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Sample records for dust agglomerates iv

  1. Compression Behaviour of Porous Dust Agglomerates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    The early planetesimal growth proceeds through a sequence of sticking collisions of dust agglomerates. Very uncertain is still the relative velocity regime in which growth rather than destruction can take place. The outcome of a collision depends on the bulk properties of the porous dust agglomerates. Continuum models of dust agglomerates require a set of material parameters that are often difficult to obtain from laboratory experiments. Here, we aim at determining those parameters from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our goal is to improveon the existing model that describe the interaction of individual monomers. We use a molecular dynamics approach featuring a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. The model includes normal forces, rolling, twisting and sliding between the dust grains. We present a new treatment of wall-particle interaction that allows us to perform customized simulations that directly correspond to laboratory experiments. We find that the existing i...

  2. Flue Dust Agglomeration in the Secondary Lead Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzgebel, Klaus

    1981-01-01

    A secondary lead smelter produces several tons of bag-house dust a day. Appropriate handling of this dust is mandatory to meet the proposed OSHA and EPA workroom and ambient standards. Dust agglomeration proved a successful approach. Dusts with a high concentration of PbCl2, or compounds containing PbCl2 can be agglomerated at much lower temperatures than samples with low PbCl2 concentrations. The chlorine sources are polyvinyl chloride (PVC) battery plate separators. Since PVC is used in Europe to a much greater extent than in the U.S., the composition of feedstock must be considered in equipment selection at U.S. secondary smelters. The vapor pressure characteristics of PbCl2 favor its evaporation at blast furnace temperatures. Condensation occurs in the gas cooling system. Recycling of baghouse dust leads to a buildup of PbCl2 in the smelter. Its removal from the system is eventually necessary through leaching, if charges with a high PVC content are processed.

  3. Updates to the dust-agglomerate collision model and implications for planetesimal formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Jürgen; Brisset, Julie; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Kothe, Stefan; Landeck, Alexander; Schräpler, Rainer; Weidling, René

    2016-10-01

    Since the publication of our first dust-agglomerate collision model in 2010, several new laboratory experiments have been performed, which have led to a refinement of the model. Substantial improvement of the model has been achieved in the low-velocity regime (where we investigated the abrasion in bouncing collisions), in the high-velocity regime (where we have studied the fragmentation behavior of colliding dust aggregates), in the erosion regime (in which we extended the experiments to impacts of small projectile agglomerates into large target agglomerates), and in the very-low velocity collision regime (where we studied further sticking collisions). We also have applied the new dust-agglomerate collision model to the solar nebula conditions and can constrain the potential growth of planetesimals by mass transfer to a very small parameter space, which makes this growth path very unlikely. Experimental examples, an outline of the new collision model, and applications to dust agglomerate growth in the solar nebula will be presented.

  4. Charging of Fractal Dust Agglomerates in a Plasma Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, L S

    2007-01-01

    The charge on micron-sized dust grains plays a crucial role in the structure and evolution of forming aggregates within the dust population during the coagulation process. The manner in which the charge is arranged on developing irregular structures can affect the fractal dimension of aggregates formed during collisions, which in turn influences the coagulation rate and size evolution of the dust cloud. Preliminary models for the charge evolution on fractal aggregates immersed in a plasma environment calculated using a modification to the orbital-motion-limited (OML) theory are presented in this paper. The model calculates currents to each point on the aggregate surface using a line-of-sight (LOS) approximation: only those electron or ion trajectories which are not blocked by another grain within the aggregate contribute to the charging current. Both the total charge and the dipole moment are calculated for the dust aggregate. While most coagulation theories assume that it is difficult for like-charged grains...

  5. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. V. Multiple Impacts of Dusty Agglomerates at Velocities Above the Fragmentation Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, Stefan; Güttler, Carsten; Blum, Jürgen

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, a number of new experiments have advanced our knowledge on the early growth phases of protoplanetary dust aggregates. Some of these experiments have shown that collisions between porous and compacted agglomerates at velocities above the fragmentation threshold velocity can lead to growth of the compact body, when the porous collision partner fragments upon impact and transfers mass to the compact agglomerate. To obtain a deeper understanding of this potentially important growth process, we performed laboratory and drop tower experiments to study multiple impacts of small, highly porous dust-aggregate projectiles onto sintered dust targets. The projectile and target consisted of 1.5 μm monodisperse, spherical SiO2 monomers with volume filling factors of 0.15 ± 0.01 and 0.45 ± 0.05, respectively. The fragile projectiles were accelerated by a solenoid magnet and combined with a projectile magazine with which 25 impacts onto the same spot on the target could be performed in vacuum. We measured the mass-accretion efficiency and the volume filling factor for different impact velocities between 1.5 and 6.0 m s^{-1}. The experiments at the lowest impact speeds were performed in the Bremen drop tower under microgravity conditions to allow partial mass transfer also for the lowest adhesion case. Within this velocity range, we found a linear increase of the accretion efficiency with increasing velocity. In the laboratory experiments, the accretion efficiency increases from 0.12 to 0.21 in units of the projectile mass. The recorded images of the impacts showed that the mass transfer from the projectile to the target leads to the growth of a conical structure on the target after less than 100 impacts. From the images, we also measured the volume filling factors of the grown structures, which ranged from 0.15 (uncompacted) to 0.40 (significantly compacted) with increasing impact speed. The velocity dependency of the mass-transfer efficiency and the packing

  6. Cold Agglomeration of Ultrafine Oxidized Dust (UOD from Ferromanganese and Silicomanganese Industrial Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ordiales

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Different wastes are generated in ferromanganese and silicomanganese alloy production. One of them is the ultrafine oxidized dust (UOD produced in the collection and control of flying dusts in the ferroalloy industry. This waste has fairly high manganese content (20%–40% Mn, making it suitable to be a secondary raw material for the ferromanganese industry. This research proposes a method for the transformation of UOD into a useable raw material. Cold agglomeration is the best option, due to its low energy consumption. Portland cement and refractory cement are compared as suitable candidates in the management of the UOD for their reuse in the electric arc furnace feed.

  7. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. Vi. Erosion of Large Aggregates and its Consequences for the Dust-Size Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Schräpler, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Observed protoplanetary disks consist of a large amount of micrometer-sized particles. Dullemond and Dominik (2005) pointed out for the first time the difficulty in explaining the strong mid-IR excess of classical T-Tauri stars without any dust-retention mechanisms. Because high relative velocities in between micrometer-sized and macroscopic particles exist in protoplanetary disks, we present experimental results on the erosion of macroscopic agglomerates consisting of micrometer-sized spherical particles via the impact of micrometer-sized particles. We find that after an initial phase, in which an impacting particle erodes up to 10 particles of an agglomerate, the impacting particles compress the agglomerate's surface, which partly passivates the agglomerates against erosion. Due to this effect the erosion halts within our error bars for impact velocities up to ~30 m/s. For larger velocities, the erosion is reduced by an order of magnitude. This outcome is explained and confirmed by a numerical model. In a n...

  8. Dust Explosion Characteristics of Agglomerated 35 nm and 100 nm Aluminum Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chun Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment, nanoparticles of 35 nm Al and 100 nm Al powders, respectively, formed particles with average sizes of 161 nm and 167 nm in agglomeration. The characteristics of dust cloud explosions with the two powder sizes, 35 nm and 100 nm, revealed considerable differences, as shown here: (dp/dtmax-35 nm = 1254 bar/s, (dp/dtmax-100 nm = 1105 bar/s; Pmax-35 nm = 7.5 bar, Pmax-100 nm = 12.3 bar, and MEC-35 nm = 40 g/m3, MEC-100 nm = 50 g/m3. The reason of Pmax-35 nm value is smaller than Pmax-100 nm may be due to agglomeration. From an analysis of the explosive residue, the study found that nanoparticles of 35 nm Al powder became filamentous strands after an explosion, where most of 100 nm Al nanoparticles maintained a spherical structure, This may be because the initial melting temperature of 35 nm Al is 435.71°C, while that for 100 nm Al is 523.58°C, higher by 87.87°C. This study discovered that explosive property between the 35 nm Al and 100 nm Al powders after agglomeration were different.

  9. Milky Way Tomography IV: Dissecting Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, Michael; Sesar, Branimir; Jurić, Mario; Schlafly, Edward F; Bellovary, Jillian; Finkbeiner, Douglas; Vrbanec, Dijana; Beers, Timothy C; Brooks, Keira J; Schneider, Donald P; Gibson, Robert R; Kimball, Amy; Jones, Lynne; Yoachim, Peter; Krughoff, Simon; Connolly, Andrew J; Loebman, Sarah; Bond, Nicholas A; Schlegel, David; Dalcanton, Julianne; Yanny, Brian; Majewski, Steven R; Knapp, Gillian R; Gunn, James E; Smith, J Allyn; Fukugita, Masataka; Kent, Steve; Barentine, John; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan

    2011-01-01

    We use SDSS photometry of 73 million stars to simultaneously obtain best-fit main-sequence stellar energy distribution (SED) and amount of dust extinction along the line of sight towards each star. Using a subsample of 23 million stars with 2MASS photometry, whose addition enables more robust results, we show that SDSS photometry alone is sufficient to break degeneracies between intrinsic stellar color and dust amount when the shape of extinction curve is fixed. When using both SDSS and 2MASS photometry, the ratio of the total to selective absorption, $R_V$, can be determined with an uncertainty of about 0.1 for most stars in high-extinction regions. These fits enable detailed studies of the dust properties and its spatial distribution, and of the stellar spatial distribution at low Galactic latitudes. Our results are in good agreement with the extinction normalization given by the Schlegel et al. (1998, SFD) dust maps at high northern Galactic latitudes, but indicate that the SFD extinction map appears to be...

  10. Agglomerated nanoparticles of hydrous Ce(IV) + Zr(IV) mixed oxide: Preparation, characterization and physicochemical aspects on fluoride adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Abir; Chakrabarti, Sharadindra; Biswas, Krishna; Ghosh, Uday Chand, E-mail: ucghosh@yahoo.co.in

    2014-07-01

    Hydrous Ce(IV)–Zr(IV) oxide (Ce/Zr ~ 1:1, mol/mol) (HCZMO) prepared by simple chemical precipitation was nanoparticles (60–70 nm) agglomerate with irregular surface morphology. The BET surface area, pore volume and pHzpc were estimated to be 185.04 m² g⁻¹, 0.1219 cm³ g⁻¹ and 5.8 (±0.2), respectively. Investigation of fluoride adsorption over HCZMO from its aqueous phase at an optimized pH ~ 6.0 showed that the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium data described, respectively, the pseudo-second order equation (R² = 0.98–0.99) and the Langmuir isotherm (R² > 0.99) very well. Values of the computed Arrhenius activation energy, Ea (1.16 kJ mol⁻¹), Langmuir monolayer capacity, θ (19.5 mg g⁻¹), D–R adsorption energy, ED–R (15.05 kJ mol⁻¹) and isosteric heat of reaction, ΔHr (0.518 kJ mol⁻¹) suggested that the fluoride has high affinity for homogeneous HCZMO surface for adsorption. Evidences appeared from the equal distribution co-efficient values and too well Langmuir isotherm fit. The fluoride adsorption reactions at 298–313 K with HCZMO were spontaneous (ΔG⁰ = negative) despite endothermic nature (ΔH⁰, kJ mol⁻¹ = +3.53, +4.04), owing to the increase of entropy (ΔS⁰, J mol⁻¹ K⁻¹ = +12.4, 13.8). More than 95% fluoride was released from F⁻-HCZMO (24.8 mg F⁻ g⁻¹) by 1.0 M NaOH, confirming the ion-exchange adsorption mechanism inclining to chemisorption. 1 g HCZMO per liter of a groundwater (F⁻: 4.40 mg L⁻¹) can reduce fluoride level below 1.5 mg L⁻¹ in batch treatment.

  11. Milky Way Tomography IV: Dissecting Dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Michael; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Sesar, Branimir; /Caltech; Juric, Mario; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Schlafly, Edward F.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Bellovary, Jillian; /Michigan U.; Finkbeiner, Douglas; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Vrbanec, Dijana; /Zagreb U.; Beers, Timothy C.; /Natl. Solar Observ., Tucson; Brooks, Keira J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2011-11-01

    We use SDSS photometry of 73 million stars to simultaneously obtain best-fit main-sequence stellar energy distribution (SED) and amount of dust extinction along the line of sight towards each star. Using a subsample of 23 million stars with 2MASS photometry, whose addition enables more robust results, we show that SDSS photometry alone is sufficient to break degeneracies between intrinsic stellar color and dust amount when the shape of extinction curve is fixed. When using both SDSS and 2MASS photometry, the ratio of the total to selective absorption, R{sub V}, can be determined with an uncertainty of about 0.1 for most stars in high-extinction regions. These fits enable detailed studies of the dust properties and its spatial distribution, and of the stellar spatial distribution at low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 30{sup o}). Our results are in good agreement with the extinction normalization given by the Schlegel et al. (1998, SFD) dust maps at high northern Galactic latitudes, but indicate that the SFD extinction map appears to be consistently overestimated by about 20% in the southern sky, in agreement with recent study by Schlafly et al. (2010). The constraints on the shape of the dust extinction curve across the SDSS and 2MASS bandpasses disfavor the reddening law of O'Donnell (1994), but support the models by Fitzpatrick (1999) and Cardelli et al. (1989). For the latter, we find a ratio of the total to selective absorption to be R{sub V} = 3.0 {+-} 0.1(random) {+-} 0.1 (systematic) over most of the high-latitude sky. At low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 5{sup o}), we demonstrate that the SFD map cannot be reliably used to correct for extinction because most stars are embedded in dust, rather than behind it, as is the case at high Galactic latitudes. We analyze three-dimensional maps of the best-fit R{sub V} and find that R{sub V} = 3.1 cannot be ruled out in any of the ten SEGUE stripes at a precision level of {approx} 0.1 - 0.2. Our best estimate for the

  12. Research approach and first results on agglomerate compaction in protoplanetary dust simulation in the Cloud Manipulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Blum, Jurgen; Ingo Von Borstel, Olaf; Schraepler, Rainer; Balapanov, Daniyar; Cecere, Anselmo

    2016-07-01

    Nanometre and micrometre-sized solid particles are ubiquitous in space and on Earth - from galaxies, interstellar space, protoplanetary and debris disks to planetary rings and atmospheres, planetary surfaces, comets, interplanetary space, Earth's atmosphere. Apparently, the most intriguing problem in the picture of the formation of planets is the transition from individual microscopic dust grains to kilometre-sized planetesimals. Revealing the mechanisms of this transition is one of the main tasks of the European Space Agency's project Interaction in Cosmic and Atmospheric Particle Systems (ICAPS). It was found that Brownian motion driven agglomeration could not provide the transition within reasonable time scale. As a result, at this stage top scientific goals shifted towards forced agglomeration and concentration of particles, targeting revealing the onset of compaction, experimental study of the evolution of fractal dimensions, size and mass distribution, occurrence of bouncing. The main tasks comprise 1) development of the rapid agglomeration model 2) development of the experimental facilities creating big fractal-type agglomerates from 10 to 1000 μm from a cloud of micrometre-size grains; 3) experimental realization of the rapid agglomeration in microgravity and ground conditions; and 4) in situ investigation of the morphology, mobility, mechanical and optical properties of the free-floating agglomerates, including investigation of thermophoresis, photophoresis of the agglomerates and of the two-phase flow phenomena. To solve the experimental part of the tasks we developed a Cloud Manipulation System, realized as a breadboard (CMS BB) for long duration microgravity platforms and a simplified laboratory version (CMS LV) mostly oriented on short duration microgravity and ground tests. The new system is based on the use of thermophoresis, most favourable for cloud manipulation without creating additional particle-particle forces in the cloud with a possibility

  13. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates II. Low Velocity Collision Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Langkowski, Doreen; Blum, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    For the investigation of collisions among protoplanetesimal dust aggregates, we performed microgravity experiments in which the impacts of high-porosity mm-sized dust aggregates into 2.5 cm-sized high-porosity dust aggregates can be studied. The dust aggregates consisted of micrometer-sized dust grains and were produced by random ballistic deposition with porosities between 85% and 93%. Impact velocities ranged from ~0.1 m/s to ~3 m/s and impact angles were almost randomly distributed. We also used "molded" target aggregates such that the radii of the local surface curvatures corresponded to the projectile radii. The experiments showed that impacts into the highest-porosity targets almost always led to sticking, whereas for the less porous dust aggregates, the collisions with intermediate velocities and high impact angles resulted in the bouncing of the projectile with a mass transfer from the target to the projectile aggregate. Sticking probabilities for the impacts into the "molded" target aggregates were c...

  14. Agglomeration processes sustained by dust density waves in Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} plasma: From C{sub 2}H{sub 2} injection to the formation of an organized structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dap, Simon; Hugon, Robert; Poucques, Ludovic de; Briancon, Jean-Luc; Bougdira, Jamal [Universite de Lorraine-Institut Jean Lamour, Dpt CP2S UMR 7198 CNRS, Faculte des Sciences et Technologies, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Lacroix, David [Universite de Lorraine-LEMTA, UMR 7563 CNRS, Faculte des Sciences et Technologies, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, an experimental investigation of dust particle agglomeration in a capacitively coupled RF discharge is reported. Carbonaceous particles are produced in an argon plasma using acetylene. As soon as the particle density becomes sufficient, dust density waves (DDWs) are spontaneously excited within the cathode sheath. Recently, it was proven that DDWs can significantly enhance the agglomeration rate between particles by transferring them a significant kinetic energy. Thus, it helps them to overcome Coulomb repulsion. The influence of this mechanism is studied from acetylene injection to the formation of very large agglomerates forming an organized structure after a few dozens of seconds. For this purpose, three diagnostic tools are used: extinction measurements to probe nanometer-sized particles, fast imaging for large agglomerates and a dust extraction technique developed for ex-situ analysis.

  15. The WIRED Survey. IV. New Dust Disks from the McCook & Sion White Dwarf Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoard, D. W.; Debes, John H.; Wachter, Stefanie; Leisawitz, David T.; Cohen, Martin

    2013-06-01

    We have compiled photometric data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All Sky Survey and other archival sources for the more than 2200 objects in the original McCook & Sion Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs. We applied color-selection criteria to identify 28 targets whose infrared spectral energy distributions depart from the expectation for the white dwarf (WD) photosphere alone. Seven of these are previously known WDs with circumstellar dust disks, five are known central stars of planetary nebulae, and six were excluded for being known binaries or having possible contamination of their infrared photometry. We fit WD models to the spectral energy distributions of the remaining ten targets, and find seven new candidates with infrared excess suggesting the presence of a circumstellar dust disk. We compare the model dust disk properties for these new candidates with a comprehensive compilation of previously published parameters for known WDs with dust disks. It is possible that the current census of WDs with dust disks that produce an excess detectable at K-band and shorter wavelengths is close to complete for the entire sample of known WDs to the detection limits of existing near-IR all-sky surveys. The WD dust disk candidates now being found using longer wavelength infrared data are drawn from a previously underrepresented region of parameter space, in which the dust disks are overall cooler, narrower in radial extent, and/or contain fewer emitting grains.

  16. The WIRED Survey. IV. New Dust Disks from the McCook & Sion White Dwarf Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoard, D.W.; Debes, John H.; Wachter, Stefanie; Leisawitz, David T.; Cohen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We have compiled photometric data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All Sky Survey and other archival sources for the more than 2200 objects in the original McCook & Sion Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs. We applied color-selection criteria to identify 28 targets whose infrared spectral energy distributions depart from the expectation for the white dwarf photosphere alone. Seven of these are previously known white dwarfs with circumstellar dust disks, five are known central stars of planetary nebulae, and six were excluded for being known binaries or having possible contamination of their infrared photometry. We fit white dwarf models to the spectral energy distributions of the remaining ten targets, and find seven new candidates with infrared excess suggesting the presence of a circumstellar dust disk. We compare the model dust disk properties for these new candidates with a comprehensive compilation of previously published parameters for known white dwarfs with dust disks. It is possible that the current census of white dwarfs with dust disks that produce an excess detectable at K-band and shorter wavelengths is close to complete for the entire sample of known WDs to the detection limits of existing near-IR all-sky surveys. The white dwarf dust disk candidates now being found using longer wavelength infrared data are drawn from a previously underrepresented region of parameter space, in which the dust disks are overall cooler, narrower in radial extent, and/or contain fewer emitting grains.

  17. Agglomeration of microparticles in complex plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Ivlev, Alexei; Konopka, Uwe; Morfill, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Agglomeration of highly charged microparticles was observed and studied in complex plasma experiments carried out in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The agglomeration was caused by strong dust density waves triggered in a particle cloud by decreasing neutral gas pressure. Using a high-speed camera during this unstable regime, it was possible to resolve the motion of individual microparticles and to show that the relative velocities of some particles were sufficiently high to overcome the mutual Coulomb repulsion and hence to result in agglomeration. After stabilising the cloud again through the increase of the pressure, we were able to observe the aggregates directly with a long-distance microscope. We show that the agglomeration rate deduced from our experiments is in good agreement with theoretical estimates. In addition, we briefly discuss the mechanisms that can provide binding of highly charged microparticles in a plasma.

  18. The WIRED Survey. IV. New Dust Disks from the McCook & Sion White Dwarf Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Hoard, D W; Wachter, Stefanie; Leisawitz, David T; Cohen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We have compiled photometric data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All Sky Survey and other archival sources for the more than 2200 objects in the original McCook & Sion Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs. We applied color-selection criteria to identify 28 targets whose infrared spectral energy distributions depart from the expectation for the white dwarf photosphere alone. Seven of these are previously known white dwarfs with circumstellar dust disks, five are known central stars of planetary nebulae, and six were excluded for being known binaries or having possible contamination of their infrared photometry. We fit white dwarf models to the spectral energy distributions of the remaining ten targets, and find seven new candidates with infrared excess suggesting the presence of a circumstellar dust disk. We compare the model dust disk properties for these new candidates with a comprehensive compilation of previously published parameters for known white dwarfs with dust disks....

  19. Advances in food powder agglomeration engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuq, B; Gaiani, C; Turchiuli, C; Galet, L; Scher, J; Jeantet, R; Mandato, S; Petit, J; Murrieta-Pazos, I; Barkouti, A; Schuck, P; Rondet, E; Delalonde, M; Dumoulin, E; Delaplace, G; Ruiz, T

    2013-01-01

    Food powders are used in everyday life in many ways and offer technological solutions to the problem of food production. The natural origin of food powders, diversity in their chemical composition, variability of the raw materials, heterogeneity of the native structures, and physicochemical reactivity under hydrothermal stresses contribute to the complexity in their behavior. Food powder agglomeration has recently been considered according to a multiscale approach, which is followed in the chapter layout: (i) at the particle scale, by a presentation of particle properties and surface reactivity in connection with the agglomeration mechanisms, (ii) at the mechanisms scale, by describing the structuration dynamics of agglomerates, (iii) at the process scale, by a presentation of agglomeration technologies and sensors and by studying the stress transmission mode in the powder bed, and finally (iv) by an integration of the acquired knowledge, thanks to a dimensional analysis carried out at each scale.

  20. GMASS ultradeep spectroscopy of galaxies at z ~ 2. IV. The variety of dust populations

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, S; Cimatti, A; Daddi, E; Kurk, J D; Bolzonella, M; Cassata, P; Halliday, C; Mignoli, M; Pozzetti, L; Renzini, A; Berta, S; Dickinson, M; Franceschini, A; Rodighiero, G; Rosati, P; Zamorani, G

    2009-01-01

    The properties of dust attenuation at rest-frame UV wavelengths are inferred from very high-quality FORS2 spectra of 78 galaxies from the GMASS survey at 1dust ejected from the galaxy main body via superwinds, UV extinction curves in-between those of the SMC and LMC characterise the sample galaxies. The fraction of galaxies with extinction curves differing from the SMC one increases, if more dust resides in the galactic plane or dust attenuation depends on stellar age. On average, the width of the manifested UV bumps is about 60% o...

  1. Defining urban agglomerations to detect agglomeration economies

    CERN Document Server

    Cottineau, Clementine; Hatna, Erez; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Agglomeration economies are a persistent subject of debate among economists and urban planners. Their definition turns on whether or not larger cities and regions are more efficient and more productive than smaller ones. We complement existing discussion on agglomeration economies and the urban wage premium here by providing a sensitivity analysis of estimated coefficients to different delineations of urban agglomeration as well as to different definitions of the economic measure that summarises the urban premium. This quantity can consist of total wages measured at the place of work, or of income registered at the place of residence. The chosen option influences the scaling behaviour of city size as well as the spatial distribution of the phenomenon at the city level. Spatial discrepancies between the distribution of jobs and the distribution of households at different economic levels makes city definitions crucial to the estimation of economic relations which vary with city size. We argue this point by regr...

  2. THE MILKY WAY TOMOGRAPHY WITH SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. IV. DISSECTING DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Michael; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brooks, Keira J.; Gibson, Robert R.; Jones, Lynne; Yoachim, Peter; Krughoff, Simon; Connolly, Andrew J.; Loebman, Sarah [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Juric, Mario [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schlafly, Edward F.; Finkbeiner, Douglas [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bellovary, Jillian [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vrbanec, Dijana [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 32, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kimball, Amy [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Bond, Nicholas A. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Schlegel, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS 50R5032, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2012-10-01

    We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry of 73 million stars to simultaneously constrain best-fit main-sequence stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) and amount of dust extinction along the line of sight toward each star. Using a subsample of 23 million stars with Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry, whose addition enables more robust results, we show that SDSS photometry alone is sufficient to break degeneracies between intrinsic stellar color and dust amount when the shape of extinction curve is fixed. When using both SDSS and 2MASS photometry, the ratio of the total to selective absorption, R{sub V} , can be determined with an uncertainty of about 0.1 for most stars in high-extinction regions. These fits enable detailed studies of the dust properties and its spatial distribution, and of the stellar spatial distribution at low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 30 Degree-Sign ). Our results are in good agreement with the extinction normalization given by the Schlegel et al. (SFD) dust maps at high northern Galactic latitudes, but indicate that the SFD extinction map appears to be consistently overestimated by about 20% in the southern sky, in agreement with recent study by Schlafly et al. The constraints on the shape of the dust extinction curve across the SDSS and 2MASS bandpasses disfavor the reddening law of O'Donnell, but support the models by Fitzpatrick and Cardelli et al. For the latter, we find a ratio of the total to selective absorption to be R{sub V} = 3.0 {+-} 0.1(random){+-}0.1 (systematic) over most of the high-latitude sky. At low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 5 Degree-Sign ), we demonstrate that the SFD map cannot be reliably used to correct for extinction because most stars are embedded in dust, rather than behind it, as is the case at high Galactic latitudes. We analyze three-dimensional maps of the best-fit R{sub V} and find that R{sub V} = 3.1 cannot be ruled out in any of the 10 SEGUE stripes at a precision level of {approx}0

  3. Engineering of Piroxicam Agglomerates by Additives Using Wet Agglomeration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi 1 *

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wet agglomeration is a method wherein the crystals of dispersion are held together in aggregates by small amount of a liquid acting as an intercrystal binder. In present study, in order to study the possible modification of agglomerate structure, low concentrations of additives (0.1-1% were added to binder liquid. Methods: Piroxicam agglomerates were produced by wet agglomeration method by three solvent systems including a good solvent (dimethylformamide or acetone, antisolvent (water and a binder liquid (ethylacetate or isopropylacetate. Span 80, talc, ethylcellulose and Eudragit RS in different concentrations were used as additives. The agglomerates were evaluated for production yield of agglomerates, size, friability and drug release properties. Results: The results showed that formation of agglomerates was possible in presence of span and talc. However, no agglomerates could be obtained with polymers tested (ethylcellulose and Eudragit RS. Talc increased agglomerate size, whereas the obtained agglomerates were more susceptible to breakup. However, using span as opposed to talc resulted in agglomerates with higher strength but smaller particle size. The dissolution tests showed that both additives adversely affected the dissolution rate of piroxicam from the agglomerates. Conclusion: Result of this study suggested that additives even in small amounts played a major role in agglomerate properties.

  4. Existing state of potassium chloride in agglomerated sintering dust and its water leaching kinetics%铁矿粉烧结电除尘灰中氯化钾的赋存形态及其水浸动力学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭翠; 郭占成; 张福利

    2011-01-01

    In order to examine the leaching rate of potassium chloride from the sintering dust by water,surface morphology and inner structure of the dust,especially the existing state of potassium chloride,were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and linear scanning technique via energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).The characterization shows that the sintering dusts are mostly porous composites or agglomerates of the fine dust particles with size less than 10 μm,and the potassium chloride and sodium chloride particles are partly covered by other water insoluble matters in the dust which consist of elements iron,calcium and etc.Exposure of potassium chloride in the agglomerated dust matrix of this kind suggests that the leaching can be simply perceived as the dissolution of water soluble matters in the dust.On-line monitor of specific electrical conductivity of the leaching system verifies the prediction that leaching kinetics of potassium chloride from the sintering dust fits dissolution model well.Leaching equilibrium can be reached within 5 min with potassium leaching ratio more than 95%.%为分析氯化钾从烧结电除尘灰中水浸出速率及浸出动力学,使用扫描电镜-线扫描分析氯化钾在烧结电除尘灰中的赋存状态及其与其它颗粒之间的赋存关系.实验发现烧结电除尘的平均粒径小于10μm,大多以团聚形式存在;氯化钾和氯化钠颗粒在烧结电除尘中的部分表面与其它粉尘颗粒如铁氧化物、钙镁化合物等有粘附连接.氯化钾在烧结电除尘中的存在形式表明其水浸出过程可视为可溶水的物质的溶解过程.借助于在线电导率测量手段分析烧结电除尘灰的水浸动力学.结果证明该粉尘的水浸过程符合扩散控制的溶解过程模型.浸出平衡在5min之内即可达到,同时氯化钾的浸出率达到95%以上.

  5. THE WIRED SURVEY. IV. NEW DUST DISKS FROM THE McCOOK and SION WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Debes, John H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Leisawitz, David T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cohen, Martin, E-mail: hoard@mpia.de [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, Marina, CA 93933 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We have compiled photometric data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All Sky Survey and other archival sources for the more than 2200 objects in the original McCook and Sion Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs. We applied color-selection criteria to identify 28 targets whose infrared spectral energy distributions depart from the expectation for the white dwarf (WD) photosphere alone. Seven of these are previously known WDs with circumstellar dust disks, five are known central stars of planetary nebulae, and six were excluded for being known binaries or having possible contamination of their infrared photometry. We fit WD models to the spectral energy distributions of the remaining ten targets, and find seven new candidates with infrared excess suggesting the presence of a circumstellar dust disk. We compare the model dust disk properties for these new candidates with a comprehensive compilation of previously published parameters for known WDs with dust disks. It is possible that the current census of WDs with dust disks that produce an excess detectable at K-band and shorter wavelengths is close to complete for the entire sample of known WDs to the detection limits of existing near-IR all-sky surveys. The WD dust disk candidates now being found using longer wavelength infrared data are drawn from a previously underrepresented region of parameter space, in which the dust disks are overall cooler, narrower in radial extent, and/or contain fewer emitting grains.

  6. Acoustic agglomeration of power plant fly ash. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reethof, G.; McDaniel, O.H.

    1982-01-01

    The work has shown that acoustic agglomeration at practical acoustic intensities and frequencies is technically and most likely economically viable. The following studies were performed with the listed results: The physics of acoustic agglomeration is complex particularly at the needed high acoustic intensities in the range of 150 to 160 dB and frequencies in the 2500 Hz range. The analytical model which we developed, although not including nonlinear acoustic efforts, agreed with the trends observed. We concentrated our efforts on clarifying the impact of high acoustic intensities on the generation of turbulence. Results from a special set of tests show that although some acoustically generated turbulence of sorts exists in the 150 to 170 dB range with acoustic streaming present, such turbulence will not be a significant factor in acoustic agglomeration compared to the dominant effect of the acoustic velocities at the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. Studies of the robustness of the agglomerated particles using the Anderson Mark III impactor as the source of the shear stresses on the particles show that the agglomerates should be able to withstand the rigors of flow through commercial cyclones without significant break-up. We designed and developed a 700/sup 0/F tubular agglomerator of 8'' internal diameter. The electrically heated system functioned well and provided very encouraging agglomeration results at acoustic levels in the 150 to 160 dB and 2000 to 3000 Hz ranges. We confirmed earlier results that an optimum frequency exists at about 2500 Hz and that larger dust loadings will give better results. Studies of the absorption of acoustic energy by various common gases as a function of temperature and humidity showed the need to pursue such an investigation for flue gas constituents in order to provide necessary data for the design of agglomerators. 65 references, 56 figures, 4 tables.

  7. The Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA): IV. Dust scaling relations at sub-kpc resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Viaene, S; Baes, M; Bendo, G J; Blommaert, J A D L; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Ciesla, L; Cortese, L; De Looze, I; Gear, W K; Gentile, G; Hughes, T M; Jarrett, T; Karczewski, O Ł; Smith, M W L; Spinoglio, L; Tamm, A; Tempel, E; Thilker, D; Verstappen, J

    2014-01-01

    The imprints of dust-starlight interactions are visible in scaling relations between stellar characteristics, star formation parameters and dust properties. We aim to examine dust scaling relations on a sub-kpc resolution in the Andromeda galaxy (M31) by comparing the properties on a local and global scale to other galaxies of the local universe. New Herschel observations are combined with available data from GALEX, SDSS, WISE and Spitzer to construct a dataset covering UV to submm wavelengths. We work at the resolution of the SPIRE $500\\; \\mu$m beam, with pixels corresponding to physical regions of 137 x 608 pc in the galaxy's disk. A panchromatic spectral energy distribution was modelled for each pixel and several dust scaling relations are investigated. We find, on a sub-kpc scale, strong correlations between $M_d/M_\\star$ and NUV-r, and between $M_d/M_\\star$ and $\\mu_\\star$ (the stellar mass surface density). Striking similarities with corresponding relations based on integrated galaxies are found. We dec...

  8. Spherical agglomeration of acetylsalicylic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polowczyk Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper spherical agglomeration of acetylsalicylic acid was described. In the first step, the system of good and poor solvents as well as bridging liquid was selected. As a result of a preliminary study, ethyl alcohol, water and carbon tetrachloride were used as the good solvent, poor one, and bridging liquid, respectively. Then, the amount of acetylsalicylic acid and the ratio of the solvents as well as the volume of the bridging liquid were examined. In the last step, the agglomeration conditions, such as mixing intensity and time, were investigated. The spherical agglomerates obtained under optimum conditions could be subjected to a tableting process afterwards.

  9. Agglomeration, Inequality and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    David Castells; Vicente Royuela

    2014-01-01

    The impact of income inequality on economic growth is dependent on several factors, including the time horizon considered, the initial level of income and its initial distribution. Yet, as growth and inequality are also uneven across space, it is also pertinent to consider the effects of the geographical agglomeration of economic activity. Moreover, it would also seem pertinent to consider not just the levels of inequality and agglomeration, but also the changes they undergo (i.e., their with...

  10. MTCI acoustic agglomeration particulate control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandran, R.R.; Mansour, M.N. [Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Scaroni, A.W.; Koopmann, G.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Loth, J.L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate pulse combination induced acoustic enhancement of coal ash agglomeration and sulfur capture at conditions typical of direct coal-fired turbines and PFBC hot gas cleanup. MTCI has developed an advanced compact pulse combustor island for direct coal-firing in combustion gas turbines. This combustor island comprises a coal-fired pulse combustor, a combined ash agglomeration and sulfur capture chamber (CAASCC), and a hot cyclone. In the MTCI proprietary approach, the pulse combustion-induced high intensity sound waves improve sulfur capture efficiency and ash agglomeration. The resulting agglomerates allow the use of commercial cyclones and achieve very high particulate collection efficiency. In the MTCI proprietary approach, sorbent particles are injected into a gas stream subjected to an intense acoustic field. The acoustic field serves to improve sulfur capture efficiency by enhancing both gas film and intra-particle mass transfer rates. In addition, the sorbent particles act as dynamic filter foci, providing a high density of stagnant agglomerating centers for trapping the finer entrained (in the oscillating flow field) fly ash fractions. A team has been formed with MTCI as the prime contractor and Penn State University and West Virginia University as subcontractors to MTCI. MTCI is focusing on hardware development and system demonstration, PSU is investigating and modeling acoustic agglomeration and sulfur capture, and WVU is studying aerovalve fluid dynamics. Results are presented from all three studies.

  11. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  12. Molecular line mapping of the giant molecular cloud associated with RCW 106 - IV. Ammonia towards dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Vicki; Urquhart, James S; Marshall, Jonathan P; Horiuchi, Shinji; Lo, Nadia; Walsh, Andrew J; Jordan, Christopher H; Jones, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Here we report observations of the two lowest inversion transitions of ammonia with the 70-m Tidbinbilla radio telescope. They were conducted to determine the kinetic temperatures in the dense clumps of the G333 giant molecular cloud associated with RCW 106 and to examine the effect that accurate temperatures have on the calculation of derived quantities such as mass. This project is part of a larger investigation to understand the timescales and evolutionary sequence associated with high-mass star formation, particularly its earliest stages. Assuming that the initial chemical composition of a giant molecular cloud is uniform, any abundance variations within will be due to evolutionary state. We have identified 63 clumps using SIMBA 1.2-mm dust continuum maps and have calculated gas temperatures for most (78 per cent) of these dense clumps. After using Spitzer GLIMPSE 8.0 $\\mu$m emission to separate the sample into IR-bright and IR-faint clumps, we use statistical tests to examine whether our classification s...

  13. Coal Beneficiation by Gas Agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas D. Wheelock; Meiyu Shen

    2000-03-15

    Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

  14. Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiecki, Karol Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates agglomeration effects for classical music production in a wide range of cities for a global sample of composers born between 1750 and 1899. Theory suggests a trade-off between agglomeration economies (peer effects) and diseconomies (peer crowding). I test this hypothesis...... using historical data on composers and employ a unique instrumental variable – a measure of birth centrality, calculated as the average distance between a composer’s birthplace and the birthplace of his peers. I find a strong causal impact of peer group size on the number of important compositions......’ productivity, and across different estimations in which also time-varying birth centrality measures are used as instrumental variables....

  15. Microstickies agglomeration by electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaotang Tony; Hsieh, Jeffery S

    2016-01-01

    Microstickies deposits on both paper machine and paper products when it agglomerates under step change in ionic strength, pH, temperature and chemical additives. These stickies increase the down time of the paper mill and decrease the quality of paper. The key property of microstickies is its smaller size, which leads to low removal efficiency and difficulties in measurement. Thus the increase of microstickies size help improve both removal efficiency and reduce measurement difficulty. In this paper, a new agglomeration technology based on electric field was investigated. The electric treatment could also increase the size of stickies particles by around 100 times. The synergetic effect between electric field treatment and detacky chemicals/dispersants, including polyvinyl alcohol, poly(diallylmethylammonium chloride) and lignosulfonate, was also studied.

  16. Urban agglomeration and CEO compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Bill; Hasan, Iftekhar; John, Kose; Waisman , Maya

    2012-01-01

    An underlying assumption in the executive compensation literature is that there is a national labor market for CEOs. The urban economics literature, however, documents higher ability among workers in large metropolitans, which results in a real and stable urban wage premium. In this paper, we investigate the link between the spatial clustering of firms in big, central cities (i.e., urban agglomeration) and the level and structure of CEO compensation. Using CEO compensation data for the period...

  17. Analyzing Agricultural Agglomeration in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available There has been little scholarly research on Chinese agriculture’s geographic pattern of agglomeration and its evolutionary mechanisms, which are essential to sustainable development in China. By calculating the barycenter coordinates, the Gini coefficient, spatial autocorrelation and specialization indices for 11 crops during 1981–2012, we analyze the evolutionary pattern and mechanisms of agricultural agglomeration. We argue that the degree of spatial concentration of Chinese planting has been gradually increasing and that regional specialization and diversification have progressively been strengthened. Furthermore, Chinese crop production is moving from the eastern provinces to the central and western provinces. This is in contrast to Chinese manufacturing growth which has continued to be concentrated in the coastal and southeastern regions. In Northeast China, the Sanjiang and Songnen plains have become agricultural clustering regions, and the earlier domination of aquaculture and rice production in Southeast China has gradually decreased. In summary, this paper provides a political economy framework for understanding the regionalization of Chinese agriculture, focusing on the interaction among the objectives, decisionmaking behavior, path dependencies and spatial effects.

  18. MORPHOLOGICAL AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CHANGES DURING THE HEATING OF SPHERICAL CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATE AGGLOMERATES PREPARED BY SPRAY PYROLYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiyoshi Itatani; Mari Abe; Tomohiro Umeda; Ian J. Davies; Seiichiro Koda

    2004-01-01

    The microstructural changes taking place during heating of calcium orthophosphate (Ca3(PO4)2) agglomerates were examined in this study. The starting powder was prepared by the spray-pyrolysis of calcium phosphate (Ca/P air-liquid nozzle. The spray-pyrolyzed powder was found to be composed of dense spherical agglomerates with a mean diameter of 1.3 μm. This powder was further heat-treated at a temperature between 800 and 1400 ℃ for 10 min. When the spray-pyrolyzed powder was heated up to 900 ℃, only βCa3(PO4)2 was detected, and the mean pore size of the spherical agglomerates increased via the (i) elimination of residual water and nitrates, (ii) rearrangement of primary particles within the agglomerates, (iii) coalescence of small pores (below 0.1 μm), and (iv) coalescence of agglomerates with diameters below 1 μm into the larger agglomerates. Among the heat-treated powders, pore sizes within the spherical agglomerates were observed to be the largest (mean diameter: 1.8 μm) for the powder heat-treated at 900 ℃ for 10 min.With an increase in heat-treatment temperature up to 1000 ℃, the spherical agglomerates were composed of dense shells. Upon further heating up to 1400 ℃, the hollow spherical agglomerates collapsed as a result of sintering via the phase transformation from β- to α-Ca3(PO4)2 (1150 ℃), thus leading to the formation of a three-dimensional porous network.

  19. Eco-spatial Structure of Urban Agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Rongchao; MIAO Changhong; LI Xuexin; CHEN Deguang

    2007-01-01

    In terms of ecological theory, this paper makes a comprehensive analysis of the mutualism and coevolutionary mechanism between the eco-spatial structure and socio-economic development ofthe urban agglomeration,and maps out optimized modes of the eco-spatial structure of the urban agglomeration. The analysis is a case study of the urban agglomeration on different levels of global, national, provincial and local scales, on the basis of those conclusions are drawn: 1) Within the scope of the urban agglomeration, the cities should be reasonably sized and appropriately densified; the spatial combination of the urban agglomeration ought to be orderly, and its eco-spatial structure ought to be optimized and efficient; the relationship between the economic society and eco-spatial environment ought to be that of mutual benefit and co-evolution. 2) "The mode of corridor group network" is a certain trend evoked from the spatial structure of urban agglomeration. 3) The eco-spatial structure of urban agglomeration under "the mode of corridor group network" can further increase the environmental capacity of urban agglomeration, and is in favor of the harmonious relationship between man and nature.

  20. On the mechanism of agglomeration in suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Agglomeration in suspension is a size enlargement method that facilitates operation of solid processing and preserves the solubilization properties of fine particles. A small quantity of binder liquid is added into a suspension of microparticles, directly in the stirred vessel where the precipitation or crystallization took place. This study deals with the evaluation of the effect of agitation time before and after addition of binder liquid on agglomerates properties in order to give some insights into the mechanism of the formation of the agglomerates. Methods: Carbamazepine is used as a model drug and isopropyl acetate is used as binder liquid. The agglomerates characterization includes the particle size, morphology and density. Results: The results showed that, by increasing the agitation time before addition of binder liquid, smaller agglomerates with less density and irregular forms composed of larger crystals were obtained. However, with increasing agitation time after addition of binder liquid the agglomerates size and density increases and morphology improves. Indeed, by continuing agitation along the course of agglomeration the properties of the particles change gradually but substantially. Conclusion: With optimized agitation time before and after addition of binder liquid, spherical and dense agglomerates can be obtained.

  1. Engineering development of selective agglomeration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This report presents the findings of the project entitled ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration.`` The purpose is to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1993. Engineering development included bench-scale process development, component development adaptation or modification of existing unit operations, proof-of-concept (POC) module design, fabrication, testing, data evaluation, and conceptual design of a commercial facility. The information obtained during POC operation resulted in a technical and economic design base sufficient to support construction and operation of a commercial plant. Throughout this project performance targets for the engineering development of selective agglomeration process were to achieve 85% or greater Btu recovery at 85% or greater pyritic sulfur rejection (PSR). Additional objectives included producing a final clean-coal product with an ash content of 6% or less which is suitable for conventional coal handling systems. The selective agglomeration process, as applied to coal cleaning, is based on differences in the surface chemistry of coal and its associated impurities. Coal particles are hydrophobic (i.e., repel water) while the majority of its impurities are hydrophilic (i.e., stabilized in water). During selective agglomeration, a liquid (the agglomerant) that is immiscible with water is introduced into a coal-water slurry and agitated to disperse it in the slurry, thereby allowing it to come into contact with all particles in the slurry. The coal particles, due to their hydrophobic nature, are attracted to the agglomerant phase. The hydrophilic mineral impurities remain in the water phase. Continued agitation of the agglomerant-coated coal particles causes them to coalesce to form agglomerates. Once the agglomerates are formed, they are separated from the mineral matter-bearing aqueous phase by subsequent processing steps.

  2. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Lehigh University, 19W Memorial Dr, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Mohapatra, S. [Dynalene Inc., 5250W Coplay Rd, Whitehall, Pennsylvania 18052 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  3. Understanding Lateritic Ore Agglomeration Behaviour as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    istics, low grade lateritic ores require more aggressive but costly chemical and hydrometallurgical techniques (e.g., leaching in ... Isothermal, batch agglomeration tests involving 30 and 44 % w/w sulphuric acid ... *Loss of ignition. Table 2: ...

  4. Study of Metal Agglomeration and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-02

    of agglomerating particles in SL which, in turn, depends on the level of adhesion ( Fadh ) and aerodynamic (Faer) forces, discontinuity of SL and...influences the value of Fadh . On the whole, the FL properties might be determined by the ratio between Tign and the degradation temperature of...drop in Fadh contributes to decreasing the intensity of «inter-pocket» fusion and increasing the agglomerate dispersity. Hence, in spite of the

  5. Theoretical studies on aerosol agglomeration processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, K.E.J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis, theoretical modeling of certain aerosol systems has been presented. At first, the aerosol general dynamic equation is introduced, along with a discretization routine for its numerical solution. Of the various possible phenomena affecting aerosol behaviour, this work is mostly focused on aerosol agglomeration. The fundamentals of aerosol agglomeration theory are thus briefly reviewed. The two practical applications of agglomeration studied in this thesis are flue gas cleaning using an electrical agglomerator and nanomaterial synthesis with a free jet reactor. In an electrical agglomerator the aerosol particles are charged and brought into an alternating electric field. The aim is to remove submicron particles from flue gases by collisions with larger particles before conventional gas cleaning devices that have a clear penetration window in the problematic 0.1-1{mu}m size range. A mathematical model was constructed to find out the effects of the different system parameters on the agglomerator`s performance. A crucial part of this task was finding out the collision efficiencies of particles of varying size and charge. The original idea was to use unipolar charging of the particles, and a laboratory scale apparatus was constructed for this purpose. Both theory and experiments clearly show that significant removal of submicron particles can not be achieved by such an arrangement. The theoretical analysis further shows that if the submicron particles and the large collector particles were charged with opposite polarity, significant removal of the submicron particles could be obtained. The second application of agglomeration considered in this thesis is predicting/controlling nanoparticle size in the gas-to-particle aerosol route to material synthesis. In a typical material reactor, a precursor vapor reacts to form molecules of the desired material. In a cooling environment, a particulate phase forms, the dynamics of which are determined by the rates of

  6. Diffusion and reaction in microbead agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Kirchner, Carolina; Träuble, Markus; Wittstock, Gunther

    2010-04-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy has been used to analyze the flux of p-aminonophenol (PAP) produced by agglomerates of polymeric microbeads modified with galactosidase as a model system for the bead-based heterogeneous immunoassays. With the use of mixtures of enzyme-modified and bare beads in defined ratio, agglomerates with different saturation levels of the enzyme modification were produced. The PAP flux depends on the intrinsic kinetics of the galactosidase, the local availability of the substrate p-aminophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (PAPG), and the external mass transport conditions in the surrounding of the agglomerate and the internal mass transport within the bead agglomerate. The internal mass transport is influenced by the diffusional shielding of the modified beads by unmodified beads. SECM in combination with optical microscopy was used to determine experimentally the external flux. These data are in quantitative agreement with boundary element simulation considering the SECM microelectrode as an interacting probe and treating the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of the enzyme as nonlinear boundary conditions with two independent concentration variables [PAP] and [PAPG]. The PAPG concentration at the surface of the bead agglomerate was taken as a boundary condition for the analysis of the internal mass transport condition as a function of the enzyme saturation in the bead agglomerate. The results of this analysis are represented as PAP flux per contributing modified bead and the flux from freely suspended galactosidase-modified beads. These numbers are compared to the same number from the SECM experiments. It is shown that depending on the enzyme saturation level a different situation can arise where either beads located at the outer surface of the agglomerate dominate the contribution to the measured external flux or where the contribution of buried beads cannot be neglected for explaining the measured external flux.

  7. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-23

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity. Achieving sufficient blend uniformity requires that the blending conditions are able to break up agglomerates, which is often an abrasion process. This study was based on the assumption that the abrasion rate of agglomerates determines the required blending time. It is shown that the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed is a relevant parameter which correlates with the abrasion rate of agglomerates. However, aspects related to the strength of agglomerates should also be considered. For this reason the Stokes abrasion number (St(Abr)) has been defined. This parameter describes the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. The St(Abr) number is shown to predict the abrasion potential of agglomerates in the dry-mixing process. It appeared possible to include effects of filler particle size and impeller rotational rate into this concept. A clear relationship between abrasion rate of agglomerates and the value of St(Abr) was demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Waste and dust utilisation in shaft furnaces

    OpenAIRE

    Senk, D.; Babich, A.; Gudenau, H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Wastes and dusts from steel industry, non-ferrous metallurgy and other branches can be utilized e.g. in agglomeration processes (sintering, pelletizing or briquetting) and by injection into shaft furnaces. This paper deals with the second way. Combustion and reduction behaviour of iron- and carbon-rich metallurgical dusts and sludges containing lead, zinc and alkali as well as other wastes with and without pulverized coal (PC) has been studied when injecting into shaft furnaces. Following sha...

  9. Dust in brown dwarfs and extra-solar planets IV. Assessing TiO2 and SiO nucleation for cloud formation modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, G; Giles, H; Bromley, S T

    2014-01-01

    Clouds form in atmospheres of brown dwarfs and planets. The cloud particle formation processes are similar to the dust formation process studied in circumstellar shells of AGB stars and in Supernovae. Cloud formation modelling in substellar objects requires gravitational settling and element replenishment in addition to element depletion. All processes depend on the local conditions, and a simultaneous treatment is required. We apply new material data in order to assess our cloud formation model results regarding the treatment of the formation of condensation seeds. We re-address the question of the primary nucleation species in view of new (TiO2)_N-cluster data and new SiO vapour pressure data. We apply the density functional theory using the computational chemistry package Gaussian 09 to derive updated thermodynamical data for (TiO2)_N-clusters as input for our TiO2 seed formation model. We test different nucleation treatments and their effect on the overall cloud structure by solving a system of dust momen...

  10. AGGLOMERATIONS BENEFITS OF THE CULTURE ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Ludwiczak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is an attempt to find another interpretation of culture, an economic one as a significant local asset development conducive to the formation of agglomeration benefits through the mechanism of the presence of the creative class. The paper presented below provides a framework for thinking about this matter on the basis of economics. The article is a research hypothesis, yet nowhere formulated. Therefore, further empirical re-search is needed, particularly in relation to the villages of average size, indicating how culture is one factor contributing to the formation of the benefits of agglomeration.

  11. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination IV: Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy analyses of impact features in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Anna L.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gainsforth, Zack; Stodolna, Julien; Frank, David R.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, SašA.; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bechtel, Hans A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hillier, Jon K.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Hvide, Brit; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leroux, Hugues; Leonard, Ariel; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Nittler, Larry R.; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Ja; Postberg, Frank; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Tresseras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Solé, Vicente A.; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank J.; Stephan, Thomas; Sterken, Veerle J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sutton, Steven; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-09-01

    We report the quantitative characterization by synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy of 31 potential impact features in the aerogel capture medium of the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. Samples were analyzed in aerogel by acquiring high spatial resolution maps and high energy-resolution spectra of major rock-forming elements Mg, Al, Si, Fe, and others. We developed diagnostic screening tests to reject spacecraft secondary ejecta and terrestrial contaminants from further consideration as interstellar dust candidates. The results support an extraterrestrial origin for three interstellar candidates: I1043,1,30 (Orion) is a 3 pg particle with Mg-spinel, forsterite, and an iron-bearing phase. I1047,1,34 (Hylabrook) is a 4 pg particle comprising an olivine core surrounded by low-density, amorphous Mg-silicate and amorphous Fe, Cr, and Mn phases. I1003,1,40 (Sorok) has the track morphology of a high-speed impact, but contains no detectable residue that is convincingly distinguishable from the background aerogel. Twenty-two samples with an anthropogenic origin were rejected, including four secondary ejecta from impacts on the Stardust spacecraft aft solar panels, nine ejecta from secondary impacts on the Stardust Sample Return Capsule, and nine contaminants lacking evidence of an impact. Other samples in the collection included I1029,1,6, which contained surviving solar system impactor material. Four samples remained ambiguous: I1006,2,18, I1044,2,32, and I1092,2,38 were too dense for analysis, and we did not detect an intact projectile in I1044,3,33. We detected no radiation effects from the synchrotron soft X-ray analyses; however, we recorded the effects of synchrotron hard X-ray radiation on I1043,1,30 and I1047,1,34.

  12. Bipolar charged aerosol agglomeration and collection by a two zone agglomerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In older to collect fine particles more efficiently, a new-type electrostatic agglomerator with two sones was developed. The distinguishing feature of this electrostatic agglomerator is that the particles are bipolarly charged and coagulated in the same alternating electric field simultaneously. The silica flour with 2 μm mass median diameter and the smoke from burning wood powder were used as test aerosol. The comparison experimental results have shown that when the mean electric field is 4 kV/cm the collection efficiency of the new electrostatic agglomerator was 98.2% for silica flour and 67.4% for wood powder smoke. Under the same experimental condition, the collection efficiency of the electrostatic agglomerator with three zones was 97.4% for collecting silica flour and the collection efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator was 56.3% for wood powder smoke.

  13. Water migration mechanisms in amorphous powder material and related agglomeration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renzetti, S.; Voogt, J.A.; Oliver, L.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    The agglomeration phenomenon of amorphous particulate material is a major problem in the food industry. Currently, the glass transition temperature (Tg) is used as a fundamental parameter to describe and control agglomeration. Models are available that describe the kinetics of the agglomeration proc

  14. Labor market pooling and occupational agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Gabe, Todd M.; Jaison R. Abel

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the micro-foundations of occupational agglomeration in U.S. metropolitan areas, with an emphasis on labor market pooling. Controlling for a wide range of occupational attributes, including proxies for the use of specialized machinery and for the importance of knowledge spillovers, we find that jobs characterized by a unique knowledge base exhibit higher levels of geographic concentration than do occupations with generic knowledge requirements. Further, by analyzing co-aggl...

  15. Specialization and Agglomeration Patterns in Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman, Sheila A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates specialization and agglomeration trends in EU-27 NUTS2 regions over 1991-2011 by means of two versions of the relative Theil indicator that use employment data. The paper’s main focus is on Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs regions. As a legacy of central planning, in the early ‘Nineties these regions presented significantly above-average specialization and agglomeration. The paper shows that over 1991-2011 these features change very little; moreover, while disproportions fall in the other EU members, they rise in CEECs, implying growing divergence among the two groups in real terms, notwithstanding EU emphasis on real convergence. Indicators disaggregated by sectors show that for CEECs specialization/agglomeration change most in agriculture, market services and manufacturing. The paper focuses on the last two sectors. It argues that performance in the service sector is largely due to capital regions catching up on previous underdevelopment in the sector, therefore getting closer to Western regions. Non-capital regions instead lag behind, moving away from the EU sectoral average. As far as manufacturing is concerned, CEECs regions continue to specialize in the more traditional lines of production, for which also agglomeration remains extremely high. Consideration of the changes over time gives a partially different picture and shows that the higher specialization in overall manufacturing results from the development of a small but dynamic medium-high technology sub-sector that is significantly disseminated across regions, thus appearing to result from successful industrial restructuring and reconversion.

  16. Ukrainian experience of oil agglomeration of coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biletskyi, V.S. [Donetsk State Technical University, Donetsk (Ukraine). Dept. of Coal Preparation

    1997-12-31

    During the years 1980-1996 a series of investigations related to the applied and theoretical aspects of the coal oil agglomeration processing were carried out in the Ukraine at the Donetsk State Technical University and Coal Chemistry National Academy of Sciences (NAN) of Ukraine, institutes UralVTI, VNIIPIHidrotruboprovod, LenNIlkhimmash, Kharkiv polytechnical Institute, Institute of Biocolloide Chemistry NAN of Ukraine and also at coal preparation plants and thermoelectric power stations in the Donbas. Theoretical bases of the process of selective oil agglomeration are developed on the basis of modern physical chemistry, physical-chemical hydrodynamics, adhesion theory, and solid fuel chemistry. The necessary sufficient conditions for aggregate forming coal and oil components in water have been formulated. The central problem of `coal-reagent` interaction during coal aggregation has been solved, and a mathematical description of processes for forming coal-oil aggregates including kinetics has been made. Analysis of factors which influence the process and its mathematical models have been realized. Rational conditions of pelletising of energetic and coking coal, coal raw material and products of coal preparation plants, electric power stations, and hydrotransport systems have been determined. Results of the complex study of technological properties of coal aggregates as objects of dewatering, hydrotransportation, consumption, coking, pyrolysis and carriers at gold adhesive preparation are presented. The theoretical principles and experimental data served as a basis for creating about 40 new methods and devices for the process of coal selective oil agglomeration. 14 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Development of a Gas-Promoted Oil Agglomeration Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Nelson; F. Zhang; J. Drzymala; M. Shen; R. Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1997-11-01

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal was carried out with scale model mixing systems in which aqueous suspensions of ultrafine coal particles were treated with a liquid hydrocarbon and a small amount of air. The resulting agglomerates were recovered by screening. During a batch agglomeration test the progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated suspensions or by observing changes in turbidity in the case of dilute suspensions. Dilute suspensions were employed for investigating the kinetics of agglomeration, whereas concentrated suspensions were used for determining parameters that characterize the process of agglomeration. A key parameter turned out to be the minimum time te required to produce compact spherical agglomerates. Other important parameters included the projected area mean particle diameter of the agglomerates recovered at the end of a test as well as the ash content and yield of agglomerates. Batch agglomeration tests were conducted with geometrically similar mixing tanks which ranged in volume from 0.346 to 11.07 liters. Each tank was enclosed to control the amount of air present. A variable speed agitator fitted with a six blade turbine impeller was used for agitation. Tests were conducted with moderately hydrophobic Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and with more hydrophobic Upper Freeport coal using either n-heptane, i-octane, or hexadecane as an agglomerant.

  18. Factors influencing particle agglomeration during solid-state sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Wang; Shao-Hua Chen

    2012-01-01

    Discrete element method (DEM) is used to study the factors affecting agglomeration in three-dimensional copper particle systems during solid-state sintering.A new parameter is proposed to characterize agglomeration.The effects of a series of factors are studied,including particle size,size distribution,inter-particle tangential viscosity,temperature,initial density and initial distribution of particles on agglomeration.We find that the systems with smaller particles,broader particle size distribution,smaller viscosity,higher sintering temperature and smaller initial density have stronger particle agglomeration and different distributions of particles induce different agglomerations.This study should be very useful for understanding the phenomenon of agglomeration and the micro-structural evolution during sintering and guiding sintering routes to avoid detrimental agglomeration.

  19. Agglomeration rate and action forces between atomized particles of agglomerator and inhaled-particles from coal combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Feng; ZHANG Jun-ying; ZHENG Chu-guang

    2005-01-01

    In order to remove efficiently haled-particles emissions from coal combustions, a new way was used to put forward the process of agglomeration and the atomization was produced by the nozzle and then sprayed into the flue before precipitation devices of power station boiler in order to make inhaled-particles agglomerate into bigger particles, which can be easily removed but not change existing running conditions of boiler. According to this idea, a model is set up to study agglomeration rate and effect forces between fly ash inhaledparticles and atomized agglomerator particles. The developed agglomeration rate was expressed by relative particle number decreasing speed per unit volume. The result showed that viscosity force and flow resistance force give main influences on agglomeration effect of inhaled particles, while springiness force and gravity have little effect on agglomeration effect of theirs. Factors influencing the agglomeration rate and effect forces are studied, including agglomerator concentration, agglomerator flux and agglomerator density,atomized-particles diameters and inhaled-particles diameter and so on.

  20. THE SYNERGISTIC EFFECT OF MIXED XEROGRAPHIC TONER AGGLOMERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuixia Wang,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Agglomeration phenomena of two mixed xerographic toners were investigated using 1-octadecanol as the agglomeration agent and a cationic surfactant as the co-agglomeration agent. One toner carrying no surface charge agglomerated well under most conditions, while the other toner carrying a negative surface charge performed worse. It was found that when mixing these two toners together during pulping and when using 1-octadecanol as the agglomeration agent alone, there was an additive effect on agglomeration. On the other hand, addition of a small amount of cationic surfactant dramatically enhanced the mixed toner agglomeration efficiency and generated an obvious synergistic effect. The particle number after agglomeration was significantly reduced, and the particle size was greatly increased compared to the single toner agglomeration. The optimal amount of the cationic surfactant was close to the optimal cationic surfactant demand of the negatively charged toner. Based on these findings it can be recommended that the cationic surfactant should be added during agglomeration of the mixed office waste paper, and its optimal dosage needs to be chosen to reach the best performance.

  1. Models of agglomeration and glass transition

    CERN Document Server

    Kerner, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This book is for any physicist interested in new vistas in the domain of non-crystalline condensed matter, aperiodic and quasi-crystalline networks and especially glass physics and chemistry. Students with an elementary background in thermodynamics and statistical physics will find the book accessible. The physics of glasses is extensively covered, focusing on their thermal and mechanical properties, as well as various models leading to the formation of the glassy states of matter from overcooled liquids. The models of agglomeration and growth are also applied to describe the formation of quasicrystals, fullerenes and, in biology, to describe virus assembly pathways.

  2. The soundscape dynamics of human agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Haroldo V; De Souza, Rodolfo T; Lenzi, Ervin K; Mendes, Renio S; Evangelista, Luiz R, E-mail: hvr@dfi.uem.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringa, PR (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    We report on a statistical analysis of the people agglomeration soundscape. Specifically, we investigate the normalized sound amplitudes and intensities that emerge from human collective meetings. Our findings support the existence of non-trivial dynamics characterized by heavy tail distributions in the sound amplitudes, long-range correlations in the sound intensity and non-exponential distributions in the return interval distributions. Additionally, motivated by the time-dependent behavior present in the volatility/variance series, we compare the observational data with those obtained from a minimalist autoregressive stochastic model, namely the generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic process (the GARCH process), and find that there is good agreement.

  3. Multifrequency scanning probe microscopy study of nanodiamond agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Vasudeva; Lippold, Stephen; Li, Qian; Strelcov, Evgheny; Okatan, Baris; Legum, Benjamin; Kalinin, Sergei; Clarion University Team; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Team

    Due to their rich surface chemistry and excellent mechanical properties and non-toxic nature, nanodiamond particles have found applications such as biomedicine, tribology and lubrication, targeted drug delivery systems, tissue scaffolds and surgical implants. Although single nanodiamond particles have diameters about 4-5nm, they tend to form agglomerates. While these agglomerates can be useful for some purposes, many applications of nanodiamonds require single particle, disaggregated nanodiamonds. This work is oriented towards studying forces and interactions that contribute to agglomeration in nanodiamonds. In this work, using multifrequency scanning probe microscopy techniques, we show that agglomerate sizes can vary between 50-100nm in raw nanodiamonds. Extremeties of particles and Interfaces between agglomerates show dissipative forces with scanning probe microscope tip, indicating agglomerates could act as points of increased adhesion, thus reducing lubricating efficiency when nanodiamonds are used as lubricant additives. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  4. Kinetic energy density and agglomerate abrasion rate during blending of agglomerates into powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Rubingh, Carina M; Tran, Thanh N; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2012-01-01

    Problems related to the blending of a cohesive powder with a free flowing bulk powder are frequently encountered in the pharmaceutical industry. The cohesive powder often forms lumps or agglomerates which are not dispersed during the mixing process and are therefore detrimental to blend uniformity.

  5. Optimization of some parameters on agglomeration performance of Zonguldak bituminous coal by oil agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Aslan; I. Unal [Cumhuriyet University, Sivas (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

    2009-03-15

    In this study, the optimization of some parameters on agglomeration performance of Zonguldak bituminous coal by oil agglomeration was discussed. A three-level Box-Behnken design combining with a response surface methodology (RSM) and quadratic programming (QP) were employed for modeling and optimization some operations parameters on oil agglomeration performance. The relationship between the responses, i.e., grade and recovery, and four process parameters, i.e., amount of oil, agitation time, agitation rate and solid content were presented as empirical model equations for both grade and recovery on oil agglomeration. The model equations were then optimized individually using the quadratic programming method to maximize both for grade and recovery within the experimental range studied. The optimum conditions were found to be 14.61% for amount of oil, 8.94 min for agitation time, 1554 rpm for agitation rate and 5% for solid content to achieve the maximum grade. The maximum model prediction of 0.650 grade at these optimum conditions is higher than any value obtained in the initial tests conducted. Similarly, the conditions for maximum recovery were found to be 20.60% for amount of oil, 5 min for agitation time, 1800 rpm for agitation rate and 19.48% for solid content with a prediction of 96.90% recovery, which is also higher than any other recovery obtained in the initial tests conducted. 34 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Agglomeration in a fluidized bed using multiple jet streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehmat, A.; Abbasian, J. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Kothari, M.; Hariri, H.; Arastoopour, H. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the overall temperature distribution, temperature in the vicinity of the jets, and the rate of agglomeration in a fluidized bed containing multiple jet streams. Agglomeration of ash during coal gasification increases carbon utilization efficiency considerably. The agglomeration requires a fluidized-bed reactor with a specially designed distributor equipped with a jet to yield a hot zone confined within the bed. The rate of agglomeration depends upon the size and the intensity of the zone. This rate, and hence the unit capacity, could be increased by adding multiple jets to the distributor. The purpose of this study was to verify this phenomenon. The temperature distribution inside the agglomerating fluidized-bed reactor with a single jet was studied by Hariri et al. Various parameters were involved in agglomeration phenomena -- bed material, fluidization velocity, bed temperature, jet velocity, jet temperature, bed geometry, and distributor geometry. Controlled agglomerates were produced in the fluidized bed when a sloped gas distributor consisting of a central jet and a porous plate was used. Gas at temperatures above the melting temperature of a bed material was introduced into the jet and gas at temperatures below the softening temperature was introduced into the distributor. The rate of agglomerate formation was significantly influenced by an increase in either jet air or auxiliary (grid) air temperature. The extent of agglomeration also depended strongly upon the volume of the hot zone confined within the isotherms with temperatures higher than the melting point of the bed material.

  7. Agglomeration in a fluidized bed using multiple jet streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehmat, A.; Abbasian, J. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kothari, M.; Hariri, H.; Arastoopour, H. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Tests were conducted to determine the overall temperature distribution, temperature in the vicinity of the jets, and the rate of agglomeration in a fluidized bed containing multiple jet streams. Agglomeration of ash during coal gasification increases carbon utilization efficiency considerably. The agglomeration requires a fluidized-bed reactor with a specially designed distributor equipped with a jet to yield a hot zone confined within the bed. The rate of agglomeration depends upon the size and the intensity of the zone. This rate, and hence the unit capacity, could be increased by adding multiple jets to the distributor. The purpose of this study was to verify this phenomenon. The temperature distribution inside the agglomerating fluidized-bed reactor with a single jet was studied by Hariri et al. Various parameters were involved in agglomeration phenomena -- bed material, fluidization velocity, bed temperature, jet velocity, jet temperature, bed geometry, and distributor geometry. Controlled agglomerates were produced in the fluidized bed when a sloped gas distributor consisting of a central jet and a porous plate was used. Gas at temperatures above the melting temperature of a bed material was introduced into the jet and gas at temperatures below the softening temperature was introduced into the distributor. The rate of agglomerate formation was significantly influenced by an increase in either jet air or auxiliary (grid) air temperature. The extent of agglomeration also depended strongly upon the volume of the hot zone confined within the isotherms with temperatures higher than the melting point of the bed material.

  8. Effect of agglomeration on flowability of baby food powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, Karolina; Lenart, Andrzej

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the wet agglomeration in a fluidized bed on flowability of agglomerated products, such as baby food powders. The agglomeration process was performed in the fluidized bed. The wetting liquid used to the process was: water, 2% lecithin solution, and 50% sugar solution. Food powders flowability was expressed as: Hausner Ratio, pouring time, angles of sliding and of repose and flow function. The composition of materials, used to prepare mixtures, has a significant influence on tested properties. The higher milk powder of the mixtures caused decreasing of their flowability. Wet agglomeration of baby food powders caused an increase in the mean diameter of particles, which made it possible to receive agglomerates with good flowability and decreased bulk density. The increase of milk powder content from 0 to 73% in the mixture before the agglomeration contributed to improve its flowability. Wet agglomeration with 2% lecithin solution and 50% sugar solution reduced particle size and bulk density, improved flowability of received agglomerates in relation to agglomerates received with water as a wetting liquid.

  9. Light scattering by fractal dust aggregates: I. Angular dependence of scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Tazaki, Ryo; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Kataoka, Akimasa; Nomura, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    In protoplanetary disks, micron-sized dust grains coagulate to form highly porous dust aggregates. Because the optical properties of these aggregates are not completely understood, it is important to investigate how porous dust aggregates scatter light. In this study, the light scattering properties of porous dust aggregates were calculated using a rigorous method, the T-matrix method, and the results were then compared with those obtained using the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye (RGD) theory and Mie theory with the effective medium approximation (EMT). The RGD theory is applicable to moderately large aggregates made of nearly transparent monomers. This study considered two types of porous dust aggregates, ballistic cluster-cluster agglomerates (BCCAs) and ballistic particle-cluster agglomerates (BPCAs). First, the angular dependence of the scattered intensity was shown to reflect the hierarchical structure of dust aggregates; the large-scale structure of the aggregates is responsible for the intensity at small scatteri...

  10. Negative polarization of agglomerate particles with various densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shkuratov

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the negative polarization produced by agglomerate particles of various density. We found that all types of agglomerates studied reveal similar dependence of negative polarization minimum Pmin and its location αmin on particle size and refractive index.

  11. WP/084 Measuring Industry Agglomeration and Identifying the Driving Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, Emma; Tarp, Finn; Newman, Carol

    Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We propose a new measure and examine what it reveals about the importance of transp...

  12. Numerical study of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling mixer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh Nguyen, [No Value; Willemsz, Tofan; Frijlink, Henderik; Maarschalk, Kees van der Voort

    2014-01-01

    A numerical simulation using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) was performed to investigate the phenomena concerning the abrasion and breakage of agglomerates in a diffusion powder mixer. Agglomerates were created by defining a single structure of particles with bonds of different strengths using th

  13. Overpopulated, Underdeveloped Urban Agglomerations: Tomorrow’s Unstable Operating Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Overpopulated , Underdeveloped Urban Agglomerations: Tomorrow’s 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...ABSTRACT This paper asserts that a unique future operational environment is developing: overpopulated , underdeveloped urban agglomerations. A...proposed definition for this operating environment is (or would be) an overpopulated urban area which is located within a developing or underdeveloped

  14. Urban Agglomerations in Regional Development: Theoretical, Methodological and Applied Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Vladimirovich Shmidt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the analysis of the major process of modern socio-economic development, such as the functioning of urban agglomerations. A short background of the economic literature on this phenomenon is given. There are the traditional (the concentration of urban types of activities, the grouping of urban settlements by the intensive production and labour communications and modern (cluster theories, theories of network society conceptions. Two methodological principles of studying the agglomeration are emphasized: the principle of the unity of the spatial concentration of economic activity and the principle of compact living of the population. The positive and negative effects of agglomeration in the economic and social spheres are studied. Therefore, it is concluded that the agglomeration is helpful in the case when it brings the agglomerative economy (the positive benefits from it exceed the additional costs. A methodology for examination the urban agglomeration and its role in the regional development is offered. The approbation of this methodology on the example of Chelyabinsk and Chelyabinsk region has allowed to carry out the comparative analysis of the regional centre and the whole region by the main socio-economic indexes under static and dynamic conditions, to draw the conclusions on a position of the city and the region based on such socio-economic indexes as an average monthly nominal accrued wage, the cost of fixed assets, the investments into fixed capital, new housing supply, a retail turnover, the volume of self-produced shipped goods, the works and services performed in the region. In the study, the analysis of a launching site of the Chelyabinsk agglomeration is carried out. It has revealed the following main characteristics of the core of the agglomeration in Chelyabinsk (structure feature, population, level of centralization of the core as well as the Chelyabinsk agglomeration in general (coefficient of agglomeration

  15. WP/084 Measuring Industry Agglomeration and Identifying the Driving Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, Emma; Tarp, Finn; Newman, Carol

    Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We propose a new measure and examine what it reveals about the importance of transp......Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We propose a new measure and examine what it reveals about the importance...... of transport costs, labour market pooling, and technology transfer for agglomeration processes. We contrast this analysis with insights from existing measures in the literature and find very different underlying stories at work. An exceptionally rich set of data from Vietnam makes us confident that our measure...

  16. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-09-30

    Heap leaching is one of the methods being used to recover metal from low grade ore deposits. The main problem faced during heap leaching is the migration of fine grained particles through the heap, forming impermeable beds which result in poor solution flow. The poor solution flow leads to less contact between the leach solution and the ore, resulting in low recovery rates. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses prevents fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Currently, there is one facility in the United States which uses agglomeration. This operation agglomerates their ore using leach solution (raffinate), but is still experiencing undesirable metal recovery from the heaps due to agglomerate breakdown. The use of a binder, in addition to the leach solution, during agglomeration would help to produce stronger agglomerates that did not break down during processing. However, there are no known binders that will work satisfactorily in the acidic environment of a heap, at a reasonable cost. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. Increasing copper recovery in heap leaching by the use of binders and agglomeration would result in a significant decrease in the amount of energy consumed. Assuming that 70% of all the leaching heaps would convert to using agglomeration technology, as much as 1.64*10{sup 12} BTU per year would be able to be saved if a 25% increase in copper recovery was experienced, which is equivalent to saving approximately 18% of the energy currently being used in leaching heaps. For every week a leach cycle was decreased, a savings of as much as 1.23*10{sup 11} BTU per week would result. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures. These binders and experimental procedures will be able to be used for use in improving the energy efficiency of

  17. Operational source receptor calculations for large agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauss, Michael; Shamsudheen, Semeena V.; Valdebenito, Alvaro; Pommier, Matthieu; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    For Air quality policy an important question is how much of the air pollution within an urbanized region can be attributed to local sources and how much of it is imported through long-range transport. This is critical information for a correct assessment of the effectiveness of potential emission measures. The ratio between indigenous and long-range transported air pollution for a given region depends on its geographic location, the size of its area, the strength and spatial distribution of emission sources, the time of the year, but also - very strongly - on the current meteorological conditions, which change from day to day and thus make it important to provide such calculations in near-real-time to support short-term legislation. Similarly, long-term analysis over longer periods (e.g. one year), or of specific air quality episodes in the past, can help to scientifically underpin multi-regional agreements and long-term legislation. Within the European MACC projects (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) and the transition to the operational CAMS service (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) the computationally efficient EMEP MSC-W air quality model has been applied with detailed emission data, comprehensive calculations of chemistry and microphysics, driven by high quality meteorological forecast data (up to 96-hour forecasts), to provide source-receptor calculations on a regular basis in forecast mode. In its current state, the product allows the user to choose among different regions and regulatory pollutants (e.g. ozone and PM) to assess the effectiveness of fictive emission reductions in air pollutant emissions that are implemented immediately, either within the agglomeration or outside. The effects are visualized as bar charts, showing resulting changes in air pollution levels within the agglomeration as a function of time (hourly resolution, 0 to 4 days into the future). The bar charts not only allow assessing the effects of emission

  18. Spatial Linkage and Urban Expansion: AN Urban Agglomeration View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, L. M.; Tang, X.; Liu, X. P.

    2017-09-01

    Urban expansion displays different characteristics in each period. From the perspective of the urban agglomeration, studying the spatial and temporal characteristics of urban expansion plays an important role in understanding the complex relationship between urban expansion and network structure of urban agglomeration. We analyze urban expansion in the Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration (YRD) through accessibility to and spatial interaction intensity from core cities as well as accessibility of road network. Results show that: (1) Correlation between urban expansion intensity and spatial indicators such as location and space syntax variables is remarkable and positive, while it decreases after rapid expansion. (2) Urban expansion velocity displays a positive correlation with spatial indicators mentioned above in the first (1980-1990) and second (1990-2000) period. However, it exhibits a negative relationship in the third period (2000-2010), i.e., cities located in the periphery of urban agglomeration developing more quickly. Consequently, the hypothesis of convergence of urban expansion in rapid expansion stage is put forward. (3) Results of Zipf's law and Gibrat's law show urban expansion in YRD displays a convergent trend in rapid expansion stage, small and medium-sized cities growing faster. This study shows that spatial linkage plays an important but evolving role in urban expansion within the urban agglomeration. In addition, it serves as a reference to the planning of Yangtze River Delta Urban Agglomeration and regulation of urban expansion of other urban agglomerations.

  19. Agglomerates containing pantoprazole microparticles: modulating the drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffin, Renata P; Colombo, Paolo; Sonvico, Fabio; Rossi, Alessandra; Jornada, Denise S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Silvia S

    2009-01-01

    Pantoprazole-loaded microparticles were prepared using a blend of Eudragit S100 and Methocel F4M. The accelerated stability was carried out during 6 months at 40 degrees C and 75% relative humidity. In order to improve technological characteristics of the pantoprazole-loaded microparticles, soft agglomerates were prepared viewing an oral delayed release and gastro-resistant solid dosage form. The agglomeration was performed by mixing the pantoprazole microparticles with spray-dried mannitol/lecithin powders. The effects of factors such as the amount of lecithin in the spray-dried mannitol/lecithin powders and the ratio between pantoprazole microparticles and spray-dried mannitol/lecithin powders were evaluated. The pantoprazole-loaded microparticles present no significant degradation in 6 months. The agglomerates presented spherical shape, with smooth surface and very small quantity of non-agglomerated particles. The agglomerates presented different yields (35.5-79.0%), drug loading (58-101%), and mechanical properties (tensile strength varied from 44 to 69 mN mm(-2)), when the spray-dried mannitol/lecithin powders with different lecithin amounts were used. The biopharmaceutical characteristics of pantoprazole microparticles, i.e., their delayed-release properties, were not affected by the agglomeration process. The gastro-resistance of the agglomerates was affected by the amount of spray-dried mannitol/lecithin powders. The ratio of lecithin in the spray-dried mannitol/lecithin powders was the key factor in the agglomerate formation and in the drug release profiles. The agglomerates presenting better mechanical and biopharmaceutical characteristics were prepared with 1:2 (w/w) ratio of pantoprazole-loaded microparticles and mannitol/lecithin (80:20) powder.

  20. Externalities, Floating Population and Spatial Agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Yu; Wang Chuansheng; Fan Jie

    2007-01-01

    With the further development of socialist market economy,the mobility of factor markets in China,especially the labor market.is strengthened.Extemalities interacts with the agglomeration of productive factors.Under the framework of new economic geographg this article presents a theoretical model involving the endogenous population density affected by urban externalities.Results show that the population density is more concentrated around the center because the degree and extent of interaction between individuals intensifies when the distance from the center decreases.When there are several extemalifies resonurces,the aggregation of externalities changes the configuration of spatial factor allocation.These results fit well with the empirical facts about the decreasing density of floating population along the cities of Guangzhou,Dongguan and Shenzhen in Guangdong Province which is situat d in the eastern coast of the Pearl River Delta.We find that under the impacts of externalities released from Hong Kong into the coast,floating population Was more concentrated around Shenzhen and Dongguan,which are more adjacent to Hong Kong compared with Guangzhou City.

  1. Physical properties of soils in Rostov agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbov, S. N.; Bezuglova, O. S.; Abrosimov, K. N.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Tagiverdiev, S. S.; Morozov, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    Physical properties of natural and anthropogenically transformed soils of Rostov agglomeration were examined. The data obtained by conventional methods and new approaches to the study of soil physical properties (in particular, tomographic study of soil monoliths) were used for comparing the soils of different functional zones of the urban area. For urban territories in the steppe zone, a comparison of humus-accumulative horizons (A, Asod, Ap, and buried [A] horizons) made it possible to trace tendencies of changes in surface soils under different anthropogenic impacts and in the buried and sealed soils. The microtomographic study demonstrated differences in the bulk density and aggregation of urban soils from different functional zones. The A horizon in the forest-park zone is characterized by good aggregation and high porosity, whereas buried humus-accumulative horizons of anthropogenically transformed soils are characterized by poor aggregation and low porosity. The traditional parameters of soil structure and texture also proved to be informative for the identification of urban pedogenesis.

  2. Evolution of Zipf's Law for Indian Urban Agglomerations Vis-à-Vis Chinese Urban Agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik; Basu, Banasri

    We investigate into the rank-size distributions of urban agglomerations for India between 1981 to 2011. The incidence of a power law tail is prominent. A relevant question persists regarding the evolution of the power tail coefficient. We have developed a methodology to meaningfully track the power law coefficient over time, when a country experience population growth. A relevant dynamic law, Gibrat's law, is empirically tested in this connection. We argue that these empirical findings for India are in contrast with the findings in case of China, another country with population growth but monolithic political system.

  3. Evolution of Zipf's Law for Indian Urban Agglomerations vis-\\`{a}-vis Chinese Urban Agglomerations

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    We investigate into the rank-size distributions of urban agglomerations for India between 1981 to 2011. The incidence of a power law tail is prominent. A relevant question persists regarding the evolution of the power tail coefficient. We have developed a methodology to meaningfully track the power law coefficient over time, when a country experience population growth. A relevant dynamic law, Gibrat's law, is empirically tested in this connection. We argue that these empirical findings for India goes in contrast with the findings in case of China, another country with population growth but monolithic political system.

  4. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  5. Amenability of Muzret bituminous coal to oil agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahinoglu, E.; Uslu, T. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Mining Engineering, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-12-15

    Laboratory scale agglomeration tests were undertaken to investigate the amenability of Muzret (Yusufeli-Artvin) bituminous coal to oil agglomeration. Kerosene was extensively used as oil in the tests. In addition, fuel oil, diesel oil, and hazelnut oil were also used in order to determine the effect of oil type. The effects of the parameters including coal content, kerosene content, agglomeration time, coal particle size, pH, oil type, and agitation rate, on the combustible matter recovery, ash reduction and pyritic sulphur reduction, were investigated. It was found that Muzret bituminous coal could be readily cleaned by oil agglomeration with substantial reductions in ash and pyritic sulphur content. Maximum combustible matter recovery, ash reduction and pyritic sulphur reduction were achieved to be 85.54%, 59.98%, and 85.17%, respectively. (author)

  6. Incipient Motion of Sand and Oil Agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, T. R.; Dalyander, S.; Jenkins, R. L., III; Penko, A.; Long, J.; Frank, D. P.; Braithwaite, E. F., III; Calantoni, J.

    2016-12-01

    Weathered oil mixed with sediment in the surf zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, forming large mats of sand and oil. Wave action fragmented the mats into sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs) with diameters of about 1 to 10 cm. These SOAs were transported by waves and currents along the Gulf Coast, and have been observed on beaches for years following the spill. SOAs are composed of 70%-95% sand by mass, with an approximate density of 2107 kg/m³. To measure the incipient motion of SOAs, experiments using artificial SOAs were conducted in the Small-Oscillatory Flow Tunnel at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory under a range of hydrodynamic forcing. Spherical and ellipsoidal SOAs ranging in size from 0.5 to 10 cm were deployed on a fixed flat bed, a fixed rippled bed, and a movable sand bed. In the case of the movable sand bed, SOAs were placed both proud and partially buried. Motion was tracked with high-definition video and with inertial measurement units embedded in some of the SOAs. Shear stress and horizontal pressure gradients, estimated from velocity measurements made with a Nortek Vectrino Profiler, were compared with observed mobility to assess formulations for incipient motion. For SOAs smaller than 1 cm in diameter, incipient motion of spherical and ellipsoidal SOAs was consistent with predicted critical stress values. The measured shear stress at incipient motion of larger, spherical SOAs was lower than predicted, indicating an increased dependence on the horizontal pressure gradient. In contrast, the measured shear stress required to move ellipsoidal SOAs was higher than predicted, even compared to values modified for larger particles in mixed-grain riverine environments. The laboratory observations will be used to improve the prediction of incipient motion, transport, and seafloor interaction of SOAs.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DUST GENERATED IN THE RECYCLING PROCESS OF THE ELECTRIC ARC FURNACE DUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Gonçalves Rizz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Electric Arc Furnace Dust (EAFD is a solid waste generated by the production of steel through the Electric Arc Furnace. This waste is labeled dangerous, which motivates studies aiming its recycling. Experiments were made to study a pyrometallurgical process for the recycling of the dust, using the insertion of dust briquettes in molten pig iron in three temperatures. In the briquettes, there were made additions of calcium fluoride in four different concentrations. This paper has the objective to characterize the dust that results from this process, verifying the influence of the temperature and the concentration of calcium fluoride in the briquette in the morphology and chemical composition of the new dust, determining the optimal conditions for the recovery of the zinc content of the dust. This newly generated dust was analyzed in an Scanning Electronic Microscope, used to capture micrographs and chemical composition by EDS. The micrographs show that the temperature and the calcium fluoride concentration interfere in the way the dust particles agglomerate. Chemical analysis points that the higher zinc recuperation occurrs in the experiments at 1500°C with 7% addition of calcium fluoride.

  8. Using Raster Based Solutions to Identify Spatial Economic Agglomerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian DARDALA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient economic activities incline to be concentrated in space, and therefore there is an increased attention over the forces of spatial economic agglomerations and the role of location in economic development. This paper proposes some solutions to automate the identification of spatial agglomerations and their intensities, function on the spatial distribution of items in the geographical areas. The software components developed to accomplish this task are Geographic Information Systems specific tools.

  9. Agglomeration economies and global activities: impact on firm survival

    OpenAIRE

    FERRAGINA, Anna Maria; Mazzotta, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    The focus of our contribution is to shed light on the importance of firm agglomerations and FDI as drivers of firm survival in Italy. We focus upon different types of agglomeration economies related to the geographical context checking how these economies impact differently on heterogeneous firms survival and whether effects are robust to different estimators (Probit, Cox hazard models, Probit Heckman) and to different assumptions about inter-and intra-regional spillovers. The novelty our pap...

  10. Defect agglomeration in ferroelectric ceramics under cyclic electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG LiMing; YANG Wei

    2008-01-01

    The agglomeration of point defects in ferroelectric ceramics could be driven by repeated domain switching under cyclic electric field. The evolution equation of pore concentration under cyclic electric field is derived, with the help of a relation between the pore concentration and the extent of pore agglomeration. The results of the simulation agree quantitatively with the experimental data. An integrated framework about the mechanisms of electrically induced fatigue is proposed, which links the mechanisms at different scales.

  11. Waste and dust utilisation in shaft furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senk, D.; Babich, A.; Gudenau, H.W. [Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Wastes and dusts from steel industry, non-ferrous metallurgy and other branches can be utilised e.g. in agglomeration processes (sintering, pelletising or briquetting) and by injection into shaft furnaces. This paper deals with the second way. Combustion and reduction behaviour of iron- and carbon-rich metallurgical dusts and sludges containing lead, zinc and alkali as well as other wastes with and without pulverised coal (PC) has been studied when injecting into shaft furnaces. Following shaft furnaces have been examined: blast furnace, cupola furnace, OxiCup furnace and imperial-smelting furnace. Investigations have been done at laboratory and industrial scale. Some dusts and wastes under certain conditions can be not only reused but can also improve combustion efficiency at the tuyeres as well as furnace performance and productivity.

  12. Agglomeration Control during Ultrasonic Crystallization of an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn Gielen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of ultrasound during crystallization can efficiently inhibit agglomeration. However, the mechanism is unclear and sonication is usually enabled throughout the entire process, which increases the energy demand. Additionally, improper operation results in significant crystal damage. Therefore, the present work addresses these issues by identifying the stage in which sonication impacts agglomeration without eroding the crystals. This study was performed using a commercially available API that showed a high tendency to agglomerate during seeded crystallization. The crystallization progress was monitored using process analytical tools (PAT, including focus beam reflectance measurements (FBRM to track to crystal size and number and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR to quantify the supersaturation level. These tools provided insight in the mechanism by which ultrasound inhibits agglomeration. A combination of improved micromixing, fast crystal formation which accelerates depletion of the supersaturation and a higher collision frequency prevent crystal cementation to occur. The use of ultrasound as a post-treatment can break some of the agglomerates, but resulted in fractured crystals. Alternatively, sonication during the initial seeding stage could assist in generating nuclei and prevent agglomeration, provided that ultrasound was enabled until complete desupersaturation at the seeding temperature. FTIR and FBRM can be used to determine this end point.

  13. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; C.A. Hardison; K. Lewandowski

    2004-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking.

  14. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-12-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures that can be used for improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching, by preventing the ''ponding'' and ''channeling'' effects that currently cause reduced recovery and extended leaching cycle times. Methods have also been developed for iron ore

  15. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-12-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures that can be used for improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching, by preventing the ''ponding'' and ''channeling'' effects that currently cause reduced recovery and extended leaching cycle times. Methods have also been developed for iron ore

  16. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  17. AMG by element agglomeration and constrained energy minimization interpolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, T V; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-02-17

    This paper studies AMG (algebraic multigrid) methods that utilize energy minimization construction of the interpolation matrices locally, in the setting of element agglomeration AMG. The coarsening in element agglomeration AMG is done by agglomerating fine-grid elements, with coarse element matrices defined by a local Galerkin procedure applied to the matrix assembled from the individual fine-grid element matrices. This local Galerkin procedure involves only the coarse basis restricted to the agglomerated element. To construct the coarse basis, one exploits previously proposed constraint energy minimization procedures now applied to the local matrix. The constraints are that a given set of vectors should be interpolated exactly, not only globally, but also locally on every agglomerated element. The paper provides algorithmic details, as well as a convergence result based on a ''local-to-global'' energy bound of the resulting multiple-vector fitting AMG interpolation mappings. A particular implementation of the method is illustrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  18. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  19. Crystallo-co-agglomeration: A novel particle engineering technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradkar Anant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA is a novel particle engineering/design technique developed by Kadam et al, to overcome the limitations of spherical crystallization (SC. Basically, it′s single step process used for size enlargement of single, two or more, small dose or large dose drugs, in combination with or without diluent. The process of CCA involves simultaneous crystallization and agglomeration of drug/s with/without excipients/s from good solvent and/or bridging liquid by addition of a non-solvent. Till date CCA has been applied for spherical agglomeration of talc, bromhexine hydrochloride-talc, ibuprofen-talc, ibuprofen-paracetamol, and naproxen-starch. The spherical agglomerates obtained by CCA can be used as intact beads (encapsulated spansules or directly compressible tablet intermediates having satisfactory micromeritic (flowability, mechanical (friability, crushing, compressional (compressibility, compactibility, and drug release properties. Modified drug release from agglomerates and compacts thereof can be achieved using suitable polymer composition in the process design. Thus, it can be concluded that, CCA is a simple and cost effective process, which can be tailor-made for particle design of all majority of drugs and combinations thereof.

  20. Nano-sized Mn oxide/agglomerated silsesquioxane composite as a good catalyst for water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Madadkhani, Sepideh

    2016-12-01

    Water splitting to hydrogen and oxygen is an important reaction to store sustainable energies, and water oxidation is identified as the bottleneck for water splitting because it requires the high activation energy to perform. Herein a nano-sized Mn oxide/agglomerated silsesquioxane composite was used to synthesize an efficient catalyst for water oxidation. The composite was synthesized by a straightforward and simple procedure and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, and electrochemical methods. Silsesquioxane causes good dispersion of Mn in the composite. The water-oxidizing activity of this composite was studied in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. The composite at the best calcination temperature (300 °C) shows a turnover frequency 0.3 (mmol O2/mol Mn.s). Regarding the low-cost, environmentally friendly precursors, simple synthesis, and efficiency for water oxidation, the composite is a promising catalyst that can be used in artificial photosynthetic systems for water splitting. We used Agglomerated silsesquioxane as a support for nano-sized Mn oxide to synthesize a good water-oxidizing catalyst.

  1. THE SPATIAL AGGLOMERATION OF EDUCATED PEOPLE IN COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Tomás Sayago Gómez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, Colombia's education system has been growing in terms of access and coverage. However, this development has taken place mainly in bigger cities, and displays an agglomeration of graduates in tertiary education. The purpose of this article is to test this hypothesis of agglomeration and attempt to find out which factors are associated to this phenomena: quality of life, the effects of income, political safety, and supply of education. Using empirical evidence derived from real data obtained by DANE in the 2005 Census and a variable of violence from the IEPRI, spatial econometric models are set out to understand its dynamics, to stop and reverse this agglomeration, and to create benefits for smaller municipalities.

  2. Reconstruction of Industrial Location in View of Industrial Agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Huayou; DING Sibao

    2006-01-01

    The Industrial Agglomeration Theory has been evolving all the time. The study on the industrial location has become the focus of the massive theoretical location problems about agglomeration since the 1970s. The authors here analyze the evolution and the characteristics of the Industrial Agglomeration Theory and study its effect on the reconstruction of industrial location. The study suggests that the new idea of reconstruction of industrial location is to cultivate regional innovative system. On this basis, the authors analyze two cases of old industrial bases on their construction-Tiexi Industrial District in Shenyang City and Changchun Industrial Economic Development Zone. Finally, the authors put forward some suggestions that should be regarded, which include: 1) to combine industrial location reconstruction and enterprises' inner reform; 2) to speed up adjustment of resources and opening to the world; 3) to combine government mechanism with the market mechanism properly.

  3. Flocculation, hydrophobic agglomeration and filtration of ultrafine coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Z. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Department of Mineral and Mineral Process Engineering

    1999-07-01

    Selective flocculation tests were run on three types of coal and three additives in tests on a new hydrophobic agglomeration process using hydrophobic latices. The coals differed widely in surface wettability. The additives were hydrophobic latexes, a semi-hydrophobic flocculant, and a typical hydrophilic polyelectrolyte. The results show that coal wettability is very important in selective flocculation. UBC-1 hydrophobic latex flocculated hydrophobic coal particles only, while the polyelectrolyte flocculated all the coal samples and minerals that were tested. Tests of oil agglomeration using kerosene emulsified with surfactants of various ionic properties show that even oxidized coals can be agglomerated, if cationic surfactants are used to emulsify the oil. The hydrophobic latex and emulsified oils also significantly increase filtration rate and reduce filter cake moisture content.

  4. Dust Mite Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dust mite allergy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dust mite allergy is an allergic reaction to tiny bugs that commonly live in house dust. Signs of dust mite allergy include those common to hay fever, such as ...

  5. Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hayashi, Kanetoshi [NKK Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

  6. Ground truth of (sub-)micrometre cometary dust – Results of MIDAS onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannel, Thurid; Bentley, Mark; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romsted, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Köberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-10-01

    The investigation of comet 67P by Rosetta has allowed the comprehensive characterisation of pristine cometary dust particles ejected from the nucleus. Flying alongside the comet at distances as small as a few kilometres, and with a relative velocity of only centimetres per second, the Rosetta payload sampled almost unaltered dust. A key instrument to study this dust was MIDAS (the Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System), a dedicated atomic force microscope that scanned the surfaces of hundreds of (sub-)micrometre sized particles in 3D with resolutions down to nanometres. This offers the unique opportunity to explore the morphology of smallest cometary dust and expand our current knowledge about cometary material.Here we give an overview of dust collected and analysed by MIDAS and highlight its most important features. These include the ubiquitous agglomerate nature of the dust, which is found at all size scales from the largest (>10 µm) through to the smallest (common cometary origin.

  7. Decimetre dust aggregates in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Teiser, Jens; 10.1051/0004-6361/200912027

    2011-01-01

    The growth of planetesimals is an essential step in planet formation. Decimetre-size dust agglomerates mark a transition point in this growth process. In laboratory experiments we simulated the formation, evolution, and properties of decimetre-scale dusty bodies in protoplanetary discs. Small sub-mm size dust aggregates consisting of micron-size SiO$_2$ particles randomly interacted with dust targets of varying initial conditions in a continuous sequence of independent collisions. Impact velocities were 7.7 m/s on average and in the range expected for collisions with decimetre bodies in protoplanetary discs. The targets all evolved by forming dust \\emph{crusts} with up to several cm thickness and a unique filling factor of 31% $\\pm$3%. A part of the projectiles sticks directly. In addition, some projectile fragments slowly return to the target by gravity. All initially porous parts of the surface, i.e. built from the slowly returning fragments, are compacted and firmly attached to the underlying dust layers b...

  8. MEASUREMENT OF AGGLOMERATION ECONOMIES AT COUNTY LEVEL IN JIANGSU PROVINCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Ying; PU Ying-xia; YAO Shi-mou

    2005-01-01

    Agglomeration economies are the important factors for the regional development. However, the common indicators to measure them, such as Gini Coefficients neglect the spatial ingredient of data, leading to a-spatial estimates. In order to assess spatial neighbor effects of agglomeration economies, this study makes the new attempts by applying a series of techniques of spatial autocorrelation analysis, specifically, measuring the economies of urbanization and localization at the county level in the secondary and tertiary industries of Jiangsu Province in 1999 and 2002. The conclusions in this study reveal that on the whole, the localization effects on the economies of the secondary industry might be stronger than urbanization effects for that period, and highly agglomerative economies were limited within the southern Jiangsu and parts of middle along the Changjiang (Yangtze) River. Moreover, the tertiary industry has been strong urbanization rather than localization economies in the whole Jiangsu. Unlike the secondary industry, the tertiary industry held the high levels of agglomeration economies can be also found in the poor northern Jiangsu, and then the spatial clusters of trade and services might be basically seen in each of urban districts in 13 cities. All in all, spatial autocorrelation analysis is a better method to test agglomeration economies.

  9. Spherical agglomerates of lactose with enhanced mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamešić, Dejan; Planinšek, Odon; Lavrič, Zoran; Ilić, Ilija

    2017-01-10

    The aim of this study was to prepare spherical agglomerates of lactose and to evaluate their physicochemical properties, flow properties, particle friability and compaction properties, and to compare them to commercially available types of lactose for direct compression (spray-dried, granulated and anhydrous β-lactose). Porous spherical agglomerates of α-lactose monohydrate with radially arranged prism-like primary particles were prepared exhibiting a high specific surface area. All types of lactose analysed had passable or better flow properties, except for anhydrous β-lactose, which had poor flowability. Particle friability was more pronounced in larger granulated lactose particles; however, particle structure was retained in all samples analysed. The mechanical properties of spherical agglomerates of lactose, in terms of compressibility, established with Walker analysis, and compactibility, established with a compactibility profile, were found to be superior to any commercially available types of lactose. Higher compactibility of spherical agglomerates of lactose is ascribed to significantly higher particle surface area due to a unique internal structure with higher susceptibility to fragmentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative characterization of nanoparticle agglomeration within biological media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondow, Nicole, E-mail: n.hondow@leeds.ac.uk; Brydson, Rik [University of Leeds, Institute for Materials Research (United Kingdom); Wang, Peiyi [University of Leeds, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology (United Kingdom); Holton, Mark D.; Brown, M. Rowan; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D. [Swansea University, Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering (United Kingdom); Brown, Andy [University of Leeds, Institute for Materials Research (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Quantitative analysis of nanoparticle dispersion state within biological media is essential to understanding cellular uptake and the roles of diffusion, sedimentation, and endocytosis in determining nanoparticle dose. The dispersion of polymer-coated CdTe/ZnS quantum dots in water and cell growth medium with and without fetal bovine serum was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. Characterization by TEM of samples prepared by plunge freezing the blotted solutions into liquid ethane was sensitive to the dispersion state of the quantum dots and enabled measurement of agglomerate size distributions even in the presence of serum proteins where DLS failed. In addition, TEM showed a reduced packing fraction of quantum dots per agglomerate when dispersed in biological media and serum compared to just water, highlighting the effect of interactions between the media, serum proteins, and the quantum dots. The identification of a heterogeneous distribution of quantum dots and quantum dot agglomerates in cell growth medium and serum by TEM will enable correlation with the previously reported optical metrology of in vitro cellular uptake of this quantum dot dispersion. In this paper, we present a comparative study of TEM and DLS and show that plunge-freeze TEM provides a robust assessment of nanoparticle agglomeration state.

  11. Frequency comparative study of coal-fired fly ash acoustic agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianzhong Liu; Jie Wang; Guangxue Zhang; Junhu Zhou; Kefa Cen

    2011-01-01

    Particulate pollution is main kind of atmospheric pollution.The fine particles are seriously harmful to human health and environment.Acoustic agglomeration is considered as a promising pretreatment technology for fine particle agglomeration.The mechanisms of acoustic agglomeration are very complex and the agglomeration efficiency is affected by many factors.The most important and controversial factor is frequency.Comparative studies between high-frequency and low-frequency sound source to agglomerate coalfired fly ash were carried out to investigate the influence of frequency on agglomeration efficiency.Acoustic agglomeration theoretical analysis,experimental particle size distributions (PSDs) and orthogonal design were examined.The results showed that the 20 kHz high-frequency sound source was not suitable to agglomerate coal-fired fly ash.Only within the size ranging from 0.2 to 0.25 μm the particles agglomerated to adhere together,and the agglomerated particles were smaller than 2.5 μm.The application of low-frequency (1000-1800 Hz) sound source was proved as an advisable pretreatment with the highest agglomeration efficiency of 75.3%,and all the number concentrations within the measuring range decreased.Orthogonal design L16 (4)3 was introduced to determine the optimum frequency and optimize acoustic agglomeration condition.According to the results of orthogonal analysis,frequency was the dominant factor of coal-fired fly ash acoustic agglomeration and the optimum frequency was 1400 Hz.

  12. Phosphate-enhanced cytotoxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles and agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, W Neil; Chern, Christina; Sun, Dazhi; McMahon, Rebecca E; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Wei-Jung A; Hahn, Mariah S; Sue, H-J

    2014-02-10

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) have been found to readily react with phosphate ions to form zinc phosphate (Zn3(PO4)2) crystallites. Because phosphates are ubiquitous in physiological fluids as well as waste water streams, it is important to examine the potential effects that the formation of Zn3(PO4)2 crystallites may have on cell viability. Thus, the cytotoxic response of NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells was assessed following 24h of exposure to ZnO NPs suspended in media with and without the standard phosphate salt supplement. Both particle dosage and size have been shown to impact the cytotoxic effects of ZnO NPs, so doses ranging from 5 to 50 μg/mL were examined and agglomerate size effects were investigated by using the bioinert amphiphilic polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to generate water-soluble ZnO ranging from individually dispersed 4 nm NPs up to micron-sized agglomerates. Cell metabolic activity measures indicated that the presence of phosphate in the suspension media can led to significantly reduced cell viability at all agglomerate sizes and at lower ZnO dosages. In addition, a reduction in cell viability was observed when agglomerate size was decreased, but only in the phosphate-containing media. These metabolic activity results were reflected in separate measures of cell death via the lactate dehydrogenase assay. Our results suggest that, while higher doses of water-soluble ZnO NPs are cytotoxic, the presence of phosphates in the surrounding fluid can lead to significantly elevated levels of cell death at lower ZnO NP doses. Moreover, the extent of this death can potentially be modulated or offset by tuning the agglomerate size. These findings underscore the importance of understanding how nanoscale materials can interact with the components of surrounding fluids so that potential adverse effects of such interactions can be controlled.

  13. Literature review and binder and coal selection for research studies on coal agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.G.; Kuby, O.A.; Girimont, J.A.; peterson, C.A.; Saller, E.

    1982-02-26

    This report discusses the results of a literature survey on coal agglomeration and the approaches that were employed in selecting binders and coals to be studied in a process development program currently being performed for the Department of Energy. The survey is the first step toward the development of a useful process for the agglomeration of coal fines for use in a fixed-bed gasifier. Literature was found and reviewed on the effects of coal composition and physical properties, on agglomeration techniques and operating variables, on binders or additives to promote agglomeration, on pretreatment techniques on agglomerate feedstocks and post-treatment techniques on formed agglomerates, and on test results obtained by researchers in the past using various additives, treatments and agglomeration techniques. Much of this information did not deal directly with agglomerates for fixed-bed gasifiers, but the reported observations and results could be extrapolated to give useful guidelines for research plans. Conclusions and plans for further work are presented.

  14. Effect of polymers on crystallo-co-agglomeration of ibuprofen-paracetamol: Factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the effect of concentration of polyethylene glycol and ethyl cellulose on the properties of agglomerates of ibuprofen-paracetamol obtained by crystallo-co-agglomeration technique. The process of crystallo-co-agglomeration involved recrystallization of ibuprofen and its simultaneous agglomeration with paracetamol in presence polymers. The effect of combination of polyethylene glycol and ethylcellulose was studied by 2 2 factorial design. Ibuprofen content of the agglomerate increased with increase in ethyl cellulose while paracetamol content was decreased with increase in polyethylene glycol. Differential scanning calorimetry thermograms of agglomerates showed the unchanged endotherm for ibuprofen melting, whereas paracetamol endotherm was diffused with low enthalpy. The agglomerates were spherical but increase in polyethylene glycol caused its deformation. Agglomerates containing ethylcellulose with polyethylene glycol have higher resistance for fragmentation, modulus of elasticity but impart high tensile strength.

  15. Comments on an Analytical Thermal Agglomeration for Problems with Surface Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, N. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Up until Dec 2016, the thermal agglomeration was very heuristic, and as such, difficult to define. The lack of predictability became problematic, and the current notes represent the first real attempt to systematize the specification of the agglomerated process parameters.

  16. Water migration mechanisms in amorphous powder material and related agglomeration propensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renzetti, S.; Voogt, J.A.; Oliver, L.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    The agglomeration phenomenon of amorphous particulate material is a major problem in the food industry. Currently, the glass transition temperature (Tg) is used as a fundamental parameter to describe and control agglomeration. Models are available that describe the kinetics of the agglomeration proc

  17. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  18. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Southern Company Services, Inc., (SCS) was contracted in 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a commercially acceptable selective agglomeration technology to enhance the use of high-sulfur coals by 1993. The project scope involved development of a bench-scale process and components, as well as the design, testing, and evaluation of a proof-of-concept (POC) facility. To that end, a two-ton-per-hour facility was constructed and tested near Wilsonville, Alabama. Although it was not the primary focus of the test program, SCS also measured the ability of selective agglomeration to remove trace elements from coal. This document describes the results of that program.

  19. Bifurcation theory for hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    This book contributes to an understanding of how bifurcation theory adapts to the analysis of economic geography. It is easily accessible not only to mathematicians and economists, but also to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in nonlinear mathematics. The self-organization of hexagonal agglomeration patterns of industrial regions was first predicted by the central place theory in economic geography based on investigations of southern Germany. The emergence of hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography models was envisaged by Krugman. In this book, after a brief introduction of central place theory and new economic geography, the missing link between them is discovered by elucidating the mechanism of the evolution of bifurcating hexagonal patterns. Pattern formation by such bifurcation is a well-studied topic in nonlinear mathematics, and group-theoretic bifurcation analysis is a well-developed theoretical tool. A finite hexagonal lattice is used to express uniformly distri...

  20. Functionally graded porous scaffolds made of Ti-based agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Keivan A; Hilditch, Tim; Dargusch, Matthew S; Nouri, Alireza

    2016-10-01

    Mono- and double-layer porous scaffolds were successfully fabricated using ball-milled agglomerates of Ti and Ti-10Nb-3Mo alloy. For selectively controlling the level of porosity and pore size, the agglomerates were sieved into two different size fractions of 100-300μm and 300-500μm. Compressive mechanical properties were measured on a series of cylindrical sintered compacts with different ratios of solid core diameter to porous layer width. The graded porous scaffolds exhibited stress-strain curves typical for metallic foams with a defined plateau region after yielding. The compressive strengths and elastic moduli ranged from 300 to 700MPa and 14 to 55GPa, respectively, depending on the core diameter and the material used. The obtained properties make these materials suitable for load-bearing implant applications.

  1. Public Action and Innovationsupport Institutions in New Technological Agglomerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borras, Susana; Bacaria, Jordi; Fernandez-Ribas, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    In all industrial and technological agglomerations several types of public and semi-public actors coexist. The same happens with the levels of government. Consequently, the daily reality of agglomerations is characterized by a wide diversity of innovation-support institutions more or less actively...... on the major efforts of different public actors in the territory since the 1980s, mainly through the establishment and enhancement of innovation-support institutions, and analyses succinctly their effects through selected successful and failed cases. Two normative statements are suggested from the analysis...... into an open explicit option for the economic performance of the territory. The conclusions include a final plea for further research about the industrial dynamics and knowledge flows in the Vallès Occidental County, an important growth pole of Catalonia....

  2. Flocculation, hydrophobic agglomeration and filtration of ultrafine coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhimin

    In coal preparation plant circuits, fine coal particles are aggregated either by oil agglomeration or by flocculation. In a new hydrophobic agglomeration process, recently developed hydrophobic latices are utilized. While the selectivity of such aggregation processes determines the beneficiation results, the degree of aggregation has a strong effect on fine coal filtration. The aim of this research was to study the fundamentals and analyze the common grounds for these processes, including the potential effect of the coal surface properties. The selective flocculation tests, in which three types of coal, which differed widely in surface wettability, and three additives (hydrophobic latices, a semi-hydrophobic flocculant and a typical hydrophilic polyelectrolyte) were utilized, showed that coal wettability plays a very important role in selective flocculation. The abstraction of a hydrophobic latex on coal and silica revealed that the latex had a much higher affinity towards hydrophobic coal than to hydrophilic mineral matter. As a result, the UBC-1 hydrophobic latex flocculated only hydrophobic coal particles while the polyelectrolyte (PAM) flocculated all the tested coal samples and minerals, showing no selectivity in the fine coal beneficiation. The oil agglomeration was tested using kerosene emulsified with various surfactants (e.g. cationic, anionic and non-ionic). Surfactants enhance not only oil emulsification, hence reducing oil consumption (down to 0.25--0.5%), but also entirely change the electrokinetic properties of the droplets and affect the interaction energy between oil droplets and coal particles. Consequently, the results found in the course of the experimental work strongly indicate that even oxidized coals can be agglomerated if cationic surfactants are used to emulsify the oil. Oil agglomeration of the Ford-4 ultrafine coal showed that even at extremely low oil consumption (0.25 to 0.5%), a clean coal product with an ash content around 5% at over

  3. AGGLOMERATION AND RADIATION EFFECT OF THE PULL OF URBANIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Jin-li

    2003-01-01

    In order to explore the train of thought for China's urbanizing development and coordinated rural eco-nomic development, and to find good ways of solving rural problems through urbanization, this paper absorbs the push-and-pull forces theory and the systematic dynamic theory in the traditional population migration theories, views urbanization as a dynamic system, makes research on the push-and-pull mechanism of urbanization. The pull ingpower of urbanization is analyzed according to two aspects, the agglomeration effect and the radiation effect of cities. The agglomeration effect provides continuous propelling force for urbanization, and the radiation effect furtheraccelerates the urbanization process by pushing forward the development of rural economy. Of course, the slow de-velopment of urbanization can result in the hindrance to rural economic development.

  4. On Some Versions of the Element Agglomeration AMGe Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lashuk, I; Vassilevski, P

    2007-08-09

    The present paper deals with element-based AMG methods that target linear systems of equations coming from finite element discretizations of elliptic PDEs. The individual element information (element matrices and element topology) is the main input to construct the AMG hierarchy. We study a number of variants of the spectral agglomerate element based AMG method. The core of the algorithms relies on element agglomeration utilizing the element topology (built recursively from fine to coarse levels). The actual selection of the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is based on solving large number of local eigenvalue problems. Additionally, we investigate strategies for adaptive AMG as well as multigrid cycles that are more expensive than the V-cycle utilizing simple interpolation matrices and nested conjugate gradient (CG) based recursive calls between the levels. The presented algorithms are illustrated with an extensive set of experiments based on a matlab implementation of the methods.

  5. Characterization of dust from blast furnace cast house de-dusting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2016-12-14

    During casting of liquid iron and slag, a considerable amount of dust is emitted into the cast house of a blast furnace (BF). Usually, this dust is extracted via exhaust hoods and subsequently separated from the ventilation air. In most BFs the cast house dust is recycled. In this study a sample of cast house dust was split by air classification into five size fractions, which were then analysed. Micrographs showed that the dominating particle type in all size fractions is that of single spherical-shaped particles. However, some irregular-shaped particles were also found and in the finest size fraction also some agglomerates were present. Almost spherical particles consisted of Fe and O, while highly irregular-shaped particles consisted of C. The most abundant element was Fe, followed by Ca and C. These elements were distributed relatively uniformly in the size fractions. As, Cd, Cu, K, Pb, S, Sb and Zn were enriched significantly in the fine size fractions. Thus, air classification would be an effective method for improved recycling. By separating a small fraction of fines (about 10-20%), a reduction of the mass of Zn in the coarse dust recycled in the range of 40-55% would be possible.

  6. Recycling of electric arc furnace (EAF dust for use in steel making process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alencastro de Araújo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The EAF dust is listed as hazardous waste from specific source, K061, according to ABNT 10004:2004 and constitutes one of the major problems of electrical steel plant. This work suggests recycling of the EAF dust by sintering of a composite, pre-cast agglomerate (PCA consisting of EAF dust agglomerate to coke particles, mill scale and ceramic fluorite into pellets. The work was divided into three stages, in the first stage the technical viability of using only solid waste industrial to produce a PCA was observed, in the second phase, the main effects between the components of the PCA to obtain the optimal formulation was tested. In the third phase the intensity of the variables, coke and fluorite ceramics, for removing zinc of PCA was checked. Every stage was chemically analyzed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and X-ray diffraction. The first two stages of the production PCA were carried out in a pilot plant sintering downstream and the third phase in a pilot plant upstream. As a result of the process two by-products were obtained, the pre-cast agglomerated, PCA, with total iron content exceeding 70%, object of the process of sintering and zinc dust, containing more than 50% zinc resulting from volatilization of this metal during the sintering process and collected by bag filter. In addition, approximately 90% of lead and cadmium contained in the initial EAF dust was extracted.

  7. Light Scattering and Thermal Emission by Primitive Dust Particles in Planetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Li, Aigen; Lebreton, Jérémy

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on numerical approaches to deducing the light-scattering and thermal-emission properties of primitive dust particles in planetary systems from astronomical observations. The particles are agglomerates of small grains with sizes comparable to visible wavelength and compositions being mainly magnesium-rich silicates, iron-bearing metals, and organic refractory materials in pristine phases. These unique characteristics of primitive dust particles reflect their formation and evolution around main-sequence stars of essentially solar composition. The development of light-scattering theories has been offering powerful tools to make a thorough investigation of light scattering and thermal emission by primitive dust agglomerates in such a circumstellar environment. In particular, the discrete dipole approximation, the T-matrix method, and effective medium approximations are the most popular techniques for practical use in astronomy. Numerical simulations of light scattering and thermal emission by ...

  8. Analysis on the Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Financial Agglomeration with Markov Chain Approach in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard approach to studying financial industrial agglomeration is to construct measures of the degree of agglomeration within financial industry. But such measures often fail to exploit the convergence or divergence of financial agglomeration. In this paper, we apply Markov chain approach to diagnose the convergence of financial agglomeration in China based on the location quotient coefficients across the provincial regions over 1993–2011. The estimation of Markov transition probability matrix offers more detailed insights into the mechanics of financial agglomeration evolution process in China during the research period. The results show that the spatial evolution of financial agglomeration changes faster in the period of 2003–2011 than that in the period of 1993–2002. Furthermore, there exists a very uneven financial development patterns, but there is regional convergence for financial agglomeration in China.

  9. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of secondary acid products and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured in real-time using ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles corresponded to different air mass source regions. During volcanically influenced periods, dust mixed with sulphate dominated. This rapidly switched to dust predominantly mixed with chloride when the first Asian dust front reached the R/V Ronald Brown. We hypothesise that the high degree of mixing of dust with chloride was caused by the prior reaction of NOy(g and volcanic SO2(g with sea salt particles, reducing the availability of nitrate and sulphate precursors while releasing HCl(g, which then reacted with the incoming dust front. The segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual dust particles is demonstrated for the first time. This is likely caused by the dust plume encountering elevated SO2(g in the Chinese interior before reaching coastal urban areas polluted by both SO2(g and NOx(g. This caused the fractions of dust mixed with nitrate and/or chloride to be strongly dependent on the total dust loadings, whereas dust mixed with sulphate did not show this same dust concentration dependence. Ammonium was also significantly mixed with dust and the amount correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent statements that they exist as an external mixture. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous models and mechanisms of the atmospheric processing of dust. The uptake of secondary acids was also dependent on the individual dust particle mineralogy; nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S(IV

  10. Agglomeration behaviour of steel plants solid waste and its effect on sintering performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Kumar Singh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recycling has been the fascinating topic among the researchers for all times. The present study shows the recycling of steel plant's solid wastes as blast furnace flue dust and sludge towards agglomeration and their use in the production of sinter. These wastes consist of metal oxides and coke fines as a valuable material with some alkali oxides. Using these wastes as it is in the form of fines exacerbate the further processing. Pellets of these wastes are prepared with three types of binders as molasses, dextrin and bentonite. The result reveals that properties as compressive strength, shatter strength, are better in the case of bentonite binder having the productivity of the disc pelletizer machine as 75. After that, these macro pellets used for sintering with iron ore and other ingredients in pot type, down draft laboratory grade sintering machine, which shows very high productivity and good mechanical properties of the sinter as well. The microstructural analysis reveals the presence of re-oxidized hematite and a little bit of a magnetite phase with some slag phases, which confirmed later by XRD analysis. Results also show the decrease in coke rate, i.e. coke consumption to produce sinter and at the same time, this process is highly eco-friendly.

  11. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  12. Macroscopic Dust in Protoplanetary Disks - From Growth to Destruction

    CERN Document Server

    Deckers, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The collision dynamics of dusty bodies are crucial for planetesimal formation. Especially decimeter agglomerates are important in the different formation models. Therefore, in continuation of our experiments on mutual decimeter collisions, we investigate collisions of centimeter onto decimeter dust agglomerates in a small drop tower under vacuum conditions (p<5*10^{-1} mbar) at a mean collision velocity of 6.68 +- 0.67m/s. We use quartz dust with irregularly shaped micrometer grains. Centimeter projectiles with different diameters, masses and heights are used, their typical volume filling factor is Phi_{p,m}=0.466+-0.02. The decimeter agglomerates have a mass of about 1.5kg, a diameter and height of 12cm and a mean filling factor of Phi_{t,m}=0.44+-0.004. At lower collision energies only the projectile gets destroyed and mass is transferred to the target. The accretion efficiency decreases with increasing obliquity and increasing difference in filling factor, if the projectile is more compact than the targ...

  13. Mineralogical properties and internal structures of individual fine particles of Saharan dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Park, Mi Yeon; Kandler, Konrad; Nousiainen, Timo; Kemppinen, Osku

    2016-10-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing radiation, gases, other aerosols, and clouds. The assessment of its optical and chemical impacts requires knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of bulk dust and single particles. Despite the existence of a large body of data from field measurements and laboratory analyses, the internal properties of single dust particles have not been defined precisely. Here, we report on the mineralogical organization and internal structures of individual fine ( common particle type was clay-rich agglomerate, dominated by illite-smectite series clay minerals with subordinate kaolinite. Submicron grains of iron (hydr)oxides (goethite and hematite) were commonly dispersed through the clay-rich particles. The median total volume of the iron (hydr)oxide grains included in the dust particles was estimated to be about 1.5 % vol. The average iron content of clay minerals, assuming 14 wt % H2O, was determined to be 5.0 wt %. Coarse mineral cores, several micrometers in size, were coated with thin layers of clay-rich agglomerate. Overall, the dust particles were roughly ellipsoidal, with an average axial ratio of 1.4 : 1.0 : 0.5. The mineralogical and structural properties of single Saharan dust particles provide a basis for the modeling of dust radiative properties. Major iron-bearing minerals, such as illite-smectite series clay minerals and iron (hydr)oxides, were commonly submicron- to nano-sized, possibly enhancing their biogeochemical availability to remote marine ecosystems lacking micronutrients.

  14. Inhaled dust and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following: the respiratory system; respirable dust; the fate of inhaled dust; translocation and some general effects of inhaled dust; silicosis; experimental research on silica-related disease; natural fibrous silicates; asbestos dust levels and dust sources; asbestos-related diseases - asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma and other diseases, cancers at sites other than lung and pleura; experimental research relating to asbestos-related diseases; asbestos hazard - mineral types and hazardous occupations, neighbourhood and domestic hazard; silicates other than asbestos-man-made mineral fibres, mineral silicates and cement; metals; coal mine dust, industrial carbon and arsenic; natural and synthetic organic substances; dusts that provoke allergic alveolitis; tobacco smoke.

  15. Field observations of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, Patricia (Soupy); Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Mickey, Rangley C.

    2015-01-01

    Oil that comes into the surf zone following spills, such as occurred during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, can mix with local sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs), at times in the form of mats a few centimeters thick and tens of meters long. Smaller agglomerates that form in situ or pieces that break off of larger mats, sometimes referred to as surface residual balls (SRBs), range in size from sand-sized grains to patty-shaped pieces several centimeters (cm) in diameter. These mobile SOAs can cause beach oiling for extended periods following the spill, on the scale of years as in the case of DWH. Limited research, including a prior effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigating SOA mobility, alongshore transport, and seafloor interaction using numerical model output, focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. To address this data gap, we constructed artificial sand and oil agglomerates (aSOAs) with sand and paraffin wax to mimic the size and density of genuine SOAs. These aSOAs were deployed in the nearshore off the coast of St. Petersburg, Florida, during a field experiment to investigate their movement and seafloor interaction. This report presents the methodology for constructing aSOAs and describes the field experiment. Data acquired during the field campaign, including videos and images of aSOA movement in the nearshore (1.5-meter and 0.5-meter water depth) and in the swash zone, are also presented in this report.

  16. Measurement of net electric charge and dipole moment of dust aggregates in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Yousefi, Razieh; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the agglomeration of dust particles in complex plasmas requires a knowledge of the basic properties such as the net electrostatic charge and dipole moment of the dust. In this study, dust aggregates are formed from gold coated mono-disperse spherical melamine-formaldehyde monomers in a radio-frequency (rf) argon discharge plasma. The behavior of observed dust aggregates is analyzed both by studying the particle trajectories and by employing computer models examining 3D structures of aggregates and their interactions and rotations as induced by torques arising from their dipole moments. These allow the basic characteristics of the dust aggregates, such as the electrostatic charge and dipole moment, to be determined. It is shown that the experimental results support the predicted values from computer models for aggregates in these environments.

  17. Measurement of net electric charge and dipole moment of dust aggregates in a complex plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Razieh; Davis, Allen B; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the agglomeration of dust particles in complex plasmas requires knowledge of basic properties such as the net electrostatic charge and dipole moment of the dust. In this study, dust aggregates are formed from gold-coated mono-disperse spherical melamine-formaldehyde monomers in a radiofrequency (rf) argon discharge plasma. The behavior of observed dust aggregates is analyzed both by studying the particle trajectories and by employing computer models examining three-dimensional structures of aggregates and their interactions and rotations as induced by torques arising from their dipole moments. These allow the basic characteristics of the dust aggregates, such as the electrostatic charge and dipole moment, as well as the external electric field, to be determined. It is shown that the experimental results support the predicted values from computer models for aggregates in these environments.

  18. A phenomenological model for improving understanding of the ammonium nitrate agglomeration process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videla Leiva Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate is intensively used as explosive in the mining industry as the main component of ANFO. The ammonium nitrate is known to be a strong hygroscopic crystal matter which generates problems due to the creation of water bridges between crystals leading later to nucleation and crystallization forming an agglomerated solid cake. The agglomeration process damages the ammonium nitrate performance and is undesirable. Usually either organic or inorganic coatings are used to control agglomeration. In the present work a characterization method of humidity adsorption of the ammonium nitrate crystal was performed under laboratory conditions. Several samples were exposed into a defined humidity in a controlled chamber during 5 hours after which the samples were tested to measure agglomeration as the resistance force to compression. A clear relation was found between coating protection level, humidity and agglomeration. Agglomeration can be then predicted by a phenomenological model based of combination of the mono-layer BET adsorption and CNT nucleation models.

  19. Influences of seed size and number on agglomeration in synthetic Bayer liquors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bin; ZHOU Ke-chao; CHEN Qi-yuan

    2006-01-01

    By means of Malvern laser particle size analyzer and scanning electron microscopy, the influences of seed size and number on agglomeration in Bayer process were investigated. Agglomeration is almost finished in 8 h,seeds, below 5 μm, especially below 2 μm, gather together rapidly and almost disappear in 8 h. In the same supersaturation of aluminate solution and seed size, the smaller the number of seed is, the bigger the degree of agglomeration is. With the same primary number of seed, the agglomeration of larger seed is superior to that of small seed,and the agglomeration does not happen among the coarse seeds. The agglomeration mainly happens among fine particles, and the combinations among the fine particles are unconsolidated.

  20. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells.

  1. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-08-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells.

  2. Automated Manufacture of Fertilizing Agglomerates from Burnt Wood Ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svantesson, Thomas

    2002-12-01

    In Sweden, extensive research is conducted to find alternative sources of energy that should partly replace the electric power production from nuclear power. With the ambition to create a sustainable system for producing energy, the use of renewable energy is expected to grow further and biofuels are expected to account for a significant part of this increase. However, when biofuels are burned or gasified, ash appears as a by-product. In order to overcome the problems related to deposition in land fills, the idea is to transform the ashes into a product - agglomerates - that easily could be recycled back to the forest grounds; as a fertilizer, or as a tool to reduce the acidification in the forest soil at the spreading area. This work considers the control of a transformation process, which transforms wood ash produced at a district heating plant into fertilizing agglomerates. A robust machine, built to comply with the industrial requirements for continuous operation, has been developed and is controlled by an industrial control system in order to enable an automated manufacture.

  3. Characterization of steel mill electric-arc furnace dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofilić, Tahir; Rastovcan-Mioc, Alenka; Cerjan-Stefanović, Stefica; Novosel-Radović, Vjera; Jenko, Monika

    2004-06-18

    In order to make a complete characterization of electric-arc furnace (EAF) dust, as hazardous industrial waste, and to solve its permanent disposal and/or recovery, bearing in mind both the volumes formed in the Croatian steel industry and experiences of developed industrial countries, a study of its properties was undertaken. For this purpose, samples of EAF dust, taken from the regular production process in the Zeljezara Sisak Steel Mill between December 2000 and December 2001, were subjected to a series of tests. The chemical composition of EAF dust samples was investigated by means of a several different analytical methods. The results from the chemical analysis show that the approximate order of abundance of major elements in EAF dusts is as follows: Fe, Zn, Mn, Ca, Mg, Si, Pb, S, Cr, Cu, Al, C, Ni, Cd, As and Hg. Granular-metric composition of single samples was determined by applying sieve separation. Scanning electron micro-structural examination of EAF dust microstructure was performed and results indicated that all twelve EAF dusts were composed of solid spherical agglomerates with Fe, Zn, Pb, O, Si and Ca as the principal element. The investigation of grain morphology and the mineralogical composition of EAF dust were taken by combination of high resolution Auger electron spectroscopy (HR AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray powder diffraction analysis. The analysis of XPS-spectra determined the presence of zinc in the form of ZnO phase and the presence of lead in the form of PbO phase, i.e. PbSO3/PbSO4 forms. The results of the X-ray diffraction phase analysis show that the basis of the examined EAF dust samples is made of a mixture of metal oxides, silicates and sulphates. The metal concentration, anions, pH value and conductivity in water eluates was determined in order to define the influence of EAF dust on the environment.

  4. Risk assessment of children’s exposure to potentially harmful elements (PHE in selected urban parks of the Silesian agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kicińska Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The author determined the total contents of selected elements potentially hazardous for health (PHE: As, Be, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni and Sn in soils, sand of sandboxes and airborne dust collected in three urban parks of the Silesian agglomeration. The upper limit of Cd content (a Polish regulation was exceeded in the soils of two largest and most frequented parks, the Silesian Park and the Kościuszko Park. The mean Cd contents in soils are 9 and 7 mg/kg, respectively. The metal contents of the sand from sandboxes are generally much lower than those of the soils: Cu 28 times on average, As 13 times, and Cd and Ni around 4 times, while the Co and Sn contents of sand are comparable with those of soils. Airborne dusts are a significant source of metals: they contain Cd (1–20 mg/kg, Co (2–17 mg/kg and Cu (6–143 mg/kg. The quotients of the health risk indicate a potential health risk caused by As, Cd and Ni for children, particularly those with a low (below 15 kg body weight. The risk level of 1–4% PTMDI (Provisional Maximum Tolerable Daily Intake origins from an accidental swallowing of soil.

  5. On minimal energy dipole moment distributions in regular polygonal agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Adriano Possebon; Cunha, Francisco Ricardo; Ceniceros, Hector Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Static, regular polygonal and close-packed clusters of spherical magnetic particles and their energy-minimizing magnetic moments are investigated in a two-dimensional setting. This study focuses on a simple particle system which is solely described by the dipole-dipole interaction energy, both without and in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. For a regular polygonal structure of n sides with n ≥ 3 , and in the absence of an external field, it is proved rigorously that the magnetic moments given by the roots of unity, i.e. tangential to the polygon, are a minimizer of the dipole-dipole interaction energy. Also, for zero external field, new multiple local minima are discovered for the regular polygonal agglomerates. The number of found local extrema is proportional to [ n / 2 ] and these critical points are characterized by the presence of a pair of magnetic moments with a large deviation from the tangential configuration and whose particles are at least three diameters apart. The changes induced by an in-plane external magnetic field on the minimal energy, tangential configurations are investigated numerically. The two critical fields, which correspond to a crossover with the linear chain minimal energy and with the break-up of the agglomerate, respectively are examined in detail. In particular, the numerical results are compared directly with the asymptotic formulas of Danilov et al. (2012) [23] and a remarkable agreement is found even for moderate to large fields. Finally, three examples of close-packed structures are investigated: a triangle, a centered hexagon, and a 19-particle close packed cluster. The numerical study reveals novel, illuminating characteristics of these compact clusters often seen in ferrofluids. The centered hexagon is energetically favorable to the regular hexagon and the minimal energy for the larger 19-particle cluster is even lower than that of the close packed hexagon. In addition, this larger close packed agglomerate has two

  6. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of secondary acids and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured with an online single-particle mass spectrometer, the ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles correlate with air masses from different source regions. The uptake of secondary acids depended on the individual dust particle mineralogy; high amounts of nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while high amounts of sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S(IV to S(VI by iron in the aluminosilicate dust is a possible explanation for this enrichment of sulphate, which has important consequences for the fertilization of remote oceans by soluble iron. This study shows the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual aged dust particles for the first time. A transport and aging timeline provides an explanation for the observed segregation. Our data suggests that sulphate became mixed with the dust first. This implies that the transport pathway is more important than the reaction kinetics in determining which species accumulate on mineral dust. Early in the study, dust particles in volcanically influenced air masses were mixed predominately with sulphate. Dust mixed with chloride then dominated over sulphate and nitrate when a major dust front reached the R. V. Ronald Brown. We hypothesize that the rapid increase in chloride on dust was due to mixing with HCl(g released from acidified sea salt particles induced by heterogeneous reaction with volcanic SO2(g, prior to the arrival of the dust front. The amount of ammonium mixed with dust correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent reports that they exist as external mixtures. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous

  7. Discussion on the dispersion & agglomeration of aircraft industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Chu

    2009-01-01

    The aircraft industry is crucial to the economy and security of a nation. In this paper, the spatial characteristics and patterns of the aircraft industry are analyzed on different spatial scales. It is found that there is a 'Matthew effect' in the global aircraft industry and the spatial evolution of the industry is consistent with the industrialization process of the whole country. It is also revealed that the spatial evolution of the country is driven by both the centripetal forces including capital, talents, technology and agglomeration economies and the centrifugal forces including the comparative advantage, cost &risk sharing, emerging markets, development policy for less-developed regions and the military imperative. These forces have both market-stabilizing and market-disrupting effects on the spatial evolution of the aircraft industry. The study suggests that lessons drawn from the experiences in the United States and France are expected to be conducive to the rise of China's aircraft industry in the future.

  8. Constructing Political Region Agglomerations for Effective Science Communcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Often political regions form a better scale for modeling than regulargrids, since they are used for collecting socioeconomic data and aremore relevant to stakeholders and policy-makers. However, differentpolitical regions can enclose very different areas, populations,ranges of climatic variability, and for many countries there are anundesireable number of regions available at any administrative level.We provide a solution to this problem, by providing a general systemfor agglomerating regions to a larger scale, to approximately optimizearbitrary objectives. These regions provide an intermediate scale formodeling and greater comparability than unagglomerated regions. Wefirst apply the approach to the US, producing region agglomerationsthat normalize region size, population, income, and climaticvariability. We then apply the technique globally, generating acononical collection of regions for studying the impacts of climatechange.

  9. Agglomeration and Deposition Behaviour of Solid Recovered Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Hjuler, Klaus;

    2016-01-01

    Waste-derived fuels, such as solid recovered fuel (SRF), are increasingly being used in, e.g., the cement industry as a means to reduce cost. The inhomogeneous nature of SRF makes it difficult to combust, and many problems may arise within, e.g., combustion control, feeding of fuel, deposit...... formation, or accumulation of impurities. The combustion of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), wood, and SRF were studied in a rotary drum furnace. The combustion was recorded on a camera (60 frames per second), so that any agglomeration or deposition of fuel or ash...... could be monitored. PE and PP pose no significant risk of forming deposits in a combustion environment (T > 800 °C) as a result of a rapid devolatilization, while PET may cause deposits as a result of a sticky char residue. The deposition tendency of the investigated SRF is low, and it may be managed...

  10. Agglomeration and Deposition Behaviour of Solid Recovered Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Nielsen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    contains significant quantities of common plastics such as polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Fluidized bed experiments to examine the pyrolysis of polymers have shown that bed agglomeration can result from melting plastics or sticky char residues in the case...... materials such as plastic and paper than mixed MSW [2]. The inhomogeneous nature of SRF [3] makes it difficult to combust and many problems may arise concerning e.g. combustion control, feeding of fuel [2,4], deposit formation [5], or accumulation of impurities [3]. Laboratory ash fusion tests typically...... of PET [11,12]. The main objective of this study was to characterize the combustion of SRF and especially the deposition propensity of SRF and the main constituents of SRF. This relates both to the low temperature deposits formed during plastic pyrolysis and the high temperature deposits formed by ash...

  11. Fluidization and mixing of nanoparticle agglomerates assisted via magnetic impaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scicolone, James V.; Lepek, Daniel; Louie, Lin; Dave, Rajesh N., E-mail: dave@adm.njit.edu [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical, Biological and Pharmaceutical Engineering (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Mixing of nanopowders in an environmentally benign magnetically assisted fluidized bed (MAFB) system was studied. Examination of fluidization behavior of agglomerate particulate fluidization (APF; silica R974 or R972) and agglomerate bubbling fluidization (ABF; alumina or titania) nano-powders in un-assisted and MAFB systems confirmed previous results on decreased minimum fluidization velocity and increased bed expansion of APF and ABF powders due to magnetic assistance. APF and ABF powder mixtures behaved like APF powders with the bed expansions in between those of individual constituents. Unlike previous MAFB studies, fluidization as a function of time was studied to examine its influence on nano-mixing. With time, the bed expansion reduced, and reduction was faster as magnet-to-powder ratio increased from 0:1 to 5:1, although fluidization was sustained, confirmed via the pressure drop measurements. Reduction in bed expansion was attributed to change in the nature of nanoagglomerates, which showed increased density as a function of processing time, ruling out electrostatics or elutriation as major factors. Mixtures of silica (APF) and alumina (ABF), processed at various magnet-to-powder ratios, were characterized via statistical analysis from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy using field emission scanning electron microscope to compute homogeneity of mixing (HoM). Magnetic assistance improved the HoM as a function of time, and was strongly related to the product of number of magnets and time, similar to previous results in magnetically assisted impaction mixing (MAIM). The best achievable HoM was significantly better than unassisted fluidization and comparable to previous results for rapid expansion of high-pressure suspensions and MAIM.

  12. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  13. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  14. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  15. Productive Places : The influence of technological change and relatedness on agglomeration externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neffke, F.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis addresses the topic of agglomeration externalities. Agglomeration externalities can roughly be defined as advantages and disadvantages local firms experience when locating close to other firms. An old debate exists over the question whether firms benefit more from being close to firms in

  16. Productive Places : The influence of technological change and relatedness on agglomeration externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neffke, F.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis addresses the topic of agglomeration externalities. Agglomeration externalities can roughly be defined as advantages and disadvantages local firms experience when locating close to other firms. An old debate exists over the question whether firms benefit more from being close to firms in

  17. Agglomeration in fluidized beds at high temperatures: Mechanisms, detection and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malte Bartels; Weigang Lin; John Nijenhuis; Freek Kapteijn; J. Ruud van Ommen [Delft University of Technology - DelftChemTech, Delft (Netherlands)

    2008-10-15

    Fluidized-bed conversion of solid fuels is a well-established and widely used technology. Yet, operational problems are encountered in industrial practice. One of the most important problems is the occurrence of agglomeration at high temperature, meaning that bed particles adhere to each other to form larger entities (agglomerates). This process is often not recognized until sudden defluidization and often leads to a costly shutdown of the whole installation. In particular, the thermal conversion of certain biomass fuels, which is becoming increasingly popular, increases the risk of agglomeration. This paper critically reviews the current research status of this topic in terms of agglomeration mechanisms, detection and counteraction strategies. To understand the complex phenomenon of agglomeration in fluidized beds at high temperatures different areas are distinguished viz. hydrodynamics, chemical reaction mechanisms, particle interaction mechanisms and molecular cramming. Special emphasis is given to the detection of agglomeration. The range of detection methods is comprised of fuel ash analysis methods to predict potential agglomeration as well as analysis methods based on (on-line) process measurements, such as pressure and temperature. Finally, different methods to counteract agglomeration phenomena are presented; they comprise operational measures, utilization of additives, alternative bed materials and improved reactor design. 176 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A model to estimate the size of nanoparticle agglomerates in gas−solid fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín, Lilian de, E-mail: L.DeMartinMonton@tudelft.nl; Ommen, J. Ruud van [Delft University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15

    The estimation of nanoparticle agglomerates’ size in fluidized beds remains an open challenge, mainly due to the difficulty of characterizing the inter-agglomerate van der Waals force. The current approach is to describe micron-sized nanoparticle agglomerates as micron-sized particles with 0.1–0.2-μm asperities. This simplification does not capture the influence of the particle size on the van der Waals attraction between agglomerates. In this paper, we propose a new description where the agglomerates are micron-sized particles with nanoparticles on the surface, acting as asperities. As opposed to previous models, here the van der Waals force between agglomerates decreases with an increase in the particle size. We have also included an additional force due to the hydrogen bond formation between the surfaces of hydrophilic and dry nanoparticles. The average size of the fluidized agglomerates has been estimated equating the attractive force obtained from this method to the weight of the individual agglomerates. The results have been compared to 54 experimental values, most of them collected from the literature. Our model approximates without a systematic error the size of most of the nanopowders, both in conventional and centrifugal fluidized beds, outperforming current models. Although simple, the model is able to capture the influence of the nanoparticle size, particle density, and Hamaker coefficient on the inter-agglomerate forces.

  19. A MODEL FOR FINE PARTICLE AGGLOMERATION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED ABSORBERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model for fine particle agglomeration in circulating fluidized bed absorbers (CFBAS) has been developed. It can model the influence of different factors on agglomeration, such as the geometry of CFBAs, superficial gas velocity, initial particle size distribution, and type of ag...

  20. Statistical Evaluation of Non-Agglomerating Coating for Granulated Natural Asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjokorde Walmiki Samadhi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Agglomeration of granulated Buton natural asphalt during storage is of major concern in its large-scale commercial application. This work develops a simple test method to evaluate the performance of agglomeration-resistant coating for granulated Buton asphalt, consisting of water-based polymeric primary coating and mineral-based secondary coating. The method uses a static load cell to measure the agglomerated granule count fraction under simulated storage conditions. A 24-1 fractional factorial experiment with two replications is employed to evaluate the effect of coating drying temperature, drying time, asphalt to secondary coating mass ratio, and secondary coating type on the agglomerated count fraction at ambient temperature and 60 oC. The test is able to measure a statistically significant increase in agglomeration resistance when the coating is applied, with an agglomerated fraction of 17.5% at 60 oC. The test identifies asphalt to secondary coating weight ratio as a significant factor, with an ANOVA p-value much lower than other effects. A decrease in this mass ratio from 5:1 to 5:2 increases the agglomeration, which is hypothesized to be attributed to the hydrated cementitious phase between granular external surfaces. More work is needed to identify the acceptable fraction of agglomerated granules.

  1. Humid storage conditions increase the dissolution rate of diazepam from solid dispersions prepared by melt agglomeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna Cecilia; Torstenson, Anette Seo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of cooling mode and storage conditions on the dissolution rate of a solid dispersion prepared by melt agglomeration. The aim has been to relate this effect to the solid state properties of the agglomerates. The cooling mode had an effect on t...

  2. Dust in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Armosky, Brad J.

    2004-01-01

    Space is seeming less and less like empty space as new discoveries and reexaminations fill in the gaps. And, ingenuity and technology, like the Spitzer Space Telescope, is allowing examination of the far reaches of the Milky Way and beyond. Even dust is getting its due, but not the dust everyone is familiar with. People seldom consider the dust in…

  3. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE HYDROPHOBIC AGGLOMERATION CHARACTERISTICS OF EASY DEGRADATION COAL FINES IN WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王力; 陈鹏

    1997-01-01

    The separation of ultrafine coal from three Chinese coal samples of easy degradation coal fines in water has been investigated by the application of a hydrophobic agglomeration process. In addition to yielding clean coal with high recovery, this process requires significantly less oil concentration for agglomeration (less than 0.4% in oil-water weight ratio) and produces stabler agglomerates than general oil agglomeration process, the cost of the oil would no longer be an important consideration for its commercial application. Neutral diesel oil was used to make oleophilic coal particles agglomerated with good rejection of clay minerals under little oil consumption and certain agitation speed at 2000 r/min. An important advantage of this process compared with other cleaning fine coal methods is that it can extremely reduce or eliminate the effects of coal degradation and some clay minerals on coal preparation.

  4. Morphological characterization of diesel soot agglomerates based on the Beer-Lambert law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapuerta, Magín; Martos, Francisco J.; José Expósito, Juan

    2013-03-01

    A new method is proposed for the determination of the number of primary particles composing soot agglomerates emitted from diesel engines as well as their individual fractal dimension. The method is based on the Beer-Lambert law and it is applied to micro-photographs taken in high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Differences in the grey levels of the images lead to a more accurate estimation of the geometry of the agglomerate (in this case radius of gyration) than other methods based exclusively on the planar projections of the agglomerates. The method was validated by applying it to different images of the same agglomerate observed from different angles of incidence, and proving that the effect of the angle of incidence is minor, contrary to other methods. Finally, the comparisons with other methods showed that the size, number of primary particles and fractal dimension (the latter depending on the particle size) are usually underestimated when only planar projections of the agglomerates are considered.

  5. Laboratory Observations of Artificial Sand and Oil Agglomerates: Video and Velocity Data: Sea Floor Interaction Experiment Video (GoPro)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Weathered oil in the surf-zone after an oil spill may mix with suspended sediments to form sand and oil agglomerates (SOA). Sand and oil agglomerates may form in...

  6. Laboratory Observations of Artificial Sand and Oil Agglomerates Video and Velocity Data: Sea Floor Interaction Experiment Flow Velocity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Weathered oil in the surf-zone after an oil spill may mix with suspended sediments to form sand and oil agglomerates (SOA). Sand and oil agglomerates may form in...

  7. Laboratory Observations of Artificial Sand and Oil Agglomerates Video and Velocity Data: False-Floor Experiment Interpretive Video

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Weathered oil in the surf-zone after an oil spill may mix with suspended sediments to form sand and oil agglomerates (SOA). Sand and oil agglomerates may form in...

  8. Laboratory Observations of Artificial Sand and Oil Agglomerates Video and Velocity Data: Sea Floor Interaction Experiment Interpretive Video

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Weathered oil in the surf-zone after an oil spill may mix with suspended sediments to form sand and oil agglomerates (SOA). Sand and oil agglomerates may form in...

  9. Mixing of mineral dust with urban pollution aerosol over Dakar (Senegal): impact on dust physico-chemical and radiative properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, A.; Veira, A.; Mund, S.; Esselborn, M.; Kiemle, C.; Weinzierl, B.; Hamburger, T.; Ehret, G. (Institut fur Physik der Atmosphaere, Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany)), e-mail: andreas.petzold@dlr.de; Lieke, K.; Kandler, K. (Institut fur Angewandte Geowissenschaften, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany))

    2011-09-15

    In the framework of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) in 2008, the mixing of the urban pollution plume of Dakar (Senegal) with mineral dust was studied in detail using the German research aircraft Falcon which was equipped with a nadir-looking high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and extensive aerosol in situ instrumentation. The mineral dust layer as well as the urban pollution plume were probed remotely by the HSRL and in situ. Back trajectory analyses were used to attribute aerosol samples to source regions.We found that the emission from the region of Dakar increased the aerosol optical depth (532 nm) from approximately 0.30 over sea and over land east of Dakar to 0.35 in the city outflow. In the urban area, local black carbon (BC) emissions, or soot respectively, contributed more than 75% to aerosol absorption at 530 nm. In the dust layer, the single-scattering albedo at 530 nm was 0.96 - 0.99, whereas we found a value of 0.908 +- 0.018 for the aerosol dominated by urban pollution. After 6 h of transport over the North Atlantic, the externally mixed mode of secondary aerosol particles had almost completely vanished, whereas the BC agglomerates (soot) were still externally mixed with mineral dust particles

  10. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  11. Chirality in interstellar dust and in comets: Life from dead stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayo Greenberg, J. [Huygens Laboratory, University of Leiden, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (The Netherlands)

    1996-07-01

    Interstellar dust grains have mantles of prebiotic organic molecules. A large fraction of the clouds of interstellar dust grains pass close enough to neutron stars for the circularly polarized ultraviolet radiation to produce a 10{percent} or higher enantiomeric excess in the organic grain mantles. The time between such close passages is about ten times larger than the average lifetime of the molecular clouds so that the most prestellar and protostellar clouds contain predominantly left or right handed prebiotic molecules. Comets as agglomerated interstellar dust preserve the initial enantiomeric excess. Even if only 0.1{percent} of the comet material survives as small comet dust particles which preserve their prebiotic molecules, there could be {approximately}10{sup 251} chances for life to originate from one of these if it lands in water. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Dust particle formation due to interaction between graphite and helicon deuterium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwashita, Shinya, E-mail: shinya.iwashita@rub.de [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nishiyama, Katsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shiratani, Masaharu, E-mail: siratani@ed.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    The collection of dust particles using divertor simulation helicon plasmas has been carried out to examine dust formation due to the interaction between a graphite target and deuterium plasmas, which are planned to operate in the large helical device (LHD) at the Japanese National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). The collected dust particles are classified into three types: (i) small spherical particles below 400 nm in size, (ii) agglomerates whose primary particles have a size of about 10 nm, and (iii) large flakes above 1 {mu}m in size. These features are quite similar to those obtained through hydrogen plasma operation, indicating that the dust formation mechanisms due to the interaction between a carbon wall and a plasma of deuterium, which is the isotope of hydrogen, is probably similar to those of hydrogen.

  13. Dust generation in powders: Effect of particle size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Somik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between the bulk and grain-scale properties of powders and dust generation. A vortex shaker dustiness tester was used to evaluate 8 calcium carbonate test powders with median particle sizes ranging from 2μm to 136μm. Respirable aerosols released from the powder samples were characterised by their particle number and mass concentrations. All the powder samples were found to release respirable fractions of dust particles which end up decreasing with time. The variation of powder dustiness as a function of the particle size distribution was analysed for the powders, which were classified into three groups based on the fraction of particles within the respirable range. The trends we observe might be due to the interplay of several mechanisms like de-agglomeration and attrition and their relative importance.

  14. Color-based tracking of plasma dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villamayor, Michelle Marie S., E-mail: mvillamayor@nip.upd.edu.ph; Soriano, Maricor N.; Ramos, Henry J. [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Kato, Shuichi; Wada, Motoi [Graduate School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Color-based tracking to observe agglomeration of deposited particles inside a compact planar magnetron during plasma discharge was done by creating high dynamic range (HDR) images of photos captured by a Pentax K10D digital camera. Carbon erosion and redeposition was also monitored using the technique. The HDR images were subjected to a chromaticity-based constraint discoloration inside the plasma chamber indicating film formation or carbon redeposition. Results show that dust deposition occurs first near the evacuation pumps due to the pressure gradient and then accumulates at the positively charged walls of the chamber. This method can be applied to monitor dust formation during dusty plasma experiments without major modification of plasma devices, useful especially for large fusion reactors.

  15. Imaging-based dust sensors: equipment and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Greco, Sonia

    2004-05-01

    Dust detection and control in real time, represent one of the most challenging problem in all those environments where fine and ultrafine airborne particulate solids products are present. The presence of such products can be linked to several factors, often directly related and influenced by the working-production actions performed. Independently from the causes generating dust, airborne contaminants are an occupational problem of increasing interest as they are related to a wide number of diseases. In particular, airborne dusts are well known to be associated with several classical occupational lung diseases, such as the pneumoconiosis, especially at high levels of exposure. Nowadays there is also an increasing interest in other dust related diseases, from the most serious as cancer and asthma, to those related with allergies or irritation and other illnesses, also occurring at lower levels of exposure. Among the different critical factors influencing health risk for airborne dust exposure, mainly four have to be considered, that is: i) nature of the dust resulting from working in terms of presence of specific poisoning material, i.e. free silica, and morphological and morphometrical attributes of particulates constituting airborne dust; ii) size of the particles, iii) duration of exposure time and, finally, iv) airborne dust concentration in the breathing zone where the worker performs his activity. A correct dust detection is not easy, especially if some of the previous mentioned factors, have to be detected and quantified in real time in order to define specific "on-line" control actions aimed to reduce the level of the exposure to dust of the workers, as for example: i) modification of aspirating devices operating condition, change of filtering cleaning sequence, etc. . The more severe are the environmental conditions, in terms of dust presence (in quantity and quality) more difficult is to utilize efficient sampling devices. Detection devices, in fact, tend

  16. APPLICATION OF SPHERICAL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE MICROMERITIC PROPERTIES AND DISSOLUTION CHARACTERISTICS OF NABUMETONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradnya Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed to enhance the solubility and dissolution rate of Nabumetone, 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphalenyl-2-butanone water insoluble anti-inflammatory drug by spherical agglomeration technique using a solvent change method consisting of acetone, water and dichloromethane as solvent, non solvent and bridging liquid respectively. The hydrophilic polymers like poly vinyl pyrrolidone K-30 (PVP and sodium alginate were used in the agglomeration process. Infrared (I.R spectroscopic studies, Differential scanning calorimetery (DSC and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used for characterization of pure drug and its agglomerates. The I.R spectroscopy revealed that there is no chemical interaction between drug and polymers, also indicated that no chemical changes in the crystallized agglomerates .The agglomerates exhibited significantly improved solubility, dissolution rate and micromeritic properties (angle of repose, Carr’s index, bulk density, tapped density. Hausner’s ratio compared with pure drug Nabumetone. The aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of the drug from spherical agglomerates was significantly (p < 0.05 increased (nearly two times. SEM studies revealed that the agglomerates possess a good spherical shape. The study revealed that Micromeritic Properties, Solubility and Invitro drug release rate is increased with increase in PVP concentration from 0.25% to 1% as compared to sodium alginate.

  17. Monitoring of odor nuisance in the tri-city agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicki, Jacek; Dymerski, Tomasz; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes a principle of operation of odor nuisance monitoring network, which is being designed in the tri-city agglomeration. Moreover, it presents the preliminary results of an investigation on ambient air quality with respect to odour nuisance in a vicinity of the municipal landfill. The investigation was performed during spring-winter season using a prototype of electronic nose and the Nasal Ranger field olfactometers. The prototype was equipped with a set of six semiconductor sensors by FIGARO Co. and one PID-type sensor. The field olfactometers were used to determine mean concentration of odorants, which amounted from 2.2 to 30.2 ou/m3 depending on the place of measurement. In case of the investigation with the electronic nose prototype a classification of the ambient air samples with respect to the place of sampling was performed utilizing kNN algorithm supported with a cross-validation method. Correct classification of the ambient air samples was at the level of 66.7%. Performed investigation revealed that discrimination of the ambient air samples differing in concentration of odorants and place of origin was possible.

  18. Gravitational agglomeration of post-HCDA LMFBR nonspherical aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, R. F.

    1980-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of collisional dynamics of two particle interactions in a gravitational field is reported. This research is unique in that it is the first attempt at modeling the hydrodynamic interactions between a nonspherical particle and a spherical particle undergoing gravitational collisions in an LMFBR environment. Basic definitions and expressions are developed for nonspherical particles and related to spherical particles by means of shape factors. Using volume equivalent diameter as the defining length in the gravitational collision kernel, the aerodynamic shape factor, k, the density correction factor, alpha, and the gravitational collision shape factor, beta, are used to correct the collision kernel for the case of collisions between aerosol agglomerates. The Navier-Stokes equation in oblate spheroidal coordinates is solved to model a nonspherical particle and then the dynamic equations for two particle motions are developed. A computer program NGCEFF is constructed, the Navier-Stokes equation is solved by the finite difference method, and the dynamical equations are solved by Gear's method. It is concluded that the aerosol gravitational collision shape factor can be determined by further theoretical work based on the concepts and methods developed in this dissertation.

  19. OUTFLOW AND HOT DUST EMISSION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huiyuan; Xing, Feijun; Wang, Tinggui; Zhou, Hongyan [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Kai [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, Shaohua, E-mail: whywang@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Polar Research Institute of China, Jinqiao Road 451, Shanghai 200136 (China)

    2013-10-10

    Correlations of hot dust emission with outflow properties are investigated, based on a large z ∼ 2 non-broad absorption line quasar sample built from the Wide-field Infrared Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data releases. We use the near-infrared slope and the infrared to UV luminosity ratio to indicate the hot dust emission relative to the emission from the accretion disk. In our luminous quasars, these hot dust emission indicators are almost independent of the fundamental parameters, such as luminosity, Eddington ratio and black hole mass, but moderately dependent on the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) and FWHM of C IV lines. Interestingly, the latter two correlations dramatically strengthen with increasing Eddington ratio. We suggest that, in high Eddington ratio quasars, C IV regions are dominated by outflows so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) can reliably reflect the general properties and velocity of outflows, respectively. In low Eddington ratio quasars, on the other hand, C IV lines are primarily emitted by virialized gas so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) become less sensitive to outflows. Therefore, the correlations for the highest Eddington ratio quasars are more likely to represent the true dependence of hot dust emission on outflows and the correlations for the entire sample are significantly diluted by the low Eddington ratio quasars. Our results show that an outflow with a large BAI or velocity can double the hot dust emission on average. We suggest that outflows either contain hot dust in themselves or interact with the dusty interstellar medium or torus.

  20. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,'' there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  1. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,`` there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  2. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Dale L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  3. Cooperative Game Among Cities in Urban Agglomerations and Economical Sustainable Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shah Weidong

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses redounded profits of cooperation and non-cooperation among cities in urban agglomerations based on game theory. It discusses the problems of economical development among cities with feeble cooperation, and deduces the conclusion that only cooperation of cities produces the maximum profits and realizes Pareto efficiency for cities and urban agglomerations. The paper states that cooperation is the cornerstone of economic sustainable development in urban agglomerations in profits produced by cooperation among cities.Some suggestions to accelerate cooperation among cities are proposed.

  4. Operational Dust Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  5. Daqing Petrochemical Adopted Technology of Agglomeration New Energy Saving Production%Daqing Petrochemical Adopted Technology of Agglomeration New Energy Saving Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    To reduce energy consumption of equipment and exhaust emission to the uttermost, Daqing Petrochemical Company has developed pre-agglomeration production flow successfully and confirmed an optimized energy-saving method of differential pressure agglomeration. For a long time, BR equipment of 80,000 tons per year in Daqing Petrochemical Company have been adopting general isobaric technology and elutriation method to separate polymer and solvent, which caused over 10 tons of steam per ton of rubber and restricted the energy conservation and emission reduction of the enterprise.

  6. Ash agglomeration during fluidized bed gasification of high sulphur content lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, V.; Marinov, S.P.; Lazarov, L.; Stefanova, M. (SRTI Energydesign, Sofia (Bulgaria))

    1992-09-01

    Intensive ash agglomeration has hampered the fluidized bed gasification of lignites from the Elhovo deposit (Bulgaria) containing 5.9 wt% sulphur in the dry state. Samples of slag and agglomerates from the pilot plant have been examined by means of chemical, X-ray analysis, IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Pyrrhotite (FeS) and wustite (FeO) have been established in the agglomerates, where junctions between ash particles have been found to consist of magnetite, spinel and garnet grains. The chemical reactions leading to garnet formation have been studied. Centres of sintering and centres of melting during the ash agglomeration process have been distinguished. The pyrite product, an eutectic of FeS and FeO melting at 924[degree]C, is assumed to be responsible for the cessation of lignite gasification with steam and air under pressure at a bed temperature of 930[degree]. 11 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Mechanism of Agglomerating Development of Industrial Space: A Case Study on Shenzhen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The agglomeration of industries refers to the concentration and aggregation of the same or different industries in a certain area. After analyzing the spatial pattern of the economic activities in the world, it can be found

  8. THE ADSORPTION OF STARCHES ON PRESSURE-SENSITIVE ADHESIVE MATERIAL AND ITS IMPACT ON AGGLOMERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Huo; Richard A.Venditti; Houmin Chang

    2004-01-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) particles, or stickies, will self-agglomerate in water with agitation.Under certain conditions, it was found that some starches and Poly-Diallyldimethylammonium Chloride prevent this agglomeration. Both cationic and neutral starches were found to adsorb onto the surface of the negatively charged stickies. This was determined by infra-red spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and charge titration methods. Cationic charge promotes the adsorption of starch onto the surface of stickies and cationic starches adsorbed on the PSA film do not desorb when exposed for 15 minutes to deionized water at room temperature. Cationic starches were found to prevent the agglomeration of stickies at lower concentrations relative to neutral starches.Stickies compete with fibers for the cationic charge in the system. Over the molecular weight (MW)range studied, the MW of the starch has no effect on the prevention of agglomeration of stickies.

  9. The Integration and Sustainable Development of Chengdu-Chongqing Urban Agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jie; Mao Hanying

    2006-01-01

    Urban Agglomeration is an inevitable outcome of urbanization and industrialization, and a main form of urban development. Based on the analysis of urbanization and urban system situation, this paper will discuss the integration of urban agglomeration development, using the urban area of Cheng (Chengdu)-Yu (Chongqing)Urban agglomeration (CYUA) as a case study. By means of industries, population and spatial integrations, the function, strength and competition of CYUA will be improved and this urban agglomeration will transit from a budding state to a growing and mature one in future. The sustainable development of CYUA will depend on countermeasures, such as accelerating industrialization and urbanization, building a traffic network and express roads, strengthening the ability of self-sufficiency,enlarging the ecological construction and environmental protection, and establishing the synergetic institution of cross districts.

  10. Role of Solvents in Improvement of Dissolution Rate of Drugs: Crystal Habit and Crystal Agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization is often used for manufacturing drug substances. Advances of crystallization have achieved control over drug identity and purity, but control over the physical form remains poor. This review discusses the influence of solvents used in crystallization process on crystal habit and agglomeration of crystals with potential implication for dissolution. According to literature it has been known that habit modification of crystals by use of proper solvents may enhance the dissolution properties by changing the size, number and the nature of crystal faces exposed to the dissolution medium. Also, the faster dissolution rate of drug from the agglomerates of crystals compared with the single crystals may be related to porous structure of the agglomerates and consequently their better wettability. It is concluded from this review that in-depth understanding of role of the solvents in crystallization process can be applied to engineering of crystal habit or crystal agglomeration, and predictably dissolution improvement in poorly soluble drugs.

  11. The capital agglomeration of the Republic of Korea as a fuzzy central place system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pavel P. Em

    2016-01-01

    Explosive urbanization in the Republic of Korea from 1950 to 2010 marked by a growth in extensive urban agglomerations rendered unproductive the approach that was commonly used in the central place...

  12. Agglomeration Evolution of Nano-Particles Aluminium in Normal Incident Shock Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zheng-Xin; WU Jing-He; HU Dong; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2006-01-01

    Agglomeration behaviour of nano-particle aluminium (nano-Al) in normal incident shock waves is investigated by our devised shock tube technology. The morphology, particle size, agglomeration process of nano-Al studied in normal incident shock waves are comprehensible evaluated by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The above-mentioned techniques show that the high strength and temperature of incident shock wave give a chance for activity of nano-Al in the reactions and decrease the agglomeration, and the morphology of agglomeration is affected by the temperature of nano-Al reaction region. The dynamic temperature of reaction region determined by the intensity ratio of two AlO bands is 2602K, which is closer to nano-Al actual reacted temperature than the determined temperature of ordinary methods (i.e. six channel instantaneous optical pyrometer; plank black body radiation law, etc.)

  13. Study on Agglomeration and Densification Behaviors of Gadolinium-Doped Ceria Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    By synthesizing reactive powders via a self-sustaining combustion synthesis, the glycine-nitrate process, the gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) with the chemical formula Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 was prepared. The resultant powders were dispersed with the terpineol as the dispersant through different methods such as ball milling and high-shear dispersing. Coagulation factor (CF) was used to mark the degree of agglomeration on the nano-scale GDC in this work. The effect of agglomeration on the densification behavior at different sintering temperatures was investigated. The studies indicated that agglomeration retarded the densification at the sintering stage. The powders with better dispersion exhibited a higher sintered density at the same temperature. After effective dispersion treatment, GDC could be fully densified at the sintering temperature of 1300 ℃. The densification temperature was significantly lower than those reported previously. The high sintering kinetics of the ceramics was obtained based on the agglomeration control.

  14. Light-Induced Agglomeration and Diffusion of Different Particles with Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-Cong; SUN Xiu-Dong; LIU Hong-Peng; ZHANG Jian-Long

    2010-01-01

    @@ The dynamic process of light-induced agglomeration of carbon nanotubes(CNTs),C60 and Escherichia coli(E.coli)in aqueous solutions is demonstrated using an optical tweezers system.Based on the results,the diameter of the agglomerated region and the agglomeration rate increase with the increasing laser power.After the saturation-stable period,CNTs diffuse completely,C60 dusters only diffuse partially,and E.coli never diffuses in the agglomeration region.Theoretical analyses show that the molecular polarization and thermal diffusion of particles play crucial roles in the diffusion process.The results indicate the possibility of using light to aggregate and sort nanoparticles.

  15. Compactibility of agglomerated mixtures of calcium carbonate and microcrystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón Serra, María de Lourdes; Villafuerte Robles, Leopoldo

    2003-06-04

    The tablet tensile strength (T) of agglomerated mixtures of microcrystalline cellulose-Avicel PH 102 (MC), calcium carbonate (CC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (Povidone, PVP), lubricated with magnesium stearate (MS), and formed under a compaction pressure (P(c)) ranging up to 618MPa has been determined. The compactibility was defined through: ln(-ln(1-T/T(max)))=Slope x lnP(c)+Intercept. MC/CC mixtures added of an agglutinant, before and after lubrication, show an important positive effect on their tablet tensile strength compared to a lineal relationship. This positive effect becomes smaller with decreasing compaction pressures. By different mixing methods, the higher the mixing efficiency the higher the compactibility, following the order: spray-dried>wet massing>tumble mixing. The compactibility of MC/CC/PVP spray-dried mixtures with calcium carbonate content from 20 to 60% was equal to or greater than that of pure microcrystalline cellulose. After lubrication with 2% MS the compactibility decreased, only the mixture with the maximal tablet tensile strength attained the tensile strength of pure microcrystalline cellulose. The presence of the binder, the lubricant and higher compaction pressures allow the accommodation of higher calcium carbonate proportions in the mixtures, at the maximal tablet tensile strength of the series. The lubricant decreases in a greater extent the compactibility of mixtures with a continuous phase of MC/PVP than that of CC/PVP. This is attributed to the plastic behavior of the MC/PVP continuous phase compared to a calcium carbonate continuous phase able to disrupt the Povidone and the possible lubricant coatings allowing a stronger interparticle interaction.

  16. A Comprehensive Quantitative Evaluation of New Sustainable Urbanization Level in 20 Chinese Urban Agglomerations

    OpenAIRE

    Cong Xu; Shixin Wang; Yi Zhou; Litao Wang; Wenliang Liu

    2016-01-01

    On 16 March 2014, the State Council of China launched its first urbanization planning initiative dubbed “National New Urbanization Planning (2014–2020)” (NNUP). NNUP put forward 20 urban agglomerations and a sustainable development approach aiming to transform traditional Chinese urbanization to sustainable new urbanization. This study quantitatively evaluates the level of sustainability of the present new urbanization process in 20 Chinese urban agglomerations and provides some positive sugg...

  17. Tourism agglomeration and its impact on social welfare: an empirical approach to the Spanish case

    OpenAIRE

    Urtasun, Ainhoa; Gutiérrez, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    This paper measures two descriptors of tourism namely, its scale and agglomeration level and subsequently evaluates both descriptors according to their direct and joint impacts on the host communities' quality of life. The key constructs for this research are the following: (1) a tourism evaluation function that incorporates the scale and agglomeration of tourism, which is constructed for each one of the 50 Spanish provinces; and (2) a measure of the host communities' quality of life that com...

  18. An Agglomeration Law for Sorting Networks and its Application in Functional Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Lukas Immanuel Schiller

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we will present a general agglomeration law for sorting networks. Agglomeration is a common technique when designing parallel programmes to control the granularity of the computation thereby finding a better fit between the algorithm and the machine on which the algorithm runs. Usually this is done by grouping smaller tasks and computing them en bloc within one parallel process. In the case of sorting networks this could be done by computing bigger parts of the network with one ...

  19. Making friends with your neighbors? Agglomeration and tacit collusion in the lodging industry

    OpenAIRE

    Li Gan; Manuel A. Hernandez

    2011-01-01

    Agglomeration is a location pattern frequently observed in service industries such as hotels. This paper empirically examines if agglomeration facilitates tacit collusion in the lodging industry using a quarterly dataset of hotels that operated in rural areas across Texas between 2003 and 2005. We jointly model a price and occupancy rate equation under a switching regression model to endogenously identify a collusive and non-collusive regime. The estimation results indicate that clustered hot...

  20. Cell agglomeration in the wells of a 24-well plate using acoustic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashina, Yuta; Takemura, Kenjiro; Friend, James

    2017-02-28

    Cell agglomeration is essential both to the success of drug testing and to the development of tissue engineering. Here, a MHz-order acoustic wave is used to generate acoustic streaming in the wells of a 24-well plate to drive particle and cell agglomeration. Acoustic streaming is known to manipulate particles in microfluidic devices, and even provide concentration in sessile droplets, but concentration of particles or cells in individual wells has never been shown, principally due to the drag present along the periphery of the fluid in such a well. The agglomeration time for a range of particle sizes suggests that shear-induced migration plays an important role in the agglomeration process. Particles with a diameter of 45 μm agglomerated into a suspended pellet under exposure to 2.134 MHz acoustic waves at 1.5 W in 30 s. Additionally, BT-474 cells also agglomerated as adherent masses at the center bottom of the wells of tissue-culture treated 24-well plates. By switching to low cell binding 24-well plates, the BT-474 cells formed suspended agglomerations that appeared to be spheroids, fully fifteen times larger than any cell agglomerates without the acoustic streaming. In either case, the viability and proliferation of the cells were maintained despite acoustic irradiation and streaming. Intermittent excitation was effective in avoiding temperature excursions, consuming only 75 mW per well on average, presenting a convenient means to form fully three-dimensional cellular masses potentially useful for tissue, cancer, and drug research.

  1. Stone dusting process advance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Ryan; David Humphreys [Mining Attachments (Qld.) Pty Ltd. (Australia)

    2009-01-15

    The coal mining industry has, for many years, used dry stone dust or calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) in the prevention of the propagation of coal dust explosions throughout their underground mines in Australia. In the last decade wet stone dusting has been introduced. This is where stone dust and water are mixed together to form a paste like slurry. This mixture is pumped and sprayed on to the underground roadway surfaces. This method solved the contamination of the intake airways but brought with it a new problem known as 'caking'. Caking is the hardened layer that is formed as the stone dust slurry dries. It was proven that this hardened layer compromises the dispersal characteristics of the stone dust and therefore its ability to suppress a coal dust explosion. This project set out to prove a specially formulated, non toxic slurry additive and process that could overcome the caking effect. The slurry additive process combines dry stone dust with water to form a slurry. The slurry is then treated with the additive and compressed air to create a highly vesicular foam like stone dusted surface. The initial testing on a range of additives and the effectiveness in minimising the caking effect of wet dusting were performed at Applied Chemical's research laboratory in Melbourne, Victoria and independently tested at the SGS laboratory in Paget, Queensland. The results from these tests provided the platform to conduct full scale spraying trials at the Queensland Mines Rescue Station and Caledon Coal's Cook Colliery, Blackwater. The project moved into the final stage of completion with the collection of data. The intent was to compare the slurry additive process to dry stone dusting in full-scale methane explosions at the CSIR Kloppersbos explosion facility in Kloppersbos, South Africa.

  2. Developmental research study of coal-fines agglomeration for fixed-bed gasification. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmquist, S.A.; Girimont, J.A.; Korosi, F.A.; Kuby, O.A.; Nelson, S.G.; Paulin, M.O.; Peterson, C.A.; Baker, R.L.; Saller, E.

    1983-05-31

    This report presents the results of an intensive program to develop and evaluate agglomerates made from coal fines for use in a fixed-bed gasifier. There were several tasks completed earlier and their results published prior to this final report. These included: Task 1-A, a literature survey of coal agglomeration, binders and techniques used in coal agglomeration, coal and binder treatments and the results of work done by others; Task 1-B, an examination of performance of lump coals in coal gasification, testing and evaluation of the properties of these coals, and evaluation of mine site coal upgrading methods; and Task 1-C/D, a laboratory investigation of coal agglomerates, including wafers, briquettes and pellets, in which the agglomerated coal fines were formed and tested, and the performance of various coal/binder combinations was recorded and evaluated, and factors affecting commercial scale coal agglomeration and gasification were evaluated. These three prior tasks are presented in this report in condensed form.

  3. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A.; Shcherbina, M.E. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, P.G., E-mail: qzzzma@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirichenko, N.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser irradiation of dense gold nanoparticles colloidal solution can result in their agglomeration. • Gas bubbles in-phase pulsation induced by laser radiation accounts for nanoparticles agglomeration. • Time evolution of the size distribution function proceeds in activation mode. • The electrostatic-like model of nanoparticles agglomeration is in good correspondence with the experimental data. - Abstract: Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 10{sup 14} particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  4. Study on the Policy Factors of Innovative Talents Agglomeration in Jiangsu Province based on Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wenfei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Innovative talent is the key factor to promote the development of innovative economy and realize innovative drive in Jiangsu Province. Innovative talent agglomeration can fully play the effect of innovative talents through the agglomeration efficiency. Among many factors that affect the agglomeration of innovative talents, the guiding role of government policy factors is becoming more and more important. Based on the survey of domestic and foreign literature, through questionnaire survey, this paper combines relevant analysis and regression analysis to study the mechanism between the of scientific research funds investment, household registration policy, outstanding achievement award and patent licensing and the innovative talent agglomeration. The results show that the investment of scientific research funds, the household registration policy, the outstanding achievement award and the patent authorization have remarkable influence on the innovation talent agglomeration. The conclusion of this study not only expands the theoretical research field of government policy and innovative talent agglomeration, but also provides practical guidance for the government of Jiangsu Province in the era of innovation knowledge.

  5. A Study on the Density of Agglomerates Prepared from Cork Wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The density of black regranulate (BR) of cork and of black agglomerate (BA) and composite agglomerate (CA) prepared fromsuch a waste by different methods was investigated. The preparation of the agglomerates was undertaken by controlling thespecimen thickness for BA and the particle size for BR and the binder dosage for CA. The mass changes produced in theoven-drying treatment at 376.15 K of the agglomerates and in their subsequent stabilization under ambient conditions werealso analyzed. The density was determined by standard methods. For BR, the bulk density first decreased and then increasedwith decreasing particle size. It was much lower than the apparent density of the agglomeration products of cork. Although toa lesser extent, the density was also lower for BA than for CA. It was higher for the smaller thickness specimens of BA. In thecase of CA, the density followed the same variation trends as for BR. Furthermore it increased significantly with the increasein resin dosage. This resulted in a noticeable increase in the weight loss during the oven-drying and in a significant decreasein the degree of moisture adsorption during the stabilization period of the agglomerate.

  6. Design of Agglomerated Crystals of Ibuprofen During Crystallization: Influence of Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sIbuprofen is a problematic drug in tableting, and dissolution due to its poor solubility, hydrophobicity, and tendency to stick to surface. Because of the bad compaction behavior ibuprofen has to be granulated usually before tableting. However, it would be more satisfactory to obtain directly during the crystallization step crystalline particles that can be directly compressed and quickly dissolved. Materials and Methods Crystallization of ibuprofen was carried out using the quasi emulsion solvent diffusion method in presence of surfactant (sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS, Tween 80. The particles were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD and were evaluated for particle size, flowability, drug release and tableting behavior. ResultsIbuprofen particles obtained in the presence of surfactants consisted of numerous plate- shaped crystals which had agglomerated together as near spherical shape. The obtained agglomerates exhibited significantly improved micromeritic properties as well as tableting behavior than untreated drug crystals. The agglomerates size and size distribution was largely controlled by surfactant concentration, but there was no significant influence found on the tableting properties. The dissolution tests showed that the agglomerates obtained in presence of SLS exhibited enhanced dissolution rate while the agglomerates made in the presence of Tween 80 had no significant impact on dissolution rate of ibuprofen in comparison to untreated sample. The XRPD and DSC results showed that during the agglomeration process, ibuprofen did not undergo any polymorphic changes.Conclusion The study highlights the influence of surfactants on crystallization process leading to modified performance.

  7. Effect of the Additives on the Desulphurization Rate of Flash Hydrated and Agglomerated CFB Fly Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D. X.; Li, H. L.; Xu, M.; Lu, J. F.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, J. S.; Yue, G. X.

    CFB fly ash from separators was mixed with water or the mixture of water and additives under the temperature of 363K by use of a blender. Then, this compound of fly ash and water or additives was pumped into a CFB combustion chamber by a sludge pump. Because the temperature of flue gas was high in CFB, the fly ash was hydrated fast and agglomerated in the same time. Through this process, the size of agglomerating fly ash is larger than the original particle and the relative residence time of agglomerated fly ash in CFB becomes longer. Therefore, the rate of utility of calcium in fly ash improves and the content of carbon in fly ash decreases. This results in a low Ca/S and low operational cost for CFB boiler. The additive is one key factor, which affects the rate of desulfurization of agglomerated fly ash. Effect of different additives on rate of desulfurization is not same. Cement and limestone are beneficiated to sulfur removal of agglomerated fly ash, but sodium silicate does not devote to the rate of sulfur removal of agglomerated fly ash.

  8. Analysis of Agglomeration of Al2O3 Particles in Liquid Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalisz D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The removal of non-metallic inclusions from liquid steel is a result of co-operation of fluctuation, adhesion and agglomeration effects, with emphasis on agglomeration which plays the most important role. It is based on a few types of collisions between non-metallic particles, where turbulent collisions are most prominent. As a result of agglomeration, nonmetallic inclusions are intensely removed through flotation and increase of different dimensions of inclusions, which manifests itself with the occurrence of clusters mainly composed of Al2O3 precipitations. Authors investigated the agglomeration effect by making computer simulations with the use of the PSG method. The calculations were performed for a definite population of spherical particles of radius r in the steel volume. The applied calculation method allows for analyzing the dynamics of the collision process. The assumed initial number of particles remains constant, only the number of particles in specific size-groups varies. It was also revealed that the process of agglomerates formation is much faster for particles having a bigger initial radius. In the case of very small precipitations (r=1 μm their removal through agglomeration is very difficult because the probability those collisions can take place between them rapidly decreases.

  9. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  10. Dust escape from Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    The Dust ballerina skirt is a set of well defined streams composed of nanometric sized dust particles that escape from the Jovian system and may be accelerated up to >=200 km/s. The source of this dust is Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar system. The escape of dust grains from Jupiter requires first the escape of these grains from Io. This work is basically devoted to explain this escape given that the driving of dust particles to great heights and later injection into the ionosphere of Io may give the particles an equilibrium potential that allow the magnetic field to accelerate them away from Io. The grain sizes obtained through this study match very well to the values required for the particles to escape from the Jovian system.

  11. Galactic dust properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for variations in the dust emissivity law with temperature and wavelength. A recent dust emission model, called TLS model (for two-level systems), based on the description of the disordered internal structure of the amorphous dust grains has been developped to interpret observations in the far-infrared/submillimeter (FIR/submm) domain. A recent work focusing on the comparison between data of the diffuse interstellar medium seen by FIRAS-WMAP, as well as Archeops compact sources, with the TLS model allowed us to constrain the model parameters characterizing the general Galactic dust properties. Using the newly available Herschel/Hi-GAL data of the inner Galactic plane, we report a 500 μm emissivity excess in the peripheral parts of the Galactic plane, that can reach up to 20% of the emissivity. Results of the TLS modeling indicate significant changes in the dust properties from the central to peripheral parts of the Galactic plane.

  12. Biomass equipments. Dryers. Drying, crushing, agglomeration of agro-industrial products; Materiels pour la biomasse. Les secheurs, sechage, broyage, agglomeration de produits agro-industriels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deur, O. [Promill (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the French Promill Company activity in the design and manufacturing of complete drying-crushing-agglomerating units for agro-industrial products (pulp of beet, lucerne, etc..). The paper focusses on the thermal and mechanical efficiency of the high temperature dryer and on the pulp granulating squeezer. (J.S.)

  13. Preparation of sustained release matrix pellets by melt agglomeration in the fluidized bed: influence of formulation variables and modelling of agglomerate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli-Bruns, Anette; Knop, Klaus; Lippold, Bernhard C

    2010-03-01

    The one-step preparation of sustained release matrix pellets, using a melting procedure in a fluidized bed apparatus, was tested in a 2(3) full factorial design of experiments, using microcrystalline wax as lipophilic binder, theophylline as model drug and talc as additional matrix forming agent. The three influence parameters were (A) size of binder particles, (B) fraction of theophylline in solid particles and (C) fraction of microcrystalline wax in formulation. The response variables were agglomerate size and size distribution, dissolution time, agglomerate crush resistance, sphericity, yield and porosity. Nearly spherical pellets comprising a smooth, closed surface could be obtained with the used method, exhibiting the hollow core typical for the immersion and layering mechanism. The reproducibility was very good concerning all responses. The size of agglomerates is proportional to the size of the binder particles, which serve as cores for pellet formation in the molten state in the fluidized bed. Additionally, the agglomerate size is influenced by the volume of the solid particles in relation to the binder particles, with more solid particles leading to larger agglomerates and vice versa. Dissolution times vary in a very wide range, resulting from the interplay between amount of drug in relation to the meltable matrix substance microcrystalline wax and the non-meltable matrix substance talc. The change of binder particle size does not lead to a structural change of the matrix; both dissolution times and porosity are not significantly altered. Agglomerate crush resistance is low due to the hollow core of the pellets. However, it is significantly increased if the volume fraction of microcrystalline wax in the matrix is high, which means that the matrix is mechanically better stabilized. A theoretical model has been established to quantitatively explain agglomerate growth and very good accordance of the full particle size distributions between predicted and

  14. TEM analysis of the internal structures and mineralogy of Asian dust particles and the implications for optical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Y. Jeong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere. This interaction depends on the microphysical properties of the dust particles, including size, mineral composition, external morphology, and internal structure. Ideally all these properties should be accounted for in dust remote sensing, the modeling of single-scattering properties, and radiative effect assessment. There have been many reports on the microphysical characterizations of mineral dust, but no investigations of the internal structures or mineral composition of individual dust particles. We explored the interiors of Asian dust particles using the combined application of focused ion beam thin-slice preparation and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that individual dust particles consisted of numerous mineral grains, which were organized into several types of internal structure: single and polycrystalline cores of quartz, feldspars, calcite, and amphibole often with oriented clay coatings; individual clay agglomerates of nano-thin clay platelets showing preferred to random orientations commonly with coarser mineral inclusions; and platy coarse phyllosilicates (muscovite, biotite, and chlorite. Micron to submicron pores were scattered throughout the interior of particles. Clays in the coatings and agglomerates were dominated by nano-thin platelets of the clay minerals of illite-smectite series including illite, smectite, and their mixed layers with subordinate kaolinite and clay-size chlorite. Submicron iron oxide grains, dominantly goethite, were distributed throughout the clay agglomerates and coatings. Unlike the common assumptions and simplifications, we found that the analyzed dust particles were irregularly shaped with birefringent, polycrystalline, and polymineralic heterogeneous compositions. Accounting for this structural and mineralogical makeup may improve the remote sensing retrieval of dust and the

  15. TEM analysis of the internal structures and mineralogy of Asian dust particles and the implications for optical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, G. Y.; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-07-01

    Mineral dust interacts with incoming/outgoing electromagnetic radiation in the atmosphere. This interaction depends on the microphysical properties of the dust particles, including size, mineral composition, external morphology, and internal structure. Ideally all of these properties should be accounted for in the remote sensing of dust, the modeling of single-scattering properties, and radiative effect assessment. There have been many reports on the microphysical characterizations of mineral dust, but no investigations of the internal structures of individual dust particles. We explored the interiors of Asian dust particles using the combined application of focused ion beam thin-slice preparation and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that individual dust particles consisted of numerous mineral grains, which were organized into several types of internal structure: single and polycrystalline cores of quartz, feldspars, calcite, and amphibole often with oriented clay coatings; individual clay agglomerates of nano-thin clay platelets showing preferred to random orientations common with coarser mineral inclusions; and platy coarse phyllosilicates (muscovite, biotite, and chlorite). Micron to submicron pores were scattered throughout the interior of particles. Clays in the coatings and agglomerates were dominated by nano-thin platelets of the clay minerals of illite-smectite series including illite, smectite, and their mixed layers with subordinate kaolinite and clay-sized chlorite. Submicron iron oxide grains, dominantly goethite, were distributed throughout the clay agglomerates and coatings. Unlike the common assumptions and simplifications, we found that the analyzed dust particles were irregularly shaped with birefringent, polycrystalline, and polymineralic heterogeneous compositions. Accounting for this structural and mineralogical makeup may improve the remote sensing retrieval of dust and the evaluation of radiation effects

  16. Boundary Layer Dust Occurrence IV Atmospheric Dust Over Selected Geographical Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    San Marcos, Colombia 4 San Salvador/Ilopango, El Savador 4 Santa Elena, Venezuela 4 Santa Rosa de Copan, Honduras °> Sariwon, North Korea 4...Nicolo, Italy 4 Vienna, Austria 4 Villa Cisneros , Spanish Sahara 1, 37 Vrf Omul, Rumania 4 Wittenberge, East Germany 4 Wonsan, North Korea 4

  17. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  18. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, F. Q.L. [Grinnell College, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  19. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, F. Q.L.; John, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Calle, C. I.

    2011-01-20

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  20. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, F. Q. L.; John, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Calle, C. I.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 cu mm volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales 1 s).

  1. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  2. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  3. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  4. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  5. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  6. Temperature-Switchable Agglomeration of Magnetic Particles Designed for Continuous Separation Processes in Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Anja S; Heinzler, Raphael; Ooi, Huey Wen; Franzreb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was the synthesis and characterization of thermally switchable magnetic particles for use in biotechnological applications such as protein purification and enzymatic conversions. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization was employed to synthesize poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes via a "graft-from" approach on the surface of magnetic microparticles. The resulting particles were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis and their temperature-dependent agglomeration behavior was assessed. The influence of several factors on particle agglomeration (pH, temperature, salt type, and particle concentration) was evaluated. The results showed that a low pH value (pH 3-4), a kosmotropic salt (ammonium sulfate), and a high particle concentration (4 g/L) resulted in improved agglomeration at elevated temperature (40 °C). Recycling of particles and reversibility of the temperature-switchable agglomeration were successfully demonstrated for ten heating-cooling cycles. Additionally, enhanced magnetic separation was observed for the modified particles. Ionic monomers were integrated into the polymer chain to create end-group functionalized particles as well as two- and three-block copolymer particles for protein binding. The adsorption of lactoferrin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme to these ion exchange particles was evaluated and showed a binding capacity of up to 135 mg/g. The dual-responsive particles combined magnetic and thermoresponsive properties for switchable agglomeration, easy separability, and efficient protein adsorption.

  7. Effect of Rubber Nanoparticle Agglomeration on Properties of Thermoplastic Vulcanizates during Dynamic Vulcanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanguang Wu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the dispersed rubber microparticles in ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM/polypropylene (PP thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs are actually agglomerates of rubber nanoparticles. In this study, based on this new understanding of the microstructure of TPV, we further revealed the microstructure-properties relationship of EPDM/PP TPV during dynamic vulcanization, especially the effect of the size of rubber nanoparticle agglomerates (dn, the thicknesses of PP ligaments (IDpoly and the rubber network on the properties of EPDM/PP TPV. We were able to simultaneously obtain a high tensile strength, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and elasticity for the EPDM/PP TPV by the achievement of a smaller dn, a thinner IDpoly and a denser rubber network. Interestingly, the effect of dn and IDpoly on the elastic modulus of EPDM/PP TPV composed of rubber nanoparticle agglomerates is different from that of EPDM/PP TPVs composed of rubber microparticles reported previously. The deformation behavior of the TPVs during stretching was studied to understand the mechanism for the achievement of good mechanical properties. Interestingly, the rubber nanoparticle agglomerates are oriented along the tensile direction during stretching. The TPV samples with smaller and more numerous rubber nanoparticle agglomerates can slow down the development of voids and cracks more effectively, thus leading to increase in tensile strength and elongation at break of the EPDM/PP TPV.

  8. Development of standards and a cost model for coal agglomeration and related studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.G.; Kuby, O.A.; Korosi, F.A.; Paulin, M.O.

    1982-02-26

    Several topics concerning coal agglomeration and fixed-bed coal gasification, as they relate to an agglomeration-process development program presently being performed for the Department of Energy, are discussed in this report. Specific topics include an examination of the performance of coals in fixed-bed gasifiers, the development of properties' standards by which agglomerates produced in the program may be compared, the development of a cost model to judge the economic feasibility of coal agglomeration for potential users and the maximum binder levels to be considered in the program, the definition of a suitable briquette size for coal gasification, and a study of upgrading methods at the mines to improve agglomeration. Extensive property data and the results of a number of special tests on six coals (Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, Wyoming Bighorn subbituminous coal, Montana Rosebud No. 14 subbituminous coal, North Dakota Indian Head lignite and Pennsylvania Nanoth anthracite coal) and on FMC formcoke and Simplex briquettes are reported.

  9. THE EFFECT OF OFFSET PRINTING INK ON LASER TONER INK AGGLOMERATION UNDER NEUTRAL PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Xie,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available 1-octadecanol is known to be a highly effective agglomerating agent for laser toner ink. However, the office waste paper used in the actual production often contains various types of inks. The effect of the offset ink and types of surfactants with different charge characteristics were studied relative to the agglomeration of the laser toner ink under neutral pulping conditions. It was found that the addition of a small amount of the offset ink printed waste paper was beneficial for the agglomeration of the laser toner ink. The optimal percentage of addition is 12.5% to 25%. The offset printed ink had a positive charge of 0.001±0.0005 mEq/g when the offset ink was treated by 70˚C water at neutral conditions. Addition of a proper amount of cationic surfactant was beneficial to improve the agglomeration at any ratio of the mixed laser printed and offset waste papers. When the percentage of offset waste paper was less than 50%, the addition of anionic surfactant and nonionic surfactant was harmful for agglomeration, and there was no significant effect at higher offset content.

  10. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1997-01-15

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 {micro}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In this investigation a hybrid process--Micro-agglomerate flotation--which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation was studied. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles and to use froth flotation to separate these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units will be relatively large agglomerates (30--50 {micro}m in size) rather than fine coal particles (1--10 {micro}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is demonstrated in this study that the process is very sensitive to fluctuations in operating parameters. It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases as well as the agitation conditions in order to promote selectivity. Both kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors play a critical role in determining overall system response.

  11. Effect of sample container morphology on agglomeration dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Dae Seong; Kim, Hack Jin [Dept. of Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been used extensively in medical and biological applications, and agglomeration of magnetic nanoparticles is employed in the purification of water and proteins. The magnetic weight can be measured with a conventional electronic balance. Details of the experimental setup have been previously reported. That is, complex energy landscape involved in the agglomeration is changing with progress. Simulation of colloidal magnetic particles under magnetic field shows that the chain of particles is energetically more favorable than the ring and that the transition barrier between the chain and the ring is very low. The energy barriers among entangled nanoparticles of the agglomerate seem to be much more complicated than those among colloidal particles. The energy barrier distributions at 1000 min are similar for the two containers; however, the trend of blue shift and broadening is much more evident in the case of conical tube. These results indicate that the potential energy surface for agglomeration is modified more significantly in the conical tube which makes the agglomerate denser.

  12. Novorossiysk agglomeration landscapes and cement production: geochemical impact assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseenko, A. V.; Pashkevich, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    The article deals with assessing the environmental impact of marl mining and cement production in Novorossiysk city (Krasnodar krai, Russia). The existing methods of studying the environmental effects caused by the cement industry have been reviewed. Soil and aquatic vegetation sampling has been carried out and the gross concentration of metals in the samples has been defined. The research has been conducted in the certified and accredited laboratory using emission spectral analysis. The external control has been carried out via X-ray fluorescence analysis. Based on the collected data, main chemical pollutants in soil cover and water area near the cement plant have been identified. The contaminants released by urban enterprises and motor vehicle emissions, as well as fugitive dust from dumps and the cement factory, lead to multi-element lithogeochemical anomaly at geochemical barriers in soils. Accumulation of pollutants in soil depends on the type of land use and the area relief. The most contaminated aquatic landscapes have been identified in the inner bay. According to this information, the technical proposals can be prepared for environmental safety management in strongly polluted city areas, as well as for the reclamation design in the areas currently experiencing the negative impact of cement production.

  13. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  14. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  15. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  16. THE EFFECT OF CHARGE AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS ON LASER TONER AGGLOMERATION UNDER ALKALINE PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Jiang,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale agglomeration experiments followed by image analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of different cationic surfactants on the 1-octadecanol agglomeration of a negatively charged laser toner. Various types of surfactants with different geometric structures were investigated. It was found that this toner became agglomerated under neutral pulping conditions, but it did not agglomerate under alkaline conditions at all. A small amount of the cationic surfactant compensated for the agglomeration disruption caused by the negative surface charge of the toner and made this toner agglomerate very well. These cationic surfactants consist of a chemical structure of C12 to C18 saturated alkyl hydrophobic chains. The positive charge of these surfactants played the major role in alleviating agglomeration disruption. Additionally, an extra phenol group on these surfactants contributed only minor advantages for toner agglomeration in the presence of 1-octadecanol. The best co-agglomeration performance occurred within a very narrow range of similar total positive charge densities based on the total toner weight. It was also found that this positive charge effect could not be applied to the chemical compounds of high molecular weight polymeric materials.

  17. Biomass-Ash-Induced Agglomeration in a Fluidized Bed. Part 1: Experimental Study on the Effects of a Gas Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    . Understanding of the agglomeration in various atmospheres is crucial to optimize the design and operation conditions. This study focuses on the effects of gases on agglomeration tendency with different types of biomass, including corn straw, rice straw, and wheat straw. The biomass ash samples are mixed...... atmospheres are much lower than that in air. It appears that, in a steam atmosphere, the agglomeration of corn straw and rice straw ash is predominantly coating-induced. The agglomeration in both H2 and air atmospheres are melting-induced. In a H2 atmosphere, K2SO4 in the ash samples disappears, caused...

  18. Dust Versus Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, A N

    1999-01-01

    Two groups have recently discovered a statistically significant deviation in the fluxes of high-redshift type Ia supernovae from the predictions of a Friedmann model with zero cosmological constant. This letter argues that bright, dusty, starburst galaxies would preferentially eject a dust component with a shallower opacity curve (hence less reddening) and a higher opacity/mass than the observed galactic dust which is left behind. Such dust could cause the falloff in flux at high-z without violating constraints on reddening or metallicity. The specific model presented is of needle-like dust, which is expected from the theory of crystal growth and has been detected in samples of interstellar dust. Carbon needles with conservative properties can supply the necessary opacity, and would very likely be ejected from galaxies as required. The model is not subject to the arguments given in the literature against grey dust, but may be constrained by future data from supernova searches done at higher redshift, in clust...

  19. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Michael; Uhlemann, Cora; Haugg, Thomas, E-mail: michael.kopp@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: cora.uhlemann@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: thomas.haugg@physik.lmu.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, Theresienstr. 37, Munich, 80333 (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves.

  20. Reasons and remedies for the agglomeration of multilayered graphene and carbon nanotubes in polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Rasheed; Inam, Fawad

    2016-01-01

    One of the main issues in the production of polymer nanocomposites is the dispersion state of filler as multilayered graphene (MLG) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) tend to agglomerate due to van der Waals forces. The agglomeration can be avoided by using organic solvents, selecting suitable dispersion and production methods, and functionalizing the fillers. Another proposed method is the use of hybrid fillers as synergistic effects can cause an improvement in the dispersion state of the fillers. In this review article, various aspects of each process that can help avoid filler agglomeration and improve dispersion state are discussed in detail. This review article would be helpful for both current and prospective researchers in the field of MLG- and CNT-based polymer nanocomposites to achieve maximum enhancement in mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of produced polymer nanocomposites.

  1. Numerical Modelling of Agglomeration and Deagglomeration in Dry Powder Inhalers: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiecheng; Wu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Numerical modelling using computational fluid mechanics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM) becomes increasingly prevalent for the exploration of agglomeration and deagglomeration in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). These techniques provide detailed information on air flow and particle-particle/wall interaction, respectively. Coupling of CFD and DEM enables an in-depth investigation of the mechanisms at the microscopic level. This paper reviews the applications of CFD and DEM in DPI development and optimisation. The recent progress in modelling of two key processes in DPIs, i.e. agglomeration and deagglomeration, is presented. It has been demonstrated that DEM-CFD is a promising numerical approach to investigate the underlying agglomeration and deagglomeration mechanisms for DPIs. With further advances in computing capacity, it is expected that DEM-CFD will be capable of addressing more realistic and complicated issues in DPI improvement.

  2. Effect of agglomeration during coprecipitation: Delayed spinellization of magnesium aluminate hydrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soumen Pal; A K Bandyopadhyay; S Mukherjee; B N Samaddar; P G Pal

    2010-08-01

    Precipitation of magnesium aluminate hydrate with faster addition of ammonia at desired pH causes agglomeration. Agglomerated powder, without any further treatment, on calcination forms intermediate compounds at low temperatures (≤ 900°C). The intermediate compounds on further heat treatment (≥ 1000°C) decompose into MgO, MgAl2O4 and -Al2O3. Effect of agglomeration and absorption of foreign ions such as Cl–, SO$^{2-}_{4}$, and NH$^{+}_{4}$ in complex compounds probably cause loss of Al3+ and Mg2+ ions during heat treatment, and stoichiometry changes. Powders prepared by continuous method with better control of process parameters than batch process yields better spinellization.

  3. Reasons and remedies for the agglomeration of multilayered graphene and carbon nanotubes in polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheed Atif

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the main issues in the production of polymer nanocomposites is the dispersion state of filler as multilayered graphene (MLG and carbon nanotubes (CNTs tend to agglomerate due to van der Waals forces. The agglomeration can be avoided by using organic solvents, selecting suitable dispersion and production methods, and functionalizing the fillers. Another proposed method is the use of hybrid fillers as synergistic effects can cause an improvement in the dispersion state of the fillers. In this review article, various aspects of each process that can help avoid filler agglomeration and improve dispersion state are discussed in detail. This review article would be helpful for both current and prospective researchers in the field of MLG- and CNT-based polymer nanocomposites to achieve maximum enhancement in mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of produced polymer nanocomposites.

  4. Study of the temperature evolution of defect agglomerates in neutron irradiated molybdenum single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambri, O.A. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario. Member of the CONICET' s Research Staff, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: olambri@fceia.unr.edu.ar; Zelada-Lambri, G.I. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Cuello, G.J. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain); Bozzano, P.B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica. Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    Small angle neutron scattering as a function of temperature, differential thermal analysis, electrical resistivity and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed in low rate neutron irradiated single crystalline molybdenum, at room temperature, for checking the evolution of the defects agglomerates in the temperature interval between room temperature and 1200 K. The onset of vacancies mobility was found to happen in temperatures within the stage III of recovery. At around 550 K, the agglomerates of vacancies achieve the largest size, as determined from the Guinier approximation for spherical particles. In addition, the decrease of the vacancy concentration together with the dissolution of the agglomerates at temperatures higher than around 920 K was observed, which produce the release of internal stresses in the structure.

  5. A Novel Equivalent Agglomeration Model for Heat Conduction Enhancement in Nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jize; Zheng, Liancun; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multilevel equivalent agglomeration (MEA) model in which all particles in an irregular cluster are treated as a new particle with equivalent volume, the liquid molecules wrapping the cluster and in the gaps are considered to assemble on the surface of new particle as mixing nanolayer (MNL), the thermal conductivity in MNL is assumed to satisfy exponential distribution. Theoretical predictions for thermal conductivity enhancement are highly in agreement with the classical experimental data. Also, we first try to employ TEM information quantitatively to offer probable reference agglomeration ratio (not necessary a very precise value) to just test rational estimations range by present model. The comparison results indicate the satisfactory priori agglomeration ratio estimations range from renovated model. PMID:26777389

  6. FORMATION MECHANISM AND SPATIAL PATTERN OF URBAN AGGLOMERATION IN CENTRAL JILIN OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Gan; ZHANG Ping-yu; JIAO Bin

    2006-01-01

    Urban agglomeration is made up of cities with different sizes to be linked by traffic network in a given area, and it is an inevitable result when urbanization reaches a certain level. Taking urban agglomerationin central Jilin(UACJ) as an example, this article analyzes the formation mechanism and spatial pattern of urban agglomeration in the less-developed area. First, the dynamics of UACJ has been analyzed from the aspects of geographical condition, economic foundation, policy background, and traffic condition. Then the development process is divided into three stages-single city, city group and city cluster. Secondly, the central cities are identified from the aspects of city centrality, and the development axes are classified based on economic communication capacity. Finally, the urban agglomeration is divided into five urban economic regions in order to establish the reasonable distribution of industries.

  7. On the Mechanism of Ultrasound-Driven Deagglomeration of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Aluminum Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashova, Olga; Vorozhtsov, Sergey

    2016-05-01

    One of the promising directions in the technology of composite alloys with improved mechanical properties is reinforcement of the metallic matrix with nanopowders introduced in the liquid metal. Ultrasonic processing is known to significantly improve the introduction of submicrone particles to the metallic melt. This study focuses on the mechanisms of deagglomeration and wettability of such particles by the melt under the action of ultrasound. The suggested mechanism involves the penetration of the liquid metal into the pores and cracks of the agglomerates under the excess pressure created by imploding cavitation bubbles and further destruction of the agglomerate by the sound wave. The main dependences connecting the acoustic parameters and processing time with the physical and chemical properties of particles and the melt are obtained through analytical modeling. The mathematical description of the ultrasonic deagglomeration in liquid metal is presented; a dependence of the threshold intensity of ultrasound for the break-up of agglomerates on their size is reported.

  8. Internal migration, regional labor markets and the role of agglomeration economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo Friedel; Schmidt, Torben Dall

    2015-01-01

    for the role of space–time dynamic adjustment processes and simultaneity among migration and labor market variables and finally test for heterogeneity in the migration response to regional labor market disparities among low- and high-skilled migrants. Our results support the view that agglomeration economies......We analyze the determinants and regional implications of internal migration flows across Danish municipalities in 2006–2012. Besides assessing the role of labor market and housing market factors in driving a region’s net migration rate, we particularly focus on agglomeration factors identified...... by “new” migration theories related to regional growth models and the new economic geography. The work contributes to the field in the following way: we extend the scarce literature on the different channels through which agglomeration economies act as an attractor for mobile labor. Moreover, we account...

  9. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  10. Experimental and modeling researches of dust particles in the HL-2A tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄治辉; 严龙文; 冨田幸博; 冯震; 程钧; 洪文玉; 潘宇东; 杨青巍; 段旭如

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of dust particle characteristics in fusion devices has become more and more imperative. In the HL-2A tokamak, the morphologies and compositions of dust particles are analyzed by using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) with mapping. The results indicate that the sizes of dust particles are in a range from 1 µm to 1 mm. Surprisingly, the stainless steel spheres with a diameter of 2.5 µm–30 µm are obtained. Production mechanism of the dust particles includes flaking, disintegration, agglomeration, and arcing. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the flaking dust particles are observed by a CMOS fast framing camera and simulated by a computer program. Both of the results display that the ion friction force is dominant in the toroidal direction, while the centrifugal force is crucial in the radial direction. Therefore, the visible dust particles are accelerated toriodally by the ion friction force and migrated radially by the centrifugal force. The averaged velocity of the grain is on the order of∼100 m/s. These results provide an additional supplement for one of critical plasma-wall interaction (PWI) issues in the framework of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of self-agglomeration of charged fullerenes in solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soumik

    2013-01-28

    The agglomeration of fullerenes in solvents is an important phenomenon that is relevant to controlled synthesis of fullerene-based nanowires as well as fullerene-based composites. The molecular aggregation in solvents depends on the atomistic interactions of fullerene with the solvent and is made complicated by the fact that fullerenes accrue negative surface charges when present in solvents such as water. In the present work, we simulated fullerenes of varying size and shape (C60, C180, C240, and C540) with and without surface charges in polar protic (water), polar aprotic (acetone), and nonpolar (toluene) solvents using molecular dynamics method. Our results demonstrate that uncharged fullerenes form agglomerates in polar solvents such as water and acetone and remain relatively dispersed in nonpolar toluene. The presence of surface charge significantly reduces agglomerate size in water and acetone. Additionally, the relative influence of surface charge on fullerene agglomeration depends on the size and geometry of the fullerene with larger fullerenes forming relatively smaller agglomerates. We evaluated the diffusion coefficients of solvent molecules within the solvation shell of fullerenes and observed that they are much lower than the bulk solvent and are strongly associated with the fullerenes as seen in the corresponding radial distribution functions. To correlate agglomerate size with the binding energy between fullerenes, we evaluated the potential of mean force between fullerenes in each solvent. Consistent with the solubility of fullerenes, binding energy between fullerenes is the greatest in water followed by acetone and toluene. The presence of charge decreases the binding energy of fullerenes in water and thus results in dispersed fullerenes.

  12. Agglomeration in Stripper Ash Coolers and Its Possible Remedial Solutions: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravi Inder

    2016-04-01

    The bottom ash of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler contains large amounts of physical heat. When low quality coals are used in these types of boilers, the ash content is normally more than 40 % and the physical heat loss is approximately 3 % if the bottom ash is discharged without cooling. Bottom ash cooler (BAC) is often used to treat the high temperature bottom ash to reclaim heat, and to facilitate the easily handling and transportation of ash. The CFB boiler at BLA Power, Newari, MP (India) is facing problems of clinker formation in strip ash coolers of plant since the installation of unit. These clinkers are basically agglomerates, which leads to defluidization of stripper ash cooler (BAC) units. There are two strip ash coolers in unit. Each strip ash cooler is capable of working independently. The proper functioning of both strip coolers is very important as it is going to increase the combustion efficiency of boiler by stripping of fine unburnt coal particles from ash, which are injected into the furnace. In this paper causes, characterization of agglomerates, thermo gravimetric analysis of fuel used, particular size distribution of coal and sand and possible remedial solution to overcome these agglomerates in strip ash coolers has also been presented. High temperature in compact separators, non uniform supply of coal and not removing small agglomerates from stripper ash cooler are among main causes of agglomeration in stripper ash cooler. Control of compact separator temperature, replacing 10-12 % of bed material and cleaning stripper ash cooler periodically will decrease agglomeration in stripper ash cooler of unit.

  13. In-Situ Agglomeration and De-agglomeration by Milling of Nano-Engineered Lubricant Particulate Composites for Cold Spray Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.

    2014-10-01

    Nano-engineered self-lubricating particles comprised of hexagonal-boron-nitride powder (hBN) encapsulated in nickel have been developed for cold spray coating of aluminum components. The nickel encapsulant consists of several nano-sized layers, which are deposited on the hBN particles by electroless plating. In the cold spray deposition, the nickel becomes the matrix in which hBN acts as the lubricant. The coating demonstrated a very promising performance by reducing the coefficient of friction by almost 50% and increasing the wear resistance more than tenfold. The coatings also exhibited higher bond strength, which was directly related to the hardenability of the particles. During the encapsulation process, the hBN particles agglomerate and form large clusters. De-agglomeration has been studied through low- and high-energy ball milling to create more uniform and consistent particle sizes and to improve the cold spray deposition efficiency. The unmilled and milled particles were characterized with Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, BET, and hardness tests. It was found that in low-energy ball milling, the clusters were compacted to a noticeable extent. However, the high-energy ball milling resulted in breakup of agglomerations and destroyed the nickel encapsulant.

  14. Detailed analysis of a quench bomb for the study of aluminum agglomeration in solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallier, S.; Kratz, J.-G.; Quaglia, N.; Fouin, G.

    2016-07-01

    A standard quench bomb (QB) - widely used to characterize condensed phase from metalized solid propellant combustion - is studied in detail. Experimental and numerical investigations proved that collected particles are mostly unburned aluminum (Al) agglomerates despite large quenching distances. Particles are actually found to quench early as propellant surface is swept by inert pressurant. Further improvements of the QB are proposed which allow measuring both Al agglomerates and alumina residue with the same setup. Finally, the results obtained on a typical aluminized ammonium perchlorate (AP) / hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant are briefly discussed.

  15. Mathematical modeling of pigment dispersion taking into account the full agglomerate particle size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2017-01-01

    particle size distribution was simulated. Data from two previous experimental investigations were used for model validation. The first concerns two different yellow organic pigments dispersed in nitrocellulose/ethanol vehicles in a ball mill and the second a red organic pigment dispersed in a solvent-based....... The only adjustable parameter used was an apparent rate constant for the linear agglomerate erosion rate. Model simulations, at selected values of time, for the full agglomerate particle size distribution were in good qualitative agreement with the measured values. A quantitative match of the experimental...

  16. The Morphology of Urban Agglomerations for Developing Countries: A Case Study with China

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between two well-accepted empirical propositions regarding the distribution of population in cities, namely, Gibrat's law and Zipf's law, are rigorously examined using the Chinese census data. Our findings are quite in contrast with the most of the previous studies performed exclusively for developed countries. This motivates us to build a general environment to explain the morphology of urban agglomerations both in developed and developing countries. A dynamic process of job creation generates a particular distribution for the urban agglomerations and introduction of Special Economic Zones (SEZ) in this abstract environment shows that the empirical observations are in good agreement with the proposed model.

  17. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  18. Urban agglomerations and transformations of medium-sized towns in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runge Anna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This analysis investigates medium-sized towns in Poland, i.e. those with a population between 20–100 thousand, located up to 100 km away from the main city of the agglomeration. The aim of this article is to compare the level of socio-economic development of Polish towns depending on their location in relation to the main city in the largest agglomerations in 1998 and 2013. Three zones of distance from the main city of each agglomeration have been taken into consideration: a. the inner zone, reaching up to 25 km from the main city; b. the outer zone located at a distance of 25 to 50 km from the main city, and c. the peripheral zone, located at a distance of 50 to 100 km from the main city and including the medium-size towns located outside the agglomeration system. This analysis of the distribution of medium-sized towns and their level of socio-economic development has shown various levels of changes which depend on the distance from the main city of the agglomeration. In 1998, the highest level of development of the medium-sized towns was recorded in towns outside of these agglomeration systems, i.e. those located most remotely from the main city (peripheral zone. Most of the medium-sized towns are situated at a distance of 50–100 km from Warszawa, Kraków, Łódź, Lublin, Gdańsk and have developed their own local, or even regional labour markets and some of them have even provided administrative functions in the past as voivodeship capitals. Only in the Poznań agglomeration, the level of development of medium-sized towns was higher in the immediate surroundings of the main city (25 km. The medium-sized towns in all zones of the distance from the main city in the Wrocław agglomeration represented a similar level of development. By 2013, the level of development of the medium-sized towns in the peripheral zone in all investigated settlement systems had decreased, with a significant improvement in the level of development of the towns in

  19. Oblique dust density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  20. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion-dust plasmas with dust size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Kai-Biao [Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong (China)

    2014-06-15

    Nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves which are described with a Kortweg-de vries (KdV) equation by using the reductive perturbation method, are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively-charged dust particles of different sizes and masses. The effects of the power-law distribution of dust and other plasma parameters on the dust-acoustic solitary waves are studied. Numerical results show that the dust size distribution has a significant influence on the propagation properties of dust-acoustic solitons. The amplitudes of solitary waves in the case of a power-law distribution is observed to be smaller, but the soliton velocity and width are observed to be larger, than those of mono-sized dust grains with an average dust size. Our results indicate that only compressed solitary waves exist in dusty plasma with different dust species. The relevance of the present investigation to interstellar clouds is discussed.

  1. Dibromidodimethyldipyridineplatinum(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairéad E. Kelly

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [PtBr2(CH32(C5H5N2], the PtIV metal centre lies on a twofold rotation axis and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The structure displays weak intramolecular C—H...Br hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  2. Marketing produktu Karel IV.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikšů, Šárka

    2009-01-01

    Goal of the thesis Marketing of the product Karel IV. is to propose chanels of marketing communication and indicate possibilities of next product's development. Theoretical part is based on marketing plan and it's partition. In the practical part you can find market analysis and competing products analysis, product's evolution description and marketing research.

  3. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  4. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered.

  5. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  6. Waste and dust utilisation in shaft furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senk, D.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Wastes and dusts from steel industry, non-ferrous metallurgy and other branches can be utilized e.g. in agglomeration processes (sintering, pelletizing or briquetting and by injection into shaft furnaces. This paper deals with the second way. Combustion and reduction behaviour of iron- and carbon-rich metallurgical dusts and sludges containing lead, zinc and alkali as well as other wastes with and without pulverized coal (PC has been studied when injecting into shaft furnaces. Following shaft furnaces have been examined: blast furnace, cupola furnace, OxiCup furnace and imperial-smelting furnace. Investigations have been done at laboratory and industrial scale. Some dusts and wastes under certain conditions can be not only reused but can also improve combustion efficiency at the tuyeres as well as furnace performance and productivity.

    Los residuos y polvos de filtro provenientes de la industria siderúrgica, de la obtención de metales no ferrosos y de otras industrias, pueden ser utilizados, por ejemplo, en procesos de aglomeración como sintetizado, peletizado o briqueteado. En su caso, estos pueden ser inyectados en los hornos de cuba. Este artículo se enfoca a la inyección de estos materiales en los hornos de cuba. El comportamiento de la combustión y reducción de los polvos ricos en hierro y carbono y también lodos que contienen plomo, zinc y compuestos alcalinos y otros residuos con o sin carbón pulverizado (CP fue examinado, cuando se inyectaron en hornos de cuba. Los siguientes hornos de cuba fueron examinados: Horno alto, cubilote, OxiCup y horno de cuba Imperial Smelting. Las investigaciones se llevaron a cabo a escala de laboratorio e industrial. Algunos residuos y polvos bajo ciertas condiciones, no sólo pueden ser reciclados, sino también mejoran la eficiencia de combustión en las toberas, la operación y productividad del horno.

  7. Agglomeration of Celecoxib by Quasi Emulsion Solvent Diffusion Method: Effect of Stabilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion (QESD has evolved into an effective technique to manufacture agglomerates of API crystals. Although, the proposed technique showed benefits, such as cost effectiveness, that is considerably sensitive to the choice of a stabilizer, which agonizes from a absence of systemic understanding in this field. In the present study, the combination of different solvents and stabilizers were compared to investigate any connections between the solvents and stabilizers. Methods: Agglomerates of celecoxib were prepared by QESD method using four different stabilizers (Tween 80, HPMC, PVP and SLS and three different solvents (methyl acetate, ethyl acetate and isopropyl acetate. The solid state of obtained particles was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy. The agglomerated were also evaluated in term of production yield, distribution of particles and dissolution behavior. Results: The results showed that the effectiveness of stabilizer in terms of particle size and particle size distribution is specific to each solvent candidate. A stabilizer with a lower HLB value is preferred which actually increased its effectiveness with the solvent candidates with higher lipophilicity. HPMC appeared to be the most versatile stabilizer because it showed a better stabilizing effect compared to other stabilizers in all solvents used. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the efficiency of stabilizers in forming the celecoxib agglomerates by QESD was influenced by the HLB of the stabilizer and lipophilicity of the solvents.

  8. A Comprehensive Quantitative Evaluation of New Sustainable Urbanization Level in 20 Chinese Urban Agglomerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On 16 March 2014, the State Council of China launched its first urbanization planning initiative dubbed “National New Urbanization Planning (2014–2020” (NNUP. NNUP put forward 20 urban agglomerations and a sustainable development approach aiming to transform traditional Chinese urbanization to sustainable new urbanization. This study quantitatively evaluates the level of sustainability of the present new urbanization process in 20 Chinese urban agglomerations and provides some positive suggestions for the achievement of sustainable new urbanization. A three-level index system which is based on six fundamental elements in a city and a Full Permutation Polygon Synthetic Indicator evaluation method are adopted. The results show that China is undergoing a new urbanization process with a low level of sustainability and there are many problems remaining from traditional urbanization processes. There exists a polarized phenomenon in the urbanization of 20 urban agglomerations. Based on their own development patterns, the 20 urban agglomerations can be divided into seven categories. Every category has its own development characteristics. The analyses also show that waste of water resources, abuse of land resources, and air pollution are three big problems that are closely linked to traditional Chinese urbanization processes. To achieve sustainable new urbanization in China, four relevant suggestions and comments have been provided.

  9. Discrete element modelling of the quasi-static uniaxial compression of individual infant formula agglomerates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kevin J. Hanley; Catherine O'Sullivan; Edmond P. Byrne; Kevin Cronin

    2012-01-01

    Infant formula is usually produced in an agglomerated powder form.These agglomerates are subjected to many transient forces following their manufacture.These can be difficult to quantify experimentally because of their small magnitudes and short durations.Numerical models have the potential to address this gap in the experimental data.The objective of the research described here was to calibrate a discrete element model for these agglomerates using experimental data obtained for quasi-static loading,and to use this model to study the mechanics of the particle response in detail.The Taguchi method was previously proposed as a viable calibration approach for discrete element models.In this work,the method was assessed for calibration of the model parameters (e.g.,bond stiffnesses and strengths) considering three responses: the force at failure,strain at failure and agglomerate stiffness.The Weibull moduli for the simulation results and the experimental data were almost identical following calibration and the 37% characteristic stresses were similar.An analysis of the energy terms in the model provided useful insight into the model response.The bond energy and the normal force exerted on the platens were strongly correlated,and bond breakage events coincided with the highest energy dissipation rates.

  10. Environmental Regulation, Economic Network and Sustainable Growth of Urban Agglomerations in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Chong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we examine the influence of environmental regulation on sustainable economic growth from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. Our research is twofold. First, we apply a modified NEG (New Economic Geography model to analyze how environmental regulation influences firms’ location choices and cities’ sustainable economic growth. Second, we test a spatial econometric model employing panel data of the three largest urban agglomerations in China from 2003 to 2013 to study the relationship between environmental regulation and sustainable economic growth as well as the spillover channels of economic activities. The results reveal a remarkable negative effect of environmental regulation on economic growth. In addition, we find no sufficient evidence to prove the existence of long-term effects of environmental regulation on economic growth in the three urban agglomerations. Furthermore, using different weight matrices to illustrate the different economic networks of the urban agglomeration, we validate the difference in spillover mechanisms across these three urban agglomerations. Specifically, the disparity in environmental regulation acts as a spillover channel for the Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta, while it is not significant for Jing-Jin-Ji.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF LOGISTICS OVER THE OCCURRENCE OF SPATIAL AGGLOMERATION OF BUSINESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MĂDĂLINA S. MATICIUC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper involves an examination of the literature that refers to the various methods of spatial agglomeration of businesses where the focus is actually minimizing transportation costs. The research has a predominantly theoretical nature, based on exploratory method, being focused on the literature review to highlight the evolution of different forms of spatial organization so we can identify the advantages of acquiring further knowledge needed to the applied research, providing in this manner prospects for progress. The vicinity of the representatives of the economic, political and educational environment presents many advantages with regard to reciprocal relationships that can develop within these, whether formal or informal, highlighting the potential of flexible innovative forms of spatial organization of clusters. Spatial agglomeration theories that were developed in the course of time, is a cornerstone for new innovative forms of business spatial organization such as clusters and networks of clusters that are offering many advantages in terms of cost of transportation. The evolution of business spatial agglomerations shows that the vast majority of companies aim to ensure competitive advantage not only in close locations to increase the generation of innovation and reduced transport costs, but also through access to knowledge in a fast and easy way. The work comes in support of these ideas , proposing in the conclusions part a new model of business agglomeration which does not require physical proximity but one of cloud type.

  12. An Agglomeration Law for Sorting Networks and its Application in Functional Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Immanuel Schiller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will present a general agglomeration law for sorting networks. Agglomeration is a common technique when designing parallel programmes to control the granularity of the computation thereby finding a better fit between the algorithm and the machine on which the algorithm runs. Usually this is done by grouping smaller tasks and computing them en bloc within one parallel process. In the case of sorting networks this could be done by computing bigger parts of the network with one process. The agglomeration law in this paper pursues a different strategy: The input data is grouped and the algorithm is generalized to work on the agglomerated input while the original structure of the algorithm remains. This will result in a new access opportunity to sorting networks well-suited for efficient parallelization on modern multicore computers, computer networks or GPGPU programming. Additionally this enables us to use sorting networks as (parallel or distributed merging stages for arbitrary sorting algorithms, thereby creating new hybrid sorting algorithms with ease. The expressiveness of functional programming languages helps us to apply this law to systematically constructed sorting networks, leading to efficient and easily adaptable sorting algorithms. An application example is given, using the Eden programming language to show the effectiveness of the law. The implementation is compared with different parallel sorting algorithms by runtime behaviour.

  13. Morphological and Physicochemical Characterization of Agglomerates of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Cell Culture Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Freyre-Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NP are possible carcinogenic materials (2B-IARC and their toxicity depends on shape, size, and electrical charge of primary NP and on the system formed by NP media. The aim of this work was to characterize agglomerates of three TiO2 NP by evaluating their morphometry, stability, and zeta potential (ζ in liquid media and their changes with time. Sizes of agglomerates by dynamic light scattering (DLS resulted to be 10–50 times larger than those obtained by digital image analysis (DIA given the charged zone around particles. Fractal dimension (FD was highest for agglomerates of spheres and belts in F12K, and in E171 in FBS media. E171 and belts increased FD with time. At time zero, using water as dispersant FD was larger for agglomerates of spheres than for of E171. Belts suspended in water had the smallest values of circularity (Ci which was approximately unchanged with time. All dispersions had ζ values around −30 mV at physiological pH (7.4 and dispersions of NP in water and FBS showed maximum stability (Turbiscan Lab analysis. Results help in understanding the complex NP geometry-size-stability relationships when performing in vivo and in vitro environmental-toxicity works and help in supporting decisions on the usage of TiO2 NP.

  14. Agglomeration, Innovation and Regional Development: Theoretical Perspectives and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de Henri L.F.; Poot, Jacques; Smit, Martijn J.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation and technological change are central to the quest for regional development. In the globally-connected knowledge-driven economy, the relevance of agglomeration forces that rely on proximity continues to increase, paradoxically despite declining real costs of information, communication and

  15. STUDY ON THE CHARACTERISTICS OF AGGLOMERATION AND CYCLONE SEPARATION OF DIESEL PARTICULATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A particulate separation system that can be used to study the characteristics of the diesel particulate agglomeration and cyclone s eparation is developedIt includes a diesel particulate agglomerator and a cycl one separator mainlyA preliminary investigation on the cyclone separation tech nology for controlling the exhaust particulate from a diesel engine is conducted The experimental results show that the diameter distribution of the diesel par ticulate is changed after they pass through the agglomerator,almost 30%~40% o f the particulate agglomerated from less than 10μm to larger than 10μm ,this change contributes to trap diesel particulateWith this system installed on the exhaust pipe of a singlecylinder engine,the particulate separation effi ciency is around 40%~60% under typical engine running conditionThe backpres sure of this system is less than 5 kPa on full load condition,much less than tha t of other methods of particulate filtrationThis technology has the possibilit y to open a new prospect for particulate reduction because of its simplicity,rel iability and low resistance

  16. Phloem Ultrastructure and Pressure Flow: Sieve-Element-Occlusion-Related Agglomerations Do Not Affect Translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froelich, Daniel R.; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kåre Hartvig;

    2011-01-01

    to a discussion about the mode of phloem transport. At present, it is generally agreed that P protein agglomerations are preparation artifacts due to injury, the lumen of sieve tubes is free of obstructions, and phloem flow is driven by an osmotically generated pressure differential according to Münch’s classical...

  17. Agglomeration, Innovation and Regional Development: Theoretical Perspectives and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de Henri L.F.; Poot, Jacques; Smit, Martijn J.

    2007-01-01

    Innovation and technological change are central to the quest for regional development. In the globally-connected knowledge-driven economy, the relevance of agglomeration forces that rely on proximity continues to increase, paradoxically despite declining real costs of information, communication and

  18. Combination of methanogenesis and denitrification in a UASB reactor for water reclamation applied to small agglomerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila, J.M.S.; Khassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.

    2009-01-01

    A two-step system combining an anaerobic/anoxic UASB reactor followed by a low energy consuming rotating biological contactor might be a sustainable option for wastewater treatment and reuse in small agglomerations. This article focuses on the UASB stage. The performance of a lab-scale UASB fed with

  19. Biomass ash - bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in fluidised bed combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, H.J.M.; Hofmans, H.; Huijnen, R.; Kastelein, R.; Kiel, J.H.A. [ECN Biomass, Petten (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    The present study has been aimed at improving the fundamental understanding of mechanisms underlying agglomeration and defluidisation in fluidised bed combustion and gasification of biomass and waste. To this purpose dedicated lab-scale static heating and fluidisation experiments have been conducted with carefully selected and prepared ashes and bed materials, viz. straw ash/sand and willow ash/sand mixtures, mullite subjected to straw gasification and artificially coated mullite. The main conclusion is that ash/bed material interaction processes are very important and often determine the bed agglomeration and defluidisation tendency. In the static heating experiments with both ash/sand mixtures, partial melting-segregation of ash components and dissolution/reaction with the bed material are processes that determine the melt composition. This melt composition and behaviour can deviate considerably form expectations based on ash-only data. Artificially coated bed materials prove to be very useful for systematic studies on the influence of coating composition and thickness on agglomeration tendency. For the coated mullite samples, different stages in the defluidisation process are identified and the influence of coating properties (thickness, composition, morphology) and operating parameters is elucidated. The behaviour of the mullite appears to be dominated by a remnant glass phase. On the one hand, this glass phase accounts for an alkali-getter capability, while on the other hand it is mainly responsible for agglomeration at temperatures {>=} 800C. 3 refs.

  20. Phloem Ultrastructure and Pressure Flow: Sieve-Element-Occlusion-Related Agglomerations Do Not Affect Translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froelich, Daniel R.; Mullendore, Daniel L.; Jensen, Kåre Hartvig

    2011-01-01

    to a discussion about the mode of phloem transport. At present, it is generally agreed that P protein agglomerations are preparation artifacts due to injury, the lumen of sieve tubes is free of obstructions, and phloem flow is driven by an osmotically generated pressure differential according to Münch’s classical...

  1. New surfactant for hydrate anti-agglomeration in hydrocarbon flowlines and seabed oil capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minwei; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-07-15

    Anti-agglomeration is a promising solution for gas hydrate risks in deepsea hydrocarbon flowlines and oil leak captures. Currently ineffectiveness at high water to oil ratios limits such applications. We present experimental results of a new surfactant in rocking cell tests, which show high efficiency at a full range of water to oil ratios; there is no need for presence of the oil phase. We find that our surfactant at a very low concentration (0.2 wt.% of water) keeps the hydrate particles in anti-agglomeration state. We propose a mechanism different from the established water-in-oil emulsion theory in the literature that the process is effective without the oil phase. There is no need to emulsify the water phase in the oil phase for hydrate anti-agglomeration; with oil-in-water emulsion and without emulsion hydrate anti-agglomeration is presented in our research. We expect our work to pave the way for broad applications in offshore natural gas production and seabed oil capture with very small quantities of an eco-friendly surfactant.

  2. Conversion of biomass, prediction and solution methods for ash agglomeration and related problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Drift, A. [ECN Fuels Conversion and Environment, Petten (Netherlands); Olsen, A. [Risoe, Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-11-01

    When biomass is used as fuel for thermal conversion plants, minerals from the fuel can be responsible for major problems. Generally, these problems are associated with the existence and development of low melting compounds or eutectics, which form sticky layers. In a fluidised bed, this can result in bed-agglomeration and defluidisation. This causes local high temperature, which often accelerates the process. It ultimately can lead to a completely sintered bed content with a glassy phase gluing the bed particles together and shut-down of the plant. The main objective of the title project is to develop a methodology to predict ash/bed agglomeration and sintering problems, to indicate related problems and, furthermore, to identify solution methods to make different types of biomass streams more viable for energy production. Within the present study, selected fuels are subjected to different existing methods together with some new ones, in order to determine the agglomeration temperature. The selected fuels are verge grass, Danish wheat straw (both stored dry and partly leached due to rainfall), sewage sludge, cacao shells and willow as a reference. The methods used within the study are chemical analysis of fuel and ashes, determination of standard ash melting temperatures, compression strength measurements of the ash, DTA/TG analysis of the ash, SEM and ESEM (high temperature environmental scanning microscopy), two different lab-scale bubbling fluidised bed combustion facilities, a lab-scale bubbling fluidised bed gasifier and a circulating fluidised bed gasifier. The lab-scale facilities have been used to test potential measures to reduce the problem of agglomeration. These measures are the use of additives (kaolin, magnesite, dolomite, gibbsite and sewage sludge) and non-quartz bed materials (alumina and mullite). The work performed within the project has lead to the following results. Chemical analysis of the fuel can give a first indication of whether there might

  3. Evidence that pentosans and xylanase affect the re-agglomeration of the gluten network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, M.; Vliet, T. van; Hamer, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the gluten-starch separation process gluten is formed first as a result of breakdown of the gliadin-glutelin structures during mixing followed by their re-agglomeration. To date the effect of pentosans and enzymes have not been studied separately. A simple modification of TNO Glutomatic system en

  4. Dust Devil Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 6 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. Dust devils, small cyclonic wind storms, are common in the American Southwest and on Mars. As the dust devil moves across the surface it picks up the loose dust, leaving behind a dark track to mark its passage. These dust devil tracks are in the Argyre Basin. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -46.6, Longitude 317.5 East (42.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the

  5. Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Dennis; Fenton, Lori; Neakrase, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michael; Statella, Thiago; Whelley, Patrick; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Balme, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Dust devils that leave dark- or light-toned tracks are common on Mars and they can also be found on the Earth's surface. Dust devil tracks (hereinafter DDTs) are ephemeral surface features with mostly sub-annual lifetimes. Regarding their size, DDT widths can range between ˜1 m and ˜1 km, depending on the diameter of dust devil that created the track, and DDT lengths range from a few tens of meters to several kilometers, limited by the duration and horizontal ground speed of dust devils. DDTs can be classified into three main types based on their morphology and albedo in contrast to their surroundings; all are found on both planets: (a) dark continuous DDTs, (b) dark cycloidal DDTs, and (c) bright DDTs. Dark continuous DDTs are the most common type on Mars. They are characterized by their relatively homogenous and continuous low albedo surface tracks. Based on terrestrial and martian in situ studies, these DDTs most likely form when surficial dust layers are removed to expose larger-grained substrate material (coarse sands of ≥500 μm in diameter). The exposure of larger-grained materials changes the photometric properties of the surface; hence leading to lower albedo tracks because grain size is photometrically inversely proportional to the surface reflectance. However, although not observed so far, compositional differences (i.e., color differences) might also lead to albedo contrasts when dust is removed to expose substrate materials with mineralogical differences. For dark continuous DDTs, albedo drop measurements are around 2.5 % in the wavelength range of 550-850 nm on Mars and around 0.5 % in the wavelength range from 300-1100 nm on Earth. The removal of an equivalent layer thickness around 1 μm is sufficient for the formation of visible dark continuous DDTs on Mars and Earth. The next type of DDTs, dark cycloidal DDTs, are characterized by their low albedo pattern of overlapping scallops. Terrestrial in situ studies imply that they are formed when sand

  6. Dust during the Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Elfgren, E; Elfgren, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The possibility that population III stars have reionized the Universe at redshifts greater than 6 has recently gained momentum with WMAP polarization results. Here we analyse the role of early dust produced by these stars and ejected into the intergalactic medium. We show that this dust, heated by the radiation from the same population III stars, produces a submillimetre excess. The electromagnetic spectrum of this excess is compatible with the FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) cosmic far infrared background. This spectrum, a Doppler spectrum times the $\

  7. Nucleocapsid protein from fig mosaic virus forms cytoplasmic agglomerates that are hauled by endoplasmic reticulum streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly throughout the cell, and we

  8. Impact of agglomeration state of nano- and submicron sized gold particles on pulmonary inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassee Flemming R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanoparticle (NP toxicity testing comes with many challenges. Characterization of the test substance is of crucial importance and in the case of NPs, agglomeration/aggregation state in physiological media needs to be considered. In this study, we have addressed the effect of agglomerated versus single particle suspensions of nano- and submicron sized gold on the inflammatory response in the lung. Rats were exposed to a single dose of 1.6 mg/kg body weight (bw of spherical gold particles with geometric diameters of 50 nm or 250 nm diluted either by ultrapure water or by adding phosphate buffered saline (PBS. A single dose of 1.6 mg/kg bw DQ12 quartz was used as a positive control for pulmonary inflammation. Extensive characterization of the particle suspensions has been performed by determining the zetapotential, pH, gold concentration and particle size distribution. Primary particle size and particle purity has been verified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques. Pulmonary inflammation (total cell number, differential cell count and pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell damage (total protein and albumin and cytotoxicity (alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and acute systemic effects in blood (total cell number, differential cell counts, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein 3 and 24 hours post exposure. Uptake of gold particles in alveolar macrophages has been determined by TEM. Results Particles diluted in ultrapure water are well dispersed, while agglomerates are formed when diluting in PBS. The particle size of the 50 nm particles was confirmed, while the 250 nm particles appear to be 200 nm using tracking analysis and 210 nm using TEM. No major differences in pulmonary and systemic toxicity markers were observed after instillation of agglomerated versus single gold particles of different sizes. Both agglomerated as well as single nanoparticles were

  9. Evaluation of charge and agglomeration behavior of TiO₂ nanoparticles in ecotoxicological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Y; Lead, J R; Baalousha, M

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic nature of nanoparticle (NP) agglomeration behavior is of paramount interest to many current studies in environmental nanoscience and nano(eco)toxicology because agglomeration affects the NP bioavailability and toxicity. The present study investigates the surface charge and agglomeration behavior of TiO2 NPs in four different ecotoxicological media (OECD algae, OECD L_variegatus, hardwater and plant media) and two different electrolytes KCl (200 mM) and CaCl2 (50 mM). TiO2 NPs were positively charged, and the zeta potential varied from +1.9 mV in hardwater (at pH7.1) to +24.5 mV in CaCl2 electrolyte (at pH7.4) in all media except algae media, where the zeta potential was -6.7 mV (at pH7.7). Despite the differences in the pH and the surface charge of TiO2 NPs in the different media, an immediate agglomeration of the NPs in all standard ecotoxicological media was observed with aggregate sizes in the micrometer scale, as the measured zeta potentials were insufficient to prevent TiO2 NP agglomeration. The isoelectric point (pHiep) of TiO2 NPs in the studied media varied in the range (6.8-7.6), which was attributed to preferential association of anions and cations to TiO2; that is the pHiep decreases with the increased concentration of Cl and increases with the increased concentrations of Na and Mg. Despite the complexity of the ecotoxicological media and the presence of a mixture of different monovalent and divalent electrolytes, the agglomeration kinetics in the media follows the DVLO theory where two distinct agglomeration rates (slow, reaction limited regime and fast, diffusion limited regime) were observable. The critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of TiO2 NPs in the ecotoxicological media varied from 17.6 to 54.0% v/v standard media in UHPW, due to differences in media pH and TiO2 NP surface charge. In the ecotoxicological media (hardwater, L-variegatus and plant), where TiO2 NPs are positively charged, the CCC decrease with the increased divalent

  10. Free Collisions in a Microgravity Many-Particle Experiment III: The Collision Behavior of sub-Millimeter-Sized Dust Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Kothe, Stefan; Weidling, René; Güttler, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    We conducted micro-gravity experiments to study the outcome of collisions between sub-mm-sized dust agglomerates consisting of \\mu m-sized SiO2 monomer grains at velocities of several cm/s. Prior to the experiments, we used X-ray computer tomography (nano-CT) imaging to study the internal structure of these dust agglomerates and found no rim compaction so that their collision behavior is not governed by preparation-caused artefacts. We found that collisions between these dust aggregates can lead either to sticking or to bouncing, depending mostly on the impact velocity. While previous collision models derived the transition between both regimes from contact physics, we used the available empirical data from these and earlier experiments to derive a power law relation between dust-aggregate mass and impact velocity for the threshold between the two collision outcomes. In agreement with earlier experiments, we show that the transition between both regimes is not sharp, but follows a shallower power law than pre...

  11. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To ensure the safety and success of future lunar exploration missions, it is important to measure the toxicity of the lunar dust and its electrostatic properties. The electrostatic properties of lunar dust govern its behavior, from how the dust is deposited in an astronaut s lungs to how it contaminates equipment surfaces. NASA has identified the threat caused by lunar dust as one of the top two problems that need to be solved before returning to the Moon. To understand the electrostatic nature of lunar dust, NASA must answer the following questions: (1) how much charge can accumulate on the dust? (2) how long will the charge remain? and (3) can the dust be removed? These questions can be answered by measuring the electrostatic properties of the dust: its volume resistivity, charge decay, charge-to-mass ratio or chargeability, and dielectric properties.

  12. Reduction disintegration mechanism of cold briquettes from blast furnace dust and sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Rocha Lemos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the reduction disintegration mechanism in ferriferous burden that is used in blast furnaces. The behavior of this burden in the granular zone of this metallurgical reactor is important for smooth operation. The objective of this work was to prepare cold self-reducing briquettes using blast furnace dust and sludge and binders and compare the reduction disintegration index (RDI of these agglomerates with conventional ferriferous burdens such as pellets, sinter and iron ore. In the present work, 25 different mixtures were prepared to produce briquettes in two geometries: pillow and cylindrical. The RDI value was determined for the briquettes that passed the tumbling test.

  13. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Agglomeration Influences Dose-Rates and Modulates Oxidative Stress Mediated Dose-Response Profiles In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-31

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm-1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  14. Pilot plant testing of IGT`s two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehmat, A.; Mensinger, M.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Richardson, T.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is conducting a multi-year experimental program to develop and test, through pilot-scale operation, IGT`s two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating combustor (AGGCOM). The AGGCOM process is based on combining the fluidized-bed agglomeration and gasification technology with the cyclonic combustion technology, both of which have been developed at IGT over many years. AGGCOM is a unique and extremely flexible combustor that can operate over a wide range of conditions in the fluidized-bed first stage from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration), including gasification of high-energy-content wastes. The ACCCOM combustor can easily and efficiently destroy solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes, while isolating solid inorganic contaminants within an essentially non-leachable glassy matrix, suitable for disposal in ordinary landfills. Fines elutriated from the first stage are captured by a high-efficiency cyclone and returned to the fluidized bed for ultimate incorporation into the agglomerates. Intense mixing in the second-stage cyclonic combustor ensures high destruction and removal efficiencies (DRE) for organic compounds that may be present in the feed material. This paper presents an overview of the experimental development of the AGGCOM process and progress made to date in designing, constructing, and operating the 6-ton/day AGGCOM pilot plant. Results of the bench-scale tests conducted to determine the operating conditions necessary to agglomerate a soil were presented at the 1991 Incineration Conference. On-site construction of the AGGCOM pilot plant was initiated in August 1992 and completed at the end of March 1993, with shakedown testing following immediately thereafter. The initial tests in the AGGCOM pilot plant will focus on the integrated operation of both stages of the combustor and will be conducted with ``clean`` topsoil.

  15. A discrete element and ray framework for rapid simulation of acoustical dispersion of microscale particulate agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-03-01

    In industry, particle-laden fluids, such as particle-functionalized inks, are constructed by adding fine-scale particles to a liquid solution, in order to achieve desired overall properties in both liquid and (cured) solid states. However, oftentimes undesirable particulate agglomerations arise due to some form of mutual-attraction stemming from near-field forces, stray electrostatic charges, process ionization and mechanical adhesion. For proper operation of industrial processes involving particle-laden fluids, it is important to carefully breakup and disperse these agglomerations. One approach is to target high-frequency acoustical pressure-pulses to breakup such agglomerations. The objective of this paper is to develop a computational model and corresponding solution algorithm to enable rapid simulation of the effect of acoustical pulses on an agglomeration composed of a collection of discrete particles. Because of the complex agglomeration microstructure, containing gaps and interfaces, this type of system is extremely difficult to mesh and simulate using continuum-based methods, such as the finite difference time domain or the finite element method. Accordingly, a computationally-amenable discrete element/discrete ray model is developed which captures the primary physical events in this process, such as the reflection and absorption of acoustical energy, and the induced forces on the particulate microstructure. The approach utilizes a staggered, iterative solution scheme to calculate the power transfer from the acoustical pulse to the particles and the subsequent changes (breakup) of the pulse due to the particles. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the approach.

  16. An Empirical Analysis of Industrial Agglomeration in the Western Ethnic Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xionglang; ZHANG Huiyin

    2014-01-01

    Industrial agglomeration refers to a high concentration of the same industry or related industries in a particular geographic area , and a process of gradual concentration of industrial cap-ital elements within a space .The new economic geography considers that industrial agglomeration is caused by circulating cumulative cause and effect . Accidental disturbance destroys the original bal-ance of the symmetrical area , which in turn brings about the expansion of the market in a concentrated industrial area , which then causes the effect of market expansion.This, accordingly, induces the factors of production to begin to concentrate in the area.The concentration of elements and industries brings about the “regional price index effect”.The concentration of manufacturers in the region is helpful in reducing both transportation costs and living costs of the labor .Accordingly , the elements become further concentrated , which causes the ex-pansion of market scale and the concentration of el-ements.Finally, a kind of industrial agglomeration forms.Industrial agglomeration is not only a kind of group concentration of similar enterprises in a specific region , but most importantly it is a kind of common growth among the enterprises .Therefore, the degree of concentration of an industry reflects the competiveness of an industry , which in turn re-flects the economic strength of a region or a coun-try.The concept that industrial concentration could promote the relative competiveness of the industries in the region has already been accepted by most e-conomists .Hence , it has an important meaning re-garding the study of industrial agglomeration in the western ethnic region . There are two ways to measure industrial ag-glomeration.One is the Gini Coefficient index and the other is the Industrial Agglomeration Index of location quotient .The author thinks that the degree of regional industrial agglomeration could either be examined with a static stock index , or a dynamic

  17. Laboratory Observations of Artificial Sand and Oil Agglomerates Video and Velocity Data: False-Floor Experiment Flow Velocity and Shear Stress

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Weathered oil in the surf-zone after an oil spill may mix with suspended sediments to form sand and oil agglomerates (SOA). Sand and oil agglomerates may form in...

  18. Laboratory Observations of Artificial Sand and Oil Agglomerates: Video and Velocity Data: Sea Floor Interaction Experiment Preview Video (GoPro)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Weathered oil in the surf-zone after an oil spill may mix with suspended sediments to form sand and oil agglomerates (SOA). Sand and oil agglomerates may form in...

  19. Identification of the exploatation dust in road dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is to determine models of explore dust from vehicle brake systems and the presentationof measurement results of the exploitation dust, which is separate from road dust. The following methods and measuring devices were used: T-01M device, screen analysis, analysis of chemical composition with the use of a scanning microscope with Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analyser. The measurements for identifying this type of dust were conducted on marked sections of roads: motorway, city road and mountain road. The explored dust was distinguished in the following car systems: brakes, clutch plates, tyres and catalytic converters.

  20. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Senovilla, J M M; Senovilla, Jose M. M.; Vera, Raul

    2000-01-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has new surprising features. The universe is ``closed'' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is ``enclosed'' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable agai...

  1. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    2000-07-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has surprising new features. The universe is `closed' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is `enclosed' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable against some global non-vacuum perturbations.

  2. Left in the Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft ended its seven-year voyage January 15 after a safe landing on earth, bringing back a capsule of comet particles and samples of interstellar dust that exceeded the loftiest of expectations of mission scientists. The ensuing studies of the cosmic treasure are expected to shed light on the origins of the solar system and earth itself.

  3. Dust devil dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Onishchenko, O.; Couedel, L.; Arnas, C.; Escarguel, A.; Benkadda, S.; Fedun, V.

    2016-06-01

    A self-consistent hydrodynamic model for the solar heating-driven onset of a dust devil vortex is derived and analyzed. The toroidal flows and vertical velocity fields are driven by an instability that arises from the inversion of the mass density stratification produced by solar heating of the sandy surface soil. The nonlinear dynamics in the primary temperature gradient-driven vertical airflows drives a secondary toroidal vortex flow through a parametric interaction in the nonlinear structures. While an external tangential shear flow may initiate energy transfer to the toroidal vortex flow, the nonlinear interactions dominate the transfer of vertical-radial flows into a fast toroidal flow. This secondary flow has a vertical vorticity, while the primary thermal gradient-driven flow produces the toroidal vorticity. Simulations for the complex nonlinear structure are carried out with the passive convection of sand as test particles. Triboelectric charging modeling of the dust is used to estimate the charging of the sand particles. Parameters for a Dust Devil laboratory experiment are proposed considering various working gases and dust particle parameters. The nonlinear dynamics of the toroidal flow driven by the temperature gradient is of generic interest for both neutral gases and plasmas.

  4. Agglomerates, smoke oxide particles, and carbon inclusions in condensed combustion products of an aluminized GAP-based propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Wen; Liu, Peijin; Yang, Wenjing

    2016-12-01

    In solid propellants, aluminum is widely used to improve the performance, however the condensed combustion products especially the large agglomerates generated from aluminum combustion significantly affect the combustion and internal flow inside the solid rocket motor. To clarify the properties of the condensed combustion products of aluminized propellants, a constant-pressure quench vessel was adopted to collect the combustion products. The morphology and chemical compositions of the collected products, were then studied by using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive (SEM-EDS) method. Various structures have been observed in the condensed combustion products. Apart from the typical agglomerates or smoke oxide particles observed before, new structures including the smoke oxide clusters, irregular agglomerates and carbon-inclusions are discovered and investigated. Smoke oxide particles have the highest amount in the products. The highly dispersed oxide particle is spherical with very smooth surface and is on the order of 1-2 μm, but due to the high temperature and long residence time, these small particles will aggregate into smoke oxide clusters which are much larger than the initial particles. Three types of spherical agglomerates have been found. As the ambient gas temperature is much higher than the boiling point of Al2O3, the condensation layer inside which the aluminum drop is burning would evaporate quickly, which result in the fact that few "hollow agglomerates" has been found compared to "cap agglomerates" and "solid agglomerates". Irregular agglomerates usually larger than spherical agglomerates. The formation of irregular agglomerates likely happens by three stages: deformation of spherical aluminum drops; combination of particles with various shape; finally production of irregular agglomerates. EDS results show the ratio of O to Al on the surface of agglomerates is lower in comparison to smoke oxide particles. C and O account for

  5. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  6. A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioannini, L.; Matteucci, F.; Vladilo, G.; Calura, F.

    2016-09-01

    We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by AGB stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to Damped Lyman-α systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are: i) we can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of dust and in certain cases it becomes the dominant process in the dust cycle. On the other hand, dust destruction seems to be a negligible process in irregulars. iii) Concerning Damped Lyman-α systems, we show that the observed gas-phase abundances of silicon, normalized to volatile elements (zinc and sulfur), are in agreement with our model. iv) The abundances of iron and silicon in DLA systems suggest that the two elements undergo a different history of dust formation and evolution. Our work casts light on the nature of iron-rich dust: the observed depletion pattern of iron is well reproduced only when an additional source of iron dust is considered. Here we explore the possibility of a contribution from Type Ia SNe as well as an efficient accretion of iron nano-particles.

  7. A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioannini, L.; Matteucci, F.; Vladilo, G.; Calura, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova (SN) explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by asymptotic giant branch stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to damped Lyman α (DLA) systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are the following. (i) We can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. (ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of dust and in certain cases it becomes the dominant process in the dust cycle. On the other hand, dust destruction seems to be a negligible process in irregulars. (iii) Concerning DLA systems, we show that the observed gas-phase abundances of silicon, normalized to volatile elements (zinc and sulfur), are in agreement with our model. (iv) The abundances of iron and silicon in DLA systems suggest that the two elements undergo a different history of dust formation and evolution. Our work casts light on the nature of iron-rich dust: the observed depletion pattern of iron is well reproduced only when an additional source of iron dust is considered. Here we explore the possibility of a contribution from Type Ia SNe as well as an efficient accretion of iron nanoparticles.

  8. Effect of particle size of Martian dust on the degradation of photovoltaic cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.

    1991-01-01

    Glass coverglass and SiO2 covered and uncovered silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells were subjected to conditions simulating a Mars dust storm, using the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel, to assess the effect of particle size on the performance of PV cells in the Martian environment. The dust used was an artificial mineral of the approximate elemental composition of Martian soil, which was sorted into four different size ranges. Samples were tested both initially clean and initially dusted. The samples were exposed to clear and dust laden winds, wind velocities varying from 23 to 116 m/s, and attack angles from 0 to 90 deg. It was found that transmittance through the coverglass approximates the power produced by a dusty PV cell. Occultation by the dust was found to dominate the performance degradation for wind velocities below 50 m/s, whereas abrasion dominates the degradation at wind velocities above 85 m/s. Occultation is most severe at 0 deg (parallel to the wind), is less pronounced from 22.5 to 67.5 deg, and is somewhat larger at 90 deg (perpendicular to the wind). Abrasion is negligible at 0 deg, and increases to a maximum at 90 deg. Occultation is more of a problem with small particles, whereas large particles (unless they are agglomerates) cause more abrasion.

  9. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 May 2002) The Science The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this THEMIS image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo (brightness) and low thermal inertia values. This thick mantle of dust creates the appearance of snow covered mountains in the image. Like snow accumulation on Earth, Martian dust can become so thick that it eventually slides down the face of steep slopes, creating runaway avalanches of dust. In the center of this image about 1/3 of the way down is evidence of this phenomenon. A few dozen dark streaks can be seen on the bright, sunlit slopes of the crater rim. The narrow streaks extend downslope following the local topography in a manner very similar to snow avalanches on Earth. But unlike their terrestrial counterparts, no accumulation occurs at the bottom. The dust particles are so small that they are easily launched into the thin atmosphere where they remain suspended and ultimately blow away. The apparent darkness of the avalanche scars is due to the presence of relatively dark underlying material that becomes exposed following the passage of the avalanche. Over time, new dust deposition occurs, brightening the scars until they fade into the background. Although dark slope streaks had been observed in Viking mission images, a clear understanding of this dynamic phenomenon wasn't possible until the much higher resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed the details. MOC images also showed that new avalanches have occurred during the time MGS has been in orbit. THEMIS images will allow additional mapping of their distribution and frequency, contributing new insights about Martian dust avalanches. The Story The stiff peaks in this image might remind you of the Alps here on Earth, but they really outline the choppy edge of a large Martian crater over 50 miles wide (seen in the context image at right). While these aren

  10. Simulation of Solid Particle Agglomeration Process in Gas Enhanced by High Intensity Sound Field%Simulation of Solid Particle Agglomeration Process in Gas Enhanced by High Intensity Sound Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    There are two mechanisms in the particle agglomeration process enhanced by the high intensity sound field in the gas-solid system: the orthokinetic interaction mechanism and hydrodynamic interaction mechanism. The orthokinetic interaction mechanism, hydrodynamic interaction mechanism and the acoustic agglomeration process which included the both two mechanisms were investigated by modeling method and MATLAB program. The results showed: the value of acoustic agglomeration kernel function (AAKF) based on the orthokinetic interaction mechanism was zero when the size of two particles in the pair was the same.

  11. Dust processing in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Villaume, Alexa; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain grow...

  12. FUNCTIONAL, SECTORAL AND REGIONAL TRANSFORMATION OF THE ECONOMY OF THE MISKOLC AGGLOMERATION REVISITED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea KRISTÓF

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the segments of economic development and shifts in the Miskolc agglomeration the present study introduces some characteristics of the functional, sectoral and regional differentiation of economic transformation. The functional, sectoral and geographical distribution of business corporations in the 35 settlements of the Miskolc agglomeration in 2016 may help to interpret and assess economic processes adapted to local characteristics in the past quarter-century. During the research, only those operating businesses were considered that had net sales of 20 million HUF or more in 2015. An empirical study of 640 active businesses in 35 settlements reveals the regional inequalities and sectoral concentration of the economy. The intensity of the spatial structure of the economy is uneven within the Miskolc agglomeration and spatial specialization can also be observed in the economic hinterland of Miskolc. The economic development induced significant changes in the spatial structure of three towns (Felsőzsolca, Nyékládháza, and Alsózsolca. Services (e.g. personal, distributive, and services for other businesses as well as commerce, logistics and leisure functions concentrated in these towns strengthened their positions in the spatial structure. In addition, the technological and industrial parks of these towns are playing an increasing role. However, the towns of the agglomeration cannot or can hardly be regarded as economic competitors of Miskolc, i.e. the urban region has not become polycentric, and the inhabitants of these towns are not totally independent of Miskolc. In the case of Sajóbábony (due to its special situation and Szikszó (despite its economic recovery the functional, sectoral and regional transformation is not clear yet. Of the villages, only four (Kistokaj, Mályi, Szirmabesenyő, Hernádnémeti could significantly improve their economic positions, and were able to rival the dynamically transforming three towns of the

  13. The effects of lunar dust accumulation on the performance of photovoltaic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzan, Cynthia M.; Brinker, David J.; Kress, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Lunar base activity, particularly rocket launch and landing, will suspend and transport lunar dust. From preliminary models, the resulting dust accumulation can be significant, even as far as 2 km from the source. For example, at 2 km approximately 0.28 mg/sq cm of dust is anticipated to accumulate after only 10 surface missions with a 26,800 N excursion vehicle. The possible associated penalties in photovoltaic array performance were therefore the subject of experimental as well as theoretical investigation. To evaluate effects of dust accumulation on relative power output, current-voltage characteristics of dust-covered silicon cells were determined under the illumination of a Spectrolab X-25L solar simulator. The dust material used in these experiments was a terrestrial basalt which approximated lunar soil in particle size and composition. Cell short circuit current, an indicator of the penetrating light intensity, was found to decrease exponentially with dust accumulation. This was predicted independently by modeling the light occlusion caused by a growing layer of dust particles. Moreover, the maximum power output of dust-covered cells, derived from the I-V curves, was also found to degrade exponentially. Experimental results are presented and potential implications discussed.

  14. The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE): Studying the Collision Behavior of Submillimeter-Sized Dust Aggregates on the Suborbital Rocket Flight REXUS 12

    CERN Document Server

    Brisset, Julie; Kothe, Stefan; Weidling, René; Blum, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE) is a novel approach to study the collision properties of submillimeter-sized, highly porous dust aggregates. The experiment was designed, built and carried out to increase our knowledge about the processes dominating the first phase of planet formation. During this phase, the growth of planetary precursors occurs by agglomeration of micrometer-sized dust grains into aggregates of at least millimeters to centimeters in size. However, the formation of larger bodies from the so-formed building blocks is not yet fully understood. Recent numerical models on dust growth lack a particular support by experimental studies in the size range of submillimeters, because these particles are predicted to collide at very gentle relative velocities of below 1 cm/s that can only be achieved in a reduced-gravity environment. The SPACE experiment investigates the collision behavior of an ensemble of silicate-dust aggregates inside several evacuated glass contai...

  15. Disentangling the effects of polymer coatings on silver nanoparticle agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity to determine mechanisms of nanotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, Justin M., E-mail: jzook@nist.gov; Halter, Melissa D.; Cleveland, Danielle; Long, Stephen E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Material Measurement Laboratory (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are frequently coated with a variety of polymers, which may affect various interdependent mechanisms of toxicity or antimicrobial action, including agglomeration and dissolution rates. Here, we systematically measure how citrate, dextran, 5 and 20 kDa poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) coatings affect AgNP agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity. In addition, to disentangle the coatings' effects on agglomeration from their other effects, we produce multiple stable agglomerate sizes of several of the coated {approx}23 nm AgNPs ranging from singly-dispersed to mean agglomerate sizes of several hundred nanometers. These dispersions allow us to independently study the effects of agglomeration and polymer coating on dissolution rate and hemolytic toxicity. We find that both hemolytic toxicity and dissolution rate are highest for the 5 kDa PEG coating, and toxicity and dissolution rate decrease significantly with increasing agglomerate size independent of coating. This correlation between toxicity and dissolution rate suggests that both polymer coating and agglomeration may affect hemolytic toxicity largely through their effects on dissolution. Because both the AgNP dissolution rate and hemolysis decrease only moderately compared to the large increases in agglomerate size, AgNPs' hemolytic toxicity may be caused by their large surface area and consequently high dissolution rate, rather than from other size-specific effects. At the silver concentrations used in this work, silver dissolved from AgNPs is expected to be primarily in the form of AgCl NPs, which are therefore more likely than Ag{sup +} ions to be the primary drivers of hemolytic toxicity. In addition, all AgNPs we tested are much more toxic to horse red blood cells than sheep red blood cells, highlighting the complexity of toxic responses and the need to test toxicity in multiple biological systems.

  16. Southern Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 9 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. In our final dust devil image we are again looking at the southern hemisphere of Mars. These tracks occur mainly on the northeast side of the topographic ridges. Of course, there are many exceptions, which makes understanding the dynamics that initiate the actual dust devil cyclone difficult. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -47.6, Longitude 317.3 East (42.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed

  17. Plentiful Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 8 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. These dust devil tracks occur on the northern plains of Mars. The majority of the surface seen in the image has been affected by the passage of dust devils. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -54.6, Longitude 79.3 East (280.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  18. Distribution of dust during two dust storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 ?g?m?3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 ?g?m?3). The mean PM1 concentrations were 97-241 ?g?m?3 with a maximum of 261 ?g?m?3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  19. Production and Characterisation of Comet Dust Analogues For The Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, A.; Brucato, J. R.; Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, P.

    Various instruments included in the Rosetta payload are aimed at characterizing the comet dust properties. A primary fundamental question mark concerns the properties of materials that they will have to analyse during actual operation. Organic (CHON), silicate and icy grains arranged in more or less heterogeneous fluffy agglomerates, appear plausible. Moreover, the dust will probably be characterised by different coex- isting textures: amorphous, partially structured and crystalline grains. On this ground the full success of the Rosetta mission will be achieved also thanks to the followingt activities: - test and calibration of on-board instruments by cometary representative marerials; - preparation to the interpretation of data returned by Rosetta on the basis of laboratory experiments on analogues of cometary materials. In this paper we report the results of laboratory activities performed along the previous lines.

  20. In Situ Observations of Interaction Between Particulate Agglomerates and an Advancing Planar Solid/Liquid Interface: Microgravity Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; Juretzko, F.; Stafanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Results are reported of directional solidification experiments on particulate agglomerate pushing and engulfment by a planar solid/liquid (s/l) interface. These experiments were conducted on the Space Shuttle Columbia during the United States Microgravity Payload 4 (USMP-4) Mission. It was found that the pushing to engulfment transition velocity, V(sub cr) for agglomerates depends not only on their effective size but also their orientation with respect to the s,1 interface. The analytical model for predicting V(sub cr) of a single particle was subsequently enhanced to predict V(sub cr) of the agglomerates by considering their shape factor and orientation.

  1. In-Situ Observations of Interaction Between Particulate Agglomerates and an Advancing Planar Solid/Liquid Interface: Microgravity Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; Juretzko, F.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Results are reported of directional solidification experiments on particulate agglomerate pushing and engulfment by a planar solid/liquid (s/1) interface. These experiments were conducted on the Space Shuttle Columbia during the United States Microgravity Payload 4 (USMP-4) Mission. It was found that the pushing to engulfment transition velocity, V(sub ct),, for agglomerates depends not only on their effective size but also their orientation with respect to the s/l interface. The analytical model for predicting V(sub cr) of a single particle was subsequently enhanced to predict V(sub cr) of the agglomerates by considering their shape factor and orientation.

  2. Investigation of coalescence kinetics of microcristalline cellulose in fluidised bed spray agglomeration: experimental studies and modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Peglow

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a model for fluidized bed spray agglomeration is presented. To describe the processes of heat and mass transfer, a physical based model is derived. The model takes evaporation process from the wetted particles as well as the effects of transfer phenomena between suspension gas and bypass gas into account. The change of particle size distribution during agglomeration, modeled by population balances, is linked to the heat and mass transfer model. A new technique is derived to extract agglomeration and nucleation rates from experimental data. Comparisons of experiments and simulations are presented.

  3. Biomass ash-bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in FBC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, H.J.M.; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Kiel, J.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    In (bubbling) fluidized-bed combustion and gasification of biomass, several potential problems are associated with the inorganic components of the fuel. A major problem area is defluidization due to bed agglomeration. The most common found process leading to defluidization in commercial-scale ins......In (bubbling) fluidized-bed combustion and gasification of biomass, several potential problems are associated with the inorganic components of the fuel. A major problem area is defluidization due to bed agglomeration. The most common found process leading to defluidization in commercial...... describes a fundamental study on the mechanisms of defluidization. For the studied process of bed defluidization due to sintering of grain-coating layers, it was found that the onset of the process depends on (a) a critical coating thickness, (b) on the fluidization velocity when it is below approximately...... four times the minimum fluidization velocity, and (c) on the viscosity (stickiness) of the outside of the grains (coating)....

  4. XRD and DTA Analysis of Developed Agglomerated Fluxes for Submerged Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique study of structural and chemical analysis of crystalline phases in developed agglomerated fluxes was carried out. Thirty-two fluxes were developed by using a mixture of oxides, halides, carbonates, silicates, and ferroalloys for submerged arc welding. The present paper focuses on only ten (out of thirty-two fluxes which were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD to know the different types of oxides formed and changed in oxidation number of metallic centers after sintering process at around 850∘C. To know the effect of temperature over phase transformation and melting of different compounds, differential thermal analysis (DTA was carried out from 1000 to 1400∘C. This study aims to know the quantity of ions present (percentage and melting behavior of developed agglomerated fluxes for submerged arc welding process.

  5. Spatial Agglomeration and Productivity of Textile and Leather Manufacturing in the Punjab Province of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Iqba

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether spatial agglomeration of textile and leather industry facilitates to enhance its own productivity at establishment level in the Punjab province of Pakistan. The empirical analysis is based on the survey data for the years 1995-96, 2000-2001 and 2005-06 collected from the Punjab Bureau of Statistics (PBS. The production function framework has been utilized. The results of production function suggest that spatial agglomeration of textile and leather industry plays a vital role in determining the productivity of establishments. The impact of localization (specialization is positive and stronger than urbanization (diversification which implies that locating manufacturing establishments in a particular district leads to enhance the productivity of establishments. Therefore, government policy should be biased to promote localization of textile and leather industry.

  6. Remediation of oil-contaminated sand by coal agglomeration using ball milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yu-Jen; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2011-10-01

    The mechanical shear force provided by a less energy intensive device (usually operating at 20-200 rpm), a ball mill, was used toperform coal agglomeration and its effects on remediation of a model fuel oil-contaminated sand were evaluated. Important process parameters such as the amount of coal added, milling time, milling speed and the size of milling elements are discussed. The results suggested that highly hydrophobic oil-coal agglomerates, formed by adding suitable amounts of coal into the oil-contaminated sand, could be mechanically liberated from cleaned sand during ball milling and recovered as a surface coating on the steel balls. Over 90% removal of oil from oil-contaminated sand was achieved with 6 wt% of coal addition and an optimum ball milling time of 20 min and speed of 200 rpm. This novel process has considerable potential for cleaning oil-contaminated sands.

  7. A Complex Network Approach for Nanoparticle Agglomeration Analysis in Nanoscale Images

    CERN Document Server

    Brandoli, Bruno; Orue, Jonathan; Arruda, Mauro; Goncalves, Diogo; Goncalves, Wesley; Moreira, Raphaell; Rodrigues-Jr, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Complex networks have been widely used in science and technology because of their ability to represent several systems. One of these systems is found in Biochemistry, in which the synthesis of new nanoparticles is a hot topic. However, the interpretation of experimental results in the search of new nanoparticles poses several challenges. This is due to the characteristics of nanoparticles images and due to their multiple intricate properties; one property of recurrent interest is the agglomeration of particles. Addressing this issue, this paper introduces an approach that uses complex networks to detect and describe nanoparticle agglomerates so to foster easier and more insightful analyses. In this approach, each detected particle in an image corresponds to a vertice and the distances between the particles define a criterion for creating edges. Edges are created if the distance is smaller than a radius of interest. Once this network is set, we calculate several discrete measures able to reveal the most outsta...

  8. Sonic enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Technical progress report: January 1993--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This 15th Quarterly Technical Progress Report presents the results of work accomplished during the period January 4, 193 through March 28, 1993 under Contract No. DE-AC21-88MC26288 entitled {open_quotes}Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture.{close_quotes} The fundamental studies conducted by West Virginia University and Pennsylvania State University are provided in subsections of this report. Shakedown testing continued through this period resulting in a series of required modifications for the coal-feed system, coal injector, installation of a water-cooling jacket at the bottom of the agglomeration chamber, and finally, the installation of an additional flow sensor and rate meter. Coal-fired bimodal tests were initiated at the end of the period. The unit was run at 2 atm pressure for 3 hours with steady-state operation for 2 hours. Then, the pressure was increased to 3 atm with steady-state operation for 2 hours.

  9. Investigation of agglomerated Cu seed on Cu oxidation after chemical mechanical planarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jeng-Yu, E-mail: jylin@ttu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China); Chou, Shu-Wei [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Min-Yuan [TSMC, No. 8, Li-Hsin Rd. 6, Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsinchu 300-77, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-01

    After chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), the reason which caused the formation of Cu-oxide defects at the interface between Cu deposit and TaN barrier layer has been studied. The experimental results of atomic force microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction demonstrated that the agglomeration phenomenon was found on Cu seed in the thickness of only 10 nm, thus resulting in the electrodeposited Cu film with more abundant C impurities at Cu/TaN interface and lower (1 1 1)/(2 0 0) ratio compared to the thick one (30 nm). Therefore it caused the Cu deposit with poor corrosion resistance and then the Cu-oxide defects were easily formed after CMP. As a result, the correlation between Cu-oxide defects at the Cu/TaN interface and the agglomeration on Cu seed layer was proposed herein.

  10. Analysis on Ecological Footprint of the Urban Agglomeration in Pearl River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG; Yi; CHENG; Huan; BAI; Zhong-yan; PENG; Xiao-chun

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]The research aimed to calculate and analyze ecological footprint of the urban agglomeration in Pearl River Delta in 2009. [Method]9 cities in Pearl River Delta as research zone, by using calculation model of the ecological footprint, ecological footprint and security of the urban agglomeration in Pearl River Delta were calculated. Current situation and sustainable development condition of the ecological environment in Pearl River Delta were conducted quantitative analysis. [Result] Except construction land and woodland, other 4 kinds of lands were all in ecological deficit states in Pearl River Delta. Especially arable land and fossil fuel land had obvious ecological deficit. [Conclusion]Biological resource consumption level and energy consumption level in Pearl River Delta were higher. We ought to take a variety of measures to reduce ecological deficit, making development manner turn toward sustainable direction.

  11. [House dust mite allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, A; Pichler, C

    2012-04-01

    House dust mites can be found all over the world where human beings live independent from the climate. Proteins from the gastrointestinal tract- almost all known as enzymes - are the allergens which induce chronic allergic diseases. The inhalation of small amounts of allergens on a regular base all night leads to a slow beginning of the disease with chronically stuffed nose and an exercise induced asthma which later on persists. House dust mites grow well in a humid climate - this can be in well isolated dwellings or in the tropical climate - and nourish from human skin dander. Scales are found in mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets. The clinical picture with slowly aggravating complaints leads quite often to a delayed diagnosis, which is accidently done on the occasion of a wider spectrum of allergy skin testing. The beginning of a medical therapy with topical steroids as nasal spray or inhalation leads to a fast relief of the complaints. Although discussed in extensive controversies in the literature - at least in Switzerland with the cold winter and dry climate - the recommendation of house dust mite avoidance measures is given to patients with good clinical results. The frequent ventilation of the dwelling with cold air in winter time cause a lower indoor humidity. Covering encasings on mattresses, pillow, and duvets reduces the possibility of chronic contact with mite allergens as well as the weekly changing the bed linen. Another option of therapy is the specific immunotherapy with extracts of house dust mites showing good results in children and adults. Using recombinant allergens will show a better quality in diagnostic as well as in therapeutic specific immunotherapy.

  12. Assessment of Urban Ecosystem Health Based on Entropy Weight Extension Decision Model in Urban Agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Yang; Aiwen Lin; Zhenzhen Zhao; Ling Zou; Cheng Sun

    2016-01-01

    Urban ecosystem health evaluation can assist in sustainable ecological management at a regional level. This study examined urban agglomeration ecosystem health in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River with entropy weight and extension theories. The model overcomes information omissions and subjectivity problems in the evaluation process of urban ecosystem health. Results showed that human capital and education, economic development level as well as urban infrastructure have a significant ef...

  13. Agglomeration Economies, Economic Growth and the New Economic Geography in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Diaz-Bautista

    2005-01-01

    The present study of regional economic growth in Mexico is based on the new economic geography, where distance plays an important role in explaining urban regional economic growth. The results show that distance to the northern border of Mexico and labor migration between states of Mexico, after the passage of NAFTA are important factors that explain the regional state growth and agglomerations in Mexico between 1994 and 2000. The results also indicate that job growth and FDI are not signific...

  14. Bed agglomeration in biomass fueled CFB-boilers; Sintring av baeddmaterial vid biobraensleeldning i CFB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zintl, F. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    In fluidized-bed boilers fired with solid fuels operational problems caused by spontaneous defluidization are sometimes observed. This bed agglomeration can be caused by sintering phenomena where fuel components and/or bed material may be involved. In serious cases the problems can lead to expensive operation breaks. The objective in this project was to show whether this type of operational problems can be minimized by choice of other than conventional bed materials. The study was carried out as model experiments in a larger laboratory scale. In a fluidized bed fired with propane a number of both well known and more unusual bed materials were tried out. The choice of bed materials included some common sands (silver and quartz sand) and, as possible alternatives, olivine sand, zirconium sand, calcined dolomite and the synthetic materials sintered magnesite (MgO) and mullite (alumina silicate). The model experiments were started at about 700 deg C and the temperature then raised until an irreversible bed agglomeration was observed, or to a maximum of 1100 deg C. The most promising results were obtained with calcined dolomite, being an active bed material. With this material no irreversible agglomerations were observed at all. The expensive synthetic materials sintered magnesite and mullite and the zirconium sand turned out as the next best. Olivine sand, on the other hand, showed a clear sensitivity to physical agglomeration and some sensitivity also towards sintering. The common sand types based on silicon oxide clearly showed the worst results. 12 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab 12 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  15. Nucleation, wetting and agglomeration of copper and copper-alloy thin films on metal liner surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBarbera, Stephanie Florence

    One of the key challenges in fabricating narrower and higher aspect ratio interconnects using damascene technology has been achieving an ultra-thin (˜2 nm) and continuous Cu seed coverage on trench sidewalls. The thin seed is prone to agglomeration because of poor Cu wetting on the Ta liner. Using in-situ conductance measurements, the effect of lowering the substrate temperature during Cu seed deposition has been studied on tantalum (Ta) and ruthenium (Ru) liner surfaces. On a Ta surface, it was found that lowering the deposition temperature to --65°C increases the nucleation rate of the Cu thin film, and reduces the minimum coalescing thickness for Cu on Ta liner from ˜4.5 nm (at room temperature) to ˜2 nm. On a Ru surface, Cu coalesces at wetting angle, coalescing thickness, and agglomeration resistance of thin Cu-3% Au, Cu-3% Mn, and Cu-3% Al layers on a Ta liner surface have been studied. It was found that the alloying increases the wetting angle of Cu on Ta at high temperature, as a result of either reduction in Cu alloy surface energy, solute surface segregation, or solute-liner interactions. In addition, the Cu alloys were found to be less agglomeration resistive as compared to pure Cu; their smaller grain size, interaction with the liner surface, and tendency to oxidize were found to accelerate their agglomeration. The coalescing thickness of the Cu alloys was found to be reduced from that of Cu (˜4.5 nm) to ˜2 nm.

  16. Agglomeration of Non-metallic Inclusions at the Steel/Ar Interface: Model Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wangzhong; Dogan, Neslihan; Coley, Kenneth S.

    2017-08-01

    Inclusion agglomeration is an important element in several industrial problems during steelmaking, such as nozzle clogging. In parallel work by the authors, a revised Kralchevsky-Paunov model has been established and the performance of this model has been validated against the experimental data from in-situ observations using confocal laser scanning microscopy. In this work, the revised model has been applied to quantitatively evaluate the attractive capillary force for the agglomeration of various inclusions at the interface between Ar and liquid iron/steel. A parametric study of the effects on the capillary force of the inclusion density, contact angle between the inclusion and liquid steel, and the surface tension of the liquid metal are quantitatively investigated. The results show that inclusion density and contact angle have a more marked effect on the capillary force than surface tension of liquid metal. Moreover, the inclusion agglomeration behavior in the liquid iron/steel matrix is discussed. The coagulation coefficient of various inclusions is calculated. Both the calculation results of the attractive capillary force of inclusions at the interface between Ar and liquid iron/steel and coagulation coefficient of inclusions in the liquid iron/steel matrix can offer a close agreement; moreover, the order of magnitude of inclusion agglomeration tendency is suggested. By using the coagulation coefficient, the inclusion collision volume and collision rate are calculated and the effects of inclusion composition, size, and number density are investigated. The evaluation results show that the tendency for affecting inclusion collision is inclusion number density > inclusion size > inclusion composition.

  17. Assessment of surface urban heat island across China's three main urban agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonghong; Fang, Xiaoyi; Xu, Yongming; Zhang, Shuo; Luan, Qingzu

    2017-06-01

    This article proposes a method for estimating the surface urban heat island intensity (SUHI) of urban areas, which addresses prior difficulties in the determination of rural contexts that may be used as a point of comparison. Based on indexes produced using this method, as well as remotely sensed datasets, the article compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of SUHIs within three major urban agglomerations (the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Pearl River Delta) and six typical metropolises. The article also examines the influence of socioeconomic factors on SUHI. The study revealed that this method is able to objectively monitor regional-scale SUHIs. The climate of the area studied is probably a determining factor in the seasonal variation of SUHIs. Research from the last 5 years (2010-2014) demonstrates that the urban heat island effect within the three urban agglomerations and five metropolises is serious. From 1994 to 2014, the average SUHI value for central urban areas rose from 0.4 to 2.3 K, while the total area where the SUHI value was >3.0 K increased from 1938 to 29,690 km2. The morphology of heat islands is significantly influenced by urbanization, meaning that heat islands within the areas studied will only continue to grow. Urban population and electricity consumption are the socioeconomic factors that exerted the greatest influence on the size of heat islands in China's major urban agglomerations. However, it is likely that economic measures designed to mitigate the UHI effect will differ in effectiveness from one urban agglomeration to another.

  18. Development of clean coal and clean soil technologies using advanced agglomeration technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignasiak, B.; Pawlak, W.; Szymocha, K.; Marr, J.

    1990-04-01

    The specific objectives of the bituminous coal program were to explore and evaluate the application of advanced agglomeration technology for: (1)desulphurization of bituminous coals to sulphur content acceptable within the current EPA SO{sub 2} emission guidelines; (2) deashing of bituminous coals to ash content of less than 10 percent; and (3)increasing the calorific value of bituminous coals to above 13,000 Btu/lb. (VC)

  19. A coal dust burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakhrshev, B.M.; Khasnullin, I.G.; Krauze, Ye.G.; Ushakov, Yu.A.; Zinovyev, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    The burner for combustion of coal dust fuel, primarily, in rotating furnaces, contains coaxially disposed pipes, a branch pipe for feeding in the air mixture and a rotating mechanism. The first two pipes are switched in to an air source. The third pipe on the input end has an oblique section and the pipe may be rotated around an axis by a mechanism. The first pipe has ports and it may be moved in an axial direction. By installing the third pipe in the first and second positions, it is possible to direct the dust coming from the branch pipe along the central (the larger part of the dust) or the central pipe, respectively, which makes it possible to regulate the configuration of the torch and its temperature. Hot air is sucked from the furnace through the ports in the perforated first pipe to the mouth of the burner, which makes it possible to intensify combustion. By moving the fifitpipe to the right it is possible to overlap the ports with the projections and to rule out suction of the air. The possibility of regulating combustion in wide ranges makes it possible to reduce the expenditure of fuel by 2 to 3 percent.

  20. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  1. 电凝并技术脱除P M2.5的研究现状及发展方向%Research status and development direction of electric agglomeration technology for PM2 . 5 removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    竹涛; 陈锐; 王晓佳; 夏妮; 赵文娟; 李笑阳

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve capture efficiency of traditional filter for PM2. 5,the agglomeration of homopolar and heteropole charged par-ticles in alternating electric field,coulomb agglomeration of heteropole charged particles,agglomeration of heteropole charged particles in direct-current electric field were introduced. The development direction of electric agglomeration was analyzed. The agglomeration effects of heteropole charged particles in alternating electric field was the best. The two-area filter had better fine particle capture performance than the three-area filter. The low temperature plasma electric agglomeration equipment was placed directly in pipe to precharge dust. A doub-le-beam electric cage bag filter was developed based on the original bag filter. Based on the new bag filter,a compound reactor which could remove S,NOx and Hg at the same time had tight structure and small volume. Its dust removal efficiency was able to reach 99%.%针对传统除尘器无法有效捕集P M2.5的问题,笔者论述了同极荷电颗粒在交变电场中的凝并、异极性荷电粉尘的库伦凝并、异极荷电颗粒在交变电场中的凝并、异极荷电颗粒在直流电场中的凝并、四级凝并5种电凝并技术的研究现状,并提出了电凝并技术的发展方向。5种电凝并技术中,异极荷电颗粒在交变电场中的凝并效果较好;两区式异极荷电颗粒在交变电场中的凝并效果优于三区式。低温等离子体-电凝并技术将低温等离子体-电凝并设备直接置于管道中,对粉尘预荷电;基于原有布袋除尘器开发出双踪电笼布袋除尘装置,联合脱除P M2.5。利用低温等离子体-电凝并技术开发的复合反应器结构紧凑,占地面积小,对细微粒子的除尘效率高达99%,可实现脱硫脱硝脱汞的协同脱除,是电凝并技术的发展方向。

  2. Integrated low emission cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines (electrostatic agglomeration)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quimby, J.M.; Kumar, K.S.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to investigate the removal of SO[sub x] and particulate matter from direct coal fired combustion gas streams at high temperature and high pressure conditions. This investigation was to be accomplished through a bench scale testing and evaluation program for SO[sub x] removal and the innovative particulate collection concept of particulate growth through electrostatic agglomeration followed by high efficiency mechanical collection. The process goal was to achieve control better than that required by 1979 New Source Performance Standards. During Phase I, the designs of the combustor and gas cleanup apparatus were successfully completed. Hot gas cleanup was designed to be accomplished at temperature levels between 1800[degrees] and 2500[degrees]F at pressures up to 15 atmospheres. The combustor gas flow rate could be varied between 0.2--0.5 pounds per second. The electrostatic agglomerator residence time could be varied between 0.25 to 3 seconds. In Phase II, all components were fabricated, and erected successfully. Test data from shakedown testing was obtained. Unpredictable difficulties in pilot plant erection and shakedown consumed more budget resources than was estimated and as a consequence DOE, METC, decided ft was best to complete the contract at the end of Phase II. Parameters studied in shakedown testing revealed that high-temperature high pressure electrostatics offers an alternative to barrier filtration in hot gas cleanup but more research is needed in successful system integration between the combustor and electrostatic agglomerator.

  3. Assessment of Urban Ecosystem Health Based on Entropy Weight Extension Decision Model in Urban Agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban ecosystem health evaluation can assist in sustainable ecological management at a regional level. This study examined urban agglomeration ecosystem health in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River with entropy weight and extension theories. The model overcomes information omissions and subjectivity problems in the evaluation process of urban ecosystem health. Results showed that human capital and education, economic development level as well as urban infrastructure have a significant effect on the health states of urban agglomerations. The health status of the urban agglomeration’s ecosystem was not optimistic in 2013. The majority of the cities were unhealthy or verging on unhealthy, accounting for 64.52% of the total number of cities in the urban agglomeration. The regional differences of the 31 cities’ ecosystem health are significant. The cause originated from an imbalance in economic development and the policy guidance of city development. It is necessary to speed up the integration process to promote coordinated regional development. The present study will aid us in understanding and advancing the health situation of the urban ecosystem in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River and will provide an efficient urban ecosystem health evaluation method that can be used in other areas.

  4. Relationship Between Social Economic Agglomeration and Labor Productivity of Core Cities in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng; YANG Qingshan; ZHAO Yichun

    2012-01-01

    Dalian,Shenyang,Changchun and Harbin are the four core cities which play an essential role in terms of promoting the economic development in Northeast China.In this paper,the impact of urban agglomeration on labor productivity is explored by making comparisons among these four cities.The model used for analysis is a classical model derived from previous studies.Some indicators,such as population density and economic density,were selected to examine the impact of urban agglomeration on the labor productivity based on the time-series data for the four cities from 1990 to 2007.The four main conclusions are:1) The promotion from the growth rate of population density on the growth rate of labor productivity is limited.2) The negative relationship exists between the growth rate of employment density and the growth rate of labor productivity.3) Agglomeration effect exists in the four cities,the highest one is Dalian,Shenyang takes the second place,followed by Changchun and Harbin,and the predominant promotion exerted on the labor productivity is the output density.

  5. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  6. Gasification of palm empty fruit bunch in a bubbling fluidized bed: a performance and agglomeration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahijani, Pooya; Zainal, Zainal Alimuddin

    2011-01-01

    Gasification of palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) was investigated in a pilot-scale air-blown fluidized bed. The effect of bed temperature (650-1050 °C) on gasification performance was studied. To explore the potential of EFB, the gasification results were compared to that of sawdust. Results showed that maximum heating values (HHV) of 5.37 and 5.88 (MJ/Nm3), dry gas yield of 2.04 and 2.0 (Nm3/kg), carbon conversion of 93% and 85 % and cold gas efficiency of 72% and 71 % were obtained for EFB and sawdust at the temperature of 1050 °C and ER of 0.25. However, it was realized that agglomeration was the major issue in EFB gasification at high temperatures. To prevent the bed agglomeration, EFB gasification was performed at temperature of 770±20 °C while the ER was varied from 0.17 to 0.32. Maximum HHV of 4.53 was obtained at ER of 0.21 where no agglomeration was observed.

  7. Investigations on Agglomeration and Haemocompatibility of Vitamin E TPGS Surface Modified Berberine Chloride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameswara Rao Vuddanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to investigate the influence of surface modification on systemic stability of NPs. Vitamin E TPGS (1% w/v was used for surface modification of berberine chloride nanoparticles. Naked and surface modified NPs were incubated in different SBFs (pH 6.8 and 7.4 with or without bile salts and human plasma. NPs were observed for particle agglomeration and morphology by particle size analyzer and TEM, respectively. The haemocompatibility studies were conducted on developed NPs to evaluate their safety profile. The surface modified NPs were stable compared to naked NPs in different SBFs due to the steric stabilization property of vitamin E TPGS. Particle agglomeration was not seen when NPs were incubated in SBF (pH 6.8 with bile salts. No agglomeration was observed in NPs after their incubation in plasma but particle size of the naked NPs increased due to adhesion of plasma proteins. The TEM images confirmed the particle size results. DSC and FT-IR studies confirmed the coexistence of TPGS in surface modified NPs. The permissible haemolysis, LDH release, and platelet aggregation revealed that NPs were compatible for systemic administration. Thus, the study illustrated that the surface modification is helpful in the maintenance of stability of NPs in systemic conditions.

  8. Behavior of Polyamine Fixing Agents on Agglomeration of Dissolved and Colloidal Substances in Papermaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqian Zhang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Five polyamine fixing agents with different molecular weights but slightly different charge densities were used to treat a deinked pulp. Their efficacy in controlling colloidal substances (CS in the pulp was measured using focused beam reflectance measurements (FBRM. The objective was to determine if the colloidal substances were affected by the fixing agents by a “colloidal fixation” mechanism, i.e., colloidal particles being fixed onto pulp fiber in an un-agglomerated, single-particle state, or a “colloidal agglomeration” one, i.e., colloidal particles being coagulated by fixing agents into bigger agglomerates. The results showed that colloidal fixation does take place, especially for the polyamine with the smallest molecular weight. Among the five polyamines, it was found that higher molecular weights tended to result in more extensive colloidal agglomeration, but the effect of charge density was almost insignificant. Because it is efficient in differentiating between these two fixation mechanisms, FBRM is a powerful tool in screening different fixing agents.

  9. Acceleration of cometary dust near the nucleus: application to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorov, Yuri; Reshetnyk, Volodymyr; Lacerda, Pedro; Hartogh, Paul; Blum, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    We present a model of cometary dust capable of simulating the dynamics within the first few tens of km of the comet surface. Recent measurements by the Grain Impact Analyser and Dust Accumulator and Cometary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser instruments on Rosetta show that the nucleus emits fluffy dust particles with porosities above 50 per cent and sizes up to at least mm (Fulle et al. 2015b; Rotundi et al. 2015; Schulz et al. 2015). Retrieval of the physical properties of these particles requires a model of the effective forces governing their dynamics. Here, we present a model capable of simulating realistic, large and porous particles using hierarchical aggregates, which shows previous extrapolations to be inadequate. The main strengths of our approach are that we can simulate very large (mm-scale) non-spherical agglomerates and can accurately determine their (1) effective cross-section and ratio of cross-section to mass, (2) gas drag coefficient, and (3) light scattering properties. In practical terms, we find that a more detailed treatment of the dust structure results in three to five times higher velocities for large dust particles in the inner coma than previously estimated using spherical particles of the same mass. We apply our model to the dynamics of dust in the vicinity of the nucleus of comet 67P and successfully reproduce the dust speeds reported early on when the comet was roughly 3.5 au from the Sun. At this stage, we employ a simple spherical comet nucleus, we model activity as constant velocity gas expansion from a uniformly active surface, and use Mie scattering. We discuss pathways to improve on these simplifications in the future.

  10. Laboratory measurements of light scattering properties of a carbonaceous interstellar dust analogue (soot particles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Ankur; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Ahmed, Gazi A.; Kashyap Boruah, Goutam

    2012-07-01

    Dust particles are present everywhere in the solar system, cometary comae and tail, interstellar dust clouds, asteroidal atmospheres and aerosols of other planetary atmospheres. The in situ sampling of the cometary dust composition conducted by CIDA (Cometary and Interstellar Dust Analyzer) and observed interstellar extinction and polarization revealed the presence of amorphous carbon, graphite, silicate, graphite, carbonates, metal oxide grains, ice particles and nanodiamonds in the interstellar medium. These particles act as the heterogeneous media to scatter solar or steller light. Observations and simulations of the light scattered by dust particles in cometary comae, interplanetary space and planetary regolith (or analogous terrestrial dust aggregates) is necessary to deduce the physical properties of their constituent particles and may lead to a better understanding of the formation of solar system. Notably the measurement of the volume scattering function (VSF) and degree of linear polarization (DLP) can be used to estimate parameters like size, porosity and roughness of the dust particles. In this contribution we report the design and fabrication of a laser based laboratory light scattering instrument that uses an array of 16 static Si photodetectors and can be operated at three different incident wavelengths (543.5 nm, 594.5 nm and 632.8 nm). The accuracy and the reliability of the setup were verified by conducting light scattering measurements on spherical water droplets and comparing the results with theoretical Mie calculations. The results of the measurements of the VSF and DLP of carbonaceous soot particles (agglomerates) that were sprayed in front of the laser beam by using an aerosol sprayer are presented. The experimental results were further analyzed by comparing with theoretically generated T-matrix and DDA (Discrete Dipole Approximation) plots with estimated parameters to yield more fruitful conclusions. Significant variations of the light

  11. Clouds and Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 2 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 180 East (180 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote

  12. Physicochemical Characteristics of Dust Particles in HVOF Spraying and Occupational Hazards: Case Study in a Chinese Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haihong; Li, Haijun; Li, Xinyu

    2016-06-01

    Dust particles generated in thermal spray process can cause serious health problems to the workers. Dust particles generated in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying WC-Co coatings were characterized in terms of mass concentrations, particle size distribution, micro morphologies, and composition. Results show that the highest instantaneous exposure concentration of dust particles in the investigated thermal spray workshop is 140 mg/m3 and the time-weighted average concentration is 34.2 mg/m3, which are approximately 8 and 4 times higher than the occupational exposure limits in China, respectively. The large dust particles above 10 μm in size present a unique morphology of polygonal or irregular block of crushed powder, and smaller dust particles mainly exist in the form of irregular or flocculent agglomerates. Some heavy metals, such as chromium, cobalt, and nickel, are also found in the air of the workshop and their concentrations are higher than the limits. Potential occupational hazards of the dust particles in the thermal spray process are further analyzed based on their characteristics and the workers' exposure to the nanoparticles is assessed using a control banding tool.

  13. Application of acoustic agglomeration to enhance air filtration efficiency in air-conditioning and mechanical ventilation (ACMV) systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bing Feng Ng; Jin Wen Xiong; Man Pun Wan

    2017-01-01

    .... This pre-conditioning mechanism can be fulfilled by acoustic agglomeration, which is a phenomenon that promotes the coagulation of suspended particles by acoustic waves propagating in the fluid medium...

  14. A 3D hybrid grid generation technique and a multigrid/parallel algorithm based on anisotropic agglomeration approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Laiping; Zhao Zhong; Chang Xinghua; He Xin

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid grid generation technique and a multigrid/parallel algorithm are presented in this paper for turbulence flow simulations over three-dimensional (3D) complex geometries.The hybrid grid generation technique is based on an agglomeration method of anisotropic tetrahedrons.Firstly,the complex computational domain is covered by pure tetrahedral grids,in which anisotropic tetrahedrons are adopted to discrete the boundary layer and isotropic tetrahedrons in the outer field.Then,the anisotropic tetrahedrons in the boundary layer are agglomerated to generate prismatic grids.The agglomeration method can improve the grid quality in boundary layer and reduce the grid quantity to enhance the numerical accuracy and efficiency.In order to accelerate the convergence history,a multigrid/parallel algorithm is developed also based on anisotropic agglomeration approach.The numerical results demonstrate the excellent accelerating capability of this multigrid method.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of the effect of waviness and agglomeration of CNTs on interface strength of thermoset nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alian, A R; Meguid, S A

    2017-02-08

    Most existing molecular dynamics simulations in nanoreinforced composites assume carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to be straight and uniformly dispersed within thermoplastics. In reality, however, CNTs are typically curved, agglomerated and aggregated as a result of van der Waal interactions and electrostatic forces. In this paper, we account for both curvature and agglomeration of CNTs in extensive molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The purpose of these simulations is to evaluate the influence of waviness and agglomeration of these curved and agglomerated CNTs on the interfacial strength of thermoset nanocomposite and upon their load transfer capability. Two aspects of the work were accordingly examined. In the first, realistic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of the same length but varied curvatures were embedded in thermoset polymer composites and simulations of pull-out tests were conducted to evaluate the corresponding interfacial shear strength (ISS). In the second, the effect of the agglomerate size upon the ISS was determined using bundles of CNTs of different diameters. The results of our MD simulations revealed the following. The pull-out force of the curved CNTs is significantly higher than its straight counterpart and increases further with the increase in the waviness of the CNTs. This is attributed to the added pull-out energy dissipated in straightening the CNTs during the pull-out process. It also reveals that agglomeration of CNTs leads to a reduction in the ISS and poor load transferability, and that this reduction is governed by the size of the agglomerate. The simulation results were also used to develop a generalized relation for the ISS that takes into consideration the effect of waviness and agglomeration of CNTs of CNT-polymer composites.

  16. Optimizing Saharan dust CALIPSO retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate improvements in CALIPSO dust extinction retrievals over North Africa and Europe when corrections are applied regarding the Saharan dust lidar ratio assumption, the separation of dust portion in detected dust mixtures, and the averaging scheme introduced in the Level 3 CALIPSO product. First, a universal, spatially constant lidar ratio of 58 sr instead of 40 sr is applied to individual Level 2 dust-related backscatter products. The resulting aerosol optical depths show an improvement compared with synchronous and co-located AERONET measurements. An absolute bias of the order of −0.03 has been found, improving on the statistically significant biases of the order of −0.10 reported in the literature for the original CALIPSO product. When compared with the MODIS co-located AOD product, the CALIPSO negative bias is even less for the lidar ratio of 58 sr. After introducing the new lidar ratio for the domain studied, we examine potential improvements to the climatological CALIPSO Level 3 extinction product: (1 by introducing a new methodology for the calculation of pure dust extinction from dust mixtures and (2 by applying an averaging scheme that includes zero extinction values for the non-dust aerosol types detected. The scheme is applied at a horizontal spatial resolution of 1° × 1° for ease of comparison with the instantaneous and co-located dust extinction profiles simulated by the BSC-DREAM8b dust model. Comparisons show that the extinction profiles retrieved with the proposed methodology reproduce the well-known model biases per sub-region examined. The very good agreement of the proposed CALIPSO extinction product with respect to AERONET, MODIS and the BSC-DREAM8b dust model, makes this dataset an ideal candidate for the provision of an accurate and robust multi-year dust climatology over North Africa and Europe.

  17. Diaquatetrabromidotin(IV trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [SnBr4(H2O2]·3H2O, forms large colourless crystals in originally sealed samples of tin tetrabromide. It constitutes the first structurally characterized hydrate of SnBr4 and is isostructural with the corresponding hydrate of SnCl4. It is composed of SnIV atoms octahedrally coordinated by four Br atoms and two cis-related water molecules. The octahedra exhibit site symmetry 2. They are arranged into columns along [001] via medium–strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the two lattice water molecules (one situated on a twofold rotation axis while the chains are interconnected via longer O—H...Br hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  18. Aerosol influence domain of Beijing and peripheral city agglomeration and its climatic effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiangde; SHI Xiaohui; ZHANG Shengjun; DING Guoan; MIAO Qiuju; ZHOU Li

    2006-01-01

    The aerosol distribution in Beijing and peripheral cities agglomeration (BPCA) and its regional climatic effect are investigated on the basis of the statistical analyses of satellite Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) retrieval aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the meteorological data of sunshine duration, fog days, and low cloud cover, observed at Beijing and its peripheral meteorological stations. The analysis on multi-samples variational correction of the satellite remote sensing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD under the clear sky and stable weather condition in conjunction with surface observations reveal that there was a "triangle-like" distribution pattern of the high values of aerosols in the southern "valley" of the "U-shape"megarelief of Beijing and its peripheral areas. The distribution pattern suggests that the large-scale transfer and diffusion of city agglomeration pollutants might form a relatively persistent characteristic spatial distribution of city agglomeration pollutants much larger than city-scale. Under the background of the particular megarelief effect of Beijing and peripheral areas, the high value area of TOMS AOD, as well as regional correlation distribution between clear sky sunshine duration and TOMS AOD are also similar to the composite image of MODIS AOD variational fields,that is to say, the effect of atmospheric aerosols was very distinctive in Beijing and peripheral areas. The high value area of the negative correlation between clear sky sunshine duration and TOMS AOD approximately accorded with the significant negative value area of the sunshine duration deviations of the 1980s to the 1990s, and the daily variations of the AOD also showed an anti-phase relation with those of clear sky sunshine duration. The above high correlation area of the urban aerosol impact of Beijing-Tianjin region leant towards south peripheral area,with its "center of gravity" in the south of Beijing-Tianjin agglomeration, and

  19. The self-preserving size distribution theory. I. Effects of the Knudsen number on aerosol agglomerate growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Petrus J; Friedlander, Sheldon K

    2002-04-15

    Gas-phase synthesis of fine solid particles leads to fractal-like structures whose transport and light scattering properties differ from those of their spherical counterparts. Self-preserving size distribution theory provides a useful methodology for analyzing the asymptotic behavior of such systems. Apparent inconsistencies in previous treatments of the self-preserving size distributions in the free molecule regime are resolved. Integro-differential equations for fractal-like particles in the continuum and near continuum regimes are derived and used to calculate the self-preserving and quasi-self-preserving size distributions for agglomerates formed by Brownian coagulation. The results for the limiting case (the continuum regime) were compared with the results of other authors. For these cases the finite difference method was in good in agreement with previous calculations in the continuum regime. A new analysis of aerosol agglomeration for the entire Knudsen number range was developed and compared with a monodisperse model; Higher agglomeration rates were found for lower fractal dimensions, as expected from previous studies. Effects of fractal dimension, pressure, volume loading and temperature on agglomerate growth were investigated. The agglomeration rate can be reduced by decreasing volumetric loading or by increasing the pressure. In laminar flow, an increase in pressure can be used to control particle growth and polydispersity. For D(f)=2, an increase in pressure from 1 to 4 bar reduces the collision radius by about 30%. Varying the temperature has a much smaller effect on agglomerate coagulation.

  20. dBASE IV basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  1. Phase IV of Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, ...

  2. Dust coagulation in ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  3. Flying Through Dust From Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    How can we tell what an asteroid is made of? Until now, weve relied on remote spectral observations, though NASAs recently launched OSIRIS-REx mission may soon change this by landing on an asteroid and returning with a sample.But what if we could learn more about the asteroids near Earth without needing to land on each one? It turns out that we can by flying through their dust.The aerogel dust collector of the Stardust mission. [NASA/JPL/Caltech]Ejected CluesWhen an airless body is impacted by the meteoroids prevalent throughout our solar system, ejecta from the body are flung into the space around it. In the case of small objects like asteroids, their gravitational pull is so weak that most of the ejected material escapes, forming a surrounding cloud of dust.By flying a spacecraft through this cloud, we could perform chemical analysis of the dust, thereby determining the asteroids composition. We could even capture some of the dust during a flyby (for example, by using an aerogel collector like in the Stardust mission) and bring it back home to analyze.So whats the best place to fly a dust-analyzing or -collecting spacecraft? To answer this, we need to know what the typical distribution of dust is around a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) a problem that scientists Jamey Szalay (Southwest Research Institute) and Mihly Hornyi (University of Colorado Boulder) address in a recent study.The colors show the density distribution for dust grains larger than 0.3 m around a body with a 10-km radius. The distribution is asymmetric, with higher densities on the apex side, shown here in the +y direction. [Szalay Hornyi 2016]Moon as a LaboratoryTo determine typical dust distributions around NEAs, Szalay and Hornyi first look at the distribution of dust around our own Moon, caused by the same barrage of meteorites wed expect to impact NEAs. The Moons dust cloud was measured in situ in 2013 and 2014 by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) on board the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment

  4. Gravimetric dust sampling for control purposes and occupational dust sampling.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the introduction of gravimetric dust sampling, konimeters had been used for dust sampling, which was largely for control purposes. Whether or not absolute results were achievable was not an issue since relative results were used to evaluate...

  5. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Domańska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mołocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis.

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  7. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  8. Agglomeration Rents,Policy Rents and Agglomeration Mechanism:Study on Science and Technology Service Industries%集聚租、政策租与产业集聚:基于科技服务业的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟小平

    2014-01-01

    促进科技服务业集聚的机制可分解为市场机制和政策机制,前者为产业集群内的企业提供集聚租,后者提供政策租。集聚租和政策租都能显著地促进科技服务业的产业集聚,集聚租和政策租在产业集聚的不同过程中发挥着不同的作用,基于市场机制的集聚租能够对科技服务业的集聚产生长久效应,而基于政策机制以获得政策租是促进科技服务企业进驻集群的短期诱因。%Relying on the relevant theory of industry organization and space economics,this paper aims at explaining the motives for the growing self-reinforcement of industry spatial agglomeration. Based on this, the stimulus factors of S&T service industrial agglomeration can be divided into market mechanism and policy mechanism. Correspondingly,the objective of the agglomeration of S&T service industry is to obtain the“ag-glomeration rent”and“policy rent”provided by industry cluster. The results show that,the effect of“policy rent”and“agglomeration rent”on S&T service industrial agglomeration is obvious. In the long term,the effect of“agglomeration rent”on S&T service industrial agglomeration is greater than that of“policy rent”.

  9. Indoor allergens in settled dust from kindergartens in city of Łódź, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Cyprowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of the study was to determine the levels of house dust mite (Der p1, dog (Can f1, cat (Fel d1 and cockroach (Bla g2 allergens in kindergartens localized in an urban agglomeration. Material and Methods: A quantitative analysis of allergens was carried out in settled dust samples collected by vacuuming the floor surface in three kindergartens (N = 84 and children's clothing (N = 36. The samples were collected in springsummer and autumn-winter periods as well as at the beginning and end of the week. The allergen dust concentration was determined by enzyme-linked immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA. Results: The mean geometric concentrations (±geometric standard deviations of allergens Der p1, Can f1, Fel d1 and Bla g2 determined in kindergartens were: 0.02±3.21 μg/g of dust; 0.97±4.49 μg/g of dust; 0.30±4.43 μg/g of dust and 0.01±3.08 μg/g of dust, respectively. Younger classrooms (children aged from 3 to 4 years were characterized by almost twice higher mean concentration of allergen Fel d1, as compared to older classrooms (children aged from 5 to 6 years (p < 0.05. A significant impact of seasonality on the level of dog allergen Can f1 was found (p < 0.05. No significant weekly variation was found in average concentrations of the allergens. Children who had a dog and/or cat at home were characterized by high concentrations of allergens Can f1 and Fel d1 on their clothes (59.2±5.39 μg Can f1/g of dust; 3.63±1.47 μg Fel d1/g of dust, significantly higher than concentrations of allergens in children who did not have any pets (p < 0.001. Conclusions: Special attention should be paid to keeping the kindergarten rooms tidy and clean and to an appropriate choice of furnishings and fittings which would prevent the proliferation of the house dust mite and accumulation of allergens.

  10. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  11. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  12. Mining dust filter. Bergbaustaubfilter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igelbuescher, H.; Hoelter, H.

    1988-12-28

    A dust filter for application underground, whose casing is designed as a transportable unit combinable with further casings and fitted with removable filter pockets. These filter pockets have a frame which seals towards the casing and with the lattices on which the filter cloth is stretched and with spacers holding the said lattices at a distance. Each casing as such has inspection ports that are operationable optionally on either side, and clean and crude gas channels on its upper side. The ends of these channels have coupleable head pieces, so that connection is made easy when casings are arranged in a line. Each crude gas channel is connected to the inside of the casing by means of perforations in the floor of said channel, whereas the clean gas channel, for its part, is in connection with the inside of the casing by means of a channel on the head side of the casing. It is thus possible to create a dust filter having practically any desired output by arranging individual modules in line, in which connection each individual module is reliably transportable on the facilities available below ground, as pre-fabricated above ground. Stable support of the sides of the filter cloths is ensured by the lattice that consists of reciprocally cranked longitudinal and transverse wires. 10 figs.

  13. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  14. Erosion of dust aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 m/s and above. Though fractal aggregates as ...

  15. Andromeda's dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, Robert [CSIRO—Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NWS 1710 (Australia); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  16. Dust and the Sick Building Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul; Wohlfahrt Nielsen, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome......Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome...

  17. Stability of silver nanoparticles: agglomeration and oxidation in biological relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Laura E.; Giacomelli, Carla E.

    2017-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are the most used nanomaterial in consumer products due to the intrinsic antimicrobial capacity of silver. However, Ag-NP may be also harmful to algae, aquatic species, mammalian cells, and higher plants because both Ag+ and nanoparticles are responsible of cell damages. The oxidative dissolution of Ag-NP would proceed to completion under oxic conditions, but the rate and extent of the dissolution depend on several factors. This work correlates the effect of the capping agent (albumin and citrate) with the stability of Ag-NP towards agglomeration in simulated body fluid (SBF) and oxidation in the presence of ROS species (H2O2). Capping provides colloidal stability only through electrostatic means, whereas albumin acts as bulky ligands giving steric and electrostatic repulsion, inhibiting the agglomeration in SBF. However, citrate capping protects Ag-NP from dissolution to a major extent than albumin does because of its reducing power. Moreover, citrate in solution minimizes the oxidation of albumin-coated Ag-NP even after long incubation times. H2O2-induced dissolution proceeds to completion with Ag-NP incubated in SBF, while incubation in citrate leads to an incomplete oxidation. In short, albumin is an excellent capping agent to minimize Ag-NP agglomeration whereas citrate provides a mild-reductive medium that prevents dissolution in biological relevant media as well as in the presence of ROS species. These results provide insight into how the surface properties and media composition affect the release of Ag+ from Ag-NP, related to the cell toxicity and relevant to the storage and lifetime of silver-containing nanomaterials.

  18. Modern understanding of ‘geoeconomic position’ and the Saint Petersburg agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov S. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a modern interpretation of the concept of ‘geoeconomic situation’ as applied to one of the most important centers of the Baltic region — the St. Petersburg agglomeration. The coastal location of the agglomeration and close connections with the Leningrad region make it possible to consider the Saint Petersburg coastal region (Baltic Area as a whole. The article sets out not only to verify, confirm, and explain the features of the geoeconomic position of the coastal region, but also to describe the contiguous geoeconomic space. The position of the St. Petersburg coastal region is of crucial importance for ensuring a steady growth of regional economy, the propagation of industrialization impulses, and modernization in the heart of Russian Northwestern macroregion. At the same time, the specific features of the region’s geoeconomic position magnify the ‘inherited’ ad acquired effects of focal industrialization and space polarization, which creates additional prerequisites for the inversion of the Russian economic space — ‘Russia of the physical space’ and ‘the economic space of Russia’. The study uses traditional methodology of economic geography (the territorial, cluster, and spatial approaches and the geoeconomic approach developed by the authors. The article also addresses recent findings in regional economy and spatial studies. It is aimed at the development of the geoeconomic paradigm in the framework of social geography and that of spatial science. An analysis of the geoeconomic position and the developing spatial relations can be of interest for researchers of geographic clusters, agglomerations, and such cross-border forms of cooperation, as growth triangles, for example.

  19. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  20. A Comparative Study on Changes in the Spatial Industry Agglomeration in Eastern EU Developing Countries: Romania vs. Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina-Stefania Dirzu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Taking a closer look at the spatial distribution of industrial sectors, it becomes quite obvious that there is an increasing disposition for industries to concentrate in certain regions in order to benefit of agglomeration assets. In this context, we consider necessary to analyze how industrial agglomerations have evolved over time and to what extent major transformations have affected agglomeration phenomenon in lagging regions of Eastern countries, finally our paper bringing supportive evidence from Romania and Bulgaria. To what extent, have patterns of industrial agglomeration modified during the transition period? Has relocation of economic activities taken place? What are the main determinants of industrial concentration patterns? These are some crucial questions that we try to find a realistic response through the present paper. Eastern economies are notably challenging from this point of view because they experienced several decades long economic development period which was earmarked by socialist industrialization. Under the planned economy, these countries have faced more barriers to an efficient geographical allocation of economic activities across regions than their peers in the Western Europe especially because they faced the legacy of a planned economy system that determined locations for economic activities based on political decisions, not based on economic efficiency. Thus, our effort can be seen as a contribution to knowledge about agglomeration in the non-Western countries in general, and in developing regions in particular. Focusing our study on two-digit industrial sectors of 14 regions at NUTS2 level, this paper aims to identify and explain the changes regarding the evolution of industrial agglomerations in the last years across Romania compared to Bulgaria. In the end, our analysis will be able to conclude in what manner the effects of transition period influenced the patterns of industrial agglomeration in these two

  1. Preparation of agglomerated crystals for direct tabletting and microencapsulation by the spherical crystallization technique with a continuous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, T; Takeuchi, H; Hino, T; Itoh, A; Kawashima, Y; Kiuchi, K

    1994-04-01

    Adhesive and cohesive properties of chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CP) crystals were modified to improve their powder processing, e.g., direct tabletting and microencapsulation, by agglomeration. Moreover, sustained-released gelling microcapsules of CP were devised to prolong the pharmacological effect. The spherical crystallization technique was applied to prepare agglomerates for direct tabletting and microencapsulation to use them as core materials. The ethanolic solution dissolving CP was poured into a stirred cyclohexane, yielding spherically agglomerated crystals. The resultant agglomerates were free-flowing and easily packable spheres with average diameters of 200 to 1000 microns. The agglomerates reserved the high compressibility of the original powder having a small particle size (14 microns). The compression behavior represented by Heckel's equation suggested that the agglomerates were disintegrated to individual primary crystals at low compression pressures, and then they were closely repacked and plastically deformed at higher pressures. After agglomeration, microencapsulation was continuously performed in the same batch by a phase separation method. Coacervate droplets produced by pouring cyclohexane into a dichloromethane solution, dissolving polyvinyl acetate as a coating polymer, were added to the crystallization system under stirring, to prepare the microcapsules. By filling the microcapsules in gelatin hard capsules or tabletting them, their drug release rates became retarded compared with the physical mixture treated in the same way, having the same formulation as the microcapsules. This phenomenon was due to the gelation of polyvinyl acetate of the microcapsules in the dissolution medium, whose glass transition temperature is very low. This novel sustained-release dosage form is termed "gelled microcapsules."

  2. DSM-IV Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) will become one of most frequently used reference documents in counseling profession. Describes progress being made in development of DSM-IV, scheduled for publication in 1994. Describes revision process and proposed organizational changes and new diagnostic…

  3. The suborbital particle aggregation and collision experiment (SPACE): Studying the collision behavior of submillimeter-sized dust aggregates on the suborbital rocket flight REXUS 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Julie; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Weidling, René; Blum, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE) is a novel approach to study the collision properties of submillimeter-sized, highly porous dust aggregates. The experiment was designed, built, and carried out to increase our knowledge about the processes dominating the first phase of planet formation. During this phase, the growth of planetary precursors occurs by agglomeration of micrometer-sized dust grains into aggregates of at least millimeters to centimeters in size. However, the formation of larger bodies from the so-formed building blocks is not yet fully understood. Recent numerical models on dust growth lack a particular support by experimental studies in the size range of submillimeters, because these particles are predicted to collide at very gentle relative velocities of below 1 cm/s that can only be achieved in a reduced-gravity environment. The SPACE experiment investigates the collision behavior of an ensemble of silicate-dust aggregates inside several evacuated glass containers which are being agitated by a shaker to induce the desired collisions at chosen velocities. The dust aggregates are being observed by a high-speed camera, allowing for the determination of the collision properties of the protoplanetary dust analog material. The data obtained from the suborbital flight with the REXUS (Rocket Experiments for University Students) 12 rocket will be directly implemented into a state-of-the-art dust growth and collision model.

  4. The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE): studying the collision behavior of submillimeter-sized dust aggregates on the suborbital rocket flight REXUS 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Julie; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Weidling, René; Blum, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    The Suborbital Particle Aggregation and Collision Experiment (SPACE) is a novel approach to study the collision properties of submillimeter-sized, highly porous dust aggregates. The experiment was designed, built, and carried out to increase our knowledge about the processes dominating the first phase of planet formation. During this phase, the growth of planetary precursors occurs by agglomeration of micrometer-sized dust grains into aggregates of at least millimeters to centimeters in size. However, the formation of larger bodies from the so-formed building blocks is not yet fully understood. Recent numerical models on dust growth lack a particular support by experimental studies in the size range of submillimeters, because these particles are predicted to collide at very gentle relative velocities of below 1 cm/s that can only be achieved in a reduced-gravity environment. The SPACE experiment investigates the collision behavior of an ensemble of silicate-dust aggregates inside several evacuated glass containers which are being agitated by a shaker to induce the desired collisions at chosen velocities. The dust aggregates are being observed by a high-speed camera, allowing for the determination of the collision properties of the protoplanetary dust analog material. The data obtained from the suborbital flight with the REXUS (Rocket Experiments for University Students) 12 rocket will be directly implemented into a state-of-the-art dust growth and collision model.

  5. Quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma containing spherical particles and their binary agglomerates

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, M; Nosenko, V; Thomas, H M

    2015-01-01

    A new type of quasi-two-dimensional complex plasma system was observed which consisted of monodisperse microspheres and their binary agglomerations (dimers). The particles and their dimers levitated in a plasma sheath at slightly different heights and formed two distinct sublayers. The sys- tem did not crystallize and may be characterized as disordered solid. The dimers were identified based on their characteristic appearance in defocused images, i.e., rotating interference fringe pat- terns. The in-plane and inter-plane particle separations exhibit nonmonotonic dependence on the discharge pressure which agrees well with theoretical predictions.

  6. Modelling Inter-Particle Forces and Resulting Agglomerate Sizes in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2005-01-01

    The theory of inter-particle forces versus external shear in cement-based materials is reviewed. On this basis, calculations on maximum agglomerate size present after the combined action of superplasticizers and shear are carried out. Qualitative experimental results indicate that external shear...... affects the particle size distribution of Mg(OH)2 (used as model material) as well as silica, whereas the addition of superplasticizers affects only the smallest particles in cement and thus primarily acts as water reducers and not dispersers....

  7. Race-Specific Agglomeration Economies: Social Distance and the Black-White Wage Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Ananat; Shihe Fu; Ross, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a striking but previously unnoticed relationship between city size and the black-white wage gap, with the gap increasing by 2.5% for every million-person increase in urban population. We then look within cities and document that wages of blacks rise less with agglomeration in the workplace location, measured as employment density per square kilometer, than do white wages. This pattern holds even though our method allows for non-parametric controls for the effects of age, educat...

  8. Study of agglomeration behavior of combustion-synthesized nano-crystalline ceria using new fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Srirupa T.; Bedekar, Vinila [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Patra, A.; Sastry, P.U. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: aktyagi@barc.gov.in

    2008-10-20

    Ceria powders were prepared by gel combustion process using cerium nitrate and hitherto unexplored amino acid fuels such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine, tryptophan, phenyl alanine, valine, etc. These powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, surface area analysis, sinterability, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The combustion-synthesized powders were agglomerates of nano-crystallites. SAXS profiles of the powders prepared using tryptophan, phenyl alanine and dimethyl urea exhibited fractal behavior.

  9. Influence of the nanoparticles agglomeration state in the quantum-confinement effects: Experimental evidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorite, I., E-mail: lorite@physik.uni-leipzig.de [Electroceramic Department, Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen 5, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, Faculty of Physics and Earth Sciences, Linnestrasse 5, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Romero, J. J.; Fernandez, J. F. [Electroceramic Department, Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen 5, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    The agglomeration state facilitates particle-particle interaction which produces important effects in the phonon confinement effects at the nanoscale. A partial phonon transmission between close nanoparticles yields a lower momentum conservation relaxation than in a single isolated nanoparticle. It means a larger red shift and broadening of the Raman modes than the expected ones for Raman quantum confinement effects. This particle-particle interaction can drive to error when Raman responses are used to estimate the size of the nanoscaled materials. In this work different corrections are suggested to overtake this source of error.

  10. Influence of the nanoparticles agglomeration state in the quantum-confinement effects: Experimental evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lorite

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The agglomeration state facilitates particle-particle interaction which produces important effects in the phonon confinement effects at the nanoscale. A partial phonon transmission between close nanoparticles yields a lower momentum conservation relaxation than in a single isolated nanoparticle. It means a larger red shift and broadening of the Raman modes than the expected ones for Raman quantum confinement effects. This particle-particle interaction can drive to error when Raman responses are used to estimate the size of the nanoscaled materials. In this work different corrections are suggested to overtake this source of error.

  11. POC-SCALE TESTING OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT FOR FINE COAL PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the technical progress achieved from July 01, 1997 to September 30, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental procedures and test data for recovery of fine coal from coal fines streams generated at a commercial coal preparation plant are described. Two coal fines streams, namely Sieve Bend Effluent and Cyclone Overflow were investigated. The test results showed that ash was reduced by more than 50% at combustible matter recovery levels exceeding 95%.

  12. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  13. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dust plasma: II. Power-law distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Jingyu; Du, Jiulin

    2012-01-01

    The dust-acoustic waves and their stability driven by a flowing dust plasma when it cross through a static (target) dust plasma (the so-called permeating dust plasma) are investigated when the components of the dust plasma obey the power-law q-distributions in nonextensive statistics. The frequency, the growth rate and the stability condition of the dust-acoustic waves are derived under this physical situation, which express the effects of the nonextensivity as well as the flowing dust plasma velocity on the dust-acoustic waves in this dust plasma. The numerical results illustrate some new characteristics of the dust-acoustic waves, which are different from those in the permeating dust plasma when the plasma components are the Maxwellian distribution. In addition, we show that the flowing dust plasma velocity has a significant effect on the dust-acoustic waves in the permeating dust plasma with the power-law q-distribution.

  14. E ring dust sources: Implications from Cassini's dust measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Frank; Albers, Nicole; Hörning, Marcel; Kempf, Sascha; Krivov, Alexander V.; Makuch, Martin; Schmidt, Jürgen; Seiß, Martin; Miodrag Sremčević

    2006-08-01

    The Enceladus flybys of the Cassini spacecraft are changing our understanding of the origin and sustainment of Saturn's E ring. Surprisingly, beyond the widely accepted dust production caused by micrometeoroid impacts onto the atmosphereless satellites (the impactor-ejecta process), geophysical activities have been detected at the south pole of Enceladus, providing an additional, efficient dust source. The dust detector data obtained during the flyby E11 are used to identify the amount of dust produced in the impactor-ejecta process and to improve related modeling [Spahn, F., Schmidt, J., Albers, N., Hörning, M., Makuch, M., Seiß, M., Kempf, S., Srama, R., Dikarev, V.V., Helfert, S., Moragas-Klostermeyer, G., Krivov, A.V., Sremčević, M., Tuzzolino, A., Economou, T., Grün, E., 2006. Cassini dust measurements at Enceladus: implications for Saturn's E ring. Science, in press]. With this, we estimate the impact-generated dust contributions of the other E ring satellites and find significant differences in the dust ejection efficiency by two projectile families - the E ring particles (ERPs) and the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Together with the Enceladus south-pole source, the ERP impacts play a crucial role in the inner region, whereas the IDP impacts dominate the particle production in the outer E ring, possibly accounting for its large radial extent. Our results can be verified in future Cassini flybys of the E ring satellites. In this way poorly known parameters of the dust particle production in hypervelocity impacts can be constrained by comparison of the data and theory.

  15. Study on agglomeration-collected magnetic separation of ink%油墨的凝聚-磁选研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑其; 车小奎; 陈松; 陈伟东

    2011-01-01

    Agglomeration and magnetic separation of ink are investigated in the paper. Magnetite, sodium oleate and kerosene were added in waste ink pulp, which holds magnetite and nonmagnetic ink together through hydrophobic agglomeration. The agglomerates were then recovered through magnetic separation. The study indicates that sodium oleate and kerosene as the agglomeration reagents are the premise and guarantee for agglomeration of magnetite and ink, and magnetite as the magnetic seed ensures the magnetism of the agglomerate that can be used for magnetic separation. Ink agglomerate size and magnetism increased as a result of agglomeration. Ink recovery in magnetic product is 84.09%, when the experiment conditions are the ink density of 20% ,magnetite dosage of 2 g/L,sodium oleate dosage of 3 g/L, and kerosene dosage of 3 g/L, pH = 9,the agglomeration stir time of 20 min and the magnetic field intensity of 1 T.%进行了油墨凝聚、磁选的研究,在废油墨中添加磁铁矿、油酸钠和煤油,使磁铁矿和非磁性油墨通过疏水性凝聚粘附在一起,再用磁选回收.研究表明,油酸钠和煤油作为凝聚剂是磁铁矿与油墨凝聚的前提和保证,磁种磁铁矿的加入确保了聚团的磁性能用于磁选.凝聚增大油墨聚团粒度和磁性.在油墨浓度为200g/L、磁铁矿用量2g/L、油酸钠用量为3g/L、煤油用量3g/L、pH=9、凝聚搅拌时间20 min和磁场强度为1 T的条件下,油墨在磁性产品中的回收率为84.09%.

  16. Mechanical and electrostatic experiments with dust particles collected in the inner coma of comet 67P by COSIMA onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Fischer, Henning; Langevin, Yves; Merouane, Sihane; Paquette, John; Rynö, Jouni; Stenzel, Oliver; Briois, Christelle; Kissel, Jochen; Koch, Andreas; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Altobelli, Nicolas; Baklouti, Donia; Bardyn, Anais; Cottin, Herve; Engrand, Cecile; Fray, Nicolas; Haerendel, Gerhard; Henkel, Hartmut; Höfner, Herwig; Hornung, Klaus; Lehto, Harry; Mellado, Eva Maria; Modica, Paola; Le Roy, Lena; Siljeström, Sandra; Steiger, Wolfgang; Thirkell, Laurent; Thomas, Roger; Torkar, Klaus; Varmuza, Kurt; Zaprudin, Boris

    2017-05-01

    The in situ cometary dust particle instrument COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) onboard ESA's Rosetta mission has collected about 31 000 dust particles in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. The particles are identified by optical microscope imaging and analysed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. After dust particle collection by low speed impact on metal targets, the collected particle morphology points towards four families of cometary dust particles. COSIMA is an in situ laboratory that operates remotely controlled next to the comet nucleus. The particles can be further manipulated within the instrument by mechanical and electrostatic means after their collection by impact. The particles are stored above 0°C in the instrument and the experiments are carried out on the refractory, ice-free matter of the captured cometary dust particles. An interesting particle morphology class, the compact particles, is not fragmented on impact. One of these particles was mechanically pressed and thereby crushed into large fragments. The particles are good electrical insulators and transform into rubble pile agglomerates by the application of an energetic indium ion beam during the secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'.

  17. Mechanical and electrostatic experiments with dust particles collected in the inner coma of comet 67P by COSIMA onboard Rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilchenbach, Martin; Fischer, Henning; Langevin, Yves; Merouane, Sihane; Paquette, John; Rynö, Jouni; Stenzel, Oliver; Briois, Christelle; Kissel, Jochen; Koch, Andreas; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Altobelli, Nicolas; Baklouti, Donia; Bardyn, Anais; Cottin, Herve; Engrand, Cecile; Fray, Nicolas; Haerendel, Gerhard; Henkel, Hartmut; Höfner, Herwig; Hornung, Klaus; Lehto, Harry; Mellado, Eva Maria; Modica, Paola; Le Roy, Lena; Siljeström, Sandra; Steiger, Wolfgang; Thirkell, Laurent; Thomas, Roger; Torkar, Klaus; Varmuza, Kurt; Zaprudin, Boris

    2017-07-13

    The in situ cometary dust particle instrument COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) onboard ESA's Rosetta mission has collected about 31 000 dust particles in the inner coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. The particles are identified by optical microscope imaging and analysed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. After dust particle collection by low speed impact on metal targets, the collected particle morphology points towards four families of cometary dust particles. COSIMA is an in situ laboratory that operates remotely controlled next to the comet nucleus. The particles can be further manipulated within the instrument by mechanical and electrostatic means after their collection by impact. The particles are stored above 0°C in the instrument and the experiments are carried out on the refractory, ice-free matter of the captured cometary dust particles. An interesting particle morphology class, the compact particles, is not fragmented on impact. One of these particles was mechanically pressed and thereby crushed into large fragments. The particles are good electrical insulators and transform into rubble pile agglomerates by the application of an energetic indium ion beam during the secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF FIRMS STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS ON THE DEGREE OF AGGLOMERATION ECONOMIES ENJOYED AMONGST FIRMS IN THE LAGOS REGION, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAGBOHUNKA Adejompo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Agglomeration economies is a potent tool in socio-economic revamping, rejuvenation and sustenance of regions, this is as a result of the impulse it transmitted through the multiplier effect it is capable of generated. Therefore, this paper underscores the influence of firms structural characteristics on the degree of agglomeration economies enjoyed amongst firms, using the Lagos region as a case study. The first stage in the collection of primary data involves the reconnaissance survey, thereafter one hundred and three questionnaire were administered in twelve industrial estates; one questionnaire in each of the firm. The paper reveals the following structural characteristics as germane to industrial enterprise; age of firms, areal plant size (m², capacity utilization (in percentage, and Labour size and firms investment. The paper has also found out those agglomeration economies enjoyed ranges from transportation, labour, power supply, to joint water supply. The Roy’s Largest Root test employed to test for the significance of the canonical correlations at 0.05 significant levels shows the calculated F-value 3.5247 and the tabulated F-value 2.90. This suggests that the degree of agglomeration economies enjoyed by firms is significantly explained by the size and structural characteristics of the firms. The paper therefore recommends more and active government participation in the industrial scene, given the necessary support for the expansion of firm’s structural characteristics which will lead to increase agglomeration economies enjoyed by these firms.

  19. Influences of Different Components on Agglomeration Behavior of MoS2 During Oxidation Roasting Process in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Wang, Jing-Song; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-08-01

    An agglomeration of the furnace charge always takes place during the oxidation roasting process of molybdenite concentrate (with the main component of MoS2) in multiple hearth furnaces, which greatly affects the production process and furnace service life. In the present work, a preliminary study about the influence of various components on the agglomeration phenomenon of pure MoS2 have been carried out. The results show that reaction temperature, impurity content, and air flow rate have significant effects on the agglomeration extent. Meanwhile, the impurity type added into the pure MoS2 plays a crucial role. It was found that CaO and MgO have a stronger sulfur-fixing effect and that the desulphurization of the roasted product was uncompleted. It was also concluded that the agglomeration is due to the formation of low-melting-point eutectics, including that between MoO3 and impurities and that between MoO3 and Mo4O11. It is suggested that decreasing the impurities contents, especially K, Cu, Pb, and Fe, is an effective method for reducing the extent of agglomeration.

  20. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  1. The role of nanoparticulate agglomerates in TiO2 photocatalysis: degradation of oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Irina; Mendive, Cecilia B.; Bahnemann, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous bimodal study of the photocatalytic oxalic acid degradation by aqueous TiO2 suspensions revealed that particular systems possess the capacity to protect a certain amount of oxalic acid from oxidation, thus hindering, to some extent, the photocatalytic reaction. While measurements of the oxalic acid concentration in the bulk liquid phase indicated full photocatalytic degradation; in situ pH-stat measurements allowed the quantification of the amount of oxalic acid remaining in the part of the nanoparticulate agglomerates where light could apparently not access. An explanation for this phenomenon takes into account the possibility of the formation of TiO2 agglomerates in which these molecules are hidden from the effect of the light, thus being protected from photocatalytic degradation. Studies of different TiO2 materials with different particle sizes allowed a deeper exploration of this phenomenon. In addition, because this property of encapsulating pollutant molecules by photocatalytic systems is found to be a reversible phenomenon, P25 appears to be more convenient and advantageous as compared to the use of large surface area photocatalysts.

  2. STUDY ON ECOLOGICAL SPACE OF URBAN AGGLOMERATION--Taking Wuxi City as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    From the angle of ecology, urban agglomeration presents relevant types of landscape structure, which in-clude Patch, Corridor and Matrix. There are different landscape features and different problems in different developmentphases. This paper has put forward five basic conditions for security pattern of landscape ecology of urban agglomeration,described quantitatively the features for landscape ecology in Wuxi, and analyzed ecological background of spatial expan-sion and spatial organization of urban development in Wuxi. From the angle of ecological land use and non-ecological landuse, the paper has analyzed the features of land use and ecological distribution of land in the urban area. The spatial mod-el of cities and towns in Wuxi is composed of one metropolis, two urban zones and three development axes. This thesishas planned preliminarily ecological protection network at four levels in the urban region according to four layers. At last,combining landscape ecology with urban space, a tentative security pattern of landscape ecology has been p1anned in Wux-i, namely Source-Buffer Zone and Metropolis, Radiating Routes and Expansion Direction of City, Strategic Point and Interac-tion between Cities and Towns, Inter-Source Linkage-Corridor of a Stable Landscape Structure.

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies of agglomeration effects in multi-walled carbon nanotube-polycarbonate melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we report on morphological and rheological characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT-polycarbonate composites produced by injection molding. The main focus is to carry out nonlinear viscoelastic experiments that allow following the structural rearrangements of carbon nanotubes in the polycarbonate melt. Small angle X-ray scattering reveals only a slight orientation of MWNTs in the as-received samples, i.e. after application of extremely high shear rates. Thus, the main structural effect observed during the stress growth experiment is the breakage of MWNT agglomerates. To study this effect in detail a flocculation experiment, in which the sample undergoes oscillatory deformation first at a small strain amplitude in the linear regime succeeded by higher amplitudes in the nonlinear regime, has been carried out. The agglomeration process manifests itself in an increase of the storage and loss moduli in the linear regime, whereas the deagglomeration process does vice versa. The corresponding effects can be described in the frame of a superposition approach that takes into account the stress contribution of the polycarbonate matrix, the hydrodynamic reinforcement due to embedded nanotubes and the viscoelastic stress due to the presence of a MWNT-network.

  4. Comparison of dispersion behavior of agglomerated particles in liquid between ultrasonic irradiation and mechanical stirring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitomo, Syunsuke; Koizumi, Hayato; Uddin, Md Azhar; Kato, Yoshiei

    2018-01-01

    The particle dispersion behavior was compared for ultrasonic irradiation and mechanical stirring. The experiment and calculation were carried out with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles. The dispersion rate of the agglomerated particles increased with the decreasing ultrasonic frequency and the increasing electric power, whereas it increased with the increasing rotation speed for the mechanical stirring. The temporal change in the particle dispersion proceeded stably after passage of a long time. The dispersion of the ultrasonic irradiation was suggested to occur by the erosion from the surface of the cluster one by one due to the bulk cavitation as well as the division into smaller particles because of the inner cavitation, and that of the mechanical stirring mainly by the division into smaller clusters due to the shear stress flow. Based on the experimental results, mathematical models for the ultrasonic irradiation and mechanical stirring were developed with the dispersion and agglomeration terms and the calculation of the temporal change in the total cluster number at the different operational factors agreed with the experiments. The dispersion efficiency of the ultrasonic irradiation was larger than that of the mechanical stirring at the lower input power, but it was reversed at the higher input power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. On the flexibility of agglomeration based physical space discontinuous Galerkin discretizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, F.; Botti, L.; Colombo, A.; Di Pietro, D. A.; Tesini, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we show that the flexibility of the discontinuous Galerkin (dG) discretization can be fruitfully exploited to implement numerical solution strategies based on the use of elements with very general shapes. Thanks to the freedom in defining the mesh topology, we propose a new h-adaptive technique based on agglomeration coarsening of a fine mesh. The possibility to enhance the error distribution over the computational domain is investigated on a Poisson problem with the goal of obtaining a mesh independent discretization. The main building block of our dG method consists of defining discrete polynomial spaces directly on physical frame elements. For this purpose we orthonormalize with respect to the L2-product a set of monomials relocated in a specific element frame and we introduce an easy way to reduce the cost related to numerical integration on agglomerated meshes. To complete the dG formulation for second order problems, two extensions of the BR2 scheme to arbitrary polyhedral grids, including an estimate of the stabilization parameter ensuring the coercivity property, are here proposed.

  6. Cytotoxicity properties of PM2.5 collected in Wrocław agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bełcik Maciej Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available WHO report published in May 2016 presents the cities with the highest concentrations of particulate matter fraction 10 μm and 2.5 μm on the earth. Report presents that many of Polish cities are on the top of polluted regions in European Union. One of the cities mentioned in the report is Wrocław. Wrocław is the urban and industrial agglomeration, where air pollutions comes from three main sources: low-emissions, industrial emissions and urban traffic. In recent years, reduction in annual average concentrations of particulate matter has been observed. However Wrocław is still one of the cities in Poland, which have problems with smog situations during winter season. This article presents results of researches conducted on the particulate matter fraction 2.5 μm collected in Wrocław agglomeration. Pollutions have been tested using PAN-I assay kit, which contains 4 single toxicity tests allows to check different parameters defining toxic effects on human cells. Cytotoxicity tests which are conducted are: LDH test to evaluate the integrity of cell membrane, XTT test to assess mitochondrial activity, NR test for the evaluation of the lysosomal activity and SRB test to evaluate the total protein content. Tests were performed on adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cell line (A549, which allows to simulate conditions as close as real.

  7. Calcium Oxalate Stone Agglomeration Inhibition [tm] Reflects Renal Stone-Forming Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, J S; Cole, F E; Romani, W; Husserl, F E; Fuselier, H A; Kok, D J; Erwin, D T

    2000-04-01

    Louisiana and other Gulf South states comprise a "Stone Belt" where calcium oxalate stone formers (CaOx SFs) are found at a high rate of approximately 5%. In these patients, the agglomeration of small stone crystals, which are visible in nearly all morning urine collections, forms stones that can become trapped in the renal parenchyma and the renal pelvis. Without therapy, about half of CaOx SFs repeatedly form kidney stones, which can cause excruciating pain that can be relieved by passage, fragmentation (lithotripsy), or surgical removal. The absence of stones in "normal" patients suggests that there are stone inhibitors in "normal" urines.At the Ochsner Renal Stone Clinic, 24-hour urine samples are collected by the patient and sent to the Ochsner Renal Stone Research Program where calcium oxalate stone agglomeration inhibition [tm] measurements are performed. Urine from healthy subjects and inactive stone formers has demonstrated strongly inhibited stone growth [tm] in contrast to urine from recurrent CaOx SFs. [tm] data from 1500 visits of 700 kidney stone patients have been used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in Ochsner's CaOx SF patients. These data have also been used to demonstrate the interactive roles of certain identified urinary stone-growth inhibitors, citrate and Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), which can be manipulated with medication to diminish recurrent stone formation. Our goal is to offer patients both financial and pain relief by reducing their stones with optimized medication, using medical management to avoid costly treatments.

  8. Evaluation of the leaching characteristics of wood ash and the influence of ash agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenari, B.-M.; Lindqvist, O. [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Karlsson, L.G. [Kemakta Consulting AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-11-01

    The release of mineral nutrients and other species from untreated and stabilised wood ash has been investigated. Stabilisation is applied with the aim to modify the solubility of ash components and the ash particle size, i.e. to form dense ash particle agglomerates. This process induces the formation of several secondary minerals. The most important reaction is the transformation of Ca(OH){sub 2} into CaCO{sub 3} which lowers the calcium leaching rate significantly. A significant fraction of the alkali metals, K and Na, is present in salts which are rapidly released. The short-term release of these salts, as simulated in laboratory experiments, was not reduced by the stabilisation methods applied. Generally, low leaching rates were observed for the important plant nutrients P and Mg as well as for Fe and other metals from both untreated and agglomerated ashes. Thermodynamics equilibrium modelling of the hardening process showed that in addition to the transformation of Ca(OH){sub 2} to CaCO{sub 3}, formation of the mineral ettringite is possible at a high pH. Experimental results have confirmed this. As the pH in the pore solution decreases during long-term leaching ettringite will be transformed into calcium carbonate and gypsum. In accordance with the experimental results, no formation of secondary solubility controlling potassium or sodium minerals was indicated by the modelling results. (author)

  9. Measurement of drug agglomerates in powder blending simulation samples by near infrared chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiyong; Woldu, Abraham; Kelly, Richard; McCool, Jim; Bruce, Rick; Rasmussen, Henrik; Cunningham, John; Winstead, Denita

    2008-02-28

    This research note describes a powder blending simulation study conducted using 20-mL scintillation vials and a bench-top rotating mixer on a scale of 2g for each sample. In order to investigate the impact of mean particle size and size distribution on blending behavior of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), the drug substance was separated into sieve fractions using the US standard sieves of 60, 80, 100, 200, and 325mesh. Each of the fractions was mixed with two excipients (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and microcrystalline cellulose) for up to 20min. Then the blending samples were analyzed by a near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) system. The NIR-CI system was able to measure API particles/domains (agglomerates) at 0.001mm(2) and above within a 11.2mmx9.0mm field of view. It was found that blends prepared with larger API particles (60-200 mesh) contain agglomerated API domains > or =0.1mm(2). The blends prepared with finer API particles (mesh) show the characteristics of a randomized mixing. This simple and effective method can be used for evaluation of blending behavior for APIs in formulation development.

  10. Environmental influence of Wuhan urban agglomeration development and strategies of environmental protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Qun; LIU Ying-tao; MAO Han-ying

    2006-01-01

    In Wuhan urban agglomeration (WUA), the population growth and concentration, the industrial development and urban sprawl have been affecting the environment fundamentally. Comparing with Yangtze delta metropolitan region, the level of urbanization and industrialization of WUA has lagged behind for about 10 years; but the problems in environmental protection and rehabilitation are commonly serious. In the future, WUA should avoid unnecessary mistakes and seek a win-win strategy for economy and environment in its large-scale development stage. Based on the analysis of the changing of main environmental pollutants and the coupled curves in past decades, the paper discussed the important links among the urban environmental pollutions, industry growth and urban sprawl in WUA. It is concluded that the integration of economic and environmental policies in urban development is more required and significant at the large urban agglomeration region. Four proactive and long-term strategies need to be adopted to provide prior guidance and better protection for the development of WUA.

  11. Experimental study on size-dependency of effective permittivity of particle-gas mixture with agglomeration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiaomin; Xu Lijun; Li Songyun

    2007-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) theory is the basis of a capacitance sensor used for concentration measurement of a particulate solid flow, its measurement result is independent on particle size. In existence of particle agglomeration or aggradation, however, it is found that the effective permittivity of a gas/solid mixture is dependent on particle size. In this paper, a parallel plate, differential capacitance sensor is utilized to investigate the influence of particle size on the effective permittivity of the mixture in such a case. Static experiments using three materials including glass, limestone and quartz particles were carried out in an off-line manner. The volume fraction of particles being tested ranged from 20×10-6 to 600×10-6, while the particle size was between 3 and 100 μm. Experimental results show that the effective permittivity of a particle-gas mixture with particle agglomeration is larger than that predicted by EMA and the smaller the particle size, the larger the effective permittivity. The experiment process and analysis results are discussed in detail in the paper.

  12. Agglomeration multigrid methods with implicit Runge-Kutta smoothers applied to aerodynamic simulations on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    For unstructured finite volume methods an agglomeration multigrid with an implicit multistage Runge-Kutta method as a smoother is developed for solving the compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The implicit Runge-Kutta method is interpreted as a preconditioned explicit Runge-Kutta method. The construction of the preconditioner is based on an approximate derivative. The linear systems are solved approximately with a symmetric Gauss-Seidel method. To significantly improve this solution method grid anisotropy is treated within the Gauss-Seidel iteration in such a way that the strong couplings in the linear system are resolved by tridiagonal systems constructed along these directions of strong coupling. The agglomeration strategy is adapted to this procedure by taking into account exactly these anisotropies in such a way that a directional coarsening is applied along these directions of strong coupling. Turbulence effects are included by a Spalart-Allmaras model, and the additional transport-type equation is approximately solved in a loosely coupled manner with the same method. For two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical examples and a variety of differently generated meshes we show the wide range of applicability of the solution method. Finally, we exploit the GMRES method to determine approximate spectral information of the linearized RANS equations. This approximate spectral information is used to discuss and compare characteristics of multistage Runge-Kutta methods.

  13. In situ measurement of the rheological properties and agglomeration on cementitious pastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hong [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 50 UNIST-gil, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Hong Jae, E-mail: yimhj@knu.ac.kr [Department of Construction and Disaster Prevention Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 2559 Gyeongsang-daero, Sangju, Gyeongsangbuk-do 742-711 (Korea, Republic of); Ferron, Raissa Douglas [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 301 East Dean Keeton Street, C1748, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Various factors influence the rheology of cementitious pastes, with the most important being the mixing protocol, mixture proportions, and mixture composition. This study investigated the influence of ground-granulated blast-furnace slag, on the rheological behavior of cementitious pastes. In tandem with the rheological measurements, fresh state microstructural measurements were conducted using three different techniques: A coupled stroboscope-rheometer, a coupled laser backscattering-rheometer, and a conventional laser diffraction technique. Laser diffraction and the coupled stroboscope-rheometer were not good measures of the in situ state of flocculation of a sample. Rather, only the laser backscattering technique allowed for in situ measurement on a highly concentrated suspension (cementitious paste). Using the coupled laser backscattering-rheometer technique, a link between the particle system and rheological behavior was determined through a modeling approach that takes into account agglomeration properties. A higher degree of agglomeration was seen in the ordinary Portland cement paste than pastes containing the slag and this was related to the degree of capillary pressure in the paste systems.

  14. Low-agglomerated yttria nanopowders via decomposition of sulfate-doped precursor with transient morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.P. Yavetskiy; D.Yu. Kosyanov; V.N. Baumer; A.G. Doroshenko; A.I. Fedorov; N.A. Matveevskaya; A.V. Tolmachev; O.M. Vovk

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication peculiarities of low-agglomerated yttria (Y2O3) nanopowders via thermal decomposition of sulfate-doped precursor with transient morphology were studied. It was determined that Y2(OH)5(NO3)x(CO2)y(SO4)z·nH2O (n=1-2) crystalline precursor underwent fragmentation and decomposition into isolated quasi-spherical Y2O3 particles upon calcination. Effect was con-nected with minimizing the free energy of the plate-like crystallites via reducing the contact surface until to the moment of spheroidi-zation and attainment of isolation that occurred atТ=1100 °С. Residual sulfate ions slowed down the surface diffusion during heat treatment thus retaining quasy-spherical morphology and low aggregation degree of Y2O3 nanopowders. Sulfate-doped yttria nanopowders with medium particle size of 53±13 nm possessed improved sinterability in comparison with undoped ones arising from finer particle size, narrower particle distribution and lower agglomeration degree.

  15. POC-SCALE TESTING OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT FOR FINE COAL PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the technical progress achieved from October 1, 1997 to December 31, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental test procedures and the results related to the processing of coal fines originating from process streams generated at the Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant, owned and operated by the Drummond Company Inc. of Alabama, are described. Two samples of coal fines, namely Cyclone Overflow and Pond Fines were investigated. The batch test results showed that by applying the Aglofloat technology a significant ash removal might be achieved at a very high combustible matter recovery: · for the Cyclone Overflow sample the ash reduction was in the range 50 to 55% at combustible matter recovery about 98% · for the Pond Fines sample the ash reduction was up to 48% at combustible matter recovery up to 85%. Additional tests were carried out with the Alberta origin Luscar Mine coal, which will be used for the parametric studies of agglomeration equipment at the 250 kg/h pilot plant. The Luscar coal is very similar to the Mary Lee Coal Group (processed at Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant) in terms of rank and chemical composition.

  16. An accelerated stochastic vortex structure method for particle collision and agglomeration in homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizaji, Farzad F.; Marshall, Jeffrey S.

    2016-11-01

    Modeling the response of interacting particles, droplets, or bubbles to subgrid-scale fluctuations in turbulent flows is a long-standing challenge in multiphase flow simulations using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach. The problem also arises for large-eddy simulation for sufficiently small values of the Kolmogorov-scale particle Stokes number. This paper expands on a recently proposed stochastic vortex structure (SVS) method for modeling of turbulence fluctuations for colliding or otherwise interacting particles. An accelerated version of the SVS method was developed using the fast multipole expansion and local Taylor expansion approach, which reduces computation speed by two orders of magnitude compared to the original SVS method. Detailed comparisons are presented showing close agreement of the energy spectrum and probability density functions of various fields between the SVS computational model, direct numerical simulation (DNS) results, and various theoretical and experimental results found in the literature. Results of the SVS method for particle collision rate and related measures of particle interaction exhibit excellent agreement with DNS predictions for homogeneous turbulent flows. The SVS method was also used with adhesive particles to simulate formation of particle agglomerates with different values of the particle Stokes and adhesion numbers, and various measures of the agglomerate structure are compared to the DNS results.

  17. Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Deluane, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s plans for implementing the Vision for Space Exploration include returning to the moon as a stepping stone for further exploration of Mars, and beyond. Dust on the lunar surface has a ubiquitous presence which must be explicitly addressed during upcoming human lunar exploration missions. While the operational challenges attributable to dust during the Apollo missions did not prove critical, the comparatively long duration of impending missions presents a different challenge. Near term plans to revisit the moon places a primary emphasis on characterization and mitigation of lunar dust. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems. This paper presents the current perspective and implementation of dust knowledge management and integration, and mitigation technology development activities within NASA s Exploration Technology Development Program. This work is presented within the context of the Constellation Program s Integrated Lunar Dust Management Strategy. The Lunar Dust Mitigation Technology Development project has been implemented within the ETDP. Project scope and plans will be presented, along with a a perspective on lessons learned from Apollo and forensics engineering studies of Apollo hardware. This paper further outlines the scientific basis for lunar dust behavior, it s characteristics and potential effects, and surveys several potential strategies for its control and mitigation both for lunar surface operations and within the working volumes of a lunar outpost.

  18. Aqueous complexation of thorium(IV), uranium(IV), neptunium(IV), plutonium(III/IV), and cerium(III/IV) with DTPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Alex; Paulenova, Alena; Gelis, Artem V

    2012-07-16

    Aqueous complexation of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III/IV), and Ce(III/IV) with DTPA was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, and cyclic voltammetry at 1 M ionic strength and 25 °C. The stability constants for the 1:1 complex of each trivalent and tetravalent metal were calculated. From the potentiometric data, we report stability constant values for Ce(III)DTPA, Ce(III)HDTPA, and Th(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 20.01 ± 0.02, log β(111) = 22.0 ± 0.2, and log β(101) = 29.6 ± 1, respectively. From the absorption spectrophotometry data, we report stability constant values for U(IV)DTPA, Np(IV)DTPA, and Pu(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 31.8 ± 0.1, 32.3 ± 0.1, and 33.67 ± 0.02, respectively. From the cyclic voltammetry data, we report stability constant values for Ce(IV) and Pu(III) of log β(101) = 34.04 ± 0.04 and 20.58 ± 0.04, respectively. The values obtained in this work are compared and discussed with respect to the ionic radius of each cationic metal.

  19. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radon Solvents Styrene Sulfur Dioxide Toluene Uranium Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) For Educators Introduction Tox Town-Based Curriculum Units / Science Club Careers in Environmental Health, Chemistry, and Toxicology More Resources Dust Storms en español ...

  20. Dust Acoustic Wave Excitation in a Plasma with Warm Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M.; Thomas, E., Jr.; Marcus, L.; Fisher, R.; Williams, J. D.; Merlino, R. L.

    2008-11-01

    Measurements of the dust acoustic wave dispersion relation in dusty plasmas formed in glow discharges at the University of Iowa [1] and Auburn University [2] have shown the importance of finite dust temperature effects. The effect of dust grains with large thermal speeds was taken into account using kinetic theory of the ion-dust streaming instability [3]. The results of analytic and numerical calculations of the dispersion relation based on the kinetic theory will be presented and compared with the experimental results. [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [3] M. Rosenberg, E. Thomas Jr., and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 15, 073701 (2008).

  1. The Modern RPG IV Language

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzi, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This updated, classic work on the RPG language covers all the new functions and features that have been added since 2003, including new op codes and built-in functions, new chapters on free-format RPG IV and Web programming interfaces, information on implementing XML within RPG IV, and expanded information on procedures. This reference guide takes both novice and experienced RPG IV programmers through the language, from its foundation to its most advanced techniques. More than 100 charts and tables, as well as 350 real-life code samples of functions and operations are included, showing readers

  2. [Causation, prevention and treatment of dust explosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maolong; Jia, Wenbin; Wang, Hongtao; Han, Fei; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Hu, Dahai

    2014-10-01

    With the development of industrial technology, dust explosion accidents have increased, causing serious losses of people's lives and property. With the development of economy, we should lay further emphasis on causation, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion. This article summarizes the background, mechanism, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion, which may provide some professional knowledge and reference for the treatment of dust explosion.

  3. Effect of Gas Velocity on the Dust Sediment Layer in the Coupled Field of Corona Plasma and Cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingshan; Ma, Chaochen; Li, Minghua; S, N. Danish

    2006-09-01

    A dust sediment layer was found on the outer tube wall when the ESCP (electrostatic centrifugal precipitator) trapped diesel particulates or ganister sand. The Compton back scatter method was used to measure the sediment thickness during the experiment. The effect of the inlet gas velocity on the dust sediment layer was investigated. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) was used to measure the velocity field between the inner barb tube wall and the outer tube wall. Experiments showed that the thickness of the sediment increased with time, and the sediment layer at the lower end was much thicker than that at the upper end. The agglomeration on the outer tube wall could be removed when the inlet gas velocity was increased to a certain value.

  4. Cohesion of Amorphous Silica Spheres: Toward a Better Understanding of the Coagulation Growth of Silicate Dust Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Senshu, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion forces between submicrometer-sized silicate grains play a crucial role in the formation of silicate dust agglomerates, rocky planetesimals, and terrestrial planets. The surface energy of silicate dust particles is the key to their adhesion and rolling forces in a theoretical model based on the contact mechanics. Here we revisit the cohesion of amorphous silica spheres by compiling available data on the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in various circumstances. It turned out that the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in a vacuum is a factor of 10 higher than previously assumed. Therefore, the previous theoretical models underestimated the critical velocity for the sticking of amorphous silica spheres, as well as the rolling friction forces between them. With the most plausible value of the surface energy for amorphous silica spheres, theoretical models based on the contact mechanics are in harmony with laboratory experiments. Consequently, we conclude that silicate grains ...

  5. A numerical study on dust devils with implications to global dust budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estimates of the contribution of dust devils (DDs) to the global dust budget have large uncertainties because the dust emission mechanisms in DDs are not yet well understood. In this study, a large-eddy simulation model coupled with a dust scheme is used to investigate DD dust entrainment. DDs a...

  6. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration. Fossil energy interim report, October 1, 1983--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1992-12-31

    Numerous agglomeration tests were conducted with several types of low-ash coal and graphite, high grade mineral pyrite, and other materials. Relatively pure hydrocarbons, including heptane and hexadecane, were used as agglomerants. Access of air to the system was controlled. Particle recovery by agglomeration was observed to depend on a number of system parameters. Among the most important parameters are the hydrophobicity of the particles and the oil dosage, so that the, recovery of solids per unit of oil administered is proportional to the hydrophobicity. The pH and ionic strength of the aqueous suspension affect particle recovery in different ways depending on the surface properties of the particles. On the other hand, the presence of air in the system generally improves particle recovery. The greatest effect of air was observed in a closely related study which showed that air had to be present to produce good agglomerates from a moderately hydrophobic coal in a mixer producing a lower shear rate. The rate of agglomeration was found to be much greater for a strongly hydrophobic coal than for a moderately hydrophobic coal, and the rate was observed to be proportional to the oil dosage. Also the rate was enhanced by the presence of air in the, system. For hydrophobic coals, the rate increased with increasing ionic strength of the aqueous medium, but it was not affected greatly by pH over a wide range. The separation of coal and pyrite particles by selective agglomeration was found to depend on the relative hydrophobicity of the materials, the oil dosage, and the properties of the aqueous medium.

  7. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  8. Surface System Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will perform a detailed examination of dust mitigation and tolerance strategies for connections and mechanisms to be employed on the lunar...

  9. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Testi, Leonardo; Ricci, Luca; Andrews, Sean; Blum, Juergen; Carpenter, John; Dominik, Carsten; Isella, Andrea; Natta, Antonella; Williams, Jonathan; Wilner, David

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) In the core accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow from the submicron sizes typical of interstellar dust to micron size particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds and cores, the growth from micron size particles to pebbles and kilometre size bodies must occur in protoplanetary disks. This step in the formation of planetary systems is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in young extrasolar systems. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational...

  10. Wormhole shadows in rotating dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which investigated the shadows of the Ellis wormhole surrounded by nonrotating dust, in this paper we study wormhole shadows in a rotating dust flow. First, we derive steady-state solutions of slowly rotating dust surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. Solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady-state solutions. Because the Ellis wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. The bright ring looks distorted due to rotation. Aside from the bright ring, there appear weakly luminous complex patterns by the emission from the other side of the throat. These structure could be detected by high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  11. Automated Classification of Stratospheric Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S. W.; Lasue, J.; Stepinski, T.

    2010-03-01

    We have applied data mining techniques to the JSC Cosmic Dust Catalog Volume 16 cluster particles. We have demonstrated a technique capable of reproducing the separation between cosmic and contaminant particles.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV (MPS IV), also known as Morquio syndrome, is a progressive condition that mainly affects ... Management Genetic Testing (3 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Morquio syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-A ...

  13. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Ricci, L.; Andrews, S.; Blum, J.; Carpenter, J.; Dominik, C.; Isella, A.; Natta, A.; Williams, J. P.; Wilner, D. J.

    In the core-accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow up to micrometer-sized particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds, the growth to pebbles and kilometer-sized bodies must occur at the high densities within protoplanetary disks. This critical step is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in extrasolar systems before the appearance of large planetary-sized bodies. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational signatures of these processes are summarized. We briefly discuss grain growth in molecular cloud cores and in collapsing envelopes of protostars, as these likely provide the initial conditions for the dust in protoplanetary disks. We then review the observational constraints on grain growth in disks from millimeter surveys, as well as the very recent evidence for radial variations of the dust properties in disks. We also include a brief discussion on the small end of the grain size distribution and dust settling as derived from optical, near-, and mid-infrared observations. Results are discussed in the context of global dust-evolution models; in particular, we focus on the emerging evidence for a very efficient early growth of grains and the radial distribution of maximum grain sizes as the result of growth barriers. We also highlight the limits of the current models of dust evolution in disks, including the need to slow the radial drift of grains to overcome the migration/fragmentation barrier.

  14. Dust vortex flows in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, P.K

    2002-12-30

    Coherent nonlinear structures in the form of dust vortex flows have been observed in unmagnetized laboratory dusty plasmas. Our objective here is show that the dynamics of such dust vortices is governed by a modified Navier-Stokes equation (MNSE) and that the stationary solutions of the MNSE can be represented as monopolar as well as a row of identical Stuart and a row of counter-rotating vortices.

  15. Development of a fluidized bed agglomeration modeling methodology to include particle-level heterogeneities in ash chemistry and granular physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, Aditi B.

    The utility of fluidized bed reactors for combustion and gasification can be enhanced if operational issues such as agglomeration are mitigated. The monetary and efficiency losses could be avoided through a mechanistic understanding of the agglomeration process and prediction of operational conditions that promote agglomeration. Pilot-scale experimentation prior to operation for each specific condition can be cumbersome and expensive. So the development of a mathematical model would aid predictions. With this motivation, the study comprised of the following model development stages- 1) development of an agglomeration modeling methodology based on binary particle collisions, 2) study of heterogeneities in ash chemical composition and gaseous atmosphere, 3) computation of a distribution of particle collision frequencies based on granular physics for a poly-disperse particle size distribution, 4) combining the ash chemistry and granular physics inputs to obtain agglomerate growth probabilities and 5) validation of the modeling methodology. The modeling methodology comprised of testing every binary particle collision in the system for sticking, based on the extent of dissipation of the particles' kinetic energy through viscous dissipation by slag-liquid (molten ash) covering the particles. In the modeling methodology developed in this study, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations are used to estimate the amount of slag-liquid in the system, and the changes in particle collision frequencies are accounted for by continuously tracking the number density of the various particle sizes. In this study, the heterogeneities in chemical composition of fuel ash were studied by separating the bulk fuel into particle classes that are rich in specific minerals. FactSage simulations were performed on two bituminous coals and an anthracite to understand the effect of particle-level heterogeneities on agglomeration. The mineral matter behavior of these constituent classes was studied

  16. Electric arc furnace dust utilization in iron ore sintering: influence of particle size; Utilizacao da poeira de aciaria eletrica na sinterizacao de minerio de ferro: influencia da granulometria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telles, V.B.; Junca, E.; Rodrigues, G.F.; Espinosa, D.C.R.; Tenorio, J.A.S., E-mail: victor_bridit@hotmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the utilization of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) generated in steelmaking by electric arc furnace (EAF) as raw material in iron ore sintering. The waste was characterized by size, chemical composition and X-ray diffraction. The physical characterization showed that 90% of the particles have a size less then 1,78 {mu}m and the material have the tendency to agglomerate. The waste were submitted to a pre-agglomeration prior to its incorporation in the sinter. The influence on the addition of the waste with different granulometry in the iron or sinter production were analyzed by sinter characterization and sintering parameters. (author)

  17. Dust in the Interplanetary Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Lamy, Herve

    2010-01-01

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nano dust particles of sizes 1 - 10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nano dust are detected near 1AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Though such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  18. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  19. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delory, G. T.; Elphic, R. C.; Morgan, T. H.; Colaprete, A.; Horanyi, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Hine, B.; Boroson, D.; Salute, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    National Research Council decadal surveys and the recent “Scientific Context for Exploration of the Moon” (SCEM) report identify studies of the pristine state of the lunar atmosphere and dust environment as among the leading priorities for future lunar science missions. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is currently under development to address these goals. LADEE will determine the composition of the lunar atmosphere and investigate the processes that control its distribution and dynamics, including sources, sinks, and surface interactions. LADEE will also determine whether dust is present in the lunar exosphere, and reveal the processes that contribute to its sources and variability. These investigations are relevant to our understanding of surface boundary exospheres and dust processes occurring at many objects throughout the solar system, address questions regarding the origin and evolution of lunar volatiles, and have potential implications for future exploration activities. LADEE employs a high heritage instrument payload: the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS), the Ultraviolet/Visible Spectrometer (UVS), and the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX). It will also carry the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration (LLCD) as a technology demo. LADEE is an important component in NASA’s portfolio of near-term lunar missions, addressing objectives that are currently not covered by other U.S. or international efforts, and whose observations must be conducted before large scale human or robotic activities irrevocably perturb the tenuous and fragile lunar atmosphere. LADEE’s success will also demonstrate the effectiveness of a low-cost, rapid development program, utilizing a modular bus design together with the new Minotaur IV+ launch vehicle, and will thus pave the way for cost-effective future lunar missions in a cost-constrained environment. The LADEE spacecraft with various instrument locations.

  20. The Cosmic DUNE dust astronomy mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grun, E.; Srama, R.; Cosmic Dune Team

    A dust astronomy mission aims at the simultaneous measurement of the origin and the chemical composition of individual dust grains in space. Interstellar dust traversing the solar system constitutes the galactic solid phase of matter from which stars and planetary systems form. Interplanetary dust, from comets and asteroids, represents remnant material from bodies at different stages of early solar system evolution. Thus, studies of interstellar and interplanetary dust with Cosmic DUNE (Cosmic Dust Near Earth) will provide a comparison between the composition of the interstellar medium and primitive planetary objects. Cosmic DUNE will prepare the way for effective collection in near-Earth space of interstellar and interplanetary dust for subsequent return to Earth and analysis in laboratories. Cosmic DUNE establishes the next logical step beyond NASA's Stardust mission, with four major advancements in cosmic dust research: (1) Analysis of the elemental and isotopic composition of individual cosmic dust grains, (2) determination of the size distribution of interstellar dust, (3) characterization of the interstellar dust flow through the planetary system, and (4) analysis of interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin. This mission goal will be reached with novel dust instrumentation. A dust telescope trajectory sensor has been developed which is capable of obtaining precision trajectories of sub-micron sized particles in space. A new high mass resolution dust analyzer of 0.1m2 impact area can cope with the low fluxes expected in interplanetary space. Cosmic DUNE will be proposed to ESA in response to its upcoming call for mission ideas.

  1. Acceleration of cometary dust near the nucleus: Application to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    CERN Document Server

    Skorov, Yuri; Lacerda, Pedro; Hartogh, Paul; Blum, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    We present a model of cometary dust capable of simulating the dynamics within the first few tens of km of the comet surface. Recent measurements by the GIADA and COSIMA instruments on Rosetta show that the nucleus emits fluffy dust particles with porosities above 50% and sizes up to at least mm (Schulz et al. 2015, Rotundi et al. 2015, Fulle et al. 2015). Retrieval of the physical properties of these particles requires a model of the effective forces governing their dynamics. Here, we present a model capable of simulating realistic, large and porous particles using hierarchical aggregates, which shows previous extrapolations to be inadequate. The main strengths of our approach are that we can simulate very large (mm-scale) non-spherical agglomerates and can accurately determine their 1) effective cross-section and ratio of cross-section to mass, 2) gas drag coefficient, and 3) light scattering properties. In practical terms, we find that a more detailed treatment of the dust structure results in 3-5 times hig...

  2. Are enhanced dust explosion hazards to be foreseen in production, processing and handling of powders consisting of nano-size particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhoff, Rolf K.

    2011-07-01

    Based on experience with powders having particle sizes down to the range 1 - 0.1 μm one might expect that dust clouds from combustible nm-particle powders would exhibit extreme ignition sensitivities (very low MIEs) and extreme explosion rates (very high KSt-values). However, there are two basic physical reasons why this may not necessarily be the case. Firstly, the formation of clouds of well-dispersed primary particles from bulk powders consisting of nm-particles is extremely difficult to achieve, due to the comparatively very strong inter-particle cohesion forces. Secondly, should such a dispersion process nevertheless be fully successful, extremely fast coagulation processes in clouds within the explosive mass concentration range, would transform the primary nm-particles into much larger agglomerates within fractions of a second. Furthermore, for organic dusts and coal, the basic mechanism of flame propagation in the dust cloud is a further reason for not expecting extreme ignition sensitivities and explosion rates dust clouds from nm-particles. The overall conclusion is that dust clouds consisting of nm primary particles would not necessarily be expected to exhibit more severe MIE and KSt-values than those of dust clouds of μm primary particles. Recent experimental evidence confirms that this is in fact the case for KSt, whereas for MIE the values for some metals are significantly lower for nm primary particles than for μm ones.

  3. Are enhanced dust explosion hazards to be foreseen in production, processing and handling of powders consisting of nano-size particles?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhoff, Rolf K, E-mail: rolf.eckhoff@ift.uib.no [University of Bergen (Norway)

    2011-07-06

    Based on experience with powders having particle sizes down to the range 1 - 0.1 {mu}m one might expect that dust clouds from combustible nm-particle powders would exhibit extreme ignition sensitivities (very low MIEs) and extreme explosion rates (very high K{sub St-}values). However, there are two basic physical reasons why this may not necessarily be the case. Firstly, the formation of clouds of well-dispersed primary particles from bulk powders consisting of nm-particles is extremely difficult to achieve, due to the comparatively very strong inter-particle cohesion forces. Secondly, should such a dispersion process nevertheless be fully successful, extremely fast coagulation processes in clouds within the explosive mass concentration range, would transform the primary nm-particles into much larger agglomerates within fractions of a second. Furthermore, for organic dusts and coal, the basic mechanism of flame propagation in the dust cloud is a further reason for not expecting extreme ignition sensitivities and explosion rates dust clouds from nm-particles. The overall conclusion is that dust clouds consisting of nm primary particles would not necessarily be expected to exhibit more severe MIE and K{sub St}{sup -}values than those of dust clouds of {mu}m primary particles. Recent experimental evidence confirms that this is in fact the case for K{sub St}, whereas for MIE the values for some metals are significantly lower for nm primary particles than for {mu}m ones.

  4. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  5. Circumplanetary dust dynamics : application to Martian dust tori and Enceladus dust plumes

    OpenAIRE

    Makuch, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Our Solar system contains a large amount of dust, containing valuable information about our close cosmic environment. If created in a planet's system, the particles stay predominantly in its vicinity and can form extended dust envelopes, tori or rings around them. A fascinating example of these complexes are Saturnian rings containing a wide range of particles sizes from house-size objects in the main rings up to micron-sized grains constituting the E ring. Other example are ring systems in g...

  6. Optical detection of nanoparticle agglomeration in a living system under the influence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Robert, E-mail: robert.mueller@ipht-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Stranik, Ondrej [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Schlenk, Florian; Werner, Sebastian [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University, Otto-Schott-Str. 41, 07745 Jena (Germany); Malsch, Daniéll [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Fischer, Dagmar [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University, Otto-Schott-Str. 41, 07745 Jena (Germany); Fritzsche, Wolfgang [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Nanoparticles are important in diagnosis and therapy. In order to apply their potential, an understanding of the behavior of particles in the body is crucial. However, in vitro experiments usually do not mimic the dynamic conditions of the in vivo situation. The aim of our work was an in vivo observation of particle transport in chicken egg vessels in the presence of a magnetic field by particle tracking. For that we demonstrate the spatial resolution of our observations in a vein and a temporal resolution by observation of the cardiac cycle in an artery. Microscopic images were recorded in dark field reflection and fluorescence mode. - Highlights: • Optically accessible blood circulation in hen's egg CAV model. • Observation of transport of magnetic particles in chicken egg vessels. • Irreversibility of agglomerates after removing the magnetic field.

  7. Copper droplets agglomeration/coagulation in the conditions similar to industrial ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wołczyński W.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The studied copper droplets suspension in the liquid slag came from the direct-to-blister technology developed in the KGHM - Polska Miedź S.A. plants. A treatment by the stimulators and reagents was performed in the conditions delivered / ensured by the BOLMET S.A., Wiechlice. These conditions were similar to those usually applied to the industrial process. Particularly, this treatment was similar, to some extent, to that known for the electric arc-furnace technology employed in the Smelter and Refinery Plant, Głogów. An effectiveness of the newly developed and patented complex chemical/reagent for the copper removal from slag was tested during the treatment. The effect of the liquid slag stirring on the copper droplets self-cleaning was also analysed. The performed test confirmed the effectiveness of the studied complex reagent in agglomeration, coagulation and sedimentation of the copper droplets.

  8. Measuring socio-economic inequality: From dwellers' perspective within Bangalore urban agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keya Chakraborty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Planners and researchers have realized that larger regional framework of urban areas are significant in assessing various inequality aspects in a developing country like India. The framework consists of heterogeneity in spatial and demographic aspects and in quality of socio-economic development levels as well. Against this background, the present paper has proposed a methodological framework to assess socio-economic inequality within Bangalore Urban Agglomeration (BUA as governed by the composite set of Human Development Index (HDI based indicators. Assessments are based on local data of dwellers' preferences on the indicators. On the whole, this paper has tried to establish the significance of application of HDI based indicators in an assessment of socio-economic inequality within BUA. Consequently, the paper has arrived at the need for improvement of comprehensive HDI governed basic public services, amenities, and advanced facilities, across all trans-urban-area levels to ensure a holistic development within BUA.

  9. Impact of Climate Change on Urban Agglomerations in China's Coastal Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Suocheng; Tao Shu; YangWangzhou; Li Fei; LiShuangcheng; Li Yu; Liu Hongyan

    2012-01-01

    Climate change and urbanization issues are the two key factors that make humans liable to be affected by disasters, which are overlapped in urban agglomeration. The five big urban agglom- erations of China with strong economic power are the important engines for national economic and social development. However, being in the sea-land mutual interaction belts with a vast hazard- bearing body, they are affected by sea-land compound disasters, and are liable to suffer heavy disaster losses with climate change. It is suggested that government departments concerned should fully recognize the impact of climate change on coastal urban ag- glomerations, propose strategies as soon as possible, and integrate the impact of climate change and adaptation countermeasures into the various kinds of social-economic development plans for coastal urban regions.

  10. Stability of Spatial Structure of Urban Agglomeration in China Based on Central Place Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper brings forward the concept of stability of the spatial structure of urban agglomeration (UA) based on Central Place Theory by introducing centrality index and fractal theory. Before assessment, K=4 is selected as parameter to calculate centrality index and fractal dimension (K represents the quantitive relationship between city and the counties in Central Place Theory), and then found the number of nodes, the type of spatial structure, the spatial allocation of nodes with different hierarchy affecting the stability of spatial structure. According to spatial contact direction and the level of stability, UAs in China are classified into five types. Finally, it is posed as a further question that how to use hierarchical relation K=6 and K=7 in central place system to coordinate with the assessment of stability of spatial structure is brought forward.

  11. Effects of CMP slurry additives on the agglomeration of alumina nanoparticles 1: general aggregation rate behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Neil; Talbot, Jan B

    2014-04-01

    The aggregation behavior for 150 nm alumina particles suspended in 1 mM KNO3 solutions with various additives used in chemical mechanical planarization of copper was investigated. Three behaviors were observed: no aggregation, reversible aggregation where large agglomerates formed almost instantaneously, and steady aggregation where particle sizes grew over the duration of the measurement. In general steady aggregation occurred at high pH for all suspensions, while no aggregation occurred at acidic pH, except with suspensions with sodium dodecyl sulfate, where reversible aggregation was observed. No aggregation was observed at near neutral pH for all suspensions. Zeta potential and isoelectric points for each suspension were also measured. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ADDITION OF ELECTRIC ARC FURNACE DUST IN HOT METAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Fardin Grillo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the process of incorporation of the mass in final hot metal and volatilization mass contained in the electric arc furnace dust (EAFD, by addition in hot metal at a temperature of 1,400°C; 1,450°C and 1,500°C altering experimental conditions such as the percentage of EAFD to be added and the percentage of silicon in hot metal. Previously, the EAFD was characterized using techniques of chemical analysis and size analysis. After characterization, the EAFD to be added to the hot metal was agglomerated in the form of briquettes. The achievement of fusion experiments in laboratory scale was placed in a vertical tubular furnace with temperature control. A flow of inert gas (argon was maintained inside the furnace during the experiments. The result of the sample EAFD volatilized shows that there is an increase in the zinc concentration when compared with the concentration of zinc present in EAFD “as received”.

  13. The morphology of cometary dust: Subunit size distributions down to tens of nanometres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannel, Thurid; Bentley, Mark; Boakes, Peter; Jeszenszky, Harald; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    The Rosetta orbiter carried a dedicated analysis suite for cometary dust. One of the key instruments was MIDAS (Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System), an atomic force microscope that scanned the surfaces of hundreds of (sub-)micrometre particles in 3D with resolutions down to nanometres. This provided the opportunity to study the morphology of the smallest cometary dust; initial investigation revealed that the particles are agglomerates of smaller subunits [1] with different structural properties [2]. To understand the (surface-) structure of the dust particles and the origin of their smallest building blocks, a number of particles were investigated in detail and the size distribution of their subunits determined [3]. Here we discuss the subunit size distributions ranging from tens of nanometres to a few micrometres. The differences between the subunit size distributions for particles collected pre-perihelion, close to perihelion, and during a huge outburst are examined, as well as the dependence of subunit size on particle size. A case where a particle was fragmented in consecutive scans allows a direct comparison of fragment and subunit size distributions. Finally, the small end of the subunit size distribution is investigated: the smallest determined sizes will be reviewed in the context of other cometary missions, interplanetary dust particles believed to originate from comets, and remote observations. It will be discussed if the smallest subunits can be interpreted as fundamental building blocks of our early Solar System and if their origin was in our protoplanetary disc or the interstellar material. References: [1] M.S. Bentley, R. Schmied, T. Mannel et al., Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Chruyumov-Gerasimenko, Nature, 537, 2016. doi:10.1038/nature19091 [2] T. Mannel, M.S. Bentley, R. Schmied et al., Fractal cometary dust - a window into the early Solar system, MNRAS, 462, 2016. doi:10.1093/mnras/stw2898 [3] R. Schmied, T. Mannel, H. Jeszenszky, M

  14. Calcium Oxalate Stone Agglomeration Inhibition [tm] Reflects Renal Stone-Forming Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Jill S.; Cole, Francis E.; Romani, William; Husserl, Fred E.; Fuselier, Harold A.; Kok, Dirk J.; Erwin, Donald T.

    2000-01-01

    Louisiana and other Gulf South states comprise a “Stone Belt” where calcium oxalate stone formers (CaOx SFs) are found at a high rate of approximately 5%. In these patients, the agglomeration of small stone crystals, which are visible in nearly all morning urine collections, forms stones that can become trapped in the renal parenchyma and the renal pelvis. Without therapy, about half of CaOx SFs repeatedly form kidney stones, which can cause excruciating pain that can be relieved by passage, fragmentation (lithotripsy), or surgical removal. The absence of stones in “normal” patients suggests that there are stone inhibitors in “normal” urines. At the Ochsner Renal Stone Clinic, 24-hour urine samples are collected by the patient and sent to the Ochsner Renal Stone Research Program where calcium oxalate stone agglomeration inhibition [tm] measurements are performed. Urine from healthy subjects and inactive stone formers has demonstrated strongly inhibited stone growth [tm] in contrast to urine from recurrent CaOx SFs. [tm] data from 1500 visits of 700 kidney stone patients have been used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in Ochsner's CaOx SF patients. These data have also been used to demonstrate the interactive roles of certain identified urinary stone-growth inhibitors, citrate and Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), which can be manipulated with medication to diminish recurrent stone formation. Our goal is to offer patients both financial and pain relief by reducing their stones with optimized medication, using medical management to avoid costly treatments. PMID:21811395

  15. Agglomeration, isolation and dissolution of commercially manufactured silver nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzey, Sherrie; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2010-06-01

    The increasing use of manufactured nanoparticles ensures these materials will make their way into the environment. Silver nanoparticles in particular, due to use in a wide range of applications, have the potential to get into water systems, e.g., drinking water systems, ground water systems, estuaries, and/or lakes. One important question is what is the chemical and physical state of these nanoparticles in water? Are they present as isolated particles, agglomerates or dissolved ions, as this will dictate their fate and transport. Furthermore, does the chemical and physical state of the nanoparticles change as a function of size or differ from micron-sized particles of similar composition? In this study, an electrospray atomizer coupled to a scanning mobility particle sizer (ES-SMPS) is used to investigate the state of silver nanoparticles in water and aqueous nitric acid environments. Over the range of pH values investigated, 0.5-6.5, silver nanoparticles with a bimodal primary particle size distribution with the most intense peak at 5.0 ± 7.4 nm, as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), show distinct size distributions indicating agglomeration between pH 6.5 and 3 and isolated nanoparticles at pH values from 2.5 to 1. At the lowest pH investigated, pH 0.5, there are no peaks detected by the SMPS, indicating complete nanoparticle dissolution. Further analysis of the solution shows dissolved Ag ions at a pH of 0.5. Interestingly, silver nanoparticle dissolution shows size dependent behavior as larger, micron-sized silver particles show no dissolution at this pH. Environmental implications of these results are discussed.

  16. Elemental tracers for Chinese source dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小曳; 张光宇; 朱光华; 张德二; 安芷生; 陈拓; 黄湘萍

    1996-01-01

    The mass-particle size distributions of 10 dust-carrying elements in aerosol particles were determined tor 12 sites in desert regions of northern China. The desert dust is proved to he of origin of eolian loess deposited on the Loess Plateau. Their transport to the loess was mainly attributable to the non-dust storm processes under the interglacial climate condition. The impact ot" dust storm on the accumulation of the loess increased in the glacial stage. On the basis of the signatures of 4 dust elements (Al. Fe, Mg and Sc). Chinese dust is believed to have 3 major desert sources (northwestern deserts, northern high dust deserts and northern low dust deserts). With a chemical element balance model, an elemental tracer system is established to proportion the export of China-source dust.

  17. Particle Lifting Processes in Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neakrase, L. D. V.; Balme, M. R.; Esposito, F.; Kelling, T.; Klose, M.; Kok, J. F.; Marticorena, B.; Merrison, J.; Patel, M.; Wurm, G.

    2016-10-01

    Particle lifting in dust devils on both Earth and Mars has been studied from many different perspectives, including how dust devils could influence the dust cycles of both planets. Here we review our current understanding of particle entrainment by dust devils by examining results from field observations on Earth and Mars, laboratory experiments (at terrestrial ambient and Mars-analog conditions), and analytical modeling. By combining insights obtained from these three methodologies, we provide a detailed overview on interactions between particle lifting processes due to mechanical, thermal, electrodynamical and pressure effects, and how these processes apply to dust devils on Earth and Mars. Experiments and observations have shown dust devils to be effective lifters of dust given the proper conditions on Earth and Mars. However, dust devil studies have yet to determine the individual roles of each of the component processes acting at any given time in dust devils.

  18. Micro-evidence on the determinants of innovation in the Netherlands : The relative importance of absorptive capacity and agglomeration externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Martijn J.; Abreu, Maria A.; de Groot, Henri L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Although the benefits of clustering for innovation have received much attention in the theoretical as well as empirical literature, analyses at the regional level often disregard the characteristics of local firms. We tackle both at the same time: agglomeration externalities (Marshall, Porter, Jacob

  19. The influence of particle size, fluidization velocity and fuel type on ash-induced agglomeration in biomass combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eGatternig

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Agglomeration of the bed material is one of the main obstacles for biomass utilization in fluidized bed combustors. Especially high-potential fuels such as fast growing energy crops or biogeneous residues are affected, due to their high content of alkaline metals. Despite ongoing research efforts, the knowledge base on what fuels are affected is still limited. This paper describes the design and installation of two lab-scale reactors for the experimental determination of agglomeration temperatures. The reactor concept and measurement method were developed under consideration of experiences from existing test rigs published in literature. Preliminary tests confirmed a reproducibility of ±5°C for both new reactors.The results of an extended measurement campaign (156 test runs of 25 fuel species at a wide range of the operational parameters bed particle size, gas velocity, bed ash accumulation, based on design of experiment criteria, showed high agglomeration tendencies for residues (e.g., dried distillery grains, corn cobs while woody energy crops (e.g., willow, alder exhibited very stable combustion behavior. The operating parameters influenced the agglomeration behavior to a lesser degree than different ash compositions of fuel species tested. An interpolation within the design of experiment factor space allowed for a subsequent comparison of our results with experiments reported in literature. Good agreement was reached for fuels of comparable ash composition considering the interpolation errors of ±32°C on average.

  20. Monitoring and Sampling Strategy for (Manufactured) Nano Objects Agglomerates and Aggregates (NOAA); Potential Added Value of the NANODEVICE Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.H.; Lidén, G.; Asbach, C.; Berges, M.; Tongeren, M. van

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanomaterials and nano-enabled products is associated with the potential for workers' exposure to (manufactured) nano-objects' agglomerates and aggregates (NOAA). Workplace air monitoring studies have been conducted to assess the actual exposure; however, the methods and strategies

  1. Application of acoustic agglomeration to enhance air filtration efficiency in air-conditioning and mechanical ventilation (ACMV) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Bing Feng; Xiong, Jin Wen; Wan, Man Pun

    2017-01-01

    The recent episodes of haze in Southeast Asia have caused some of the worst regional atmospheric pollution ever recorded in history. In order to control the levels of airborne fine particulate matters (PM) indoors, filtration systems providing high PM capturing efficiency are often sought, which inadvertently also results in high airflow resistance (or pressure drop) that increases the energy consumption for air distribution. A pre-conditioning mechanism promoting the formation of particle clusters to enhance PM capturing efficiency without adding flow resistance in the air distribution ductwork could provide an energy-efficient solution. This pre-conditioning mechanism can be fulfilled by acoustic agglomeration, which is a phenomenon that promotes the coagulation of suspended particles by acoustic waves propagating in the fluid medium. This paper discusses the basic mechanisms of acoustic agglomeration along with influencing factors that could affect the agglomeration efficiency. The feasibility to apply acoustic agglomeration to improve filtration in air-conditioning and mechanical ventilation (ACMV) systems is investigated experimentally in a small-scale wind tunnel. Experimental results indicate that this novel application of acoustic pre-conditioning improves the PM2.5 filtration efficiency of the test filters by up to 10% without introducing additional pressure drop. The fan energy savings from not having to switch to a high capturing efficiency filter largely outstrip the additional energy consumed by the acoustics system. This, as a whole, demonstrates potential energy savings from the combined acoustic-enhanced filtration system without compromising on PM capturing efficiency.

  2. Chemically mediated diffusion of d-metals and B through Si and agglomeration at Si-on-Mo interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tsarfati,; Zoethout, E.; van de Kruijs, R.; F. Bijkerk,

    2009-01-01

    Chemical diffusion and interlayer formation in thin layers and at interfaces is of increasing influence in nanoscopic devices, such as nanoelectronics and reflective multilayer optics. Chemical diffusion and agglomeration at interfaces of thin Ru, Mo, Si, and B4C layers have been studied with x-ray

  3. Steric stabilization of nonaqueous silicon slips. I - Control of particle agglomeration and packing. II - Pressure casting of powder compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkar, Awdhoot V.; Henderson, Robert J. M.; Feke, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    The application of steric stabilization to control particle agglomeration and packing of silicon powder in benzene and trichloroethylene is reported. The results provide useful guidelines for controlling unfavorable particle-particle interactions during nonaqueous processing of silicon-based ceramic materials. The application of steric stabilization to the control and improvement of green processing of nonaqueous silicon slips in pressure consolidation is also demonstrated.

  4. Nanostructured micro-raspberries from superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Studying agglomeration degree and redispersibility of nanoparticulate powders via magnetisation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Claudia; Späth, Stephan; Ballweg, Thomas; Luxenhofer, Robert; Mandel, Karl

    2017-11-01

    Surface modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are assembled into nanostructured micro-raspberry particles via spray drying. The micro-raspberry powder is readily redispersed to individual nanoparticles or nanostructured sub-units, depending on the initially adjusted nanoparticle modification. In this work, it is demonstrated how the technique of magnetic zero-field-cooled/field-cooled (ZFC/FC) measurements can be used to judge the degree of agglomeration, i.e. the extent of hard-agglomerates and soft-agglomerates in a system and predict the redispersibility of the powder particles. Furthermore, the uniformity of surface modification of the individual nanoparticles can be judged via this method. In addition, the technique can be applied to characterise complex nanostructured particle systems composed of iron oxide nanoparticles mixed with another type of nanoparticulate building-block. Thus, this work shows that magnetic measurement techniques are a promising approach to characterise agglomeration states of nanoparticles, their degree of surface modification and their distribution in complex particle and composite systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved dissolution and micromeritic properties of naproxen from spherical agglomerates: preparation, in vitro and in vivo characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damineni Saritha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Naproxen, an anti-inflammatory drug, exhibits poor aqueous solubility, which limits the pharmacological effects. The present work was carried out to study the effect of agglomeration on micromeritic properties and dissolution. Naproxen agglomerates were prepared by using a three solvents system composed of acetone (good solvent, water (non-solvent and dichloromethane (bridging liquid. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC results showed no change in the drug after crystallization process. X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD studies showed the sharp peaks are present in the diffractograms of spherical agglomerates with minor reduction in height of the peaks. The residual solvents are largely below the tolerated limits in the agglomerates. Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM studies showed that agglomerates were spherical in structure and formed by cluster of small crystals. The agglomerates exhibited improved solubility, dissolution rate and micromeritic properties compared to pure drug. Anti-inflammatory studies were conducted in Wistar strain male albino rats and naproxen agglomerates showed more significant activity than the pure drug.Naproxeno, fármaco anti-inflamatório, apresenta baixa solubilidade em água, o que limita os efeitos farmacológicos. O presente trabalho foi realizado para estudar o efeito da aglomeração nas propriedades micromeríticas e na dissolução. Aglomerados de naproxeno foram preparados por meio da utilização de sistema de três solventes composto de acetona (bom solvente, água (não-solvente e diclorometano (líquido de ligação. A DSC não resulta mostrou nenhuma mudança na droga depois de processo de cristalização. Estudos de difração de Raios X do Pó (XRPD mostraram picos agudos nos difratogramas de aglomerados esféricos, com redução mínima dea altura dos picos. Os solventes residuais estão amplamente abaixo dos limites tolerados nos aglomerados. Os estudos de Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura

  6. The global atmospheric loading of dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. F.; Ridley, D. A.; Haustein, K.; Miller, R. L.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust is one of the most ubiquitous aerosols in the atmosphere, with important effects on human health and the climate system. But despite its importance, the global atmospheric loading of dust has remained uncertain, with model results spanning about a factor of five. Here we constrain the particle size-resolved atmospheric dust loading and global emission rate, using a novel theoretical framework that uses experimental constraints on the optical properties and size distribution of dust to eliminate climate model errors due to assumed dust properties. We find that most climate models underestimate the global atmospheric loading and emission rate of dust aerosols.

  7. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angeli, M., E-mail: deangeli@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Laguardia, L. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Perelli Cippo, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Apicella, M.L. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Conti, C. [Istituto per la Conservazione e la Valorizzazione dei Beni Culturali – CNR, Milan (Italy); Giacomi, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO{sub 2}, LiOH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  8. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  9. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  10. Computational imaging analysis of fibrin matrices with the inclusion of erythrocytes from homozygous SS blood reveals agglomerated and amorphous structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averett, Rodney D; Norton, David G; Fan, Natalie K; Platt, Manu O

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a single point mutation disease that is known to alter the coagulation system, leading to hypercoagulable plasma conditions. These hypercoagulable conditions can lead to complications in the vasculature, caused by fibrin clots that form undesirably. There is a need to understand the morphology and structure of fibrin clots from patients with sickle cell disease, as this could lead to further discovery of treatments and life-saving therapies. In this work, a computational imaging analysis method is presented to evaluate fibrin agglomeration in the presence of erythrocytes (RBCs) homozygous for the sickle cell mutation (SS). Numerical algorithms were used to determine agglomeration of fibrin fibers within a matrix with SS RBCs to test the hypothesis that fibrin matrices with the inclusion of SS RBCs possess a more agglomerated structure than native fibrin matrices with AA RBCs. The numerical results showed that fibrin structures with SS RBCs displayed an overall higher degree of agglomeration as compared to native fibrin structures. The computational algorithm was also used to evaluate fibrin fiber overlap (aggregation) and anisotropy (orientation) in normal fibrin matrices compared to fibrin matrices polymerized around SS RBCs; however, there was no statistical difference. Ultrasound measurements of stiffness revealed rigid RBCs in the case of samples derived from homozygous SS blood, and densely evolving matrices, when compared to normal fibrin with the inclusion of AA RBCs. An agglomeration model is suggested to quantify the fibrin aggregation/clustering near RBCs for both normal fibrin matrices and for the altered structures. The results of this work are important in the sense that the understanding of aggregation and morphology in fibrin clots with incorporation of RBCs from persons living with sickle cell anemia may elucidate the complexities of comorbidities and other disease complications.

  11. The definition and identification of urban agglomerations%城市群的界定与识别研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 邓羽; 牛文元

    2013-01-01

    The definition and identification are important contents in the urban agglomeration research.Traditional studies rely on empirical data,and the implementation is limited due to the difficulty of gathering data.However,modeling study is rare,and the finite precision is the main disadvantage.Based on the previous studies,this paper develops the definition of urban agglomeration; by combining models and methods,(and) identification system of urban agglomeration is proposed.By qualitative and quantitative analyses,urban agglomeration is delineated more efficiently and precisely.This research will help to both define urban agglomerations and identify them in practice.%城市群的界定与识别是城市群研究的重要内容之一.传统研究以实证数据判断为主,但由于数据可获取性不易,极大的限制了该手段的应用;模型等定量识别方法较少采用,结果的精度较差是其主要弊端.本文在综合以往学者研究的基础上,提出城市群界定的标准体系;运用区域作用组合模型,得出城市群的识别体系.通过模型与实证相结合,更加高效和精确地识别城市群.通过研究,为城市群的界定提供一种研究思路,并为城市群识别的操作层面提供了一种测度手段.

  12. Contribution of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) Collagen IV to the Mechanical Properties of the Glomerular Basement Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoneva, Lazarina

    The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a vital part of the blood-urine filtration barrier in the kidneys. In healthy GBMs, the main tension-resisting component is alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) type IV collagen, but in some diseases it is replaced by other collagen IV isoforms. As a result, the GBM becomes leaky and disorganized, ultimately resulting in kidney failure. Our goal is to understanding the biomechanical aspects of the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains and how their absence could be responsible for (1) the initial injury to the GBM and (2) progression to kidney failure. A combination of experiments and computational models were designed for that purpose. A model basement membrane was used to compare experimentally the distensibility of tissues with the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains present and missing. The experiments showed basement membranes containing alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains were less distensible. It has been postulated that the higher level of lateral cross-linking (supercoiling) in the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks contributes additional strength/stability to basement membranes. In a computational model of supercoiled networks, we found that supercoiling greatly increased the stiffness of collagen IV networks but only minimally decreased the permeability, which is well suited for the needs of the GBM. It is also known that the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks are more protected from enzymatic degradation, and we explored their significance in GBM remodeling. Our simulations showed that the more protected network was needed to prevent the system from entering a dangerous feedback cycle due to autoregulation mechanisms in the kidneys. Overall, the work adds to the evidence of biomechanical differences between the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks and other collagen IV networks, points to supercoiling as the main source of biomechanical differences, discusses the suitability of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV

  13. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  14. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  15. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  16. Coal dust: the real cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, S. [Independent Editorial and Technical Services, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    A recent British court case awarded retired coal miners compensation for asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Although the sums involved were small, large numbers of retired coal miners are likely to be eligible for such awards, as British safety in mines was not substantially worse than most other producers at the time, and was better than many. In some parts of the world safety standards are still poor. Dust suppression should be used on coal cutting machines, and dust controlled in transit. This may prove less expensive than it initially appears since the coal dust can be used instead of lost. This particularly important for transport in open trucks. Employers must also ensure that the safety equipment supplied is both comfortable and used. 3 refs., 5 photos.

  17. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tolias, P; De Angeli, M; De Temmerman, G; Ripamonti, D; Riva, G; Bykov, I; Shalpegin, A; Vignitchouk, L; Brochard, F; Bystrov, K; Bardin, S; Litnovsky, A

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions - detachment, sliding, rolling - are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  18. Polarized Emission from Interstellar Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Vaillancourt, J E

    2006-01-01

    Observations of far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (SMM) polarized emission are used to study magnetic fields and dust grains in dense regions of the interstellar medium (ISM). These observations place constraints on models of molecular clouds, star-formation, grain alignment mechanisms, and grain size, shape, and composition. The FIR/SMM polarization is strongly dependent on wavelength. We have attributed this wavelength dependence to sampling different grain populations at different temperatures. To date, most observations of polarized emission have been in the densest regions of the ISM. Extending these observations to regions of the diffuse ISM, and to microwave frequencies, will provide additional tests of grain and alignment models. An understanding of polarized microwave emission from dust is key to an accurate measurement of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. The microwave polarization spectrum will put limits on the contributions to polarized emission from spinning dust and vibrat...

  19. Microwave Emission from Aligned Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2003-01-01

    Polarized microwave emission from dust is an important foreground that may contaminate polarized CMB studies unless carefully accounted for. We discuss potential difficulties associated with this foreground, namely, the existence of different grain populations with very different emission/polarization properties and variations of the polarization yield with grain temperature. In particular, we discuss observational evidence in favor of rotational emission from tiny PAH particles with dipole moments, i.e. ``spinning dust'', and also consider magneto-dipole emission from strongly magnetized grains. We argue that in terms of polarization, the magneto-dipole emission may dominate even if its contribution to total emissivity is subdominant. Addressing polarized emission at frequencies larger than approsimately 100 GHz, we discuss the complications arising from the existence of dust components with different temperatures and possibly different alignment properties.

  20. Whirling-type dust catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachev, V.G.; Butylkin, Yu.P.; Denisov, V.I.; Ermin, Yu.S.

    1980-10-07

    A whirling-type dust catcher is proposed, containing a cylindrical body mounted in its upper part, a diaphragm, a tangential nozzle (venturi) for delivery of the secondary gas, located in the lower part of the bunker body and an axial pipe with a vortex generator for introduction of the gas to be cleaned and a coaxial pipe connecting the bunker with the evacuation zone of the vortex generator. For increasing the degree of dust collection by elimination of gas fedthrough from the bunker into the axial zone of the dust catcher, it is equipped with an additional vortex generator set up in the outlet of the coaxial pipe, which is made in the shape of an inverse cone.

  1. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-10-20

    An explanation is given of the low value of R lambda triple bond A lambda/E(B - V), the ratio of absolute to selective extinction deduced from Type Ia supernova observations. The idea involves scattering by dust clouds located in the circumstellar environment, or at the highest velocity shells of the supernova ejecta. The scattered light tends to reduce the effective R lambda in the optical, but has an opposite effect in the ultraviolet. The presence of circumstellar dust can be tested by ultraviolet to near infrared observations and by multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SNe Ia.

  2. 11. IV avati Draakoni galeriis...

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Tanel Saare (sünd. 1979) näitus "Gott und huhn episode IV: seed shower". Eksponeeritakse väljavõtteid aktsioonidest aastatel 2000-2004 Turus, Nürnbergis, Berliinis, Lohusalus ja Soulis. Osa aktsioone toimus koos rühmitusega Non Grata

  3. VeVeRa-IV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evelien Eggink; Debbie Oudijk; Klarita Sadiraj

    2012-01-01

    Original title: VeVeRa-IV The Dutch population is set to age rapidly in the coming years. More and more people will also attain a very great age. This means that the need for home care and care provided in nursing or residential care homes will also increase. As part of the Long-term Care Programme

  4. Phase IV of Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Viraj

    2010-04-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan). Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  5. Phase IV of Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT. No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan. Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  6. [Effect of lunar dust on humans: -lunar dust: regolith-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Miki, Takeo; Higashi, Toshiaki; Horie, Seichi; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mukai, Chiaki

    2010-09-01

    We reviewed the effect of lunar dust (regolith) on humans by the combination of the hazard/exposure of regolith and microgravity of the moon. With regard to the physicochemical properties of lunar dust, the hazard-related factors are its components, fibrous materials and nanoparticles. Animal exposure studies have been performed using a simulant of lunar dust, and it was speculated that the harmful effects of the simulant lies between those of crystalline silica and titanium dioxide. Fibrous materials may not have a low solubility judging from their components. The nanoparticles in lunar dust may have harmful potentials from the view of the components. As for exposure to regolith, there is a possibility that particles larger than ones in earth (1 gravity) are respirable. In microgravity, 1) the deposition of particles of less than 1 µm in diameter in the human lung did not decrease, 2) the functions of macrophages including phagocytosis were suppressed, 3) pulmonary inflammation was changed. These data on hazard/exposure and microgravity suggest that fine and ultrafine particles in regolith may have potential hazards and risks for humans.

  7. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  8. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  9. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is to a large extent covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it poses a hazard in the form of dust clouds being...

  10. Efficient radiative transfer in dust grain mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, S

    2003-01-01

    The influence of a dust grain mixture consisting of spherical dust grains with different radii and/or chemical composition on the resulting temperature structure and spectral energy distribution of a circumstellar shell is investigated. The comparison with the results based on an approximation of dust grain parameters representing the mean optical properties of the corresponding dust grain mixture reveal that (1) the temperature dispersion of a real dust grain mixture decreases substantially with increasing optical depth, converging towards the temperature distribution resulting from the approximation of mean dust grain parameters, and (2) the resulting spectral energy distributions do not differ by more than 10% if >= 2^5 grain sizes are considered which justifies the mean parameter approximation and the many results obtained under its assumption so far. Nevertheless, the dust grain temperature dispersion at the inner boundary of a dust shell may amount to >>100K and has therefore to be considered in the cor...

  11. 75 FR 64411 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... the CMDPSU or CPDM and the sampled work shift is less than 8 hours, the value of t used for... Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors AGENCY: Mine Safety and...

  12. Early dust evolution in protostellar accretion disks

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We investigate dust dynamics and evolution during the formation of a protostellar accretion disk around intermediate mass stars via 2D numerical simulations. Using three different detailed dust models, compact spherical particles, fractal BPCA grains, and BCCA grains, we find that even during the early collapse and the first 10,000 yr of dynamical disk evolution, the initial dust size distribution is strongly modified. Close to the disk's midplane coagulation produces dust particles of sizes ...

  13. History and Applications of Dust Devil Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Balme, Matthew R.; Gu, Zhaolin; Kahanpää, Henrik; Klose, Martina; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Patel, Manish R.; Reiss, Dennis; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Spiga, Aymeric; Takemi, Tetsuya; Wei, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Studies of dust devils, and their impact on society, are reviewed. Dust devils have been noted since antiquity, and have been documented in many countries, as well as on the planet Mars. As time-variable vortex entities, they have become a cultural motif. Three major stimuli of dust devil research are identified, nuclear testing, terrestrial climate studies, and perhaps most significantly, Mars research. Dust devils present an occasional safety hazard to light structures and have caused several deaths.

  14. Dust levitation about Itokawa's equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Electrostatic dust motion has been hypothesized to occur on the asteroids, due to the observations of the Eros dust ponds [1] and the potential presence of such a phenomenon on the Moon [2]. There are two phases of electrostatic dust motion: lofting and the subsequent trajectories. The feasibility of electrostatic dust lofting can be assessed by comparing the strength of the electrostatic force to the gravity and cohesion which hold the grain on to the surface [3--5]. The motion of the dust grains after they detach from the surface can be described as either ballistic, escaping, or levitating. We are interested in dust levitation because it could potentially redistribute grains on the surface of an asteroid (for instance, producing the Eros dust ponds) and it could also be hazardous to spacecraft. Specifically, levitating dust could obscure the observations of surface-based spacecraft or possibly trigger obstacle avoidance routines during landing. Dust Levitation: Dust levitation is defined as the altitude oscillation of grains prior to their redeposition on the surface of an asteroid. Levitation occurs about equilibria where the electrostatic and gravity forces on the grain are equal and opposite. An equilibrium state is defined as a position and charge for a specific grain size. We have previously identified equilibria using a 1D plasma model and a simple gravity model for Itokawa [6]. In this simple model, the largest grain that was capable of stable levitation above Itokawa was 3 microns (in radius) [6]. Additionally, we have shown that levitating dust grains follow the variation in the equilibria for a rotating asteroid (i.e., the grain continues to oscillate about an equilibrium state that approaches the surface) [7]. Due to the nonspherical shape of Itokawa, both the gravity and plasma environments are much more complicated than the 1D approximations made in our previous work. Thus, in order to accurately assess the feasibility of dust

  15. Linear and nonlinear excitations in complex plasmas with nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and dust size distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li-Ping; Xue Ju-Kui; Li Yan-Long

    2011-01-01

    Both linear and nonlinear excitation in dusty plasmas have been investigated including the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and Gaussian size distribution dust particles.A linear dispersion relation and a Korteweg-de VriesBurgers equation governing the dust acoustic shock waves are obtained.The relevance of the instability of wave and the wave evolution to the dust size distribution and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation is illustrated both analytically and numerically.The numerical results show that the Gaussian size distribution of dust particles and the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong common influence on the propagation of both linear and nonlinear excitations.

  16. Origin of Harmattan dust settled in Northern Ghana – Long transported or local dust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsie, Gry; Awadzi, Theodore W; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    compositions of the bulk dust samples. Traces of minerals in the clay fraction of the Harmattan period dust may have their origin in the Bodélé Depression or other saline environments. The Harmattan dust deposited in Ghana shows only little resemblance to dust from the Chad basin and with Harmattan dust...... deposited in Niger. This study therefore suggests that the dust deposited during the Harmattan period in northern Ghana is not under significant influence of sediments from the Bodélé Depression. Similarity in the mineral and elemental composition of the dust from both the Harmattan and Monsoon periods...

  17. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the particles

  18. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably endot

  19. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biscaro, Chiara; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains that formed in the Type II-b supernova ejecta by modelling the sputtering of grains. The dust is located in dense ejecta clumps that are crossed by the reverse shock. We also investigate fur...

  20. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...