 20 h after the accident, rectal temperature was 36°C. Autopsy showed the cause of death to be asphyxia due to obstruction of the airway by aspiration of wood chips. The ethanol and n-propanol levels were significantly higher in the lungs (left, 0.603 and 0.009 mg/g; right, 0.571 and 0.006 mg/g) than in other tissues. A significant difference in ethanol concentration was observed between the left cardiac blood (0.243 mg/g) and the right femoral blood (0.042 mg/g). Low levels of ethanol and n-propanol were detected in the stomach contents (0.105 and 0.001 mg/g, respectively). In order to determine whether aspiration of wood chips affects postmortem ethanol production in the lung, we measured the ethanol and n-propanol levels of homogenized rabbit lung tissue incubated with autoclaved or non-autoclaved wood chips. Levels of ethanol and n-propanol were significantly higher in the homogenates incubated with non-autoclaved chips for 24h. The results of this animal experiment suggested that the ethanol detected in the lung was produced by putrefactive bacteria within the wood chips. After death, the ethanol produced endogenously in the lung appears to have diffused and affected the ethanol concentration of the left cardiac blood.

  6. Foreground removal from WMAP 7yr polarization maps using an MLP neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, H U Nørgaard -

    2012-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems in extracting the cosmic microwave background signal (CMB) from millimeter/submillimeter observations is the pollution by emission from the Milky Way: synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust emission. To extract the fundamental cosmological parameters from CMB signal, it is mandatory to minimize this pollution since it will create systematic errors in the CMB power spectra. In previous investigations, it has been demonstrated that the neural network method provide high quality CMB maps from temperature data. Here the analysis is extended to polarization maps. As a concrete example, the WMAP 7-year polarization data, the most reliable determination of the polarization properties of the CMB, has been analysed. The analysis has adopted the frequency maps, noise models, window functions and the foreground models as provided by the WMAP Team, and no auxiliary data is included. Within this framework it is demonstrated that the network can extract the CMB polarization signal with no ...

  7. Foreground removal from WMAP 7 yr polarization maps using an MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems in extracting the cosmic microwave background signal (CMB) from millimeter/submillimeter observations is the pollution by emission from the Milky Way: synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust emission. To extract the fundamental cosmological parameters from CMB...... signal, it is mandatory to minimize this pollution since it will create systematic errors in the CMB power spectra. In previous investigations, it has been demonstrated that the neural network method provide high quality CMB maps from temperature data. Here the analysis is extended to polarization maps....... As a concrete example, the WMAP 7-year polarization data, the most reliable determination of the polarization properties of the CMB, has been analyzed. The analysis has adopted the frequency maps, noise models, window functions and the foreground models as provided by the WMAP Team, and no auxiliary data...

  8. Galactic dust properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for variations in the dust emissivity law with temperature and wavelength. A recent dust emission model, called TLS model (for two-level systems), based on the description of the disordered internal structure of the amorphous dust grains has been developped to interpret observations in the far-infrared/submillimeter (FIR/submm) domain. A recent work focusing on the comparison between data of the diffuse interstellar medium seen by FIRAS-WMAP, as well as Archeops compact sources, with the TLS model allowed us to constrain the model parameters characterizing the general Galactic dust properties. Using the newly available Herschel/Hi-GAL data of the inner Galactic plane, we report a 500 μm emissivity excess in the peripheral parts of the Galactic plane, that can reach up to 20% of the emissivity. Results of the TLS modeling indicate significant changes in the dust properties from the central to peripheral parts of the Galactic plane.

  9. Improving video foreground segmentation with an object-like pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoliu; Lv, Wei; Liu, Huawei; You, Xing; Li, Baoqing; Yuan, Xiaobing

    2015-03-01

    Foreground segmentation in video frames is quite valuable for object and activity recognition, while the existing approaches often demand training data or initial annotation, which is expensive and inconvenient. We propose an automatic and unsupervised method of foreground segmentation given an unlabeled and short video. The pixel-level optical flow and binary mask features are converted into the normal probabilistic superpixels, therefore, they are adaptable to build the superpixel-level conditional random field which aims to label the foreground and background. We exploit the fact that the appearance and motion features of the moving object are temporally and spatially coherent in general, to construct an object-like pool and background-like pool via the previous segmented results. The continuously updated pools can be regarded as the "prior" knowledge of the current frame to provide a reliable way to learn the features of the object. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach exceeds the current methods, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  10. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Jaffe, Andrew H.

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)~1.3×10-4, σ(nt)~0.03, σ( ns )~1.8×10

  11. Automatic Foreground Extraction Based on Difference of Gaussian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel algorithm for automatic foreground extraction based on difference of Gaussian (DoG is presented. In our algorithm, DoG is employed to find the candidate keypoints of an input image in different color layers. Then, a keypoints filter algorithm is proposed to get the keypoints by removing the pseudo-keypoints and rebuilding the important keypoints. Finally, Normalized cut (Ncut is used to segment an image into several regions and locate the foreground with the number of keypoints in each region. Experiments on the given image data set demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  12. A Bayesian analysis of redshifted 21-cm HI signal and foregrounds: Simulations for LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Abhik; Chapman, Emma; Jelic, Vibor

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the EoR with the 21-cm hyperfine emission of neutral hydrogen (HI) promise to open an entirely new window onto the formation of the first stars, galaxies and accreting black holes. In order to characterize the weak 21-cm signal, we need to develop imaging techniques which can reconstruct the extended emission very precisely. Here, we present an inversion technique for LOFAR baselines at NCP, based on a Bayesian formalism with optimal spatial regularization, which is used to reconstruct the diffuse foreground map directly from the simulated visibility data. We notice the spatial regularization de-noises the images to a large extent, allowing one to recover the 21-cm power-spectrum over a considerable $k_{\\perp}-k_{\\para}$ space in the range of $0.03\\,{\\rm Mpc^{-1}}foreground removal...

  13. Fugitive dust emissions due to car traffic on streets in Vienna; Diffuse Staubemissionen durch den Fahrzeugverkehr auf den Strassen der Stadt Wien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeflinger, W.; Koschutnig, W. [Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik, Umwelttechnik und Technische Biowissenschaften der Technischen Univ. Wien (Austria)

    2003-10-01

    Fugitive dust emissions resulting from street car traffic in the city of Vienna were determined over a period of 17 months. The emission factor over the measuring period was calculated by measuring the silt content (sL-value) of different selected streets and using the available traffic count data. It is shown, that strewing crushed stone on streets in winter has a major influence on fugitive dust emission. A comparison of these emission factors with ambient air measuring data over the same measuring period shows parallel curves, which shows that resuspension of the dust deposited on streets affects air quality in the city of Vienna. (orig.)

  14. 多孔介质散射器对滤筒除尘器清灰性能的影响研究%Effect of Diffusers Based on Porous Media on the Dust Cleaning in Cartridge Filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岚溪; 胥海伦; 刘东; 叶会文

    2016-01-01

    Due to the losing efficacy of the dust-cleaning at the top of the cartridge filters and the overlarge pressure at the bottom, this paper proposes to interfere the dust-cleaning fluid flow in the cartridge filters with gas diffusers based on porous media. The influence of the inlet-pressure and the diffusers based on porous media on these characteristics is simulated. Results are as follows. At the same inlet-pressure of the nozzles, the dust-cleaning performance shows the best when the porosity of the porous media is 0.87. At the same porosity of the porous media, the dust-cleaning performance shows the best when the inlet-pressure of the nozzles is 0.5MPa.%现有滤筒除尘器清灰存在滤筒顶部失效,底部压力太大的缺点,提出采用多孔介质气体散射器进行干扰滤筒除尘器内清灰的流场,并采用数值方法进行计算,结果表明:喷嘴进口压力相同情况下,多孔介质气流散射器孔隙率为0.87时清灰性能最好;多孔介质气流散射器孔隙率相同情况下,喷嘴进口压力为0.5MPa时清灰性能最好。

  15. Continuum Foreground Polarization and Na I Absorption in Type Ia SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelaya, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Baade, D.; Höflich, P.; Maund, J.; Patat, F.; Quinn, J. R.; Reilly, E.; Wang, L.; Wheeler, J. C.; Förster, F.; González-Gaitán, S.

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of the continuum polarization over the 400–600 nm range of 19 SNe Ia obtained with FORS at the VLT. We separate them into those that show Na i D lines at the velocity of their hosts and those that do not. Continuum polarization of the sodium sample near maximum light displays a broad range of values, from extremely polarized cases like SN 2006X to almost unpolarized ones like SN 2011ae. The non-sodium sample shows, typically, smaller polarization values. The continuum polarization of the sodium sample in the 400–600 nm range is linear with wavelength and can be characterized by the mean polarization ({P}{mean}). Its values span a wide range and show a linear correlation with color, color excess, and extinction in the visual band. Larger dispersion correlations were found with the equivalent width of the Na i D and Ca ii H and K lines, and also a noisy relation between {P}{mean} and R V , the ratio of total to selective extinction. Redder SNe show stronger continuum polarization, with larger color excesses and extinctions. We also confirm that high continuum polarization is associated with small values of R V . The correlation between extinction and polarization—and polarization angles—suggest that the dominant fraction of dust polarization is imprinted in interstellar regions of the host galaxies. We show that Na i D lines from foreground matter in the SN host are usually associated with non-galactic ISM, challenging the typical assumptions in foreground interstellar polarization models. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programs 068.D-0571(A), 069.D-0438(A), 070.D-0111(A), 076.D-0178(A), 079.D-0090(A), 080.D-0108(A), 081.D-0558(A), 085.D-0731(A), and 086.D-0262(A). Also based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto (Spain).

  16. EVIDENCE FOR ANOMALOUS DUST-CORRELATED EMISSION AT 8 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Michelle; Page, Lyman [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Dunkley, Joanna [Sub-department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-20

    In 1969 Edward Conklin measured the anisotropy in celestial emission at 8 GHz with a resolution of 16.{sup 0}2 and used the data to report a detection of the cosmic microwave background dipole. Given the paucity of 8 GHz observations over large angular scales and the clear evidence for non-power-law Galactic emission near 8 GHz, a new analysis of Conklin's data is informative. In this paper, we compare Conklin's data to that from Haslam et al. (0.4 GHz), Reich and Reich (1.4 GHz), and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP; 23-94 GHz). We show that the spectral index between Conklin's data and the 23 GHz WMAP data is {beta} = -1.7 {+-} 0.1, where we model the emission temperature as T{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {beta}}. Free-free emission has {beta} Almost-Equal-To - 2.15 and synchrotron emission has {beta} Almost-Equal-To - 2.7 to -3. Thermal dust emission ({beta} Almost-Equal-To 1.7) is negligible at 8 GHz. We conclude that there must be another distinct non-power-law component of diffuse foreground emission that emits near 10 GHz, consistent with other observations in this frequency range. By comparing to the full complement of data sets, we show that a model with an anomalous emission component, assumed to be spinning dust, is preferred over a model without spinning dust at 5{sigma} ({Delta}{chi}{sup 2} = 31). However, the source of the new component cannot be determined uniquely.

  17. Foreground simulations for the LOFAR - Epoch of Reionization Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jelic, Vibor; Labropoulos, Panagiotis; Thomas, Rajat M; Bernardi, Gianni; Brentjens, Michiel; de Bruyn, Ger; Ciardi, Benedetta; Harker, Geraint; Koopmans, Leon V E; Pandey, Vishambhar; Schaye, Joop; Yatawatta, Sarod

    2008-01-01

    Future high redshift 21-cm experiments will suffer from a high degree of contamination, due both to astrophysical foregrounds and to non-astrophysical and instrumental effects. In order to reliably extract the cosmological signal from the observed data, it is essential to understand very well all data components and their influence on the extracted signal. Here we present simulated astrophysical foregrounds datacubes and discuss their possible statistical effects on the data. The foreground maps are produced assuming 5 deg x 5 deg windows that match those expected to be observed by the LOFAR Epoch-of-Reionization (EoR) key science project. We show that with the expected LOFAR-EoR sky and receiver noise levels, which amount to ~52 mK at 150 MHz after 300 hours of total observing time, a simple polynomial fit allows a statistical reconstruction of the signal. We also show that the polynomial fitting will work for maps with realistic yet idealised instrument response, i.e., a response that includes only a unifor...

  18. Selection between foreground models for global 21-cm experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Harker, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    The precise form of the foregrounds for sky-averaged measurements of the 21-cm line during and before the epoch of reionization is unknown. We suggest that the level of complexity in the foreground models used to fit global 21-cm data should be driven by the data, under a Bayesian model selection methodology. A first test of this approach is carried out by applying nested sampling to simplified models of global 21-cm data to compute the Bayesian evidence for the models. If the foregrounds are assumed to be polynomials of order n in log-log space, we can infer the necessity to use n=4 rather than n=3 with <2h of integration with limited frequency coverage, for reasonable values of the n=4 coefficient. Using a higher-order polynomial does not necessarily prevent a significant detection of the 21-cm signal. Even for n=8, we can obtain very strong evidence distinguishing a reasonable model for the signal from a null model with 128h of integration. More subtle features of the signal may, however, be lost if the...

  19. Foreground Removal in 21cm Surveys of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovic, Nada

    2010-01-01

    It is well-known that foreground subtraction in 21cm surveys removes large scale power. We investigate associated systematic biases. We show that removing line-of-sight fluctuations on large scales aliases into suppression of the 3D power spectrum across a broad range of scales. This bias can be eliminated by marginalizing over small k in the 1D power spectrum; however, the unbiased estimator will have unavoidably larger variance. We also show that Gaussian realizations of the power spectrum permit accurate and extremely rapid Monte-Carlo simulations for error analysis; repeated realizations of the fully non-Gaussian field are unnecessary. We perform Monte-Carlo maximum-likelihood simulations of foreground removal which yield unbiased, minimum variance estimates of the power spectrum in agreement with Fisher matrix estimates. Foreground removal also distorts the 21cm PDF, reducing the contrast between neutral and ionized regions. We show that it is the subtraction of large-scales modes which is responsible fo...

  20. UV extinction properties of carina nebular dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Derck

    1993-01-01

    I have performed an analysis of the UV extinction by dust along the line of sight to the young open cluster Tr 16. The observed curves are parameterized in order to extract quantitative information about the structure of the curves. Furthermore, by constructing differential extinction curves, obtained by differencing curves for stars which lie within a few arc seconds of each other on the sky, I was able to obtain a curve which is free of the effects of foreground extinction, and represents the extinction by the dust in the Tr 16 molecular cloud. I then show that this curve is nearly identical to one due to dust in the Orion molecular cloud. This result shows that dust in the Carina arm exhibits the same behavior as that in the local arm.

  1. Physical Conditions in the Foreground Gas of Reflection Nebulae NGC 2023, vdB 102, and NGC 7023

    CERN Document Server

    Knauth, D C; Pan, K; Yan, M; Lambert, D L; Knauth, David C.; Lambert, David L.

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical spectra of HD 37903 and HD 147009, which illuminate the reflection nebulae, NGC 2023 and vdB 102, were obtained for comparison with our results for HD 200775 and NGC 7023. Ground-based measurements of the molecules, CH, C$_2$, and CN, and the atoms, Na I and K I, were analyzed to extract physical conditions in the foreground cloud. Estimates of the gas density, gas temperature and flux of ultraviolet radiation were derived and were compared with the results from infrared and radio studies of the main molecular cloud. The conditions are similar to those found in studies of diffuse clouds. The foreground material is less dense than the gas in the molecular cloud behind the star(s). The gas temperature was set at 40 K, the temperature determined for the foreground gas in NGC 7023. The flux of ultraviolet radiation was found to be less intense than in the molecular material behind the star(s). The column densities of Na I and K I were reproduced reasonably well when the extinction curve fo...

  2. A FAST FOREGROUND DIGITAL CALIBRATION TECHNIQUE FOR PIPELINED ADC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yu; Yang Haigang; Cheng Xin; Liu Fei; Yin Tao

    2012-01-01

    Digital calibration techniques are widely developed to cancel the non-idealities of the pipelined Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs).This letter presents a fast foreground digital calibration technique based on the analysis of error sources which influence the resolution of pipelined ADCs.This method estimates the gain error of the ADC prototype quickly and calibrates the ADC simultaneously in the operation time.Finally,a 10 bit,100 Ms/s pipelined ADC is implemented and calibrated.The simulation results show that the digital calibration technique has its efficiency with fewem operation cycles.

  3. Markov random fields for static foreground classification in surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, Jack K.; Lu, Thomas T.

    2014-09-01

    We present a novel technique for classifying static foreground in automated airport surveillance systems between abandoned and removed objects by representing the image as a Markov Random Field. The proposed algorithm computes and compares the net probability of the region of interest before and after the event occurs, hence finding which fits more naturally with their respective backgrounds. Having tested on a dataset from the PETS 2006, PETS 2007, AVSS20074, CVSG, VISOR, CANDELA and WCAM datasets, the algorithm has shown capable of matching the results of the state-of-the-art, is highly parallel and has a degree of robustness to noise and illumination changes.

  4. Improved Gaussian Mixture Models for Adaptive Foreground Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsarakis, Nikolaos; Pnevmatikakis, Aristodemos; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive foreground segmentation is traditionally performed using Stauffer & Grimson’s algorithm that models every pixel of the frame by a mixture of Gaussian distributions with continuously adapted parameters. In this paper we provide an enhancement of the algorithm by adding two important dynamic...... elements to the baseline algorithm: The learning rate can change across space and time, while the Gaussian distributions can be merged together if they become similar due to their adaptation process. We quantify the importance of our enhancements and the effect of parameter tuning using an annotated...

  5. Spatial distribution of interstellar dust in the Sun's vicinity. Comparison with neutral sodium-bearing gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergely, J.-L.; Valette, B.; Lallement, R.; Raimond, S.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: 3D tomography of the interstellar dust and gas may be useful in many respects, from the physical and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium itself to foreground decontamination of the cosmic microwave background, or various studies of the environments of specific objects. However, while spectral data cubes of the galactic emission become increasingly precise, the information on the distance to the emitting regions has not progressed as well and relies essentially on the galactic rotation curve. Our goal here is to bring more precise information on the distance to nearby interstellar dust and gas clouds within 250 pc. Methods: We apply the best available calibration methods to a carefully screened set of stellar Strömgren photometry data for targets possessing a Hipparcos parallax and spectral type classification. We combine the derived interstellar extinctions and the parallax distances for about 6000 stars to build a 3D tomography of the local dust. We use an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach and a least squares criterion, optimized for this specific data set. We apply the same inversion technique to a totally independent set of neutral sodium absorption data available for about 1700 target stars. Results: We obtain 3D maps of the opacity and the distance to the main dust-bearing clouds within 250 pc and identify in those maps well-known dark clouds and high galactic more diffuse entities. We calculate the integrated extinction between the Sun and the cube boundary and compare this with the total galactic extinction derived from infrared 2D maps. The two quantities reach similar values at high latitudes, as expected if the local dust content is satisfyingly reproduced and the dust is closer than 250 pc. Those maps show a larger high latitude dust opacity in the North compared to the South, reinforcing earlier evidences. Interestingly the gas maps do not show the same asymmetry, suggesting a polar asymmetry of the dust to gas

  6. Tensors, BICEP2, prior dependence, and dust

    CERN Document Server

    Cortês, Marina; Parkinson, David

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the prior dependence on the inferred spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations, in light of recent results from BICEP2 and taking into account a possible dust contribution to polarized anisotropies. We highlight an optimized parameterization of the tensor power spectrum, and adoption of a logarithmic prior on its amplitude $A_T$, leading to results that transform more evenly under change of pivot scale. In the absence of foregrounds the tension between the results of BICEP2 and Planck drives the tensor spectral index $n_T$ to be blue-tilted in a joint analysis, which would be in contradiction to the standard inflation prediction ($n_T<0$). When foregrounds are accounted for, the BICEP2 results no longer require non-standard inflationary parameter regions. We present limits on primordial $A_T$ and $n_T$, adopting foreground scenarios put forward by Mortonson & Seljak and motivated by Planck 353 GHz observations, and assess what dust contribution leaves a detectable cosmological signal. ...

  7. Orion revisited. II. The foreground population to Orion A

    CERN Document Server

    Bouy, H; Bertin, E; Sarro, L M; Barrado, D

    2014-01-01

    Following the recent discovery of a large population of young stars in front of the Orion Nebula, we carried out an observational campaign with the DECam wide-field camera covering ~10~deg^2 centered on NGC 1980 to confirm, probe the extent of, and characterize this foreground population of pre-main-sequence stars. We confirm the presence of a large foreground population towards the Orion A cloud. This population contains several distinct subgroups, including NGC1980 and NGC1981, and stretches across several degrees in front of the Orion A cloud. By comparing the location of their sequence in various color-magnitude diagrams with other clusters, we found a distance and an age of 380pc and 5~10Myr, in good agreement with previous estimates. Our final sample includes 2123 candidate members and is complete from below the hydrogen-burning limit to about 0.3Msun, where the data start to be limited by saturation. Extrapolating the mass function to the high masses, we estimate a total number of ~2600 members in the ...

  8. Studying Galactic interstellar turbulence through fluctuations in synchrotron emission: First LOFAR Galactic foreground detection

    CERN Document Server

    Iacobelli, M; Orrú, E; Pizzo, R F; Anderson, J; Beck, R; Bell, M R; Bonafede, A; Chyzy, K; Dettmar, R -J; Enßlin, T A; Heald, G; Horellou, C; Horneffer, A; Jurusik, W; Junklewitz, H; Kuniyoshi, M; Mulcahy, D D; Paladino, R; Reich, W; Scaife, A; Sobey, C; Sotomayor-Beltran, C; Alexov, A; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Birzan, L; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brouw, W N; Bruggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J E; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Duscha, S; Eisloffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hassall, T E; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Horandel, J; Jelic, V; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kramer, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Macario, G; Mann, G; McKean, J P; Munk, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A G; Röttgering, H; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Vogt, C; van Weeren, R J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P; Zensus, A

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic outer scale of turbulence and the ratio of the random to ordered components of the magnetic field are key parameters to characterise magnetic turbulence in the interstellar gas, which affects the propagation of cosmic rays within the Galaxy. We provide new constraints to those two parameters. We use the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) to image the diffuse continuum emission in the Fan region at (l,b) (137.0,+7.0) at 80"x70" resolution in the range [146,174] MHz. We detect multi-scale fluctuations in the Galactic synchrotron emission and compute their power spectrum. Applying theoretical estimates and derivations from the literature for the first time, we derive the outer scale of turbulence and the ratio of random to ordered magnetic field from the characteristics of these fluctuations . We obtain the deepest image of the Fan region to date and find diffuse continuum emission within the primary beam. The power spectrum of the foreground synchrotron fluctuations displays a power law behaviour fo...

  9. Model Independent Foreground Power Spectrum Estimation using WMAP 5-year Data

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Tuhin; Jain, Pankaj; Souradeep, Tarun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose & implement on WMAP 5-year data, a model independent approach of foreground power spectrum estimation for multifrequency observations of CMB experiments. Recently a model independent approach of CMB power spectrum estimation was proposed by Saha et al. 2006. This methodology demonstrates that CMB power spectrum can be reliably estimated solely from WMAP data without assuming any template models for the foreground components. In the current paper, we extend this work to estimate the galactic foreground power spectrum using the WMAP 5 year maps following a self contained analysis. We apply the model independent method in harmonic basis to estimate the foreground power spectrum and frequency dependence of combined foregrounds. We also study the behaviour of synchrotron spectral index variation over different regions of the sky. We compare our results with those obtained from MEM foreground maps which are formed in pixel space. We find that relative to our model independent estimates...

  10. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Odegard, N; Chuss, D T; Miller, N J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for CMB measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 millimeters to 100 microns and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anticorrelation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenologic...

  11. Phase cross-correlation of the WMAP ILC map and foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Naselsky, P D; Verkhodanov, O V

    2003-01-01

    We present a circular cross-correlation tests for the phases of the Internal Linear Combination Map (ILC) and {\\it WMAP}'s foregrounds for all K--W frequency bands at the range of multipoles $\\ell\\le 50$. We have found significant deviations from the expected Poissonian statistics for the ILC and the foregrounds phases. Our analysis shows that the low multipole range of the ILC power spectrum contains some of the foregrounds residues.

  12. Estimating the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the effect of residual foreground contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantaye, Y.; Leach, S.M.; Baccigalupi, C. [SISSA, Astrophysics Sector, via Bonomea 265, Trieste 34136 (Italy); Stivoli, F. [INRIA, Laboratoire de Recherche en Informatique, Université Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 490, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Grain, J. [CNRS, Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiments 120-121, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Tristram, M. [CNRS, Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Université Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 200, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Stompor, R., E-mail: fantaye@sissa.it, E-mail: stivoli@gmail.com, E-mail: julien.grain@ias.u-psud.fr, E-mail: leach@sissa.it, E-mail: tristram@lal.in2p3.fr, E-mail: bacci@sissa.it, E-mail: radek@apc.univ-paris7.fr [CNRS, Laboratoire Astroparticule and Cosmologie, 10 rue A. Domon et L. Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2011-08-01

    We consider future balloon-borne and ground-based suborbital experiments designed to search for inflationary gravitational waves, and investigate the impact of residual foregrounds that remain in the estimated cosmic microwave background maps. This is achieved by propagating foreground modelling uncertainties from the component separation, under the assumption of a spatially uniform foreground frequency scaling, through to the power spectrum estimates, and up to measurement of the tensor to scalar ratio in the parameter estimation step. We characterize the error covariance due to subtracted foregrounds, and find it to be subdominant compared to instrumental noise and sample variance in our simulated data analysis. We model the unsubtracted residual foreground contribution using a two-parameter power law and show that marginalization over these foreground parameters is effective in accounting for a bias due to excess foreground power at low l. We conclude that, at least in the suborbital experimental setups we have simulated, foreground errors may be modeled and propagated up to parameter estimation with only a slight degradation of the target sensitivity of these experiments derived neglecting the presence of the foregrounds.

  13. Cross-correlation of the CMB and foregrounds phases derived from the WMAP data

    CERN Document Server

    Naselsky, P D; Verkhodanov, O V

    2004-01-01

    We present circular and linear cross-correlation tests and the "friend-of-friend" analysis for phases of the Internal Linear Combination Map (ILC) and the WMAP foregrounds for all K--W frequency bands at the range of multipoles $\\ell\\le100$. We compare also Tegmark, de Oliveira-Costa and Hamilton (2003) and Naselsky et al. (2003) cleaned maps with corresponding foregrounds. We have found significant deviations from the expected Poissonian statistics for all the cleaned maps and foregrounds. Our analysis shows that, for a low multipole range of the cleaned maps, power spectra contains some of the foregrounds residuals mainly from the W band.

  14. Illumination and Reflectance Estimation with its Application in Foreground Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Jun Tu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a novel approach to estimate the illumination and reflectance of an image. The approach is based on illumination-reflectance model and wavelet theory. We use a homomorphic wavelet filter (HWF and define a wavelet quotient image (WQI model based on dyadic wavelet transform. The illumination and reflectance components are estimated by using HWF and WQI, respectively. Based on the illumination and reflectance estimation we develop an algorithm to segment sows in grayscale video recordings which are captured in complex farrowing pens. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithm can be applied to detect the domestic animals in complex environments such as light changes, motionless foreground objects and dynamic background.

  15. Differentiating salt marsh species using foreground/background analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.; Pinzon, J.; Ustin, S.L.; Rejmankova, E. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Three California salt marsh plant species have distinctive morphologies that could be remotely sensed by airborne spectrometers because the architectures create differences in canopy reflectance characteristics. This paper presents a method to differentiate wetland species using a modified spectral mixture analysis termed hierarchical foreground and background analysis (HFBA). To validate this approach, the method was applied to field spectral data from several salt marshes. Foreground and background analysis allows the user to direct analysis along a specified axis of variance by identifying vectors through the n-dimensional spectral volume by identifying vectors that comprise the information of selected subset of spectra which emphasizes the presence of a discriminative signature of interest. The goal of FBA is to project spectral variation along the most relevant axis of variance that maximizes spectral differences between groups, while minimizing spectral variation within each group. For this work, we selected a training set that allowed us to create HFBA vectors which efficiently discriminate species based on canopy spectral characteristics. Results indicated that the dominant species in these salts marshes could be clearly differentiated with greater than 90% certainty from field collected canopy spectrometer data. Hundred percent of Spartina and 79% of Salicornia were correctly classified at the first level of classification. The accuracy of classification for Salicornia improved to 87% in the second level of classification. The unclassified spectral samples were related to extraordinary conditions within the wetlands such as extreme biomass, salinity and nitrogen conditions. These patterns were apparent in AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/infrared Imaging Spectrometer) images which showed distinct zonation corresponding to the distributions of these species in the marsh. Results were confirmed by field reconnaissance. 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. HD/H2 as a Probe of the Roles of Gas, Dust, Light, Metallicity, and Cosmic Rays in Promoting the Growth of Molecular Hydrogen in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszt, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    We modeled recent observations of UV absorption of HD and {H_2} in the Milky Way and toward damped/subdamped Lyα systems at z = 0.18 and z >1.7. N(HD)/N({H_2}) ratios reflect the separate self-shieldings of HD and {H_2} and the coupling introduced by deuteration chemistry. Locally, observations are explained by diffuse molecular gas with 16 cm-3 1.7, N(HD) is comparable to the Galaxy but with 10 times smaller N({H_2}) and somewhat smaller N({H_2})/N(H I). Comparison of our Galaxy with the Magellanic Clouds shows that smaller {H_2}/H is expected at subsolar metallicity, and we show by modeling that HD/{H_2} increases with density at low metallicity, opposite to the Milky Way. Observations of HD would be explained with higher n(H) at low metallicity, but high-z systems have high HD/{H_2} at metallicity 0.04 shielding effects. The abrupt {H_2} transition to {H_2}/H ≈ 1%-10% occurs mostly from self-shielding, although it is assisted by extinction for n(H) <~ 16 cm-3. Interior {H_2} fractions are substantially increased by dust extinction below <~ 32 cm-3. At smaller n(H), ζ H , small increases in {H_2} triggered by dust extinction can trigger abrupt increases in N(HD).

  17. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  18. An Improved Model of Diffuse Galactic Radio Emission from 10 MHz to 5 THz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H.; Tegmark, M.; Dillon, J. S.; Kim, D. A.; Liu, A.; Neben, A. R.; Jonas, J.; Reich, P.; Reich, W.

    2016-10-01

    We present an improved Global Sky Model (GSM) of diffuse Galactic radio emission from 10 MHz to 5 THz, whose uses include foreground modeling for CMB and 21 cm cosmology. Our model improves on past work both algorithmically and by adding new data sets such as the Planck maps and the enhanced Haslam map. Our method generalises the Principal Component Analysis approach to handle non-overlapping regions, enabling the inclusion of 29 sky maps with no region of the sky common to all. We also perform a blind separation of our GSM into physical components with a method that makes no assumptions about physical emission mechanisms (synchrotron, free-free, dust, etc). Remarkably, this blind method automatically finds five components that have previously only been found "by hand", which we identify with synchrotron, free-free, cold dust, warm dust, and the CMB anisotropy. Computing the cross-power spectrum between these blindly extracted components and Planck component maps, we find a strong correlation at all angular scales. The improved GSM is available online at http://github.com/jeffzhen/gsm2016.

  19. An Improved Model of Diffuse Galactic Radio Emission from 10 MHz to 5 THz

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, H; Dillon, J; Liu, A; Neben, A; Jonas, J; Reich, P; Reich, W

    2016-01-01

    We present an improved Global Sky Model (GSM) of diffuse galactic radio emission from 10 MHz to 5 THz, whose uses include foreground modeling for CMB and 21 cm cosmology. Our model improves on past work both algorithmically and by adding new data sets such as the Planck maps and the enhanced Haslam map. Our method generalizes the Principal Component Analysis approach to handle non-overlapping regions, enabling the inclusion of 29 sky maps with no region of the sky common to all. We also perform a blind separation of our GSM into physical components with a method that makes no assumptions about physical emission mechanisms (synchrotron, free-free, dust, etc). Remarkably, this blind method automatically finds five components that have previously only been found "by hand", which we identify with synchrotron, free-free, cold dust, warm dust, and the CMB anisotropy, with maps and spectra agreeing with previous work but in many cases with smaller error bars. The improved GSM is available online at github.com/jeffzh...

  20. An improved model of diffuse galactic radio emission from 10 MHz to 5 THz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H.; Tegmark, M.; Dillon, J. S.; Kim, D. A.; Liu, A.; Neben, A. R.; Jonas, J.; Reich, P.; Reich, W.

    2017-01-01

    We present an improved Global Sky Model (GSM) of diffuse Galactic radio emission from 10 MHz to 5 THz, whose uses include foreground modelling for cosmic microwave background (CMB) and 21 cm cosmology. Our model improves on past work both algorithmically and by adding new data sets such as the Planck maps and the enhanced Haslam map. Our method generalizes the principal component analysis approach to handle non-overlapping regions, enabling the inclusion of 29 sky maps with no region of the sky common to all. We also perform a blind separation of our GSM into physical components with a method that makes no assumptions about physical emission mechanisms (synchrotron, free-free, dust, etc). Remarkably, this blind method automatically finds five components that have previously only been found `by hand', which we identify with synchrotron, free-free, cold dust, warm dust, and the CMB anisotropy. Computing the cross-power spectrum between these blindly extracted components and Planck component maps, we find a strong correlation at all angular scales. The improved GSM is available online at http://github.com/jeffzhen/gsm2016.

  1. Diffuse molecular gas at high redshift: Detection of CO molecules and the 2175 {\\AA} dust feature at z=1.64

    CERN Document Server

    Noterdaeme, P; Srianand, R; Petitjean, P; López, S

    2009-01-01

    We present the detection of carbon monoxide molecules (CO) at z=1.6408 towards the quasar SDSSJ160457.50+220300.5 using the VLT Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph. CO absorption is detected in at least two components in the first six A-X bands and one d-X(5-0) inter-band system. This is the second detection of this kind along a quasar line of sight. The CO absorption profiles are well modelled assuming a rotational excitation of CO in the range 6dust depletion pattern typical of cold gas in the Galactic disc. The background quasar spectrum is significantly reddened (u-K~4.5 mag) and presents a pronounced 2175 A dust absorption feature at the redshift of the CO absorber. Using a control sample of ~500 quasars we find the chance probability for this feature to be s...

  2. The Burrell Schmidt Deep Virgo Survey: Tidal Debris, Galaxy Halos, and Diffuse Intracluster Light in the Virgo Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Mihos, J Christopher; Feldmeier, John J; Rudick, Craig; Janowiecki, Steven; Morrison, Heather; Slater, Colin; Watkins, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    We present a deep imaging survey of the Virgo Cluster, designed to study the connection between cluster galaxies and Virgo's diffuse intracluster light (ICL). Our observations span roughly 16 square degrees and reach a 3-sigma depth of mu(B)=29.5 and mu(V)=28.5 mag/arcsec^2. At these depths, the limiting systematic uncertainties are astrophysical: scattered starlight from foreground Galactic dust, and variations in faint background sources. The dust-scattered starlight is well-traced by deep far-infrared imaging, making it distinguishable from true Virgo diffuse light. Our imaging maps the Virgo core around M87 and the adjacent M86/M84 region, in subcluster B around M49, and in the more distant W' cloud around NGC 4365. Most of the detected ICL is found in the Virgo core and within the W' cloud, with little evidence for extensive ICL in subcluster B. The large amount of diffuse light seen in the infalling W' cloud likely illustrates the importance of the group environment for generating ICL. The bulk of the d...

  3. The effects of metallicity, radiation field and dust extinction on the charge state of PAHs in diffuse clouds: implications for the DIB carrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, N.L.J.; Spaans, M.

    2006-01-01

    Context.The unidentified diffuse interstellar bands (DIB) are observed throughout the Galaxy, the Local Group and beyond. Their carriers are possibly related to complex carbonaceous gas-phase molecules, such as (cationic) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fullerenes. Aims.In order to reveal the i

  4. The effects of metallicity, radiation field and dust extinction on the charge state of PAHs in diffuse clouds : implications for the DIB carrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, NLJ; Spaans, M

    2006-01-01

    Context. The unidentified diffuse interstellar bands (DIB) are observed throughout the Galaxy, the Local Group and beyond. Their carriers are possibly related to complex carbonaceous gas-phase molecules, such as (cationic) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fullerenes. Aims. In order to reveal the

  5. The effect of foreground mitigation strategy on EoR window recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, Emma; Zaroubi, Saleem; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Dulwich, Fred; Jelić, Vibor; Mort, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The removal of the Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds remains a major challenge for those wishing to make a detection of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) 21 cm signal. Multiple methods of modelling these foregrounds with varying levels of assumption have been trialled and shown promising

  6. Foreground removal using fastica : A showcase of LOFAR-EoR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, Emma; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Harker, Geraint; Jelic, Vibor; Labropoulos, Panagiotis; Zaroubi, Saleem; Brentjens, Michiel A.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new implementation of the fastica algorithm on simulated Low Frequency Array Epoch of Reionization data with the aim of accurately removing the foregrounds and extracting the 21-cm reionization signal. We find that the method successfully removes the foregrounds with an average fittin

  7. Improved foreground removal in GMRT 610 MHz observations towards redshifted 21-cm tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Abhik; Ali, Sk Saiyad; Chengalur, Jayaram N

    2011-01-01

    Foreground removal is a challenge for 21-cm tomography of the high redshift Universe. We use archival GMRT data (obtained for completely different astronomical goals) to estimate the foregrounds at a redshift ~ 1. The statistic we use is the cross power spectrum between two frequencies separated by \\Delta{\

  8. Statistical diagnostics to identify Galactic foregrounds in B-mode maps

    CERN Document Server

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the search for inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization motivate the search for new diagnostics to distinguish the Galactic foreground contribution to B modes from the cosmic signal. We show that B modes from these foregrounds should exhibit a local hexadecapolar departure in power from statistical isotropy (SI). We present a simple algorithm to search for a uniform SI violation of this sort, as may arise in a sufficiently small patch of sky. We then show how to search for these effects if the orientation of the SI violation varies across the survey region, as is more likely to occur in surveys with more sky coverage. If detected, these departures from Gaussianity would indicate some level of Galactic foreground contamination in the B-mode maps. Given uncertainties about foreground properties, though, caution should be exercised in attributing a null detection to an absence of foregrounds.

  9. A polarimetric approach for constraining the dynamic foreground spectrum for cosmological global 21-cm measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Nhan, Bang D; Burns, Jack O

    2016-01-01

    The cosmological global (sky-averaged) 21-cm signal is a powerful tool to probe the evolution of the intergalactic medium (IGM) in high-redshift Universe ($z \\leq 6$). One of the biggest observational challenges is to remove the foreground spectrum which is at least four orders of magnitude brighter than the cosmological 21-cm emission. Conventional global 21-cm experiments rely on the spectral smoothness of the foreground synchrotron emission to separate it from the unique 21-cm spectral structures in a single total-power spectrum. However, frequency-dependent instrumental and observational effects are known to corrupt such smoothness and complicates the foreground subtraction. We introduce a polarimetric approach to measure the projection-induced polarization of the anisotropic foreground onto a stationary dual-polarized antenna. Due to Earth rotation, when pointing the antenna at a celestial pole, the revolving foreground will modulate this polarization with a unique frequency-dependent sinusoidal signatur...

  10. Possible signature of distant foreground in the Planck data

    CERN Document Server

    Yershov, V N; Raikov, A A

    2014-01-01

    By using the Planck map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation we have checked and confirmed the existence of a correlation between supernova (SN) redshifts, $z_{\\rm SN}$, and CMB temperature fluctuations at the SNe locations, $T_{\\rm SN}$, which we previously reported for the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the Planck data is $r=+0.38\\pm 0.08$ which indicates that the correlation is statistically significant (the signal is about $5\\sigma$ above the noise level). The correlation becomes even stronger for the type Ia subsample of SNe, $r_{\\rm Ia}=+0.45\\pm 0.09$, whereas for the rest of the SNe it is vanishing. By checking the slopes of the regression lines $T_{\\rm SN} / z_{\\rm SN}$ for Planck's different frequency bands we have also excluded the possibility of this anomaly being caused by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The remaining possibility is some, unaccounted for, contribution to the CMB from distant ($z>0.3$) foreground through either the int...

  11. Planck 2013 results. XII. Diffuse component separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2014-01-01

    presented in the cross-spectrum based Planck likelihood analysis. We choose two of the CMB maps for specific scientific goals. We also present maps and frequency spectra of the Galactic low-frequency, CO, and thermal dust emission. The component maps are found to provide a faithful representation of the sky...... foregrounds, including thermal dust and line emission from molecular carbon monoxide (CO). This paper describes the component separation framework adopted by Planck for many cosmological analyses, including CMB power spectrum determination and likelihood construction on large angular scales, studies...... of primordial non-Gaussianity and statistical isotropy, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, gravitational lensing, and searches for topological defects. We test four foreground-cleaned CMB maps derived using qualitatively different component separation algorithms. The quality of our reconstructions is evaluated...

  12. Efficient Foreground Extraction Based on Optical Flow and SMED for Road Traffic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K SuganyaDevi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Foreground detection is a key procedure in video analysis such as object detection and tracking. Several foreground detection techniques and edge detectors have been developed until now but the problem is, usually it is difficult to obtain an optimal foreground due to weather, light, shadow and clutter interference. Background subtract is a common method in foreground detection. In background subtract noise appears at fixed place, when it is used to deal with long image sequence there may be much accumulate error in the foreground. In OF (Optical Flow noise appears randomly and this covers long distance over long period of time. Optical flow cannot get rid of the light influences which result in background noises. To overcome this SMED (Separable Morphological Edge Detector is used. SMED has robustness to light changing and even slight movement in the video sequence. This paper proposes a new foreground detection approach called OF and SMED which is more accurate in foreground detection and elimination of noises is very high. This approach is useful for efficient crowd and traffic monitoring, user friendly, highly automatic intelligent, computationally efficient system.

  13. Polarized galactic synchrotron and dust emission and their correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Steve K

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the level of polarized dust and synchrotron emission using the WMAP9 and Planck data. The primary goal of this study is to inform the assessment of foreground contamination in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements below $\\ell\\sim200$ from 23 to 353 GHz. We compute angular power spectra as a function of sky cut based on the Planck 353 GHz polarization maps. Our primary findings are the following. (1) There is a spatial correlation between the dust emission as measured by Planck at 353 GHz and the synchrotron emission as measured by WMAP at 23 GHz with $\\rho\\approx0.4$ or greater for $\\ell<20$ and $f_{\\mathrm{sky}}\\geq0.5$, dropping to $\\rho\\approx0.2$ for $30<\\ell<200$. (2) A simple foreground model with dust, synchrotron, and their correlation fits well to all possible cross spectra formed with the WMAP and Planck 353 GHz data given the current uncertainties. (3) In the 50$\\%$ cleanest region of the polarized dust map, the ratio of synchrotron to dust amplitudes...

  14. Dust Mite Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dust mite allergy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dust mite allergy is an allergic reaction to tiny bugs that commonly live in house dust. Signs of dust mite allergy include those common to hay fever, such as ...

  15. Dust obscuration by an evolving galaxy population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najita, Joan; Silk, Joseph; Wachter, Kenneth W.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of an evolving luminosity function (LF) on the ability of foreground galaxies to obscure background sources is discussed, using the Press-Schechter/CDM standard evolving LF model. Galaxies are modeled as simplified versions of local spirals and Poisson statistics are used to estimate the fraction of sky covered by intervening dusty galaxies and the mean optical depths due to these galaxies. The results are compared to those obtained in the case of nonevolving luminosity function in a low-density universe. It is found that evolution of the galaxy LF does not allow the quasar dust obscuration hypothesis to be sustained for dust disks with plausible sizes. Even in a low-density universe, where evolution at z = less than 10 is unimportant, large disk radii are needed to achieve the desired obscuring effect. The mean fraction of sky covered is presented as a function of the redshift z along with adequate diagram illustrations.

  16. ABS: an Analytical method of Blind Separation of CMB B-mode from foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Pengjie; Zhang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Extracting CMB B-mode polarization from complicated foregrounds is a challenging task in searching for inflationary gravitational waves. We propose an analytical solution to the B-mode power spectrum measurement directly from post-processing the cross bandpower between different frequency bands, without free parameters or fitting procedures, or any assumptions on foregrounds. Testing against a variety of foregrounds, survey frequency configurations and instrument noise, we verify its applicability and numerical stability. It also provides a clean diagnostic for future surveys to achieve unbiased B-mode measurement. Furthermore, it has applications beyond CMB and can even have profound impacts in totally different areas such as cosmic magnification.

  17. The Application of Continuous Wavelet Transform Based Foreground Subtraction Method in 21 cm Sky Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Junhua; Wang, Jingying; An, Tao; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    We propose a continuous wavelet transform based non-parametric foreground subtraction method for the detection of redshifted 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization. This method works based on the assumption that the foreground spectra are smooth in frequency domain, while the 21 cm signal spectrum is full of saw-tooth-like structures, thus their characteristic scales are significantly different. We can distinguish them in the wavelet coefficient space easily and perform the foreground subtraction. Compared with the traditional spectral fitting based method, our method is more tolerant to complex foregrounds. Furthermore, we also find that when the instrument has uncorrected response error, our method can also work significantly better than the spectral fitting based method. Our method can obtain similar results with the Wp smoothing method, which is also a non-parametric method, but our method consumes much less computing time.

  18. EnviroAtlas - MSPA connectivity with water as foreground for the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset categorizes land cover into structural elements (e.g. core, edge, connector, etc.). Water is treated as foreground in this dataset. This...

  19. HD/H2 as a probe of the roles of gas, dust, light, metallicity and cosmic rays in promoting the growth of molecular hydrogen in the diffuse interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Liszt, H S

    2014-01-01

    We modelled recent observations of UV absorption of HD and \\HH\\ in the Milky Way and toward damped/sub-damped Lyman alpha systems at z=0.18 and z $>$ 1.7. N(HD)/N(\\HH) ratios reflect the separate self-shieldings of HD and \\HH\\ and the coupling introduced by deuteration chemistry. Locally, observations are explained by diffuse molecular gas with $ 16 \\pccc \\la$ n(H) $\\la 128 \\pccc $ if the cosmic-ray ionization rate per H-nucleus \\zetaH $= 2\\times 10^{-16}\\ps$ as inferred from \\H3\\p\\ and OH\\p. The dominant influence on N(HD)/N(\\HH) is the cosmic-ray ionization rate with a much weaker downward dependence on n(H) at Solar metallicity, but dust-extinction can drive N(HD) higher as with N(\\HH). At z $>$ 1.7, N(HD) is comparable to the Galaxy but with 10x smaller N(\\HH) and somewhat smaller N(\\HH)/N(H I). Comparison of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds shows that smaller \\HH/H is expected at sub-Solar metallicity and we show by modelling that HD/\\HH\\ increases with density at low metallicity, opposite to the Mil...

  20. [CII] absorption and emission in the diffuse interstellar medium across the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Gerin, M; Goicoechea, J R; Gusdorf, A; Godard, B; de Luca, M; Falgarone, E; Goldsmith, P F; Lis, D C; Menten, K M; Neufeld, D; Phillips, T G; Liszt, H

    2014-01-01

    Ionized carbon is the main gas-phase reservoir of carbon in the neutral diffuse interstellar medium and its 158 micron fine structure transition [CII] is the most important cooling line of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We combine [CII] absorption and emission spectroscopy to gain an improved understanding of physical conditions in the different phases of the ISM. We present high resolution [CII] spectra obtained with the Herschel/HIFI instrument towards bright dust continuum sources regions in the Galactic plane, probing simultaneously the diffuse gas along the line of sight and the background high-mass star forming regions. These data are complemented by observations of the 492 and 809 GHz fine structure lines of atomic carbon and by medium spectral resolution spectral maps of the fine structure lines of atomic oxygen at 63 and 145 microns with Herschel/PACS. We show that the presence of foreground absorption may completely cancel the emission from the background source in medium spectral resolution...

  1. Measuring the tensor to scalar ratio from CMB B-modes in presence of foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Betoule, Marc; Delabrouille, J; Jeune, M Le; Cardoso, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    Abreg: We investigate the impact of polarized foreground emission on the performances of future CMB experiments in measuring the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. We design a component separation pipeline, based on the Smica method, aimed at estimating r and the foreground contamination from the data with no prior assumption on the frequency dependence or spatial distribution of the foregrounds. We derive error bars accounting for the uncertainty on foreground contribution. We use the current knowledge of galactic and extra-galactic foregrounds as implemented in the Planck Sky Model (PSM), to build simulations of the sky emission for various experimental setups. Our method, permits us to detect r = 0.1 at more than 3 sigma from B-modes only with Planck data, and r = 0.001 at 6 sigma for the most ambitious designs of the future EPIC probe. We find that all-sky experiments permit a proper measurement of the reionization bump despite the large scale foreground emission and are nearly insensitive to contamination from po...

  2. Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, B; Weiland, J L; Hill, R S; Kogut, A; Bennett, C L; Hinshaw, G; Dunkley, J; Halpern, M; Jarosik, N; Komatsu, E; Larson, D; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Nolta, M R; Page, L; Smith, K M; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 microKelvin upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. We find no indication in the polarization data of an extra "haze" of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination (ILC) method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs with 62 newly detected sources. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, WMAP total intensity data show...

  3. OPENING THE 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION WINDOW: MEASUREMENTS OF FOREGROUND ISOLATION WITH PAPER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Ali, Zaki [Astronomy Department, U. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, U. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bradley, Richard F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U. Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); DeBoer, Dave; Dexter, Matthew; MacMahon, Dave [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, U. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gugliucci, Nicole E. [Department of Astronomy, U. Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jacobs, Daniel C. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ (United States); Klima, Patricia J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Manley, Jason; Walbrugh, William P. [Square Kilometer Array, South Africa Project, Cape Town (South Africa); Stefan, Irina I. [Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-10

    We present new observations with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization with the aim of measuring the properties of foreground emission for 21 cm epoch of reionization (EoR) experiments at 150 MHz. We focus on the footprint of the foregrounds in cosmological Fourier space to understand which modes of the 21 cm power spectrum will most likely be compromised by foreground emission. These observations confirm predictions that foregrounds can be isolated to a {sup w}edge{sup -}like region of two-dimensional (k , k{sub Parallel-To })-space, creating a window for cosmological studies at higher k{sub Parallel-To} values. We also find that the emission extends past the nominal edge of this wedge due to spectral structure in the foregrounds, with this feature most prominent on the shortest baselines. Finally, we filter the data to retain only this ''unsmooth'' emission and image its specific k{sub Parallel-To} modes. The resultant images show an excess of power at the lowest modes, but no emission can be clearly localized to any one region of the sky. This image is highly suggestive that the most problematic foregrounds for 21 cm EoR studies will not be easily identifiable bright sources, but rather an aggregate of fainter emission.

  4. The COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment search for thecosmic infrared background. I. Limits and detections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, M.G.; Arendt, R.G.; Kelsall, T.; Dwek, E.; Odegard, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Freudenreich, H.T.; Reach, W.T.; Silverberg, R.F.; Moseley, S.H.; Pei, Y.C.; Lubin, P.; Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A.; Smoot,G.F.; Weiss, R.; Wilkinson, D.T.; Wright, E.L.

    1998-01-06

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft was designed primarily to conduct a systematic search for an isotropic cosmic infrared background (CIB) in 10 photometric bands from 1.25 to 240 mu m. The results of that search are presented here. Conservative limits on the CIB are obtained from the minimum observed brightness in all-sky maps at each wavelength, with the faintest limits in the DIRBE spectral range being at 3.5 mu m(nu l nu<64 nW m-2 sr-1, 95 percent confidence level) and at 240 mu m (nu l nu < 28 nW m-1 sr-1, 95 percent confidence level). The bright foregrounds from interplanetary dust scattering and emission, stars, and interstellar dust emission are the principal impediments to the DIRBE measurements of the CIB. These foregrounds have been modeled and removed from the sky maps. Assessment of the random and systematic uncertainties in the residuals and tests for isotropy show that only the 140 and 240 mum data provide candidate detections of the CIB. The residuals and their uncertainties provide CIB upper limits more restrictive than the dark sky limits at wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 mu m. No plausible solar system or Galactic source of the observed 140 and 240 mu m residuals can be identified, leading to the conclusion that the CIB has been detected at levels of nu l nu = 25 +- 7 and 14 +- 3 nW m-2 sr-1 at 140 and 240 mu m, respectively. The integrated energy from 140 to 240 mu m, 10.3 nW m-2sr-1, is about twice the integrated optical light from the galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field, suggesting that star formation might have been heavily enshrouded by dust at high redshift. The detections and upper limits reported here provide new constraints on models of the history of energy-releasing processes and dust production since the decoupling of the cosmic microwave background from matter.

  5. Polarized Emission from Interstellar Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Vaillancourt, J E

    2006-01-01

    Observations of far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (SMM) polarized emission are used to study magnetic fields and dust grains in dense regions of the interstellar medium (ISM). These observations place constraints on models of molecular clouds, star-formation, grain alignment mechanisms, and grain size, shape, and composition. The FIR/SMM polarization is strongly dependent on wavelength. We have attributed this wavelength dependence to sampling different grain populations at different temperatures. To date, most observations of polarized emission have been in the densest regions of the ISM. Extending these observations to regions of the diffuse ISM, and to microwave frequencies, will provide additional tests of grain and alignment models. An understanding of polarized microwave emission from dust is key to an accurate measurement of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. The microwave polarization spectrum will put limits on the contributions to polarized emission from spinning dust and vibrat...

  6. Ambipolar diffusion in complex plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losseva, T V; Popel, S I; Yu, M Y; Ma, J X

    2007-04-01

    A self-consistent model of the ambipolar diffusion of electrons and ions in complex (dusty) plasmas accounting for the local electric fields, the dust grain charging process, and the interaction of the plasma particles with the dust grains and neutrals is presented. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the interaction of the electrons and ions with the dust grains as well as with the neutrals are investigated. It is shown that increase of the dust density leads to a reduction of the diffusion scale length, and this effect is enhanced at higher electron densities. The dependence of the diffusion scale length on the neutral gas pressure is found to be given by a power law, where the absolute value of the power exponent decreases with increase of the dust density. The electric field gradient and its effects are shown to be significant and should thus be taken into account in studies of complex plasmas with not very small dust densities. The possibility of observing localized coherent dissipative nonlinear dust ion-acoustic structures in an asymmetrically discharged double plasma is discussed.

  7. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of melting of finite dust clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, André; Schella, André; Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The experimental melting transition of finite two-dimensional dust clusters in a dusty plasma is analyzed using the method of instantaneous normal modes. In the experiment, dust clusters are heated in a thermodynamic equilibrium from a solid to a liquid state using a four-axis laser manipulation system. The fluid properties of the dust cluster, such as the diffusion constant, are measured from the instantaneous normal mode analysis. Thereby, the phase transition of these finite clusters is approached from the liquid phase. From the diffusion constants, unique melting temperatures have been assigned to dust clusters of various sizes that very well reflect their dynamical stability properties.

  8. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, N.; Kogut, A.; Chuss, D. T.; Miller, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 mm to 100 μm and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems (TLS) model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anti-correlation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner et al. because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model that was recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenological model consisting of the sum of two graybody components. We find that the two-graybody model gives the best fit and the FDS model gives a significantly poorer fit than the other models. The Meisner and Finkbeiner model and the TLS model remain viable for use in Galactic foreground subtraction, but the FIRAS data do not have a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to provide a strong test of the predicted spectrum at millimeter wavelengths.

  9. Dust processing in photodissociation regions - Mid-IR emission modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Compiegne, M; Verstraete, L; Habart, E

    2008-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopy of dense illuminated ridges (or photodissociation regions, PDRs) suggests dust evolution. Such evolution must be reflected in the gas physical properties through processes like photo-electric heating or H_2 formation. With Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) and ISOCAM data, we study the mid-IR emission of closeby, well known PDRs. Focusing on the band and continuum dust emissions, we follow their relative contributions and analyze their variations in terms of abundance of dust populations. In order to disentangle dust evolution and excitation effects, we use a dust emission model that we couple to radiative transfer. Our dust model reproduces extinction and emission of the standard interstellar medium that we represent with diffuse high galactic latitude clouds called Cirrus. We take the properties of dust in Cirrus as a reference to which we compare the dust emission from more excited regions, namely the Horsehead and the reflection nebula NGC 2023 North. We show that in both regio...

  10. Cosmic Dust in the 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The past century of interstellar dust has brought us from first ignoring it to finding that it plays an important role in the evolution of galaxies. Current observational results in our galaxy provide a complex physical and chemical evolutionary picture of interstellar dust starting with the formation of small refractory particles in stellar atmospheres to their modification in diffuse and molecular clouds and ultimately to their contribution to star forming regions. Observations of the prope...

  11. Cosmic Dust in the 21st Century

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, J M; Shen, Chuanjian

    2000-01-01

    The past century of interstellar dust has brought us from first ignoring it to finding that it plays an important role in the evolution of galaxies. Current observational results in our galaxy provide a complex physical and chemical evolutionary picture of interstellar dust starting with the formation of small refractory particles in stellar atmospheres to their modification in diffuse and molecular clouds and ultimately to their contribution to star forming regions. Observations of the properties of dust in very young galaxies will be an important probe of the rates of star formation in terms of the production and destruction of dust grains. Future observations of dust at high spectral and spatial resolution will provide detailed information on processes in collapsing clouds up to star formation. Space missions to comets in the next century will first study them in situ but ultimately will bring back pristine nucleus material which will contain the end product of the collapsing protosolar molecular cloud at ...

  12. GPU-Accelerated Foreground Segmentation and Labeling for Real-Time Video Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Song

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Real-time and accurate background modeling is an important researching topic in the fields of remote monitoring and video surveillance. Meanwhile, effective foreground detection is a preliminary requirement and decision-making basis for sustainable energy management, especially in smart meters. The environment monitoring results provide a decision-making basis for energy-saving strategies. For real-time moving object detection in video, this paper applies a parallel computing technology to develop a feedback foreground–background segmentation method and a parallel connected component labeling (PCCL algorithm. In the background modeling method, pixel-wise color histograms in graphics processing unit (GPU memory is generated from sequential images. If a pixel color in the current image does not locate around the peaks of its histogram, it is segmented as a foreground pixel. From the foreground segmentation results, a PCCL algorithm is proposed to cluster the foreground pixels into several groups in order to distinguish separate blobs. Because the noisy spot and sparkle in the foreground segmentation results always contain a small quantity of pixels, the small blobs are removed as noise in order to refine the segmentation results. The proposed GPU-based image processing algorithms are implemented using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA toolkit. The testing results show a significant enhancement in both speed and accuracy.

  13. What can the occult do for you? Understanding dust geometry in other galaxies from overlapping galaxy pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, Benne Willem

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar dust is still the dominant uncertainty in Astronomy, limiting precision in e.g., cosmological distance estimates and models of how light is re-processed within a galaxy. When a foreground galaxy serendipitously overlaps a more distant one, the latter backlights the dusty structures in the nearer foreground galaxy. Such an overlapping or occulting galaxy pair can be used to measure the distribution of dust in the closest galaxy with great accuracy. My STARSMOG program uses HST observation of occulting galaxy pairs to accurately map the distribution of dust in foreground galaxies in fine (interstellar dust grains and re-emitted at longer wavelengths. To model this accurately, one needs to know the distribution and detailed geometry of dust in galaxies. The travel of light through an inhomogeneous medium is radically different from the smooth one and depends strongly on the medium’s inner structure. Secondly, the model for our Universe today includes dark energy, inferred from the distances to supernova, which themselves may be dimmed by intervening dust. An accurate model for the dust extinction in supernova host galaxies is critical to evolve this technique to the next level of accuracy needed to map dark energy. And finally, the fine-scale maps of dust extinction in occuling galaxies can be used to trace the molecular cloud sizes and the role of turbulence in the ISM of these disks. Furthermore, Integral Field Unit observations of such pairs will map the effective extinction curve in these occulting galaxies, disentangling the role of fine-scale geometry and grain composition on these curves.The overlapping galaxy technique promises to deliver a clear understanding of the dust in galaxies: the dust geometry, a probability function of the amount of dimming as a function of galaxy type, its dependence on wavelength and evolution of all these properties with cosmic time (from more distant pairs).

  14. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTINGS). I. OVERVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Barmby, Pauline [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Bonanos, Alceste Z. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Groenewegen, M. A. T. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Lagadec, Eric [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Univ. Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, F-06300 Nice (France); Lennon, Daniel [ESA—European Space Astronomy Centre, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Marengo, Massimo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Zijlstra, Albert, E-mail: martha.boyer@nasa.gov [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Nearby resolved dwarf galaxies provide excellent opportunities for studying the dust-producing late stages of stellar evolution over a wide range of metallicity (–2.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ –1.0). Here, we describe DUSTiNGS (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer): a 3.6 and 4.5 μm post-cryogen Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc that is designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. The survey includes 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies. This near-complete sample allows for the building of statistics on these rare phases of stellar evolution over the full metallicity range. The photometry is >75% complete at the tip of the red giant branch for all targeted galaxies, with the exception of the crowded inner regions of IC 10, NGC 185, and NGC 147. This photometric depth ensures that the majority of the dust-producing stars, including the thermally pulsing AGB stars, are detected in each galaxy. The images map each galaxy to at least twice the half-light radius to ensure that the entire evolved star population is included and to facilitate the statistical subtraction of background and foreground contamination, which is severe at these wavelengths. In this overview, we describe the survey, the data products, and preliminary results. We show evidence for the presence of dust-producing AGB stars in eight of the targeted galaxies, with metallicities as low as [Fe/H] = –1.9, suggesting that dust production occurs even at low metallicity.

  15. Foreground and Background Lexicons and Word Sense Disambiguation for Information Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Kilgarriff, A

    1999-01-01

    Lexicon acquisition from machine-readable dictionaries and corpora is currently a dynamic field of research, yet it is often not clear how lexical information so acquired can be used, or how it relates to structured meaning representations. In this paper I look at this issue in relation to Information Extraction (hereafter IE), and one subtask for which both lexical and general knowledge are required, Word Sense Disambiguation (WSD). The analysis is based on the widely-used, but little-discussed distinction between an IE system's foreground lexicon, containing the domain's key terms which map onto the database fields of the output formalism, and the background lexicon, containing the remainder of the vocabulary. For the foreground lexicon, human lexicography is required. For the background lexicon, automatic acquisition is appropriate. For the foreground lexicon, WSD will occur as a by-product of finding a coherent semantic interpretation of the input. WSD techniques as discussed in recent literature are suit...

  16. Limits on Foreground Subtraction from Chromatic Beam Effects in Global Redshifted 21 cm Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mozdzen, Thomas J; Monsalve, Raul A; Rogers, Alan E E

    2015-01-01

    Foreground subtraction in global redshifted 21 cm measurements is limited by frequency-dependent (chromatic) structure in antenna beam patterns. Chromatic beams couple angular structures in Galactic foreground emission to spectral structures that may not be removed by smooth functional forms. We report results for simulations based on two dipole antennas used by the Experiment to Detect the Global EoR Signature (EDGES). The residual levels in simulated foreground-subtracted spectra are found to differ substantially between the two antennas, suggesting that antenna design must be carefully considered. Residuals are also highly dependent on the right ascension and declination of the antenna pointing, with RMS values differing by as much as a factor of 20 across pointings. For EDGES and other ground-based experiments with zenith pointing antennas, right ascension and declination correspond directly to the local sidereal time and the latitude of the deployment site, hence chromatic beam effects should be taken in...

  17. Semi-automatic removal of foreground stars from images of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Frei, Z

    1996-01-01

    A new procedure, designed to remove foreground stars from galaxy profiles is presented. Although several programs exist for stellar and faint object photometry, none of them treat star removal from the images very carefully. I present my attempt to develop such a system, and briefly compare the performance of my software to one of the well known stellar photometry packages, DAOPhot. Major steps in my procedure are: (1) automatic construction of an empirical 2D point spread function from well separated stars that are situated off the galaxy; (2) automatic identification of those peaks that are likely to be foreground stars, scaling the PSF and removing these stars, and patching residuals (in the automatically determined smallest possible area where residuals are truly significant); and (3) cosmetic fix of remaining degradations in the image. The algorithm and software presented here is significantly better for automatic removal of foreground stars from images of galaxies than DAOPhot or similar packages, since...

  18. Erasing the variable: Empirical foreground discovery for global 21 cm spectrum experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Switzer, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    Spectral measurements of the 21 cm monopole background have the promise of revealing the bulk energetic properties and ionization state of our universe from z ~ 6-30. Synchrotron foregrounds are orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal, and are the principal challenge faced by these experiments. While synchrotron radiation is thought to be spectrally smooth and described by relatively few degrees of freedom, the instrumental response to bright foregrounds may be much more complex. To deal with such complexities, we develop an approach that discovers contaminated spectral modes using spatial fluctuations of the measured data. This approach exploits the fact that foregrounds vary across the sky while the signal does not. The discovered modes are projected out of each line-of-sight of a data cube. An angular weighting then optimizes the cosmological signal amplitude estimate by giving preference to lower-noise regions. Using this method, we show that it is essential for the passband to be stable t...

  19. THE EFFECTS OF POLARIZED FOREGROUNDS ON 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION POWER SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David F.; Aguirre, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Parsons, Aaron R.; Pober, Jonathan C. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jacobs, Daniel C., E-mail: damo@sas.upenn.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ USA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Experiments aimed at detecting highly-redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization (EoR) are plagued by the contamination of foreground emission. A potentially important source of contaminating foregrounds may be Faraday-rotated, polarized emission, which leaks into the estimate of the intrinsically unpolarized EoR signal. While these foregrounds' intrinsic polarization may not be problematic, the spectral structure introduced by the Faraday rotation could be. To better understand and characterize these effects, we present a simulation of the polarized sky between 120 and 180 MHz. We compute a single visibility, and estimate the three-dimensional power spectrum from that visibility using the delay spectrum approach presented in Parsons et al. Using the Donald C. Backer Precision Array to Probe the Epoch of Reionization as an example instrument, we show the expected leakage into the unpolarized power spectrum to be several orders of magnitude above the expected 21 cm EoR signal.

  20. Using dynamic mode decomposition for real-time background/foreground separation in video

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutz, Jose Nathan; Grosek, Jacob; Brunton, Steven; Fu, Xing; Pendergrass, Seth

    2017-06-06

    The technique of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is disclosed herein for the purpose of robustly separating video frames into background (low-rank) and foreground (sparse) components in real-time. Foreground/background separation is achieved at the computational cost of just one singular value decomposition (SVD) and one linear equation solve, thus producing results orders of magnitude faster than robust principal component analysis (RPCA). Additional techniques, including techniques for analyzing the video for multi-resolution time-scale components, and techniques for reusing computations to allow processing of streaming video in real time, are also described herein.

  1. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  2. An Infrared Census of DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer (DUSTiNGS), I. Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Martha L; Barmby, Pauline; Bonanos, Alceste Z; Gehrz, Robert D; Gordon, Karl D; Groenewegen, M A T; Lagadec, Eric; Lennon, Daniel; Marengo, Massimo; Meixner, Margaret; Skillman, Evan; Sloan, G C; Sonneborn, George; van Loon, Jacco Th; Zijlstra, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Nearby resolved dwarf galaxies provide excellent opportunities for studying the dust-producing late stages of stellar evolution over a wide range of metallicity (-2.7 75% complete at the tip of the Red Giant Branch for all targeted galaxies, with the exception of the crowded inner regions of IC 10, NGC 185, and NGC 147. This photometric depth ensures that the majority of the dust-producing stars, including the thermally-pulsing AGB stars, are detected in each galaxy. The images map each galaxy to at least twice the half-light radius to ensure that the entire evolved star population is included and to facilitate the statistical subtraction of background and foreground contamination, which is severe at these wavelengths. In this overview, we describe the survey, the data products, and preliminary results. We show evidence for the presence of dust-producing AGB stars in 8 of the targeted galaxies, with metallicities as low as [Fe/H] = -1.9, suggesting that dust production occurs even at low metallicity.

  3. The {ital COBE} Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background. I. Limits and Detections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, M.G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Arendt, R.G. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kelsall, T.; Dwek, E. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Odegard, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Freudenreich, H.T. [Raytheon STX, Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reach, W.T. [California Institute of Technology, IPAC/JPL, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Silverberg, R.F.; Moseley, S.H. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pei, Y.C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lubin, P. [Physics Department, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A. [Code 685, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Smoot, G.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Space Sciences Laboratory, Department of Physics, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Weiss, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 20F-001, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wilkinson, D.T. [Princeton University, Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Box 708, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wright, E.L. [UCLA, Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1562 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer ({ital COBE}) spacecraft was designed primarily to conduct a systematic search for an isotropic cosmic infrared background (CIB) in 10 photometric bands from 1.25 to 240 {mu}m. The results of that search are presented here. Conservative limits on the CIB are obtained from the minimum observed brightness in all-sky maps at each wavelength, with the faintest limits in the DIRBE spectral range being at 3.5 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 64 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level) and at 240 {mu}m ({nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} {lt} 28 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, 95{percent} confidence level). The bright foregrounds from interplanetary dust scattering and emission, stars, and interstellar dust emission are the principal impediments to the DIRBE measurements of the CIB. These foregrounds have been modeled and removed from the sky maps. Assessment of the random and systematic uncertainties in the residuals and tests for isotropy show that only the 140 and 240 {mu}m data provide candidate detections of the CIB. The residuals and their uncertainties provide CIB upper limits more restrictive than the dark sky limits at wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 {mu}m. No plausible solar system or Galactic source of the observed 140 and 240 {mu}m residuals can be identified, leading to the conclusion that the CIB has been detected at levels of {nu}{ital I}{sub {nu}} = 25 {plus_minus} 7 and 14 {plus_minus} 3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1} at 140 and 240 {mu}m, respectively. The integrated energy from 140 to 240 {mu}m, 10.3 nW m{sup {minus}2} sr{sup {minus}1}, is about twice the integrated optical light from the galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field, suggesting that star formation might have been heavily enshrouded by dust at high redshift. The detections and upper limits reported here provide new constraints on models of the history of energy-releasing processes and dust

  4. Inhaled dust and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following: the respiratory system; respirable dust; the fate of inhaled dust; translocation and some general effects of inhaled dust; silicosis; experimental research on silica-related disease; natural fibrous silicates; asbestos dust levels and dust sources; asbestos-related diseases - asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma and other diseases, cancers at sites other than lung and pleura; experimental research relating to asbestos-related diseases; asbestos hazard - mineral types and hazardous occupations, neighbourhood and domestic hazard; silicates other than asbestos-man-made mineral fibres, mineral silicates and cement; metals; coal mine dust, industrial carbon and arsenic; natural and synthetic organic substances; dusts that provoke allergic alveolitis; tobacco smoke.

  5. Understanding (Galactic) Foreground Emission: A Road To Success For The LOFAR-EoR Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelic, Vibor; Lofar Eor Team, [Unknown

    The LOFAR-EoR experiment will use the innovative technology and capabilities of the radio telescope LOFAR to study the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). However, feeble cosmological radiation is swamped by the prominent foreground emission of our Galaxy and other extragalactic radio sources. This

  6. Sensitivity and foreground modelling for large-scale CMB B-mode polarization satellite missions

    CERN Document Server

    Remazeilles, M; Eriksen, H K K; Wehus, I K

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of large-scale B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are a fundamental goal of current and future CMB experiments. However, because of the much higher instrumental sensitivity, CMB experiments will be more sensitive to any imperfect modelling of the Galactic foreground polarization in the estimation of the primordial B-mode signal. We compare the sensitivity to B-modes for different concepts of CMB satellite missions (LiteBIRD, COrE, COrE+, PRISM, EPIC, PIXIE) in the presence of Galactic foregrounds that are either correctly or incorrectly modelled. We quantify the impact on the tensor-to-scalar parameter of imperfect foreground modelling in the component separation process. Using Bayesian parametric fitting and Gibbs sampling, we perform the separation of the CMB and the Galactic foreground B-mode polarization. The resulting CMB B-mode power spectrum is used to compute the likelihood distribution of the tensor-to-scalar ratio. We focus the analysis to the very large angula...

  7. A foreground object features-based stereoscopic image visual comfort assessment model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Jiang, G.; Ying, H.; Yu, M.; Ding, S.; Peng, Z.; Shao, F.

    2014-11-01

    Since stereoscopic images provide observers with both realistic and discomfort viewing experience, it is necessary to investigate the determinants of visual discomfort. By considering that foreground object draws most attention when human observing stereoscopic images. This paper proposes a new foreground object based visual comfort assessment (VCA) metric. In the first place, a suitable segmentation method is applied to disparity map and then the foreground object is ascertained as the one having the biggest average disparity. In the second place, three visual features being average disparity, average width and spatial complexity of foreground object are computed from the perspective of visual attention. Nevertheless, object's width and complexity do not consistently influence the perception of visual comfort in comparison with disparity. In accordance with this psychological phenomenon, we divide the whole images into four categories on the basis of different disparity and width, and exert four different models to more precisely predict its visual comfort in the third place. Experimental results show that the proposed VCA metric outperformance other existing metrics and can achieve a high consistency between objective and subjective visual comfort scores. The Pearson Linear Correlation Coefficient (PLCC) and Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient (SROCC) are over 0.84 and 0.82, respectively.

  8. Effects of Numerical Versus Foreground-Only Icon Displays on Understanding of Risk Magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Eric R; Gabard, Alexis R; Groves, Aislinn E; Lipkus, Isaac M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to advance knowledge of how to measure gist and verbatim understanding of risk magnitude information and to apply this knowledge to address whether graphics that focus on the number of people affected (the numerator of the risk ratio, i.e., the foreground) are effective displays for increasing (a) understanding of absolute and relative risk magnitudes and (b) risk avoidance. In 2 experiments, the authors examined the effects of a graphical display that used icons to represent the foreground information on measures of understanding (Experiments 1 and 2) and on perceived risk, affect, and risk aversion (Experiment 2). Consistent with prior findings, this foreground-only graphical display increased perceived risk and risk aversion; however, it also led to decreased understanding of absolute (although not relative) risk magnitudes. Methodologically, this work shows the importance of distinguishing understanding of absolute risk from understanding of relative risk magnitudes, and the need to assess gist knowledge of both types of risk. Substantively, this work shows that although using foreground-only graphical displays is an appealing risk communication strategy to increase risk aversion, doing so comes at the cost of decreased understanding of absolute risk magnitudes.

  9. Foreground effect on the J-factor estimation of classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Koji; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Ibe, Masahiro; Sugai, Hajime; Hayashi, Kohei; Horigome, Shun-ichi

    2017-07-01

    The gamma-ray observation of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is a promising approach to search for the dark matter annihilation (or decay) signal. The dSphs are the nearby satellite galaxies with a clean environment and dense dark matter halo so that they give stringent constraints on the O(1) TeV dark matter. However, recent studies have revealed that current estimation of astrophysical factors relevant for the dark matter searches are not conservative, where the various non-negligible systematic uncertainties are not taken into account. Among them, the effect of foreground stars on the astrophysical factors has not been paid much attention, which becomes more important for deeper and wider stellar surveys in the future. In this article, we assess the effects of the foreground contamination by generating the mock samples of stars and using a model of future spectrographs. We investigate various data cuts to optimize the quality of the data and find that the cuts on the velocity and surface gravity can efficiently eliminate the contamination. We also propose a new likelihood function that includes the foreground distribution function. We apply this likelihood function to the fit of the three types of the mock data (Ursa Minor, Draco with large dark matter halo and Draco with small halo) and three cases of the observation. The likelihood successfully reproduces the input J-factor value while the fit without considering the foreground distribution gives a large deviation from the input value by a factor of 3.

  10. Foreground contamination in Ly-alpha intensity mapping during the epoch of reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Santos, Mario G

    2013-01-01

    The intensity mapping of Ly-alpha emission during the epoch of reionization (EoR) will be contaminated by foreground emission lines from lower redshifts. We calculate the mean intensity and power spectrum of Ly-alpha emission at z~7, and estimate the uncertainties according to the relevant astrophysical processes. We find that the low-redshift emission lines from 6563 A H-alpha, 5007 A [OIII] and 3727 A [OII] will be the strong contaminants on the observed Ly-alpha power spectrum. We make use of both the star formation rate (SFR) and luminosity functions (LF) to estimate the mean intensity and power spectra of the three foreground lines at z~0.5 for H-alpha, z~0.9 for [OIII] and z~1.6 for [OII], as they will contaminate the Ly-alpha emission at z~7. The [OII] line is found to be the strongest. We analyze the masking of the bright survey pixels with a foreground line above some line intensity threshold as a way to reduce the contamination in the intensity mapping survey. We find that the foreground contaminati...

  11. The foregrounding of place in Trainspotting: A discourse-stylistic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Møller; Herrmann, Cassandra; Myrup Thiesson, Tine

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how place is foregrounded through language in Irvine Welsh’s 1993 novel Trainspotting. We establish that many of the linguistic features occurring in the novel are associated with and represent Scots, a stigmatised language variety of Scotland. Drawing on Silverstein...

  12. A Fast Method for Power Spectrum and Foreground Analysis for 21 cm Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Joshua S; Tegmark, Max

    2012-01-01

    We develop and demonstrate an acceleration of the Liu & Tegmark quadratic estimator formalism for inverse variance foreground subtraction and power spectrum estimation in 21 cm tomography from O(N^3) to O(N log N), where N is the number of voxels of data. This technique makes feasible the megavoxel scale analysis necessary for current and upcoming radio interferometers by making only moderately restrictive assumptions about foreground models and survey geometry. We exploit iterative and Monte Carlo techniques and the symmetries of the foreground covariance matrices to quickly estimate the 21 cm brightness temperature power spectrum, P(k_parallel, k_perpendicular), the Fisher information matrix, the error bars, the window functions, and the bias. We also extend the Liu & Tegmark foreground model to include bright point sources with known positions in a way that scales as O[(N log N)(N point sources)] < O(N^5/3). As a first application of our method, we forecast error bars and window functions for th...

  13. NIC: a robust background extraction algorithm for foreground detection in dynamic scenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynh-The, Thien; Banos, Oresti; Lee, Sungyoung; Kang, Byeong Ho; Kim, Eun-Soo; Le-Tien, Thuong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a robust foreground detection method capable of adapting to different motion speeds in scenes. A key contribution of this paper is the background estimation using a proposed novel algorithm, neighbor-based intensity correction (NIC), that identifies and modifies the motion pixels

  14. Segmentation of foreground apple targets by fusing visual attention mechanism and growth rules of seed points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, W.; Shang, W.; Shao, Y.; Wang, D.; Yu, X.; Song, H.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate segmentation of apple targets is one of the most important problems to be solved in the vision system of apple picking robots. This work aimed to solve the difficulties that background targets often bring to foreground targets segmentation, by fusing the visual attention mechanism and the growth rule of seed points. Background targets could be eliminated by extracting the ROI (region of interest) of apple targets; the ROI was roughly segmented on the HSV color space, and then each of the pixels was used as a seed growing point. The growth rule of the seed points was adopted to obtain the whole area of apple targets from seed growing points. The proposed method was tested with 20 images captured in a natural scene, including 54 foreground apple targets and approximately 84 background apple targets. Experimental results showed that the proposed method can remove background targets and focus on foreground targets, while the k-means algorithm and the chromatic aberration algorithm cannot. Additionally, its average segmentation error rate was 13.23%, which is 2.71% higher than that of the k-means algorithm and 2.95% lower than that of the chromatic aberration algorithm. In conclusion, the proposed method contributes to the vision system of apple-picking robots to locate foreground apple targets quickly and accurately under a natural scene. (Author)

  15. The effect of Galactic foreground subtraction on redshifted 21-cm observations of quasar HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Geil, Paul M; Petrovic, Nada; Oh, Peng

    2008-01-01

    We assess the impact of Galactic synchrotron foreground removal on the observation of high-redshift quasar HII regions in redshifted 21-cm emission. We consider the case where a quasar is observed in an intergalactic medium (IGM) whose ionisation structure evolves slowly relative to the light crossing time of the HII region, as well as the case where the evolution is rapid. The latter case is expected towards the end of the reionisation era where the highest redshift luminous quasars will be observed. In the absence of foregrounds the fraction of neutral hydrogen in the IGM could be measured directly from the contrast between the HII region and surrounding IGM. However, we find that foreground removal lowers the observed contrast between the HII region and the IGM. This indicates that measurement of the neutral fraction would require modelling to correct for this systematic effect. On the other hand, foreground removal does not modify the most prominent features of the 21-cm maps. Using a simple algorithm we ...

  16. The Marriage of Gas and Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D. J.; Laibe, G.

    2015-10-01

    Dust-gas mixtures are the simplest example of a two fluid mixture. We show that when simulating such mixtures with particles or with particles coupled to grids a problem arises due to the need to resolve a very small length scale when the coupling is strong. Since this is occurs in the limit when the fluids are well coupled, we show how the dust-gas equations can be reformulated to describe a single fluid mixture. The equations are similar to the usual fluid equations supplemented by a diffusion equation for the dust-to-gas ratio or alternatively the dust fraction. This solves a number of numerical problems as well as making the physics clear.

  17. The marriage of gas and dust

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Dust-gas mixtures are the simplest example of a two fluid mixture. We show that when simulating such mixtures with particles or with particles coupled to grids a problem arises due to the need to resolve a very small length scale when the coupling is strong. Since this is occurs in the limit when the fluids are well coupled, we show how the dust-gas equations can be reformulated to describe a single fluid mixture. The equations are similar to the usual fluid equations supplemented by a diffusion equation for the dust-to-gas ratio or alternatively the dust fraction. This solves a number of numerical problems as well as making the physics clear.

  18. The problematic growth of dust in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Andrea; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Dust growth via accretion of gas species has been proposed as the dominant process to increase the amount of dust in galaxies. We show here that this hypothesis encounters severe difficulties that make it unfit to explain the observed UV and IR properties of such systems, particularly at high redshifts. Dust growth in the diffuse ISM phases is hampered by (a) too slow accretion rates; (b) too high dust temperatures, and (c) the Coulomb barrier that effectively blocks accretion. In molecular clouds these problems are largely alleviated. Grains are cold (but not colder than the CMB temperature). However, in dense environments accreted materials form icy water mantles, perhaps with impurities. Mantles are immediately (1 yr) photo-desorbed as grains return to the diffuse ISM at the end of the cloud lifetime, thus erasing any memory of the growth. We conclude that dust attenuating stellar light at high-z must be ready-made stardust largely produced in supernova ejecta.

  19. Large-scale Inference Problems in Astronomy: Building a 3D Galactic Dust Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The term ''Big Data'' has become trite, as modern technology has made data sets of terabytes or even petabytes easy to store. Such data sets provide a sandbox in which to develop new statistical inference techniques that can extract interesting results from increasingly rich (and large) databases. I will give an example from my work on mapping the interstellar dust of the Milky Way. 2D emission-based maps have been used for decades to estimate the reddening and emission from interstellar dust, with applications from CMB foregrounds to surveys of large-scale structure. For studies within the Milky Way, however, the third dimension is required. I will present our work on a 3D dust map based on Pan-STARRS1 and 2MASS over 3/4 of the sky (http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.01005), assess its usefulness relative to other dust maps, and discuss future work. Supported by the NSF.

  20. Forecasting performance of CMB experiments in the presence of complex foreground contaminations

    CERN Document Server

    Stompor, Radek; Poletti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We present a new, semi-analytic framework for estimating the level of residuals present in CMB maps derived from multi-frequency Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data and forecasting their impact on cosmological parameters. The data are assumed to contain non-negligible signals of astrophysical and/or Galactic origin, which we clean using parametric component separation technique. We account for discrepancies between the foreground model assumed during the separation procedure and the true one, allowing for differences in scaling laws and/or their spatial variations. Our estimates and their uncertainties include both systematic and statistical effects and are averaged over the instrumental noise and CMB signal realizations. The framework can be further extended to account self-consistently for existing uncertainties in the foreground models. We demonstrate and validate the framework on simple study cases which aim at estimating the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r. The proposed approach is computationally efficient...

  1. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  2. Asian dust events of April 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husar, R. B.; Tratt, D. M.; Schichtel, B. A.; Falke, S. R.; Li, F.; Jaffe, D.; Gassó, S.; Gill, T.; Laulainen, N. S.; Lu, F.; Reheis, M. C.; Chun, Y.; Westphal, D.; Holben, B. N.; Gueymard, C.; McKendry, I.; Kuring, N.; Feldman, G. C.; McClain, C.; Frouin, R. J.; Merrill, J.; Dubois, D.; Vignola, F.; Murayama, T.; Nickovic, S.; Wilson, W. E.; Sassen, K.; Sugimoto, N.; Malm, W. C.

    2001-08-01

    On April 15 and 19, 1998, two intense dust storms were generated over the Gobi desert by springtime low-pressure systems descending from the northwest. The windblown dust was detected and its evolution followed by its yellow color on SeaWiFS satellite images, routine surface-based monitoring, and through serendipitous observations. The April 15 dust cloud was recirculating, and it was removed by a precipitating weather system over east Asia. The April 19 dust cloud crossed the Pacific Ocean in 5 days, subsided to the surface along the mountain ranges between British Columbia and California, and impacted severely the optical and the concentration environments of the region. In east Asia the dust clouds increased the albedo over the cloudless ocean and land by up to 10-20%, but it reduced the near-UV cloud reflectance, causing a yellow coloration of all surfaces. The yellow colored backscattering by the dust eludes a plausible explanation using simple Mie theory with constant refractive index. Over the West Coast the dust layer has increased the spectrally uniform optical depth to about 0.4, reduced the direct solar radiation by 30-40%, doubled the diffuse radiation, and caused a whitish discoloration of the blue sky. On April 29 the average excess surface-level dust aerosol concentration over the valleys of the West Coast was about 20-50 μg/m3 with local peaks >100 μg/m3. The dust mass mean diameter was 2-3 μm, and the dust chemical fingerprints were evident throughout the West Coast and extended to Minnesota. The April 1998 dust event has impacted the surface aerosol concentration 2-4 times more than any other dust event since 1988. The dust events were observed and interpreted by an ad hoc international web-based virtual community. It would be useful to set up a community-supported web-based infrastructure to monitor the global aerosol pattern for such extreme aerosol events, to alert and to inform the interested communities, and to facilitate collaborative

  3. Asian dust events of April 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husar, R.B.; Tratt, D.M.; Schichtel, B.A.; Falke, S.R.; Li, F.; Jaffe, D.; Gasso, S.; Gill, T.; Laulainen, N.S.; Lu, F.; Reheis, M.C.; Chun, Y.; Westphal, D.; Holben, B.N.; Gueymard, C.; McKendry, I.; Kuring, N.; Feldman, G.C.; McClain, C.; Frouin, R.J.; Merrill, J.; DuBois, D.; Vignola, F.; Murayama, T.; Nickovic, S.; Wilson, W.E.; Sassen, K.; Sugimoto, N.; Malm, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    On April 15 and 19, 1998, two intense dust storms were generated over the Gobi desert by springtime low-pressure systems descending from the northwest. The windblown dust was detected and its evolution followed by its yellow color on SeaWiFS satellite images, routine surface-based monitoring, and through serendipitous observations. The April 15 dust cloud was recirculating, and it was removed by a precipitating weather system over east Asia. The April 19 dust cloud crossed the Pacific Ocean in 5 days, subsided to the surface along the mountain ranges between British Columbia and California, and impacted severely the optical and the concentration environments of the region. In east Asia the dust clouds increased the albedo over the cloudless ocean and land by up to 10-20%, but it reduced the near-UV cloud reflectance, causing a yellow coloration of all surfaces. The yellow colored backscattering by the dust eludes a plausible explanation using simple Mie theory with constant refractive index. Over the West Coast the dust layer has increased the spectrally uniform optical depth to about 0.4, reduced the direct solar radiation by 30-40%, doubled the diffuse radiation, and caused a whitish discoloration of the blue sky. On April 29 the average excess surface-level dust aerosol concentration over the valleys of the West Coast was about 20-50 ??g/m3 with local peaks >100 ??g/m3. The dust mass mean diameter was 2-3 ??m, and the dust chemical fingerprints were evident throughout the West Coast and extended to Minnesota. The April 1998 dust event has impacted the surface aerosol concentration 2-4 times more than any other dust event since 1988. The dust events were observed and interpreted by an ad hoc international web-based virtual community. It would be useful to set up a community-supported web-based infrastructure to monitor the global aerosol pattern for such extreme aerosol events, to alert and to inform the interested communities, and to facilitate collaborative

  4. Initiating GrabCut by Color Difference for Automatic Foreground Extraction of Passport Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangüesa, Adriá Arbués; Jørgensen, Nicolai Krogh; Larsen, Christian Aagaard;

    2016-01-01

    Grabcut, an iterative algorithm based on Graph Cut, is a popular foreground segmentation method. However, it suffers from a main drawback: a manual interaction is required in order to start segmenting the image. In this paper, four different methods based on image pairs are used to obtain an init...... faced, such as the segmentation in hair regions or tests in a non-uniform background scenario....

  5. From foreground to background: how task-neutral context influences contextual cueing of visual search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian eZang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Selective attention determines the effectiveness of implicit contextual learning (e.g., Jiang & Leung, 2005. Visual foreground-background segmentation, on the other hand, is a key process in the guidance of attention (Wolfe, 2003. In the present study, we examined the impact of foreground-background segmentation on contextual cueing of visual search in three experiments. A visual search display, consisting of distractor ‘L’s and a target ‘T’, was overlaid on a task-neutral cuboid on the same depth plane (Experiment 1, on stereoscopically separated depth planes (Experiment 2, or spread over the entire display on the same depth plane (Experiment 3. Half of the search displays contained repeated target-distractor arrangements, whereas the other half was always newly generated. The task-neutral cuboid was constant during an initial training session, but was either rotated by 90º or entirely removed in the subsequent test sessions. We found that the gains resulting from repeated presentation of display arrangements during training (i.e., contextual-cueing effects were diminished when the cuboid was changed or removed in Experiment 1, but remained intact in Experiments 2 and 3 when the cuboid was placed in a different depth plane, or when the items were randomly spread over the whole display but not on the edges of the cuboid. These findings suggest that foreground-background segmentation occurs prior to contextual learning, and only objects/arrangements that are grouped as foreground are learned over the course of repeated visual search.

  6. BAYESIAN SEMI-BLIND COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR FOREGROUND REMOVAL IN INTERFEROMETRIC 21 cm OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Le; Timbie, Peter T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bunn, Emory F. [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Sutter, P. M. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wandelt, Benjamin D., E-mail: lzhang263@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 W Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we present a new Bayesian semi-blind approach for foreground removal in observations of the 21 cm signal measured by interferometers. The technique, which we call H i Expectation–Maximization Independent Component Analysis (HIEMICA), is an extension of the Independent Component Analysis technique developed for two-dimensional (2D) cosmic microwave background maps to three-dimensional (3D) 21 cm cosmological signals measured by interferometers. This technique provides a fully Bayesian inference of power spectra and maps and separates the foregrounds from the signal based on the diversity of their power spectra. Relying only on the statistical independence of the components, this approach can jointly estimate the 3D power spectrum of the 21 cm signal, as well as the 2D angular power spectrum and the frequency dependence of each foreground component, without any prior assumptions about the foregrounds. This approach has been tested extensively by applying it to mock data from interferometric 21 cm intensity mapping observations under idealized assumptions of instrumental effects. We also discuss the impact when the noise properties are not known completely. As a first step toward solving the 21 cm power spectrum analysis problem, we compare the semi-blind HIEMICA technique to the commonly used Principal Component Analysis. Under the same idealized circumstances, the proposed technique provides significantly improved recovery of the power spectrum. This technique can be applied in a straightforward manner to all 21 cm interferometric observations, including epoch of reionization measurements, and can be extended to single-dish observations as well.

  7. Effects of foreground scale in texture discrimination tasks: performance is size, shape, and content specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, B S; Sagi, D

    1993-01-01

    Textural gradients can be defined as differences across space in orientation and spatial frequency content, along with absolute luminance and contrast. In this study, stimuli were created with gradients of these types to see how changing the size and shape of the foreground region affects the psychophysical task. The foreground regions were designed as clusters of target texels alternating with interplaced background texels (of the same cluster size). This design gives rise to a texture square-wave, with texture frequency defined by the distance from the beginning of one target cluster to the next. It was found that for stimuli with vertical and horizontal Gabor patches, the relationship between the global and local orientation of the foreground region is a critical variable, indicating some global-local interaction. When the global orientation of the foreground region is orthogonal to local target texel orientation, visibility is optimal for high texture frequencies, while for parallel arrangements, low texture frequencies are most visible. The latter result was also found to a lesser degree for tasks involving contrast gradients as well as spatial-frequency gradients, but with no effect caused by varying the global orientation. The results indicate the existence of a second-stage filter that integrates (across space) responses of similar first-stage spatial filters, and then sums the resultant activities with those of orthogonal first-stage filters, whose spatial proximity are to the sides of the local orientation. The size of these integrating mechanisms may extend to more than 7 deg, with connections between smoothed activities of filters with orthogonal orientations spanning approximately 1-2 deg.

  8. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  9. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  10. Erasing the Variable: Empirical Foreground Discovery for Global 21 cm Spectrum Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Eric R.; Liu, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Spectral measurements of the 21 cm monopole background have the promise of revealing the bulk energetic properties and ionization state of our universe from z approx. 6 - 30. Synchrotron foregrounds are orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal, and are the principal challenge faced by these experiments. While synchrotron radiation is thought to be spectrally smooth and described by relatively few degrees of freedom, the instrumental response to bright foregrounds may be much more complex. To deal with such complexities, we develop an approach that discovers contaminated spectral modes using spatial fluctuations of the measured data. This approach exploits the fact that foregrounds vary across the sky while the signal does not. The discovered modes are projected out of each line-of-sight of a data cube. An angular weighting then optimizes the cosmological signal amplitude estimate by giving preference to lower-noise regions. Using this method, we show that it is essential for the passband to be stable to at least approx. 10(exp -4). In contrast, the constraints on the spectral smoothness of the absolute calibration are mainly aesthetic if one is able to take advantage of spatial information. To the extent it is understood, controlling polarization to intensity leakage at the approx. 10(exp -2) level will also be essential to rejecting Faraday rotation of the polarized synchrotron emission. Subject headings: dark ages, reionization, first stars - methods: data analysis - methods: statistical

  11. Non-parametric foreground subtraction for 21cm epoch of reionization experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Harker, Geraint; Bernardi, Gianni; Brentjens, Michiel A; De Bruyn, A G; Ciardi, Benedetta; Jelic, Vibor; Koopmans, Leon V E; Labropoulos, Panagiotis; Mellema, Garrelt; Offringa, Andre; Pandey, V N; Schaye, Joop; Thomas, Rajat M; Yatawatta, Sarod

    2009-01-01

    An obstacle to the detection of redshifted 21cm emission from the epoch of reionization (EoR) is the presence of foregrounds which exceed the cosmological signal in intensity by orders of magnitude. We argue that in principle it would be better to fit the foregrounds non-parametrically - allowing the data to determine their shape - rather than selecting some functional form in advance and then fitting its parameters. Non-parametric fits often suffer from other problems, however. We discuss these before suggesting a non-parametric method, Wp smoothing, which seems to avoid some of them. After outlining the principles of Wp smoothing we describe an algorithm used to implement it. We then apply Wp smoothing to a synthetic data cube for the LOFAR EoR experiment. The performance of Wp smoothing, measured by the extent to which it is able to recover the variance of the cosmological signal and to which it avoids leakage of power from the foregrounds, is compared to that of a parametric fit, and to another non-parame...

  12. Faraday tomography of the local interstellar medium with LOFAR: Galactic foregrounds towards IC 342

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eck, C. L.; Haverkorn, M.; Alves, M. I. R.; Beck, R.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Enßlin, T.; Farnes, J. S.; Ferrière, K.; Heald, G.; Horellou, C.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Jelić, V.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Sobey, C.; Sridhar, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the interstellar medium (ISM), but are difficult to detect and characterize. The new generation of low-frequency radio telescopes, such as the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR: a Square Kilometre Array-low pathfinder), provides advancements in our capability of probing Galactic magnetism through low-frequency polarimetry. Maps of diffuse polarized radio emission and the associated Faraday rotation can be used to infer properties of, and trace structure in, the magnetic fields in the ISM. However, to date very little of the sky has been probed at high angular and Faraday depth resolution. We observed a 5° by 5° region centred on the nearby galaxy IC 342 (ℓ = 138.2°,b = + 10.6°) using the LOFAR high-band antennae in the frequency range 115-178 MHz. We imaged this region at 4'.5x3'.8 resolution and performed Faraday tomography to detect foreground Galactic polarized synchrotron emission separated by Faraday depth (different amounts of Faraday rotation). Our Faraday depth cube shows a rich polarized structure, with up to 30 K of polarized emission at 150 MHz. We clearly detect two polarized features that extend over most of the field, but are clearly separated in Faraday depth. Simulations of the behaviour of the depolarization of Faraday-thick structures at such low frequencies show that such structures would be too strongly depolarized to explain the observations. These structures are therefore rejected as the source of the observed polarized features. Only Faraday thin structures will not be strongly depolarized at low frequencies; producing such structures requires localized variations in the ratio of synchrotron emissivity to Faraday depth per unit distance. Such variations can arise from several physical phenomena, such as a transition between regions of ionized and (mostly) neutral gas. We conclude that the observed polarized emission is Faraday thin, and propose that the emission originates from two mostly neutral clouds in the local ISM

  13. Dust in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Armosky, Brad J.

    2004-01-01

    Space is seeming less and less like empty space as new discoveries and reexaminations fill in the gaps. And, ingenuity and technology, like the Spitzer Space Telescope, is allowing examination of the far reaches of the Milky Way and beyond. Even dust is getting its due, but not the dust everyone is familiar with. People seldom consider the dust in…

  14. Dust in the Circumgalactic Medium of Low-Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Peek, J E G; Corrales, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Using spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we present a detection of reddening due to dust in the circumgalactic medium of galaxies. We detect the mean change in the colors of "standard crayons" correlated with the presence of foreground galaxies at z ~0.05 as a function of angular separation. Following Peek & Graves (2010), we create standard crayons using passively evolving galaxies corrected for Milky Way reddening and color-redshift trends, leading to a sample with as little as 2% scatter in color. We devise methods to ameliorate possible systematic effects related to the estimation of colors, and we find an excess reddening induced by foreground galaxies at a level ranging from 10 to 0.5 millimagnitudes on scales ranging from 30 kpc to 1 Mpc. We attribute this effect to a large-scale distribution of dust around galaxies similar to the findings of Menard et al. 2010. We find that circumgalactic reddening is a weak function of stellar mass over the range $6 \\times 10^9 ...

  15. Modeling Thermal Dust Emission with Two Components: Application to the Planck HFI Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Meisner, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. (1999) two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck HFI maps. This parametrization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single modified blackbody (MBB) dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. (1999) based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.1' resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 micron data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.1' FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to...

  16. Radial transport of dust in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, E I; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations which detect dust at large galactocentric distances in the disks of spiral galaxies, we propose a mechanism of outward radial transport of dust by spiral stellar density waves. We consider spiral galaxies in which most of dust formation is localized inside the corotation radius. We show that in the disks of such spiral galaxies, the dust grains can travel over radial distances that exceed the corotation radius by roughly 25%. A fraction of the dust grains can be trapped on kidney-shaped stable orbits between the stellar spiral arms and thus can escape the destructive effect of supernova explosions. These grains form diffuse dusty spiral arms, which stretch 4-5 kpc from the sites of active star formation. About 10% of dust by mass injected inside corotation, can be transported over radial distances 3-4 kpc during approximately 1.0 Gyr. This is roughly an order of magnitude more efficient than can be provided by the turbulent motions.

  17. Impact of galactic and intergalactic dust on the stellar EBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavryčuk, V.

    2016-06-01

    Current theories assume that the low intensity of the stellar extragalactic background light (stellar EBL) is caused by finite age of the Universe because the finite-age factor limits the number of photons that have been pumped into the space by galaxies and thus the sky is dark in the night. We oppose this opinion and show that two main factors are responsible for the extremely low intensity of the observed stellar EBL. The first factor is a low mean surface brightness of galaxies, which causes a low luminosity density in the local Universe. The second factor is light extinction due to absorption by galactic and intergalactic dust. Dust produces a partial opacity of galaxies and of the Universe. The galactic opacity reduces the intensity of light from more distant background galaxies obscured by foreground galaxies. The inclination-averaged values of the effective extinction AV for light passing through a galaxy is about 0.2 mag. This causes that distant background galaxies become apparently faint and do not contribute to the EBL significantly. In addition, light of distant galaxies is dimmed due to absorption by intergalactic dust. Even a minute intergalactic opacity of 1 × 10^{-2} mag per Gpc is high enough to produce significant effects on the EBL. As a consequence, the EBL is comparable with or lower than the mean surface brightness of galaxies. Comparing both extinction effects, the impact of the intergalactic opacity on the EBL is more significant than the obscuration of distant galaxies by partially opaque foreground galaxies by factor of 10 or more. The absorbed starlight heats up the galactic and intergalactic dust and is further re-radiated at IR, FIR and micro-wave spectrum. Assuming static infinite universe with no galactic or intergalactic dust, the stellar EBL should be as high as the surface brightness of stars. However, if dust is considered, the predicted stellar EBL is about 290 nW m^{-2} sr^{-1}, which is only 5 times higher than the observed

  18. The Impact of Foregrounds on Redshift Space Distortion Measurements With the Highly-Redshifted 21 cm Line

    CERN Document Server

    Pober, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    The highly redshifted 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen has become recognized as a unique probe of cosmology from relatively low redshifts (z ~ 1) up through the Epoch of Reionization (z ~ 8) and even beyond. To date, most work has focused on recovering the spherically averaged power spectrum of the 21 cm signal, since this approach maximizes the signal-to-noise in the initial measurement. However, like galaxy surveys, the 21 cm signal is effected by redshift space distortion effects, and is inherently anisotropic between the line-of-sight and transverse directions. A full measurement of this anisotropy can yield unique cosmological information, potentially even isolating the matter power spectrum from astrophysical effects at high redshifts. However, foregrounds also have an anisotropic footprint between the line-of-sight and transverse directions: the so-called foreground "wedge". Although techniques to subtract foregrounds are actively being developed, a "foreground avoidance" approach of simply ignoring cont...

  19. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  20. Saline dust storms and their ecological impacts in arid regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilili; Abuduwaili

    2010-01-01

    In many arid and semiarid regions,saline playas represent a significant source of unconsoli-dated sediments available for aeolian transport,and severe saline dust storms occur frequently due to human disturbance.In this study,saline dust storms are reviewed systematically from the aspects of con-cept,general characteristics,conditions of occurrence,distribution and ecological impact.Our researches showed that saline dust storms are a kind of chemical dust storm originating in dry lake beds in arid and semiarid regions;large areas of unconsolidated saline playa sediments and frequent strong winds are the basic factors to saline dust storm occurrence;there are differentiation characteristics in deposition flux and chemical composition with wind-blown distance during saline dust storm diffusion;and saline dust storm diffusion to some extent increases glacier melt and results in soil salinization in arid regions.An under-standing of saline dust storms is important to guide disaster prevention and ecological rehabilitation.

  1. Modelling and simulation of large-scale polarized dust emission over the southern Galactic cap using the GASS HI data

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Tuhin; Martin, Peter G; Bracco, Andrea; Vansyngel, Flavien; Aumont, Jonathan; Bock, Jamie; Doré, Olivier; Haud, Urmas; Kalberla, Peter M W; Serra, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The Planck survey has quantified polarized Galactic foregrounds and established that they are a main limiting factor in the quest for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode signal induced by primordial gravitational waves during cosmic inflation. The necessity of achieving an accurate separation of the Galactic foregrounds therefore binds the search for the signal from cosmic inflation to our understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM). The two most relevant observational results coming out of Planck data analysis are the line of sight depolarization due to the fluctuations of the Galactic magnetic field orientation and the alignment of the dust filamentary structures with the magnetic field at high Galactic latitude. Furthermore, Planck and HI emission data in combination indicate that most of the dust filamentary structures are present in the cold neutral medium. The goal of this paper is to test whether together these salient observational results can account fully for the statistical p...

  2. High Energy Studies of Astrophysical Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia Racquel

    Astrophysical dust---any condensed matter ranging from tens of atoms to micron sized grains---accounts for about one third of the heavy elements produced in stars and disseminated into space. These tiny pollutants are responsible for producing the mottled appearance in the spray of light we call the "Milky Way." However these seemingly inert particles play a strong role in the physics of the interstellar medium, aiding star and planet formation, and perhaps helping to guide galaxy evolution. Most dust grains are transparent to X-ray light, leaving a signature of atomic absorption, but also scattering the light over small angles. Bright X-ray objects serendipitously situated behind large columns of dust and gas provide a unique opportunity to study the dust along the line of sight. I focus primarily on X-ray scattering through dust, which produces a diffuse halo image around a central point source. Such objects have been observed around X-ray bright Galactic binaries and extragalactic objects that happen to shine through the plane of the Milky Way. I use the Chandra X-ray Observatory, a space-based laboratory operated by NASA, which has imaging resolution ideal for studying X-ray scattering halos. I examine several bright X-ray objects with dust-free sight lines to test their viability as templates and develop a parametric model for the Chandra HETG point spread function (PSF). The PSF describes the instrument's imaging response to a point source, an understanding of which is necessary for properly measuring the surface brightness of X-ray scattering halos. I use an HETG observation of Cygnus X-3, one of the brightest objects available in the Chandra archive, to derive a dust grain size distribution. There exist degenerate solutions for the dust scattering halo, but with the aid of Bayesian analytics I am able to apply prior knowledge about the Cyg X-3 sight line to measure the relative abundance of dust in intervening Milky Way spiral arms. I also demonstrate how

  3. Probing Milky Way Structure with Near-Infrared Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasowski, Gail; Ménard, Brice; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Garcia-Hernandez, D.; García Pérez, Ana; Hayden, Michael R.; Hearty, Fred; Holtzman, Jon A.; Johnson, Jennifer; Kinemuchi, Karen; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Sellgren, Kristen; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Whelan, David G.; Wilson, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Astronomers have studied the set of interstellar absorption features known as the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) for nearly a century, characterizing them into families and using them as probes of local interstellar medium (ISM) conditions even while trying to understand their origin. Though most DIB studies have focused on the optical features, recent DIB identifications at infrared (IR) wavelengths -- where extinction by interstellar dust is significantly decreased -- provide us with tracers of ISM along heavily extincted, previously inaccessible sightlines. This talk will briefly summarize results from a project using the strongest of these IR DIBs (detected in more than 60,000 sightlines towards cool, distant giant stars observed as part of the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey) to characterize the large-scale distribution and properties of the Galactic ISM, including in the heavily reddened bulge and inner disk. The DIB absorption's tight correlation with foreground reddening makes it a powerful, independent probe of line-of-sight dust extinction. For the first time, we map the velocity field of a DIB on large scales and find that it displays the signature of the rotating Galactic disk. Three-dimensional modeling of the carrier distribution reveals not only large-scale gradients consistent with other ISM components, but also substructures that coincide with particular Galactic bulge and disk features. Finally, we find that features that are outliers in the distribution of DIB profile shapes may have an origin in circumstellar, rather than interstellar, environments along these particular sightlines, and the properties of these atypical features may contain clues towards identifying the currently-unknown carrier molecule of this DIB.

  4. All-Sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation Between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Z.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gold, B.

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free- model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed- models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100-240 micrometer maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-alpha model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (T(sub dust)) to be 13.7-22.7 (plus or minus 1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index (alpha) to be 1.2-3.1 (plus or minus 0.3) and the optical depth (tau) to range 0.6-46 x 10(exp -5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, we present all-sky evidence for an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, which fits the relation alpha = 1/(delta + omega (raised dot) T(sub dust) with delta = -.0.510 plus or minus 0.011 and omega = 0.059 plus or minus 0.001. This best model will be useful to cosmic microwave background experiments for removing foreground dust contamination and it can serve as an all-sky extended-frequency reference for future higher resolution dust models.

  5. Foregrounded Beauty:A Brief Analysis of Cummings’Typical Poems from the Perspective of Stylistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文荣

    2014-01-01

    E. E. Cummings is one of the representatives of American modern experimental poets whose poems are well-known for the unique style. Cummings endeavors to make his poems be different from other poets’. He broke the traditional way of writing poems, invented in the changing of lines of the poem and the spelling of the words in the poem, thus to make his personal poem style distinctive. Therefore, standing on the stylistic point of view, this paper makes a brief analysis on Cummings’typical poems from foregrounding perspective.

  6. Extinction and dust properties in a clumpy medium

    CERN Document Server

    Scicluna, P

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) The dust content of the universe is primarily explored via its interaction with stellar photons, producing interstellar extinction. However, owing to the physical extension of the observing beam, observations may detect scattered photons, resulting in a change in the observed (or effective) extinction, depending on the spatial distribution of the dust and the resolution of the instrument. We investigate the influence of clumpy dust distributions on effective extinction toward embedded sources and those in the diffuse ISM. We use Monte Carlo radiative transfer to examine effective extinction for various geometries. By varying the number, optical depth and volume-filling factor of clumps in models of spherical shells and the diffuse ISM, we explore the evolution of extinction. Depending on the number of scattering events in the beam, the extinction curve steepens in homogeneous media and flattens in clumpy media. As a result, clumpy dust distributions can to reproduce extinction curves with arbitrary...

  7. The dust mass in Cassiopeia A from a spatially resolved Herschel analysis

    CERN Document Server

    De Looze, I; Swinyard, B M; Rho, J; Gomez, H L; Matsuura, M; Wesson, R

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models predict that core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) can be efficient dust producers (0.1-1.0 Msun), potentially accounting for most of the dust production in the early Universe. Observational evidence for this dust production efficiency is however currently limited to only a few CCSN remnants (e.g., SN1987A, Crab Nebula). In this paper, we revisit the dust mass produced in Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a ~330-year old O-rich Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) embedded in a dense interstellar foreground and background. We present the first spatially resolved analysis of Cas A based on Spitzer and Herschel infrared and submillimetre data at a common resolution of ~0.6 arcmin for this 5 arcmin diameter remnant following a careful removal of contaminating line emission and synchrotron radiation. We fit the dust continuum from 17 to 500 micron with a four-component interstellar medium (ISM) and supernova (SN) dust model. We find a concentration of cold dust in the unshocked ejecta of Cas A and derive a mass of ...

  8. Dead Zones in protoplanetary disks : accumulation and coagulation of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, S.; Taillifet, E.

    2011-10-01

    The growth of micronic dust to macroscopical sizes (>meter) in a turbulent protoplanetary disk is still largely debated. In particular the dust coagulation process must go through two barriers imposed by their coupling with the gas: the "meter" barrier due to an efficient radial migration of dust when their Stokes number is about one and the "fragmentation barrier" implied by the critical fragmentation velocity (around cm/s) preventing any further growth of particle when they reach a macroscopic size due to the two fast relative velocities of particles. So, paradoxically, a protoplanetary disks may seem quite a hostile place for dust-growth, despite the frequent detection of exoplanets showing that planetary formation is in fact an efficient process. We then explore a new possibility suggested by the stratified nature of a protoplanetary disk. Protoplanetary disks are expected to harbour nonionized regions in their mid-plane, the so called "dead zone" inside which the gas flow should be laminar. Dust coagulation in these regions could be quite effective and in addition, since they are regions of low diffusivity, they are expected to be able to accumulate efficiently dust. Using hybrid numerical simulations, coupling dustgrowth and dust dynamics, we explore how dust penetrate a dead-zone and how dust coagulate up to macroscopic sizes and compare it to coagulation efficiency in the active layers of the disk, subject to turbulence. Different disk structures will be explored and discussed. Implication for observations by ALMA will be also presented.

  9. Operational Dust Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  10. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF PARTICLE TURBULENT DIFFUSION IN A NEW TYPE OF AXIAL CYCLONE DUST COLLECTOR%固体粒子在直流式除尘器中湍流脉动的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓兴勇; 凌志光; 姜小敏

    2000-01-01

    本文对直流除尘器涡室内固体粒子的湍流脉动现象进行了数值分析,通过气体速度随机脉动谱,把气相湍流运动对固体粒子运动的影响引入粒子的运动平衡方程中,用拉格朗日法模拟了粒子的轨迹及其扩散运动,应用四阶龙科库塔方法求解粒子的运动方程。计算结果表明对粒子的数值模拟可以较好地预测除尘器的性能,如除尘器的切割粒径%A numerical study has been conducted for the flow of adilute particle-laden gas flow in a new type of Axial Cyclone DustCollector (ACDC). The turbulent movements of particles were gottenfrom the calculation of the individual particle movement in the highlyturbulent gas flow in ACDC. The influence of turbulent gas fluctuationson particle motion was taken into account by means of gas velocity stochasticfluctuation spectrum. The three-dimensional motion of particle in ACDCwas described by the Lagrangian formulated deterministic equilibriumequations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme was used to solveparticle equilibrium equations. The calculation result shows that thenumerical simulations of solid particle could predict the performanceof Dust Collector, such as the cut-size of dust collectors

  11. The effect of foreground subtraction on cosmological measurements from intensity mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolz, L.; Abdalla, F. B.; Blake, C.; Shaw, J. R.; Chapman, E.; Rawlings, S.

    2014-07-01

    We model a 21-cm intensity mapping survey in the redshift range 0.01 fast independent component analysis technique. We present the power spectrum of the large-scale matter distribution, C(ℓ), before and after the application of this foreground removal method and calculate the systematic errors. Our simulations show a certain level of bias remains in the power spectrum at all scales ℓ < 400. At large-scales ℓ < 30 this bias is particularly significant. We measure the impact of these systematics in two ways: first we fit cosmological parameters to the broad-band shape of the C(ℓ) where we find that the best fit is significantly shifted at the 2-3σ level depending on masking and noise levels. However, secondly, we recover cosmic distances without biases at all simulated redshifts by fitting the baryon acoustic oscillations in the C(ℓ). We conclude that further advances in foreground removal are needed in order to recover unbiased information from the broad-band shape of the C(ℓ), however, intensity mapping experiments will be a powerful tool for mapping cosmic distances across a wide redshift range.

  12. Foreground effect on the $J$-factor estimation of classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Koji; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Ibe, Masahiro; Sugai, Hajime; Hayashi, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    The gamma-ray observation of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is a promising approach to search for the dark matter annihilation (or decay) signal. The dSphs are the nearby satellite galaxies with a clean environment and dense dark matter halo so that they give stringent constraints on the ${\\cal O}(1)$ TeV dark matter. However, recent studies have revealed that current estimation of astrophysical factors relevant for the dark matter searches are not conservative, where the various non-negligible systematic uncertainties are not taken into account. Among them, the effect of foreground stars on the astrophysical factors has not been paid much attention, which becomes more important for deeper and wider stellar surveys in the future. In this article, we assess the effects of the foreground contamination by generating the mock samples of stars and using a model of future spectrographs. We investigate various data cuts to optimize the quality of the data and find that the cuts on the velocity and surface gra...

  13. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abergel, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2014-01-01

    column densities lower than 1020 cm-2 that could be the signature of dust in the warm ionized medium. In the diffuse ISM at high Galactic latitude, we report an anticorrelation between Τ353/NH and Tobs while the dust specific luminosity, i.e., the total dust emission integrated over frequency (the...... is strong. To estimate Galactic E (B-V) in extragalactic fields at high latitude we develop a new method based on the thermal dust radiance, instead of the dust optical depth, calibrated to E (B-V) using reddening measurements of quasars deduced from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data....

  14. Probing the Cold Dust Emission in the AB Aur Disk: A Dust Trap in a Decaying Vortex? *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente, Asunción; Baruteau, Clément; Neri, Roberto; Carmona, Andrés; Agúndez, Marcelino; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Bachiller, Rafael; Cernicharo, José; Berné, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    One serious challenge for planet formation is the rapid inward drift of pebble-sized dust particles in protoplanetary disks. Dust trapping at local maxima in the disk gas pressure has received much theoretical attention but still lacks observational support. The cold dust emission in the AB Aur disk forms an asymmetric ring at a radius of about 120 au, which is suggestive of dust trapping in a gas vortex. We present high spatial resolution (0”.58×0”.78 ≈ 80×110 au) NOEMA observations of the 1.12 mm and 2.22 mm dust continuum emission from the AB Aur disk. Significant azimuthal variations of the flux ratio at both wavelengths indicate a size segregation of the large dust particles along the ring. Our continuum images also show that the intensity variations along the ring are smaller at 2.22 mm than at 1.12 mm, contrary to what dust trapping models with a gas vortex have predicted. Our two-fluid (gas+dust) hydrodynamical simulations demonstrate that this feature is well explained if the gas vortex has started to decay due to turbulent diffusion, and dust particles are thus losing the azimuthal trapping on different timescales depending on their size. The comparison between our observations and simulations allows us to constrain the size distribution and the total mass of solid particles in the ring, which we find to be of the order of 30 Earth masses, enough to form future rocky planets. PMID:28944000

  15. Searching for Inflationary B-modes: Can dust emission properties be extrapolated from 350 GHz to 150 GHz?

    CERN Document Server

    Tassis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Recent Planck results have shown that the path to isolating an inflationary B-mode signal in microwave polarization passes through understanding and modeling the interstellar dust polarized emission foreground, even in regions of the sky with the lowest level of dust emission. One of the most commonly used ways to remove the dust foreground is to extrapolate the polarized dust emission signal from frequencies where it dominates (e.g., 350 GHz) to frequencies commonly targeted by cosmic microwave background experiments (e.g., 150 GHz). We show, using a simple 2-cloud model, that if more than one cloud is present along the line-of-sight, with even mildly different temperature and dust column density, but severely misaligned magnetic field, then the 350 GHz polarized sky map is not predictive of that at 150 GHz. This problem is intrinsic to all microwave experiments and is due to information loss due to line-of-sight integration. However, it can be alleviated through interstellar medium tomography: a reconstruct...

  16. Stone dusting process advance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Ryan; David Humphreys [Mining Attachments (Qld.) Pty Ltd. (Australia)

    2009-01-15

    The coal mining industry has, for many years, used dry stone dust or calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) in the prevention of the propagation of coal dust explosions throughout their underground mines in Australia. In the last decade wet stone dusting has been introduced. This is where stone dust and water are mixed together to form a paste like slurry. This mixture is pumped and sprayed on to the underground roadway surfaces. This method solved the contamination of the intake airways but brought with it a new problem known as 'caking'. Caking is the hardened layer that is formed as the stone dust slurry dries. It was proven that this hardened layer compromises the dispersal characteristics of the stone dust and therefore its ability to suppress a coal dust explosion. This project set out to prove a specially formulated, non toxic slurry additive and process that could overcome the caking effect. The slurry additive process combines dry stone dust with water to form a slurry. The slurry is then treated with the additive and compressed air to create a highly vesicular foam like stone dusted surface. The initial testing on a range of additives and the effectiveness in minimising the caking effect of wet dusting were performed at Applied Chemical's research laboratory in Melbourne, Victoria and independently tested at the SGS laboratory in Paget, Queensland. The results from these tests provided the platform to conduct full scale spraying trials at the Queensland Mines Rescue Station and Caledon Coal's Cook Colliery, Blackwater. The project moved into the final stage of completion with the collection of data. The intent was to compare the slurry additive process to dry stone dusting in full-scale methane explosions at the CSIR Kloppersbos explosion facility in Kloppersbos, South Africa.

  17. Modeling the Radio Foreground for Detection of CMB Spectral Distortions from the Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana Rao, Mayuri; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Udaya Shankar, N.; Chluba, Jens

    2017-05-01

    Cosmic baryon evolution during the Cosmic Dawn and Reionization results in redshifted 21-cm spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These encode information about the nature and timing of first sources over redshifts 30-6 and appear at meter wavelengths as a tiny CMB distortion along with the Galactic and extragalactic radio sky, which is orders of magnitude brighter. Therefore, detection requires precise methods to model foregrounds. We present a method of foreground fitting using maximally smooth (MS) functions. We demonstrate the usefulness of MS functions over traditionally used polynomials to separate foregrounds from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) signal. We also examine the level of spectral complexity in plausible foregrounds using GMOSS, a physically motivated model of the radio sky, and find that they are indeed smooth and can be modeled by MS functions to levels sufficient to discern the vanilla model of the EoR signal. We show that MS functions are loss resistant and robustly preserve EoR signal strength and turning points in the residuals. Finally, we demonstrate that in using a well-calibrated spectral radiometer and modeling foregrounds with MS functions, the global EoR signal can be detected with a Bayesian approach with 90% confidence in 10 minutes’ integration.

  18. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jonghee; Hwang, Una

    2013-01-01

    The ejecta of the Cas A supernova remnant has a complex morphology, consisting of dense fast-moving line emitting knots and diffuse X-ray emitting regions that have encountered the reverse shock, as well as more slowly expanding, unshocked regions of the ejecta. Using the Spitzer 5-35 micron IRS data cube, and Herschel 70, 100, and 160 micron PACS data, we decompose the infrared emission from the remnant into distinct spectral components associated with the different regions of the ejecta. Such decomposition allows the association of different dust species with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories, and determination of the dust heating mechanisms. Our decomposition identified three characteristic dust spectra. The first, most luminous one, exhibits strong emission features at approx. 9 and 21 micron, and a weaker 12 micron feature, and is closely associated with the ejecta knots that have strong [Ar II] 6.99 micron and [Ar III] 8.99 micron emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low MgO-to-SiO2 ratios. A second, very different dust spectrum that has no indication of any silicate features, is best fit by Al2O3 dust and is found in association with ejecta having strong [Ne II] 12.8 micron and [Ne III] 15.6 micron emission lines. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that best matched by magnesium silicates with relatively high MgO-to-SiO2 ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray emitting shocked ejecta and the shocked interstellar/circumstellar material. All three spectral components include an additional featureless cold dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with [Si II] 34.8 micron emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. The dust mass giving rise to the warm dust component is about approx. 0.1solar M. However, most of the dust mass

  19. The dust mass in Cassiopeia A from a spatially resolved Herschel analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Looze, I.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Rho, J.; Gomez, H. L.; Matsuura, M.; Wesson, R.

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical models predict that core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) can be efficient dust producers (0.1-1.0 M⊙), potentially accounting for most of the dust production in the early Universe. Observational evidence for this dust production efficiency is however currently limited to only a few CCSN remnants (e.g. SN 1987A, Crab nebula). In this paper, we revisit the dust mass produced in Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a ∼330-yr old O-rich Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) embedded in a dense interstellar foreground and background. We present the first spatially resolved analysis of Cas A based on Spitzer and Herschel infrared and submillimetre data at a common resolution of ∼0.6 arcmin for this 5 arcmin diameter remnant following a careful removal of contaminating line emission and synchrotron radiation. We fit the dust continuum from 17 to 500 μm with a four-component interstellar medium and supernova (SN) dust model. We find a concentration of cold dust in the unshocked ejecta of Cas A and derive a mass of 0.3-0.5 M⊙ of silicate grains freshly produced in the SNR, with a lower limit of ≥0.1-0.2 M⊙. For a mixture of 50 per cent of silicate-type grains and 50 per cent of carbonaceous grains, we derive a total SN dust mass between 0.4 and 0.6 M⊙. These dust mass estimates are higher than from most previous studies of Cas A and support the scenario of SN-dominated dust production at high redshifts. We furthermore derive an interstellar extinction map for the field around Cas A which towards Cas A gives average values of AV = 6-8 mag, up to a maximum of AV = 15 mag.

  20. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  1. Dust evolution in the transition towards the denser ISM: impact on dust temperature, opacity, and spectral index

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Melanie; Jones, Anthony P

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the observed dust emission and extinction indicate a systematic evolution of grain properties in the transition from the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) to denser molecular clouds. The differences in the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) observed from the diffuse ISM to denser regions, namely an increase in the spectral index at long wavelengths, an increase in the FIR opacity, and a decrease in temperature, are usually assumed to be the result of changes in dust properties. We investigate if evolutionary processes, such as coagulation and accretion, are able to change the dust properties of grains in a way that is consistent with observations. We use a core-mantle grain model to describe diffuse ISM-type grains, and using DDA we calculate how the accretion of mantles and coagulation into aggregates vary the grain optical properties. We calculate the dust SED and extinction using DustEM and the radiative transfer code CRT. We show that the accretion of an aliphatic carbon mantle on diffu...

  2. Dust escape from Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    The Dust ballerina skirt is a set of well defined streams composed of nanometric sized dust particles that escape from the Jovian system and may be accelerated up to >=200 km/s. The source of this dust is Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar system. The escape of dust grains from Jupiter requires first the escape of these grains from Io. This work is basically devoted to explain this escape given that the driving of dust particles to great heights and later injection into the ionosphere of Io may give the particles an equilibrium potential that allow the magnetic field to accelerate them away from Io. The grain sizes obtained through this study match very well to the values required for the particles to escape from the Jovian system.

  3. Exploring the Cosmic Reionization Epoch in Frequency Space: An Improved Approach to Remove the Foreground in 21 cm Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jingying; An, Tao; Gu, Junhua; Guo, Xueying; Li, Weitian; Wang, Yu; Liu, Chengze; Martineau-Huynh, Olivier; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Aiming to correctly restore the redshifted 21 cm signals emitted by the neutral hydrogen during the cosmic reionization processes, we re-examine the separation approaches based on the quadratic polynomial fitting technique in frequency space to investigate whether they works satisfactorily with complex foreground, by quantitatively evaluate the quality of restored 21 cm signals in terms of sample statistics. We construct the foreground model to characterize both spatial and spectral substructures of the real sky, and use it to simulate the observed radio spectra. By comparing between different separation approaches through statistical analysis of restored 21 cm spectra and corresponding power spectra, as well as their constraints on the mean halo bias $b$ and average ionization fraction $x_e$ of the reionization processes, at $z=8$ and the noise level of 60 mK we find that, although the complex foreground can be well approximated with quadratic polynomial expansion, a significant part of Mpc-scale components ...

  4. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury VIII: A Wide-Area, High-Resolution Map of Dust Extinction in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Dalcanton, Julianne J; Hogg, David W; Lang, Dustin; Leroy, Adam K; Gordon, Karl D; Sandstrom, Karin; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F; Bell, Eric F; Dong, Hui; Gilbert, Karoline M; Gouliermis, Dimitrious A; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Lauer, Tod R; Schruba, Andreas; Seth, Anil C; Skillman, Evan D

    2015-01-01

    We map the distribution of dust in M31 at 25pc resolution, using stellar photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. We develop a new mapping technique that models the NIR color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of red giant branch (RGB) stars. The model CMDs combine an unreddened foreground of RGB stars with a reddened background population viewed through a log-normal column density distribution of dust. Fits to the model constrain the median extinction, the width of the extinction distribution, and the fraction of reddened stars. The resulting extinction map has >4 times better resolution than maps of dust emission, while providing a more direct measurement of the dust column. There is superb morphological agreement between the new map and maps of the extinction inferred from dust emission by Draine et al. 2014. However, the widely-used Draine & Li (2007) dust models overpredict the observed extinction by a factor of ~2.5, suggesting that M31's true dust mass is lower and that dust grains are sign...

  5. Foregrounding Sociomaterial Practice in Our Understanding of Affordances: The Skilled Intentionality Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Ludger; Rietveld, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Social coordination and affordance perception always take part in concrete situations in real life. Nonetheless, the different fields of ecological psychology studying these phenomena do not seem to make this situated nature an object of study. To integrate both fields and extend the reach of the ecological approach, we introduce the Skilled Intentionality Framework that situates both social coordination and affordance perception within the human form of life and its rich landscape of affordances. We argue that in the human form of life the social and the material are intertwined and best understood as sociomateriality. Taking the form of life as our starting point foregrounds sociomateriality in each perspective we take on engaging with affordances. Using ethnographical examples we show how sociomateriality shows up from three different perspectives we take on affordances in a real-life situation. One perspective shows us a landscape of affordances that the sociomaterial environment offers. Zooming in on this landscape to the perspective of a local observer, we can focus on an individual coordinating with affordances offered by things and other people situated in this landscape. Finally, viewed from within this unfolding activity, we arrive at the person’s lived perspective: a field of relevant affordances solicits activity. The Skilled Intentionality Framework offers a way of integrating social coordination and affordance theory by drawing attention to these complementary perspectives. We end by showing a real-life example from the practice of architecture that suggests how this situated view that foregrounds sociomateriality can extend the scope of ecological psychology to forms of so-called “higher” cognition.

  6. IRAS observations of the diffuse infrared background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, M. G.; Gillett, F. C.; Low, F. J.; Gautier, T. N.; Beichman, C. A.; Aumann, H. H.; Neugebauer, G.; Baud, B.; Boggess, N.; Emerson, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    IRAS data reveal bright emission from interplanetary dust which dominates the celestial background at 12, 25, and 60 microns except near the galactic plane. At 100 microns, interplanetary dust emission is prominent only near the ecliptic plane; diffuse galactic emission is found over the rest of the sky. At the galactic poles, the observed brightness implies that A(v) is likely to be of order 0.1 mag. The angular variation of the zodiacal emission in the ecliptic plane and in the plane at elongation 90 deg, and an annual modulation of the ecliptic pole brightness, are generally consistent with previously determined interplanetary dust distributions.

  7. Self-diffusion in a stochastically heated two-dimensional dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion in a two-dimensional dusty plasma liquid (i.e., a Yukawa liquid) is studied experimentally. The dusty plasma liquid is heated stochastically by a surrounding three-dimensional toroidal dusty plasma gas which acts as a thermal reservoir. The measured dust velocity distribution functions are isotropic Maxwellians, giving a well-defined kinetic temperature. The mean-square displacement for dust particles is found to increase linearly with time, indicating normal diffusion. The measured diffusion coefficients increase approximately linearly with temperature. The effective collision rate is dominated by collective dust-dust interactions rather than neutral gas drag, and is comparable to the dusty-plasma frequency.

  8. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  9. Spinning dust emission from ultrasmall silicates: emissivity and polarization spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem; Lan, Nguyen Quynh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. It is believed that the AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we assume that a population of ultrasmall silicate grains may exist in the ISM, and quantify rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We found that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when those small grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing the dipole moment per atom ($\\beta$) and can reach $P\\sim 20\\%$ for $\\beta\\sim 0.1$D at grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space $(\\beta,Y_{Si})$ for silicate nanoparticles in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the ob...

  10. The Dust-to-Gas Ratio in the Small Magellanic Cloud Tail

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, K D; Müller, E; Misselt, K A; Bolatto, A; Bernard, J -P; Reach, W; Engelbracht, C W; Babler, B; Bracker, S; Block, M; Clayton, G C; Hora, J; Indebetouw, R; Israel, F P; Li, A; Madden, S; Meade, M; Meixner, M; Sewilo, M; Shiao, B; Smith, L J; van Loon, J Th; Whitney, B A

    2008-01-01

    The Tail region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was imaged using the MIPS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the SAGE-SMC Spitzer Legacy. Diffuse infrared emission from dust was detected in all the MIPS bands. The Tail gas-to-dust ratio was measured to be 1200 +/- 350 using the MIPS observations combined with existing IRAS and HI observations. This gas-to-dust ratio is higher than the expected 500-800 from the known Tail metallicity indicating possible destruction of dust grains. Two cluster regions in the Tail were resolved into multiple sources in the MIPS observations and local gas-to-dust ratios were measured to be ~440 and ~250 suggests dust formation and/or significant amounts of ionized gas in these regions. These results support the interpretation that the SMC Tail is a tidal tail recently stripped from the SMC that includes gas, dust, and young stars.

  11. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  12. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  13. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  14. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71, al Farabi ave., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  15. Properties of the Diffuse X-ray Background toward MBM20 with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Sen-Gupta, A; Koutroumpa, D; Smith, R; Lallement, R

    2009-01-01

    We used Suzaku observations of the molecular cloud MBM20 and a low neutral hydrogen column density region nearby to separate and characterize the foreground and background diffuse X-ray emission. A comparison with a previous observation of the same regions with XMM-Newton indicates a significant change in the foreground flux which is attributed to Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX). The data have also been compared with previous results from similar "shadow" experiments and with a SWCX model to characterize its O VII and O VIII emission.

  16. The Youth Worker as Jazz Improviser: Foregrounding Education "In the Moment" within the Professional Development of Youth Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Pete

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues for the foregrounding of improvisation and education "in the moment" within youth workers' professional development. Devised in collaboration with third-year Youth and Community Work students and lecturers at a university in Birmingham, this participatory action research project drew on work of jazz…

  17. NGC 1980 Is Not a Foreground Population of Orion: Spectroscopic Survey of Young Stars with Low Extinction in Orion A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Min; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel; Zhang, Lan; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Alonso-Martínez, Miguel; Eiroa, Carlos; Wang, Hongchi

    2017-04-01

    We perform a spectroscopic survey of the foreground population in Orion A with MMT/Hectospec. We use these data, along with archival spectroscopic data and photometric data, to derive spectral types, extinction values, and masses for 691 stars. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope data, we characterize the disk properties of these sources. We identify 37 new transition disk (TD) objects, 1 globally depleted disk candidate, and 7 probable young debris disks. We discover an object with a mass of less than 0.018-0.030 M ⊙, which harbors a flaring disk. Using the Hα emission line, we characterize the accretion activity of the sources with disks, and confirm that the fraction of accreting TDs is lower than that of optically thick disks (46% ± 7% versus 73% ± 9%, respectively). Using kinematic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and APOGEE INfrared Spectroscopy of the Young Nebulous Clusters program (IN-SYNC), we confirm that the foreground population shows similar kinematics to their local molecular clouds and other young stars in the same regions. Using the isochronal ages, we find that the foreground population has a median age of around 1-2 Myr, which is similar to that of other young stars in Orion A. Therefore, our results argue against the presence of a large and old foreground cluster in front of Orion A.

  18. The Youth Worker as Jazz Improviser: Foregrounding Education "In the Moment" within the Professional Development of Youth Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Pete

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues for the foregrounding of improvisation and education "in the moment" within youth workers' professional development. Devised in collaboration with third-year Youth and Community Work students and lecturers at a university in Birmingham, this participatory action research project drew on work of jazz ethnomusicologists…

  19. The Youth Worker as Jazz Improviser: Foregrounding Education "In the Moment" within the Professional Development of Youth Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Pete

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues for the foregrounding of improvisation and education "in the moment" within youth workers' professional development. Devised in collaboration with third-year Youth and Community Work students and lecturers at a university in Birmingham, this participatory action research project drew on work of jazz ethnomusicologists…

  20. Planck early results. XVII. Origin of the submillimetre excess dust emission in the Magellanic Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.

    2011-01-01

    here using the Planck data. The integrated SED of the two galaxies before subtraction of the foreground (Milky Way) and background (CMB fluctuations) emission are in good agreement with previous determinations, confirming the presence of the millimetre excess. In the context of this preliminary...... to constrain the thermal dust emissivity power-law index (β). The average spectral index is found to be consistent with β = 1.5 and β = 1.2 below 500μm for the LMC and SMC respectively, significantly flatter than the values observed in the Milky Way. Also, there is evidence in the SMC of a further flattening...

  1. Dust Versus Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, A N

    1999-01-01

    Two groups have recently discovered a statistically significant deviation in the fluxes of high-redshift type Ia supernovae from the predictions of a Friedmann model with zero cosmological constant. This letter argues that bright, dusty, starburst galaxies would preferentially eject a dust component with a shallower opacity curve (hence less reddening) and a higher opacity/mass than the observed galactic dust which is left behind. Such dust could cause the falloff in flux at high-z without violating constraints on reddening or metallicity. The specific model presented is of needle-like dust, which is expected from the theory of crystal growth and has been detected in samples of interstellar dust. Carbon needles with conservative properties can supply the necessary opacity, and would very likely be ejected from galaxies as required. The model is not subject to the arguments given in the literature against grey dust, but may be constrained by future data from supernova searches done at higher redshift, in clust...

  2. Where are the Dust Tori of Mars? - A Possible Role of Stochastic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, M.; Brilliantov, N. V.; Spahn, F.; Krivov, A. V.

    2005-08-01

    Dust tori around Mars were predicted theoretically several decades ago, but still escape direct detection. On the base of our recent analytical and numerical studies we re-assess expected properties of the dust belts. In addition to deterministic models developed before we investigate the influence of stochastic effects on the dynamics, lifetimes of particles, and configuration of the dust tori. There exist various sources of stochasticity. For instance, we consider the influence of solar radiation on an ensemble of differently-shaped dust particles. Following the ergodic hypothesis, the dynamics of a single dust grain exposed to fluctuating radiation mimics the stochastic evolution of the whole ensemble. Further, we study the action of the planetary shadow on the dynamics of dust particles, a perturbation which turns out to be stochastic. Additional stochastic perturbations of deterministic dust trajectories are expected to be caused by different material properties of the dust grains, fluctuations of the solar wind, and the related magnetic field. As a result the fluctuating forces cause a diffusion of the dust configuration whose related fluxes can be estimated from our numerical experiments. This effect leads to a decrease of the expected optical depth of the tori, which is mainly determined by the strength of the stochastic force. We will provide estimates for the latter resulting in a diffusion coefficient. This will give new information about change of the configuration and lifetimes of the Martian dust-tori.

  3. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Michael; Uhlemann, Cora; Haugg, Thomas, E-mail: michael.kopp@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: cora.uhlemann@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: thomas.haugg@physik.lmu.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, Theresienstr. 37, Munich, 80333 (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves.

  4. Galaxy Zoo: Dust and molecular gas in early-type galaxies with prominent dust lanes

    CERN Document Server

    Kaviraj, Sugata; Bureau, Martin; Shabala, Stanislav S; Crockett, R Mark; Silk, Joseph; Lintott, Chris; Smith, Arfon; Keel, William C; Masters, Karen L; Schawinski, Kevin; Bamford, Steven P

    2011-01-01

    We study dust and associated molecular gas in 352 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) with prominent dust lanes. 65% of these 'dusty ETGs' (D-ETGs) are morphologically disturbed, suggesting a merger origin. This is consistent with the D-ETGs residing in lower-density environments compared to a control sample drawn from the general ETG population. 80% of D-ETGs inhabit the field (compared to 60% of the controls) and <2% inhabit clusters (compared to 10% of the controls). Compared to the control sample, D-ETGs exhibit bluer UV-optical colours (indicating enhanced star formation) and an AGN fraction that is more than an order of magnitude greater. The clumpy dust mass residing in large-scale features is estimated, using the SDSS r-band images, to be between 10^{4.5} and 10^{6.5} MSun. Comparison to the total (clumpy + diffuse) dust masses - calculated using far-infrared fluxes of the 15% of the D-ETGs that are detected by IRAS - indicates that only ~20% of the dust resides in these large-scale features. The dus...

  5. Interstellar dust thermal emission at millimeter and microwave wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhuohan

    Interstellar dust grains are particles of size between a few to hundreds of nanometers, mostly made up of carbon and silicon, found in the vast space between stars within a galaxy. They are important because dust plays a major role in cycling matter and energy between stars and the interstellar medium. Models for interstellar dust thermal emission are fit to a set of 214-channel dust spectra at 60--3000 GHz. Data consist of a new and improved version of dust spectra derived from the measurements of the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer of the COsmic Background Explorer satellite, sky maps at 100 mum, 140 mum and 240 mum measured by the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, also onboard the CUBE satellite, and the 94 GHz dust map measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite. A single-component model with its emissivity spectral index fixed at 1.7 is the best among all dust models tested. It fits 88% of the sky with a chi2dof ≤ 1.13 at 210 degrees of freedom. Within this sky region, temperatures of the dust grains are predicted to be between 16.4 K and 25.1 K, and optical depths are between 1.3 x 10 -6 and 5.1 x 10-4. The uncertainties of the dust temperature are FIRAS frequency coverage in sky regions where these two models are valid. Currently, uncertainties of the best-fit parameters are limited by FIRAS angular resolution and noise, and the angular resolution of the model inherits that of the FIRAS. When data of better quality become available, such as from the Planck mission, this one-component alpha = 1.7 (deltaTdust/ Tdust ≤ 10%) model can be used to check future dust models.

  6. Diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  7. Tracing water vapor and ice during dust growth

    CERN Document Server

    Krijt, Sebastiaan; Bergin, Edwin A

    2016-01-01

    The processes that govern the evolution of dust and water (in the form of vapor or ice) in protoplanetary disks are intimately connected. We have developed a model that simulates dust coagulation, dust dynamics (settling, turbulent mixing), vapor diffusion, and condensation/sublimation of volatiles onto grains in a vertical column of a protoplanetary disk. We employ the model to study how dust growth and dynamics influence the vertical distribution of water vapor and water ice in the region just outside the radial snowline. Our main finding is that coagulation (boosted by the enhanced stickiness of icy grains) and the ensuing vertical settling of solids results in water vapor being depleted, but not totally removed, from the region above the snowline on a timescale commensurate with the vertical turbulent mixing timescale. Depending on the strength of the turbulence and the temperature, the depletion can reach factors of up to ${\\sim}50$ in the disk atmosphere. In our isothermal column, this vapor depletion r...

  8. Quantum dynamics of biological systems and dust plasma nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasukov, V. V.; Lasukova, T. V.; Lasukova, O. V.

    2012-12-01

    A quantum solution of the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov equation with convection and linear diffusion is obtained which can provide the basis for the quantum biology and quantum microphysics equation. On this basis, quantum emission of biological systems, separate microorganisms (cells or bacteria), and dust plasma particles is investigated.

  9. Diffusion MR Imaging of the Brain in Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matthew Debnam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, there has been significant advancement in the molecular characterization of intracranial diseases, particularly cerebral neoplasms. While nuclear medicine technology, including PET/CT, has been at the foreground of exploration, new MR imaging techniques, specifically diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging, have shown interesting applications towards advancing our understanding of cancer involving the brain. In this paper, we review the fundamentals and basic physics of these techniques, and their applications to patient care for both general diagnostic use and in answering specific questions in selection of patients in terms of expected response to treatment.

  10. Full-sky, High-resolution Maps of Interstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Aaron Michael

    We present full-sky, high-resolution maps of interstellar dust based on data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Planck missions. We describe our custom processing of the entire WISE 12 micron All-Sky imaging data set, and present the resulting 15 arcsecond resolution, full-sky map of diffuse Galactic dust emission, free of compact sources and other contaminating artifacts. Our derived 12 micron dust map offers angular resolution far superior to that of all other existing full-sky, infrared dust emission maps, revealing a wealth of small-scale filamentary structure. We also apply the Finkbeiner et al. (1999) two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck HFI maps. We derive full-sky 6.1 arcminute resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting this two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 micron data. In doing so, we obtain the first ever full-sky 100-3000 GHz Planck-based thermal dust emission model, as well as a dust temperature correction with ~10 times enhanced angular resolution relative to DIRBE-based temperature maps. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. (1999) based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration (2013) single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales. Future work will focus on combining

  11. Oblique dust density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  12. Planck 2013 results. XII. Diffuse component separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dobler, G.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Xia, J.-Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    Planck has produced detailed all-sky observations over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz. These observations allow robust reconstruction of the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations over nearly the full sky, as well as new constraints on Galactic foregrounds, including thermal dust and line emission from molecular carbon monoxide (CO). This paper describes the component separation framework adopted by Planck for many cosmological analyses, including CMB power spectrum determination and likelihood construction on large angular scales, studies of primordial non-Gaussianity and statistical isotropy, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, gravitational lensing, and searches for topological defects. We test four foreground-cleaned CMB maps derived using qualitatively different component separation algorithms. The quality of our reconstructions is evaluated through detailed simulations and internal comparisons, and shown through various tests to be internally consistent and robust for CMB power spectrum and cosmological parameter estimation up to ℓ = 2000. The parameter constraints on ΛCDM cosmologies derived from these maps are consistent with those presented in the cross-spectrum based Planck likelihood analysis. We choose two of the CMB maps for specific scientific goals. We also present maps and frequency spectra of the Galactic low-frequency, CO, and thermal dust emission. The component maps are found to provide a faithful representation of the sky, as evaluated by simulations, with the largest bias seen in the CO component at 3%. For the low-frequency component, the spectral index varies widely over the sky, ranging from about β = -4 to - 2. Considering both morphology and prior knowledge of the low frequencycomponents, the index map allows us to associate a steep spectral index (β -2.3 with strong free-free emission, and intermediate values with synchrotron emission.

  13. The Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey (PGMS): observations and CMB polarization foreground analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Carretti, E; McConnell, D; Bernardi, G; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Cortiglioni, S; Poppi, S

    2009-01-01

    [abridged] We present observations, maps, polarised emission properties study, and CMB foreground analysis of the Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey (PGMS), a project to investigate the Galactic latitude behaviour of the polarized synchrotron emission at 2.3-GHz with the Parkes Radio Telescope. The survey consists of a 5-deg wide strip along the Galactic meridian l=254-deg. We identify three zones distinguished by polarized emission properties: the disc, the halo, and a transition region connecting them. The halo section lies at latitudes |b|>40-deg and is characterised by weak and smooth polarized emission with steep angular power spectra of median slope $\\beta_{\\rm med} \\sim -2.6$. The disc region covers the latitudes |b|<20-deg and shows a brighter, more complex emission with inverted spectra of mean slope $\\bar{\\beta} = -1.8$. The transition region has steep spectra as in the halo, but the emission power increases toward the Galactic plane from halo to disc levels. The change at b ~ -20-deg is sudden, ind...

  14. A fast combination calibration of foreground and background for pipelined ADCs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Kexu; He Lenian

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a fast digital calibration scheme for pipelined analog-to-digital converters (ADCs).The proposed method corrects the nonlinearity caused by finite opamp gain and capacitor mismatch in multiplying digital-to-analog converters (MDACs).The considered calibration technique takes the advantages of both foreground and background calibration schemes.In this combination calibration algorithm,a novel parallel background calibration with signal-shifted correlation is proposed,and its calibration cycle is very short.The details of this technique are described in the example of a 14-bit 100 Msample/s pipelined ADC.The high convergence speed of this background calibration is achieved by three means.First,a modified 1.5-bit stage is proposed in order to allow the injection of a large pseudo-random dithering without missing code.Second,before correlating the signal,it is shifted according to the input signal so that the correlation error converges quickly.Finally,the front pipeline stages are calibrated simultaneously rather than stage by stage to reduce the calibration tracking constants.Simulation results confirm that the combination calibration has a fast startup process and a short background calibration cycle of 2×221 conversions.

  15. A fast combination calibration of foreground and background for pipelined ADCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kexu, Sun; Lenian, He

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a fast digital calibration scheme for pipelined analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The proposed method corrects the nonlinearity caused by finite opamp gain and capacitor mismatch in multiplying digital-to-analog converters (MDACs). The considered calibration technique takes the advantages of both foreground and background calibration schemes. In this combination calibration algorithm, a novel parallel background calibration with signal-shifted correlation is proposed, and its calibration cycle is very short. The details of this technique are described in the example of a 14-bit 100 Msample/s pipelined ADC. The high convergence speed of this background calibration is achieved by three means. First, a modified 1.5-bit stage is proposed in order to allow the injection of a large pseudo-random dithering without missing code. Second, before correlating the signal, it is shifted according to the input signal so that the correlation error converges quickly. Finally, the front pipeline stages are calibrated simultaneously rather than stage by stage to reduce the calibration tracking constants. Simulation results confirm that the combination calibration has a fast startup process and a short background calibration cycle of 2 × 221 conversions.

  16. Non-Gaussianity in the HILC foreground-reduced three-year WMAP CMB map

    CERN Document Server

    Bernui, A

    2010-01-01

    A detection or nondetection of primordial non-Gaussianity in the CMB data is essential not only to test alternative models of the physics of the early universe but also to discriminate among classes of inflationary models. Given this far reaching consequences of such a non-Gaussianity detection for our understanding of the physics of the early universe, it is important to employ alternative indicators in order to have further information about the Gaussianity features of CMB that may be helpful for identifying their origins. In this way, a considerable effort has recently gone into the design of non-Gaussianity indicators, and in their application in the search for deviation from Gaussianity in the CMB data. Recently we have proposed two new large-angle non-Gaussianity indicators which provide measures of the departure from Gaussianity on large angular scales. We have used these indicators to carry out analyses of Gaussianity of the single frequency bands and of the available foreground-reduced {\\it five-year...

  17. Influence of Planck foreground masks in the large angular scale quadrant CMB asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, L; Villela, T; Zhao, W

    2015-01-01

    The measured CMB angular distribution shows a great consistency with the LCDM model. However, isotropy violations were reported in CMB temperature maps of both WMAP and Planck data. We investigate the influence of different masks employed in the analysis of CMB angular distribution, in particular in the excess of power in the Southeastern quadrant (SEQ) and the lack of power in the Northeastern quadrant (NEQ). We compare the two-point correlation function (TPCF) computed for each quadrant of the CMB foreground-cleaned temperature maps to 1000 simulations generated assuming the LCDM best-fit power spectrum using four different masks. In addition to the quadrants, we computed the TPCF for circular regions in the map where the excess and lack of power are present. We also compare the effect of Galactic cuts in the TPCF calculations as compared to the simulations. We found consistent results for three masks, namely mask-rulerminimal, U73 and U66. The results indicate that the excess of power in the SEQ tends to v...

  18. Using foreground/background analysis to determine leaf and canopy chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, J. E.; Ustin, S. L.; Hart, Q. J.; Jacquemoud, S.; Smith, M. O.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) has become a well established procedure for analyzing imaging spectrometry data, however, the technique is relatively insensitive to minor sources of spectral variation (e.g., discriminating stressed from unstressed vegetation and variations in canopy chemistry). Other statistical approaches have been tried e.g., stepwise multiple linear regression analysis to predict canopy chemistry. Grossman et al. reported that SMLR is sensitive to measurement error and that the prediction of minor chemical components are not independent of patterns observed in more dominant spectral components like water. Further, they observed that the relationships were strongly dependent on the mode of expressing reflectance (R, -log R) and whether chemistry was expressed on a weight (g/g) or are basis (g/sq m). Thus, alternative multivariate techniques need to be examined. Smith et al. reported a revised SMA that they termed Foreground/Background Analysis (FBA) that permits directing the analysis along any axis of variance by identifying vectors through the n-dimensional spectral volume orthonormal to each other. Here, we report an application of the FBA technique for the detection of canopy chemistry using a modified form of the analysis.

  19. Salient Region Detection by Fusing Foreground and Background Cues Extracted from Single Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangqiang Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Saliency detection is an important preprocessing step in many application fields such as computer vision, robotics, and graphics to reduce computational cost by focusing on significant positions and neglecting the nonsignificant in the scene. Different from most previous methods which mainly utilize the contrast of low-level features, various feature maps are fused in a simple linear weighting form. In this paper, we propose a novel salient object detection algorithm which takes both background and foreground cues into consideration and integrate a bottom-up coarse salient regions extraction and a top-down background measure via boundary labels propagation into a unified optimization framework to acquire a refined saliency detection result. Wherein the coarse saliency map is also fused by three components, the first is local contrast map which is in more accordance with the psychological law, the second is global frequency prior map, and the third is global color distribution map. During the formation of background map, first we construct an affinity matrix and select some nodes which lie on border as labels to represent the background and then carry out a propagation to generate the regional background map. The evaluation of the proposed model has been implemented on four datasets. As demonstrated in the experiments, our proposed method outperforms most existing saliency detection models with a robust performance.

  20. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion-dust plasmas with dust size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Kai-Biao [Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong (China)

    2014-06-15

    Nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves which are described with a Kortweg-de vries (KdV) equation by using the reductive perturbation method, are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively-charged dust particles of different sizes and masses. The effects of the power-law distribution of dust and other plasma parameters on the dust-acoustic solitary waves are studied. Numerical results show that the dust size distribution has a significant influence on the propagation properties of dust-acoustic solitons. The amplitudes of solitary waves in the case of a power-law distribution is observed to be smaller, but the soliton velocity and width are observed to be larger, than those of mono-sized dust grains with an average dust size. Our results indicate that only compressed solitary waves exist in dusty plasma with different dust species. The relevance of the present investigation to interstellar clouds is discussed.

  1. Dust trap formation in a non-self-sustained discharge with external gas ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippov, A. V., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Babichev, V. N.; Pal’, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Cherkovets, V. E.; Rerikh, V. K.; Taran, M. D. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Results from numerical studies of a non-self-sustained gas discharge containing micrometer dust grains are presented. The non-self-sustained discharge (NSSD) was controlled by a stationary fast electron beam. The numerical model of an NSSD is based on the diffusion drift approximation for electrons and ions and self-consistently takes into account the influence of the dust component on the electron and ion densities. The dust component is described by the balance equation for the number of dust grains and the equation of motion for dust grains with allowance for the Stokes force, gravity force, and electric force in the cathode sheath. The interaction between dust grains is described in the self-consistent field approximation. The height of dust grain levitation over the cathode is determined and compared with experimental results. It is established that, at a given gas ionization rate and given applied voltage, there is a critical dust grain size above which the levitation condition in the cathode sheath cannot be satisfied. Simulations performed for the dust component consisting of dust grains of two different sizes shows that such grains levitate at different heights, i.e., size separation of dust drains levitating in the cathode sheath of an NSSD takes place.

  2. Interstellar Silicate Dust in the z=0.89 Absorber Towards PKS 1830-211: Crystalline Silicates at High Redshift?

    CERN Document Server

    Aller, Monique C; York, Donald G; Vladilo, Giovanni; Welty, Daniel E; Som, Debopam

    2012-01-01

    We present evidence of a >10-sigma detection of the 10 micron silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of tau_10=0.27+/-0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources wit...

  3. Dusty galaxies and the degeneracy between their dust distributions and the attenuation formula

    CERN Document Server

    Penner, Kyle; Weiner, Benjamin; Inami, Hanae; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Pforr, Janine; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Kassin, Susan; Papovich, Casey; Pope, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Do spatial distributions of dust grains in galaxies have typical forms, as do spatial distributions of stars? We investigate whether or not the distributions resemble uniform foreground screens, as commonly assumed by the high-redshift galaxy community. We use rest-frame infrared, ultraviolet, and H$\\alpha$ line luminosities of dust-poor and dusty galaxies at z ~ 0 and z ~ 1 to compare measured H$\\alpha$ escape fractions with those predicted by the Calzetti attenuation formula. The predictions, based on UV escape fractions, overestimate the measured H$\\alpha$ escape fractions for all samples. The interpretation of this result for dust-poor z ~ 0 galaxies is that regions with ionizing stars have more dust than regions with nonionizing UV-emitting stars. Dust distributions for these galaxies are nonuniform. The interpretation of the overestimates for dusty galaxies at both redshifts is less clear. If the attenuation formula is inapplicable to these galaxies, perhaps the disagreements are unphysical; perhaps dus...

  4. The effects of dust scattering on high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, L.; García, J.; Wilms, J.; Baganoff, F.

    2016-06-01

    High energy studies of astrophysical dust complement observations of dusty interstellar gas at other wavelengths. With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, dust scattering significantly enhances the total extinction optical depth and alters the shape of photoelectric absorption edges. This effect is modulated by the dust grain size distribution, spatial location along the line of sight, and the imaging resolution of the X-ray telescope. At soft energies, the spectrum of scattered light is likely to have significant features at the 0.3 keV (C-K), 0.5 keV (O-K), and 0.7 keV (Fe-L) photoelectric absorption edges. This direct probe of ISM dust grain elements will be important for (i) understanding the relative abundances of graphitic grains or PAHs versus silicates, and (ii) measuring the depletion of gas phase elements into solid form. We focus in particular on the Fe-L edge, fitting a template for the total extinction to the high resolution spectrum of three X-ray binaries from the Chandra archive: GX 9+9, XTE J1817-330, and Cyg X-1. We discuss ways in which spectroscopy with XMM can yield insight into dust obscured objects such as stars, binaries, AGN, and foreground quasar absorption line systems.

  5. Probing the Interstellar Dust in Galaxies over > 10 Gyr of Cosmic History

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, Varsha P; York, Donald G; Welty, Daniel E; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on an invited talk given by V. P. Kulkarni at the 8th Cosmic Dust meeting. Dust has a profound effect on the physics and chemistry of the interstellar gas in galaxies and on the appearance of galaxies. Understanding the cosmic evolution of dust with time is therefore crucial for understanding the evolution of galaxies. Despite the importance of interstellar dust, very little is known about its nature and composition in distant galaxies. We summarize the results of our ongoing programs using observations of distant quasars to obtain better constraints on dust grains in foreground galaxies that happen to lie along the quasar sightlines. These observations consist of a combination of mid-infrared data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope and optical/UV data obtained with ground-based telescopes and/or the Hubble Space Telescope. The mid-IR data target the 10 $\\mu$m and 18 $\\mu$m silicate absorption features, while the optical/UV data allow determinations of element depletions, extincti...

  6. Connecting the Different Signatures of Interstellar Dust at Low Redshift: A Benchmark for Comparison to the Distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varsha

    use Spitzer IRS spectra to measure the 9.7 and 18 micron silicate absorption features. (2) We will analyze HST/IUE UV spectra to measure the 2175 A carbonaceous dust features along the same sightlines that have the silicate measurements. (3) We will use the available Spitzer, Herschel, HST, and SDSS images of the background AGN to derive extinction curves of dust in the foreground galaxies. (4) We will examine the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) HIRES/ESI and VLT UVES/X-SHOOTER spectra of the background AGN to measure gas-phase absorption lines in the foreground galaxies. Combining these with HST spectra, we will determine the gas-phase element depletions. (5) We will search Spitzer and Herschel spectra for longer wavelength crystalline silicate resonance absorption features. (6) By analyzing and combining these archival data, we will measure the carbon:silicate dust ratios, extinction curves and element depletions, and constrain grain structural properties in these nearby galaxies. (7) We will combine the dust properties thus obtained at z < 0.1 with those at higher redshifts from our recent studies, to constrain dust evolution models developed by Co-I Dr. Dwek. The proposed work will provide the first study of correlations between different dust absorption properties in the nearby Universe, and a direct probe of dust evolution when compared with measurements for the distant Universe. Our work is directly related to the Cosmic Origins Program outlined in the 2014 NASA Science Plan, since understanding dust evolution is fundamental to understanding galaxy evolution, and planet formation. This work will use data from several NASA-supported missions to establish a local benchmark for understanding dust evolution, and is thus especially relevant for distant galaxy studies with the JWST. Our work will also provide NASA-related outreach and graduate/undergraduate student research opportunities at the University of South Carolina and Georgia Southern University.

  7. The dust SED of dwarf galaxies I. The case of NGC 4214

    CERN Document Server

    Hermelo, Israel; Relaño, Monica; Tuffs, Richard J; Popescu, Cristina C; Groves, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to establish the physical origin of dust heating and emission based on radiation transfer models, which self-consistently connect the emission components from diffuse dust and the dust in massive star forming regions. NGC 4214 is a nearby dwarf galaxy with a large set of ancillary data, ranging from the ultraviolet (UV) to radio, including maps from SPITZER, HERSCHEL and detections from PLANCK. We mapped this galaxy with MAMBO at 1.2 mm at the IRAM 30 m telescope. We extract separate dust emission components for the HII regions (plus their associated PDRs on pc scales) and for the diffuse dust (on kpc scales). We analyse the full UV to FIR/submm SED of the galaxy using a radiation transfer model which self-consistently treats the dust emission from diffuse and SF complexes components, considering the illumination of diffuse dust both by the distributed stellar populations, and by escaping light from the HII regions. While maintaining consistency with the framework of this mode...

  8. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered.

  9. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  10. “Before dividing we have to add”: inter-viewing the foregrounds of indigenous students “Antes de dividir temos que somar”: ‘entre-vistando’ foregrounds de estudantes indígenas

    OpenAIRE

    Ole Skovsmose; Helle Alrø; Paola Valero; Pedro Paulo Scandiuzzi

    2009-01-01

    Students’ cultural diversity is an important factor to consider in a mathematics education concerned with equity. We argue that the significance of mathematics education is not only given by the understanding of mathematical concepts but also by students’ foreground, that is, the students’ perception of their future possibilities in life as made apparent to the individual by his/her social-political context. For students in a cultural borderline position, different reasons and intentions for ...

  11. Dust Devil Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 6 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. Dust devils, small cyclonic wind storms, are common in the American Southwest and on Mars. As the dust devil moves across the surface it picks up the loose dust, leaving behind a dark track to mark its passage. These dust devil tracks are in the Argyre Basin. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -46.6, Longitude 317.5 East (42.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the

  12. Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Dennis; Fenton, Lori; Neakrase, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michael; Statella, Thiago; Whelley, Patrick; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Balme, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Dust devils that leave dark- or light-toned tracks are common on Mars and they can also be found on the Earth's surface. Dust devil tracks (hereinafter DDTs) are ephemeral surface features with mostly sub-annual lifetimes. Regarding their size, DDT widths can range between ˜1 m and ˜1 km, depending on the diameter of dust devil that created the track, and DDT lengths range from a few tens of meters to several kilometers, limited by the duration and horizontal ground speed of dust devils. DDTs can be classified into three main types based on their morphology and albedo in contrast to their surroundings; all are found on both planets: (a) dark continuous DDTs, (b) dark cycloidal DDTs, and (c) bright DDTs. Dark continuous DDTs are the most common type on Mars. They are characterized by their relatively homogenous and continuous low albedo surface tracks. Based on terrestrial and martian in situ studies, these DDTs most likely form when surficial dust layers are removed to expose larger-grained substrate material (coarse sands of ≥500 μm in diameter). The exposure of larger-grained materials changes the photometric properties of the surface; hence leading to lower albedo tracks because grain size is photometrically inversely proportional to the surface reflectance. However, although not observed so far, compositional differences (i.e., color differences) might also lead to albedo contrasts when dust is removed to expose substrate materials with mineralogical differences. For dark continuous DDTs, albedo drop measurements are around 2.5 % in the wavelength range of 550-850 nm on Mars and around 0.5 % in the wavelength range from 300-1100 nm on Earth. The removal of an equivalent layer thickness around 1 μm is sufficient for the formation of visible dark continuous DDTs on Mars and Earth. The next type of DDTs, dark cycloidal DDTs, are characterized by their low albedo pattern of overlapping scallops. Terrestrial in situ studies imply that they are formed when sand

  13. Dust during the Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Elfgren, E; Elfgren, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The possibility that population III stars have reionized the Universe at redshifts greater than 6 has recently gained momentum with WMAP polarization results. Here we analyse the role of early dust produced by these stars and ejected into the intergalactic medium. We show that this dust, heated by the radiation from the same population III stars, produces a submillimetre excess. The electromagnetic spectrum of this excess is compatible with the FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) cosmic far infrared background. This spectrum, a Doppler spectrum times the $\

  14. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. VIII. A WIDE-AREA, HIGH-RESOLUTION MAP OF DUST EXTINCTION IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Pl #424, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Lang, Dustin [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Gordon, Karl D.; Gilbert, Karoline M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sandstrom, Karin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dong, Hui; Lauer, Tod R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gouliermis, Dimitrios A. [Max Planck Institute für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Guhathakurta, Puragra [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astrophysics, 1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    We map the distribution of dust in M31 at 25 pc resolution using stellar photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey. The map is derived with a new technique that models the near-infrared color–magnitude diagram (CMD) of red giant branch (RGB) stars. The model CMDs combine an unreddened foreground of RGB stars with a reddened background population viewed through a log-normal column density distribution of dust. Fits to the model constrain the median extinction, the width of the extinction distribution, and the fraction of reddened stars in each 25 pc cell. The resulting extinction map has a factor of ≳4 times better resolution than maps of dust emission, while providing a more direct measurement of the dust column. There is superb morphological agreement between the new map and maps of the extinction inferred from dust emission by Draine et al. However, the widely used Draine and Li dust models overpredict the observed extinction by a factor of ∼2.5, suggesting that M31's true dust mass is lower and that dust grains are significantly more emissive than assumed in Draine et al. The observed factor of ∼2.5 discrepancy is consistent with similar findings in the Milky Way by the Plank Collaboration et al., but we find a more complex dependence on parameters from the Draine and Li dust models. We also show that the the discrepancy with the Draine et al. map is lowest where the current interstellar radiation field has a harder spectrum than average. We discuss possible improvements to the CMD dust mapping technique, and explore further applications in both M31 and other galaxies.

  15. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To ensure the safety and success of future lunar exploration missions, it is important to measure the toxicity of the lunar dust and its electrostatic properties. The electrostatic properties of lunar dust govern its behavior, from how the dust is deposited in an astronaut s lungs to how it contaminates equipment surfaces. NASA has identified the threat caused by lunar dust as one of the top two problems that need to be solved before returning to the Moon. To understand the electrostatic nature of lunar dust, NASA must answer the following questions: (1) how much charge can accumulate on the dust? (2) how long will the charge remain? and (3) can the dust be removed? These questions can be answered by measuring the electrostatic properties of the dust: its volume resistivity, charge decay, charge-to-mass ratio or chargeability, and dielectric properties.

  16. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  17. Modeling the Radio Foreground for detection of CMB spectral distortions from Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Mayuri Sathyanarayana; Shankar, N Udaya; Chluba, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic baryon evolution during Cosmic Dawn and Cosmological Reionization results in spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) owing to redshifted 21-cm absorption and emission. These spectral features from redshifts $30 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 6$ appear at meter wavelengths ($\\lesssim200$ MHz) as a tiny CMB distortion component in addition to the Galactic and extragalactic radio sky spectrum, which is orders of magnitude brighter. These spectral distortions encode information about the thermal history of baryons and the nature and timing of the first collapsed objects. However detecting them requires methods for precise modeling of foregrounds. Here we present an improvement over previous efforts to simulate foregrounds. We adopt GMOSS, a physically motivated sky model that represents sky spectra using radiative processes to simulate realistic expectation of sky spectra over 40--200 MHz. From mock observations resulting plausible spectral shapes we demonstrate that a polynomial of at least ord...

  18. Back- and fore-grounding ontology: exploring the linkages between critical realism, pragmatism, and methodologies in health & rehabilitation sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForge, Ryan; Shaw, Jay

    2012-03-01

    Back- and fore-grounding ontology: exploring the linkages between critical realism, pragmatism, and methodologies in health & rehabilitation sciences As two doctoral candidates in a health and rehabilitation sciences program, we describe in this paper our respective paradigmatic locations along a quite nonlinear ontological-epistemological-axiological-methodological chain. In a turn-taking fashion, we unpack the tenets of critical realism and pragmatism, and then trace the linkages from these paradigmatic locations through to the methodological choices that address a community-based research problem. Beyond serving as an answer to calls for academics in training to demonstrate philosophical-theoretical-methodological integrity and coherence in their scholarship, this paper represents critical realism and its fore-grounding of a deeply stratified ontology in reflexive relation to pragmatism and its back-grounding of ontology. We conclude by considering the merits and challenges of conducting research from within singular versus proliferate paradigmatic perspectives.

  19. The cycling of carbon into and out of dust

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Anthony P; Koehler, Melanie; Fanciullo, Lapo; Bocchio, Marco; Micelotta, Elisabetta; Verstraete, Laurent; Guillet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Observational evidence seems to indicate that the depletion of interstellar carbon into dust shows rather wide variations and that carbon undergoes rather rapid recycling in the interstellar medium (ISM). Small hydrocarbon grains are processed in photo-dissociation regions by UV photons, by ion and electron collisions in interstellar shock waves and by cosmic rays. A significant fraction of hydrocarbon dust must therefore be re-formed by accretion in the dense, molecular ISM. A new dust model (Jones et al., Astron. Astrophys., 2013, 558, A62) shows that variations in the dust observables in the diffuse interstellar medium (nH = 1000 cm^3), can be explained by systematic and environmentally-driven changes in the small hydrocarbon grain population. Here we explore the consequences of gas-phase carbon accretion onto the surfaces of grains in the transition regions between the diffuse ISM and molecular clouds (e.g., Jones, Astron. Astrophys., 2013, 555, A39). We find that significant carbonaceous dust re-processi...

  20. The problematic growth of dust in high-redshift galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, A.; Viti, S.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2016-11-01

    Dust growth via accretion of gas species has been proposed as the dominant process to increase the amount of dust in galaxies. We show here that this hypothesis encounters severe difficulties that make it unfit to explain the observed UV and IR properties of such systems, particularly at high redshifts. Dust growth in the diffuse ISM phases is hampered by (a) too slow accretion rates, (b) too high dust temperatures, and (c) the Coulomb barrier that effectively blocks accretion. In molecular clouds these problems are largely alleviated. Grains are cold (but not colder than the CMB temperature, TCMB ≈ 20 K at redshift z = 6). However, in dense environments accreted materials form icy water mantles, perhaps with impurities. Mantles are immediately (≲1 yr) photo-desorbed as grains return to the diffuse ISM at the end of the cloud lifetime, thus erasing any memory of the growth. We conclude that dust attenuating stellar light at high-z must be ready-made stardust largely produced in supernova ejecta.

  1. Identification of the exploatation dust in road dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is to determine models of explore dust from vehicle brake systems and the presentationof measurement results of the exploitation dust, which is separate from road dust. The following methods and measuring devices were used: T-01M device, screen analysis, analysis of chemical composition with the use of a scanning microscope with Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analyser. The measurements for identifying this type of dust were conducted on marked sections of roads: motorway, city road and mountain road. The explored dust was distinguished in the following car systems: brakes, clutch plates, tyres and catalytic converters.

  2. When indexicals target discursively subsidiary information: How foregrounding and backgrounding in discourse affect indexical reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Cornish

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Adoptant la distinction de Berrendonner (1990 ; à paraître entre « micro-syntaxe » et « macro-syntaxe », de même que celle, orthogonale, entre segments de discours mis au premier ou bien en arrière-plan (cf. Khalil, 2005, cet article se propose d’examiner certaines interactions « non-standard » parmi ces domaines. Nous nous pencherons sur des cas où un référent potentiel est évoqué à l’intérieur d’un segment hautement présupposé, en arrière-plan discursivement, mais où ce référent est ciblé par un indexical en emploi soit « anadéictique », soit non-anaphorique, et par suite transformé en une entité de discours à part entière. Ce type de référence relève de la deixis de discours, et non de l’anaphore en tant que telle. On examinera également des segments de texte plus étendus, qui entretiennent des relations discursives en termes de « macro-syntaxe ». Nous tâcherons de caractériser les limites de la référence anaphorico-discursive en fonction du degré de mise en arrière- ou au premier plan des unités de discours qui contribuent à déterminer l’existence du référent ainsi ciblé.Adopting Berrendonner’s (1990; fc. distinction between “micro-syntax” and “macro-syntax”, as well as the orthogonal one between foregrounded and backgrounded discourse segments (cf. Khalil, 2005, this paper aims to examine certain “non-canonical” interactions amongst these domains. In particular, I shall be looking at instances where a potential referent is evoked within a highly presupposed, discursively backgrounded text segment, but where that referent is targeted either via an “anadeictically”-used or a non-anaphorically used indexical expression and made into a discourse entity in its own right. The latter is characteristic of discourse deixis, but not of anaphora as such. I will also be looking at larger stretches of text, which relate to each other discursively in terms of

  3. “Before dividing we have to add”: inter-viewing the foregrounds of indigenous students “Antes de dividir temos que somar”: ‘entre-vistando’ foregrounds de estudantes indígenas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Skovsmose

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Students’ cultural diversity is an important factor to consider in a mathematics education concerned with equity. We argue that the significance of mathematics education is not only given by the understanding of mathematical concepts but also by students’ foreground, that is, the students’ perception of their future possibilities in life as made apparent to the individual by his/her social-political context. For students in a cultural borderline position, different reasons and intentions for engaging in mathematics learning may be related to the construction of meaning in mathematics. Through inter-viewing Brazilian Indian students’ foreground, we illuminate the different types of significance given to mathematics education in their particular situation. Keywords: Inter-viewing. Foreground. Cultural Borderline Position.A diversidade cultural dos estudantes é um fator importante a ser considerado na educação matemática que se preocupa com a igualdade. Sustenta-se que o significado da educação matemática não está vinculado apenas à compreensão de conceitos matemáticos mas, também, ao foreground dos estudantes, isto é, à percepção de suas possibilidades futuras na vida tal como aparecem ao indivíduo em seu contexto sociopolítico. Para os estudantes que estão em uma posição cultural de fronteira, as diferentes razões e intenções que os levam a envolver-se com a aprendizagem matemática podem estar relacionadas à construção de significado em Matemática. Entre-vistas com alguns estudantes indígenas do Brasil trazem à cena diferentes tipos de significados por eles atribuídos à Educação Matemática em suas situações particulares. Palavras chave: Entre-vista. Foreground. Posição Cultural de Fronteira.

  4. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Senovilla, J M M; Senovilla, Jose M. M.; Vera, Raul

    2000-01-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has new surprising features. The universe is ``closed'' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is ``enclosed'' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable agai...

  5. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    2000-07-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has surprising new features. The universe is `closed' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is `enclosed' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable against some global non-vacuum perturbations.

  6. Left in the Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft ended its seven-year voyage January 15 after a safe landing on earth, bringing back a capsule of comet particles and samples of interstellar dust that exceeded the loftiest of expectations of mission scientists. The ensuing studies of the cosmic treasure are expected to shed light on the origins of the solar system and earth itself.

  7. Dust devil dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Onishchenko, O.; Couedel, L.; Arnas, C.; Escarguel, A.; Benkadda, S.; Fedun, V.

    2016-06-01

    A self-consistent hydrodynamic model for the solar heating-driven onset of a dust devil vortex is derived and analyzed. The toroidal flows and vertical velocity fields are driven by an instability that arises from the inversion of the mass density stratification produced by solar heating of the sandy surface soil. The nonlinear dynamics in the primary temperature gradient-driven vertical airflows drives a secondary toroidal vortex flow through a parametric interaction in the nonlinear structures. While an external tangential shear flow may initiate energy transfer to the toroidal vortex flow, the nonlinear interactions dominate the transfer of vertical-radial flows into a fast toroidal flow. This secondary flow has a vertical vorticity, while the primary thermal gradient-driven flow produces the toroidal vorticity. Simulations for the complex nonlinear structure are carried out with the passive convection of sand as test particles. Triboelectric charging modeling of the dust is used to estimate the charging of the sand particles. Parameters for a Dust Devil laboratory experiment are proposed considering various working gases and dust particle parameters. The nonlinear dynamics of the toroidal flow driven by the temperature gradient is of generic interest for both neutral gases and plasmas.

  8. Robust Foreground Detection: A Fusion of Masked GreyWorld, Probabilistic Gradient Information and Extended Conditional Random Field Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rawlinson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Foreground detection has been used extensively in many applications such as people counting, traffic monitoring and face recognition. However, most of the existing detectors can only work under limited conditions. This happens because of the inability of the detector to distinguish foreground and background pixels, especially in complex situations. Our aim is to improve the robustness of foreground detection under sudden and gradual illumination change, colour similarity issue, moving background and shadow noise. Since it is hard to achieve robustness using a single model, we have combined several methods into an integrated system. The masked grey world algorithm is introduced to handle sudden illumination change. Colour co-occurrence modelling is then fused with the probabilistic edge-based background modelling. Colour co-occurrence modelling is good infiltering moving background and robust to gradual illumination change, while an edge-based modelling is used for solving a colour similarity problem. Finally, an extended conditional random field approach is used to filter out shadow and afterimage noise. Simulation results show that our algorithm performs better compared to the existing methods, which makes it suitable for higher-level applications.

  9. Competition for attentional resources between low spatial frequency content of emotional images and a foreground task in early visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias M; Gundlach, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Low spatial frequency (LSF) image content has been proposed to play a superior functional role in emotional content extraction via the magnocellular pathway biasing attentional resources toward emotional content in visual cortex. We investigated whether emotionally unpleasant complex images that were presented either unfiltered or with LSF content only in the background while subjects performed a foreground task will withdraw more attentional resources from the task compared to unemotional, neutral images (distraction paradigm). We measured steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) driven by flickering stimuli of a foreground task. Unfiltered unpleasant images resulted in a significant reduction of SSVEP amplitude compared to neutral images. No statistically significant differences were found with LSF background images. In a behavioral control experiment, we found no significant differences for complexity ratings between unfiltered and LSF pictures. Content identification was possible for unfiltered and LSF picture (correct responses > 74%). An additional EEG study examined typical emotion-related components for complex images presented either as unfiltered, LSF, or high spatial frequency (HSF, as an additional control) filtered, unpleasant, and neutral images. We found a significant main effect of emotional valence in the early posterior negativity. Late positive potential differences were only found for unfiltered and HSF images. Results suggest that, while LSF content is sufficient to allow for content and emotional cue extraction when images were presented alone, LSF content is not salient enough to serve as emotional distractor that withdraws attentional resources from a foreground task in early visual cortex. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  10. Starburst-like Dust Extinction in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, K D

    1998-01-01

    The recent discovery that the UV dust extinction in starburst galaxies is similar to that found in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) motivated us to re-investigate the ultraviolet (UV) extinction found in the SMC. We have been able to improve significantly on previous studies by carefully choosing pairs of well matched reddened and unreddened stars. In addition, we benefited from the improved S/N of the NEWSIPS IUE data and the larger sample of SMC stars now available. Searching the IUE Final Archive, we found only four suitable early-type stars that were significantly reddened and had well matched comparison stars. The extinction for three of these stars is remarkably similar. The curves are roughly linear with 1/lambda and have no measurable 2175 A bump. The fourth star has an extinction curve with a significant 2175 A bump and weaker far-UV extinction. The dust along all four sightlines is thought to be local to the SMC. There is no significant Galactic foreground component. The first three stars lie in the...

  11. Impact of galactic and intergalactic dust on the stellar EBL

    CERN Document Server

    Vavrycuk, Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    Current theories assume that the low intensity of the stellar extragalactic background light (stellar EBL) is caused primarily by finite age of the Universe because the finite age limits the number of photons pumped into the space by galaxies and thus the sky is dark in the night. We oppose this opinion and show that two main factors are responsible for the extremely low intensity of the observed stellar EBL: (1) a low mean surface brightness of galaxies, which causes a low luminosity density in the local Universe, and (2) light extinction due to absorption by galactic and intergalactic dust. Dust produces a partial opacity of galaxies and of the Universe. The galactic opacity reduces the intensity of light from more distant background galaxies obscured by foreground galaxies. The effective extinction AV for light passing through a galaxy is 0.2 mag. This causes that distant background galaxies do not contribute to the EBL significantly. In addition, light of distant galaxies is dimmed due to absorption by in...

  12. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 May 2002) The Science The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this THEMIS image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo (brightness) and low thermal inertia values. This thick mantle of dust creates the appearance of snow covered mountains in the image. Like snow accumulation on Earth, Martian dust can become so thick that it eventually slides down the face of steep slopes, creating runaway avalanches of dust. In the center of this image about 1/3 of the way down is evidence of this phenomenon. A few dozen dark streaks can be seen on the bright, sunlit slopes of the crater rim. The narrow streaks extend downslope following the local topography in a manner very similar to snow avalanches on Earth. But unlike their terrestrial counterparts, no accumulation occurs at the bottom. The dust particles are so small that they are easily launched into the thin atmosphere where they remain suspended and ultimately blow away. The apparent darkness of the avalanche scars is due to the presence of relatively dark underlying material that becomes exposed following the passage of the avalanche. Over time, new dust deposition occurs, brightening the scars until they fade into the background. Although dark slope streaks had been observed in Viking mission images, a clear understanding of this dynamic phenomenon wasn't possible until the much higher resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed the details. MOC images also showed that new avalanches have occurred during the time MGS has been in orbit. THEMIS images will allow additional mapping of their distribution and frequency, contributing new insights about Martian dust avalanches. The Story The stiff peaks in this image might remind you of the Alps here on Earth, but they really outline the choppy edge of a large Martian crater over 50 miles wide (seen in the context image at right). While these aren

  13. SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERNOVA 2014J IN M82: LARGE EXTINCTION FROM INTERSTELLAR DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Peter J.; Smitka, Michael T.; Wang, Lifan; Krisciunas, Kevin [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Breeveld, Alice; Kuin, N. Paul; Page, Mat [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); De Pasquale, Massimiliano [Instituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo Via Ugo la Malfa 153 90146 Palermo (Italy); Hartmann, Dieter H. [Clemson University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kinard Lab of Physics, Clemson, SC 29634-0978 (United States); Milne, Peter A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Siegel, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-05-20

    We present optical and ultraviolet (UV) photometry and spectra of the very nearby and highly reddened supernova (SN) 2014J in M82 obtained with the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Comparison of the UVOT grism spectra of SN 2014J with Hubble Space Telescope observations of SN2011fe or UVOT grism spectra of SN 2012fr are consistent with an extinction law with a low value of R{sub V} ∼1.4. The high reddening causes the detected photon distribution in the broadband UV filters to have a much longer effective wavelength than for an unreddened SN. The light curve evolution is consistent with this shift and does not show a flattening due to photons being scattered back into the line of sight (LOS). The light curve shapes and color evolution are inconsistent with a contribution scattered into the LOS by circumstellar dust. We conclude that most or all of the high reddening must come from interstellar dust. We show that even for a single dust composition, there is not a unique reddening law caused by circumstellar scattering. Rather, when considering scattering from a time-variable source, we confirm earlier studies that the reddening law is a function of the dust geometry, column density, and epoch. We also show how an assumed geometry of dust as a foreground sheet in mixed stellar/dust systems will lead to a higher inferred R{sub V}. Rather than assuming the dust around SNe is peculiar, SNe may be useful probes of the interstellar reddening laws in other galaxies.

  14. Probing the interstellar dust in galaxies over >10 Gyr of cosmic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Aller, Monique C.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam

    2016-11-01

    Dust has a profound effect on the physics and chemistry of the interstellar gas in galaxies and on the appearance of galaxies. Understanding the cosmic evolution of dust with time is therefore crucial for understanding the evolution of galaxies. Despite the importance of interstellar dust, very little is known about its nature and composition in distant galaxies. We summarize the results of our ongoing programs using observations of distant quasars to obtain better constraints on dust grains in foreground galaxies that happen to lie along the quasar sightlines. These observations consist of a combination of mid-infrared data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope and optical/UV data obtained with ground-based telescopes and/or the Hubble Space Telescope. The mid-IR data target the 10 μm and 18 μm silicate absorption features, while the optical/UV data allow determinations of element depletions, extinction curves, 2175 Å bumps, etc. Measurements of such properties in absorption-selected galaxies with redshifts ranging from z 0 to z > 2 provide constraints on the evolution of interstellar dust over the past > 10 Gyr . The optical depth of the 10 μm silicate absorption feature (τ10) in these galaxies is correlated with the amount of reddening along the sightline. But there are indications (e.g., based on the τ10 / E(B - V) ratio and possible grain crystallinity) that the dust in these distant galaxies differs in structure and composition from the dust in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. We briefly discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of galaxies and their star formation history.

  15. Dust reddening in star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Ting; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Lu, HongLin; Dong, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    We present empirical relations between the global dust reddening and other physical galaxy properties including the Halpha luminosity, Halpha surface brightness, metallicity and axial ratio for star-forming disc galaxies. The study is based on a large sample of ~22 000 well-defined star-forming galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The reddening parameterized by color excess E(B-V) is derived from the Balmer decrement. Besides the dependency of reddening on Halpha luminosity / surface brightness and gas phase metallicity, it is also correlated with the galaxy inclination, in the sense that edge-on galaxies are more attenuated than face-on galaxies at a give intrinsic luminosity. In light of these correlations, we present the empirical formulae of E(B-V) as a function of these galaxy properties, with a scatter of only 0.07 mag. The empirical relation can be reproduced if most dust attenuation to the HII region is due to diffuse background dust distributing in a disc thicker than that of H...

  16. Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.

    2006-04-24

    Metal dusting corrosion has been a serious problem in the petroleum and petrochemical industries, such as reforming and syngas production systems. This form of deterioration has led to worldwide material loss for 50 years. For the past three years, we have studied the mechanism of metal dusting for Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present a correlation between the weight loss and depth of pits that form in Ni-base alloys. Nickel-base alloys were also tested at 1 and 14.8 atm (210 psi), in a high carbon activity environment. Higher system pressure was found to accelerate corrosion in most Ni-base alloys. To reduce testing time, a pre-pitting method was developed. Mechanical scratches on the alloy surface led to fast metal dusting corrosion. We have also developed preliminary data on the performance of weldments of several Ni-base alloys in a metal dusting environment. Finally, Alloy 800 tubes and plates used in a reformer plant were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and Raman spectroscopy. The oxide scale on the surface of the Alloy 800 primarily consists of Fe{sub 1+x}Cr{sub 2-X}O{sub 4} spinel phase with high Fe content. Carbon can diffuse through this oxide scale. It was discovered that the growth of metal dusting pits could be stopped by means of a slightly oxidized alloy surface. This leads to a new way to solve metal dusting problem.

  17. Depletion patterns and dust evolution in the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, A P

    1999-01-01

    We review the use of elemental depletions in determining the composition of interstellar dust and present a new interpretation of the elemental depletion patterns for the dust forming elements in a range of diffuse cloud types. We discuss this within the context of dust processing in the ISM and show that Si and Mg are selectively eroded from dust, with respect to Fe, as expected for a sputtering erosion process. However, we find that Si is preferentially and non-stoichiometrically eroded from dust with respect to Mg by some as yet unidentified process that may act in conjunction with grain sputtering. On this basis a new way of interpreting the depletions in terms of `continuous' dust processing through erosion in the interstellar medium is presented. The observed depletion patterns can then be understood in terms of a gradually changing grain chemical composition as the erosion of the atoms proceeds non-stoichiometrically in the low-density interstellar medium. The stoichiometric erosion of multicomponent (...

  18. Foreground Analysis Using Cross-Correlations of External Templates on the 7-year WMAP data

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Tuhin; Jaffe, Tess; Dickinson, Clive; Davies, Rod; Davis, Richard; Gorski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    WMAP data when combined with ancillary data on free-free, synchrotron and dust allow an improved understanding of the spectrum of emission from each of these components. Here we examine the sky variation at intermediate and high latitudes using a cross-correlation technique. In particular, we compare the observed emission in several large partitions of the sky plus 33 selected sky regions to three "standard" templates. The regions are selected using a criterion based on the morphology of these template maps. The synchrotron emission shows evidence of steepening between GHz frequencies and the \\emph{WMAP} bands. There are indications of spectral index variations across the sky but the current data are not precise enough to accurately quantify this from region-to-region. The emission correlated with the $H_{\\alpha}$ template shows clear evidence of deviation from a free-free spectrum. The emission can be decomposed into a contribution from both free-free and spinning dust in the warm ionised medium of the Galax...

  19. Dust Masses, PAH Abundances, and Starlight Intensities in the SINGS Galaxy Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T; Bendo, G; Gordon, K D; Smith, J D T; Armus, L; Engelbracht, C W; Helou, G; Kennicutt, R C; Li, A; Roussel, H; Walter, F; Calzetti, D; Moustakas, J; Murphy, E J; Rieke, G H; Bot, C; Hollenbach, D J; Sheth, K; Teplitz, H I

    2007-01-01

    Physical dust models are presented for 65 galaxies in the SINGS survey that are strongly detected in the four IRAC bands and three MIPS bands. For each galaxy we estimate (1) the total dust mass, (2) the fraction of the dust mass contributed by PAHs, and (3) the intensity of the starlight heating the dust grains. We find that spiral galaxies have dust properties resembling the dust in the local region of the Milky Way, with similar dust-to-gas ratio, and similar PAH abundance. The observed SEDs, including galaxies with SCUBA photometry, can be reproduced by dust models that do not require "cold" (T8.1, grains contain a substantial fraction of interstellar Mg, Si and Fe. Galaxies with A_O8.1 have a median q_PAH=3.55%. The derived dust masses favor a value X_CO approx 4e20 cm^{-2}(K kms)^{-1} for the CO to H_2 conversion factor. Except for some starbursting systems (Mrk33, Tolo89, NGC3049), dust in the diffuse ISM dominates the IR power.

  20. Dust processing in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Villaume, Alexa; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain grow...

  1. Southern Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 9 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. In our final dust devil image we are again looking at the southern hemisphere of Mars. These tracks occur mainly on the northeast side of the topographic ridges. Of course, there are many exceptions, which makes understanding the dynamics that initiate the actual dust devil cyclone difficult. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -47.6, Longitude 317.3 East (42.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed

  2. Plentiful Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 8 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. These dust devil tracks occur on the northern plains of Mars. The majority of the surface seen in the image has been affected by the passage of dust devils. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -54.6, Longitude 79.3 East (280.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  3. Distribution of dust during two dust storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 ?g?m?3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 ?g?m?3). The mean PM1 concentrations were 97-241 ?g?m?3 with a maximum of 261 ?g?m?3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  4. Vaneless diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  5. Direct Measurement of Dust Attenuation in z approx. 1.5 Star-Forming Galaxies from 3D-HST: Implications for Dust Geometry and Star Formation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sedona H.; Kriek, Mariska; Brammer, Gabriel B; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha M. Foerster; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; VanDokkum, Pieter G.; Tease, Katherine Whitaker; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    The nature of dust in distant galaxies is not well understood, and until recently few direct dust measurements have been possible. We investigate dust in distant star-forming galaxies using near-infrared grism spectra of the 3D-HST survey combined with archival multi-wavelength photometry. These data allow us to make a direct comparison between dust towards star-forming regions (measured using Balmer decrements) and the integrated dust properties (derived by comparing spectral energy distributions [SEDs] with stellar population and dust models) for a statistically significant sample of distant galaxies. We select a sample of 163 galaxies between 1.36 or = 5 and measure Balmer decrements from stacked spectra. First, we stack spectra in bins of integrated stellar dust attenuation, and find that there is extra dust extinction towards star-forming regions (AV,HII is 1.81 times the integrated AV, star), though slightly lower than found for low-redshift starburst galaxies. Next, we stack spectra in bins of specific star formation rate (log sSFR), star formation rate (log SFR), and stellar mass (logM*). We find that on average AV,HII increases with SFR and mass, but decreases with increasing sSFR. The amount of extra extinction also decreases with increasing sSFR and decreasing stellar mass. Our results are consistent with the two-phase dust model - in which galaxies contain both a diffuse and a stellar birth cloud dust component - as the extra extinction will increase once older stars outside the star-forming regions become more dominant. Finally, using our Balmer decrements we derive dust-corrected H(alpha) SFRs, and find evidence that SED fitting produces incorrect SFRs if very rapidly declining SFHs are included in the explored parameter space. Subject headings: dust, extinction- galaxies: evolution- galaxies: high-redshift

  6. Dust properties of the cometary globule Barnard 207 (LDN 1489)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togi, Aditya; Witt, Adolf N.; John, Demi St.

    2017-09-01

    Barnard 207 (B207, LDN 1489, LBN 777), also known as the Vulture Head nebula, is a cometary globule in the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud region. B207 is known to host a Class I protostar, IRAS 04016+2610, located at a projected distance of 8400 au from the dense core centre. Using imaging and photometry over a wide wavelength range, from UV to sub-mm, we study the physical properties of B207 and the dust grains contained within. The core density, temperature, and mass are typical of other globules found in the Milky Way interstellar medium (ISM). The increase in the dust albedo with increasing optical wavelengths, along with the detection of coreshine in the near infrared, indicates the presence of larger dust grains in B207. The measured optical, near-, mid- and far-infrared intensities are in agreement with the CMM+AMM and CMM+AMMI dust grain type of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), suggesting mantle formation on the dust grains throughout the globule. We investigate the possibility of turbulence being responsible for diffusing dust grains from the central core to external outer layers of B207. However, in situ formation of large dust grains cannot be excluded. The reduced images (FITS file) in UV and optical bands are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/605/A99

  7. [House dust mite allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, A; Pichler, C

    2012-04-01

    House dust mites can be found all over the world where human beings live independent from the climate. Proteins from the gastrointestinal tract- almost all known as enzymes - are the allergens which induce chronic allergic diseases. The inhalation of small amounts of allergens on a regular base all night leads to a slow beginning of the disease with chronically stuffed nose and an exercise induced asthma which later on persists. House dust mites grow well in a humid climate - this can be in well isolated dwellings or in the tropical climate - and nourish from human skin dander. Scales are found in mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets. The clinical picture with slowly aggravating complaints leads quite often to a delayed diagnosis, which is accidently done on the occasion of a wider spectrum of allergy skin testing. The beginning of a medical therapy with topical steroids as nasal spray or inhalation leads to a fast relief of the complaints. Although discussed in extensive controversies in the literature - at least in Switzerland with the cold winter and dry climate - the recommendation of house dust mite avoidance measures is given to patients with good clinical results. The frequent ventilation of the dwelling with cold air in winter time cause a lower indoor humidity. Covering encasings on mattresses, pillow, and duvets reduces the possibility of chronic contact with mite allergens as well as the weekly changing the bed linen. Another option of therapy is the specific immunotherapy with extracts of house dust mites showing good results in children and adults. Using recombinant allergens will show a better quality in diagnostic as well as in therapeutic specific immunotherapy.

  8. A coal dust burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakhrshev, B.M.; Khasnullin, I.G.; Krauze, Ye.G.; Ushakov, Yu.A.; Zinovyev, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    The burner for combustion of coal dust fuel, primarily, in rotating furnaces, contains coaxially disposed pipes, a branch pipe for feeding in the air mixture and a rotating mechanism. The first two pipes are switched in to an air source. The third pipe on the input end has an oblique section and the pipe may be rotated around an axis by a mechanism. The first pipe has ports and it may be moved in an axial direction. By installing the third pipe in the first and second positions, it is possible to direct the dust coming from the branch pipe along the central (the larger part of the dust) or the central pipe, respectively, which makes it possible to regulate the configuration of the torch and its temperature. Hot air is sucked from the furnace through the ports in the perforated first pipe to the mouth of the burner, which makes it possible to intensify combustion. By moving the fifitpipe to the right it is possible to overlap the ports with the projections and to rule out suction of the air. The possibility of regulating combustion in wide ranges makes it possible to reduce the expenditure of fuel by 2 to 3 percent.

  9. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  10. Obscuration of Quasars by Dust and the Reddening Mechanism in Parkes-Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Masci, F J

    1998-01-01

    A majority of quasar surveys have been based on criteria which assume strong blue continua or a UV-excess. Any amount of dust along the line-of-sight is expected to drastically extinguish the optical/UV flux leading to a selection bias. Radio surveys however should suffer no bias against extinction by dust. Recently, a large complete sample of radio-selected quasars has become available (the `Parkes sample'). A majority of these sources exhibit optical--to--near-infrared continua that are exceedingly `red', very unlike those of quasars selected optically. The purpose of this thesis, broadly speaking, is to explore the problem of incompleteness in optical quasar surveys due to obscuration by dust, and to interpret the relatively `red' continua observed in the Parkes quasar sample. The first part of this thesis explores the observational consequences of an intervening (foreground) cosmological dust component, such as that located in galaxies and clusters. The second part examines the continuum properties of Par...

  11. Probing Interstellar Silicate Dust Grain Properties in Quasar Absorption Systems at Redshifts z<1.4

    CERN Document Server

    Aller, Monique C; York, Donald G; Welty, Daniel E; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam

    2014-01-01

    Absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars whose sightlines pass through foreground galaxies provide a valuable tool to probe the dust and gas compositions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. The first evidence of silicate dust in a quasar absorption system (QAS) was provided through our detection of the 10 micron silicate feature in the z=0.52 absorber toward the quasar AO 0235+164. We present results from 2 follow-up programs using archival Spitzer Space Telescope infrared spectra to study the interstellar silicate dust grain properties in a total of 13 QASs at 0.1dust grain properties in these distant galaxies may differ relat...

  12. Spatial distribution of interstellar dust in the Sun vicinity, comparison with neutral sodium-bearing gas

    CERN Document Server

    Vergely, Jean-Luc; Lallement, Rosine; Raimond, Severine

    2010-01-01

    3D tomography of the interstellar dust and gas may be useful in many respects, from the physical and chemical evolution of the ISM itself to foreground decontamination of the CMB, or various studies of the environments of specific objects. Our goal here is to bring more precise information on the distance to nearby interstellar dust and gas clouds within 250 pc. We apply the best available calibration methods to a carefully screened set of stellar Stromgren photometry data for targets possessing a Hipparcos parallax and spectral type classification. We combine the derived interstellar extinctions and the parallax distances for about 6,000 stars to build a 3D tomography of the local dust. We use an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach and a least squares criterion. We obtain 3D maps of the opacity and the distance to the main dust-bearing clouds with 250 pc. We calculate the integrated extinction between the Sun and the cube boundary and compare with the total galactic extinction derived f...

  13. Clouds and Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 2 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 180 East (180 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote

  14. Probing Interstellar Silicate Dust Grain Properties in Quasar Absorption Systems at Redshifts z<1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, M.; Kulkarni, V. P.; York, D. G.; Welty, D. E.; Vladilo, G.; Som, D.

    Absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars whose sightlines serendipitously pass through foreground galaxies provide a valuable tool to simultaneously probe the dust and gas compositions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. In particular, the damped and sub-damped Lyman- α (DLA/sub-DLA) absorbers trace gas-rich galaxies, independent of the intrinsic luminosities or star-formation rates of the associated galaxy stellar populations. The first evidence of silicate dust in a quasar absorption system was provided through our detection of the 10 µ m silicate feature in the z=0.52 DLA absorber toward the quasar AO 0235+164. We present results from 2 follow-up programs using archival Spitzer Space Telescope infrared spectra to study the interstellar silicate dust grain properties in a total of 13 quasar absorption systems at 0.1 < z < 1.4. We find clear detections of the 10 µ m silicate feature in the quasar absorption systems studied. In addition, we also detect the 18 µ m silicate feature in the sources with adequate spectral coverage. We find variations in the breadth, peak wavelength, and substructure of the 10 µ m interstellar silicate absorption features among the absorbers. This suggests that the silicate dust grain properties in these distant galaxies may differ relative to one another, and relative to those in the Milky Way. We also find suggestions in several sources, based on comparisons with laboratory-derived profiles from the literature, that the silicate dust grains may be significantly more crystalline than those in the amorphous Milky Way ISM. This is particularly evident in the z=0.89 absorber toward the quasar PKS 1830-211, where substructure near 10 µ m is consistent with a crystalline olivine composition. If confirmed, these grain property variations may have implications for both dust and galaxy evolution over the past 9 Gyrs, and for the commonly-made assumption that highredshift dust is similar to local dust. We also discuss

  15. Optimizing Saharan dust CALIPSO retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate improvements in CALIPSO dust extinction retrievals over North Africa and Europe when corrections are applied regarding the Saharan dust lidar ratio assumption, the separation of dust portion in detected dust mixtures, and the averaging scheme introduced in the Level 3 CALIPSO product. First, a universal, spatially constant lidar ratio of 58 sr instead of 40 sr is applied to individual Level 2 dust-related backscatter products. The resulting aerosol optical depths show an improvement compared with synchronous and co-located AERONET measurements. An absolute bias of the order of −0.03 has been found, improving on the statistically significant biases of the order of −0.10 reported in the literature for the original CALIPSO product. When compared with the MODIS co-located AOD product, the CALIPSO negative bias is even less for the lidar ratio of 58 sr. After introducing the new lidar ratio for the domain studied, we examine potential improvements to the climatological CALIPSO Level 3 extinction product: (1 by introducing a new methodology for the calculation of pure dust extinction from dust mixtures and (2 by applying an averaging scheme that includes zero extinction values for the non-dust aerosol types detected. The scheme is applied at a horizontal spatial resolution of 1° × 1° for ease of comparison with the instantaneous and co-located dust extinction profiles simulated by the BSC-DREAM8b dust model. Comparisons show that the extinction profiles retrieved with the proposed methodology reproduce the well-known model biases per sub-region examined. The very good agreement of the proposed CALIPSO extinction product with respect to AERONET, MODIS and the BSC-DREAM8b dust model, makes this dataset an ideal candidate for the provision of an accurate and robust multi-year dust climatology over North Africa and Europe.

  16. Planck intermediate results. XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Aniano, G; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Dore, O; Douspis, M; Draine, B T; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Ensslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerlow, E; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Gorski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versille, S; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihanen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vornle, M; Lopez-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macias-Perez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Norgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roudier, G; Rubio-Martin, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    We present all-sky dust modelling of the high resolution Planck, IRAS and WISE infrared (IR) observations using the physical dust model presented by Draine & Li in 2007 (DL). We study the performance of this model and present implications for future dust modelling. The present work extends to the full sky the dust modelling carried out on nearby galaxies using Herschel and Spitzer data. We employ the DL dust model to generate maps of the dust mass surface density, the dust optical extinction AV, and the starlight intensity heating the bulk of the dust, parametrized by Umin. We test the model by comparing these maps with independent estimates of the dust optical extinction AV . In molecular clouds, we compare the DL AV estimates with maps generated from stellar optical observations from the 2MASS survey. The DL AV estimates are a factor of about 3 larger than values estimated from 2MASS observations. In the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) we compare the DL optical extinction AV estimates with optical est...

  17. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    Abergel, A; Aghanim, N; Alina, D; Alves, M I R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clemens, M; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Grenier, I A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Joncas, G; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 857, 545 and 353 GHz, and IRAS 100 micron data. Using a modified black-body fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a tight representation of the data at 5 arcmin. It shows variations of the order of 30 % compared with the widely-used model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel. The Planck data allow us to estimate the dust temperature uniformly over the whole sky, providing an improved estimate of the dust optical depth compared to previous all-sky dust model, especially in high-contrast molecular regions. An increase of the dust opacity at 353 GHz, tau_353/N_H, from the diffuse to the denser interstellar medium (ISM) is reported. It is associated with a decrease in the observed dust temperature, T_obs, that could be due at least in part to the increased dust opacity. We also report an excess of dust emission at HI column densities lower than...

  18. Simulation on dissolute and dust dispersion in comprehensive mechanized heading face with forced-exhaust ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Wen; CHENG Wei-min; HAN Li; ZHOU Sheng-ju; YU Yan-bin; ZHAO Shan-shan

    2011-01-01

    According to the characteristics of comprehensive mechanized heading face,established the mathematical model of single-phase air flow with k-e two equations model,and have established k-e-(O)-kp mathematic model to solve two-phase flow of gas and particles in dust space with eulefian-eulerian method and eulerian-lagrangian method.Numerical solution of gas-particle two-phase flow was put forward based on collocated grid SIMPLE algorithm.Moreover,numerical simulation of dust concentration in fully mechanized caving face was carried out by using Fluent software.Finally,when in forced-exhaust ventilation circumstance,drawer type fan drum have less dust absorption,and most of dust spread to the other site; the dust concentration is inversely proportional to the distance from tunneling head,and the dust concentration has already diffused to decrease below 102 mg/m3 at the position ofx=12 m.Dust are more focused on relative side(in the range about y from 0 to 2 meter) of roadway space of press-ventilated fan drum,especially between tunneling place and drawer type fan drum; the roadway with road header have a higher dust concentration.These conclusions provide reliable theory basis for the dust prevention in comprehensive mechanized heading face.

  19. Acceleration of Small Dust Grains due to Charge Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem

    2011-01-01

    We consider the acceleration of very small dust grains including Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) arising from the electrostatic interactions of dust grains that have charge fluctuates in time due to charging events. We simulate the charge fluctuations of very small grains due to their sticking collisions with electrons and ions in plasma and the emission of photoelectrons by UV photons using Monte Carlo method. We identify the acceleration induced by the charge fluctuations as the dominant acceleration mechanism of very small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We show that this acceleration mechanism is more efficient for environments with low ionization, where the charge fluctuations are slow but have a large amplitude. We also discuss the implications of the present mechanism for grain coagulation and shattering in the diffuse ISM, molecular clouds and protoplanetary disks.

  20. Planck early results. XXV. Thermal dust in nearby molecular clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.

    2011-01-01

    , and the dust optical depth at 250 μm τ250. The temperature map illustrates the cooling of the dust particles in thermal equilibrium with the incident radiation field, from 16 - 17 K in the diffuse regions to 13 - 14 K in the dense parts. The distribution of spectral indices is centred at 1.78, with a standard......Planck allows unbiased mapping of Galactic sub-millimetre and millimetre emission from the most diffuse regions to the densest parts of molecular clouds. We present an early analysis of the Taurus molecular complex, on line-of-sight-averaged data and without component separation. The emission...... blackbody. Significant positive residuals are also detected in the molecular regions and in the 217 GHz and 100 GHz bands, mainly caused by the contribution of the J = 2 → 1 and J = 1 → 0 12CO and 13CO emission lines. We derive maps of the dust temperature T, the dust spectral emissivity index β...

  1. Scattered H-alpha light from Galactic dust clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Mattila, K; Lehtinen, K

    2006-01-01

    Bright emission nebulae, or HII regions, around hot stars are readily seen in H-alpha light. However, the all-pervasive faint H-alpha emission has only recently been detected and mapped over the whole sky. Mostly the H-alpha emission observed along a line of sight is produced by ionised gas in situ. There are, however, cases where all or most of the H-alpha radiation is due to scattering by electrons or dust particles which are illuminated by an H-alpha emitting source off the line of sight. Here we demonstrate that diffuse, translucent and dark dust clouds at high galactic latitudes are in many cases observed to have an excess of diffuse H-alpha surface brightness, i.e. they are brighter than the surrounding sky. We show that the majority of this excess surface brightness can be understood as light scattered off the interstellar dust grains. The source of incident photons is the general Galactic H-alpha background radiation impinging on the dust clouds from all over the sky.

  2. Chemical Evolution of Interstellar Dust into Planetary Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Comets are believed to retain some interstellar materials, stored in fairly pristine conditions since-their formation. The composition and properties of cometary dust grains should reflect those of grains in the outer part of the protosolar nebula which, at least in part, were inherited from the presolar molecular cloud. However, infrared emission features in comets differ from their interstellar counterparts. These differences imply processing of interstellar material on its way to incorporation in comets, but C and N appear to be retained. Overall dust evolution from the interstellar medium (ISM) to planetary materials is accompanied by an increase in proportion of complex organics and a decrease in pure carbon phases. The composition of cometary dust grains was measured in situ during fly-by missions to comet Halley in 1986. The mass spectra of about 5000 cometary dust grains with masses of 5 x 10(exp -17) - 5 x 10(exp -12) g provide data about the presence and relative abundances of the major elements H, C, N, O,Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni. The bulk abundances of major rock-forming elements integrated over all spectra were found to be solar within a factor of 2, while the volatile elements H, C, N, O in dust are depleted in respect to their total cosmic abundances. The abundances of C and N in comet dust are much closer to interstellar than to meteoritic and are higher than those of dust in the diffuse ISM. In dense molecular clouds dust grains are covered by icy mantles, the average composition of which is estimated to be H:C:N:O = 96:14:1:34. Up to 40% of elemental C and O may be sequestered in mantles. If we use this upper limit to add H, C, N and O as icy mantle material to the abundances residing in dust in the diffuse ISM, then the resulting values for H. C, and N match cometary abundances. Thus, ice mantles undergoing chemical evolution on grains in the dense ISM appear to have been transformed into less volatile and more complex organic

  3. A fast and explicit algorithm for simulating the dynamics of small dust grains with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    We describe a simple method for simulating the dynamics of small grains in a dusty gas, relevant to micron-sized grains in the interstellar medium and grains of centimetre size and smaller in protoplanetary discs. The method involves solving one extra diffusion equation for the dust fraction in addition to the usual equations of hydrodynamics. This "diffusion approximation for dust" is valid when the dust stopping time is smaller than the computational timestep. We present a numerical implementation using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) that is conservative, accurate and fast. It does not require any implicit timestepping and can be straightforwardly ported into existing 3D codes.

  4. Dust coagulation in ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  5. Flying Through Dust From Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    How can we tell what an asteroid is made of? Until now, weve relied on remote spectral observations, though NASAs recently launched OSIRIS-REx mission may soon change this by landing on an asteroid and returning with a sample.But what if we could learn more about the asteroids near Earth without needing to land on each one? It turns out that we can by flying through their dust.The aerogel dust collector of the Stardust mission. [NASA/JPL/Caltech]Ejected CluesWhen an airless body is impacted by the meteoroids prevalent throughout our solar system, ejecta from the body are flung into the space around it. In the case of small objects like asteroids, their gravitational pull is so weak that most of the ejected material escapes, forming a surrounding cloud of dust.By flying a spacecraft through this cloud, we could perform chemical analysis of the dust, thereby determining the asteroids composition. We could even capture some of the dust during a flyby (for example, by using an aerogel collector like in the Stardust mission) and bring it back home to analyze.So whats the best place to fly a dust-analyzing or -collecting spacecraft? To answer this, we need to know what the typical distribution of dust is around a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) a problem that scientists Jamey Szalay (Southwest Research Institute) and Mihly Hornyi (University of Colorado Boulder) address in a recent study.The colors show the density distribution for dust grains larger than 0.3 m around a body with a 10-km radius. The distribution is asymmetric, with higher densities on the apex side, shown here in the +y direction. [Szalay Hornyi 2016]Moon as a LaboratoryTo determine typical dust distributions around NEAs, Szalay and Hornyi first look at the distribution of dust around our own Moon, caused by the same barrage of meteorites wed expect to impact NEAs. The Moons dust cloud was measured in situ in 2013 and 2014 by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) on board the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment

  6. Gravimetric dust sampling for control purposes and occupational dust sampling.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the introduction of gravimetric dust sampling, konimeters had been used for dust sampling, which was largely for control purposes. Whether or not absolute results were achievable was not an issue since relative results were used to evaluate...

  7. A Polarimetric Survey for Dust in 47 Tucanae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Juan C.; Bassino, Lilia P.; Vega, E. Irene; Pellizza González, Leonardo J.; Cellone, Sergio A.; Méndez, Mariano R.

    2002-06-01

    We present linear polarization measurements in the V band for 77 stars in the field of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) and for 14 regions free of bright stars, located along an elliptical isophotal contour of the cluster, as well as UBVRI measurements for the cluster nucleus. The observations show variable foreground polarization that, once removed, leaves marginally significant polarization residuals for the nonvariable bright red giants. Although these residuals are small, there is a systematic trend in the sense that the larger ones are seen toward the south of the cluster (in a direction opposite to that of the cluster proper motion). In contrast, most of the variable stars do show significant intrinsic polarization. The behavior of the star-free regions is similar to that of the nonvariable stars and sets an upper limit to the possible existence of a global pattern of scattered (and polarized) intracluster light in the V band. In turn, the multicolor observations of the cluster nucleus cannot be fitted with a Serkowski law and exhibit a polarization excess in both U and B. This polarization could be explained as a combination of the foreground interstellar component and another component arising from dust located in the nucleus and illuminated by a bright blue post-asymptotic giant branch star (at 48" from the cluster center). Inspection of a set of archival Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images reveals the presence of a number of dark patches in the innermost regions of the cluster. A prominent patch (some 5"×3" in size) located 12" from the cluster center and with a position angle (north to east) of 120° has a slightly different polarization compared with that of the cluster nucleus and appears to be a good candidate for identification as a dust globule within the cluster. Based on observations made at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between CONICET and the National Universities of La

  8. An analytical test case for dust dynamics during a shock-wave passage

    CERN Document Server

    Mattsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    An exact solution of a forced Burgers' equation representing the dynamics of a "dust fluid" in a one-dimensional flow is presented. The test case considered starts with a steady (time independent) two-fluid flow in one dimension, where the two fluid components represent gas and dust. It is then assumed that a shock wave travels through the gas at a constant speed and without radiative energy losses and diffusion. Then, adopting a constant stopping time for the dust particles in the dust fluid (mono-dispersed grain sizes), the equation of motion for the dust fluid can be transformed into a simple ordinary differential equation, which is satisfied by the Wright omega function. Implications for the formation of detached shells around carbon stars are briefly discussed.

  9. Dust Heating by Low-mass Stars in Massive Galaxies at z<1

    CERN Document Server

    Kajisawa, M; Taniguchi, Y; Kobayashi, M A R; Ichikawa, T; Fukui, Y

    2015-01-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging data and multi-wavelength photometric catalog, we investigated the dust temperature of passively evolving and star-forming galaxies at 0.2 10^{10} Msun have a relatively high dust temperature of Tdust > 20 K, for which the formation efficiency of molecular hydrogen on the surface of dust grains in the diffuse ISM is expected to be very low from the laboratory experiments. The fraction of passively evolving galaxies strongly depends on the expected dust temperature at all redshifts and increases rapidly with increasing the temperature around Tdust ~ 20 K. These results suggest that the dust heating by low-mass stars in massive galaxies plays an important role for the continuation of their passive evolution, because the lack of the shielding effect of the molecular hydrogen on the UV radiation can prevent the gas cooling and formation of new stars.

  10. NGC4370: a case study for testing our ability to infer dust distribution and mass in nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Viaene, S; Baes, M; Fritz, J; Bendo, G J; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Bianchi, S; Cortese, L; Côté, P; Cuillandre, J -C; De Looze, I; Alighieri, S di Serego; Ferrarese, L; Gwyn, S D J; Hughes, T M; Pappalardo, C

    2015-01-01

    A fraction of the early-type galaxy population hosts a prominent dust lane. Methods to quantify the dust content of these systems based on optical imaging data usually yield dust masses which are an order of magnitude lower than dust masses derived from the observed FIR emission. High-quality optical data from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) and FIR/submm observations from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) allow us to revisit previous methods to determine the dust content in galaxies and explore new ones. We aim to derive the dust mass in NGC 4370 from both optical and FIR data, and investigate the need to invoke a putative diffuse dust component. We create color and attenuation maps, which are converted to approximate dust mass maps based on simple dust geometries. Dust masses are also derived from SED fits to FIR/submm observations. Finally, inverse radiative transfer fitting is performed to investigate more complex dust geometries. The empirical methods applied to the optical data ...

  11. Diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  12. VUV spectroscopy of carbon dust analogs: contribution to interstellar extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, L.; Alata, I.; Le, K. C.; Pino, T.; Giuliani, A.; Dartois, E.

    2016-02-01

    Context. A full spectral characterization of carbonaceous dust analogs is necessary to understand their potential as carriers of observed astronomical spectral signatures such as the ubiquitous UV bump at 217.5 nm and the far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise common to interstellar extinction curves. Aims: Our goal is to study the spectral properties of carbonaceous dust analogs from the FUV to the mid-infrared (MIR) domain. We seek in particular to understand the spectra of these materials in the FUV range, for which laboratory studies are scarce. Methods: We produced analogs to carbonaceous interstellar dust encountered in various phases of the interstellar medium: amorphous hydrogenated carbons (a-C:H), for carbonaceous dust observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, and soot particles, for the polyaromatic component. Analogs to a-C:H dust were produced using a radio-frequency plasma reactor at low pressures, and soot nanoparticles films were produced in an ethylene (C2H4) flame. We measured transmission spectra of these thin films (thickness Kronig inversion. We used these constants for comparison to existing interstellar extinction curves. Conclusions: We extend the spectral measurements of these types of carbonaceous analogs into the VUV and link the spectral features in this range to the 3.4 μm band. We suggest that these two materials might contribute to different classes of interstellar extinction curves.

  13. Can Composite Fluffy Dust Particles Solve the Interstellar Carbon Crisis?

    CERN Document Server

    Dwek, E

    1997-01-01

    Interstellar dust models are facing a "carbon crisis", so called because recent observations suggest that the abundance of carbon available for dust in the interstellar medium is less than half of the amount required to be tied up in graphite grains in order to explain the interstellar extinction curve. This paper presents an detailed assessment of a newly-proposed dust model (Mathis 1996), in which the majority of the interstellar carbon is contained in composite and fluffy dust (CFD) grains. Per unit mass, these grains produce more UV extinction, and can therefore account for the interstellar extinction curve with about half the carbon required in traditional dust models. The results of our analysis show that the CFD model falls short in solving the carbon crisis, in providing a fit to the UV-optical interstellar extinction curve. It also predicts a far-infrared emissivity in excess of that observed with the COBE/DIRBE and FIRAS instruments from the diffuse interstellar medium. The failure of the new model ...

  14. Three-Component Dust Models for Interstellar Extinction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. Muthumariappan

    2010-03-01

    Interstellar extinction curves obtained from the ‘extinction without standard’ method were used to constrain the dust characteristics in the mean ISM (V = 3.1), along the lines of sight through a high latitude diffuse molecular cloud towards HD 210121 (V = 2.1) and in a dense interstellar environment towards the cluster NGC 1977 (V = 6.42). We have used three-component dust models comprising silicate, graphite and very small carbonaceous grains (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) following the grain size distributions introduced by Li & Draine in 2001. It is shown that oxygen, carbon and silicon abundances derived from our models are closer with the available elemental abundances for the dust grains in the ISM if F & G type stars atmospheric abundances are taken for the ISM than the solar. The importance of very small grains in modelling the variation of interstellar extinction curves has been investigated. Grain size distributions and elemental abundances locked up in dust are studied and compared at different interstellar environments using these three extinction curves. We present the albedo and the scattering asymmetry parameter evaluated from optical to extreme-UV wavelengths for the proposed dust models.

  15. VUV spectroscopy of carbon dust analogs: contribution to interstellar extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Gavilan, L; Le, K C; Pino, T; Giuliani, A; Dartois, E

    2016-01-01

    A full spectral characterization of carbonaceous dust analogs is necessary to understand their potential as carriers of observed astronomical spectral signatures such as the ubiquitous UV bump at 217.5 nm and the far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise common to interstellar extinction curves. Our goal is to study the spectral properties of carbonaceous dust analogs from the FUV to the mid-infrared (MIR) domain. We seek in particular to understand the spectra of these materials in the FUV range, for which laboratory studies are scarce. We produced analogs to carbonaceous interstellar dust encountered in various phases of the interstellar medium: amorphous hydrogenated carbons (a-C:H), for carbonaceous dust observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, and soot particles, for the polyaromatic component. Analogs to a-C:H dust were produced using a radio-frequency plasma reactor at low pressures, and soot nanoparticles films were produced in an ethylene (C$_2$H$_4$) flame. We measured transmission spectra of these thin films ...

  16. Variations of the spectral index of dust emissivity from Hi-GAL observations of the Galactic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Paradis, D; Noriega-Crespo, A; Paladini, R; Piacentini, F; Bernard, J P; de Bernardis, P; Calzoletti, L; Faustini, F; Martin, P; Masi, S; Montier, L; Natoli, P; Ristorcelli, I; Thompson, M A; Traficante, A; Molinari, S

    2010-01-01

    Variations in the dust emissivity are critical for gas mass determinations derived from far-infrared observations, but also for separating dust foreground emission from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Hi-GAL observations allow us for the first time to study the dust emissivity variations in the inner regions of the Galactic plane at resolution below 1 degree. We present maps of the emissivity spectral index derived from the combined Herschel PACS 160 \\mu m, SPIRE 250 \\mu m, 350 \\mu m, and 500 \\mu m data, and the IRIS 100 \\mu m data, and we analyze the spatial variations of the spectral index as a function of dust temperature and wavelength in the two Science Demonstration Phase Hi-GAL fields, centered at l=30{\\deg} and l=59{\\deg}. Applying two different methods, we determine both dust temperature and emissivity spectral index between 100 and 500 \\mu m, at an angular resolution of 4'. Combining both fields, the results show variations of the emissivity spectral index in the range 1.8-2.6 for temperature...

  17. Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; White, M; White, S D M; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    The polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100GHz. We exploit the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353GHz to measure the dust angular power spectra $C_\\ell^{EE,BB}$ over the range $40<\\ell<600$. These will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. We show that statistical properties of the emission can be characterized over large fractions of the sky using $C_\\ell$. For the dust, they are well described by power laws in $\\ell$ with exponents $\\alpha^{EE,BB}=-2.42\\pm0.02$. The amplitudes of the polarization $C_\\ell$ vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity ones. The dust polarization frequency dependence is consistent with modified blackbody emission with $\\beta_d=1.59$ and $T_d=19.6$K. We find a systematic ratio between the amplitudes of ...

  18. Dust deposition on the Mars Exploration Rover Panoramic Camera (Pancam) calibration targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinch, K.M.; Sohl-Dickstein, J.; Bell, J.F.; Johnson, J. R.; Goetz, W.; Landis, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Panoramic Camera (Pancam) on the Mars Exploration Rover mission has acquired in excess of 20,000 images of the Pancam calibration targets on the rovers. Analysis of this data set allows estimates of the rate of deposition and removal of aeolian dust on both rovers. During the first 150-170 sols there was gradual dust accumulation on the rovers but no evidence for dust removal. After that time there is ample evidence for both dust removal and dust deposition on both rover decks. We analyze data from early in both rover missions using a diffusive reflectance mixing model. Assuming a dust settling rate proportional to the atmospheric optical depth, we derive spectra of optically thick layers of airfall dust that are consistent with spectra from dusty regions on the Martian surface. Airfall dust reflectance at the Opportunity site appears greater than at the Spirit site, consistent with other observations. We estimate the optical depth of dust deposited on the Spirit calibration target by sol 150 to be 0.44 ?? 0.13. For Opportunity the value was 0.39 ?? 0.12. Assuming 80% pore space, we estimate that the dust layer grew at a rate of one grain diameter per ???100 sols on the Spirit calibration target. On Opportunity the rate was one grain diameter per ???125 sols. These numbers are consistent with dust deposition rates observed by Mars Pathfinder taking into account the lower atmospheric dust optical depth during the Mars Pathfinder mission. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Domańska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mołocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis.

  20. Deuterium enrichment of interstellar dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen

    2016-07-01

    High abundance of some abundant and simple interstellar species could be explained by considering the chemistry that occurs on interstellar dusts. Because of its simplicity, the rate equation method is widely used to study the surface chemistry. However, because the recombination efficiency for the formation of any surface species is highly dependent on various physical and chemical parameters, the Monte Carlo method is best suited for addressing the randomness of the processes. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichment of interstellar grain mantle under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C, CH_3, CH_2D, OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ˜2 × 10^4 cm^{-3}), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (˜10^6 cm^{-3}), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverage of CO, CO_2, O_2, O_3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high fractionation of methanol but surprisingly water fractionation is found to be low. This is in contradiction with our model results indicating alternative routes for de-fractionation of water.

  1. Using machine learning to classify the diffuse interstellar bands

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Dalya; Poznanski, Dovi; Watson, Darach; Yao, Yushu; Cox, Nick L. J.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Using over a million and a half extragalactic spectra we study the correlations of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) in the Milky Way. We measure the correlation between DIB strength and dust extinction for 142 DIBs using 24 stacked spectra in the reddening range E(B-V) < 0.2, many more lines than ever studied before. Most of the DIBs do not correlate with dust extinction. However, we find 10 weak and barely studied DIBs with correlations that are higher than 0.7 with dust extinction and ...

  2. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Pober, J. C.; Ali, Z. S.; Bradley, R. F.; Carilli, C. L.; DeBoer, D. R.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Jacobs, D. C.; Klima, P.; MacMahon, D. H. E.; Manley, J. R.; Moore, D. F.; Parsons, A. R.; Stefan, I. I.; Walbrugh, W. P.

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  3. A high reliability survey of discrete Epoch of Reionization foreground sources in the MWA EoR0 field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, P. A.; Line, J.; Morales, M. F.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Jacobs, D. C.; Pober, J. C.; Sullivan, I. S.; Webster, R. L.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Dillon, J. S.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, HS.; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, S.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Sethi, S. K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tegmark, M.; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-10-01

    Detection of the epoch of reionization H I signal requires a precise understanding of the intervening galaxies and AGN, both for instrumental calibration and foreground removal. We present a catalogue of 7394 extragalactic sources at 182 MHz detected in the RA = 0 field of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization observation programme. Motivated by unprecedented requirements for precision and reliability we develop new methods for source finding and selection. We apply machine learning methods to self-consistently classify the relative reliability of 9490 source candidates. A subset of 7466 are selected based on reliability class and signal-to-noise ratio criteria. These are statistically cross-matched to four other radio surveys using both position and flux density information. We find 7369 sources to have confident matches, including 90 partially resolved sources that split into a total of 192 sub-components. An additional 25 unmatched sources are included as new radio detections. The catalogue sources have a median spectral index of -0.85. Spectral flattening is seen towards lower frequencies with a median of -0.71 predicted at 182 MHz. The astrometric error is 7 arcsec compared to a 2.3 arcmin beam FWHM. The resulting catalogue covers ˜1400 deg2 and is complete to approximately 80 mJy within half beam power. This provides the most reliable discrete source sky model available to date in the MWA EoR0 field for precision foreground subtraction.

  4. Selective attention to task-irrelevant emotional distractors is unaffected by the perceptual load associated with a foreground task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hindi Attar

    Full Text Available A number of studies have shown that emotionally arousing stimuli are preferentially processed in the human brain. Whether or not this preference persists under increased perceptual load associated with a task at hand remains an open question. Here we manipulated two possible determinants of the attentional selection process, perceptual load associated with a foreground task and the emotional valence of concurrently presented task-irrelevant distractors. As a direct measure of sustained attentional resource allocation in early visual cortex we used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs elicited by distinct flicker frequencies of task and distractor stimuli. Subjects either performed a detection (low load or discrimination (high load task at a centrally presented symbol stream that flickered at 8.6 Hz while task-irrelevant neutral or unpleasant pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS flickered at a frequency of 12 Hz in the background of the stream. As reflected in target detection rates and SSVEP amplitudes to both task and distractor stimuli, unpleasant relative to neutral background pictures more strongly withdrew processing resources from the foreground task. Importantly, this finding was unaffected by the factor 'load' which turned out to be a weak modulator of attentional processing in human visual cortex.

  5. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kohn, S A; Nunhokee, C; Bernardi, G; Pober, J; Ali, Z; Bradley, R; Carilli, C; DeBoer, D; Gugliucci, N; Jacobs, D; Klima, P; MacMahon, D; Manley, J; Moore, D; Parsons, A; Stefan, I; Walbrugh, W

    2016-01-01

    Current-generation low frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background, aim to generate power spectra of the brightness-temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally-smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally-structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR-window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work, we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilit...

  6. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  7. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  8. Mining dust filter. Bergbaustaubfilter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igelbuescher, H.; Hoelter, H.

    1988-12-28

    A dust filter for application underground, whose casing is designed as a transportable unit combinable with further casings and fitted with removable filter pockets. These filter pockets have a frame which seals towards the casing and with the lattices on which the filter cloth is stretched and with spacers holding the said lattices at a distance. Each casing as such has inspection ports that are operationable optionally on either side, and clean and crude gas channels on its upper side. The ends of these channels have coupleable head pieces, so that connection is made easy when casings are arranged in a line. Each crude gas channel is connected to the inside of the casing by means of perforations in the floor of said channel, whereas the clean gas channel, for its part, is in connection with the inside of the casing by means of a channel on the head side of the casing. It is thus possible to create a dust filter having practically any desired output by arranging individual modules in line, in which connection each individual module is reliably transportable on the facilities available below ground, as pre-fabricated above ground. Stable support of the sides of the filter cloths is ensured by the lattice that consists of reciprocally cranked longitudinal and transverse wires. 10 figs.

  9. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  10. Erosion of dust aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 m/s and above. Though fractal aggregates as ...

  11. Planck intermediate results. XLIV. The structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arzoumanian, D; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Ballardini, M; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Basak, S; Benabed, K; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Chiang, H C; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Di Valentino, E; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Dusini, S; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fantaye, Y; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frolov, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Gerbino, M; Ghosh, T; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hivon, E; Huang, Z; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Langer, M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Jeune, M Le; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Matarrese, S; Mauri, N; McEwen, J D; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Molinari, D; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Moss, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Neveu, J; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Plaszczynski, S; Polenta, G; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Ruiz-Granados, B; Salvati, L; Sandri, M; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Sirignano, C; Soler, J D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Tenti, M; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Trombetti, T; Valiviita, J; Vansyngel, F; Van Tent, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of interstellar dust polarization at high Galactic latitude, using the Stokes parameter Planck maps at 353 GHz. Our aim is to advance the understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), and to provide a model of the polarized dust foreground for cosmic microwave background component-separation procedures. Focusing on the southern Galactic cap, we examine the statistical distributions of the polarization fraction ($p$) and angle ($\\psi$) to characterize the ordered and turbulent components of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) in the solar neighbourhood. We relate patterns at large angular scales in polarization to the orientation of the mean (ordered) GMF towards Galactic coordinates $(l_0,b_0)=(70^\\circ \\pm 5^\\circ,24^\\circ \\pm 5^\\circ)$. The histogram of $p$ shows a wide dispersion up to 25 %. The histogram of $\\psi$ has a standard deviation of $12^\\circ$ about the regular pattern expected from the ordered GMF. We use these histograms to build a phenomenological...

  12. Improving the model of emission from spinning dust: effects of grain wobbling and transient spin-up

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A

    2010-01-01

    Observations continue to support the interpretation of the anomalous microwave foreground as electric dipole radiation from spinning dust grains as proposed by Draine and Lazarian (1998ab). In this paper we present a refinement of the original model by improving the treatment of a number of physical effects. First, we consider a disk-like grain rotating with angular velocity at an arbitrary angle with respect to the grain symmetry axis and derive the rotational damping and excitation coefficients arising from infrared emission, plasma-grain interactions and electric dipole emission. The angular velocity distribution and the electric dipole emission spectrum for grains is calculated using the Langevin equation, for cases both with and without fast internal relaxation. Our results show that, the peak emissivity of spinning dust, compared to earlier studies, increases by a factor of ~2 for the Warm Neutral Medium (WNM), the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM), the Cold Neutral Medium (CNM) and the Photodissociation Region...

  13. Relativistic diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  14. Andromeda's dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, Robert [CSIRO—Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NWS 1710 (Australia); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  15. Dust and the Sick Building Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul; Wohlfahrt Nielsen, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome......Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome...

  16. FOREGROUND MODEL AND ANTENNA CALIBRATION ERRORS IN THE MEASUREMENT OF THE SKY-AVERAGED λ21 cm SIGNAL AT z∼ 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardi, G. [SKA SA, 3rd Floor, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands, 7405 (South Africa); McQuinn, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Greenhill, L. J., E-mail: gbernardi@ska.ac.za [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    The most promising near-term observable of the cosmic dark age prior to widespread reionization (z ∼ 15-200) is the sky-averaged λ21 cm background arising from hydrogen in the intergalactic medium. Though an individual antenna could in principle detect the line signature, data analysis must separate foregrounds that are orders of magnitude brighter than the λ21 cm background (but that are anticipated to vary monotonically and gradually with frequency, e.g., they are considered {sup s}pectrally smooth{sup )}. Using more physically motivated models for foregrounds than in previous studies, we show that the intrinsic spectral smoothness of the foregrounds is likely not a concern, and that data analysis for an ideal antenna should be able to detect the λ21 cm signal after subtracting a ∼fifth-order polynomial in log ν. However, we find that the foreground signal is corrupted by the angular and frequency-dependent response of a real antenna. The frequency dependence complicates modeling of foregrounds commonly based on the assumption of spectral smoothness. Our calculations focus on the Large-aperture Experiment to detect the Dark Age, which combines both radiometric and interferometric measurements. We show that statistical uncertainty remaining after fitting antenna gain patterns to interferometric measurements is not anticipated to compromise extraction of the λ21 cm signal for a range of cosmological models after fitting a seventh-order polynomial to radiometric data. Our results generalize to most efforts to measure the sky-averaged spectrum.

  17. THE IMPORTANCE OF WIDE-FIELD FOREGROUND REMOVAL FOR 21 cm COSMOLOGY: A DEMONSTRATION WITH EARLY MWA EPOCH OF REIONIZATION OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pober, J. C. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Hazelton, B. J.; Beardsley, A. P.; Barry, N. A.; Martinot, Z. E.; Sullivan, I. S.; Morales, M. F.; Carroll, P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bell, M. E. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bernardi, G. [Square Kilometre Array South Africa (SKA SA), Pinelands 7405 (South Africa); Bhat, N. D. R.; Emrich, D. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Bowman, J. D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Briggs, F. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E. [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); De Oliveira-Costa, A. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Deshpande, A. A. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India); Dillon, Joshua S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ewall-Wice, A. M. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present observations, simulations, and analysis demonstrating the direct connection between the location of foreground emission on the sky and its location in cosmological power spectra from interferometric redshifted 21 cm experiments. We begin with a heuristic formalism for understanding the mapping of sky coordinates into the cylindrically averaged power spectra measurements used by 21 cm experiments, with a focus on the effects of the instrument beam response and the associated sidelobes. We then demonstrate this mapping by analyzing power spectra with both simulated and observed data from the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that removing a foreground model that includes sources in both the main field of view and the first sidelobes reduces the contamination in high k{sub ∥} modes by several per cent relative to a model that only includes sources in the main field of view, with the completeness of the foreground model setting the principal limitation on the amount of power removed. While small, a percent-level amount of foreground power is in itself more than enough to prevent recovery of any Epoch of Reionization signal from these modes. This result demonstrates that foreground subtraction for redshifted 21 cm experiments is truly a wide-field problem, and algorithms and simulations must extend beyond the instrument’s main field of view to potentially recover the full 21 cm power spectrum.

  18. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  19. Numerical Study on Infrared Optical Property of Diffuse Coal Particles in Mine Fully Mechanized Working Combined with CFD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Zheng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal dust seriously threatens the safety and occupational health of coal mines. Numerical simulation research on the infrared radiation characteristics of diffused coal dust is carried out in fully mechanized working faces based on the optical monitoring problem of dust particles in mine atmospheric environments. The CFD method is applied to obtain the law of dust transport and distribution. Combined with Mie scattering model, the infrared radiation change characteristics and spectral selection of diffused coal dust particles are simulated and analyzed along the working face. The comparison results show the following: the attenuation and scattering characteristics of mine dust particles system are first enhanced, and then they weaken as the distance from dust source increases. The infrared attenuation of mine dust at the center of the vertical cross-section is generally greater than that at the roof and floor in the same location. The dispersion of mine dust directly determines the attenuation contribution of respirable dust to total dust. Moreover, the infrared absorption effect of functional groups in coal causes the infrared attenuation effect of coal dust to have obvious optical selectivity along the roadway, the existing optical “window.”

  20. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  1. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dust plasma: II. Power-law distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Jingyu; Du, Jiulin

    2012-01-01

    The dust-acoustic waves and their stability driven by a flowing dust plasma when it cross through a static (target) dust plasma (the so-called permeating dust plasma) are investigated when the components of the dust plasma obey the power-law q-distributions in nonextensive statistics. The frequency, the growth rate and the stability condition of the dust-acoustic waves are derived under this physical situation, which express the effects of the nonextensivity as well as the flowing dust plasma velocity on the dust-acoustic waves in this dust plasma. The numerical results illustrate some new characteristics of the dust-acoustic waves, which are different from those in the permeating dust plasma when the plasma components are the Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we show that the flowing dust plasma velocity has a significant effect on the dust-acoustic waves in the permeating dust plasma with the power-law q-distribution.

  2. E ring dust sources: Implications from Cassini's dust measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Frank; Albers, Nicole; Hörning, Marcel; Kempf, Sascha; Krivov, Alexander V.; Makuch, Martin; Schmidt, Jürgen; Seiß, Martin; Miodrag Sremčević

    2006-08-01

    The Enceladus flybys of the Cassini spacecraft are changing our understanding of the origin and sustainment of Saturn's E ring. Surprisingly, beyond the widely accepted dust production caused by micrometeoroid impacts onto the atmosphereless satellites (the impactor-ejecta process), geophysical activities have been detected at the south pole of Enceladus, providing an additional, efficient dust source. The dust detector data obtained during the flyby E11 are used to identify the amount of dust produced in the impactor-ejecta process and to improve related modeling [Spahn, F., Schmidt, J., Albers, N., Hörning, M., Makuch, M., Seiß, M., Kempf, S., Srama, R., Dikarev, V.V., Helfert, S., Moragas-Klostermeyer, G., Krivov, A.V., Sremčević, M., Tuzzolino, A., Economou, T., Grün, E., 2006. Cassini dust measurements at Enceladus: implications for Saturn's E ring. Science, in press]. With this, we estimate the impact-generated dust contributions of the other E ring satellites and find significant differences in the dust ejection efficiency by two projectile families - the E ring particles (ERPs) and the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Together with the Enceladus south-pole source, the ERP impacts play a crucial role in the inner region, whereas the IDP impacts dominate the particle production in the outer E ring, possibly accounting for its large radial extent. Our results can be verified in future Cassini flybys of the E ring satellites. In this way poorly known parameters of the dust particle production in hypervelocity impacts can be constrained by comparison of the data and theory.

  3. Modelling dust extinction in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Zonca, Alberto; Mulas, Giacomo; Aresu, Giambattista; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    We model the extinction profiles observed in the Small and Large Magellanic clouds with a synthetic population of dust grains consisting by core-mantle particles and a collection of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. All different flavors of the extinction curves observed in the Magellanic Clouds can be described by the present model, that has been previously (successfully) applied to a large sample of diffuse and translucent lines of sight in the Milky Way. We find that in the Magellanic Clouds the extinction produced by classic grains is generally larger than absorption by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Within this model, the non-linear far-UV rise is accounted for by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whose presence in turn is always associated to a gap in the size distribution of classical particles. This hints either a physical connection between (e.g., a common cause for) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the absence of middle-sized dust particles, or the need for an additional component...

  4. Amino Acid Formation on Interstellar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Barbier, B.; Brack, A.; Thiemann, W.; Goesmann, F.; Rosenbauer, H.

    2003-04-01

    In the dense interstellar medium dust particles accrete ice layers of known molecular composition. In the diffuse interstellar medium these ice layers are subjected to energetic UV-irradiation. Here, photoreactions form complex organic molecules. The interstellar processes were recently successfully simulated in two laboratories. At NASA Ames Research Center three amino acids were detected in interstellar ice analogues [1], contemporaneously, our European team reported on the identification of 16 amino acids therein [2]. Amino acids are the molecular building blocks of proteins in living organisms. The identification of amino acids on the simulated icy surface of interstellar dust particles strongly supports the assumption that the precursor molecules of life were delivered from interstellar and interplanetary space via (micro-) meteorites and/or comets to the earyl Earth. The results shall be verified by the COSAC experiment onboard the ESA cometary mission Rosetta [3]. [1] M.P. Bernstein, J.P. Dworkin, S.A. Sandford, G.W. Cooper, L.J. Allamandola: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 401-403. [2] G.M. Muñoz Caro, U.J. Meierhenrich, W.A. Schutte, B. Barbier, A. Arcones Sergovia, H. Rosenbauer, W.H.-P. Thiemann, A. Brack, J.M. Greenberg: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 403-406. [3] U. Meierhenrich, W.H.-P. Thiemann, H. Rosenbauer: itshape Chirality \\upshape 11 (1999), 575-582.

  5. GALFA-HI: Dust/Gas Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan; Douglas, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (GALFA) is mapping the Arecibo sky in 21-cm neutral hydrogen emission. Last summer, GALFA HI data and IRIS infrared data were used to analyze the dust-to-gas ratio across various regions of the sky, looking for trends across the galactic environment. Maps of infrared excess, or regions of the sky where the interstellar dust is not completely traced by atomic hydrogen, were created. As molecular hydrogen cannot be observed in emission, one motivation for this IR excess study was to help establish whether regions of IR excess can be used to trace cold, dense regions of the interstellar medium (ISM) where molecular hydrogen forms, and other molecular gas accrues. Such molecular clouds are the precursors to star formation. Several regions of interest, and one cloud in particular, known as MBM 53-55, stood out in the IR excess analysis. Spectral analysis of both HI and CO data in several regions of significant IR excess confirmed the presence of molecular gas in MBM 53-55, and provided confirmation that the method of IR excess analysis is a useful tool for predicting molecular gas in the diffuse ISM. This work was funded by the NSF Arecibo Observatory REU Program.

  6. Foreground Model and Antenna Calibration Errors in the Measurement of the Sky-Averaged $\\lambda21$ cm Signal at z$\\sim$20

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardi, G; Greenhill, L J

    2014-01-01

    The most promising near-term observable of the cosmic dark age prior to widespread reionization ($z\\sim15-200$) is the sky-averaged $\\lambda21$ cm background arising from hydrogen in the intergalactic medium. Though an individual antenna could in principle detect the line signature, data analysis must separate foregrounds that are orders of magnitude brighter than the $\\lambda21$ cm background (but that are anticipated to vary monotonically and gradually with frequency). Using more physically motivated models for foregrounds than in previous studies, we show that the intrinsic "spectral smoothness" of the foregrounds is likely not a concern, and that data analysis for an ideal antenna should be able to detect the $\\lambda21$ cm signal after deprojecting a $\\sim 5^{\\rm th}$ order polynomial in $\\log \

  7. The Importance of Wide-field Foreground Removal for 21 cm Cosmology: A Demonstration With Early MWA Epoch of Reionization Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pober, J C; Beardsley, A P; Barry, N A; Martinot, Z E; Sullivan, I S; Morales, M F; Bell, M E; Bernardi, G; Bhat, N D R; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Deshpande, A A; Dillon, Joshua S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A M; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, N; Jacobs, D C; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P; Kratzenberg, E; Kudryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morgan, E; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Sethi, Shiv K; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tegmark, M; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S J; Trott, C M; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wyithe, J S B

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present observations, simulations, and analysis demonstrating the direct connection between the location of foreground emission on the sky and its location in cosmological power spectra from interferometric redshifted 21 cm experiments. We begin with a heuristic formalism for understanding the mapping of sky coordinates into the cylindrically averaged power spectra measurements used by 21 cm experiments, with a focus on the effects of the instrument beam response and the associated sidelobes. We then demonstrate this mapping by analyzing power spectra with both simulated and observed data from the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that removing a foreground model which includes sources in both the main field-of-view and the first sidelobes reduces the contamination in high k_parallel modes by several percent relative to a model which only includes sources in the main field-of-view, with the completeness of the foreground model setting the principal limitation on the amount of power removed. ...

  8. Connecting the Interstellar Gas and Dust Properties in Distant Galaxies Using Quasar Absorption Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Monique C.; Dwek, Eliahu; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam; Lackey, Kyle; Dwek, Eli; Beiranvand, Nassim; hide

    2016-01-01

    Gas and dust grains are fundamental components of the interstellar medium and significantly impact many of the physical processes driving galaxy evolution, such as star-formation, and the heating, cooling, and ionization of the interstellar material. Quasar absorption systems (QASs), which trace intervening galaxies along the sightlines to luminous quasars, provide a valuable tool to directly study the properties of the interstellar gas and dust in distant, normal galaxies. We have established the presence of silicate dust grains in at least some gas-rich QASs, and find that they exist at higher optical depths than expected for diffuse gas in the Milky Way. Differences in the absorption feature shapes additionally suggest variations in the silicate dust grain properties, such as in the level of grain crystallinity, from system-to-system. We present results from a study of the gas and dust properties of QASs with adequate archival IR data to probe the silicate dust grain properties. We discuss our measurements of the strengths of the 10 and 18 micron silicate dust absorption features in the QASs, and constraints on the grain properties (e.g., composition, shape, crystallinity) based on fitted silicate profile templates. We investigate correlations between silicate dust abundance, reddening, and gas metallicity, which will yield valuable insights into the history of star formation and chemical enrichment in galaxies.

  9. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  10. Dust and Gas in the Magellanic Clouds from the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project. II. Gas-to-Dust Ratio Variations across ISM Phases

    CERN Document Server

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Meixner, Margaret; Bot, Caroline; Bolatto, Alberto D; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Clayton, Geoffrey; Fukui, Yasuo; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Glover, Simon C O; Hony, Sacha; Israel, Frank; Jameson, Katherine; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lee, Min-Young; Li, Aigen; Madden, Suzanne C; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Okumura, K; Onishi, Toshikazu; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Reach, William; Remy-Ruyer, A; Robitaille, Thomas; Rubio, Monica; Sauvage, Marc; Seale, Jonathan; Sewilo, Marta; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Zhukovska, Svitlana

    2014-01-01

    The spatial variations of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) provide constraints on the chemical evolution and lifecycle of dust in galaxies. We examine the relation between dust and gas at 10-50 pc resolution in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on Herschel far-infrared (FIR), H I 21 cm, CO, and Halpha observations. In the diffuse atomic ISM, we derive the gas-to-dust ratio as the slope of the dust-gas relation and find gas-to-dust ratios of 380+250-130 in the LMC, and 1200+1600-420 in the SMC, not including helium. The atomic-to-molecular transition is located at dust surface densities of 0.05 Mo pc-2 in the LMC and 0.03 Mo pc-2 in the SMC, corresponding to AV ~ 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. We investigate the range of CO-to-H2 conversion factor to best account for all the molecular gas in the beam of the observations, and find upper limits on XCO to be 6x1020 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in the LMC (Z=0.5Zo) at 15 pc resolution, and 4x 1021 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in the SMC (Z=0.2Zo) at 45 pc resolution. In the ...

  11. Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Deluane, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s plans for implementing the Vision for Space Exploration include returning to the moon as a stepping stone for further exploration of Mars, and beyond. Dust on the lunar surface has a ubiquitous presence which must be explicitly addressed during upcoming human lunar exploration missions. While the operational challenges attributable to dust during the Apollo missions did not prove critical, the comparatively long duration of impending missions presents a different challenge. Near term plans to revisit the moon places a primary emphasis on characterization and mitigation of lunar dust. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems. This paper presents the current perspective and implementation of dust knowledge management and integration, and mitigation technology development activities within NASA s Exploration Technology Development Program. This work is presented within the context of the Constellation Program s Integrated Lunar Dust Management Strategy. The Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development project has been implemented within the ETDP. Project scope and plans will be presented, along with a a perspective on lessons learned from Apollo and forensics engineering studies of Apollo hardware. This paper further outlines the scientific basis for lunar dust behavior, it s characteristics and potential effects, and surveys several potential strategies for its control and mitigation both for lunar surface operations and within the working volumes of a lunar outpost.

  12. Large-scale variations of the dust optical properties in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Cambresy, L; Beichman, C A

    2005-01-01

    We present an analysis of the dust optical properties at large scale, for the whole galactic anticenter hemisphere. We used the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog to obtain the total reddening on each galaxy line of sight and we compared this value to the IRAS 100 microns surface brightness converted to extinction by Schlegel et al (1998). We performed a careful examination and correction of the possible systematic effects resulting from foreground star contamination, redshift contribution and galaxy selection bias. We also evaluated the contribution of dust temperature variations and interstellar clumpiness to our method. The correlation of the near-infrared extinction to the far-infrared optical depth shows a discrepancy for visual extinction greater than 1 mag with a ratio A_V(FIR) / A_V(gal) = 1.31 +- 0.06. We attribute this result to the presence of fluffy/composite grains characterized by an enhanced far--infrared emissivity. Our analysis, applied to half of the sky, provides new insights on the dust grains ...

  13. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radon Solvents Styrene Sulfur Dioxide Toluene Uranium Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) For Educators Introduction Tox Town-Based Curriculum Units / Science Club Careers in Environmental Health, Chemistry, and Toxicology More Resources Dust Storms en español ...

  14. Dust Acoustic Wave Excitation in a Plasma with Warm Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M.; Thomas, E., Jr.; Marcus, L.; Fisher, R.; Williams, J. D.; Merlino, R. L.

    2008-11-01

    Measurements of the dust acoustic wave dispersion relation in dusty plasmas formed in glow discharges at the University of Iowa [1] and Auburn University [2] have shown the importance of finite dust temperature effects. The effect of dust grains with large thermal speeds was taken into account using kinetic theory of the ion-dust streaming instability [3]. The results of analytic and numerical calculations of the dispersion relation based on the kinetic theory will be presented and compared with the experimental results. [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [3] M. Rosenberg, E. Thomas Jr., and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 15, 073701 (2008).

  15. A High Reliability Survey of Discrete Epoch of Reionization Foreground Sources in the MWA EoR0 Field

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, P A; Morales, M F; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Hazelton, B J; Jacobs, D C; Pober, J C; Sullivan, I S; Webster, R L; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Dillon, J S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; Gaensler, B M; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hewitt, J N; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, HS; Kratzenberg, E; Lenc, E; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morgan, E; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, S; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, S K; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tegmark, M; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S J; Trott, C M; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S B

    2016-01-01

    Detection of the Epoch of Reionization HI signal requires a precise understanding of the intervening galaxies and AGN, both for instrumental calibration and foreground removal. We present a catalogue of 7394 extragalactic sources at 182 MHz detected in the RA=0 field of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization observation programme. Motivated by unprecedented requirements for precision and reliability we develop new methods for source finding and selection. We apply machine learning methods to self-consistently classify the relative reliability of 9490 source candidates. A subset of 7466 are selected based on reliability class and signal-to-noise ratio criteria. These are statistically cross-matched to four other radio surveys using both position and flux density information. We find 7369 sources to have confident matches, including 90 partially resolved sources that split into a total of 192 sub-components. An additional 25 unmatched sources are included as new radio detections. The catalogue sour...

  16. Parametrising Epoch of Reionization foregrounds: A deep survey of low-frequency point-source spectra with the MWA

    CERN Document Server

    Offringa, A R; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; McKinley, B; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Carroll, P; Dillon, J S; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; Gaensler, B M; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Jacobs, D C; Kim, H -S; Kittiwisit, P; Lenc, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Neben, A R; Paul, S; Pindor, B; Pober, J C; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Sethi, S K; Shankar, N U; Subrahmanyan, R; Sullivan, I S; Tegmark, M; Thyagarajan, N; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Wyithe, J S B

    2016-01-01

    Experiments that pursue detection of signals from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are relying on spectral smoothness of source spectra at low frequencies. This article empirically explores the effect of foreground spectra on EoR experiments by measuring high-resolution full-polarization spectra for the 586 brightest unresolved sources in one of the MWA EoR fields using 45 h of observation. A novel peeling scheme is used to subtract 2500 sources from the visibilities with ionospheric and beam corrections, resulting in the deepest, confusion-limited MWA image so far. The resulting spectra are found to be affected by instrumental effects, which limit the constraints that can be set on source-intrinsic spectral structure. The sensitivity and power-spectrum of the spectra are analysed, and it is found that the spectra of residuals are dominated by PSF sidelobes from nearby undeconvolved sources. We release a catalogue describing the spectral parameters for each measured source.

  17. The little-studied cluster Berkeley 90. II. The foreground ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Apellániz, J Maíz; Sota, A; Simón-Díaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nearly one century after their discovery, the carrier(s) of Diffuse Interstellar Bands is/are still unknown and there are few sightlines studied in detail for a large number of DIBs. Aims: We want to study the ISM sightlines towards LS III +46 11 and LS III +46 12, two early-O-type stellar systems, and LS III +46 11 B, a mid-B-type star. The three targets are located in the stellar cluster Berkeley 90 and have a high extinction. Methods: We use the multi-epoch high-S/N optical spectra presented in paper I (Ma\\'iz Apell\\'aniz et al. 2015), the extinction results derived there, and additional spectra. Results: We have measured equivalent widths, velocities, and FWHMs for a large number of absorption lines in the rich ISM spectrum in front of Berkeley 90. The absorbing ISM has at least two clouds at different velocities, one with a lower column density (thinner) in the K I lines located away from Berkeley 90 and another one with a higher column density (thicker) associated with the cluster. The first cl...

  18. Planck intermediate results. XII: Diffuse Galactic components in the Gould Belt System

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Bedini, L; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Coulais, A; Cuttaia, F; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dobler, G; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Peel, M; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Salerno, E; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Tibbs, C T; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2013-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the diffuse low-frequency Galactic components in the Southern part of the Gould Belt system ($130^\\circ\\leq l\\leq 230^\\circ$ and $-50^\\circ\\leq b\\leq -10^\\circ$). Strong UV flux coming from the Gould Belt super-association is responsible for bright diffuse foregrounds that we observe from our position inside the system and that can help us improve our knowledge of the Galactic emission. Free-free emission and anomalous microwave emission (AME) are the dominant components at low frequencies ($\

  19. [Causation, prevention and treatment of dust explosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maolong; Jia, Wenbin; Wang, Hongtao; Han, Fei; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Hu, Dahai

    2014-10-01

    With the development of industrial technology, dust explosion accidents have increased, causing serious losses of people's lives and property. With the development of economy, we should lay further emphasis on causation, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion. This article summarizes the background, mechanism, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion, which may provide some professional knowledge and reference for the treatment of dust explosion.

  20. A Characterization of the Diffuse Galactic Emissions at Large Angular Scales Using the Tenerife Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Macías-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    diffuse emission in the range from 20 to 60 GHz. To discriminate between different models of AME, low frequency microwave data from 10 to 20 GHz are needed. We present here a reanalysis of published and unpublished Tenerife data from 10 to 33 GHz at large angular scales (from 5 to 15 degrees. We cross-correlate the Tenerife data to templates of the main galactic diffuse emissions: synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust. We find evidence of dust-correlated emission in the Tenerife data that could be explained as spinning dust grain emission.

  1. A numerical study on dust devils with implications to global dust budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estimates of the contribution of dust devils (DDs) to the global dust budget have large uncertainties because the dust emission mechanisms in DDs are not yet well understood. In this study, a large-eddy simulation model coupled with a dust scheme is used to investigate DD dust entrainment. DDs a...

  2. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  3. Surface System Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will perform a detailed examination of dust mitigation and tolerance strategies for connections and mechanisms to be employed on the lunar...

  4. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Testi, Leonardo; Ricci, Luca; Andrews, Sean; Blum, Juergen; Carpenter, John; Dominik, Carsten; Isella, Andrea; Natta, Antonella; Williams, Jonathan; Wilner, David

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) In the core accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow from the submicron sizes typical of interstellar dust to micron size particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds and cores, the growth from micron size particles to pebbles and kilometre size bodies must occur in protoplanetary disks. This step in the formation of planetary systems is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in young extrasolar systems. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational...

  5. Wormhole shadows in rotating dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which investigated the shadows of the Ellis wormhole surrounded by nonrotating dust, in this paper we study wormhole shadows in a rotating dust flow. First, we derive steady-state solutions of slowly rotating dust surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. Solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady-state solutions. Because the Ellis wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. The bright ring looks distorted due to rotation. Aside from the bright ring, there appear weakly luminous complex patterns by the emission from the other side of the throat. These structure could be detected by high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  6. Automated Classification of Stratospheric Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S. W.; Lasue, J.; Stepinski, T.

    2010-03-01

    We have applied data mining techniques to the JSC Cosmic Dust Catalog Volume 16 cluster particles. We have demonstrated a technique capable of reproducing the separation between cosmic and contaminant particles.

  7. The diffuse infrared background - COBE and other observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Silverberg, R. F.; Murdock, T.; Toller, G.; Spiesman, W.; Weiland, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite is designed to conduct a sensitive search for an isotropic cosmic infrared background radiation over the spectral range from 1 to 300 micrometers. The cumulative emissions of pregalactic, protogalactic, and evolving galactic systems are expected to be recorded in this background. The DIRBE instrument, a 10 spectral band absolute photometer with an 0.7 deg field of view, maps the full sky with high redundancy at solar elongation angles ranging from 64 to 124 degrees to facilitate separation of interplanetary, Galactic, and extragalactic sources of emission. Initial sky maps show the expected character of the foreground emissions, with relative minima at wavelengths of 3.4 micrometers and longward of 100 micrometers. Extensive modelling of the foregrounds, just beginning, will be required to isolate the extragalactic component. In this paper, we summarize the status of diffuse infrared background observations from the DIRBE, and compare preliminary results with those of recent rocket and satellite instruments.

  8. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited ...

  9. Ice nucleation by surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust and mineral dust/sulfate particles at cirrus temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Archuleta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the potential role of some types of mineral dust and mineral dust with sulfuric acid coatings as heterogeneous ice nuclei at cirrus temperatures. Commercially-available nanoscale powder samples of aluminum oxide, alumina-silicate and iron oxide were used as surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust particles, with and without multilayer coverage of sulfuric acid. A sample of Asian dust aerosol particles was also studied. Measurements of ice nucleation were made using a continuous-flow ice-thermal diffusion chamber (CFDC operated to expose size-selected aerosol particles to temperatures between -45 and -60°C and a range of relative humidity above ice-saturated conditions. Pure metal oxide particles supported heterogeneous ice nucleation at lower relative humidities than those required to homogeneously freeze sulfuric acid solution particles at sizes larger than about 50 nm. The ice nucleation behavior of the same metal oxides coated with sulfuric acid indicate heterogeneous freezing at lower relative humidities than those calculated for homogeneous freezing of the diluted particle coatings. The effect of soluble coatings on the ice activation relative humidity varied with the respective uncoated core particle types, but for all types the heterogeneous freezing rates increased with particle size for the same thermodynamic conditions. For a selected size of 200 nm, the natural mineral dust particles were the most effective ice nuclei tested, supporting heterogeneous ice formation at an ice relative humidity of approximately 135%, irrespective of temperature. Modified homogeneous freezing parameterizations and theoretical formulations are shown to have application to the description of heterogeneous freezing of mineral dust-like particles with soluble coatings.

  10. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Ricci, L.; Andrews, S.; Blum, J.; Carpenter, J.; Dominik, C.; Isella, A.; Natta, A.; Williams, J. P.; Wilner, D. J.

    In the core-accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow up to micrometer-sized particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds, the growth to pebbles and kilometer-sized bodies must occur at the high densities within protoplanetary disks. This critical step is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in extrasolar systems before the appearance of large planetary-sized bodies. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational signatures of these processes are summarized. We briefly discuss grain growth in molecular cloud cores and in collapsing envelopes of protostars, as these likely provide the initial conditions for the dust in protoplanetary disks. We then review the observational constraints on grain growth in disks from millimeter surveys, as well as the very recent evidence for radial variations of the dust properties in disks. We also include a brief discussion on the small end of the grain size distribution and dust settling as derived from optical, near-, and mid-infrared observations. Results are discussed in the context of global dust-evolution models; in particular, we focus on the emerging evidence for a very efficient early growth of grains and the radial distribution of maximum grain sizes as the result of growth barriers. We also highlight the limits of the current models of dust evolution in disks, including the need to slow the radial drift of grains to overcome the migration/fragmentation barrier.

  11. Dust vortex flows in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, P.K

    2002-12-30

    Coherent nonlinear structures in the form of dust vortex flows have been observed in unmagnetized laboratory dusty plasmas. Our objective here is show that the dynamics of such dust vortices is governed by a modified Navier-Stokes equation (MNSE) and that the stationary solutions of the MNSE can be represented as monopolar as well as a row of identical Stuart and a row of counter-rotating vortices.

  12. Planck intermediate results XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    , derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes I, Q, U, E, and B, computed by stacking individual images rotated to align the orientations of the filaments. Combining the stacked images and the histogram of relative orientations, we estimate the mean polarization...... at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between E-modes and B-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis...

  13. Dust in the Interplanetary Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Lamy, Herve

    2010-01-01

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nano dust particles of sizes 1 - 10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nano dust are detected near 1AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Though such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  14. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  15. The Cosmic DUNE dust astronomy mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grun, E.; Srama, R.; Cosmic Dune Team

    A dust astronomy mission aims at the simultaneous measurement of the origin and the chemical composition of individual dust grains in space. Interstellar dust traversing the solar system constitutes the galactic solid phase of matter from which stars and planetary systems form. Interplanetary dust, from comets and asteroids, represents remnant material from bodies at different stages of early solar system evolution. Thus, studies of interstellar and interplanetary dust with Cosmic DUNE (Cosmic Dust Near Earth) will provide a comparison between the composition of the interstellar medium and primitive planetary objects. Cosmic DUNE will prepare the way for effective collection in near-Earth space of interstellar and interplanetary dust for subsequent return to Earth and analysis in laboratories. Cosmic DUNE establishes the next logical step beyond NASA's Stardust mission, with four major advancements in cosmic dust research: (1) Analysis of the elemental and isotopic composition of individual cosmic dust grains, (2) determination of the size distribution of interstellar dust, (3) characterization of the interstellar dust flow through the planetary system, and (4) analysis of interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin. This mission goal will be reached with novel dust instrumentation. A dust telescope trajectory sensor has been developed which is capable of obtaining precision trajectories of sub-micron sized particles in space. A new high mass resolution dust analyzer of 0.1m2 impact area can cope with the low fluxes expected in interplanetary space. Cosmic DUNE will be proposed to ESA in response to its upcoming call for mission ideas.

  16. Diffusion coefficient in photon diffusion theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, R; Ten Bosch, JJ

    2000-01-01

    The choice of the diffusion coefficient to be used in photon diffusion theory has been a subject of discussion in recent publications on tissue optics. We compared several diffusion coefficients with the apparent diffusion coefficient from the more fundamental transport theory, D-app. Application to

  17. Diffusion coefficient in photon diffusion theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, R; Ten Bosch, JJ

    2000-01-01

    The choice of the diffusion coefficient to be used in photon diffusion theory has been a subject of discussion in recent publications on tissue optics. We compared several diffusion coefficients with the apparent diffusion coefficient from the more fundamental transport theory, D-app. Application to

  18. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  19. Circumplanetary dust dynamics : application to Martian dust tori and Enceladus dust plumes

    OpenAIRE

    Makuch, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Our Solar system contains a large amount of dust, containing valuable information about our close cosmic environment. If created in a planet's system, the particles stay predominantly in its vicinity and can form extended dust envelopes, tori or rings around them. A fascinating example of these complexes are Saturnian rings containing a wide range of particles sizes from house-size objects in the main rings up to micron-sized grains constituting the E ring. Other example are ring systems in g...

  20. INFRARED EMISSION BY DUST AROUND lambda BOOTIS STARS : DEBRIS DISKS OR THERMALLY EMITTING NEBULAE?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Galarza, J. R.; Kamp, I.; Su, K. Y. L.; Gaspar, A.; Rieke, G.; Mamajek, E. E.

    2009-01-01

    We present a model that describes stellar infrared excesses due to heating of the interstellar (IS) dust by a hot star passing through a diffuse IS cloud. This model is applied to six. Bootis stars with infrared excesses. Plausible values for the IS medium (ISM) density and relative velocity between

  1. Elemental tracers for Chinese source dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小曳; 张光宇; 朱光华; 张德二; 安芷生; 陈拓; 黄湘萍

    1996-01-01

    The mass-particle size distributions of 10 dust-carrying elements in aerosol particles were determined tor 12 sites in desert regions of northern China. The desert dust is proved to he of origin of eolian loess deposited on the Loess Plateau. Their transport to the loess was mainly attributable to the non-dust storm processes under the interglacial climate condition. The impact ot" dust storm on the accumulation of the loess increased in the glacial stage. On the basis of the signatures of 4 dust elements (Al. Fe, Mg and Sc). Chinese dust is believed to have 3 major desert sources (northwestern deserts, northern high dust deserts and northern low dust deserts). With a chemical element balance model, an elemental tracer system is established to proportion the export of China-source dust.

  2. Particle Lifting Processes in Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neakrase, L. D. V.; Balme, M. R.; Esposito, F.; Kelling, T.; Klose, M.; Kok, J. F.; Marticorena, B.; Merrison, J.; Patel, M.; Wurm, G.

    2016-10-01

    Particle lifting in dust devils on both Earth and Mars has been studied from many different perspectives, including how dust devils could influence the dust cycles of both planets. Here we review our current understanding of particle entrainment by dust devils by examining results from field observations on Earth and Mars, laboratory experiments (at terrestrial ambient and Mars-analog conditions), and analytical modeling. By combining insights obtained from these three methodologies, we provide a detailed overview on interactions between particle lifting processes due to mechanical, thermal, electrodynamical and pressure effects, and how these processes apply to dust devils on Earth and Mars. Experiments and observations have shown dust devils to be effective lifters of dust given the proper conditions on Earth and Mars. However, dust devil studies have yet to determine the individual roles of each of the component processes acting at any given time in dust devils.

  3. Alignment of Dust by Radiative Torque: Recent Developments

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2009-01-01

    Alignment of dust by radiative torques (RATs) has proven to be the most promising mechanism to explain alignment in various astrophysical environments, from comet atmospheres to accretion disks, molecular clouds, and diffuse interstellar gas. We discuss some of the major advances, which include, first of all, formulating of the analytical model of RATs. This model was shown to reproduce well the torques acting on actual irregular dust grains and allowed studies of the parameter space for which the alignment happens with long axes perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Such a study resulted in an important conclusion that, without any paramagnetic relaxation, the RAT alignment always happens for interstellar grains with long axes perpendicular to the magnetic field. We show that the gaseous bombardment in some cases increases the degree of alignment by knocking out grains from the positions of imperfect alignment when the grains rotate slowly to more stable positions of perfect alignment where grain...

  4. On the Source of the Dust Extinction in Type Ia Supernovae and the Discovery of Anomalously Strong Na I Absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, M M; Morrell, Nidia; Burns, Christopher R; Cox, Nick L J; Foley, Ryan J; Karakas, Amanda I; Patat, F; Sternberg, A; Williams, R E; Gal-Yam, A; Hsiao, E Y; Leonard, D C; Persson, Sven E; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Thompson, I B; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Folatelli, Gastón; Freedman, Wendy L; Hamuy, Mario; Roth, Miguel; Shields, Gregory A; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Chomiuk, Laura; Ivans, Inese I; Madore, Barry F; Penprase, B E; Perley, Daniel; Preston, G Pignata G; Soderberg, Alicia M

    2013-01-01

    High-dispersion observations of the Na I D 5890, 5896 and K I 7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to "Blueshifted" profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. (2011). This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is resp...

  5. Outgassing of icy bodies in the solar system - I. The sublimation of hexagonal water ice through dust layers

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlach, Bastian; Blum, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge about the physical processes determining the activity of comets were mainly influenced by several extremely successful space missions, the predictions of theoretical models and the results of laboratory experiments. However, novel computer models should not be treated in isolation but should be based on experimental results. Therefore, a new experimental setup was constructed to investigate the temperature dependent sublimation properties of hexagonal water ice and the gas diffusion through a dry dust layer covering the ice surface. We show that this experimental setup is capable to reproduce known gas production rates of pure hexagonal water ice. The reduction of the gas production rate due to an additional dust layer on top of the ice surface was measured and compared with the results of another experimental setup in which the gas diffusion through dust layers at room temperature was investigated. We found that the relative permeability of the dust layer is inversely proportional to its thickn...

  6. Interaction of energetic electrons with dust whistler-mode waves in magnetospheric dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, a new conceptual approach has been presented to investigate the interaction of energetic electrons with dust whistler-mode waves in magnetospheric dusty (complex) plasmas. Dust whistler-mode waves generated in the presence of charged dust grains in the magnetized dusty plasma, can scatter the launched electrons into the loss-cone leading to precipitation into the upper atmosphere which is an important loss process in the radiation belts and provides a major source of energy for the diffuse and pulsating aurora. To study the scattered electrons and chaotic regions, a Hamiltonian model of the electron-dust wave interaction has been employed in the magnetospheric plasma by considering the launched electron beam self-fields. Numerical simulations indicate that an electron beam interacting with the whistler-mode wave can easily trigger chaos in the dust-free plasma, while in the presence of dust charged grains in the plasma, the chaotic regions are quenched to some extent in the magnetosphere. Consequently, the rate of scattered electrons into the loss-cone reduces for the regions that the dust grains are present.

  7. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, 712 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Vladilo, Giovanni, E-mail: ALLERM@mailbox.sc.edu [Osservatorio Astonomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, 34143 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  8. Stochastic Circumplanetary Dynamics of Rotating Non-Spherical Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Martin; Brilliantov, N. V.; Sremcevic, M.; Spahn, F.; Krivov, A. V.

    2006-12-01

    Influence of stochastically fluctuating radiation pressure on the dynamics of dust grains on circumplanetary orbits was studied. Stochasticity stems from the permanent change of the particle cross-section due to rotation of nonspherical grains, exposed to the solar radiation. We found that stochasticity depends on the characteristic angular velocity of particles which, according to our estimates, spins very fast on the time scale of the orbital motion. According to this we modelled the stochastic part of the radiation pressure by a Gaussian white noise. Gauss perturbation equations with the radiation pressure being a sum of the deterministic and stochastic component have been used. We observed monotonous increasing standard deviation of the orbital elements, that is, the diffusive-like behaviour of the ensemble, which results in a spatial spreading of initially confined set of particles. By linear approximation we obtained expression for the effective diffusion coefficients and estimate their dependence on the geometrical characteristics of particles and their spin. Teoretical results were compared with numerical simulations performed for the putative dust tori of Mars. Our theory agrees fairly well with simulations for the initial period of the system evolution. The agreement however deteriorates with increasing time where impact of the non-linear terms of the perturbation equations becomes important. Analysis shows that the theoretical results may estimate the low boundary of the time-dependent standard deviation of the orbital elements. In the case of dust ejected from Martian moon Deimos we observed a change of orbital elements up to 10% of their initial values during the first 1000 years of orbital evolution. Our results indicate that the stochastic modulation of the radiation pressure can play an important role in the circumplanetary dynamics of dust and may, together with further noise sources (shadow, planetary bowshock, charge fluctuations, etc

  9. The global atmospheric loading of dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. F.; Ridley, D. A.; Haustein, K.; Miller, R. L.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust is one of the most ubiquitous aerosols in the atmosphere, with important effects on human health and the climate system. But despite its importance, the global atmospheric loading of dust has remained uncertain, with model results spanning about a factor of five. Here we constrain the particle size-resolved atmospheric dust loading and global emission rate, using a novel theoretical framework that uses experimental constraints on the optical properties and size distribution of dust to eliminate climate model errors due to assumed dust properties. We find that most climate models underestimate the global atmospheric loading and emission rate of dust aerosols.

  10. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angeli, M., E-mail: deangeli@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Laguardia, L. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Perelli Cippo, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Apicella, M.L. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Conti, C. [Istituto per la Conservazione e la Valorizzazione dei Beni Culturali – CNR, Milan (Italy); Giacomi, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO{sub 2}, LiOH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  11. Image computing techniques to extrapolate data for dust tracking in case of an experimental accident simulation in a nuclear fusion plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camplani, M; Malizia, A; Gelfusa, M; Barbato, F; Antonelli, L; Poggi, L A; Ciparisse, J F; Salgado, L; Richetta, M; Gaudio, P

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a preliminary shadowgraph-based analysis of dust particles re-suspension due to loss of vacuum accident (LOVA) in ITER-like nuclear fusion reactors has been presented. Dust particles are produced through different mechanisms in nuclear fusion devices, one of the main issues is that dust particles are capable of being re-suspended in case of events such as LOVA. Shadowgraph is based on an expanded collimated beam of light emitted by a laser or a lamp that emits light transversely compared to the flow field direction. In the STARDUST facility, the dust moves in the flow, and it causes variations of refractive index that can be detected by using a CCD camera. The STARDUST fast camera setup allows to detect and to track dust particles moving in the vessel and then to obtain information about the velocity field of dust mobilized. In particular, the acquired images are processed such that per each frame the moving dust particles are detected by applying a background subtraction technique based on the mixture of Gaussian algorithm. The obtained foreground masks are eventually filtered with morphological operations. Finally, a multi-object tracking algorithm is used to track the detected particles along the experiment. For each particle, a Kalman filter-based tracker is applied; the particles dynamic is described by taking into account position, velocity, and acceleration as state variable. The results demonstrate that it is possible to obtain dust particles' velocity field during LOVA by automatically processing the data obtained with the shadowgraph approach.

  12. Image computing techniques to extrapolate data for dust tracking in case of an experimental accident simulation in a nuclear fusion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camplani, M. [Visual Information Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Grupo de Tratamiento de Imágenes, E.T.S.I de Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Malizia, A.; Gelfusa, M.; Poggi, L. A.; Ciparisse, J. F.; Richetta, M.; Gaudio, P. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Barbato, F. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); EPMA, Materials Science and Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, Dubendorf CH-8600 (Switzerland); Antonelli, L. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze di base e applicate per l’Ingegneria, Universita degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Salgado, L. [Grupo de Tratamiento de Imágenes, E.T.S.I de Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Video Processing and Understanding Laboratory, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, a preliminary shadowgraph-based analysis of dust particles re-suspension due to loss of vacuum accident (LOVA) in ITER-like nuclear fusion reactors has been presented. Dust particles are produced through different mechanisms in nuclear fusion devices, one of the main issues is that dust particles are capable of being re-suspended in case of events such as LOVA. Shadowgraph is based on an expanded collimated beam of light emitted by a laser or a lamp that emits light transversely compared to the flow field direction. In the STARDUST facility, the dust moves in the flow, and it causes variations of refractive index that can be detected by using a CCD camera. The STARDUST fast camera setup allows to detect and to track dust particles moving in the vessel and then to obtain information about the velocity field of dust mobilized. In particular, the acquired images are processed such that per each frame the moving dust particles are detected by applying a background subtraction technique based on the mixture of Gaussian algorithm. The obtained foreground masks are eventually filtered with morphological operations. Finally, a multi-object tracking algorithm is used to track the detected particles along the experiment. For each particle, a Kalman filter-based tracker is applied; the particles dynamic is described by taking into account position, velocity, and acceleration as state variable. The results demonstrate that it is possible to obtain dust particles’ velocity field during LOVA by automatically processing the data obtained with the shadowgraph approach.

  13. The Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA) VII: A SKIRT radiative transfer model and insights on dust heating

    CERN Document Server

    Viaene, S; Tamm, A; Tempel, E; Bendo, G; Blommaert, J A D L; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Camps, P; Cooray, A; De Looze, I; De Vis, P; Fernandez-Ontiveros, J A; Fritz, J; Galametz, M; Gentile, G; Madden, S; Smith, M W L; Spinoglio, L; Verstocken, S

    2016-01-01

    The radiation of stars heats dust grains in the diffuse interstellar medium and in star-forming regions in galaxies. Modelling this interaction provides information on dust in galaxies, a vital ingredient for their evolution. It is not straightforward to identify the stellar populations heating the dust, and to link attenuation to emission on a sub-galactic scale. Radiative transfer models are able to simulate this dust-starlight interaction in a realistic, three-dimensional setting. We investigate the dust heating mechanisms on a local and global galactic scale, using the Andromeda galaxy (M31) as our laboratory. We perform a series of panchromatic radiative transfer simulations of Andromeda with our code SKIRT. The high inclination angle of M31 complicates the 3D modelling and causes projection effects. However, the observed morphology and flux density are reproduced fairly well from UV to sub-millimeter wavelengths. Our model reveals a realistic attenuation curve, compatible with previous, observational es...

  14. EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN THE SUBMILLIMETER DUST OPACITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Peter G.; Roy, Arabindo; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Bontemps, Sylvain [Observatoire de Bordeaux, BP 89, F-33270 Floirac (France); Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bock, James J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Carol Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Olmi, Luca [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 (Italy); Patanchon, Guillaume [Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet F-75205 Paris (France); and others

    2012-05-20

    The submillimeter opacity of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) in the Galactic plane has been quantified using a pixel-by-pixel correlation of images of continuum emission with a proxy for column density. We used multi-wavelength continuum data: three Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope bands at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m and one IRAS band at 100 {mu}m. The proxy is the near-infrared color excess, E(J - K{sub s}), obtained from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Based on observations of stars, we show how well this color excess is correlated with the total hydrogen column density for regions of moderate extinction. The ratio of emission to column density, the emissivity, is then known from the correlations, as a function of frequency. The spectral distribution of this emissivity can be fit by a modified blackbody, whence the characteristic dust temperature T and the desired opacity {sigma}{sub e}(1200) at 1200 GHz or 250 {mu}m can be obtained. We have analyzed 14 regions near the Galactic plane toward the Vela molecular cloud, mostly selected to avoid regions of high column density (N{sub H} > 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) and small enough to ensure a uniform dust temperature. We find {sigma}{sub e}(1200) is typically (2-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -25} cm{sup 2} H{sup -1} and thus about 2-4 times larger than the average value in the local high Galactic latitude diffuse atomic ISM. This is strong evidence for grain evolution. There is a range in total power per H nucleon absorbed (and re-radiated) by the dust, reflecting changes in the strength of the interstellar radiation field and/or the dust absorption opacity. These changes in emission opacity and power affect the equilibrium T, which is typically 15 K, colder than at high latitudes. Our analysis extends, to higher opacity and lower temperature, the trend of increasing {sigma}{sub e}(1200) with decreasing T that was found at high latitudes. The recognition of changes in the emission opacity

  15. Ice nucleation of ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation characteristics of montmorillonite mineral dust aerosols with and without exposure to ammonia gas were measured at different atmospheric temperatures and relative humidities with a continuous flow diffusion chamber. The montmorillonite particles were exposed to pure (100% and diluted ammonia gas (25 ppm at room temperature in a stainless steel chamber. There was no significant change in the mineral dust particle size distribution due to the ammonia gas exposure. 100% pure ammonia gas exposure enhanced the ice nucleating fraction of montmorillonite mineral dust particles 3 to 8 times at 90% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw and 5 to 8 times at 100% RHw for 120 min exposure time within our experimental conditions. The percentages of active ice nuclei were 2 to 9 times higher at 90% RHw and 2 to 13 times higher at 100% RHw in 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite compared to unexposed montmorillonite. All montmorillonite particles are more efficient as ice nuclei with increasing relative humidities and decreasing temperatures. The activation temperature of montmorillonite exposed to 100% pure ammonia was 12°C higher than for unexposed montmorillonite particles at 90% RHw and 10°C higher at 100% RHw. In the 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite experiments, the activation temperature was 7°C warmer than unexposed montmorillonite at 100% RHw. Degassing does not reverse the ice nucleating ability of ammonia exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles. This is the first experimental evidence that ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles can enhance its activation as ice nuclei and that the activation can occur at temperatures warmer than –10°C where natural atmospheric ice nuclei are very scarce.

  16. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  17. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  18. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  19. Coal dust: the real cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, S. [Independent Editorial and Technical Services, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    A recent British court case awarded retired coal miners compensation for asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Although the sums involved were small, large numbers of retired coal miners are likely to be eligible for such awards, as British safety in mines was not substantially worse than most other producers at the time, and was better than many. In some parts of the world safety standards are still poor. Dust suppression should be used on coal cutting machines, and dust controlled in transit. This may prove less expensive than it initially appears since the coal dust can be used instead of lost. This particularly important for transport in open trucks. Employers must also ensure that the safety equipment supplied is both comfortable and used. 3 refs., 5 photos.

  20. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tolias, P; De Angeli, M; De Temmerman, G; Ripamonti, D; Riva, G; Bykov, I; Shalpegin, A; Vignitchouk, L; Brochard, F; Bystrov, K; Bardin, S; Litnovsky, A

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions - detachment, sliding, rolling - are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  1. Whirling-type dust catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachev, V.G.; Butylkin, Yu.P.; Denisov, V.I.; Ermin, Yu.S.

    1980-10-07

    A whirling-type dust catcher is proposed, containing a cylindrical body mounted in its upper part, a diaphragm, a tangential nozzle (venturi) for delivery of the secondary gas, located in the lower part of the bunker body and an axial pipe with a vortex generator for introduction of the gas to be cleaned and a coaxial pipe connecting the bunker with the evacuation zone of the vortex generator. For increasing the degree of dust collection by elimination of gas fedthrough from the bunker into the axial zone of the dust catcher, it is equipped with an additional vortex generator set up in the outlet of the coaxial pipe, which is made in the shape of an inverse cone.

  2. THE PRECISION AND ACCURACY OF EARLY EPOCH OF REIONIZATION FOREGROUND MODELS: COMPARING MWA AND PAPER 32-ANTENNA SOURCE CATALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd [School of Space and Earth Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Aguirre, James E., E-mail: daniel.c.jacobs@asu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 S. 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-05-20

    As observations of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) in redshifted 21 cm emission begin, we assess the accuracy of the early catalog results from the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) and the Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA). The MWA EoR approach derives much of its sensitivity from subtracting foregrounds to <1% precision, while the PAPER approach relies on the stability and symmetry of the primary beam. Both require an accurate flux calibration to set the amplitude of the measured power spectrum. The two instruments are very similar in resolution, sensitivity, sky coverage, and spectral range and have produced catalogs from nearly contemporaneous data. We use a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting method to estimate that the two instruments are on the same flux scale to within 20% and find that the images are mostly in good agreement. We then investigate the source of the errors by comparing two overlapping MWA facets where we find that the differences are primarily related to an inaccurate model of the primary beam but also correlated errors in bright sources due to CLEAN. We conclude with suggestions for mitigating and better characterizing these effects.

  3. BICEP2 / Keck Array VI: Improved Constraints On Cosmology and Foregrounds When Adding 95 GHz Data From Keck Array

    CERN Document Server

    Array, Keck; Ade, P A R; Ahmed, Z; Aikin, R W; Alexander, K D; Barkats, D; Benton, S J; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Bowens-Rubin, R; Brevik, J A; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Buza, V; Connors, J; Crill, B P; Duband, L; Dvorkin, C; Filippini, J P; Fliescher, S; Grayson, J; Halpern, M; Harrison, S; Hilton, G C; Hui, H; Irwin, K D; Karkare, K S; Karpel, E; Kaufman, J P; Keating, B G; Kefeli, S; Kernasovskiy, S A; Kovac, J M; Kuo, C L; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Megerian, K G; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Orlando, A; Pryke, C; Richter, S; Schwarz, R; Sheehy, C D; Staniszewski, Z K; Steinbach, B; Sudiwala, R V; Teply, G P; Thompson, K L; Tolan, J E; Tucker, C; Turner, A D; Vieregg, A G; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Wu, W L K; Yoon, K W

    2016-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of all data taken by the BICEP2 & Keck Array CMB polarization experiments up to and including that taken during the 2014 observing season. This includes the first Keck Array observations at 95 GHz. The maps reach a depth of 50 nK deg in Stokes $Q$ and $U$ in the 150 GHz band and 127 nK deg in the 95 GHz band. We take auto- and cross-spectra between these maps and publicly available maps from WMAP and Planck at frequencies from 23 GHz to 353 GHz. An excess over lensed-LCDM is detected at modest significance in the 95x150 $BB$ spectrum, and is consistent with the dust contribution expected from our previous work. No significant evidence for synchrotron emission is found in spectra such as 23x95, or for dust/sync correlation in spectra such as 23x353. We take the likelihood of all the spectra for a multi-component model including lensed-LCDM, dust, synchrotron and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio $...

  4. Investigation of the diffuse ultraviolet background with DE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, John D.

    1988-01-01

    The imaging instrumentation on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite is used to measure the intensity of the diffused ultraviolet radiation on two great circles about the sky. It was found that the extragalactic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation has an intensity of 530 + or - 15 units (a unit is one photon/(sq cm s A sr) at a wavelength of 150 nm. The galactic component of the diffuse ultraviolet radiation has a dependence on galactic latitude which requires strongly forward scattering particles if it is produced by dust above the galactic plane.

  5. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  6. Direct measurements of dust attenuation in z ∼ 1.5 star-forming galaxies from 3D-HST: Implications for dust geometry and star formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Sedona H.; Kriek, Mariska [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Schreiber, Natascha M. Förster; Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lundgren, Britt [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Skelton, Rosalind E. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Whitaker, Katherine E., E-mail: sedona@berkeley.edu [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    The nature of dust in distant galaxies is not well understood, and until recently few direct dust measurements have been possible. We investigate dust in distant star-forming galaxies using near-infrared grism spectra of the 3D-HST survey combined with archival multi-wavelength photometry. These data allow us to make a direct comparison between dust around star-forming regions (A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}) and the integrated dust content (A {sub V,} {sub star}). We select a sample of 163 galaxies between 1.36 ≤ z ≤ 1.5 with Hα signal-to-noise ratio ≥5 and measure Balmer decrements from stacked spectra to calculate A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}. First, we stack spectra in bins of A {sub V,} {sub star}, and find that A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} = 1.86 A {sub V,} {sub star}, with a significance of σ = 1.7. Our result is consistent with the two-component dust model, in which galaxies contain both diffuse and stellar birth cloud dust. Next, we stack spectra in bins of specific star formation rate (log SSFR), star formation rate (log SFR), and stellar mass (log M {sub *}). We find that on average A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} increases with SFR and mass, but decreases with increasing SSFR. Interestingly, the data hint that the amount of extra attenuation decreases with increasing SSFR. This trend is expected from the two-component model, as the extra attenuation will increase once older stars outside the star-forming regions become more dominant in the galaxy spectrum. Finally, using Balmer decrements we derive dust-corrected Hα SFRs, and find that stellar population modeling produces incorrect SFRs if rapidly declining star formation histories are included in the explored parameter space.

  7. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-10-20

    An explanation is given of the low value of R lambda triple bond A lambda/E(B - V), the ratio of absolute to selective extinction deduced from Type Ia supernova observations. The idea involves scattering by dust clouds located in the circumstellar environment, or at the highest velocity shells of the supernova ejecta. The scattered light tends to reduce the effective R lambda in the optical, but has an opposite effect in the ultraviolet. The presence of circumstellar dust can be tested by ultraviolet to near infrared observations and by multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SNe Ia.

  8. [Effect of lunar dust on humans: -lunar dust: regolith-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Miki, Takeo; Higashi, Toshiaki; Horie, Seichi; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mukai, Chiaki

    2010-09-01

    We reviewed the effect of lunar dust (regolith) on humans by the combination of the hazard/exposure of regolith and microgravity of the moon. With regard to the physicochemical properties of lunar dust, the hazard-related factors are its components, fibrous materials and nanoparticles. Animal exposure studies have been performed using a simulant of lunar dust, and it was speculated that the harmful effects of the simulant lies between those of crystalline silica and titanium dioxide. Fibrous materials may not have a low solubility judging from their components. The nanoparticles in lunar dust may have harmful potentials from the view of the components. As for exposure to regolith, there is a possibility that particles larger than ones in earth (1 gravity) are respirable. In microgravity, 1) the deposition of particles of less than 1 µm in diameter in the human lung did not decrease, 2) the functions of macrophages including phagocytosis were suppressed, 3) pulmonary inflammation was changed. These data on hazard/exposure and microgravity suggest that fine and ultrafine particles in regolith may have potential hazards and risks for humans.

  9. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  10. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  11. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is to a large extent covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it poses a hazard in the form of dust clouds being...

  12. Efficient radiative transfer in dust grain mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, S

    2003-01-01

    The influence of a dust grain mixture consisting of spherical dust grains with different radii and/or chemical composition on the resulting temperature structure and spectral energy distribution of a circumstellar shell is investigated. The comparison with the results based on an approximation of dust grain parameters representing the mean optical properties of the corresponding dust grain mixture reveal that (1) the temperature dispersion of a real dust grain mixture decreases substantially with increasing optical depth, converging towards the temperature distribution resulting from the approximation of mean dust grain parameters, and (2) the resulting spectral energy distributions do not differ by more than 10% if >= 2^5 grain sizes are considered which justifies the mean parameter approximation and the many results obtained under its assumption so far. Nevertheless, the dust grain temperature dispersion at the inner boundary of a dust shell may amount to >>100K and has therefore to be considered in the cor...

  13. Dust Heating By Low-mass Stars in Massive Galaxies at z< 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajisawa, M.; Morishita, T.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, M. A. R.; Ichikawa, T.; Fukui, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging data and multi-wavelength photometric catalog, we investigated the dust temperature of passively evolving and star-forming galaxies at 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.0 in the CANDELS fields. We estimated the stellar radiation field by low-mass stars from the stellar mass and surface brightness profile of these galaxies and then calculated their steady-state dust temperature. At first, we tested our method using nearby early-type galaxies with the deep far-IR data by the Herschel Virgo cluster survey and confirmed that the estimated dust temperatures are consistent with the observed temperatures within the uncertainty. We then applied the method to galaxies at 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.0, and found that most passively evolving galaxies with {{M}star}\\gt {{10}10} {{M}⊙ } have relatively high dust temperatures of {{T}dust}\\gt 20 K, for which the formation efficiency of molecular hydrogen on the surface of dust grains in the diffuse ISM is expected to be very low from the laboratory experiments. The fraction of passively evolving galaxies strongly depends on the expected dust temperature at all redshifts and increases rapidly increasing temperature around {{T}dust}˜ 20 K. These results suggest that the dust heating by low-mass stars in massive galaxies plays an important role in the continuation of their passive evolution because the lack of the shielding effect of the molecular hydrogen on the UV radiation can prevent the gas cooling and formation of new stars.

  14. Far-infrared and dust properties of present-day galaxies in the EAGLE simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Peter; Trayford, James W.; Baes, Maarten; Theuns, Tom; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop

    2016-10-01

    The Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) cosmological simulations reproduce the observed galaxy stellar mass function and many galaxy properties. In this work, we study the dust-related properties of present-day EAGLE galaxies through mock observations in the far-infrared and submm wavelength ranges obtained with the 3D dust radiative transfer code SKIRT. To prepare an EAGLE galaxy for radiative transfer processing, we derive a diffuse dust distribution from the gas particles and we re-sample the star-forming gas particles and the youngest star particles into star-forming regions that are assigned dedicated emission templates. We select a set of redshift-zero EAGLE galaxies that matches the K-band luminosity distribution of the galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS), a volume-limited sample of about 300 normal galaxies in the Local Universe. We find overall agreement of the EAGLE dust scaling relations with those observed in the HRS, such as the dust-to-stellar mass ratio versus stellar mass and versus NUV-r colour relations. A discrepancy in the f250/f350 versus f350/f500 submm colour-colour relation implies that part of the simulated dust is insufficiently heated, likely because of limitations in our sub-grid model for star-forming regions. We also investigate the effect of adjusting the metal-to-dust ratio and the covering factor of the photodissociation regions surrounding the star-forming cores. We are able to constrain the important dust-related parameters in our method, informing the calculation of dust attenuation for EAGLE galaxies in the UV and optical domain.

  15. 75 FR 64411 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... the CMDPSU or CPDM and the sampled work shift is less than 8 hours, the value of t used for... Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors AGENCY: Mine Safety and...

  16. Early dust evolution in protostellar accretion disks

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We investigate dust dynamics and evolution during the formation of a protostellar accretion disk around intermediate mass stars via 2D numerical simulations. Using three different detailed dust models, compact spherical particles, fractal BPCA grains, and BCCA grains, we find that even during the early collapse and the first 10,000 yr of dynamical disk evolution, the initial dust size distribution is strongly modified. Close to the disk's midplane coagulation produces dust particles of sizes ...

  17. History and Applications of Dust Devil Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Balme, Matthew R.; Gu, Zhaolin; Kahanpää, Henrik; Klose, Martina; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Patel, Manish R.; Reiss, Dennis; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Spiga, Aymeric; Takemi, Tetsuya; Wei, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Studies of dust devils, and their impact on society, are reviewed. Dust devils have been noted since antiquity, and have been documented in many countries, as well as on the planet Mars. As time-variable vortex entities, they have become a cultural motif. Three major stimuli of dust devil research are identified, nuclear testing, terrestrial climate studies, and perhaps most significantly, Mars research. Dust devils present an occasional safety hazard to light structures and have caused several deaths.

  18. Dust levitation about Itokawa's equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Electrostatic dust motion has been hypothesized to occur on the asteroids, due to the observations of the Eros dust ponds [1] and the potential presence of such a phenomenon on the Moon [2]. There are two phases of electrostatic dust motion: lofting and the subsequent trajectories. The feasibility of electrostatic dust lofting can be assessed by comparing the strength of the electrostatic force to the gravity and cohesion which hold the grain on to the surface [3--5]. The motion of the dust grains after they detach from the surface can be described as either ballistic, escaping, or levitating. We are interested in dust levitation because it could potentially redistribute grains on the surface of an asteroid (for instance, producing the Eros dust ponds) and it could also be hazardous to spacecraft. Specifically, levitating dust could obscure the observations of surface-based spacecraft or possibly trigger obstacle avoidance routines during landing. Dust Levitation: Dust levitation is defined as the altitude oscillation of grains prior to their redeposition on the surface of an asteroid. Levitation occurs about equilibria where the electrostatic and gravity forces on the grain are equal and opposite. An equilibrium state is defined as a position and charge for a specific grain size. We have previously identified equilibria using a 1D plasma model and a simple gravity model for Itokawa [6]. In this simple model, the largest grain that was capable of stable levitation above Itokawa was 3 microns (in radius) [6]. Additionally, we have shown that levitating dust grains follow the variation in the equilibria for a rotating asteroid (i.e., the grain continues to oscillate about an equilibrium state that approaches the surface) [7]. Due to the nonspherical shape of Itokawa, both the gravity and plasma environments are much more complicated than the 1D approximations made in our previous work. Thus, in order to accurately assess the feasibility of dust

  19. DUST AND GAS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS FROM THE HERITAGE HERSCHEL KEY PROJECT. II. GAS-TO-DUST RATIO VARIATIONS ACROSS INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM PHASES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bot, Caroline [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bolatto, Alberto; Jameson, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Lab for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Hughes, Annie; Hony, Sacha [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wong, Tony [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Clayton, Geoffrey C. [Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Galametz, Maud [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Galliano, Frederic; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lee, Min-Young [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Glover, Simon [Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Israel, Frank [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Li, Aigen, E-mail: duval@stsci.edu [314 Physics Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); and others

    2014-12-20

    The spatial variations of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) provide constraints on the chemical evolution and lifecycle of dust in galaxies. We examine the relation between dust and gas at 10-50 pc resolution in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on Herschel far-infrared (FIR), H I 21 cm, CO, and Hα observations. In the diffuse atomic interstellar medium (ISM), we derive the GDR as the slope of the dust-gas relation and find GDRs of 380{sub −130}{sup +250} ± 3 in the LMC, and 1200{sub −420}{sup +1600} ± 120 in the SMC, not including helium. The atomic-to-molecular transition is located at dust surface densities of 0.05 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} in the LMC and 0.03 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} in the SMC, corresponding to A {sub V} ∼ 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. We investigate the range of CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor to best account for all the molecular gas in the beam of the observations, and find upper limits on X {sub CO} to be 6 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} K{sup –1} km{sup –1} s in the LMC (Z = 0.5 Z {sub ☉}) at 15 pc resolution, and 4 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} K{sup –1} km{sup –1} s in the SMC (Z = 0.2 Z {sub ☉}) at 45 pc resolution. In the LMC, the slope of the dust-gas relation in the dense ISM is lower than in the diffuse ISM by a factor ∼2, even after accounting for the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2} in the translucent envelopes of molecular clouds. Coagulation of dust grains and the subsequent dust emissivity increase in molecular clouds, and/or accretion of gas-phase metals onto dust grains, and the subsequent dust abundance (dust-to-gas ratio) increase in molecular clouds could explain the observations. In the SMC, variations in the dust-gas slope caused by coagulation or accretion are degenerate with the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2}. Within the expected 5-20 times Galactic X {sub CO} range, the dust-gas slope can be either constant or decrease by a factor of several across ISM phases. Further modeling

  20. Linear and nonlinear excitations in complex plasmas with nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and dust size distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li-Ping; Xue Ju-Kui; Li Yan-Long

    2011-01-01

    Both linear and nonlinear excitation in dusty plasmas have been investigated including the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and Gaussian size distribution dust particles.A linear dispersion relation and a Korteweg-de VriesBurgers equation governing the dust acoustic shock waves are obtained.The relevance of the instability of wave and the wave evolution to the dust size distribution and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation is illustrated both analytically and numerically.The numerical results show that the Gaussian size distribution of dust particles and the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong common influence on the propagation of both linear and nonlinear excitations.

  1. Origin of Harmattan dust settled in Northern Ghana – Long transported or local dust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsie, Gry; Awadzi, Theodore W; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    compositions of the bulk dust samples. Traces of minerals in the clay fraction of the Harmattan period dust may have their origin in the Bodélé Depression or other saline environments. The Harmattan dust deposited in Ghana shows only little resemblance to dust from the Chad basin and with Harmattan dust...... deposited in Niger. This study therefore suggests that the dust deposited during the Harmattan period in northern Ghana is not under significant influence of sediments from the Bodélé Depression. Similarity in the mineral and elemental composition of the dust from both the Harmattan and Monsoon periods...

  2. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the particles

  3. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably endot

  4. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biscaro, Chiara; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains that formed in the Type II-b supernova ejecta by modelling the sputtering of grains. The dust is located in dense ejecta clumps that are crossed by the reverse shock. We also investigate fur...

  5. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...

  6. Evidence for dust evolution within the Taurus Complex from Spitzer images

    CERN Document Server

    Flagey, N; Boulanger, F; Carey, S J; Brooke, T Y; Falgarone, E; Huard, T L; McCabe, C E; Miville-Deschênes, M A; Padgett, D L; Paladini, R; Rebull, L M

    2009-01-01

    We present Spitzer images of the Taurus Complex (TC) and take advantage of the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the observations to characterize the diffuse IR emission across the cloud. This work highlights evidence of dust evolution within the translucent sections of the archetype reference for studies of quiescent molecular clouds. We combine Spitzer 160 um and IRAS 100 um observations to produce a dust temperature map and a far-IR dust opacity map at 5' resolution. The average dust temperature is about 14.5K with a dispersion of +/-1K across the cloud. The far-IR dust opacity is a factor 2 larger than the average value for the diffuse ISM. This opacity increase and the attenuation of the radiation field (RF) both contribute to account for the lower emission temperature of the large grains. The structure of the TC significantly changes in the mid-IR images that trace emission from PAHs and VSGs. We focus our analysis of the mid-IR emission to a range of ecliptic latitudes where the zodiacal light resi...

  7. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wolk, G.; Barthel, P. D.; Peletier, R. F.; Pel, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and detect dust tori within radio galaxies of various types. Methods: Using VISIR on the VLT, we acquired sub-arcsecond (~0.40 arcsec) resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 μm, of the nuclei of a sample of 27 radio gala

  8. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e...

  9. Dust in the interplanetary medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Ingrid; Lamy, Herve [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Czechowski, Andrzej [Space Research Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud, E-mail: ingrid.mann@aeronomie.b [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France)

    2010-12-15

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nanodust particles of sizes {approx_equal}1-10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nanodust are detected near 1 AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Although such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  10. The Role of African Easterly Wave on Dust Transport and the Interaction Between Saharan Dust Layer and Atlantic ITCZ During Boreal Summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relationships among Saharan dust outbreak and transport, African easterly waves (AEW), African easterly jet (AEJ) and associated convective activities of Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) using Cloudsat-Calipso, MODIS and MERRA data. We find that a major Saharan dust outbreak is associated with the formation of a westward propagating strong cyclone around 15-25N over the western part northern Saharan. The strong cyclonic flow mobilizes and lifts the dust from the desert surface to a high elevation. As the cyclone propagate westward, it transports a thick elevated dust layer between 900 -500 hPa from the African continent to the eastern Atlantic. Cloudiness is reduced within the warm, dry dusty layer, but enhanced underneath it, possibly due to the presence of a shallow inversion layer over the marine boundary layer. The dust outbreak is linked to enhanced deep convection in the northern part of Atlantic ITCZ, abutting the southern flank of the dust layer, and a strengthening of the northward flank of the AEJ. As the dust layer spreads westward, it loses elevation and becomes increasing diffused as it reaches the central and western Atlantic. Using band pass filtered EOF analysis of MERRA winds, we find that AEWs propagating westward along two principal tracks, centered at 15-25N and 5-10N respectively. The easterly waves in the northern track are highly correlated with major dust outbreak over North Africa and associated with slower moving systems, with a quasi-periodicity of 6-9 day. On the other hand, easterly waves along the southern track are faster, with quasi-periodicity of 3-5 days. These faster easterly waves are closely tied to rainfall/cloud variations along the Atlantic ITCZ. Dust transport along the southern track by the faster waves generally leads rainfall/cloud anomalies in the same region by one or two days, suggesting the southern tracks of dust outbreak are regions of strong interaction between

  11. Extra-Galactic Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Kaper, Lex; Spaans, Marco; Foing, Bernard

    Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) have been observed ubiquitously along many sight-lines probing the interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Despite extensive efforts, their carrier(s) have not yet been identified, although they are very likely of a carbonaceous nature and reside in the gas phase. Possible candidates include, but are not limited to, polycyclic aromatic hydro- carbons (PAHs), fullerenes and carbon chains. To advance our understanding of DIB behaviour and thus DIB carrier properties we need to study environments inherently different from those observed in the Milky Way. Only recent advances in instrumentation and telescope capabilities are providing us with new exciting possibilities for extra-galactic DIB research. We present here a selection of our recent observational results for (extra)-galactic DIBs in the Local Group and beyond. In particular, DIBs in the Magellanic Clouds and in the spiral galaxy NGC1448. These first results show surprising similarities between certain DIB profiles as well as differences in DIB behaviour. Understanding diffuse cloud chemistry, in particular with respect to complex (carbonaceous) molecules, is crucial to any DIB carrier identification. In this respect, external galaxies offer a unique window as they exhibit local interstellar conditions (such as metallicity, UV-field and gas-to-dust ratio) very different from those observed in the Milky Way. We discuss briefly the effect of metallicity and the gas-to-dust ratio on the physi-chemical properties of diffuse clouds and the subsequent effects on the PAH charge state distribution and the DIB carriers.

  12. Planck Early Results: Origin of the submm excess dust emission in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bot, C; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cabella, P; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Dobashi, K; Doerl, U; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; En\\sslin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fukui, Y; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kawamura, A; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Linden-V\\ornle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Onishi, T; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paradis, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    The integrated Spectral Energy Distributions of the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud appear significantly flatter than expected from dust models based on their FIR and radio emission. The origin of this millimetre excess is still unexplained, and is here investigated using the Planck data. The background CMB contribution is subtracted using an ILC method performed locally around the galaxies. The foreground emission from the Milky Way is subtracted. After subtraction, the emission of both galaxies correlates closely with the gas emission of the LMC and SMC. The millimetre excess in the LMC can be explained by CMB fluctuations, but a significant excess is still present in the SMC SED. The Planck and IRIS data at 100 micron are combined to produce thermal dust temperature and optical depth maps of the two galaxies. The LMC temperature map shows the presence of a warm inner arm already found with the Spitzer data, but also shows the existence of a previously unidentified cold outer arm. Several cold regions are ...

  13. Planck intermediate results. XXXVIII. $E$- and $B$-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frolov, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huang, Z; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Serra, P; Soler, J D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    The quest for a $B$-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the $353\\,$GHz Planck Stokes maps at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between $E$-modes and $B$-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis Filament Finder, we identify 259 filaments at high Galactic latitude, with lengths larger or equal to $2$\\deg\\ (corresponding to $3.5\\,$pc in length for a typical distance of $100\\,$pc). These filaments show a preferred orientation parallel to the magnetic field projected onto the plane of the sky, derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes $I$, $Q$, $U$, $E$, and $B$...

  14. Observational evidence of dust evolution in galactic extinction curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.zza Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Casu, Silvia; Mulas, Giacomo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Zonca, Alberto, E-mail: cecchi-pestellini@astropa.unipa.it, E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: gmulas@oa-cagliari.inaf.it, E-mail: azonca@oa-cagliari.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Strada Prov.le Monserrato-Sestu Km 0.700, I-09042 Monserrato (Italy)

    2014-04-10

    Although structural and optical properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbons are known to respond to varying physical conditions, most conventional extinction models are basically curve fits with modest predictive power. We compare an evolutionary model of the physical properties of carbonaceous grain mantles with their determination by homogeneously fitting observationally derived Galactic extinction curves with the same physically well-defined dust model. We find that a large sample