WorldWideScience

Sample records for dunes

  1. Extending DUNE: The dune-xt modules

    OpenAIRE

    Leibner, Tobias; Milk, René; Schindler, Felix

    2016-01-01

    We present our effort to extend and complement the core modules of the Distributed and Unified Numerics Environment DUNE (http://dune-project.org) by a well tested and structured collection of utilities and concepts. We describe key elements of our four modules dune-xt-common, dune-xt-grid, dune-xt-la and dune-xt-functions, which aim at further enabling the programming of generic algorithms within DUNE as well as adding an extra layer of usability and convenience.

  2. Copernicus Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    22 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark teardrop-shaped sand dunes in eastern Copernicus Crater. The winds responsible for these dunes generally blow from the south-southwest (lower left). Location near: 48.7oS, 167.4oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  3. Russell Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    26 March 2004 Dark streaks made by dozens of spring and summer dust devils created a form of martian graffiti on the sand dunes of Russell Crater near 54.5oS, 347.4oW. Gullies have developed on some of the dune slopes, as well. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  4. Bunge Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    21 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows low albedo (dark), windblown sand dunes on the floor of Bunge Crater, located near 33.8oS, 48.9oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  5. Intracrater Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of a field of dark sand dunes on the floor of an unnamed crater in western Arabia Terra near 7.3oN, 353.4oW. The dominant winds responsible for the movement of sand through this system blows almost directly north to south (top to bottom). The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide, and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  6. ASTER Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This image of Saudi Arabia shows a great sea of linear dunes in part of the Rub' al Khali, or the Empty Quarter. Acquired on June 25, 2000, the image covers an area 37 kilometers (23 miles) wide and 28 kilometers (17 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The dunes are yellow due to the presence of iron oxide minerals. The inter-dune area is made up of clays and silt and appears blue due to its high reflectance in band 1. The Rub' al Khali is the world's largest continuous sand desert. It covers about 650,000 square kilometers (250,966 square miles) and lies mainly in southern Saudi Arabia, though it does extend into the United Arab Emirates, Oman, and Yemen. One of the world's driest areas, it is uninhabited except for the Bedouin nomads who cross it. The first European to travel through the desert was Bertram Thomas in 1930.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of

  7. Dark Dunes Over-riding Bright Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Some martian sand dunes may be more active than others. In this picture, wind has caused the dark and somewhat crescent-shaped dunes to advance toward the lower left. While their movement cannot actually be seen in this April 1998snapshot, the location of their steepest slopes--their slip faces--on their southwestern sides indicates the direction of movement. Oddly, these dark dunes have moved across and partly cover sets of smaller, bright ridges that also formed by wind action.This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image illustrates an intriguing martian 'find.' Strangely, the two dune types have different shapes and a different relative brightness. There are two explanations for the relationship seen here, and neither can be distinguished as 'the answer'--(1) it is possible that the brighter dunes are old and cemented, and represent some ancient wind activity, whereas the dark dunes are modern and are marching across the older, 'fossilized' dune forms, or (2) the bright dunes are composed of grains that are much larger or more dense than those that compose the dark dunes. In the latter scenario, the bright dunes move more slowly and are over-taken by the dark dunes because their grains are harder to transport. An interpretation involving larger or denser grains is consistent with the small size and even-spacing of the bright dunes, as well, but usually on Earth such features occur on the surfaces of larger, finer-grained dunes, not under them. The actual composition of either the bright or dark materials are unknown. This example is located on the floor of an impact crater in western Arabia Terra at 10.7oN, 351.0oW. The picture is illuminated from the right.

  8. Modelling river dune development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries; Weerts, H.J.T.; Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Ritsema, I.L; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; van Os, A.G.; Termes, A.P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Since river dunes influence flow resistance, predictions of dune dimensions are required to make accurate water level predictions. A model approach to simulate developing river dunes is presented. The model is set-up to be appropriate, i.e. as simple as possible, but with sufficient accuracy for

  9. Dune erosion above revetments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In a situation with a narrow dune, the dune base can be protected with a revetment to reduce dune erosion during extreme events. To quantify the effects of a revetment on storm impact, the functionality of the numerical storm impact model XBeach (Roelvink et al., 2009) is extended to account for the

  10. Morphodynamics of star dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.; Courrech du Pont, S.

    2012-04-01

    Star dunes are among the biggest and the most impressive dunes in Earth sand seas. Nonetheless, they remain poorly studied, probably because of their apparent complexity. They are massive pyramidal dunes with interlaced arms whose slip faces are oriented in various directions. Being large, they can integrate wind properties over a wide range of time scales. Thus, they are observed for wind regimes with multiple directions, and may result from the amalgamation of dunes or from the development of arms on a well-established dune pattern. In both cases, the roles of wind directional variability and secondary flow have been emphasized but not precisely quantified. Here, we report simulations where the star dune shape results from a a combination of longitudinal dunes, which form the star dune arms. These arms may radiate and so interact with the other dunes in the field. This mass exchange, controlled by the morphodynamics of star dunes arms, must play an important role in the large-scale arrangement of star dunes networks. We first demonstrate that star dune arms orientation maximizes the flux in the direction of crests. This is opposed to the usually admit dunes orientation, which maximizes the sediment transport perpendicular to the crest. Indeed, depending on sand availability, dunes development results from the growth of a wave on a sand bed or from a net transport of sediment, which grows and extends an isolated longitudinal dune over a non-erodible soil. These two different mechanisms lead to two different modes of crests orientation. Then, we show that the propagating arms reach a stationary state characterized by constant width, height and growth rate. These are controlled by the frequency at which the wind changes direction. Arm width and height increase, whereas the propagation speed decreases with a decreasing frequency. These morphodynamics properties are helpful to assess from pattern observation the variability of wind directionality over several time

  11. Morphogenesis of star dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.

    2010-12-01

    Dunes constantly adapt their shapes in response to the flow. Under multi-modal wind orientation, this permanent reorganization may result in the formation of star dunes, a highly complex structure with multiple arms, crests and slip faces oriented in different directions. Here, we show that this majestic dune feature can be described as a superposition of longitudinal dunes. In a 3D cellular automaton for sediment transport, star dunes form by amalgamation or by nucleation and growth of secondary longitudinal dunes. When the dune shape reaches a steady state, individual arms continue to propagate and detach from the main structure to feed other dunes in the neighborhood. From the sedimentary structures produced by the model we show that arm elongation is strongly dependent on the frequency at which the wind oscillates. This demonstrates that the elongation/propagation of dunes is a highly non-linear process that should account for crest reorientation over different time scales. We conclude that such a behavior needs to be taken into account when estimating climatic conditions from sedimentary structures on Earth or satellite images on other planetary bodies.

  12. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  13. Russell Dune Gullies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    5 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies and dust devil streaks on the slopes of a large dune in Russell Crater. Gullies on martian dunes typically occur only in the Noachis Terra region, and almost exclusively form on southward-facing slopes. They might be the result of downslope movement of sand mixed with a fluid such as carbon dioxide gas or water that had been trapped as ice in the dune. Location near: 54.6oS, 347.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  14. Dune Avalanche Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    05 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, low albedo (dark) sand dunes in Kaiser Crater near 47.2oS, 340.4oW. The dunes are--ever so slowly--moving east to west (right to left) as sand avalanches down the steeper, slip face slopes of each. Avalanching sand in the Kaiser dune field has left deep scars on these slopes, suggesting that the sand is not loose but is instead weakly cemented. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  15. June 2004 Autumn Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    7 June 2004 Presently, it is autumn in the southern hemisphere of Mars. Sand dunes at high and middle latitudes are becoming cold and frosted. This frost, probably water ice, is persistent enough that it is still present around 2 p.m. in the afternoon, when Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) flies over these dune fields. This MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an intracrater dune field at 59.4oS, 158.9oW, as it appeared last week on 3 June 2004. In summer, these dunes would be very dark relative to the substrate on which they occur. In autumn, as shown here, they begin to accumulate frost that will last through the coming winter. Southern hemisphere winter will arrive around 20 September 2004. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  16. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  17. Moving sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    In several desert areas, the slow motion of sand dunes can be a challenge for modern human activities and a threat for the survival of ancient places or archaeological sites. However, several methods exist for surveying the dune fields and estimate their migration rate. Among these methods, the use of satellite images, in particular of those freely available on the World Wide Web, is a convenient resource for the planning of future human settlements and activities.

  18. Supernova Physics at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Ankowski, Artur; Benhar, Omar; Chen, Sun; Cherry, John; Cui, Yanou; Friedland, Alexander; Gil-Botella, Ines; Haghighat, Alireza; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Huber, Patrick; Kneller, James; Laha, Ranjan; Li, Shirley; Link, Jonathan; Lovato, Alessandro; Macias, Oscar; Mariani, Camillo; Mezzacappa, Anthony; O'Connor, Evan; O'Sullivan, Erin; Rubbia, Andre; Scholberg, Kate; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2016-01-01

    The DUNE/LBNF program aims to address key questions in neutrino physics and astroparticle physics. Realizing DUNE's potential to reconstruct low-energy particles in the 10-100 MeV energy range will bring significant benefits for all DUNE's science goals. In neutrino physics, low-energy sensitivity will improve neutrino energy reconstruction in the GeV range relevant for the kinematics of DUNE's long-baseline oscillation program. In astroparticle physics, low-energy capabilities will make DUNE's far detectors the world's best apparatus for studying the electron-neutrino flux from a supernova. This will open a new window to unrivaled studies of the dynamics and neutronization of a star's central core in real time, the potential discovery of the neutrino mass hierarchy, provide new sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model, and evidence of neutrino quantum-coherence effects. The same capabilities will also provide new sensitivity to `boosted dark matter' models that are not observable in traditional direc...

  19. Dunes with Frost

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    31 May 2004 Springtime for the martian northern hemisphere brings defrosting spots and patterns to the north polar dune fields. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example located near 76.7oN, 250.4oW. In summer, these dunes would be darker than their surroundings. However, while they are still covered by frost, they are not any darker than the substrate across which the sand is slowly traveling. Dune movement in this case is dominated by winds that blow from the southwest (lower left) toward the northeast (upper right). The picure covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  20. Barchan dunes on Pluto?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    We show that the orientation and morphology of bedforms occurring on top of Pluto's smooth ice coats are consistent with an aeolian origin under conditions of unidirectional flow. From scaling relations for dune size as a function of attributes of atmosphere and sediments, we find that the average diameter of the granular particles constituting such bedforms — assuming an aeolian origin — lies within the range 600 μm< d < 750 μm. Our findings show that, owing to the effect of hysteresis in the minimal threshold wind velocity for saltation, dune migration on Pluto can occur under wind speeds that are common to Earth and Mars.

  1. Dune erosion during storm surges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Large parts of The Netherlands are protected from flooding by a narrow strip of sandy beaches and dunes. The aim of this thesis is to extend the existing knowledge of dune erosion during storm surges as it occurs along the Dutch coast. The thesis discusses: • A large scale dune erosion experiment to

  2. Two modes for dune orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain; Narteau, Clément; Gao, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Earth sand seas experience winds that blow with different strengths and from different directions in line with the seasons. In response, dune fields show a rich variety of shapes from small crescentic barchans to big star and linear dunes. Linear dunes often exhibit complex and compound patterns with different length scales and orientations, which seem difficult to relate to a single wind cycle. We present results of underwater experiments and numerical simulations where a single wind regime can lead to two different dunes orientation depending on sediment availability. Sediment availability selects the overriding mechanism for the formation of dunes: increasing in height from the destabilization of a sand bed or elongating in a finger on a non-erodible ground from a localized sand source. These mechanisms drive the dunes orientation. Therefore, dunes alignment maximizes dunes orthogonality to sand fluxes in the bed instability mode, while dunes are aligned with the sand transport direction in the fingering mode. Then, we derive a model for dunes orientation, which explains the coexistence of bedforms with different alignments and quantitatively predicts the orientation of dunes in Earth deserts. Finally, we explore the phase diagram and the stability of the fingering mode.

  3. Namibian Analogs To Titan Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Stephen D.; Lopes, R.; Kirk, R.; Stofan, E.; Farr, T.; Van der Ploeg, P.; Lorenz, R.; Radebaugh, J.

    2009-09-01

    Titan's equatorial dunes, observed in Cassini SAR, have been described as longitudinal, similar to longitudinal dunes in the Namib sand sea in southern Africa. Their "Y” junctions and the way they divert around topography are used as evidence of equatorial wind flow direction. In two instances of such diversion they exhibit overlying or crosshatched patterns in two distinct directions that have been interpreted as a transition to transverse dunes. Here we describe field observations of the Namibian dunes and these comparisons, we present images of the dunes from terrestrial SAR missions, and we discuss implications to both the Titan dunes and the wind regime that created them. Selected portions of the Namibian dunes resemble Titan's dunes in peak-to-peak distance and length. They are morphologically similar to Titan, and specific superficial analogs are common, but they also differ. For example, when Titan dunes encounter topography they either terminate abruptly, "climb” the upslope, or divert around; only the latter behavior is seen in remote sensing images of Namibia. Namib linear dunes do transition to transverse as they divert, but at considerably smaller wavelength, while at Titan the wavelengths are of the same scale. Crosshatching of similar-wavelength dunes does occur in Namibia, but not near obstacles. Many additional aeolian features that are seen at Namibia such as star dunes, serpentine ridges and scours have not been detected on Titan, although they might be below the Cassini SAR's 300-m resolution. These similarities and differences allow us to explore mechanisms of Titan dune formation, in some cases giving us clues as to what larger scale evidence to look for in SAR images. Viewed at similar resolution, they provide interesting comparisons with the Titan dunes, both in likeness and differences. A part of this work was carried out at JPL under contract with NASA.

  4. Dune formation under bimodal winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parteli, Eric J R; Durán, Orencio; Tsoar, Haim; Schwämmle, Veit; Herrmann, Hans J

    2009-12-29

    The study of dune morphology represents a valuable tool in the investigation of planetary wind systems--the primary factor controlling the dune shape is the wind directionality. However, our understanding of dune formation is still limited to the simplest situation of unidirectional winds: There is no model that solves the equations of sand transport under the most common situation of seasonally varying wind directions. Here we present the calculation of sand transport under bimodal winds using a dune model that is extended to account for more than one wind direction. Our calculations show that dunes align longitudinally to the resultant wind trend if the angle(w) between the wind directions is larger than 90 degrees. Under high sand availability, linear seif dunes are obtained, the intriguing meandering shape of which is found to be controlled by the dune height and by the time the wind lasts at each one of the two wind directions. Unusual dune shapes including the "wedge dunes" observed on Mars appear within a wide spectrum of bimodal dune morphologies under low sand availability.

  5. Solitary Dunes under Bimodal Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reffet, Erwan; Courrech du Pont, S.; Hersen, P.; Fulchignoni, M.; Douady, S.

    2009-01-01

    The high resolution and coverage achieved on Mars' surface have detailed lots of sand dunes of various types [1]. Many are reported as barchan or barchanoid dunes and present a diversity of shape ascribed to compound wind regimes, collisions or cementation. This diversity reminds us that aeolian structures are fairly complex. Although dunes have been extensively observed and documented, the conditions of their formation and evolution are still difficult to study because of the long time required for their development and their large length-scale. We developed a laboratory approach using underwater experiments to study the morphology of dunes. This method has been used successfully to reproduce various types of dunes downsized to a few centimeters. Barchan dunes are formed using a unidirectional wind-equivalent regime on a pile of ceramic sand-sized grains [2]. Changing the wind regime to a more complex one reveals other structures. In the case of multiple wind directions star dunes can be observed. A bimodal wind regime, e.g. switching between two distinct directions, over an homogeneous layer of sand leads to transverse, longitudinal or complex compound sandbeds depending on the angle between these wind directions [3]. Here, we apply bimodal wind regimes to isolated patches of sand in order to observe the variation of morphology of the resulting dunes. We present the barchanoid dunes obtained for various angles of bimodal wind and show the transition to the "chestnut” dunes type. We also investigate sudden variations in wind direction over a barchan dune. Therefore, we illustrate how the (not so) simple barchan shape can be affected by a more complex wind regime and give a new insight in understanding dunes on Mars. [1] http://www.mars-dunes.org/ . [2] Hersen et al. PRL, 2003. [3] Reffet et al. pldu.work 2008.

  6. Barchan dunes on Pluto?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parteli Eric J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that the orientation and morphology of bedforms occurring on top of Pluto’s smooth ice coats are consistent with an aeolian origin under conditions of unidirectional flow. From scaling relations for dune size as a function of attributes of atmosphere and sediments, we find that the average diameter of the granular particles constituting such bedforms — assuming an aeolian origin — lies within the range 600 μm< d < 750 μm. Our findings show that, owing to the effect of hysteresis in the minimal threshold wind velocity for saltation, dune migration on Pluto can occur under wind speeds that are common to Earth and Mars.

  7. Underground physics with DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A

    2016-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a project to design, construct and operate a next-generation long-baseline neutrino detector with a liquid argon (LAr) target capable also of searching for proton decay and supernova neutrinos. It is a merger of previous efforts of the LBNE and LBNO collaborations, as well as other interested parties to pursue a broad programme with a staged 40 kt LAr detector at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) 1300 km from Fermilab. This programme includes studies of neutrino oscillations with a powerful neutrino beam from Fermilab, as well as proton decay and supernova neutrino burst searches. In this paper we will focus on the underground physics with DUNE.

  8. Windblown Dunes and Ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-411, 4 July 2003July 4, 2003, is the 6th anniversary of the Mars Pathfinder landing. One of the elements carried to the red planet by Pathfinder was the Wind Sock Experiment. This project was designed to measure wind activity by taking pictures of three aluminum 'wind socks.' While the winds at the Mars Pathfinder site did not blow particularly strong during the course of that mission, dust storms seen from orbit and Earth-based telescopes attest to the fact that wind is a major force of change on the dry, desert surface of Mars today. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle image shows dark sand dunes and lighter-toned ripples trapped among the mountainous central peak of an old impact crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 13.9oS, 246.7oW. The dune slip faces--the steepest slope on the larger dunes--indicate sand transport is from the top/upper left toward the bottom/lower right. North is toward the top/upper right; the picture is 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left. This picture was obtained in April 2003.

  9. Biogenic crust dynamics on sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Kinast, Shai; Yizhaq, Hezi; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2012-01-01

    Sand dunes are often covered by vegetation and biogenic crusts. Despite their significant role in dune stabilization, biogenic crusts have rarely been considered in studies of dune dynamics. Using a simple model, we study the existence and stability ranges of different dune-cover states along gradients of rainfall and wind power. Two ranges of alternative stable states are identified: fixed crusted dunes and fixed vegetated dunes at low wind power, and fixed vegetated dunes and active dunes at high wind power. These results suggest a cross-over between two different forms of desertification.

  10. Gullies and Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    7 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies overlain by seasonal frost in the north wall of an unnamed crater west of Hellas Planitia. The gullies likely formed by a combination of mass movement (i.e., landsliding) and fluid flow (i.e., water-rich debris flows). Below (south of) the gullies is a field of sand dunes; they, too, are covered by seasonal frost. Location near: 47.4oS, 322.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  11. Dune erosion under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, R.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341476935

    2014-01-01

    This PhD-thesis investigated the effect of future climate change on dune erosion in the Netherlands. At present, dune erosion occurs under a combination of large storm surge and high waves, which are both generated by a storm event. Therefore to investigate the affect of future climate change on dun

  12. Dune erosion under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    This PhD-thesis investigated the effect of future climate change on dune erosion in the Netherlands. At present, dune erosion occurs under a combination of large storm surge and high waves, which are both generated by a storm event. Therefore to investigate the affect of future climate change on dun

  13. Dunes in Darwin Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03039 Dunes in Darwin Crater The dunes and sand deposits in this image are located on the floor of Darwin Crater. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 57.4S, Longitude 340.2E. 17 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. The dune size distribution and scaling relations of barchan dune fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durán, O.; Schwämmle, V.; Lind, P.G.; Herrmann, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Barchan dunes emerge as a collective phenomena involving the generation of thousands of them in so called barchan dune fields. By measuring the size and position of dunes in Moroccan barchan dune fields, we find that these dunes tend to distribute uniformly in space and follow an unique size distrib

  15. Advances in DUNE : Proceedings of the DUNE User Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Flemisch, Bernd; Klöfkorn, Robert

    2012-01-01

    DUNE, the Distributed and Unified Numerics Environment, is an open-source modular toolbox for solving partial differential equations with grid-based methods. This book covers recent advances in the development and usage of DUNE.  It consists of a collection of 13 articles which mainly evolved from talks  given at the First DUNE User Meeting in Stuttgart, Germany, 6.-8.10.2010. The articles nicely illustrate the advanced capabilities and the strong versatility of the DUNE framework. The first part presents extensions of the DUNE core modules, including the construction of local finite element spaces, a discretization toolbox, and two meta-grids, as well as a discussion of performance pitfalls. The second part introduces several external DUNE modules dealing with, e.g., reduced basis methods, unfitted discontinuous Galerkin methods, optimal control problems, and porous media applications. Specific methods and applications are subject of the third part, ranging from two-phase flow in porous media over the impl...

  16. Dune Activity in Proctor Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Observation of dune activity--whether the movement of whole dunes or the movement of sediment on a dune--is the result of a direct link between the martian surface and its atmosphere. Observation of dune activity can be used to determine the rate at which wind moves sediment. It can also help to estimate how long it takes for windblown sand to abrade surfaces--including rocks and Mars landers. One of the first sand dune fields ever recognized on Mars is shown here. Located on the floor of Proctor Crater (at 48oS, 330oW), this dune field was seen in Mariner 9images more than 27 years ago. In fact, the photomosaic base map in MOC2-170a (above, left) is constructed from Mariner 9 images taken in February and March of 1972. The thin strip overlain on the Mariner 9 mosaic is a Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image taken in June 1999. The new MOC image shows evidence that the Proctor Crater dunes are active today. The picture on the right is an expanded view of a portion of the MOC image (its location is indicated by the white box in the picture on the left). In this view (right), the sand dunes are dark and patches of southern winter frost are bright. The sun illuminates the scene from the upper left. Dark streaks can be seen on frost-covered slopes, particularly just left of the center of the picture. Thesestreaks result from recent avalanching of sand on the steep (up to 35o), down-wind side of the dune, otherwise known as the slip face. Because the dark sand streaks are superposed upon the bright frost, these streaks can only be as old as the frost. This frost cannot be more than 11 months old, and was probably only a few months old at the time the picture was taken. Thus, the dunes must be active today in order to show such streaks. The placement of dunes in the MOC image was also compared with their positions in the earlier Mariner 9 image (above, left). No evidence that entire dunes have moved since March 1972 has been found. While the period

  17. Coastal dunes of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tinley, KL

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available cordon, is analysed. Recommendations are made for the protection, conservation, management and reclamation of dune ecosystems. A comprehensive list of proposed conservation areas and an extensive bibliography are also provided....

  18. The sedimentary structure of linear sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow; Bailey; Lancaster

    2000-07-06

    Linear sand dunes--dunes that extend parallel to each other rather than in star-like or crescentic forms--are the most abundant type of desert sand dune. But because their development and their internal structure are poorly understood, they are rarely recognized in the rock record. Models of linear dune development have not been able to take into account the sub-surface structure of existing dunes, but have relied instead either on the extrapolation of short-term measurements of winds and sediment transport or on observations of near-surface internal sedimentary structures. From such studies, it has not been clear if linear dunes can migrate laterally. Here we present images produced by ground penetrating radar showing the three-dimensional sedimentary structure of a linear dune in the Namib sand sea, where some of the world's largest linear dunes are situated. These profiles show clear evidence for lateral migration in a linear dune. Moreover, the migration of a sinuous crest-line along the dune produces divergent sets of cross-stratification, which can become stacked as the dune height increases, and large linear dunes can support superimposed dunes that produce stacked sets of trough cross-stratification. These clear structural signatures of linear dunes should facilitate their recognition in geological records.

  19. Recent Aeolian Dune Change on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, M. C.; Edgett, K. S.; Cantor, B. A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous comparisons of Martian aeolian dunes in satellite images have not detected any change in dune form or position. Here, we show dome dunes in the north polar region that shrank and then disappeared over a period of 3.04 Mars years (5.7 Earth years), while larger, neighboring dunes showed no erosion or movement. The removal of sand from these dunes indicates that not only is the threshold wind speed for saltation exceeded under present conditions on Mars, but that any sand that is available for transport is likely to be moved. Dunes that show no evidence of change could be crusted, indurated. or subject to infrequent episodes of movement.

  20. Morphodynamics of river dunes: suspended sediment transport along mobile dunes and dune development towards upper stage plane bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naqshband, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    Dunes are the most common bedforms present in nearly all fluvial channels. Because of their dimensions, dunes are of central importance in predicting flow roughness and water levels. During floods in several rivers, dunes are observed to undergo an unstable transition regime after which they are was

  1. Stars and linear dunes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    1994-01-01

    A field containing 11 star and incipient star dunes occurs on Mars at 8.8 deg S, 270.9 deg W. Examples of linear dunes are found in a crater at 59.4 deg S, 343 deg W. While rare, dune varieties that form in bi- and multidirectional wind regimes are not absent from the surface of Mars. The occurence of both of these dune fields offers new insight into the nature of martian wind conditions and sand supply. The linear dunes appears to have formed through modification of a formerly transverse aeolian deposit, suggesting a relatively recent change in local wind direction. The 11 dunes in the star dune locality show a progressive change from barchan to star form as each successive dune has traveled up into a valley, into a more complex wind regime. The star dunes corroborate the model of N. Lancaster (1989), for the formation of star dunes by projection of transverse dunes into a complex, topographically influenced wind regime. The star dunes have dark streaks emanating from them, providing evidence that the dunes were active at or near the time the relevant image was obtained by the Viking 1 orbiter in 1978. The star and linear dunes described here are located in different regions on the martian surface. Unlike most star and linear dunes on Earth, both martian examples are isolated occurrences; neither is part of a major sand sea. Previously published Mars general circulation model results suggest that the region in which the linear dune field occurs should be a bimodal wind regime, while the region in which the star dunes occur should be unimodal. The star dunes are probably the result of localized complication of the wind regime owing to topographic confinement of the dunes. Local topographic influence on wind regime is also evident in the linear dune field, as there are transverse dunes in close proximity to the linear dunes, and their occurrence is best explained by funneling of wind through a topographic gap in the upwind crater wall.

  2. Dunes and Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    22 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of dark sand dunes that formed in winds blowing from east (right) to west (left), along with smaller, lighter-toned ripples and many dark dust devil tracks. The dust devil tracks indicate movement from a variety of directions, while the dunes only indicate winds from the east. In the lower left quarter of the image, dune sand has flowed around a layered rock obstacle. This scene is located near 19.9oN, 280.5oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  3. Complementarity Between Hyperkamiokande and DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Yasuda, Osamu; Ghosh, Monojit

    2016-01-01

    In this talk we present our results on the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy, the octant of the mixing angle and the CP phase in the future long baseline experiments T2HK and DUNE as well as in the atmospheric neutrino observation at Hyperkamiokande (HK).

  4. A Sterile Neutrino at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Berryman, Jeffrey M; Kelly, Kevin J; Kobach, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the potential for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) to probe the existence and effects of a fourth neutrino mass-eigenstate. We study the mixing of the fourth mass-eigenstate with the three active neutrinos of the Standard Model, including the effects of new sources of CP-invariance violation, for a wide range of new mass-squared differences, from lower than 10^-5 eV^2 to higher than 1 eV^2. DUNE is sensitive to previously unexplored regions of the mixing angle - mass-squared difference parameter space. If there is a fourth neutrino, in some regions of the parameter space, DUNE is able to measure the new oscillation parameters (some very precisely) and clearly identify two independent sources of CP-invariance violation. Finally, we use the hypothesis that there are four neutrino mass-eigenstates in order to ascertain how well DUNE can test the limits of the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm. In this way, we briefly explore whether light sterile neutrinos can serve as proxies for ot...

  5. Controls of eolian dune size and spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, N.

    1988-11-01

    Data for the Namib and Gran Desierto sand seas suggest that the controls of dune size and spacing are complex. The relation between dune height and spacing varies with dune type and location and reflects both dune dynamics (vertical accretion vs. migration or extension) and availability of sand. There is no general relation between dune spacing and grain size. In the Namib sand sea the height of compound and complex dunes (draas) is inversely proportional to potential sand-transport rates, whereas the height of dunes superimposed on their flanks varies directly with potential sand-transport rates. These observations can be combined with data on dune spacing to demonstrate the existence of a hierarchy of eolian dunes, each element of which responds to variations in sand-transport rates at different temporal and spatial scales. Whereas the morphology of individual simple dunes and superimposed dunes on draas is related to contemporary rates and directions of sand transport, the morphology and development of draas reflects long-term and regional patterns of sand transport and deposition.

  6. Experiment Simulation Configurations Used in DUNE CDR

    CERN Document Server

    Alion, T; Bashyal, A; Bass, M; Bishai, M; Cherdack, D; Diwan, M; Djurcic, Z; Evans, J; Fernandez-Martinez, E; Fields, L; Fleming, B; Gran, R; Guenette, R; Hewes, J; Hogan, M; Hylen, J; Junk, T; Kohn, S; LeBrun, P; Lundberg, B; Marchionni, A; Morris, C; Papadimitriou, V; Rameika, R; Rucinski, R; Soldner-Rembold, S; Sorel, M; Urheim, J; Viren, B; Whitehead, L; Wilson, R; Worcester, E; Zeller, G

    2016-01-01

    The LBNF/DUNE CDR describes the proposed physics program and experimental design at the conceptual design phase. Volume 2, entitled The Physics Program for DUNE at LBNF, outlines the scientific objectives and describes the physics studies that the DUNE collaboration will perform to address these objectives. The long-baseline physics sensitivity calculations presented in the DUNE CDR rely upon simulation of the neutrino beam line, simulation of neutrino interactions in the far detector, and a parameterized analysis of detector performance and systematic uncertainty. The purpose of this posting is to provide the results of these simulations to the community to facilitate phenomenological studies of long-baseline oscillation at LBNF/DUNE. Additionally, this posting includes GDML of the DUNE single-phase far detector for use in simulations. DUNE welcomes those interested in performing this work as members of the collaboration, but also recognizes the benefit of making these configurations readily available to the...

  7. Defrosting of Russell Crater Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    These two images (at right) were acquired by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) 39 days apart at 19:10 UTC (2:10 PM EST) on December 28, 2006 (upper right) and at 20:06 UTC (3:06 PM EST) on February 5, 2007 (lower right). These CRISM data were acquired in 544 colors covering the wavelength range from 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and show features as small as 20 meters (about 65 feet) across. Both images are false color composites of bands at 2.5, 1.5, and 1.25 micrometers, and are nearly centered at the same location, 54.875oS, 12.919oE (upper right) and 54.895oS, 12.943oE (lower right). Each image is approximately 11 kilometers (7 miles) across at its narrowest. These are part of a series of images capturing the evolution of carbon dioxide frost on the surface of the dunes in Russell Crater. Russell Crater is one of many craters in the southern highland region of Mars that contain large areas of sand dunes. The sand in these dunes has accumulated over a very long time period -- perhaps millions of years -- as wind blows over the highland terrain, picking up sand in some places and depositing in others. The topography of the craters forces the wind to blow up and over the crater rims, and the wind often isn't strong enough to keep the tiny grains suspended. This makes the sand fall to the ground and gradually pile up, and over time the surface breezes shape the sand into ripples and dunes. A similar process is at work at the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in Colorado, USA. The above left image shows a THEMIS daytime infrared mosaic of Russell Crater and the location of its (approximately) 30-kilometer wide dune field in the northeastern quadrant of the crater floor. Superposed on this view and shown enlarged at the upper right is CRISM image FRT000039DF. This CRISM image was acquired during the late Martian southern winter (solar longitude = 157.7o), and the bright blue in this false color composite indicates the presence of

  8. Summertime View of North Polar Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    10 October 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of dunes in one of the several north polar dune fields. The bright surfaces adjacent to some of the dunes are patches of frost. These dunes spend much of the autumn, winter, and spring seasons covered with carbon dioxide frost. Only in late spring and in summer are the dark windblown sands fully exposed. Over the course of the 9+ years of the MGS mission, the MOC team has sought evidence that sand dunes may be migrating downwind over time. However, no clear examples of the movement of a whole dune have been identified. On Earth, such movement is typically detectable in air photos of the smallest active dunes over periods of a few years. Owing to the fact that the north polar dunes spend much of each martian year under a cover of frost, perhaps these move much more slowly than their frost-free, terrestrial counterparts. The sand may also be somewhat cemented by ice or minerals, likewise preventing vigorous dune migration in the present environment. This view covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left. The dunes are located near 79.8oN, 127.1oW, and the picture was acquired on 11 September 2006.

  9. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Durán

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a cooperative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009, we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields but fail to reproduce their homogeneity along the wind direction.

  10. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duran, O.; Schwämmle, Veit; Lind, P. G.;

    2011-01-01

    Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a co-operative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009), we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between...... dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well...... as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields...

  11. Vegetated dune morphodynamics during recent stabilization of the Mu Us dune field, north-central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Mason, Joseph A.; Lu, Huayu

    2015-01-01

    The response of dune fields to changing environmental conditions can be better understood by investigating how changing vegetation cover affects dune morphodynamics. Significant increases in vegetation and widespread dune stabilization over the years 2000-2012 are evident in high-resolution satellite imagery of the Mu Us dune field in north-central China, possibly a lagged response to changing wind strength and temperature since the 1970s. These trends provide an opportunity to study how dune morphology changes with increasing vegetation stabilization. Vegetation expansion occurs mainly by expansion of pre-existing patches in interdunes. As vegetation spreads from interdunes onto surrounding dunes, it modifies their shapes in competition with wind-driven sand movement, primarily in three ways: 1) vegetation anchoring horns of barchans transforms them to parabolic dunes; 2) vegetation colonizes stoss faces of barchan and transverse dunes, resulting in lower dune height and an elongated stoss face, with shortening of barchan horns; and 3) on transverse dunes, the lee face is fixed by plants that survive sand burial. Along each of these pathways of stabilization, dune morphology tends to change from more barchanoid to more parabolic forms, but that transformation is not always completed before full stabilization. Artificial stabilization leads to an extreme case of "frozen" barchans or transverse dunes with original shapes preserved by rapid establishment of vegetation. Observations in the Mu Us dune field emphasize the point that vegetation growth and aeolian sand transport not only respond to external factors such as climate but also interact with each other. For example, some barchans lose sand mass during vegetation fixation, and actually migrate faster as they become smaller, and vegetation growth on a barchan's lower stoss face may alter sand transport over the dune in a way that favors more rapid stabilization. Conceptual models were generalized for the

  12. Mars global digital dune database: MC-30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Fenton, L.K.; Titus, T.N.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3) provides data and describes the methodology used in creating the global database of moderate- to large-size dune fields on Mars. The database is being released in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports. The first report (Hayward and others, 2007) included dune fields from lat 65° N. to 65° S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1158/). The second report (Hayward and others, 2010) included dune fields from lat 60° N. to 90° N. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1170/). This report encompasses ~75,000 km2 of mapped dune fields from lat 60° to 90° S. The dune fields included in this global database were initially located using Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) Infrared (IR) images. In the previous two reports, some dune fields may have been unintentionally excluded for two reasons: (1) incomplete THEMIS IR (daytime) coverage may have caused us to exclude some moderate- to large-size dune fields or (2) resolution of THEMIS IR coverage (100 m/pixel) certainly caused us to exclude smaller dune fields. In this report, mapping is more complete. The Arizona State University THEMIS daytime IR mosaic provided complete IR coverage, and it is unlikely that we missed any large dune fields in the South Pole (SP) region. In addition, the increased availability of higher resolution images resulted in the inclusion of more small (~1 km2) sand dune fields and sand patches. To maintain consistency with the previous releases, we have identified the sand features that would not have been included in earlier releases. While the moderate to large dune fields in MGD3 are likely to constitute the largest compilation of sediment on the planet, we acknowledge that our database excludes numerous small dune fields and some moderate to large dune fields as well. Please note that the absence of mapped dune fields does not mean that dune fields do not exist and is not intended to imply a lack of saltating sand in other areas

  13. Proton Decay Searches with DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be comprised of a beam line and near detector complex at Fermilab, Illinois as well as a massive far detector located 1300 km away at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), South Dakota. To achieve its rich physics program, DUNE plans to construct a 40kt fiducial volume Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) far detector almost a mile underground. The size, location, and technology of the proposed far detector make it an attractive tool to search for proton decay, which has yet to be observed. Observation of such a rare event requires high sensitivity to the signal and high background rejection rate. A particular background of interest arises from cosmic muons interacting with rock surrounding the detector and producing a variety of particles which can enter the detector and leave signatures similar to that of proton decay. In order to keep this background to a reasonable level without sacrificing signal acceptance efficiency, precise tracking, made possible by the LArTPC technology, is required. Precise 3D localization of proton decay events relies on the detector's ability to identify the prompt emission of scintillation light from proton decay events as the t0-defining signal. Therefore, low background rate and high detection efficiency of this light are the crucial to the search. This work examines these characteristics in a detailed Monte Carlo simulation using DUNE`s far detector reference design and demonstrates a high signal efficiency while keeping the expected number of cosmogenic background events sufficiently low.

  14. DUNE: The Dark Universe Explorer

    CERN Document Server

    Réfrégier, A; Mellier, Y; Milliard, B; Pain, R; Michaud, J; Safa, F; Amara, A; Astier, Pierre; Barrelet, E; Bertin, E; Boulade, S; Cara, C; Claret, A; Georges, L; Grange, R; Guy, J; Koeck, C; Kroely, L; Magneville, C; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Regnault, N; Smadja, G; Schimd, C; Sun, Z

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the nature of Dark Matter and Dark Energy is one of the most pressing issues in cosmology and fundamental physics. The purpose of the DUNE (Dark UNiverse Explorer) mission is to study these two cosmological components with high precision, using a space-based weak lensing survey as its primary science driver. Weak lensing provides a measure of the distribution of dark matter in the universe and of the impact of dark energy on the growth of structures. DUNE will also include a complementary supernovae survey to measure the expansion history of the universe, thus giving independent additional constraints on dark energy. The baseline concept consists of a 1.2m telescope with a 0.5 square degree optical CCD camera. It is designed to be fast with reduced risks and costs, and to take advantage of the synergy between ground-based and space observations. Stringent requirements for weak lensing systematics were shown to be achievable with the baseline concept. This will allow DUNE to place strong constrai...

  15. Modeling river dune development and dune transition to upper stage plane bed

    OpenAIRE

    Naqshband, S.; Duin, van, W.E.; Ribberink, J.S.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Large asymmetric bedforms known as dunes commonly dominate the bed of sand rivers. Due to the turbulence generation over their stoss and lee sides, dunes are of central importance in predicting hydraulic roughness and water levels. During floods in steep alluvial rivers, dunes are observed to grow rapidly as flow strength increases, undergoing an unstable transition regime, after which they are washed out in what is called upper stage plane bed. This transition of dunes to upper stage plane b...

  16. Dune Management Challenges on Developed Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    provide essential ecosys- tem services, including habitat for en- dangered species such as piping plovers, sites of high tourism value, groundwater...passive (aesthetic, psy- chological, cultural and environmental heritage, and educational) benefits. The ability of dunes to provide natural and human...and de- veloped coastlines. Humans can affect the likelihood for dunes to form or grow, ultimately impacting the benefits dunes provide. Buildings

  17. Environmental dynamics of a star dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weimin; Qu, Jianjun; Tan, Lihai; Jing, Zhefan; Bian, Kai; Niu, Qinghe

    2016-11-01

    Star dunes, the largest aeolian bedforms in the sand seas of the world, are usually distributed within specific geographical areas that have multi-directional wind regimes. However, relatively few studies have focused on the environmental factors that impart such great volumes of sand to these dunes. Specifically, verification of the developmental processes of star dunes through long-term monitoring is scarce. In this study, by observing 3-D airflow fields and long-term dune dynamics, we demonstrate how topographic barriers, which generate vertical airflow and local air circulation, control the development of a star dune on Mingsha Mountain in Dunhuang, China. Results show that airflow stagnation and deflection caused by topography is one of the major mechanisms for the formation of star dunes. In our study, topographic barriers contribute to the development of intensive vertical airflow dominated by easterly winds. This intensive vertical airflow is one of the main driving mechanisms of the upward growth of mega-dunes. Vertical airflow is the strongest developed airflow reported in available data on aeolian geomorphology. In addition, star dunes are usually distributed in areas where the local air circulation is strong. The results of long-term dune dynamics verify that local air circulation, which forms three wind directions with the regional wind regime, contributes to the maintenance and development of star dunes. Our study indicates that complex mega-dunes are products of topographic barriers, which facilitate their recognition in aeolian geomorphology. We introduce a new evolution pattern of star dunes under the influence of local environment and topographic barriers.

  18. Barchan dune mobility in Mauritania related to dune and interdune sand fluxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ould Ahmedou,, D.; Ould Mahfoudh, A.; Dupont, P

    2007-01-01

    We present a 1 year study of 50 dunes in a small field of barchan dunes in Mauritania. We documented the morphological evolution of the dunes and their migration rates and measured at 10 min intervals the interdune sand transport, the wind strength, and its direction for the same interval of time...

  19. protoDUNE-Single Phase and protDUNE-DualPhase

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    At the EHN1 two big 8m x 8m x8m detector prototypes (protoDUNE-Single Phase and protDUNE-DualPhase) are being constructed. The aim is to test technologies and detector performances for DUNE, a new generation of LBN neutr

  20. Modeling river dune development and dune transition to upper stage plane bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naqshband, S.; Duin, van O.J.M.; Ribberink, J.S.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Large asymmetric bedforms known as dunes commonly dominate the bed of sand rivers. Due to the turbulence generation over their stoss and lee sides, dunes are of central importance in predicting hydraulic roughness and water levels. During floods in steep alluvial rivers, dunes are observed to grow r

  1. 'Sharks Teeth' -- Sand Dunes in Proctor Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Sometimes, pictures received from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) are 'just plain pretty.' This image, taken in early September 2000, shows a group of sand dunes at the edge of a much larger field of dark-toned dunes in Proctor Crater. Located at 47.9oS, 330.4oW, in the 170 km (106 mile) diameter crater named for 19th Century British astronomer Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888), the dunes shown here are created by winds blowing largely from the east/northeast. A plethora of smaller, brighter ripples covers the substrate between the dunes. Sunlight illuminates them from the upper left.

  2. Parabolic dunes in north-eastern Brazil

    CERN Document Server

    Duran, O; Bezerra, L J C; Herrmann, H J; Maia, L P

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present measurements of vegetation cover over parabolic dunes with different degree of activation along the north-eastern Brazilian coast. We are able to extend the local values of the vegetation cover density to the whole dune by correlating measurements with the gray-scale levels of a high resolution satellite image of the dune field. The empirical vegetation distribution is finally used to validate the results of a recent continuous model of dune motion coupling sand erosion and vegetation growth.

  3. Point Pattern Analysis of Star-Dune Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.; McElroy, B. J.; Andrews, B. J.

    2007-12-01

    Star dunes are among the largest and most complex aeolian dunes in nature. Varying morphologies of star dunes are well documented; however, the dune-field scale properties of the pattern have received relatively little attention. This study addresses the spatial organization of star dune field patterns in the Erg Oriental, Edeyen Murzuq, Rub-al-Khali and the Gran Desierto. Areas targeted in each dune field display a transition from a simple dune pattern, in which only star forms occur, to a complex dune pattern where star dunes occur superimposed on relict linear and crescentic dune topography. Star-dune peaks determined from SRTM 90 digital elevation data are treated as points for point pattern analysis. Nearest-neighbor statistics are calculated across each dune field over 2500 sqkm intervals to characterize changes in the pattern. Dune peak spacing in simple star-dune patterns is highly disperse (R = 1.8), indicating a significant departure from a random point pattern. Simple star patterns also show a strong correlation between nearest neighbor spacing and height. Complex star dune patterns show a lower degree of dispersion and a weaker correlation between nearest neighbor spacing and height. Ultimately, these differences reflect both the control of the relict-dune pattern on the organization of the superimposed star-dune pattern and the overall maturity of the star-dune pattern.

  4. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis of dune erosion calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Heijer, C.; Van de Graaff, J.; Van Gelder, P.H.A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal dunes protect low lying coastal areas against the sea. Extreme waves and water levels during severe storms may cause breaching of the dunes. Consequently, serious damage due to flooding and direct wave attack could occur, resulting in loss of life and property. Proper coastal management impl

  5. Ecogeomorphology of Sand Dunes Shaped by Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoar, H.

    2014-12-01

    Two dune types associated with vegetation are known: Parabolic and Vegetated Linear Dunes (VLDs), the latters are the dominant dune type in the world deserts. Parabolic dunes are formed in humid, sub-humid and semi-arid environments (rather than arid) where vegetation is nearby. VLDs are known today in semiarid and arid lands where the average yearly rainfall is ≥100 mm, enough to support sparse cover of vegetation. These two dune types are formed by unidirectional winds although they demonstrate a different form and have a distinct dynamics. Conceptual and mathematical models of dunes mobility and stability, based on three control parameters: wind power (DP), average annual precipitation (p), and the human impact parameter (μ) show that where human impact is negligible the effect of wind power (DP) on vegetative cover is substantial. The average yearly rainfall of 60-80 mm is the threshold of annual average rainfall for vegetation growth on dune sand. The model is shown to follow a hysteresis path, which explains the bistability of active and stabilized dunes under the same climatic conditions with respect to wind power. We have discerned formation of parabolic dunes from barchans and transverse dunes in the coastal plain of Israel where a decrease in human activity during the second half of the 20th century caused establishment of vegetation on the crest of the dunes, a process that changed the dynamics of these barchans and transverse dunes and led to a change in the shape of the windward slope from convex to concave. These dunes gradually became parabolic. It seems that VLDs in Australia or the Kalahari have always been vegetated to some degree, though the shrubs were sparser in colder periods when the aeolian erosion was sizeable. Those ancient conditions are characterized by higher wind power and lower rainfall that can reduce, but not completely destroy, the vegetation cover, leading to the formation of lee (shadow) dunes behind each shrub. Formation of

  6. Non-standard neutrino interactions at DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouvêa, André; Kelly, Kevin J.

    2016-07-01

    We explore the effects of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) and how they modify neutrino propagation in the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). We find that NSI can significantly modify the data to be collected by the DUNE experiment as long as the new physics parameters are large enough. For example, if the DUNE data are consistent with the standard three-massive-neutrinos paradigm, order 0.1 (in units of the Fermi constant) NSI effects will be ruled out. On the other hand, if large NSI effects are present, DUNE will be able to not only rule out the standard paradigm but also measure the new physics parameters, sometimes with good precision. We find that, in some cases, DUNE is sensitive to new sources of CP-invariance violation. We also explored whether DUNE data can be used to distinguish different types of new physics beyond nonzero neutrino masses. In more detail, we asked whether NSI can be mimicked, as far as the DUNE setup is concerned, by the hypothesis that there is a new light neutrino state.

  7. Non-standard Neutrino Interactions at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    de Gouvêa, André

    2015-01-01

    We explore the effects of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) and how they modify neutrino propagation in the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). We find that NSI can significantly modify the data to be collected by the DUNE experiment as long as the new physics parameters are large enough. For example, If the DUNE data are consistent with the standard three-massive-neutrinos paradigm, order 0.1 (in units of the Fermi constant) NSI effects will be ruled out. On the other hand, if large NSI effects are present, DUNE will be able to not only rule out the standard paradigm but also measure the new physics parameters, sometimes with good precision. We find that, in some cases, DUNE is sensitive to new sources of CP-invariance violation. We also explored whether DUNE data can be used to distinguish different types of new physics beyond nonzero neutrino masses. In more detail, we asked whether NSI can be mimicked, as far as the DUNE setup is concerned, by the hypothesis that there is a new light neutr...

  8. Mars Global Digital Dune Database; MC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Fenton, L.K.; Tanaka, K.L.; Titus, T.N.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Digital Dune Database presents data and describes the methodology used in creating the global database of moderate- to large-size dune fields on Mars. The database is being released in a series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Reports. The first release (Hayward and others, 2007) included dune fields from 65 degrees N to 65 degrees S (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1158/). The current release encompasses ~ 845,000 km2 of mapped dune fields from 65 degrees N to 90 degrees N latitude. Dune fields between 65 degrees S and 90 degrees S will be released in a future USGS Open-File Report. Although we have attempted to include all dune fields, some have likely been excluded for two reasons: (1) incomplete THEMIS IR (daytime) coverage may have caused us to exclude some moderate- to large-size dune fields or (2) resolution of THEMIS IR coverage (100m/pixel) certainly caused us to exclude smaller dune fields. The smallest dune fields in the database are ~ 1 km2 in area. While the moderate to large dune fields are likely to constitute the largest compilation of sediment on the planet, smaller stores of sediment of dunes are likely to be found elsewhere via higher resolution data. Thus, it should be noted that our database excludes all small dune fields and some moderate to large dune fields as well. Therefore, the absence of mapped dune fields does not mean that such dune fields do not exist and is not intended to imply a lack of saltating sand in other areas. Where availability and quality of THEMIS visible (VIS), Mars Orbiter Camera narrow angle (MOC NA), or Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) images allowed, we classified dunes and included some dune slipface measurements, which were derived from gross dune morphology and represent the prevailing wind direction at the last time of significant dune modification. It was beyond the scope of this report to look at the detail needed to discern subtle dune modification. It was also

  9. Scaling coastal dune elevation changes across storm-impact regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joseph W.; de Bakker, Anouk T. M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Extreme storms drive change in coastal areas, including destruction of dune systems that protect coastal populations. Data from four extreme storms impacting four geomorphically diverse barrier islands are used to quantify dune elevation change. This change is compared to storm characteristics to identify variability in dune response, improve understanding of morphological interactions, and provide estimates of scaling parameters applicable for future prediction. Locations where total water levels did not exceed the dune crest experienced elevation change of less than 10%. Regions where wave-induced water levels exceeded the dune crest exhibited a positive linear relationship between the height of water over the dune and the dune elevation change. In contrast, a negative relationship was observed when surge exceeded the dune crest. Results indicate that maximum dune elevation, and therefore future vulnerability, may be more impacted from lower total water levels where waves drive sediment over the dune rather than surge-dominated flooding events.

  10. Long-baseline Neutrino Oscillation at DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Elizabeth; DUNE Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with primary physics goals of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy and measuring δc P with sufficient sensitivity to discover CP violation in neutrino oscillation. CP violation sensitivity in DUNE requires careful understanding of systematic uncertainty, with contributions expected from uncertainties in the neutrino flux, neutrino interactions, and detector effects. In this presentation, we will describe the expected sensitivity of DUNE to long-baseline neutrino oscillation parameters, how various aspects of the experimental design contribute to that sensitivity, and the planned strategy for constraining systematic uncertainty in these measurements.

  11. Dune-CurvilinearGrid: Parallel Dune Grid Manager for Unstructured Tetrahedral Curvilinear Meshes

    OpenAIRE

    Fomins, Aleksejs; Oswald, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the dune-curvilineargrid module. The module provides the self-contained, parallel grid manager, as well as the underlying elementary curvilinear geometry module dune-curvilineargeometry. This work is motivated by the need for reliable and scalable electromagnetic design of nanooptical devices. Curvilinear geometries improve both the accuracy of modeling smooth material boundaries, and the h/p-convergence rate of PDE solutions, reducing the necessary computational effort. dune-cur...

  12. Planetary science: Stormy origins of Titan's dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Claire

    2015-05-01

    Titan's equatorial dunes seem to move in the opposite direction to the prevailing easterly winds. Infrequent methane storms at Titan's low latitudes may briefly couple surface winds to fast westerlies above, dominating the net movement of sand.

  13. Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kee Dae

    2005-01-01

    The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused by invasive plants. The relationships between the degree of invasion and 14 environmental variables were studied. Plots of sand dunes along line transects perpendicular to the coastal lines were established to estimate vegetative species coverage. TWINSPAN (Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis), CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis), and DCCA (Detrended Canonical Correspondence Analysis) were performed to classify communities on sand dunes and assess species composition variation. Carex kobomugi, Elymus mollis, and Vitex rotundifolia were found to be the dominant species plotted on the east, the west, and the peripheral coasts of Cheju Island, respectively. Vegetation on the south coast was totally extinct. The 19 communities, including representative C. kobomugi, C. kobomugi- Ixeris repens, C. kobomugi- Oenothera biennis, E. mollis, Lolium multiflorum- Calystegia soldanella, and V. rotundifolia- C. kobomugi, were all classified according to TWINSPAN. Oenothera biennis and L. multiflorum were exotics observed within these native communities. CCA showed that invasive native and exotic species distribution was segregated significantly, according to disturbance level, exotic species number, gravel, sand and silt contents, as well as vegetation size. It further revealed that human disturbance can strongly favor the settlement of invasive and exotic species. Restoration options to reduce exotic plants in the South Korean sand dune areas were found to be the introduction of native plant species from one sand dune into other sand dune areas, prohibition of building and the introduction of exotic

  14. Dune vegetation fertilization by nesting sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Laura B; Roth, James D; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M; Weishampel, John F

    2007-04-01

    Sea turtle nesting presents a potential pathway to subsidize nutrient-poor dune ecosystems, which provide the nesting habitat for sea turtles. To assess whether this positive feedback between dune plants and turtle nests exists, we measured N concentration and delta15N values in dune soils, leaves from a common dune plant (sea oats [Uniola paniculata]), and addled eggs of loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) across a nesting gradient (200-1050 nests/km) along a 40.5-km stretch of beach in east central Florida, USA. The delta15N levels were higher in loggerhead than green turtle eggs, denoting the higher trophic level of loggerhead turtles. Soil N concentration and delta15N values were both positively correlated to turtle nest density. Sea oat leaf tissue delta15N was also positively correlated to nest density, indicating an increased use of augmented marine-based nutrient sources. Foliar N concentration was correlated with delta15N, suggesting that increased nutrient availability from this biogenic vector may enhance the vigor of dune vegetation, promoting dune stabilization and preserving sea turtle nesting habitat.

  15. Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3): Global dune distribution and wind pattern observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Rosalyn K.; Fenton, Lori; Titus, Timothy N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3) is complete and now extends from 90°N to 90°S latitude. The recently released south pole (SP) portion (MC-30) of MGD3 adds ∼60,000 km2 of medium to large-size dark dune fields and ∼15,000 km2 of sand deposits and smaller dune fields to the previously released equatorial (EQ, ∼70,000 km2), and north pole (NP, ∼845,000 km2) portions of the database, bringing the global total to ∼975,000 km2. Nearly all NP dunes are part of large sand seas, while the majority of EQ and SP dune fields are individual dune fields located in craters. Despite the differences between Mars and Earth, their dune and dune field morphologies are strikingly similar. Bullseye dune fields, named for their concentric ring pattern, are the exception, possibly owing their distinctive appearance to winds that are unique to the crater environment. Ground-based wind directions are derived from slipface (SF) orientation and dune centroid azimuth (DCA), a measure of the relative location of a dune field inside a crater. SF and DCA often preserve evidence of different wind directions, suggesting the importance of local, topographically influenced winds. In general however, ground-based wind directions are broadly consistent with expected global patterns, such as polar easterlies. Intriguingly, between 40°S and 80°S latitude both SF and DCA preserve their strongest, though different, dominant wind direction, with transport toward the west and east for SF-derived winds and toward the north and west for DCA-derived winds.

  16. When dunes move together, structure of deserts emerges

    CERN Document Server

    Génois, Mathieu; Pont, Sylvain Courrech du; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Crescent shaped barchan dunes are highly mobile dunes that are usually presented as a prototypical model of sand dunes. Although they have been theoretically shown to be unstable when considered separately, it is well known that they form large assemblies in desert. Collisions of dunes have been proposed as a mechanism to redistribute sand between dunes and prevent the formation of heavily large dunes, resulting in a stabilizing effect in the context of a dense barchan field. Yet, no models are able to explain the spatial structures of dunes observed in deserts. Here, we use an agent-based model with elementary rules of sand redistribution during collisions to access the full dynamics of very large barchan dune fields. Consequently, stationnary, out of equilibrium states emerge. Trigging the dune field density by a sand load/lost ratio, we show that large dune fields exhibit two assymtotic regimes: a dilute regime, where sand dune nucleation is needed to maintain a dune field, and a dense regime, where dune c...

  17. Dunes on Titan observed by Cassini Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebaugh, J.; Lorenz, R.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Wall, S.D.; Boubin, G.; Reffet, E.; Kirk, R.L.; Lopes, R.M.; Stofan, E.R.; Soderblom, L.; Allison, M.; Janssen, M.; Paillou, P.; Callahan, P.; Spencer, C.; ,

    2008-01-01

    Thousands of longitudinal dunes have recently been discovered by the Titan Radar Mapper on the surface of Titan. These are found mainly within ??30?? of the equator in optically-, near-infrared-, and radar-dark regions, indicating a strong proportion of organics, and cover well over 5% of Titan's surface. Their longitudinal duneform, interactions with topography, and correlation with other aeolian forms indicate a single, dominant wind direction aligned with the dune axis plus lesser, off-axis or seasonally alternating winds. Global compilations of dune orientations reveal the mean wind direction is dominantly eastwards, with regional and local variations where winds are diverted around topographically high features, such as mountain blocks or broad landforms. Global winds may carry sediments from high latitude regions to equatorial regions, where relatively drier conditions prevail, and the particles are reworked into dunes, perhaps on timescales of thousands to tens of thousands of years. On Titan, adequate sediment supply, sufficient wind, and the absence of sediment carriage and trapping by fluids are the dominant factors in the presence of dunes. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dark Streaks Over-riding Inactive Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Not all sand dunes on Mars are active in the modern martian environment. This example from the Lycus Sulci (Olympus Mons'aureole') region shows a case where small windblown dunes at the base of a slope have been over-ridden by more recent dark streaks (arrows). The dark streaks are most likely caused by what geologists call mass wasting or mass movement (landslides and avalanches are mass movements). Dark slope streaks such as these are common in dustier regions of Mars, and they appear to result from movement of extremely dry dust or sand in an almost fluidlike manner down a slope. This movement disrupts the bright dust coating on the surface and thus appears darker than the surrounding terrain.In this case, the dark slope streaks have moved up and over the dunes at the bottom of the slope, indicating that the process that moves sediment down the slope is more active (that is, it has occurred more recently and hence is more likely to occur) in the modern environment than is the movement of dunes and ripples at this location on Mars. The dunes, in fact, are probably mantled by dust. This October 1997 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture is illuminated from the left and located near 31.6oN, 134.0oW.

  19. Layers, Landslides, and Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 27 October 2003This image shows the northern rim of one of the Valles Marineris canyons. Careful inspection shows many interesting features here. Note that the spurs and gullies in the canyon wall disappear some distance below the top of the canyon wall, indicating the presence of some smooth material here that weathers differently from the underlying rocks. On the floor of the canyon, there are remains from a landslide that came hurtling down the canyon wall between two spurs. Riding over the topography of the canyon floor are many large sand dunes, migrating generally from the lower right to upper left.Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -14.1, Longitude 306.7 East (53.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Occurrence of Amphibians in Northern California Coastal Dune Drainages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Many coastal dune ecosystems have been degraded by non-native dune vegetation, but these systems might still provide valuable habitat for some taxa, including...

  1. Inconsistencies in coastal dune genesis and development in the western Mediterranean Cabopino Dune system, southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado-Pintado, Emilia; Malvárez, Gonzalo; Jackson, Derek; Navas, Fatima

    2016-04-01

    It is generally agreed that a falling sea level regime is required in the long term to establish dunes as distinctive landform features along a coast. Sedimentary (supply) bodies from fluvial, glacial sources or marine platform processes also need to be in place. In most Atlantic-facing coastal dune systems the current morpho-sedimentary structures are usually associated with the period between 18K BP and present when both glacial and riverine sediments emplaced sediments within the active zone of present sea level to help form beaches and dunes. Mediterranean coastal dunes fronted by steep continental shelves, such as in the western Mediterranean coast of southern Spain are, however, not associated with glacial deposits and thus are only present in association with river mouths and/or coastal lagoons. Their development is attributed to very recent sediment supply, which, combined with other forcing factors such as wind and waves, several orders of magnitude below those of north Atlantic systems, explains their limited extent. Some coastal dune fields however, do not seem to respond to this general pattern because of their scale and, more importantly, their origin linked possibly to marine platform processes rather than riverine or lagoonal development. Here, we examine the Cabopino dune system in southern Spain offering a conceptual model of their genesis and development as an "Atlantic" dune system within a Mediterranean setting. This is demonstrated by their scale (the largest in the Spanish Mediterranean) and their morphodynamic link to nearshore and platform processes in the last 18,000 years.

  2. Sand Dunes Fixation in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out at Sand Dunes Stabilization Researches Station in Baiji district (230 ln north of Baghdad, Iraq) to evaluate the effects of local soil conditioners manufactured from oil derivatives and plant residuals on sand dunes fixation as the first step for sand dunes stabilization. The results indicate that the fuel oil has the first place in improving wind erosion parameters in the study area, such as increasing mean weight diameter, dry aggregates percentage, the needed time for complete disaggregation by dry sieving, and decreasing the disaggregation rates. Bitumen emulsion occupies the second place, while the plant residuals occupies the third place and has slight effects on the studied parameters. Effects of conditioners on natural vegetation cover are negative in oil derivatives treatments,while positive in plants residuals treatments.

  3. Dynamics of a cliff top dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    Morphological changes during more than 100 years have been investigated for a cliff-top dune complex at Rubjerg at the Danish North Sea coast. Here the lower 50 m of the cliff front is composed of Pleistocene steeply inclined floes of silt and clay with coarse sand in between which gives it a saw-tooth appearance. On top of this the dunes are found for several kilometres along the coastline. Due to erosion by the North Sea the cliff has retreated about 120 m between approximately 1880 and 1970 as indicated from two national surveys, and recent GPS-surveys indicate that erosion is continuing at a similar rate. Nevertheless the cliff top dune complex has survived, but its morphology has undergone some changed. The old maps indicate that around 1880 the dune complex was composed of several up to about 20 m high dunes streamlined in the East-West direction which is parallel to the prevailing wind direction. When protective planting started during the first half of the 20th Century the cliff top dunes gradually merged together forming a narrow, tall ridge parallel to the shore line with the highest part reaching about 90 m near 1970. In 1993 the highest points along the ridge was almost 95 m high, but then the protective planting was considerably reduced and recent annual GPS-surveys indicate that the dunes respond quickly to this by changing their morphology towards the original appearance. It is remarkable that despite the mass wasting caused by the constant erosion of the cliff front the dunes have remained more or less intact. Theoretical studies of hill flow indicate given the proper geometry of the cliff then suspension of even coarse grains can be a very effective agent for carrying sand from the exposed parts of the cliff front to and beyond the cliff-top. Mostly the sand grains are deposited within some hundred meters downwind of the cliff dune while silt is often carried more than 10 km inland. Field observations indicate that where the dislodged floes and

  4. Probing Majorana Neutrino Textures at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Bora, Kalpana; Dutta, Debajyoti

    2016-01-01

    We study the possibility of probing different texture zero neutrino mass matrices at long baseline neutrino experiment DUNE. Assuming a diagonal charged lepton basis and Majorana nature of light neutrinos, we first classify the possible light neutrino mass matrices with one and two texture zeros and then numerically evaluate the parameter space in terms of atmospheric mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ and Dirac CP phase $\\delta_{\\text{CP}}$ which satisfies the texture zero conditions. We then feed these parameter values into the numerical analysis in order to study the sensitivity of DUNE experiment to them. We find that the DUNE will be able to exclude some of these texture zero mass matrices which restrict the $(\\theta_{23}-\\delta_{\\text{CP}})$ to a very specific range of values.

  5. Numerical modeling of the wind flow over a transverse dune

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, Ascânio D.; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2013-01-01

    Transverse dunes, which form under unidirectional winds and have fixed profile in the direction perpendicular to the wind, occur on all celestial objects of our solar system where dunes have been detected. Here we perform a numerical study of the average turbulent wind flow over a transverse dune by means of computational fluid dynamics simulations. We find that the length of the zone of recirculating flow at the dune lee --- the {\\em{separation bubble}} --- displays a surprisingly strong dep...

  6. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  7. Dune management challenges on developed coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elko, Nicole A.; Brodie, Kate; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Nordstrom, Karl F.; Houser, Chris; McKenna, Kim; Moore, Laura; Rosati, Julie D.; Ruggiero, Peter; Thuman, Roberta; Walker, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    From October 26-28, 2015, nearly 100 members of the coastal management and research communities met in Kitty Hawk, NC, USA to bridge the apparent gap between the coastal dune research of scientists and engineers and the needs of coastal management practitioners. The workshop aimed to identify the challenges involved in building and managing dunes on developed coasts, assess the extent to which scientific knowledge can be applied to the management community, and identify approaches to provide means to bridge the gap between needs and potential solutions.

  8. Muon-induced spallation backgrounds in DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guanying; Li, Shirley; Beacom, John

    2017-01-01

    Galactic supernovae are rare, just a few per century, so it is important to be prepared. If we are, then the long-baseline detector DUNE could detect thousands of events, compared to the tens from SN 1987A. An important question is backgrounds from muon-induced spallation reactions. We simulate particle energy-loss processes in liquid argon, and compare relevant isotope yields with those in the water-Cherenkov detector SuperK. Our approach will help optimize the design of DUNE and further benefit the study of supernova neutrinos. GZ, SWL, and JFB are supported by NSF Grant PHY-1404311.

  9. Corridors of barchan dunes: Stability and size selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersen, P.; Andersen, Ken Haste; Elbelrhiti, H.;

    2004-01-01

    Barchans are crescentic dunes propagating on a solid ground. They form dune fields in the shape of elongated corridors in which the size and spacing between dunes are rather well selected. We show that even very realistic models for solitary dunes do not reproduce these corridors. Instead, two in...... for these instabilities to develop are derived and discussed. They turn out to be much smaller than the dune field length. As a conclusion, there should exist further, yet unknown, mechanisms regulating and selecting the size of dunes.......Barchans are crescentic dunes propagating on a solid ground. They form dune fields in the shape of elongated corridors in which the size and spacing between dunes are rather well selected. We show that even very realistic models for solitary dunes do not reproduce these corridors. Instead, two...... instabilities take place. First, barchans receive a sand flux at their back proportional to their width while the sand escapes only from their horns. Large dunes proportionally capture more sand than they lose, while the situation is reversed for small ones: therefore, solitary dunes cannot remain in a steady...

  10. Coastal Protection and Dune Management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Because dunes protect a large part of The Netherlands against coastal flooding and inundation, it is vital to guarantee the strength of these natural sea defenses. Besides sea defense, dunes have other functions. Sandy shorelines and dunes are frequently eroded. A legal framework has been developed

  11. Coastal Protection and Dune Management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Because dunes protect a large part of The Netherlands against coastal flooding and inundation, it is vital to guarantee the strength of these natural sea defenses. Besides sea defense, dunes have other functions. Sandy shorelines and dunes are frequently eroded. A legal framework has been developed

  12. Dune erosion near sea walls: Model-data comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geer, P.; De Vries, S.; Van Dongeren, A.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of the dune erosion model XBeach with laboratory measurement data of dune erosion in the presence of sea walls and revetments. Simulation results show that the essential dune set back processes are captured by the model and that the measurements at most locations

  13. Exploring inner structure of Titan's dunes from Cassini Radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Heggy, E.; Farr, T. G.

    2013-12-01

    Linear dunes discovered in the equatorial regions of Titan by the Cassini-Huygens mission are morphologically very similar to many terrestrial linear dune fields. These features have been compared with terrestrial longitudinal dune fields like the ones in Namib desert in western Africa. This comparison is based on the overall parallel orientation of Titan's dunes to the predominant wind direction on Titan, their superposition on other geomorphological features and the way they wrap around topographic obstacles. Studying the internal layering of dunes has strong implications in understanding the hypothesis for their origin and evolution. In Titan's case, although the morphology of the dunes has been studied from Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, it has not been possible to investigate their internal structure in detail as of yet. Since no radar sounding data is available for studying Titan's subsurface yet, we have developed another technique to examine the inner layering of the dunes. In this study, we utilize multiple complementary radar datasets, including radar imaging data for Titan's and Earth's dunes and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)/radar sounding data for terrestrial dunes. Based on dielectric mixing models, we suggest that the Cassini Ku-band microwaves should be able to penetrate up to ~ 3 m through Titan's dunes, indicating that the returned radar backscatter signal would include contributions from both surface and shallow subsurface echoes. This implies that the shallow subsurface properties can be retrieved from the observed radar backscatter (σ0). In our analysis, the variation of the radar backscatter as a function of dune height is used to provide an insight into the layering in Titan's dunes. We compare the variation of radar backscatter with elevation over individual dunes on Titan and analogous terrestrial dunes in three sites (Great Sand Sea, Siwa dunes and Qattaniya dunes) in the Egyptian Sahara. We observe a strong, positive

  14. Barchan dunes morphology dynamics under different environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dluzewski, M.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to emphasize significance of diversified dynamics of barchans dune morphology. We analyzed and compared barchans found in two dune fields: Kharga (S Egypt) and Tarfaya-Laâyoune (S-Morocco). These dune fields are characterized by significantly different factors responsible for dunes development e.g. textural and mineralogical composition of dune sand, dune sand moisture, air humidity, inter dune vegetation cover. For each investigated dune filed and study period (2008, 2010, 2012 for Kharga and 2007, 2011, 2012 for Tarfaya-Laâyoune dune fields) detailed shape measurement of 20 simple isolated barchans of different dune sizes was made. The ± 10-2 m horizontal and ± 1,5 10-2m vertical accuracy was obtained (1 measuring point per 1m2 on average).In order to compare barchan dunes morphology and to determine depositional and erosional patterns, the 3D models were created. For better understanding of this processes, sand bulk density of barchan surface was measured (1 measuring point per 2m2 on average). The velocity of dunes in relation to dune shape was also analyzed. The results show that the relationship between typically correlated parameters change during movement of the barchans. Most values change by a few percent per year (slip face height, dune base area and dune volume) or by a dozen or so percent per year (windward side length, horns length and width). We obtain good linear relationship (with 0,05 significant level) between slip face height and the dune base area (0,77 < R2 < 0,83), dune volume (0,66 < R2 < 0,72), windward side length (0,58 < R2 < 0,87), horns length (0,71 < R2 < 0,90) or horns width (0,79 < R2 < 0,93). The linear relationship between displacement rate and the morphological parameters is not strong (0,54< R2 < 0,81) for Kharga dune field and (0,41< R2 < 0,66) for Tarfaya-Laâyoune dune field. We noted also good linear relationship between displacement rate and the angle of span of the horns (R2=0,73 on Tarfaya

  15. Variation of bee communities on a sand dune complex in the Great Basin: Implications for sand dune conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand dunes across the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts house rich bee communities. The pollination services these bees provide can be vital in maintaining the diverse, and often endemic, dune flora. These dune environments, however, are threatened by intense off-highway vehicle (OHV) use. Conservati...

  16. Model for Formation of Dunes at the North Martian Pole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jie; CHEN Chu-Xin

    2010-01-01

    @@ The Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera(MOC)took images of a series of strange horseshoe-shaped dunes at the North Martian pole in 2004.These dunes would be formed due to the strong Martian winds whose pattern is different from that on the Earth.We study the cause of the formation of these dunes and make a model for them.In this model,wind speed near the north Martian pole can be evaluated based on the shape of the dunes.We also estimate the surpassing speed of dunes of different sizes.

  17. How Altitude and Latitude Control Dune Morphometry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A.; Hayes, A.; Ewing, R.; Janssen, M. A.; Radebaugh, J.; Savage, C.; Encrenaz, P.

    2011-01-01

    Dune fields are one of the dominant landforms and represent the largest known organic reservoir on Titan. SAR-derived topography show that Titan's dune terrains tend to occupy the lowest altitude areas in equatorial regions occurring at mean elevations between approx.-400 and 0 m. In elevated dune terrains, there is a definite trend towards a smaller dune to interdune ratio, interpreted as due to limited sediment availability. A similar linear correlation is observed with latitude, suggesting that the quantity of windblown sand in the dune fields tends to decrease as one moves farther north. These findings place important constraints on Titan's geology and climate.

  18. The Single-Phase ProtoDUNE Technical Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abi, B. [Univ. of Padova (Italy); et al.

    2017-06-21

    ProtoDUNE-SP is the single-phase DUNE Far Detector prototype that is under construction and will be operated at the CERN Neutrino Platform (NP) starting in 2018. ProtoDUNE-SP, a crucial part of the DUNE effort towards the construction of the first DUNE 10-kt fiducial mass far detector module (17 kt total LAr mass), is a significant experiment in its own right. With a total liquid argon (LAr) mass of 0.77 kt, it represents the largest monolithic single-phase LArTPC detector to be built to date. It's technical design is given in this report.

  19. Recent Sand Avalanching on Rabe Crater Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Dark streaks on the steep, down-wind slopes of sand dunes in Rabe Crater are seen at several locations in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. These streaks indicate relatively recent (i.e., in the past few years or less) movement of sand down these slopes.Sand dunes move forward by the combined action of wind that drives sand up the shallow slope on the windward side of the dune (in this case, the slopes that face toward the lower right) and the avalanching of this sand down the steeper, lee-side slope. The steep slope is also known as the slip face. The dark streaks indicated by arrows are evidence for sand avalanches that occurred within a few months or years of the time when the picture was taken in March 1999. Other streaks which are seen criss-crossing the dunes may be the result of passing dust devils. This image is illuminated from the upper left and located in Rabe Crater of the Hellespontus-Noachis region near 44.2oS, 325.6oW.

  20. Moving dunes on the Google Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Several methods exist for surveying the dunes and estimate their migration rate. Among methods suitable for the macroscopic scale, the use of the satellite images available on Google Earth is a convenient resource, in particular because of its time series. Some examples of the use of this feature of Google Earth are here proposed.

  1. The Cosmic DUNE dust astronomy mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grun, E.; Srama, R.; Cosmic Dune Team

    A dust astronomy mission aims at the simultaneous measurement of the origin and the chemical composition of individual dust grains in space. Interstellar dust traversing the solar system constitutes the galactic solid phase of matter from which stars and planetary systems form. Interplanetary dust, from comets and asteroids, represents remnant material from bodies at different stages of early solar system evolution. Thus, studies of interstellar and interplanetary dust with Cosmic DUNE (Cosmic Dust Near Earth) will provide a comparison between the composition of the interstellar medium and primitive planetary objects. Cosmic DUNE will prepare the way for effective collection in near-Earth space of interstellar and interplanetary dust for subsequent return to Earth and analysis in laboratories. Cosmic DUNE establishes the next logical step beyond NASA's Stardust mission, with four major advancements in cosmic dust research: (1) Analysis of the elemental and isotopic composition of individual cosmic dust grains, (2) determination of the size distribution of interstellar dust, (3) characterization of the interstellar dust flow through the planetary system, and (4) analysis of interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin. This mission goal will be reached with novel dust instrumentation. A dust telescope trajectory sensor has been developed which is capable of obtaining precision trajectories of sub-micron sized particles in space. A new high mass resolution dust analyzer of 0.1m2 impact area can cope with the low fluxes expected in interplanetary space. Cosmic DUNE will be proposed to ESA in response to its upcoming call for mission ideas.

  2. Irregular dunes, sediment sorting, and river morphodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Astrid; Weerts, H.J.T.; Ritsema, I.L; van Os, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    This research project focuses on modelling the large-scale morphodynamics of low-slope rivers dominated by mixed sediment, such as the Dutch part of the Rhine River. Usually we simply neglect the effects of sorting and variability in dune dimensions on the large-scale morphodynamics. This paper

  3. Seasonal erosion and restoration of Mars' northern polar dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C.J.; Bourke, M.; Bridges, N.T.; Byrne, S.; Colon, C.; Diniega, S.; Dundas, C.; Herkenhoff, K.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Portyankina, G.; Thomas, N.

    2011-01-01

    Despite radically different environmental conditions, terrestrial and martian dunes bear a strong resemblance, indicating that the basic processes of saltation and grainfall (sand avalanching down the dune slipface) operate on both worlds. Here, we show that martian dunes are subject to an additional modification process not found on Earth: springtime sublimation of Mars' CO 2 seasonal polar caps. Numerous dunes in Mars' north polar region have experienced morphological changes within a Mars year, detected in images acquired by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Dunes show new alcoves, gullies, and dune apron extension. This is followed by remobilization of the fresh deposits by the wind, forming ripples and erasing gullies. The widespread nature of these rapid changes, and the pristine appearance of most dunes in the area, implicates active sand transport in the vast polar erg in Mars' current climate.

  4. Multiple origins of linear dunes on Earth and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David M.; Hesp, Patrick A.

    2009-01-01

    Dunes with relatively long and parallel crests are classified as linear dunes. On Earth, they form in at least two environmental settings: where winds of bimodal direction blow across loose sand, and also where single-direction winds blow over sediment that is locally stabilized, be it through vegetation, sediment cohesion or topographic shelter from the winds. Linear dunes have also been identified on Titan, where they are thought to form in loose sand. Here we present evidence that in the Qaidam Basin, China, linear dunes are found downwind of transverse dunes owing to higher cohesiveness in the downwind sediments, which contain larger amounts of salt and mud. We also present a compilation of other settings where sediment stabilization has been reported to produce linear dunes. We suggest that in this dune-forming process, loose sediment accumulates on the dunes and is stabilized; the stable dune then functions as a topographic shelter, which induces the deposition of sediments downwind. We conclude that a model in which Titan's dunes formed similarly in cohesive sediments cannot be ruled out by the existing data.

  5. Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, Alaska: A Terrestrial Analog Site for Polar, Topographically Confined Martian Dune Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, C. L.; Hooper, D. M.; Michaels, T. I.; McGinnis, R. N.; Stillman, D.; Bjella, K.; Stothoff, S.; Walter, G. R.; Necsoiu, M.; Grimm, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    Martian dune systems belong to two broad categories: (i) the sprawling north polar erg, rich in and immobilized by seasonal and perennial volatiles; and (ii) isolated low- to high-latitude dune fields confined by topography. While modern dune migration on Mars is nearly imperceptibly slow, recent studies are producing robust evidence for aeolian activity, including bedform modification. Cold-climate terrestrial dunes containing volatile reservoirs provide an important analog to Martian polar dunes because permafrost and seasonal cycles of CO2 and H2O frost mantling are thought to partially decouple Martian polar dunes from atmospheric forcing. The 67°N latitude, 62 km2 Great Kobuk Sand Dunes (GKSD) are a terrestrial analog for polar, intercrater dune fields on Mars. Formative winds affected by complex topography and the presence of volatiles and intercalated snow within the GKSD have direct analogy to factors that impede migration of Martian polar dunes. This system offers the opportunity to study cold-climate, noncoastal, topographically constrained, climbing and reversing barchanoid, transverse, longitudinal, and star dunes. The Kobuk Valley climate is subarctic and semiarid with long, cold winters and brief, warm summers. Niveoaeolian sedimentation occurs within west-facing lee slope catchments. In March 2010, we found the seasonally frozen layer to range in thickness from 1.5 to 4.0 m, and no evidence for shallow permafrost. Instead, using GPR and boreholes, we found a system-wide groundwater aquifer that nearly parallels topography and cuts across steeply dipping bedforms. GPR cannot uniquely detect ice and water; however, a similar analysis of rover-based GPR might be used to detect volatiles in Martian dunes. The perennial volatile reservoir is liquid because of mean annual air temperature, intense solar heating before, during, and after 38 days of continuous summer daylight, high dry sand thermal conductivity, higher wet sand thermal conductivity

  6. Dunes morphologies and superimposed bedforms in a cellular automaton dune model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.; Claudin, P.

    2009-04-01

    We use a new 3D cellular automaton model for bedform dynamics in which individual physical processes such as erosion, deposition and transport are implemented by nearest neighbor interactions and a time-dependent stochastic process. Simultaneously, a lattice gas cellular automaton model is used to compute the flow and quantify the bed shear stress on the topography. Local erosion rates are taken proportional to the shear stress in such a way that there is a complete feedback mechanism between flow and bedform dynamics. In the numerical simulations of dune fields, we observe the formation and the evolution of barchan, transverse, longitudinal and star dunes. For all these types of dunes, we observe the emergence of superimposed bedforms when dunes are large enough. Then, we use the same model under different initial conditions, and we perform the linear stability analysis of a flat sand bed disturbed by a small sinusoidal perturbation. Comparing the most unstable wavelength in the model with the characteristic size of secondary bedforms in nature, we determine the length and time scales of our cellular automaton model. Thus, we establish a link between discrete and continuous approaches and open new perspectives for modeling and quantification of complex patterns in dune fields.

  7. INLAND DUNE VEGETATION OF THE NETHERLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. HAVEMAN

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Drifting sands in the Netherlands are the result of human over-exploitation (sod-cutting, over-grazing of woodlands and heathlands. The most important association of inland sand dune areas is the Spergulo-Corynephoretum (Corynephorion canescentis, which is poor in vascular plants, but in it older stager rich in mosses and especially lichens. In the Netherlands, the area of drifting sand is reduced dramatically in the last 70 years. mainly by afforestation and spontaneous succession.

  8. Mulitple Origins of Sand Dune-Topography Interactions on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, H.; Ewing, R. C.; Hayes, A.; Cisneros, J.; Epps, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between sand dune patterns and topographic obstacles is a primary signal of sand transport direction in the equatorial region of Saturn's moon, Titan. The streamlined, tear drop appearance of the sand-dune patterns as they wrap around obstacles and a dune-free zone on the east side of many obstacles gives the impression that sand transport is from the west to east at equatorial latitudes. However, the physical mechanism behind the dune-obstacle interaction is not well explained, leaving a gap in our understanding of the equatorial sand transport and implied wind directions and magnitudes on Titan. In order to better understand this interaction and evaluate wind and sand transport direction, we use morphometric analysis of optical images on Earth and Cassini SAR images on Titan combined with analog wind tunnel experiments to study dune-topography interactions. Image analysis is performed in a GIS environment to map spatial variations in dune crestline orientations proximal to obstacles. We also use digital elevation models to and analyze the three-dimensional geometry - height, length, width and slope of the dune-topography relationships on Earth. Preliminary results show that dune patterns are deflected similarly around positive, neutral, or negative topography, where positive topography is greater than the surrounding dune height, neutral topography is at dune height and negative topography is lower than dune heights. In the latter case these are typically intra-dune field playas. The obstacle height, width, slope and wind variability appear to play a primary role in determining if a lee-dune, rather than a dune-free lee-zone, develops. In many cases a dune-free playa with evaporite and mud desiccation polygons forms lee-ward of the obstacle. To support and elaborate on the mapping and spatial characterization of dune-topography interactions, a series of experiments using a wind tunnel were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments examine the formation

  9. Particle dynamics of a cartoon dune

    CERN Document Server

    Groh, Christopher; Kruelle, Christof A

    2009-01-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of a downsized model for a desert dune is observed experimentally in a narrow water flow channel. A particle tracking method reveals that the migration speed of the model dune is one order of magnitude smaller than that of individual grains. In particular, the erosion rate consists of comparable contributions from creeping (low energy) and saltating (high energy) particles. The saltation flow rate is slightly larger, whereas the number of saltating particles is one order of magnitude lower than that of the creeping ones. The velocity field of the saltating particles is comparable to the velocity field of the driving fluid. It can be observed that the spatial profile of the shear stress reaches its maximum value upstream of the crest, while its minimum lies at the downstream foot of the dune. The particle tracking method reveals that the deposition of entrained particles occurs primarily in the region between these two extrema of the shear stress. Moreover, it is demonstrated that...

  10. Formation of aeolian dunes on Anholt, Denmark since AD 1560

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Bjørnsen, Mette; Murray, Andrew;

    2007-01-01

    Sand dunes on the island of Anholt (Denmark) in the middle of Kattegat form a relatively barren, temperate climate Aeolian system, locally termed the "Desert". The dunes have developed on top of a raised beach ridge system under the influence of dominant winds from westerly directions....... They are relatively coarse-grained with an average mean grain size of 480 µm. The last phase of aeolian activity and dune formation on Anholt started after AD 1560, when the local pine forest was removed. Historical sources report intense sand mobilization in the 17th century, and new optically stimulated...... luminescence (OSL) dates indicate that dune formation continued until the end of the 19th century. This period of sand drift and dune formation took place during the later part of the Little Ice Age, which is characterized by increased (summer) storminess in large parts of NW Europe. Dune stabilization...

  11. Sand Dunes in Steady Flow at Low Froude Numbers: Dune Height Evolution and Flow Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, S. L.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl

    2011-01-01

    The development of sand dunes in an erodible bed exposed to flowing water is considered using a numerical flow model. The bed is initially given a small perturbation, which is followed in the time domain. Examples are given where a sinusoidal perturbation reaches the fully developed steady...... equilibrium shape. The flow modeling is based on a k-ω turbulence closure. The sediment transport is assumed to be bed-load only, with an avalanche-like movement on the steep dune front. The model is also found capable of predicting the growth in wavelength if the initially prescribed wavelength...... is sufficiently short. Results of the dune development are presented for different initial wavelengths. It is demonstrated that an equilibrium shape is developed for a range of wavelength-depth ratios as long as this ratio is sufficiently small....

  12. Preliminary Observations from the 2014 Sand Dunes Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    2014 Sand Dunes Experiment by Christopher W. Miller, Ching-Sang Chiu, D. Benjamin Reeder, Ying-Jang Yang, Linus Chiu, and Chi-Fang Chen...COVERED (From-To) June 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Preliminary Observations from the 2014 Sand Dunes Experiment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government 14. ABSTRACT The Sand Dunes 2014 experiment was international US – Taiwan

  13. Gullies and avalanche scars on Martian dark dunes

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, D.; Jaumann, Ralf; Kereszturi, A.,; Sik, A.; Neukum, G.

    2007-01-01

    Gullies on Mars occur on slopes of impact craters, pits, valleys and hills. However, in some cases gullies are cut into dark dune slopes. Other mass movement features on dark dune slopes are avalanche scars which occur on most dune fields beside the gully features. We classified the mass movement features based on their morphology and analyzed them with respect to their distribution, slope angle, orientation and seasonal climatic conditions to constrain the possible formation process causing ...

  14. Origin of the late quaternary dune fields of northeastern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, D.R.; Stafford, T.W.; Cowherd, S.D.; Mahan, S.A.; Kihl, R.; Maat, P.B.; Bush, C.A.; Nehring, J.

    1996-01-01

    Stabilized eolian deposits, mostly parabolic dunes and sand sheets, cover much of the landscape of northeastern Colorado and adjacent parts of southwestern Nebraska in four geographically distinct dune fields. Stratigraphic and soil-geomorphic relations and accelerator radiocarbon dating indicate that at least three episodes of eolian sand movement occurred between 27 ka and 11 ka, possibly between 11 ka and 4 ka, and within the past 1.5 ka. Thus, eolian sand deposition took place under both glacial and interglacial climatic conditions. In the youngest episodes of eolian sand movement, Holocene parabolic dunes partially buried Pleistocene sand sheet deposits. Late Holocene sands in the Fort Morgan and Wray dune fields, to the south of the South Platte River, have trace element ratios that are indistinguishable from modern South Platte River sands, but different from Ogallala Formation bedrock, which has previously been cited as the main source of dune sand on the Great Plains. Sands in the Greeley dune field, to the north of the South Platte River, have trace element concentrations that indicate a probable Laramie Formation source. Measurements of parabolic dunes indicate paleowinds from the northwest in all dune fields, in good agreement with resultant drift directions calculated for nearby weather stations. Thus, paleowinds were probably not significantly different from present-day winds, and are consistent with a South Platte River source for the Fort Morgan and Wray dune fields, and a Laramie Formation source for the Greeley dune field. Sand accumulated downwind of the South Platte River to form the Fort Morgan dune field. In addition, sand was also transported farther downwind over the upland formed by the calcrete caprock of the Ogallala Formation, and deposited in die lee of the upland on the southeast side. Because of high wind energy, the upland itself served as a zone of sand transport, but little or no sand accumulation took place on this surface. These

  15. Aeolian dune interactions preserved in the ancient rock record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary

    2017-08-01

    Interactions between individual dunes drive the evolution of a dune-field pattern. Ubiquitous in modern systems, dune interactions have increasingly been the focus in understanding dune-field dynamics through surface models and experiments. In contrast, how these dynamics are incorporated into the stratigraphic record has remained largely unaddressed. Current models for the interpretation of the architecture of sets of aeolian cross-strata and bounding surfaces do not explicitly incorporate dune interactions. Recent documentation of a common type of dune interaction and the resulting stratigraphic architecture at the White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico, has established a set of diagnostic criteria by which this architecture could be identified. In this study, five examples of interpreted interaction architecture were identified in well-known Jurassic aeolian units in the western United States. These results confirm the expected presence of dune-interaction architecture in the rock record, and highlight the need for a new generation of models that couple complex dune surface dynamics with their stratigraphic expression.

  16. Evaluation of Sand Dunes Stabilization Techniques in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This research was conducted at the sand dunes stabilization research station in Baiji district, Iraq. Three techniques for sand dunes stabilization are selected: the first method is stabilization by clayey block barriers; the second method is stabilization by dry planting of tamarix (tamarix articulata)cuttings and the third is stabilization by using cane branch barriers. Randomized samples were taken from the surface and subsurface layers of the stabilized and shifting sand dunes to evaluate the effect of the three techniques on wind erosion parameters. The results indicate high significant differences between the wind erosion parameters in the surface and subsurface layers in the stabilized sand dunes, while there are insignificant differences between the subsurface layer of the stabilized dunes and the surface and subsurface layers in the active sand dunes. The results clarify the fact that there is an increase in the percentage of clay, silt, organic matter, mean weight diameter and the percentage of the dry aggregates (>0. 84 mm). A decrease is found in the rate of disaggregation for the dry aggregates in the samples of the surface layer of stabilized dunes when compared with the subsurface layer of stabilized dunes and the surface layer of the shifting sand dunes. There is a positive high significant correlation among the aggregate stability parameters and the percentage of clay and silt, and the content of organic matter in the studied layers.

  17. Morphology and dynamics of star dunes from numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deguo; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain

    2012-07-01

    Star dunes are giant, pyramid-shaped dunes composed of interlaced arms. These arms are marked by sinuous crests and slip faces of various directions. Their radial symmetry and scale suggest that the star dunes form as a result of complex interactions between a multidirectional wind regime and topography. However, despite their ubiquity in modern sand seas, comparatively little is known about their formation and evolution. Here we present a discrete numerical model of star-dune behaviour based on the feedback mechanisms between wind flow and bedform dynamics. Our simulations indicate that the morphology of star dunes results from the combination of individual longitudinal dunes. We find that the arms of the star dunes propagate only under favourable wind regimes. In contrast to dunes that form from an erodible bed, the crests of the propagating arms are oriented such that sand flux is maximized in the direction of arm growth. Our analysis of the simulated three-dimensional structures suggests that the morphodynamics of the arms are controlled by the frequency of wind reorientation, with a high frequency of reorientation leading to smaller arm dimension and high rates of growth. We suggest that arm propagation is an important process of mass exchange in dune fields.

  18. Analyzing dune dynamics at the dune-field scale based on multi-temporal analysis of Landsat-TM images

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, I.N.L.; Verstraeten, G.

    2012-01-01

    Studying dune dynamics at the dune-field scale requires intensive fieldwork and a relatively huge dataset. However, this is not always possible with the high cost and the limited availability of data. Here, we present a technique based on the analysis of multi-temporal Landsat-TM images for studying the dynamics of different dune morphologies from five dune-field sites around the world. A pair of Landsat-TM images for each site has been used after performing several steps of image pre-process...

  19. Aeolian dune sediment flux heterogeneity in Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Urso, Anna; Fenton, Lori K.; Michaels, Timothy I.

    2017-06-01

    It is now known unambiguously that wind-driven bedform activity is occurring on the surface of Mars today, including early detections of active sand dunes in Meridiani Planum's Endeavour crater. Many of these reports are only based on a few sets of observations of relatively isolated bedforms and lack regional context. Here, we investigate aeolian activity across central Meridiani Planum and test the hypothesis that dune sites surrounding Endeavour crater are also active and part of region-wide sediment migration driven by northwesterly winds. All 13 dune fields investigated clearly showed evidence for activity and the majority exhibited dune migration (average rates of 0.6 m/Earth-year). Observations indicate substantial geographic and temporal heterogeneity of dune crest fluxes across the area and per site. Locations with multiple time steps indicate dune sand fluxes can vary by a factor of five, providing evidence for short periods of rapid migration followed by near-stagnation. In contrast, measurements at other sites are nearly identical, indicating that some dunes are in a steady-state as they migrate. The observed sediment transport direction was consistent with a regional northeasterly-to-northwesterly wind regime, revealing more variations than were appreciated from earlier, more localized studies. Craters containing shallow, degraded, flat-floored interiors tended to have dunes with high sediment fluxes/activity, whereas local kilometer-scale topographic obstructions (e.g., central peaks, yardangs) were found to be inversely correlated with dune mobility. Finally, the previous, more limited detections of dune activity in Endeavour crater have been shown to be representative of a broader, region-wide pattern of dune motion.

  20. Bifurcation analysis of the transition of dune shapes under a unidirectional wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiya, Hirofumi; Awazu, Akinori; Nishimori, Hiraku

    2012-04-13

    A bifurcation analysis of dune shape transition is made. By use of a reduced model of dune morphodynamics, the Dune Skeleton model, we elucidate the transition mechanism between different shapes of dunes under unidirectional wind. It was found that the decrease in the total amount of sand in the system and/or the lateral sand flow shifts the stable state from a straight transverse dune to a wavy transverse dune through a pitchfork bifurcation. A further decrease causes wavy transverse dunes to shift into barchans through a Hopf bifurcation. These bifurcation structures reveal the transition mechanism of dune shapes under unidirectional wind.

  1. Restoration of coastal dune slacks in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, AP; Geelen, HWT; Jansen, AJM; Lammerts, EJ; Gulati, R.D.; Nienhuis, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    In order to stop the continuous decline of typical dune slack communities along the Dutch coast, restoration projects have been carried out since 1952. Restoration measures consisted of re-introducing traditional management techniques in dune slacks, such as mowing, grazing and sod removal, or const

  2. A parameterization of flow separation over subaqueous dunes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries J.; Dohmen-Janssen, C. Marjolein; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Termes, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Flow separation plays a key role in the development of dunes, and modeling the complicated flow behavior inside the flow separation zone requires much computational effort. To make a first step toward modeling dune development at reasonable temporal and spatial scales, a parameterization of the shap

  3. Holocene eolian activity in the Minot dune field, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, D.R.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Been, J.; Mahan, S.A.; Burdett, J.; Skipp, G.; Rowland, Z.M.

    1997-01-01

    Stabilized eolian sand is common over much of the Great Plains region of the United States and Canada, including a subhumid area of ??? 1500 km2 near Minot, North Dakota. Eolian landforms consist of sand sheets and northwest-trending parabolic dunes. Dunes and sand sheets in the Minot field are presently stabilized by a cover of prairie grasses or oak woodland. Stratigraphic studies and accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of paleosols indicate at least two periods of eolian sand movement in the late Holocene. Pedologic data suggest that all of the dune field has experienced late Holocene dune activity, though not all parts of the dune field may have been active simultaneously. Similar immobile element (Ti, Zr, La, Ce) concentrations support the interpretation that eolian sands are derived from local glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine sediments. However, glaciolacustrine and glaciofluvial source sediments have high Ca concentrations from carbonate minerals, whereas dune sands are depleted in Ca. Because noneolian-derived soils in the area are calcareous, these data indicate that the Minot dune field may have had extended periods of activity in the Holocene, such that eolian abrasion removed soft carbonate minerals. The southwest-facing parts of some presently stabilized dunes were active during the 1930s drought, but were revegetated during the wetter years of the 1940s. These observations indicate that severe droughts accompanied by high temperatures are the most likely cause of Holocene eolian activity.

  4. A parameterization of flow separation over sub-aqueous dunes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries; Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Termes, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Flow separation plays a key role in the development of dunes, and modeling the complicated flow behavior inside the flow separation zone requires much computational effort. To make a first step toward modeling dune development at reasonable temporal and spatial scales, a parameterization of the

  5. Nutrient deficiency in dune slack pioneer vegetation : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts, E.J.; Grootjans, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    A review of results of fertilization experiments in wet dune slacks is presented. In most cases the above-ground biomass appeared to be limited by nitrogen availability. Primary phosphorus limitation was assessed only once in a dune slack where sod cutting had been applied very recently. In most oth

  6. Use of unmanned aerial vehicle to establish dune reactivation baseline

    OpenAIRE

    Farr, Gareth; Blackwell, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Kenfig NNR is a large coastal dune system located in South Wales, UK. Major works Repeat surveys are planned, with the aim of identifying landcover change, principally to reactivate the dunes were carried out in the winter of 2012/2013. changes in vegetation, open sand and water filled slacks.

  7. Occurrence of amphibians in northern California coastal dune drainages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Kleeman, Patrick M.

    2017-01-01

    Many coastal dune ecosystems have been degraded by non-native dune vegetation, but these systems might still provide valuable habitat for some taxa, including amphibians. Because restoration of degraded dune systems is occurring and likely to continue, we examined the occurrence of amphibians in drainages associated with a coastal dune ecosystem degraded by invasive plants (European Beachgrass, Ammophila arenaria, and Iceplant, Carpobrotus edulis). We found that occupancy of 3 amphibian species (California Red-legged Frog, Rana draytonii; Sierran Treefrog, Hyliola sierra; and Rough-skinned Newt, Taricha granulosa) among 21 coastal-dune drainages was high, with most coastal-dune drainages occupied by all 3 species. Furthermore, reproduction of Sierran Treefrogs and California Red-legged Frogs was estimated to occur in approximately ½ and ⅓ of the drainages, respectively. The probability of occurrence of Rough-skinned Newts and pre-metamorphic life stages of both anurans decreased during the study, perhaps because of ongoing drought in California or precipitation-induced changes in phenology during the final year of the study. Maintaining structural cover and moist features during dune restoration will likely benefit native amphibian populations inhabiting coastal-dune ecosystems.

  8. Morphology and dynamics of star dunes from numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narteau, C.; Courrech Du Pont, S.; Zhang, D.; Rozier, O.

    2012-12-01

    Star dunes are giant pyramidal dunes composed of interlaced arms with sinuous crests and slip faces oriented in various directions. The radial symmetry and the size of the pattern seem to illustrate a high degree of complexity between multidirectional wind regime and topography. However, compared to other dune types, little is known about the formation and the evolution of star-dunes, which are ubiquitous in modern sand seas. Here, using a discrete model based on feedback mechanisms between flow and bedform dynamics, we show that star dune morphology results from a combination of longitudinal dunes produced by primary winds. Depending on the wind regime, star dune arms may radiate or not. In opposition to the bedform alignment on an erodible bed, the crest of the propagating arms have an orientation that maximises the sand flux in the direction of arm growth. This behaviour is described by an analytical solution when taking arm aspect ratios into account. Thanks to the 3D sedimentary structures produced by the model, we also find that arm morphodynamics is controlled by the frequency of wind reorientation. When this frequency increases, arm dimensions decreases and growth rate increases. We suggest that this arm propagation is an important mass exchange process in dune fields.

  9. Spectroscopic Studies of Nearby Cool Stars: The DUNES Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J.; Martinez-Arnáiz, R. M.; Eiroa, C.; Montes, D.

    At the universities of Madrid we are carrying out a systematic analysis of the spectroscopic properties of the nearby (dDUNES, a Herschel OTKP aiming at detecting and studying cold, faint dust disks around nearby stars. In this contribution we present some preliminary results on the kinematics of the DUNES sample.

  10. Process-based modeling of coastal dune development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.C.; Roelvink, D.; Luijendijk, A.P.; De Vries, S.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the aeolian transport model DUNE (Sauermann et al., 2001, Kroy et al., 2002) that describes important features and dynamics of typical desert dunes, is extended such that it can be applied in sandy coastal areas. Initial tests explore the limitations of the model in coastal areas afte

  11. Reducing uncertainty in prediction of dune erosion during extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Heijer, C.; Reniers, A.J.H.M.; Van de Graaff, J.; Van Gelder, P.H.A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal dunes protect low lying coastal areas against the sea. Extreme waves and water levels during severe storms may cause breaching of the dunes. Consequently, serious damage due to flooding and direct wave attack could occur, resulting in loss of life and property. Proper coastal management impl

  12. Movement of Whole Martian Dunes Difficult to Detect or Confirm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Dunes on Earth move downwind at different speeds depending upon the local wind conditions, the amount of loose sand available to be transported by wind, the shape and volume of the dunes, and overgrowths of vegetation. Typically, smaller dunes move faster than larger dunes. On Earth, some of the fastest-moving dunes that have been measured (e.g., in the deserts of Peru) move 10 to 30 meters (33 to 100 feet) per year. Small dunes usually have an almost crescent-shape to them, and are known to geologists as barchan dunes.To look for evidence of dune movement on Mars, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) has been used to re-visit some areas of known barchan dunes--because these types move the fastest--that were observed by the Mariner 9 orbiter in 1972 and the Viking 1 and 2 orbiters between 1976 and 1980. The picture above, left, shows a MOC high-resolution image taken December 25, 1999. The classic, crescentic shape of the dark barchan dunes can be seen in this picture. The steep slopes, also known as the dune slip faces, on these dunes are facing toward the southwest (north is up in both pictures). Thus, the shape of the dunes indicates that they are moving toward the southwest.The picture above right shows the MOC image from December 1999 superimposed on a Viking 1 image taken May 27, 1978. During the 11 1/2 Mars years that passed between these two dates, it turns out that no difference can be detected in the position of the dunes seen in the MOC image and the Viking image. The earlier Viking image had a resolution of about 17 meters (56 ft) per pixel, while the MOC image had a resolution of about 3.8 meters (12 ft) per pixel. Although it looks like the dunes didn't move between the Viking and MOC images, this observation is limited by the resolution of the Viking image. It is entirely possible that the dunes have moved as much as 17-20 meters (16-66 ft) and one would not be able to tell by comparing the images. As it is, movement of less than

  13. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Bourke, Mary C.; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2015-11-01

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface-atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern `wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today.

  14. The effects of psammophilous plants on sand dune dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bel, Golan

    2013-01-01

    Psammophilous plants are special plants that flourish in sand moving environments. There are two main mechanisms by which the wind affects these plants: (i) sand drift exposes roots and covers branches--the exposed roots turn into new plants and the covered branches turn into new roots; both mechanisms result in an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes; (ii) strong winds, often associated with sand movement, tear branches and seed them in nearby locations, resulting in new plants and an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes. Despite their important role in dune dynamics, to our knowledge, psammophilous plants have never been incorporated into mathematical models of sand dunes. Here, we attempt to model the effects of these plants on sand dune dynamics. We construct a set of three ordinary differential equations for the fractions of surface cover of regular vegetation, biogenic soil crust and psammophilous plants. The latter reach their optimal growth u...

  15. Armoring and vertical sorting in aeolian dune fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Unlike ripples, there are only few numerical studies on grain-size segregation at the scale of dunes in aeolian environments. Here we use a cellular automaton model to analyze vertical sorting in granular mixtures under steady unidirectional flow conditions. We investigate the feedbacks between dune growth and the segregation mechanisms by varying the size of coarse grains and their proportion within the bed. We systematically observe the development of a horizontal layer of coarse grains at the top of which sorted bed forms may grow by amalgamation. The formation of such an armor layer controls the overall sediment transport and availability. The emergence of dunes and the transition from barchan to transverse dune fields depend only on the grain size distribution of the initial sediment layer. As confirmed by observation, this result indicates that armor layers should be present in most arid deserts, where they are likely to control dune morphodynamics.

  16. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W T; Bourke, Mary C; Smyth, Thomas A G

    2015-11-05

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface-atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern 'wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today.

  17. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Bourke, Mary C; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface–atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern ‘wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today. PMID:26537669

  18. Climate change impacts on dunes erosion in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, Renske; Ruessink, Gerben

    2016-04-01

    The dunes in the Netherlands are occasionally eroded as a result of storms and corresponding storm surge levels and extreme waves. We discuss the effect of climate change and the corresponding sea level rise on dune erosion. With the XBeach dune erosion model we studied two representative profiles and analysed the effect of sea-level rise ranging from 0.20 to 2.50 m on dune erosion, as well as changes in the angle of wave incidence. The eroded volume in our XBeach model under storm conditions is in the order of magnitude of previous studies. In contrast with the Bruun-rule, which suggests a relation between sea-level rise and retreat distance, we found a linear relation between SLR and the amount of eroded volume of the dunes. Changes in the wave angle from shore normal to ~40 degrees, increase the erosion volume to the same extend as 40 cm sea-level rise.

  19. Testing model parameters for wave-induced dune erosion using observations from Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, J. R.; Long, J. W.; Stockdon, H. F.

    2017-01-01

    Models of dune erosion depend on a set of assumptions that dictate the predicted evolution of dunes throughout the duration of a storm. Lidar observations made before and after Hurricane Sandy at over 800 profiles with diverse dune elevations, widths, and volumes are used to quantify specific dune erosion model parameters including the dune face slope, which controls dune avalanching, and the trajectory of the dune toe, which controls dune migration. Wave-impact models of dune erosion assume a vertical dune face and erosion of the dune toe along the foreshore beach slope. Observations presented here show that these assumptions are not always valid and require additional testing if these models are to be used to predict coastal vulnerability for decision-making purposes. Observed dune face slopes steepened by 43% yet did not become vertical faces, and only 50% of the dunes evolved along a trajectory similar to the foreshore beach slope. Observations also indicate that dune crests were lowered during dune erosion. Moreover, analysis showed a correspondence between dune lowering and narrower beaches, smaller dune volumes, and/or longer wave impact.

  20. Testing model parameters for wave-induced dune erosion using observations from Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, Jacquelyn R.; Long, Joseph W.; Stockdon, Hilary F.

    2017-01-01

    Models of dune erosion depend on a set of assumptions that dictate the predicted evolution of dunes throughout the duration of a storm. Lidar observations made before and after Hurricane Sandy at over 800 profiles with diverse dune elevations, widths, and volumes are used to quantify specific dune erosion model parameters including the dune face slope, which controls dune avalanching, and the trajectory of the dune toe, which controls dune migration. Wave-impact models of dune erosion assume a vertical dune face and erosion of the dune toe along the foreshore beach slope. Observations presented here show that these assumptions are not always valid and require additional testing if these models are to be used to predict coastal vulnerability for decision-making purposes. Observed dune face slopes steepened by 43% yet did not become vertical faces, and only 50% of the dunes evolved along a trajectory similar to the foreshore beach slope. Observations also indicate that dune crests were lowered during dune erosion. Moreover, analysis showed a correspondence between dune lowering and narrower beaches, smaller dune volumes, and/or longer wave impact.

  1. Channels on Dunes in Russell Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Hundreds of enigmatic small channels are seen to carve into the slopes of these dark sand dunes lying within Russell Crater on Mars. These features were previously identified as gullies in images from the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on Mars Global Surveyor, but the higher resolution HiRISE image brings out many new details and mysteries. The channels extend from near the top of the dunes to their bases, indicating that some fluid material carved into the sand. The channels commonly begin as smaller tributaries joined together, suggesting several sources of fluid. Distinct dark spots are located near where the channels seem to originate. Several channels appear to originate at alcoves. Several of these channels have sinuous middle reaches while others are straighter. Further down slope, some channel edges appear elevated above the surrounding terrain, particularly in the lower reaches. The channels seem to terminate abruptly, with no deposition of material, unlike at the bases of some other gullies on Mars that are not on dunes. One hypothesis for the origin of the channels, which has previously been proposed by the MOC team, is that CO2 (or maybe H2O) frost is deposited on the dunes in shadows or at night. Some frost may also be incorporated into the internal parts of the dunes due to natural avalanching. When the frost is eventually heated by sunlight, rapid sublimation triggers an avalanche of fluidized sand, forming a gully. HiRISE will continue to target small channel features such as these and may return to search for any changes over time. Image PSP_001440_1255 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 16, 2006. The complete image is centered at -54.2 degrees latitude, 12.9 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.4 km (157.1 miles). At this distance the image scale is 50.3 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 151 cm across are resolved. The

  2. Late Pleistocene dune activity in the central Great Plains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J.A.; Swinehart, J.B.; Hanson, P.R.; Loope, D.B.; Goble, R.J.; Miao, X.; Schmeisser, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Stabilized dunes of the central Great Plains, especially the megabarchans and large barchanoid ridges of the Nebraska Sand Hills, provide dramatic evidence of late Quaternary environmental change. Episodic Holocene dune activity in this region is now well-documented, but Late Pleistocene dune mobility has remained poorly documented, despite early interpretations of the Sand Hills dunes as Pleistocene relicts. New optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from drill cores and outcrops provide evidence of Late Pleistocene dune activity at sites distributed across the central Great Plains. In addition, Late Pleistocene eolian sands deposited at 20-25 ka are interbedded with loess south of the Sand Hills. Several of the large dunes sampled in the Sand Hills clearly contain a substantial core of Late Pleistocene sand; thus, they had developed by the Late Pleistocene and were fully mobile at that time, although substantial sand deposition and extensive longitudinal dune construction occurred during the Holocene. Many of the Late Pleistocene OSL ages fall between 17 and 14 ka, but it is likely that these ages represent only the later part of a longer period of dune construction and migration. At several sites, significant Late Pleistocene or Holocene large-dune migration also probably occurred after the time represented by the Pleistocene OSL ages. Sedimentary structures in Late Pleistocene eolian sand and the forms of large dunes potentially constructed in the Late Pleistocene both indicate sand transport dominated by northerly to westerly winds, consistent with Late Pleistocene loess transport directions. Numerical modeling of the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum has often yielded mean monthly surface winds southwest of the Laurentide Ice Sheet that are consistent with this geologic evidence, despite strengthened anticyclonic circulation over the ice sheet. Mobility of large dunes during the Late Pleistocene on the central Great Plains may have been the result of

  3. Observations and modeling of alongshore variability in dune erosion at Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Renske; Gongriep, F.; Ruessink, Gerben

    2015-01-01

    Dunes can erode within a few hours when exposed to high storm surge levels and large waves. If the dunes are the primary defense, such as in the Netherlands, this could result in flooding of the hinterland when dunes breach. Models are often used to analyze how dunes will respond to extreme conditio

  4. The role of bathymetry, wave obliquity and coastal curvature in dune erosion prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Heijer, C.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at reducing uncertainty in dune erosion predictions, in particular at complex dune coasts, in order to improve the assessment method for dune safety against flooding. To that end, state-of-the-art process-based dune erosion models are employed to further investigate issues insufficie

  5. Changes of Bulgarian Coastal Dune Landscape under Anthropogenic Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, A.; Young, R.; Stancheva, M.; Stanchev, H.

    2012-04-01

    At one time large sand dune formations were widely distributed along the Bulgarian coast. However, due to increased urbanization in the coastal zone, the areas of total dune landscape has been constantly reduced. Dunes presently comprise only 10% of the entire 412 km long coastline of Bulgaria: they embrace a total length of 38.57 km and a total area of 8.78 km2 Important tasks in dune protection are identification of landscape changes for a certain period of time and accurate delineation of sand dune areas. The present research traces sand dune changes along the Bulgarian Black Sea coast over a 27 year period (1983-2010). This period includes also the time of expanded tourist boom and overbuilding of the coastal zone, and respectively presents the largest dune changes and reductions. Based on the landscape change analyst in GIS environment the study also aims to explore the importance of different natural and human factors in driving the observed dune alterations and destruction. To detect and assess dune changes during the last 3 decades, we used data for sand dunes derived from several sources at different time periods in order to compare changes in shoreline positions, dune contours and areas: i) Topographic maps in 1:5,000 scale from 1983; ii) Modern Very High Resolution orthophotographs from 2006 and 2010; iii) QuickBird Very High Resolution satellite images from 2009; iv) Statistical information for population and tourist infrastructure is also used to consider the influence of human pressure and hotel developments on the dune dynamics. In addition, for more detailed description and visualization of main dune types, digital photos have been taken at many parts of the Bulgarian coast. The study was performed in GIS environment. Based on the results obtained the dunes along the Bulgarian coast were divided into three main groups with relation to the general factors responsible for their alterations: i) Dunes that have decreased in result of shoreline retreat

  6. Provenance of coastal dune sands along Red Sea, Egypt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samir M Zaid

    2017-06-01

    Texture, mineralogy, and major and trace element geochemistry of 26 coastal dune sand samples were studied to determine the provenance and tectonic environment of two dune fields close to the beaches of Safaga (SF) and Quseir (QS) at the Egyptian Red Sea coast. Onshore winds generate fine, moderate, moderately-well to well-sorted, coarse-skewed to near-symmetrical dune sands with mesokurtic distributions. Winds pick up and transport grains from nearby beach sands and alluvial deposits into a wide Red Sea coastal plain at the border of the beach. The mineralogical (Qt–Ft–Lt) and geochemical composition of the sands, indicate that SF and QS coastal dune sands are mature and influenced by quartz-rich sands. The average CIA values in SF and QS coastal dune sands are low relative to the range of the PAAS, suggesting an arid climate and a low intensity of chemical weathering. The SF and QS coastal dune sand samples are plotted in the recycled orogen and partly in craton interior fields suggesting recycled older sedimentary and partly metamorphic-plutonic sources. The high content of quartz with shell debris and carbonates in coastal dune sands support the recycled sedimentary beach and alluvial sand sources. The dominance of heavy minerals like amphiboles (hornblende) and biotite in the coastal dune sands also supports the effect of metamorphic-plutonic source rocks. The new tectonic discriminant-function diagrams suggest that the coastal dune sands were deposited in a passive margin of a synrift basin. The results provide a good evidence for the extension in the Red Sea rift system during Oligocene-post Pliocene, which is consistent with the general geology of Egypt.

  7. Summary of the Third International Planetary Dunes Workshop: remote sensing and image analysis of planetary dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Lori K.; Hayward, Rosalyn K.; Horgan, Briony H.N.; Rubin, David M.; Titus, Timothy N.; Bishop, Mark A.; Burr, Devon M.; Chojnacki, Matthew; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Kerber, Laura; Gall, Alice Le; Michaels, Timothy I.; Neakrase, Lynn D.V.; Newman, Claire E.; Tirsch, Daniela; Yizhaq, Hezi; Zimbelman, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The Third International Planetary Dunes Workshop took place in Flagstaff, AZ, USA during June 12–15, 2012. This meeting brought together a diverse group of researchers to discuss recent advances in terrestrial and planetary research on aeolian bedforms. The workshop included two and a half days of oral and poster presentations, as well as one formal (and one informal) full-day field trip. Similar to its predecessors, the presented work provided new insight on the morphology, dynamics, composition, and origin of aeolian bedforms on Venus, Earth, Mars, and Titan, with some intriguing speculation about potential aeolian processes on Triton (a satellite of Neptune) and Pluto. Major advancements since the previous International Planetary Dunes Workshop include the introduction of several new data analysis and numerical tools and utilization of low-cost field instruments (most notably the time-lapse camera). Most presentations represented advancement towards research priorities identified in both of the prior two workshops, although some previously recommended research approaches were not discussed. In addition, this workshop provided a forum for participants to discuss the uncertain future of the Planetary Aeolian Laboratory; subsequent actions taken as a result of the decisions made during the workshop may lead to an expansion of funding opportunities to use the facilities, as well as other improvements. The interactions during this workshop contributed to the success of the Third International Planetary Dunes Workshop, further developing our understanding of aeolian processes on the aeolian worlds of the Solar System.

  8. Aleph : anatomie d'une experience

    CERN Multimedia

    Lynn Silverman

    1993-01-01

    "Aleph, anatomie d'une expérience" est un documentaire ethnologique sur les techniciens et les chercheurs de la physique des particules du Centre européen de recherche nucléaire, le CERN, près de Genève. Le film, dont le tournage s'est échelonné sur quatre années, de 1987 à 1991, retrace les différentes étapes de la mise en œuvre, sur le nouvel accélérateur (le LEP) du projet Aleph ; la construction des différents constituants du détecteur dans les centres de recherche de l'Europe entière, leur arrivée au CERN, l'assemblage… jusqu'à l'annonce des premiers résultats, obtenus en 1990.

  9. Commande adaptive d'une machine asynchrone

    OpenAIRE

    I. Slama-Belkhodja; De Fornel, B.

    1996-01-01

    Cat article décrit une stratégie de commande adaptive indirecte à Placement de Pôles (PP), appliquée à la commande en vitesse d'une machine asynchrone alimentée par un ensemble hacheur-filtre-onduleur de tension. L'algorithme des Moindres Carrés Récursifs (MCR) est utilisé pour l'identification des modèles de comportement type entrées/sorties. Un intérêt particulier est porté à la mise en oeuvre de cet algorithme et à la discussion de ses résultats, tenant compte des erreurs de modélisation e...

  10. Probabilistic estimation of dune retreat on the Gold Coast, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmsten, Margaret L.; Splinter, Kristen D.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Stockdon, Hilary F.

    2014-01-01

    Sand dunes are an important natural buffer between storm impacts and development backing the beach on the Gold Coast of Queensland, Australia. The ability to forecast dune erosion at a prediction horizon of days to a week would allow efficient and timely response to dune erosion in this highly populated area. Towards this goal, we modified an existing probabilistic dune erosion model for use on the Gold Coast. The original model was trained using observations of dune response from Hurricane Ivan on Santa Rosa Island, Florida, USA (Plant and Stockdon 2012. Probabilistic prediction of barrier-island response to hurricanes, Journal of Geophysical Research, 117(F3), F03015). The model relates dune position change to pre-storm dune elevations, dune widths, and beach widths, along with storm surge and run-up using a Bayesian network. The Bayesian approach captures the uncertainty of inputs and predictions through the conditional probabilities between variables. Three versions of the barrier island response Bayesian network were tested for use on the Gold Coast. One network has the same structure as the original and was trained with the Santa Rosa Island data. The second network has a modified design and was trained using only pre- and post-storm data from 1988-2009 for the Gold Coast. The third version of the network has the same design as the second version of the network and was trained with the combined data from the Gold Coast and Santa Rosa Island. The two networks modified for use on the Gold Coast hindcast dune retreat with equal accuracy. Both networks explained 60% of the observed dune retreat variance, which is comparable to the skill observed by Plant and Stockdon (2012) in the initial Bayesian network application at Santa Rosa Island. The new networks improved predictions relative to application of the original network on the Gold Coast. Dune width was the most important morphologic variable in hindcasting dune retreat, while hydrodynamic variables, surge and

  11. Interdisciplinary research produces results in understanding planetary dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Timothy N.; Hayward, Rosalyn K.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Third International Planetary Dunes Workshop: Remote Sensing and Image Analysis of Planetary Dunes; Flagstaff, Arizona, 12–16 June 2012. This workshop, the third in a biennial series, was convened as a means of bringing together terrestrial and planetary researchers from diverse backgrounds with the goal of fostering collaborative interdisciplinary research. The small-group setting facilitated intensive discussions of many problems associated with aeolian processes on Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan, Triton, and Pluto. The workshop produced a list of key scientifc questions about planetary dune felds.

  12. Optical dating of dune ridges on Rømø

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, A. S.; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2007-01-01

    . Samples for OSL dating were taken ~0.5 m below the crests of four different dune ridges; at least five samples were recovered from each ridge to test the internal consistency of the ages. Additional samples were recovered from the low lying areas in the swales and from the scattered dune formations......, and all ages were broadly consistent with those expected from historical information. The oldest aeolian surface on Rømø appears to be 370±30 years. This is built on what we interpret as a marine sandbank, whose surface is ~700 years old. The sand ridges seaward of the hummocky dune field have well...

  13. False Signals of CP-Invariance Violation at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    de Gouvêa, André

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is to look for new sources of CP-invariance violation. Another is to significantly test the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm. Here, we show that there are CP-invariant new physics scenarios which, as far as DUNE data are concerned, cannot be distinguished from the three-massive-neutrinos paradigm with very large CP-invariance violating effects. We discuss examples with non-standard neutrino interactions and with a fourth neutrino mass eigenstate. We briefly discuss how ambiguities can be resolved by combining DUNE data with data from other long-baseline experiments, including Hyper-Kamiokande.

  14. Phenomenology and Statistics of the Upper Slope sand Dunes in the Northeastern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Phenomenology and Statistics of the Upper Slope sand Dunes...an ONR-sponsored, multi-year, interdisciplinary, international field program was launched to characterize the large sand dunes on the upper slope of...large submarine sand dunes on the upper slope. • To study the impact of the sand dunes, and the combined impact of sand dunes and nonlinear internal

  15. Upstream sediment input effects on experimental dune trough scour in sediment mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinhans, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding causes of dune irregularity, especially dune trough scour, is important for the modeling of vertical sorting of sediment mixtures in morphological models of rivers with sediment mixtures. Sediment in dunes is generally sorted in a fining-upward manner, which affects the sediment transport composition depending on the scour depth distribution of the dunes. Why dunes become more irregular and develop deep scour holes in some conditions is only partially understood. Moreover, there...

  16. Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Antioch Dunes NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  17. Methane storms as a driver of Titan's dune orientation

    CERN Document Server

    Charnay, Benjamin; Rafkin, Scot; Narteau, Clément; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Pont, Sylvain Courrech du; Lucas, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Titan's equatorial regions are covered by eastward propagating linear dunes. This direction is opposite to mean surface winds simulated by Global Climate Models (GCMs), which are oriented westward at these latitudes, similar to trade winds on Earth. Different hypotheses have been proposed to address this apparent contradiction, involving Saturn's gravitational tides, large scale topography or wind statistics, but none of them can explain a global eastward dune propagation in the equatorial band. Here we analyse the impact of equinoctial tropical methane storms developing in the superrotating atmosphere (i.e. the eastward winds at high altitude) on Titan's dune orientation. Using mesoscale simulations of convective methane clouds with a GCM wind profile featuring superrotation, we show that Titan's storms should produce fast eastward gust fronts above the surface. Such gusts dominate the aeolian transport, allowing dunes to extend eastward. This analysis therefore suggests a coupling between superrotation, tro...

  18. Spectroscopic Observations of Nearby Cool Stars: The DUNES Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J.; Eiroa, C.; Martínez-Arnáiz, R. M.; Montes, D.

    2010-10-01

    The detection of faint dusty exo-zodies and exo-EKBs around mature stars is a direct proof of planetesimal systems. Relating the properties of such structures with the hosting stars is fundamental to get clear clues concerning how common planetary systems are, and how the form and evolve. DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars (see http://www.mpia-hd.mpg.de/DUNES/) is a Herschel Open Time Key Project with the aim of detecting cool faint exo-solar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB). Since the success of DUNES depends on very accurate determination of the stellar properties and age, we have started a high resolution observing program of the DUNES targets, with the first results are presented here.

  19. Modelling dune erosion, overwash and inundation of barrier islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhout, B.; Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Physical model experiments are performed at Deltares to investigate the morphological response of barrier islands on extreme storm events. The experiments included dune erosion, overwash and inundation regimes. Extensive measurement techniques made detailed comparison with numerical models possible.

  20. Holocene formation and evolution of coastal dunes ridges, Brittany (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vliet-Lanoë, Brigitte; Goslin, Jérôme; Hénaff, Alain; Hallégouët, Bernard; Delacourt, Christophe; Le Cornec, Erwan; Meurisse-Fort, Murielle

    2016-07-01

    Holocene coastal dune formation under a continuously rising sea level (SL) is an abnormal response to increasing storm frequency. The aim of this work is to understand the coastal sedimentary budget and the present-day sand starvation, controlled by climate and man. Dating in Brittany shows that Aeolian deposition initiated from ca. 4000 cal BP, with the slowing down of the SL rise. Pre-historical dunes appeared here from ca. 3000 cal BP, without SL regression. After, further building phases recycled the same stock of sands. Historical dunes I developed from ca. 350 AD. Major storms between 900 and 1200 AD resulted in the construction of washover coastal ridges, the Historical dunes II. A part of the sand was evacuated offshore. From ca. 1350 AD, the pre-existing ridges are reworked forming the Historical dunes III, leading to rapid coastal erosion and inland drift. Holocene dunes with a rising SL constitute a temporary anomaly, mostly forced by man, soon erased by storms in Brittany.

  1. Barchan dune corridors: Field characterization and investigation of control parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbelrhiti, H.; Andreotti, B.; Claudin, P.

    2008-06-01

    The structure of the barchan field located between Tarfaya and Laayoune (Atlantic Sahara, Morocco) is quantitatively investigated and compared to that in La Pampa de la Joya (Arequipa, Peru). On the basis of field measurements, we show how the volume, the velocity, and the output sand flux of a dune can be computed from the value of its body and horn widths. The dune size distribution is obtained from the analysis of aerial photographs. It shows that these fields are in a statistically homogeneous state along the wind direction and present a "corridor" structure in the transverse direction, in which the dunes have a rather well selected size. Investigating the possible external parameters controlling these corridors, we demonstrate that none among topography, granulometry, wind, and sand flux is relevant. We finally discuss the dynamical processes at work in these fields (collisions and wind fluctuations) and investigate the way they could regulate the size of the dunes. Furthermore, we show that the overall sand flux transported by a dune field is smaller than the maximum transport that could be reached in the absence of dunes, i.e., in saltation over the solid ground.

  2. Effects of sand burial on dune plants:a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Qu; HaLin Zhao; RuiLian Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Burial of different growth stages of plants (e.g., adult plants, seedlings and seeds) is frequent in dune ecosystems. The soil micro-environment, which differs from surface conditions, influences the survival and growth of dune plants. To sum up knowledge about the survival mechanisms of plants under sand burial and to promote practical rehabilitation of dune vegetation, we reviewed relevant published literature and concluded that:(1) Focus in recent years has been on impacts of sand burial on seed germination and seedling emergence. Generally, shallow burial increased seed germination and seed-ling emergence, but deeper burial was negative. Buried at the same depth, large seeds showed higher germination and seedling emergence rates, attributed to larger energy reserves. (2) Survival, growth and reproduction rates of dune plants show plasticity in response to sand burial. Long-term deep burial is fatal because it creates a physical barrier which overcomes the vertical growth of plants, reduces photosynthetic leaf area, and limits oxygen availability to roots. Modest burial, on the other hand, is advantageous for growth and reproduction of many dune plants, due to protection from ex-cessive temperature and drought. (3) There are few reports concerning effects of sand burial on plant physiology, but a limited number of studies indicate that partial burial increases water use efficiency, chlorophyll content, transpiration rate and net photosynthetic rates. The antioxidant protective enzyme system and osmolyte balance were reported to be involved in the mechanisms of dune plant resistance to burial.

  3. Maximizing the DUNE early physics output with current experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Monojit; Goswami, Srubabati [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); Raut, Sushant K. [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology-AlbaNova University Center, Department of Theoretical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    The deep underground neutrino experiment (DUNE) is a proposed next generation superbeam experiment at Fermilab. Its aims include measuring the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters - the neutrino mass hierarchy, the octant of the mixing angle θ{sub 23}, and the CP-violating phase δ{sub CP}. The current and upcoming experiments T2K, NOνA, and ICAL rate at IN will also be collecting data for the same measurements. In this paper, we explore the sensitivity reach of DUNE in combination with these other experiments. We evaluate the least exposure required by DUNE to determine the above three unknown parameters with reasonable confidence.We find that for each case, the inclusion of data from T2K, NOνA, and ICAL rate at IN help to achieve the same sensitivity with a reduced exposure from DUNE thereby helping to economize the configuration. Further, we quantify the effect of the proposed near detector on systematic errors and study the consequent improvement in sensitivity. We also examine the role played by the second oscillation cycle in furthering the physics reach of DUNE. Finally, we present an optimization study of the neutrino-antineutrino running of DUNE. (orig.)

  4. Simulation model of erosion and deposition on a barchan dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, A. D.; Morton, J. B.; Gal-El-hak, M.; Pierce, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Erosion and deposition over a barchan dune near the Salton Sea, California, are modeled by bookkeeping the quantity of sand in saltation following streamlines of transport. Field observations of near surface wind velocity and direction plus supplemental measurements of the velocity distribution over a scale model of the dune are combined as input to Bagnold type sand transport formulas corrected for slope effects. A unidirectional wind is assumed. The resulting patterns of erosion and deposition compare closely with those observed in the field and those predicted by the assumption of equilibrium (downwind translation of the dune without change in size or geometry). Discrepancies between the simulated results and the observed or predicted erosional patterns appear to be largely due to natural fluctuations in the wind direction. The shape of barchan dunes is a function of grain size, velocity, degree of saturation of the oncoming flow, and the variability in the direction of the oncoming wind. The size of the barchans may be controlled by natural atmospheric scales, by the age of the dunes, or by the upwind roughness. The upwind roughness can be controlled by fixed elements or by sand in the saltation. In the latter case, dune scale is determined by grain size and wind velocity.

  5. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 3: Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, James [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); McCluskey, Elaine [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lundin, Tracy [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Willhite, Joshua [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hamernik, Thomas [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Papadimitriou, Vaia [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Marchionni, Alberto [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kim, Min Jeong [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LNF); Nessi, Marzio [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Montanari, David [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Heavey, Anne [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-01-21

    This volume of the LBNF/DUNE Conceptual Design Report covers the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE and describes the LBNF Project, which includes design and construction of the beamline at Fermilab, the conventional facilities at both Fermilab and SURF, and the cryostat and cryogenics infrastructure required for the DUNE far detector.

  6. Temporal observations of a linear sand dune in the Simpson Desert, central Australia: Testing models for dune formation on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Robert A.; Tooth, Stephen; Zimbelman, James R.; Wilson, Sharon A.; Maxwell, Ted A.; Kling, Corbin

    2015-10-01

    Linear dunes are the most common dune form found on planetary surfaces, yet questions remain about their formation. Temporal observations of a linear dune located in the Simpson Desert of central Australia were made to monitor dune movement and to test competing hypotheses regarding linear dune formation. Our observations were collected on three separate occasions from 2006 to 2014. Rebar stakes were placed in a gridded pattern so that multiple measurements of sand thickness, GPS surveys, and photographs could be taken at the same locations over time. We observed widespread reworking of sand on and around the dune crest, with sand accumulation locally exceeding a meter between surveys. Overall, the height of the dune crest increased by several centimeters. We also observed fluctuations in the sand cover in the adjacent swales that often exceeded 2-3 cm between surveys, yet we did not observe any appreciable changes in the position of the dune's downwind terminus. Weather data indicate that the effective sand-transporting winds in the Simpson are widely unimodal. Net sediment flux (resultant drift direction) is toward the north-northwest, locally at an oblique angle to dune orientation. Collectively, our results suggest that the linear dune is actively maintained by vertical accretion. The implications from our observations are that linear dunes on other planetary surfaces could form in wind regimes that are widely unimodal, even where the resultant drift direction is locally oblique to dune orientation. In particular, such findings may provide support for global circulation models of Titan.

  7. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Conceptual Design Report Volume 3: Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE June 24, 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Strait, James; Lundin, Tracy; Willhite, Joshua; Hamernik, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Marchionni, Alberto; Kim, Min Jeong; Nessi, Marzio; Montanari, David; Heavey, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This volume of the LBNF/DUNE Conceptual Design Report cover the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE and describes the LBNF Project, which includes design and construction of the beamline at Fermilab, the conventional facilities at both Fermilab and SURF, and the cryostat and cryogenics infrastructure required for the DUNE far detector.

  8. A new tool for modeling dune field evolution based on an accessible, GUI version of the Werner dune model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2012-02-01

    Research into aeolian dune form and dynamics has benefited from simple and abstract cellular automata computer models. Many of these models are based upon a seminal framework proposed by Werner (1995). Unfortunately, most versions of this model are not publicly available or are not provided in a format that promotes widespread use. In our view, this hinders progress in linking model simulations to empirical data (and vice versa). To this end, we introduce an accessible, graphical user interface (GUI) version of the Werner model. The novelty of this contribution is that it provides a simple interface and detailed instructions that encourage widespread use and extension of the Werner dune model for research and training purposes. By lowering barriers for researchers to develop and test hypotheses about aeolian dune and dune field patterns, this release addresses recent calls to improve access to earth surface models.

  9. Commande adaptive d'une machine asynchrone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama-Belkhodja, I.; de Fornel, B.

    1996-06-01

    The paper deals with an indirect self-tuning speed control for an induction motor supplied by a chopper-filter-inverter system. Input/Output models are identified with the recursive least squares algorithm and the controller adaptation is based on a pole assignement strategy. Emphasis is put on the evaluation of the parameter identification in order to avoid instabilities because of disturbances or insufficient excitations. This is especially of importance when the adaptive control is carried out in closed loop systems and without additional test signals. Simulation results show the improvement of the dynamic responses and the robustness against load variations or parameters variations (rotor resistance, inertia). Cat article décrit une stratégie de commande adaptive indirecte à Placement de Pôles (PP), appliquée à la commande en vitesse d'une machine asynchrone alimentée par un ensemble hacheur-filtre-onduleur de tension. L'algorithme des Moindres Carrés Récursifs (MCR) est utilisé pour l'identification des modèles de comportement type entrées/sorties. Un intérêt particulier est porté à la mise en oeuvre de cet algorithme et à la discussion de ses résultats, tenant compte des erreurs de modélisation et de la nature peu riche en excitations des entrées du processus. Différents régimes transitoires ont été simulés pour apprécier l'apport de cette association (MCR-PP) : démarrages et inversion des sens de rotation, à vide et en charges, applications d'échelons de couple résistant, variations paramétriques. Les résultats permettent d'illustrer, tant au niveau des performances que de la robustesse, l'apport d'une telle commande adaptive pour des entraînements électriques avec une machine asynchrone.

  10. Morphodynamic study of reticulate dunes at southeastern fringe of the Tengger Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    哈斯; 董光荣; 王贵勇

    1999-01-01

    Reticulate dunes are one of the commonest dune types, and yet the least understood. Reticulate dunes at southeastern Tengger Desert are constituted by NE-SW trending primary ridges and nearly vertical secondary ridges. The result of field work studying the morphodynamics and formation mechanism for reticulate dunes in this area shows that the primary ridges were formed by dominant northwest wind and the secondary ridges developed and maintained by alternating dominant wind and subdominant northeast wind on the basis of the primary ridges. Viewed from morphodynamics, reticulate dunes correspond to the complex transverse dune on which the longitudinal element superimposed.

  11. Cellular automata to understand the behaviour of beach-dune systems: Application to El Fangar Spit active dune system (Ebro delta, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio-Parra, Fernando; Rodríguez-Santalla, Inmaculada

    2016-08-01

    Coastal dunes are sedimentary environments characterized by their high dynamism. Their evolution is determined by sedimentary exchanges between the beach-dune subsystems and the dune dynamics itself. Knowledge about these exchanges is important to prioritize management and conservation strategies of these environments. The aim of this work is the inclusion of the aeolian transport rates obtained using a calibrated cellular automaton to estimate the beach-dune sediment exchange rates in a real active dune field at El Fangar Spit (Ebro Delta, Spain). The dune dynamics model is able to estimate average aeolian sediment fluxes. These are used in combination with the observed net sediment budget to obtain a quantitative characterization of the sediment exchange interactions. The methods produce a substantial improvement in the understanding of coastal sedimentary systems that could have major implications in areas where the management and conservation of dune fields are of concern.

  12. Origin and lateral migration of linear dunes in the Qaidam Basin of NW China revealed by dune sediments, internal structures, and optically stimulated luminescence ages, with implications for linear dunes on Titan: discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David M.; Rubin, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Zhou et al. (2012) proposed that longitudinal dunes in the Qaidam Basin, China, formed like yardangs: by erosion into sediment that was not deposited by those dunes. Because erosion occurs on the upwind flanks of most migrating dunes (Rubin and Hunter, 1982, 1985), the key to demonstrating a yardang-like origin is to show that the dunes did not deposit the strata that they contain. Zhou et al. made this argument by proposing that: (1) The dunes have not deposited cross-strata in the past 810 yr. (2) Cross-bedding within the dunes was not deposited by the dunes on the present-day land surface, but rather by older dunes that had a different morphology. (3) The present dunes are a later generation, “most likely of erosional origin similar to yardangs with orientations controlled by strikes of joints,” (p. 1147). (4) Rates of deflation in the dune field have been extremely high for the past 810–2440 yr. This commentary reviews these conclusions, reviews contradictory observations, and considers alternative interpretations.

  13. Soil texture in a coppice dune system: The relative role of aeolian and hydrologic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. J.; Ravi, S.

    2016-12-01

    The desert grasslands of the southwestern U.S. have undergone extensive woody shrub encroachment over the last 150 years. The formation of coppice dunes represents a late stage of the shrub encroachment and is also associated with the redistribution of soil recourses including soil fines. The conversion of perennial grasslands into desert shrublands and the consequent redistribution of soil resources have important implications for local pastoral economics, regional and global climate, biogeochemical cycles, biodiversity, and human health. It is generally reported that the nutrient-enriched fine soil particles are more concentrated on the coppice dunes due to aeolian interception. However, a systematic investigation on the characteristics of soil texture from the dune interspaces to the top of the dunes in the coppice dune system is still not available. Here, we investigated a series of coppice dunes (with various age, length, height, and orientation) located on the P. glandulosa (mesquite) dunelands in the Jornada Basin, Chihuahuan Desert, southern New Mexico. On each of the dunes, we collected soil samples (top 5 cm) along the transects that are parallel with and perpendicular to the prevailing wind directions every 25-100 cm. The soil transects extended from the dune interspaces to the top of the dunes. Our studies show that soils under the coppice dunes are not necessary finer than the dune interspaces. Actually, soil fines with grain diameters dune interspaces than those of the dunes. We suggest that the interactions between aeolian processes and vegetation alone, cannot explain the observed pattern of soil texture distribution in this duneland. Hydrologic process, in particular the directional movement of soil fines from the dunes to the dune interspaces, explained the accumulation of fine sands in the dune interspaces relative to the center of the dunes.

  14. Estimation of dune migration rates north Riyadh City, KSA, using SPOT 4 panchromatic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutiry, M.; Hermas, E. A.; Al-Ghamdi, K. A.; Al-Awaji, H.

    2016-12-01

    Irq Al-Rethmah is located north of Riyadh City, KSA, as elongated NW-SE sand accumulations. Its formation and development are highly controlled by the ridge-and-valley landscape dominant in the east of Saudi Arabia. The active dunes of Irq Al-Rethmah are basically represented by barchan and transverse dunes. These active dunes either superimpose the old stable dunes and sand sheets or directly occur over the alluvial plain adjacent to the western reaches of old stable dunes. The Co-registration of optically sensed images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) technology was conducted on two SPOT 4 panchromatic images acquired in 2006 and 2009 respectively to determine the migration rates and direction of the active dunes. The average annual migration rates of active dunes ranged from 1.6 to 2.25 m/yr. The migration rates decrease where the active dunes superimpose the old stable dunes and sand sheets. On the other hand, these rates increase when the active dunes are located over the alluvial plain along the western margins of Irq Al-Rethmah. The calculated vector displacement field by COSI-Corr technology suggest a southward direction of dune migration indicating that the predominant wind direction is northerly. Although the calculated rates are generally low in comparison to other measured migration rates of sand dunes in the east of Saudi Arabia, the spatial analysis implies potential hazards of active dunes against many landuse components such as roads, powerlines, and recreational facilities in the study area.

  15. Hydrologic Modeling of the White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, S. M.; Newton, B. T.; Person, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The shallow groundwater flow system of White Sands dune field, located within the Tularosa Basin of Southern New Mexico, likely stabilizes the base of the largest gypsum dunefield in the world. Water table geometry and elevation play a critical role in controlling dune thickness, spatial extent, and migration rates. The White Sands National Monument (WHSA) is concerned that lowering the water table may lead to increased scour and migration of the dune field, which could be unfavorable to the preservation of the flora and fauna that have adapted to survive there. In response to projected increases in groundwater pumping in the regional Tularosa Basin groundwater system, changes in surface water use, and the threat of climate change, the WHSA is interested in understanding how these changes on a regional scale may impact the shallow dune aquifer. We have collected hydrological, geochemical, and geophysical data in order to identify the sources of recharge that contribute to the shallow dune aquifer and to assess interactions between this water table aquifer and the basin-scale, regional system. Vertical head gradients, temperature, and water quality data strongly suggest that local precipitation is the primary source of recharge to the dune aquifer today. This suggests that the modern dune system is relatively isolated from the deeper regional system. However, geochemical and electrical resistivity data indicates that the deeper basin groundwater system does contribute to the shallow system and suggests that hydrologic conditions have changed on geologic time scales. We have constructed a preliminary cross-sectional hydrologic model to attempt to characterize the interaction of the shallow dune aquifer with the deeper basin groundwater. The model cross-section extends about 80 km across the Tularosa Basin in a NW-SE direction parallel to the primary flow path. We represented 6 km of Precambrian crystalline basement, Paleozoic sedimentary rocks as well as Pleistocene

  16. The Mediterranean Coastal Dunes in Egypt: An Endangered Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batanouny, K. H.

    1999-08-01

    The Mediterranean coast in Egypt extends almost 900 km, the major part of which is bordered by sand dunes of different natures and types. Along the coastline between Alexandria and El-Alamein, a distance of some 100 km, the sand dunes represent a particular landscape with special characteristics and features, and consequently plants with particular attributes. In this area, the belt of sand dunes has developed immediately south of the shore and these dunes may rise up to 10 m in height and extend about 0·5-1·5 km inland from the shore. These dunes are famous as a habitat for the fig (Ficus carica L.) cultivation depending on the irregular rainfall. They also represent a landing station and a cross-road for birds such as quail migrating from Europe in the north. In the past, summer resort areas were confined to limited areas with few people, these same areas support the growth of some important plant species, for example, sand binders, medicinal and range plants. For more than two decades, there has been considerable socio-economic change and an open-door policy in the economy of the country has been adopted. One of the consequences of this change is that a great part of the coastal dune belt west of Alexandria till El-Alamein, has been subjected to destruction, due to the continuous construction of summer resort villages. These were built at a distance of about 100 m of the shoreline, extending 400-600 m inland and a breadth of 400 m or more along the shoreline. The area already covered by the dunes is now almost occupied by new buildings, gardens and other infrastructure. The consequences of these human activities are numerous and include impacts on the soil, water resources, the flora and the fauna, migrating birds, trends of the indigenous people, and the cultural environment. The present paper gives a concise environmental setting of the dune belt before the advent of the new activities, and the socio-economic and political attitudes which threaten the dunes

  17. Morphological characteristics and sand volumes of different coastal dune types in Essaouira Province, Atlantic Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor-Blanco, Germán; Flor, Germán; Lharti, Saadia; Pando, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Altogether three coastal dune fields, one located north and two south of the city of Essaouira, Atlantic Morocco, have been investigated to establish the distribution and overall sand volumes of various dune types. The purpose of the study was to characterize and classify the aeolian landforms of the coastal dune belt, to estimate their sand volumes and to assess the effectiveness of coastal dune stabilization measures. The northern dune field is 9 km long and lined by a wide artificial foredune complex fixed by vegetation, fences and branches forming a rectangular grid. Active and ephemeral aklé dunes border the inner backshore, while some intrusive dunes have crossed the foredune belt and are migrating farther inland. The total sand volume of the northern dune belt amounts 13,910,255 m3. The central coastal sector comprises a much smaller dune field located just south of the city. It is only 1.2 km long and, with the exception of intrusive dunes, shows all other dune types. The overall sand volume of the central dune field amounts to about 172,463 m3. The southern dune field is characterized by a narrower foredune belt and overall lower dunes that, in addition, become progressively smaller towards the south. In this sector, embryonic dunes (coppice, shadow dunes), tongue-like and tabular dunes, and sand sheets intrude from the beach, the profile of which has a stepped appearance controlled by irregular outcrops of old aeolianite and beach rock. The total volume of the southern dune field amounts 1,446,389 m3. For the whole study area, i.e. for all three dune fields combined, a sand volume of about 15,529,389 m3 has been estimated. The sand of the dune fields is derived from coastal erosion and especially the Tensift River, which enters the sea at Souira Qedima some 70 km north of Essaouira. After entering the sea, the sand is transported southwards by littoral drift driven by the mainly north-westerly swell climate and the Trade Winds blowing from the NNE. This

  18. Numerical modeling of the wind flow over a transverse dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ascânio D.; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2013-01-01

    Transverse dunes, which form under unidirectional winds and have fixed profile in the direction perpendicular to the wind, occur on all celestial objects of our solar system where dunes have been detected. Here we perform a numerical study of the average turbulent wind flow over a transverse dune by means of computational fluid dynamics simulations. We find that the length of the zone of recirculating flow at the dune lee — the separation bubble — displays a surprisingly strong dependence on the wind shear velocity, u*: it is nearly independent of u* for shear velocities within the range between 0.2 m/s and 0.8 m/s but increases linearly with u* for larger shear velocities. Our calculations show that transport in the direction opposite to dune migration within the separation bubble can be sustained if u* is larger than approximately 0.39 m/s, whereas a larger value of u* (about 0.49 m/s) is required to initiate this reverse transport. PMID:24091456

  19. Alongshore variability in nearshore-beach-dune interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Timothy; Donker, Jasper

    2017-04-01

    At straight, sandy coasts, wave- and wind-induced processes often lead to the development of an alongshore-variable morphology in the nearshore, beach and dune systems on spatial scales from tens of metres to a few kilometres. Although our understanding of this morphological patterning is quite mature for the different sub-systems, we are only starting to understand how these patterns affect each other across the entire nearshore-beach-dune system. The morphological patterns emerging in subtidal bars often exhibit landward-protruding shallower areas at regular intervals alongshore, known as horns. The alongshore depth variation in these so-called crescentic bars is thought to affect the morphodynamics of the more landward intertidal beach by acting as an alongshore-variable filter for the wave field, both during erosional storm events and the accretionary recovery periods in between storms. Recent studies have revealed that persistent (years - decades) foredune accretion and embryo dune development primarily border wider beach areas, especially along fetch-limited narrow (shore. This suggests that SPAWs play a significant role in the development of alongshore-variable dune morphology at our study site. At the conference, we will further explain the temporal and spatial variations involved in this morphological coupling across the entire nearshore-beach-dune system.

  20. The Dark UNiverse Explorer (DUNE): Proposal to ESA's Cosmic Vision

    CERN Document Server

    Refregier, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    The Dark UNiverse Explorer (DUNE) is a wide-field space imager whose primary goal is the study of dark energy and dark matter with unprecedented precision. For this purpose, DUNE is optimised for the measurement of weak gravitational lensing but will also provide complementary measurements of baryonic accoustic oscillations, cluster counts and the Integrated Sachs Wolfe effect. Immediate auxiliary goals concern the evolution of galaxies, to be studied with unequalled statistical power, the detailed structure of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, and the demographics of Earth-mass planets. DUNE is an Medium-class mission which makes use of readily available components, heritage from other missions, and synergy with ground based facilities to minimise cost and risks. The payload consists of a 1.2m telescope with a combined visible/NIR field-of-view of 1 deg^2. DUNE will carry out an all-sky survey, ranging from 550 to 1600nm, in one visible and three NIR bands which will form a unique legacy for astronomy. DUNE...

  1. Numerical modeling of the wind flow over a transverse dune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Pöschel, Thorsten; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2013-10-04

    Transverse dunes, which form under unidirectional winds and have fixed profile in the direction perpendicular to the wind, occur on all celestial objects of our solar system where dunes have been detected. Here we perform a numerical study of the average turbulent wind flow over a transverse dune by means of computational fluid dynamics simulations. We find that the length of the zone of recirculating flow at the dune lee - the separation bubble - displays a surprisingly strong dependence on the wind shear velocity, u: it is nearly independent of u for shear velocities within the range between 0.2 m/s and 0.8 m/s but increases linearly with u for larger shear velocities. Our calculations show that transport in the direction opposite to dune migration within the separation bubble can be sustained if u is larger than approximately 0.39 m/s, whereas a larger value of u (about 0.49 m/s) is required to initiate this reverse transport.

  2. Model for a dune field with exposed water table

    CERN Document Server

    Luna, Marco Cesar M de M; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-01-01

    Aeolian transport in coastal areas can be significantly affected by the presence of an exposed water table. In some dune fields, such as in Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses, northeastern Brazil, the water table oscillates in response to seasonal changes of rainfall and rates of evapotranspiration, rising above the ground during the wet season and sinking below in the dry period. A quantitative understanding of dune mobility in an environment with varying groundwater level is essential for coastal management as well as for the study of long-term evolution of many dune fields. Here we apply a model for aeolian dunes to study the genesis of coastal dune fields in presence of an oscillating water table. We find that the morphology of the field depends on the time cycle, $T_{\\mathrm{w}}$, of the water table and the maximum height, $H_{\\mathrm{w}}$, of its oscillation. Our calculations show that long chains of barchanoids alternating with interdune ponds such as found at Len\\c{c}\\'ois Maranhenses arise when $T_{\\mathrm{w}...

  3. Lidar Point Cloud Data of Nogahabara Sand Dunes, Alaska; September 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset provides information needed to reproduce a digital model of the Nogahabara Dune Field located in interior Alaska. The Nogahabara Dunes represent one of...

  4. Invasive Plant Species and Area Prioritization Report: Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — On July 20-21, 2015 a workshop was held near the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes National Wildlife Refuge (GND NWR) with members of the Dunes Collaborative, a partnership...

  5. Editorial Introduction: Fourth Planetary Dunes Workshop Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Telfer, Matt W.

    2017-06-01

    The Fourth International Planetary Dunes Workshop: Integrating Models, Remote Sensing, and Field Data was held May 19-22, 2015 in Boise, Idaho (see Final Announcement). More than 60 researchers and students participated in two and a half days of presentations and lively discussion, plus a full day field trip to Bruneau Dunes State Park. The workshop focused on the many landforms and deposits created by the dynamic interactions between granular material and airflow (aeolian processes). These processes are known to occur on several planetary bodies, including Earth, Mars, Titan, Venus, and possibly, cometary surfaces. The overarching purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for discussion and the exchange of new ideas and approaches to gaining new insights into planetary aeolian processes. Meeting programs, abstracts, and E-Posters are all available at the workshop website (http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/dunes2015/)

  6. A model of Barchan dunes including lateral shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwämmle, V; Herrmann, H J

    2005-01-01

    Barchan dunes are found where sand availability is low and wind direction quite constant. The two dimensional shear stress of the wind field and the sand movement by saltation and avalanches over a barchan dune are simulated. The model with one dimensional shear stress is extended including surface diffusion and lateral shear stress. The resulting final shape is compared to the results of the model with a one dimensional shear stress and confirmed by comparison to measurements. We found agreement and improvements with respect to the model with one dimensional shear stress. Additionally, a characteristic edge at the center of the windward side is discovered which is also observed for big barchans. Diffusion effects reduce this effect for small dunes.

  7. First Results from the DUNE 35-ton Prototype using Cosmics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insler, Jonathan; DUNE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The 35-ton prototype for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Far Detector is a single-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) integrated detector that will take cosmics data for a two month run beginning in February 2016. The 35-ton prototype will characterize DUNE's Far Detector technology performance and provide a sample of real data for DUNE reconstruction algorithms. The 35-ton prototype has two drift volumes of lengths 2.23 m and 0.23 m on either side of its anode plane assembly (APA) and makes use of wire planes with wrapped wires and a photon detection system (PDS) utilizing photon detection panels read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Data from the 35-ton LAr detector are expected to provide rich information on scintillation light and charged particle tracks. We present a preliminary analysis of cosmics data taken with the 35-ton detector with a focus on stopping muons.

  8. Martian linear dunes : observation and modelling from the LMD GCM data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    allemand, pascal; Quiquerez, Amélie; Quantin, Cathy

    2014-05-01

    Dunes are common on Earth and Mars and have similar geometries on both planets. Martian dunes are larger than terrestrial one and are shaped by winds less efficient than terrestrial winds. Martian dunes move thus much more slowly than terrestrial dunes. Their characteristic time could be similar to the characteristic time of climate change on Mars. Their geometry could thus reflect past climate conditions. Linear dunes are a family of elongated dunes shaped by at least 2 winds that blow at an obtuse angle alternatively along the year. Contrary to simple dunes as barkhanes, it is therefore difficult to invert the shape of these dunes in term of wind direction and intensity. It is thus difficult to demonstrate if their geometry is coherent or not with the current wind regimes. We mapped 10 dune fields located inside impact craters of the southern hemisphere of Mars. Five fields are composed of barkhanes and 5 by linear dunes. For each dune field location, we extracted the annual wind velocity at 20m above the surface at a temporal resolution of 1 hour every 30 martian days from the Mars Climate Database of the LMD (www-mars.lmd.jussieu.fr/). The annual wind rose was calculated for each dune field. The sand flux along the year was also computed assuming a classical law of transport with threshold. Assuming that the avalanche face of barkhanes is perpendicular to the sand flux direction, we predicted the orientation of the avalanche face for each barkhane fields. These results are coherent with the observations. Assuming that linear dunes are aligned along the average sand flux direction, we predicted the orientation of the linear dunes and compared them to the observations. In 4 cases, the predicted dune orientation is consistent with observations. In one case, there is a strong discrepancy between the predicted and observed orientation that could indicate that this linear dune field is fossil.

  9. Aeolian dunes as ground truth for atmospheric modeling on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Titus, T.N.; Michaels, T.I.; Fenton, L.K.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Martian aeolian dunes preserve a record of atmosphere/surface interaction on a variety of scales, serving as ground truth for both Global Climate Models (GCMs) and mesoscale climate models, such as the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). We hypothesize that the location of dune fields, expressed globally by geographic distribution and locally by dune centroid azimuth (DCA), may record the long-term integration of atmospheric activity across a broad area, preserving GCM-scale atmospheric trends. In contrast, individual dune morphology, as expressed in slipface orientation (SF), may be more sensitive to localized variations in circulation, preserving topographically controlled mesoscale trends. We test this hypothesis by comparing the geographic distribution, DCA, and SF of dunes with output from the Ames Mars GCM and, at a local study site, with output from MRAMS. When compared to the GCM: 1) dunes generally lie adjacent to areas with strongest winds, 2) DCA agrees fairly well with GCM modeled wind directions in smooth-floored craters, and 3) SF does not agree well with GCM modeled wind directions. When compared to MRAMS modeled winds at our study site: 1) DCA generally coincides with the part of the crater where modeled mean winds are weak, and 2) SFs are consistent with some weak, topographically influenced modeled winds. We conclude that: 1) geographic distribution may be valuable as ground truth for GCMs, 2) DCA may be useful as ground truth for both GCM and mesoscale models, and 3) SF may be useful as ground truth for mesoscale models. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Effects of trampling limitation on coastal dune plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Riccardo; Jucker, Tommaso; Prisco, Irene; Carboni, Marta; Battisti, Corrado; Acosta, Alicia T R

    2012-03-01

    Sandy coastlines are sensitive ecosystems where human activities can have considerable negative impacts. In particular, trampling by beach visitors is a disturbance that affects dune vegetation both at the species and community level. In this study we assess the effects of the limitation of human trampling on dune vegetation in a coastal protected area of Central Italy. We compare plant species diversity in two recently fenced sectors with that of an unfenced area (and therefore subject to human trampling) using rarefaction curves and a diversity/dominance approach during a two year study period. Our results indicate that limiting human trampling seems to be a key factor in driving changes in the plant diversity of dune systems. In 2007 the regression lines of species abundance as a function of rank showed steep slopes and high Y-intercept values in all sectors, indicating a comparable level of stress and dominance across the entire study site. On the contrary, in 2009 the regression lines of the two fenced sectors clearly diverge from that of the open sector, showing less steep slopes. This change in the slopes of the tendency lines, evidenced by the diversity/dominance diagrams and related to an increase in species diversity, suggests the recovery of plant communities in the two fences between 2007 and 2009. In general, plant communities subject to trampling tended to be poorer in species and less structured, since only dominant and tolerant plant species persisted. Furthermore, limiting trampling appears to have produced positive changes in the dune vegetation assemblage after a period of only two years. These results are encouraging for the management of coastal dune systems. They highlight how a simple and cost-effective management strategy, based on passive recovery conservation measures (i.e., fence building), can be a quick (1–2 years) and effective method for improving and safeguarding the diversity of dune plant communities.

  11. Single-phase ProtoDUNE, the Prototype of a Single-Phase Liquid Argon TPC for DUNE at the CERN Neutrino Platform

    CERN Document Server

    Cavanna, F; Touramanis, C

    2017-01-01

    ProtoDUNE-SP is the single-phase DUNE Far Detector prototype that is under construction and will be operated at the CERN Neutrino Platform (NP) starting in 2018. It was proposed to the CERN SPSC in June 2015 (SPSC-P-351) and was approved in December 2015 as experiment NP04 (ProtoDUNE). ProtoDUNE-SP, a crucial part of the DUNE effort towards the construction of the first DUNE 10-kt fiducial mass far detector module (17 kt total LAr mass), is a significant experiment in its own right. With a total liquid argon (LAr) mass of 0.77 kt, it represents the largest monolithic single phase LArTPC detector to be built to date. It is housed in an extension to the EHN1 hall in the North Area, where the CERN NP is providing a new dedicated charged-particle test beamline. ProtoDUNE-SP aims to take its first beam data before the LHC long shutdown (LS2) at the end of 2018. ProtoDUNE-SP prototypes the designs of most of the single-phase DUNE far detector module (DUNE-SP) components at a 1:1 scale, with an extrapolation of abo...

  12. Automatic Extraction of Dunes from Google Earth Images New Approach to Study the Dunes Migration in the LAÂYOUNE City of Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakir, D.; Rhinane, H.; Saddiqi, O.; El Arabi, E.; Baidder, L.

    2016-10-01

    In desert environments, the sandy dune movements are considered as the main threat to the livelihoods and productivity of people living in Laâyoune city, South of Morocco. Studying dunes at a large scale requires intensive fieldwork and a huge dataset. But this task is not always easy because of the high cost and the limited availability of data. In this paper we present a new approach to study and evaluate the dune dynamic using Google earth archive image acquired from 2005, 2011, 2012, and 2013. To achieve this goal, an area with 3577 meter square including 40 barchan dunes, were selected, and the barchan dunes were automatically extracted from these images using Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial analysis techniques provided by image processing software. The result shows not only the dune shape but also direction of dunes movements, and distance separating dunes. The obtained direction is ranging from North east to South west. The average rate of movement of the extracted dunes between 2005 and 2013 was calculated and is estimated at 32m per year. Validation of these dunes movement of the Laâyoune city was confirmed by the field data and previous studies.

  13. Aeolian sedimentary processes at the Bagnold Dunes, Mars: Implications for modern dune dynamics and sedimentary structures in the aeolian stratigraphic record of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Bridges, Nathan T.; Sullivan, Rob; Lapotre, Mathieu G. A.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Lamb, Mike P.; Rubin, David M.; Lewis, Kevin W.; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2016-04-01

    Wind-blown sand dunes are ubiquitous on the surface of Mars and are a recognized component of the martian stratigraphic record. Our current knowledge of the aeolian sedimentary processes that determine dune morphology, drive dune dynamics, and create aeolian cross-stratification are based upon orbital studies of ripple and dune morphodynamics, rover observations of stratification on Mars, Earth analogs, and experimental and theoretical studies of sand movement under Martian conditions. In-situ observations of sand dunes (informally called the Bagnold Dunes) by Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater, Mars provide the first opportunity to make observations of dunes from the grain-to-dune scale thereby filling the gap in knowledge between theory and orbital observations and refining our understanding of the martian aeolian stratigraphic record. We use the suite of cameras on Curiosity, including Navigation Camera (Navcam), Mast Camera (Mastcam) and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), to make observations of the Bagnold Dunes. Measurements of sedimentary structures are made where stereo images are available. Observations indicate that structures generated by gravity-driven processes on the dune lee slopes, such as grainflow and grainfall, are similar to the suite of aeolian sedimentary structures observed on Earth and should be present and recognizable in Mars' aeolian stratigraphic record. Structures formed by traction-driven processes deviate significantly from those found on Earth. The dune hosts centimeter-scale wind ripples and large, meter-scale ripples, which are not found on Earth. The large ripples migrate across the depositional, lee slopes of the dune, which implies that these structures should be present in Mars' stratigraphic record and may appear similar to compound-dune stratification.The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover Team is acknowledged for their support of this work.

  14. Pratiques budgétaires : proposition d'une typologie

    OpenAIRE

    Sponem, Samuel; Lambert, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    International audience; L'objectif de cet article est de proposer une typologie des pratiques budgétaires afin de mieux comprendre les rôles que le budget remplit et les critiques qui peuvent lui être adressées. A partir d'une analyse classificatoire (taxinomie) des pratiques de 269 entreprises françaises et d'une analyse typologique, cinq styles budgétaires sont identifiés : le budget strict, le budget diagnostic, le budget interactif, le budget souple et le budget indicatif. Ces styles se d...

  15. Constraints on Sterile Neutrino Oscillations using DUNE Near Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) is a proposed long-baseline neutrino experiment in the US with a baseline of 1300 km from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) to Sanford Underground Research Facility, which will house a 40 kt Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) as the far detector. The experiment will also have a fine grained near detector for accurately measuring the initial fluxes. We show that the energy range of the fluxes and baseline of the DUNE near detector is conducive for observing $\

  16. Measuring and modeling coastal dune development in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    De Groot, A.V.; S de Vries; Keijsers, J.G.S.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Q. Ye; Poortinga, A.; Arens, S.M.; Bochev-Van der Burgh, L.M.; K. M. Wijnberg; Schretlen, J.L.; Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the past couple of years, new coastal-dune research has sprung up in the Netherlands. In this paper, we give an overview of ongoing projects at Wageningen UR, Deltares, TU Delft and UTwente: how these are connected and what type of questions are addressed. There is an increasing demand for the understanding and prediction of coastal dune dynamics, both on the short (year) and long (100 years) term. We approach this from a variety of angles: scientific and applied, short-term and long-term,...

  17. 76 FR 57074 - Transfer of Administrative Jurisdiction at or Near Great Sand Dunes National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... National Park Service Transfer of Administrative Jurisdiction at or Near Great Sand Dunes National Park... benefit of Great Sand Dunes National Park, Baca National Wildlife Refuge, and the Rio Grande National... (Secretary) acquired certain lands and interests in land for the benefit of Great Sand Dunes National...

  18. 76 FR 68503 - Ungulate Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Great Sand Dunes National Park and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... National Park Service Ungulate Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Great Sand Dunes National... Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Ungulate Management Plan, Great Sand Dunes... Ungulate Management Plan, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Colorado. The purpose of this...

  19. DUNE as an Example of Sustainable Open Source Scientific Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    Blatt, Makus

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe how DUNE, an open source scientific software framework, is developed. Having a sustainable software framework for the solution of partial differential equations is the main driver of DUNE's development. We take a look how DUNE strives to stay sustainable software.

  20. 36 CFR 28.3 - Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District. 28.3 Section 28.3 Parks, Forests, and Public... General Provisions § 28.3 Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore... Community Development District, the Seashore District, and the Dune District. (b) The Community...

  1. Phase diagrams of dune shape and orientation depending on sand availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain

    2015-09-30

    New evidence indicates that sand availability does not only control dune type but also the underlying dune growth mechanism and the subsequent dune orientation. Here we numerically investigate the development of bedforms in bidirectional wind regimes for two different conditions of sand availability: an erodible sand bed or a localized sand source on a non-erodible ground. These two conditions of sand availability are associated with two independent dune growth mechanisms and, for both of them, we present the complete phase diagrams of dune shape and orientation. On an erodible sand bed, linear dunes are observed over the entire parameter space. Then, the divergence angle and the transport ratio between the two winds control dune orientation and dynamics. For a localized sand source, different dune morphologies are observed depending on the wind regime. There are systematic transitions in dune shape from barchans to linear dunes extending away from the localized sand source, and vice-versa. These transitions are captured fairly by a new dimensionless parameter, which compares the ability of winds to build the dune topography in the two modes of dune orientation.

  2. Modeling the biogeomorphic evolutions of coastal dunes in response to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, J.G.S.; Groot, de A.V.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal dunes form in many parts of the world the first flood defense line against the sea. To study effects of climate change on coastal dune evolution, we used a cellular model of dune, beach and vegetation development (DUBEVEG). The model was calibrated and validated against field measurements of

  3. Upstream sediment input effects on experimental dune trough scour in sediment mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhans, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding causes of dune irregularity, especially dune trough scour, is important for the modeling of vertical sorting of sediment mixtures in morphological models of rivers with sediment mixtures. Sediment in dunes is generally sorted in a fining-upward manner, which affects the sediment transp

  4. Demography and monitoring of Welsh's milkweed (Asclepias welshii) at Coral Pink Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent C. Palmer; L. Armstrong

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented of a 12-year monitoring program on the Coral Pink Sand Dunes and Sand Hills populations of the threatened Welsh's milkweed, Asclepias welshii N & P Holmgren. The species is an early sera1 member of the dune flora, colonizing blowouts and advancing with shifting dunes. When an area stabilizes and other vegetation encroaches, A. welshii is...

  5. Lidar-derived beach morphology (dune crest, dune toe, and shoreline) for U.S. sandy coastlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Kara; Long, Joseph W.; Birchler, Justin; Brenner, Owen T.; Hardy, Matthew; Morgan, Karen L. M.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Torres, Miguel Loubriel

    2017-01-01

    The USGS National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project aims to identify areas of the nation’s coastline that are most vulnerable to extreme storms and long-term shoreline change. These assessments require coastal elevation data across diverse geographic regions and covering a time span of many years.  The datasets published here, organized by individual field activity numbers (FANs), define the dune crest (denoted by DC in the feature_type attribute), dune toe (denoted by DT in the feature_type attribute), and shoreline (denoted by SL in the feature_type attribute) at 10m intervals alongshore for each processed lidar elevation survey. Beach width and beach slope as calculated from dune toe to shoreline are also included at each shoreline location.

  6. Effects of dune stabilization on vegetation characteristics and soil properties at multiple scales in Horqin Sandy Land, Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoAn Zuo; XueYong Zhao; ShaoKun Wang; Xin Zhou; Peng Lv; Jing Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Ecological patterns and processes in dune ecosystems have been a research focus in recent years, however information on how dune stabilization influences vegetation and soil at different spatial scales is still lacking. In this study, we measured vegetation characteristics and soil properties across three spatial scales (10, 100 and 1,000 m2) along gradient dune stabi-lization stages (mobile dune, semi-fixed dune and fixed dune) in Horqin Sandy Land, Northern China. Vegetation cover over all scales significantly increased with degree of dune stabilization, as well as species richness and C/N ratio at 10 m2 scale. Species richness significantly increased with the increase in measured scales at each stage of dune stabilization and was higher in fixed dune than that in mobile dune and semi-fixed dune at 100 and 1,000 m2 scales. Over all scales, aboveground biomass was lower in mobile dune than that in semi-fixed dune and fixed dune, and soil organic C, total N, EC, very fine sand and silt+clay contents were higher in fixed dune than those in mobile dune and semi-fixed dune. These results suggest that along the gradient dune stabilization, species richness has strong spatial scale-dependence, but vege-tation cover, aboveground biomass and soil properties is generally scale independent (i.e., the pattern of response is con-sistent across all scales). Effect of dune stabilization on vegetation and soil over all spatial scales results in the positive correlation among vegetation cover, species richness, biomass, soil organic C, total N, C/N, EC, very fine sand and silt+clay along the gradient dune stabilization. In addition, species richness at the smallest scale (10 m2) has more sensitive response to dune stabilization. Thus, the monitoring strategies at small scales are essential to detect changes of species diversity in semiarid dune ecosystems.

  7. Environmental Controls and Eco-geomorphic Interactions of the Barchan-to-parabolic Dune Stabilisation and the Parabolic-to-barchan Dune Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Baas, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Parabolic dunes are one of a few common aeolian landforms which are highly controlled by eco-geomorphic interactions. Parabolic dunes, on the one hand, can be developed from highly mobile dune landforms, barchans for instance, in an ameliorated vegetation condition; or on the other hand, they can be reactivated and transformed back into mobile dunes due to vegetation deterioration. The fundamental mechanisms and eco-geomorphic interactions controlling both dune transformations remain poorly understood. To bridge the gap between complex processes involved in dune transformations on a relatively long temporal scale and real world monitoring records on a very limited temporal scale, this research has extended the DECAL model to incorporate 'dynamic' growth functions and the different 'growth' of perennial shrubs between growing and non-growing seasons, informed by field measurements and remote sensing analysis, to explore environmental controls and eco-geomorphic interactions of both types of dune transformation. A non-dimensional 'dune stabilising index' is proposed to capture the interactions between environmental controls (i.e. the capabilities of vegetation to withstand wind erosion and sand burial, the sandy substratum thickness, the height of the initial dune, and the sand transport potential), and establish the linkage between these controls and the geometry of a stabilising dune. An example demonstrates how to use the power-law relationship between the dune stabilising index and the normalised migration distance to assist in extrapolating the historical trajectories of transforming dunes. The modelling results also show that a slight increase in vegetation cover of an initial parabolic dune can significantly increase the reactivation threshold of climatic impact (both drought stress and wind strength) required to reactivate a stabilising parabolic dune into a barchan. Four eco-geomorphic interaction zones that govern a barchan-to-parabolic dune transformation

  8. Definition and origin of the dune-field pattern at White Sands, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitis, Elke; Kocurek, Gary; Smith, Virginia; Mohrig, David; Ewing, Ryan C.; Peyret, A.-P. B.

    2014-12-01

    A LiDAR-derived digital elevation model (DEM) of a representative portion of the White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico, allows for characterization of an unprecedented range of dune-field parameters and serves as a basis for pattern analysis. Dune-field parameters were measured and statistically analyzed for populations of dunes selected at random and occurring along transects. Populations sampled by these two different methods are comparable, but highlight the sensitivity of transect placement in a dune field that has pattern heterogeneity. Based upon coefficients of variation, pattern emerges at White Sands primarily because of a strong fabric of crestline orientation, and secondarily because of the regularity of spacing between dunes of similar shape as defined by sinuosity, height and length. Linear regression of dune parameters shows that dune geometric relationships vary primarily with crestline length, but there is little correlation between other parameters, including dune spacing and height. This result highlights the sensitivity of identifying topographic heterogeneity in a LiDAR-derived DEM, given that mean ratios conform to global averages. Stripping off the dunes in Matlab shows a terraced surface, which is interpreted to represent paleo-shorelines formed during relative still stands in the overall retreat of Lake Otero. Elevated bands of higher, more closely spaced dunes occur just leeward of the paleo-shorelines. A revised model for the White Sands Dune Field consists of the basinward progradation of successive dune-field segments. Each segment is associated with a paleo-shoreline, and consists of an upwind dune ridge, represented by the elevated bands, and a leeward dune field.

  9. Climate-driven changes to dune activity during the Last Glacial Maximum and deglaciation in the Mu Us dune field, north-central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Huayu; Yi, Shuangwen; Vandenberghe, Jef; Mason, Joseph A.; Zhou, Yali; Wang, Xianyan

    2015-10-01

    One significant change of terrestrial landscapes in response to past climate change has been the transformation between activity and stability of extensively distributed wind-blown sand dunes. The relations between the dynamics of the aeolian landscape and its drivers are not yet completely understood, however. Evidence of aeolian sand deposition during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is scarce in many mid-latitude dune fields, whereas abundant evidence exists for aeolian sand accumulation during the deglaciation, i.e. after about 15 ka. Whether this contrast actually reflects changes in dune activity is still unclear, making paleoclimatic interpretation uncertain. Comprehensive field investigation and luminescence dating in the Mu Us dune field, north-central China, demonstrates that aeolian sands deposited during the LGM are preserved as fills in periglacial sand wedges and beneath loess deposits near the downwind dune field margin. The scarcity of LGM dune sand elsewhere in the dune field is interpreted as the result of intensive aeolian activity without substantial net sand accumulation. Increasing sand accumulation after 15 ka, reflected by much more extensive preservation, signals a change in sand supply relative to sand transportation through the dune field. Reduced wind strength and other environmental changes including regional permafrost degradation after 15 ka transformed the dune field state from net erosion to net accumulation; the dunes, however, remained largely mobile as they were in the LGM. Similar diverging patterns of dune sand accumulation and preservation before and after 15 ka in many mid-latitude dune fields imply broad climatic controls linked to the changes in high-northern-latitude forcing.

  10. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J R; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-11-17

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune's symmetry axis - that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected.

  11. Reliability of dune erosion assessment along curved coastlines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhout, B.M.; Den Heijer, C.

    2010-01-01

    The dune assessment methods used to ensure the safety of the lower areas in The Netherlands are based on simple empirical relations that are, strictly speaking, only valid for infinitely long, uniform and straight coasts. The wide application of these relations is mainly justified due to intentional

  12. Probabilistic estimation of dune erosion and coastal zone risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal erosion has gained global attention and has been studied for many decades. As a soft sea defence structure, coastal sandy dunes protect coastal zones all over the world, which usually are densely populated areas with tremendous economic value. The coastal zone of the Netherlands, one of the

  13. d'une diplomatie contestée

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les premiers plans d'ajustement structurel mis en place à. Fépoque traduiront cette .... le comportement des Etats ; notamment la définition d'une doc- trine, Félaboration ...... En définitive, la restitution du Sinaï à lÏÉgypte, leva. Thypotheque qui ...

  14. Constraints on sterile neutrino oscillations using DUNE near detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Choubey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment is a proposed long-baseline neutrino experiment in the US with a baseline of 1300 km from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab to Sanford Underground Research Facility, which will house a 40 kt Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC as the far detector. The experiment will also have a fine grained near detector for accurately measuring the initial fluxes. We show that the energy range of the fluxes and baseline of the DUNE near detector is conducive for observing νμ→νe oscillations of Δm2∼ eV2 scale sterile neutrinos, and hence can be effectively used for testing to very high accuracy the reported oscillation signal seen by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments. We study the sensitivity of the DUNE near detector to sterile neutrino oscillations by varying the baseline, detector fiducial mass and systematic uncertainties. We find that the detector mass and baseline of the currently proposed near detector at DUNE will be able to test the entire LSND parameter region with good precision. The dependence of sensitivity on baseline and detector mass is seen to give interesting results, while dependence on systematic uncertainties is seen to be small.

  15. Dew Measurements along a Longitudinal Sand Dune Transect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, A.F.G.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.

    2000-01-01

    In a desert environment dew can serve as an important source of moisture for plants, biological crusts, insects and small animals. A measurement programme was carried out within a sand dune belt situated in the northwestern Negev desert, Israel, to measure daily amounts of dew deposition as well as

  16. European dune slacks : strong interactions of biology, pedogenesis and hydrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.P.; Ernst, W.H.O.; Stuyfzand, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    Dune slacks are a unique type of wetland ecosystem, highly ranked on the international conservation agenda because of the occurrence of many rare and endangered plant species and their associated fauna. Ecologically they present some of the few examples of primary succession seres with a high degree

  17. Constraints on sterile neutrino oscillations using DUNE near detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandhya; Pramanik, Dipyaman

    2017-01-01

    DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) is a proposed long-baseline neutrino experiment in the US with a baseline of 1300 km from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) to Sanford Underground Research Facility, which will house a 40 kt Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) as the far detector. The experiment will also have a fine grained near detector for accurately measuring the initial fluxes. We show that the energy range of the fluxes and baseline of the DUNE near detector is conducive for observing νμ →νe oscillations of Δm2 ∼ eV2 scale sterile neutrinos, and hence can be effectively used for testing to very high accuracy the reported oscillation signal seen by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments. We study the sensitivity of the DUNE near detector to sterile neutrino oscillations by varying the baseline, detector fiducial mass and systematic uncertainties. We find that the detector mass and baseline of the currently proposed near detector at DUNE will be able to test the entire LSND parameter region with good precision. The dependence of sensitivity on baseline and detector mass is seen to give interesting results, while dependence on systematic uncertainties is seen to be small.

  18. Modeling river dune evolution using a parameterization of flow separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries J.; Dohmen-Janssen, C. Marjolein; Hulscher, Susanne J.M.H.; Termes, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an idealized morphodynamic model to predict river dune evolution. The flow field is solved in a vertical plane assuming hydrostatic pressure conditions. The sediment transport is computed using a Meyer-Peter–Müller type of equation, including gravitational bed slope effects and a

  19. [Research progress on plant diversity conservation in sand dune areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-min; Ma, Jun-ling

    2008-01-01

    The landscape in sand dune areas is characterized by the alternate distribution of sand dune and interdune lowland, and the unique floras in these areas are some endemic or rare plant species. In recent years, the decrease in plant species richness and the disappearance of some endemic or rare plant species in these areas have been received special attention, which were listed in the Program of International Biodiversity Conservation, and studied in many countries and districts. In this paper, the research progress in these fields was summarized from the aspects of significance of plant diversity conservation, formation mechanisms of plant diversity, ways of plant diversity conservation, roles of plant diversity research in the development of ecological theories, and important issues in operating plant diversity conservation project. To conserve plant diversity in sand dune areas, attentions should be paid to the differences in conservation goals (to maintain high species richness or to conserve endemic or rare species) among different regions, and the balances between the stabilization of active sand and the conservation of endemic or rare species, and the maintenance of high species richness and the conservation of endemic or rare species. It needed also to consider the sand dune and the interdune lowland as a unified landscape unit to explore the impacts of disturbances and habitat fragment on plant diversity.

  20. Measuring and modeling coastal dune development in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de A.V.; Vries, de S.; Keijsers, J.G.S.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Ye, Q.; Poortinga, A.; Arens, S.M.; Bochev-Van der Burgh, L.M; Wijnberg, K.M.; Schretlen, J.L.M.; Thiel de Vries, van J.S.M.; Kranenburg, W.M.; Horstman, E.M.; Wijnberg, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the past couple of years, new coastal-dune research has sprung up in the Netherlands. In this paper, we give an overview of ongoing projects at Wageningen UR, Deltares, TU Delft and UTwente: how these are connected and what type of questions are addressed. There is an increasing demand for the un

  1. Implications of Grainfall for Avalanches and Barchan Dune Morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nield, J. M.; Wiggs, G.; Baddock, M. C.; Hipondoka, M.

    2016-12-01

    Sediment accumulation on aeolian dunes is predominately though avalanching (or grainflow). This grainflow is initiated by the accumulation of grainfall deposits, close to the dune brink. When the accumulation, or `bulge', exceeds an angle of repose, avalanches are initiated and sediment is transported down the lee of the dune. The location of sediment accumulation, or avalanche initiation point, is determined by the distance that grainfall can travel from the dune brink. While previous studies have focused on determining angles at which avalanches occur, along with depositional flux rates, technical constraints have limited the testing of models to predict grainfall zone dynamics under varying wind conditions. Here we use terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to measure both grainfall distance and associated lee slope surface change of a 5 m high barchan dune under variable wind speeds, on the Skeleton Coast, Namibia. We find that under stronger winds, the distance that grainfall can travel from the brink expands (by up to 0.45 m for a 3 m/s increase in wind speed). Along with this expansion of the grainfall distance there is an increase in saltation flux over the brink. The increased grainfall distance shifts sand further from the brink resulting in dominant avalanche initiation point locations expanding from 0.3 m to 0.4 m for wind speeds above 6 m/s. This shift also corresponds to the appearance of secondary avalanches, which are initiated by primary avalanche lobe deposits extending outside of the main grainfall zone. Ultimately, under stronger winds the expansion of the grainfall distance contributes to the destabilisation and movement of increased sediment volumes down the lee slope. Avalanches under stronger wind speeds, therefore, increase in thickness, width and length, while during weaker wind speeds, most of the grainfall and grainflow is limited to the upper section of the lee slope. The implication of this dual avalanche behaviour under variable wind

  2. Modeling the biogeomorphic evolution of coastal dunes in response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, J. G. S.; De Groot, A. V.; Riksen, M. J. P. M.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal dunes form in many parts of the world the first flood defense line against the sea. To study effects of climate change on coastal dune evolution, we used a cellular model of dune, beach, and vegetation development. The model was calibrated and validated against field measurements of the Dutch coast, showing good performance for 10 year simulations. A sensitivity analysis showed that dune size and morphology are most sensitive to the rate of aeolian input and wave dissipation. Finally, 100 year climate change scenarios were run to establish the impacts of sea level rise and changes in vegetation growth rate on dune evolution. The results are in good agreement with conceptual models of dune evolution. Sea level rise largely determines the direction of dune evolution: the rate of rising controls whether dunes are able to preserve their height or sand volume while migrating landward. The effect of changing vegetation growth rates, resulting from climate change, is most manifest in dune response to large disturbances. If vegetation is removed halfway into the simulation, vegetation growth rate determines whether a foredune will revegetate and recover its height. Low vegetation growth rates result in mobile dunes that lose sand. The good agreement between observations and predictions indicates that the model successfully incorporates the suite of biogeomorphic and marine processes involved in dune building.

  3. Morphology and distribution of common 'sand' dunes on Mars - Comparison with the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, C. S.; Grolier, M. J.; Mccauley, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    A comparative study of Martian and terrestrial dunes was made based on Viking Orbiter pictures and aerial pictures of terrestrial deserts. The morphological similarity between the Martian dunes and terrestrial crescentic dunes implies that the dynamics of dune formation are similar on the two planets, despite Martian constraints on dune formation that include much higher velocity winds required to move 'sand' in saltation, the possible inhibition of sand movement by absorbed water vapor, the seasonal 'snow' cover in the north circumpolar erg, and a probably sparse sand supply. The absence of longitudinal dunes and the restriction of massive crescentic dunes to a few sites on Mars suggests that Mars may have a long eolian history in which much of the sand suitable for saltation has already been transported to the north polar erg and crater floor fields.

  4. Effect of upstream fencing on shelter zone behind solid models simulating sand formations and dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Hassan

    2013-04-01

    Moreover, results indicate that some dune/fence combinations may cause shifting of the dune upwind (instead of downwind in the absence of fence. This effect means that, with such combinations, a dune would eventually disappear. The distance between the model downwind base line and the location of reattachment (length of shelter zone was plotted against the distance of fence from upwind base line of model to determine the best possible dune/fence combination. Solid fencing (constructed from masonry bricks or stones to shelter isolated sand humps and dunes is effective in alleviating dangers on nearby structures (dune shifting upwind and to less sand drift and saltation downwind. Also, the results indicated that, it is recommended to start by dune fencing and give enough time for the project zone to widen and be effectively protected before starting the construction.

  5. Hazard impact and genetic development of sand dunes west of Samalut, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Sayed Ahmed El Gammal

    2010-12-01

    These dunes have their source from Oligocene sand and gravel deposits to the north of the study area and from the substratum. While the sands are shiny and more rounded mat grains in the northern part of these dunes due to fluvial processes, the south sands become more markedly “aeolinized” by including less rounded and striated sand grains. They move and increase in size in the down wind direction. The initiation of linear dunes explanted here west of the Nile Valley where the eastern tails of the lee side of the barchan dunes are longer than the western ones and sometimes these tails are connected with each other forming longitudinal sand dunes. These dunes are in mature stage and the southern dune may be in the last modification stage.

  6. A comparison of seed banks across a sand dune successional gradient at Lake Michigan dunes (Indiana, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht-Young, S. A.; Pavlovic, N.B.; Grundel, R.; Frohnapple, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    In habitats where disturbance is frequent, seed banks are important for the regeneration of vegetation. Sand dune systems are dynamic habitats in which sand movement provides intermittent disturbance. As succession proceeds from bare sand to forest, the disturbance decreases. At Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, we examined the seed banks of three habitat types across a successional gradient: foredunes, secondary dunes, and oak savanna. There were differences among the types of species that germinated from each of the habitats. The mean seed bank density increased across the successional gradient by habitat, from 376 to 433 to 968 seeds m-2, but with foredune and secondary dune seed bank densities being significantly lower than the savanna seed bank density. The number of seeds germinated was significantly correlated with soil organic carbon, demonstrating for this primary successional sequence that seed density increases with stage and age. The seed bank had much lower species richness than that of the aboveground vegetation across all habitats. Among sites within a habitat type, the similarity of species germinated from the seed banks was very low, illustrating the variability of the seed bank even in similar habitat types. These results suggest that restoration of these habitats cannot rely on seed banks alone. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Multi-scale Hydrologic Modeling of the White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, S. M.; Newton, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    The shallow groundwater flow system of White Sands dune field, located within the arid to semi-arid Tularosa Basin of Southern New Mexico, likely stabilizes the base of the largest gypsum dune field in the world. The dune is saturated throughout nearly its entire accumulation thickness, resulting in a shallow water table (adapted to survive there. In response to projected increases in groundwater pumping in the regional Tularosa Basin groundwater system, changes in surface water use, and the threat of climate change, the WHSA is interested in understanding how these changes on a regional scale may impact the shallow dune field aquifer. Mathematical modeling techniques on varying spatial and temporal scales are used to characterize the relative importance of the sources of water (local vs. regional) to the dune aquifer, and to quantify the timescales on which changes may affect the water table in the dune field. A 2-dimensional, dune-scale heat and fluid flow model uses the seasonal temperature fluctuations to estimate the vertical and horizontal flow of water from the regional system to the dune field aquifer. We have also constructed a 2-dimensional, hydrologic model to characterize the regional groundwater flow regime near to the dune aquifer system, as well as across the Tularosa Basin to a depth of 6 km. Additionally, a 3-dimensional, hydrologic model of the Tularosa Basin and the White Sands dune field quantifies hydrologic characteristics, sources and sinks of groundwater in the basin and at the dune field. Computed and observed salinity, groundwater residence times, and water level data are the primary means of model calibration. Preliminary results from the three models indicate the regional groundwater system does contribute flow to the dune aquifer, and that increased pumping may increase drawdown of the regional groundwater system near the dune field. These results indicate the dune is sensitive to regional hydrologic changes.

  8. DuneXpress: dust astronomy with Dune and ConeXpress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, N.; Lera, S.; Srama, R.; Vo, X.; de Kam, J.; Gruen, E.

    We present a mission scenario to implement the Cosmic Dune mission concept (Cosmic dust measurements near Earth) using the ConeXpress platform developed by Dutch Space. We discuss the different strategies for the instrument integration on-board the platform and present a preliminary mission design. Goal of the mission is to reach the Sun-Earth Lagrange point L2. As ConeXpress is propelled with ion engines, a mission design inspired from the Smart 1 mission is developed. The ConeXpress spacecraft benefits of launch opportunities as secondary payload on-board an Ariane 5 rocket and is injected into a classical geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). Starting from this parking orbit, the mission scenario is divided in 3 phases. The first phase consists in raising the orbit perigee as quick as possible up to 20000 km to minimize the spacecraft exposure to the Van Allen radiation belt. During the second phase, the perigee altitude is kept constant, while the apogee altitude is raised up to the Moon's orbit distance. The third phase consists in a Moon swing-by, which injects the spacecraft into a Halo orbit around the Lagrange point L2.

  9. Sedimentological, Mineralogical and Geochemical Characterization of Sand Dunes in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaafi, Mohammed; Abdullatif, Osman

    2014-05-01

    Sedimentological, mineralogical, morphological and geochemical studies of sand dunes from ten locations in Saudi Arabia were conducted in order to determine the differences between them and to find out the provenance and tectonic setting of these sand dunes. Sixty seven samples were collected from different sand dunes types ranging in morphology from linear, barchans, parabolic to stars dunes. In overall, the sand dunes are fine to coarse grained mean grain size, moderately sorted, near symmetrical skewness with mesokurtic distribution characterized sand dunes in most locations. The sand dunes grains are subrounded in all locations except in the Red sea, Qassim, central Arabia and the eastern province which showed sub-angular grains. The main mineral compositions of studied aeolian sand dunes are quartz, feldspar, calcite, and mica. Quartz is the dominant mineral in locations with significant amount of feldspars and mica in Najran, Red sea and Central Arabia locations. Moreover, calcite is present in Sakaka and NW Empty Quarter (Jafurah). Basement related sand dunes in Najran, Central Arabia and Red sea locations are sub-mature in terms of their mineralogical maturity. Whereas, sand dunes in other locations are texturally mature except those from the Red sea which showed sub-mature sand. The sands are classified as quartz arenite, except in the basement related sand dunes in Najran, central Arabia and the Red sea are ranging from sub-arkose, sub-litharenite and lithraenite. Morphologically, parallel to sub-parallel sand ridges with NE-SW orientation occurred in east and north parts of Empty Quarter (Najran and Jafurah) and NW-SE orientation in Dahna and Nafud deserts in central and north regions of Saudi Arabia. Parabolic sand dunes characterized the Nafud desert (Hail, Sakaka, Tayma locations). Barchans and star sand dunes characterize the Empty Quarter (Jafurah). Major, trace, and rare earth elements studies were carried out to determine the composition

  10. Dunes and microdunes on Venus: Why were so few found in the Magellan data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Catherine M.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Greeley, Ronald; Saunders, R. Steven

    1994-01-01

    A search through cycle 1, 2, and 3 Magellan radar data covering 98% of the surface of Venus revealed very few dunes. Only two possible dune fields and several areas that may contain microdunes smaller than the resolution of the images (75 m) were identified. The Aglaonice dune field was identified in the cycle 1 images by the specular returns characteristic of dune faces oriented perpendicular to the radar illumination. Cycle 1 and 2 data of the Fortuna-Meshkenet dune field indicate that there has been no noticeable movement of the dunes over an 8-month period. The dunes, which are oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the radar illumination, appear to be dark features on a brighter substrate. Bright and dark patches that were visible in either cycle 1 or 2 data, but not both, allowed identification of several regions in the southern part of Venus that may contain microdunes. The microdunes are associated with several parabolic crater deposits in the region and are probably similar to those formed in wind tunnel experiments under Venus-like conditions. Bragg scattering and/or subpixel relfections from the near-normal face on asymmetric microdunes may account for these bright and dark patches. Look-angle effects and the lack of sufficient sand-size particles seem to be most likely reasons so few dunes were identified in Magellan data. Insufficient wind speeds, thinness of sand cover, and difficulty in identifying isolated dunes may also be contributors to the scarcity of dunes.

  11. Numerical and experimental study of flow over stages of an offset merger dune interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Tang, Zhanqi; Bristow, Nathaniel; Blois, Gianluca; Christensen, Ken; Anderson, William

    2016-11-01

    Results of unidirectional turbulent flows over barchan dunes at high Reynolds number are presented. In order to capture the inertial-dominated dynamics typical of these environmental flows, complementary large-eddy simulations (LES) and experimental measurements have been used. A series of dune field topographies have been considered wherein a small dune is positioned at different positions upflow of a large dune, from a spanwise-offset position. The smaller dune is geometrically similar, but one-eighth the volume of the larger dune, thus replicating instantaneous realizations during actual dune interactions in laboratory or natural settings. Experimental measurement and LES are both used to study these configurations, with strong agreement reported between resultant datasets. We report that flow channeling in the interdune space induces a mean flow heterogeneity - termed "wake veering" - in which the location of maximum momentum deficit in the dune wake is spanwise-displaced. Elevated turbulent stresses are observed in the shear layers flanking the channeling flow. Finally, spatial distributions of surface stress from LES have been used to identify locations of elevated erosion, predicting bedform migration patterns. Results show that locations of minimal erosion - whether associated with upflow sheltering or with vanishing spatial gradients of dune height - constitute spatial "junctions" of coalescing, proximal dunes. National Science Foundation, Grant # CBET-1603254.

  12. Dynamic changes of a typical linear dune in the Tengger Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KeCun ZHANG; KenJi KAI; JianJun QU; YuQuan LING; QingHe NIU

    2010-01-01

    The dynamical processes of a typical linear dune including morphological features,dune ridge swing range and crest height were investigated at different monitoring periods in the hinterland of Tengger Desert.The results indicated that the development of linear dune depends on not only the northwesterly prevailing wind,but also the winds from northeast and southwest.The dune ridge swayed along its fundamental strike and took on an eastward movement gradually.The original dune strike was NW70° on August 3,1994,and then changed to NE15° on April 21,2001.The dune crest increased by 1.8 m longitudinally,which manifested strong wind-blown sand activities in this region.Wind erosion frequently occured at the bottom of sand dune,while sand accumulation appeared on its mid-upper section.The mean wind erosion depth was 25 cm on the bottom of linear dune and the height difference of the control points on the dune's ridge was 1.13 m.Although the linear dune swayed laterally,the horizontal displacement of its ridge moved eastward 5.8 m averagely.The swing range of the dune crest line is very distinct,with a maximum value of 13.2 m.The highest site on the K-profile swayed on both sides of the dune ridge and the heights were 19.88 m at the control point K2,19.61 m at K6 and 19.05 m at K7,respectively.The results indicated that the lateral swing of the linear dune was distinct under the northwesterly wind and it moved toward east gradually.

  13. Valles Marineris Dune Fields as Seen From the HiRISE, CTX and THEMIS Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, M.; Moersch, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Dune fields on Mars offer an opportunity to investigate the nature of eroded sediments and their interactions with the atmosphere. We examined 20 dune fields in Valles Marineris (VM) from the Mars Global Digital Dune Database [Hayward et al., 2007] to identify significant trends in composition, thermophysical properties, morphology and origin. Dune fields were examined in terms of: slopes, albedo, dust index, thermal inertia and the corresponding derived particle size. We have used image data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) instruments CTX [McEwen et al., 2006] and HiRISE [Malin et al., 2007] to establish geologic context for the dune fields, and in particular, to examine their relationships to neighboring geologic units. In general, VM dune fields display greater topographic relief and closer proximity to their inferred source regions than is typical for dune fields elsewhere on Mars. These dunes have a relatively high TES-derived thermal inertia mean value (394 Jm-2K-1 s-1/2, units hereafter assumed), which corresponds to ~1000 μm grains [Pelkey et al., 2001] or very coarse sand sizes. In contrast, typical non-VM dunes have a lower thermal inertia value of ~250, corresponding to ~350 μm grains. To investigate this more closely, high-resolution THEMIS-derived thermal inertia maps were created [Putzig et al., 2004]. CTX and HiRISE visible images revealed that bedrock outcrops are commonly found within dune fields, erroneously elevating the TES thermal inertia values over the ~3x5-km TES footprint. However, even after excluding intra-dune outcrop areas using higher-resolution THEMIS data, several VM dune fields have anomalously high thermal inertia values (>500) compared with non-VM dune fields. It is possible that the high thermal inertia values are indicative of indurated (fossilized) dune surfaces, rather than large individual grain sizes. Coprates Chasma contains a concentration of 6 dune fields both within the main chasm and in depressions to the

  14. Possibility of star (pyramid) dune development in the area of bimodal wind regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biejat, K.

    2012-04-01

    Star (pyramid) dunes are the largest aeolian landforms. They can occur in three types - simple, complex and compound. Development of this type of dunes is usually connected with multidirectional or complex wind regimes. The aim of this study was to verify a hypothesis that the star dunes can also develop by a bimodal wind regime and by local modifications of nearsurface wind flow directions. Field study was performed on Erg Chebbi, in southern Morocco. Several star and transverse dunes were selected for the study of their shape. The star dunes were analysed concerning their type and position in the dune field. This erg contains all of three types of star dunes together with transverse dunes. The regional wind data show that there are two dominant wind directions - NE (Chergui) and SW (Saheli). To determine the difference in shape of star dunes, we performed topographic surveying by GPS RTK. The results allowed to create 3D models of star dunes. The models were used to determine metric characteristics of star dunes, including area of dune basis, volume, and slope angles. On the basis of 3D models, primary, secondary and, on the compound dunes, tertiary arms were determined. Primary arms on each type of star dunes, as well as crestlines of transverse dunes, have dominant orientation NW-SE, perpendicular to two dominant wind directions. This clearly confirms that star dunes of Erg Chebbi develop by a bimodal wind regime In contrast to primary arms, subsidiary (secondary and tertiary) arms are not connected to general wind regime. The secondary arms of star dunes occur to be differentially developer. There are more subsidiary arms on SW sides in comparison to the E sides of the dunes where inclination of slopes is constant. It can be therefore inferred that sand has been supplied predominantly from SW direction. This is supported by distribution of the dunes on the erg. Most compound star dunes compose a chain along the E margin of the erg. Comparison of compound star

  15. A pressurized argon gas TPC as DUNE near detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin-Albo, J

    2016-01-01

    DUNE is a new international experiment for neutrino physics and nucleon decay searches. It will consist of two detectors, about 1300 km apart, exposed to a multi-megawatt neutrino beam that will be built at Fermilab. One of the two detectors will be installed several hundred meters downstream of the neutrino production point with the primary role of characterising the energy spectrum and composition of the beam as well as performing precision measurements of neutrino cross sections. For the design of this so-called near detector, the DUNE Collaboration is considering, among other technologies, a pressurized argon gas time projection chamber. Such a detector, thanks to its low density and low detection thresholds, would allow the detailed measurement in argon of nuclear effects at the neutrino interaction vertex, which are considered at present one of the most important sources of systematic uncertainty for neutrino oscillation measurements.

  16. Large eddy simulation of water flow over series of dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun LU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Large eddy simulation was used to investigate the spatial development of open channel flow over a series of dunes. The three-dimensional filtered Navier-Stokes (N-S equations were numerically solved with the fractional-step method in sigma coordinates. The subgrid-scale turbulent stress was modeled with a dynamic coherent eddy viscosity model proposed by the authors. The computed velocity profiles are in good agreement with the available experimental results. The mean velocity and the turbulent Reynolds stress affected by a series of dune-shaped structures were compared and analyzed. The variation of turbulence statistics along the flow direction affected by the wavy bottom roughness has been studied. The turbulent boundary layer in a complex geographic environment can be simulated well with the proposed large eddy simulation (LES model.

  17. Geologic map of Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madole, Richard F.; VanSistine, D. Paco; Romig, Joseph H.

    2016-10-20

    Geologic mapping was begun after a range fire swept the area of what is now the Great Sand Dunes National Park in April 2000. The park spans an area of 437 square kilometers (or about 169 square miles), of which 98 percent is blanketed by sediment of Quaternary age, the Holocene and Pleistocene Epochs; hence, this geologic map of the Great Sand Dunes National Park is essentially a surficial geologic map. These surficial deposits are diverse and include sediment of eolian (windblown), alluvial (stream and sheetwash), palustrine (wetlands and marshes), lacustrine (lake), and mass-wasting (landslides) origin. Sediment of middle and late Holocene age, from about 8,000 years ago to the present, covers about 80 percent of the park.Fluctuations in groundwater level during Holocene time caused wetlands on the nearby lowland that bounds the park on the west to alternately expand and contract. These fluctuations controlled the stability or instability of eolian sand deposits on the downwind (eastern) side of the lowland. When groundwater level rose, playas became lakes, and wet or marshy areas formed in many places. When the water table rose, spring-fed streams filled their channels and valley floors with sediment. Conversely, when groundwater level fell, spring-fed streams incised their valley floors, and lakes, ponds, and marshes dried up and became sources of windblown sand.Discharge in streams draining the west flank of the Sangre de Cristo Range is controlled primarily by snowmelt and flow is perennial until it reaches the mountain front, beyond which streams begin losing water at a high rate as the water soaks into the creek beds. Even streams originating in the larger drainage basins, such as Sand and Medano Creeks, generally do not extend much more than 4 km (about 2.5 miles) beyond where they exit the mountains.The Great Sand Dunes contain the tallest dunes (maximum height about 750 feet, or 230 m) in North America. These dunes cover an area of 72 square kilometers

  18. Dune-like dynamic of Martian Aeolian large ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D. A.; Yizhaq, H.; Esposito, F.

    2016-08-01

    Martian dunes are sculpted by meter-scale bed forms, which have been interpreted as wind ripples based on orbital data. Because aeolian ripples tend to orient and migrate transversely to the last sand-moving wind, they have been widely used as wind vanes on Earth and Mars. In this report we show that Martian large ripples are dynamically different from Earth's ripples. By remotely monitoring their evolution within the Mars Science Laboratory landing site, we show that these bed forms evolve longitudinally with minimal lateral migration in a time-span of ~ six terrestrial years. Our observations suggest that the large Martian ripples can record more than one wind direction and that in certain cases they are more similar to linear dunes from a dynamic point of view. Consequently, the assumption of the transverse nature of the large Martian ripples must be used with caution when using these features to derive wind directions.

  19. Polar Dunes In Summer Exhibit Frost Patches, Wind Streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Mars Global Surveyor passes over the north polar region of the red planet twelve times each day, offering many opportunities to observe how the polar cap frosts and dunes are changing as the days goby. Right now it is summer in the north. This picture, taken the second week of April 1999, shows darks and dunes and remnant patches of bright frost left over from the winter that ended in July 1998. Dark streaks indicate recent movement of sand. The picture covers an area only 1.4 kilometers (0.9 miles)across and is illuminated from the upper right. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  20. Dynamics of Unusual Debris Flows on Martian Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Dohm, James M.; Baker, Victor R.; Beyer, Ross A.; Bourke, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Gullies that dissect sand dunes in Russell impact crater often display debris flow-like deposits in their distal reaches. The possible range of both the rheological properties and the flow rates are estimated using a numerical simulation code of a Bingham plastic flow to help explain the formation of these features. Our simulated results are best explained by a rapid debris flow. For example, a debris flow with the viscosity of 10(exp 2) Pa s and the yield strength of 10(exp 2) Pa can form the observed deposits with a flow rate of 0.5 cu m/s sustained over several minutes and total discharged water volume on the order of hundreds of cubic meters, which may be produced by melting a surface layer of interstitial ice within the dune deposits to several centimeters depth.

  1. Modelling Spatial Patterns of Vegetation in Desert Sand Dunes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A stochastic numerical approach was developed to model the actual standing biomass in the sand dunes of the northwestern Negev (Israel) and probable boundary conditions that may be responsible for the vegetation patterns investigated in detail. Our results for several variables characteristic for the prevailing climate, geomorphology, hydrology and biologicy at four measurement stations along a transect from northwest to southeast allowed for the development of a stochastic model for biomass distribution over the entire sand dune field (mesoscale) and at Nizzana experimental station (microscale). With this equation it was possible to compute andinterpolate a biomass index value for each grid point on the mesoscale and micro scale. The spatial distribution of biomass is negatively linked to distance from the sea, to rainfall and relief energy.

  2. Dynamics of unusual debris flows on Martian sand dunes

    OpenAIRE

    Bourke, Mary

    2004-01-01

    PUBLISHED Gullies that dissect sand dunes in Russell impact crater often display debris flow-like deposits in their distal reaches. The possible range of both the rheological properties and the flow rates are estimated using a numerical simulation code of a Bingham plastic flow to help explain the formation of these features. Our simulated results are best explained by a rapid debris flow. For example, a debris flow with the viscosity of 10 2 Pa s and the yiel...

  3. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, O.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand / biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  4. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  5. Evidence for sensitivity of dune wetlands to groundwater nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhymes, Jennifer; Wallace, Hilary; Fenner, Nathalie; Jones, Laurence

    2014-08-15

    Dune slacks are seasonal wetlands, high in biodiversity, which experience considerable within-year and between-year variations in water-table. They are subject to many pressures including climate change, land use change and eutrophication. Despite their biological importance and the threats facing them, the hydrological and nutrient parameters that influence their soil properties and biodiversity are poorly understood and there have been no empirical studies to date testing for biological effects in dune systems resulting from groundwater nutrients at low concentrations. In this study we examined the impact of groundwater nutrients on water chemistry, soil chemistry and vegetation composition of dune slacks at three distance classes (0-150 m, 150-300 m, 300-450 m) away from known (off-site) nutrient sources at Aberffraw dunes in North Wales, whilst accounting for differences in water-table regime. Groundwater nitrate and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and soil nitrate and nitrite all had significantly higher concentrations closest to the nutrient source. Multivariate analysis showed that although plant species composition within this site was primarily controlled by water table depth and water table fluctuation, nitrogen from groundwater also influenced species composition, independently of water table and soil development. A model containing all hydrological parameters explained 17% of the total species variance; an additional 7% was explained following the addition of NO3 to this model. Areas exposed to elevated, but still relatively low, groundwater nutrient concentrations (mean 0.204 mg/L+/-0.091 of DIN) had greater abundance of nitrophilous species and fewer basipholous species than in areas with lower concentrations. This shows that clear biological impact occurs below previously suggested DIN thresholds of 0.20-0.40 (mg/L).

  6. Interdisciplinary Research Produces Results in the Understanding of Planetary Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Timothy N.; Hayward, Rosalyn Kay; Bourke, Mary C.

    2010-08-01

    Second International Planetary Dunes Workshop: Planetary Analogs—Integrating Models, Remote Sensing, and Field Data; Alamosa, Colorado, 18-21 May 2010; Dunes and other eolian bed forms are prominent on several planetary bodies in our solar system. Despite 4 decades of study, many questions remain regarding the composition, age, and origins of these features, as well as the climatic conditions under which they formed. Recently acquired data from orbiters and rovers, together with terrestrial analogs and numerical models, are providing new insights into Martian sand dunes, as well as eolian bed forms on other terrestrial planetary bodies (e.g., Titan). As a means of bringing together terrestrial and planetary researchers from diverse backgrounds with the goal of fostering collaborative interdisciplinary research, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Carl Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, the Desert Research Institute, and the U.S. National Park Service held a workshop in Colorado. The small group setting facilitated intensive discussion of problems and issues associated with eolian processes on Earth, Mars, and Titan.

  7. PLANT COMMUNITIES ON COASTAL DUNES IN LAZIO (ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. STANISCI

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the paper is to describe the conservation state of the dune plant communities of Lazio (central Italy, using both original and already published phytosociological relevés. This case study in particular analyses the effects of human disturbance on the species composition and the vegetation zonation in coastal sandy landscape, already classified in three land facets. 13 plant associations were recognised and 9 of them were identified as potential natural vegetation types for the sandy coastal ecosystems of Lazio. Incidence of ruderal species and alien taxa were calculated for each plant community and for each land facet. The results have produced evidence that, even if Lazio coastline is largely occupied by human settlements or infrastructures, several sites still preserve an high plant communities diversity and few alien taxa inside the natural habitats occur. On the contrary where the human impact is intense, dune plant communities disappear or if they are still present, the vegetation zonation is incomplete, ruderals are abundant and alien species are locally common. A data-base of dune plant diversity was realised for a monitoring purpose.

  8. UAVS TO ASSESS THE EVOLUTION OF EMBRYO DUNES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Taddia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The balance of a coastal environment is particularly complex: the continuous formation of dunes, their destruction as a result of violent storms, the growth of vegetation and the consequent growth of the dunes themselves are phenomena that significantly affect this balance. This work presents an approach to the long-term monitoring of a complex dune system by means of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs. Four different surveys were carried out between November 2015 and November 2016. Aerial photogrammetric data were acquired during flights by a DJI Phantom 2 and a DJI Phantom 3 with cameras in a nadiral arrangement. GNSS receivers in Network Real Time Kinematic (NRTK mode were used to frame models in the European Terrestrial Reference System. Processing of the captured images consisted in reconstruction of a three-dimensional model using the principles of Structure from Motion (SfM. Particular care was necessary due to the vegetation: filtering of the dense cloud, mainly based on slope detection, was performed to minimize this issue. Final products of the SfM approach were represented by Digital Elevation Models (DEMs of the sandy coastal environment. Each model was validated by comparison through specially surveyed points. Other analyses were also performed, such as cross sections and computing elevation variations over time. The use of digital photogrammetry by UAVs is particularly reliable: fast acquisition of the images, reconstruction of high-density point clouds, high resolution of final elevation models, as well as flexibility, low cost and accuracy comparable with other available techniques.

  9. Herschel DUNES Observations of Cold Debris Disks Around Nearby Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Aki; Eiroa, C.; DUNES Team

    2011-01-01

    The DUNES (DUst discs around NEarby Stars) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory is a sensitivity-limited photometric survey for faint, cold debris disks around nearby FGK stars. It takes advantage of the PACS and SPIRE instruments to detect and characterize cold disks as faint as Ldust/Lstar 10-7 - 10-6, at dust temperatures around 30 - 40 K. Such systems are extrasolar analogues of Solar System's Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB). DUNES will observe a statistically significant, volume-limited (d Stars at larger distances (d DUNES sample has been observed to date. Our goal of detecting very faint, cold dust disks has been achieved; many disks are also spatially resolved. The unresolved disks show a variety of spectral energy distributions, some suggesting the presence of cold EKB-like dust rings. A number of previously unknown debris disks have been detected, including the coldest disks yet found. Preliminary results relating disk properties to the host star parameters will be shown.

  10. Complementarity Between Hyperkamiokande and DUNE in Determining Neutrino Oscillation Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Fukasawa, Shinya; Yasuda, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy, the octant of the mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ and the CP phase $\\delta_{CP}$ in the future long baseline experiments T2HK and DUNE as well as in the atmospheric neutrino observation at Hyperkamiokande (HK). These three experiments have the excellent facility to discover the above mentioned neutrino oscillation parameters in terms of both statistics and matter effect. In our analysis we find that the sensitivity is enhanced greatly if we combine these three experiments. Our results show that the hierarchy sensitivity of both T2HK and HK are limited due to the presence of parameter degeneracy. But this degeneracy is removed when T2HK and HK are added together. With T2HK+HK (DUNE), the neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined at least at $ 5 \\sigma$ (8\\,$\\sigma$) C.L. for any value of true $\\delta_{CP}$. With T2HK+HK+DUNE the significance of the mass hierarchy increases to almost 15 $\\sigma$ for the unfavorable value of $\\delta_{CP}$. Fo...

  11. Sensitivities to charged-current nonstandard neutrino interactions at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Bakhti, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of charged-current nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSIs) at the source and at the detector in the simulated data for the planned Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), while neglecting the neutral-current NSIs at the propagation. We study the effects of NSIs on the simultaneous measurements of $\\theta_{23}$ and $ \\delta _{CP} $ in the DUNE. The analysis reveals that 3$\\sigma $ C.L. measurement of the correct octant of $\\theta _{23}$ in the standard mixing scenario is spoiled if NSIs are taken into account. Likewise, the NSIs can deteriorate the uncertainty of the $\\delta _{CP}$ measurement by a factor of two relative to that in the standard oscillation scenario. We further show that the source and the detector NSIs can induce a significant amount of fake CP-violation and the no fake CP-violation case can be excluded by more than 99\\% C.L. We also find the potential of DUNE to constrain the relevant charged-current NSI parameters from the single parameter fits for both neutr...

  12. Unravelling raked linear dunes to explain the coexistence of bedforms in complex dunefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Ping; Narteau, Clément; Dong, Zhibao; Rozier, Olivier; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Raked linear dunes keep a constant orientation for considerable distances with a marked asymmetry between a periodic pattern of semi-crescentic structures on one side and a continuous slope on the other. Here we show that this shape is associated with a steady-state dune type arising from the coexistence of two dune growth mechanisms. Primary ridges elongate in the direction of the resultant sand flux. Semi-crescentic structures result from the development of superimposed dunes growing perpendicularly to the maximum gross bedform-normal transport. In the particular case of raked linear dunes, these two mechanisms produces primary and secondary ridges with similar height but with different orientations, which are oblique to each other. The raked pattern develops preferentially on the leeward side of the primary ridges according to the direction of propagation of the superimposed bedforms. As shown by numerical modelling, raked linear dunes occur where both these oblique orientations and dynamics are met. PMID:28128195

  13. Evidence for community structure and habitat partitioning in coastal dune stiletto flies at the Guadalupe-Nipomo dunes system, California

    OpenAIRE

    Holston, Kevin C.

    2005-01-01

    This study provides empirical evidence for habitat selection by North American species of stiletto flies (Diptera: Therevidae), based on local distributions of adults and immatures, and the first hypothesis of community assemblages proposed for a stiletto fly community. Sites at three localities within the Guadalupe-Nipomo dune system were sampled for stiletto flies in 1997 and 2001 by sifting sand, malaise trapping, and hand netting. Nine species were collected from four ecological zones and...

  14. Monitoring and analysis of sand dune movement and growth on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redsteer, Margaret Hiza; Bogle, Rian C.; Vogel, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Recurring drought and rising temperatures have caused reactivation and renewed growth of sand dunes on the lands of the Navajo Nation on the Colorado Plateau. Migrating dunes threaten health, housing, and transportation pathways. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are conducting research to better understand the processes of dune growth and movement. This research will provide critical data to the Native peoples of the region in their response to the changing environment.

  15. Dynamic changes of a typical linear dune in the Tengger Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The dynamical processes of a typical linear dune including morphological features, dune ridge swing range and crest height were investigated at different monitoring periods in the hinterland of Tengger Desert. The results indicated that the development of linear dune depends on not only the northwesterly prevailing wind, but also the winds from northeast and southwest. The dune ridge swayed along its fundamental strike and took on an eastward movement gradually. The original dune strike was NW70° on August 3, 1994, and then changed to NE15° on April 21, 2001. The dune crest increased by 1.8 m longitudinally, which manifested strong wind-blown sand activities in this region. Wind erosion frequently occured at the bottom of sand dune, while sand accumulation appeared on its mid-upper section. The mean wind erosion depth was 25 cm on the bottom of linear dune and the height difference of the control points on the dune’s ridge was 1.13 m. Although the linear dune swayed laterally, the horizontal displacement of its ridge moved eastward 5.8 m averagely. The swing range of the dune crest line is very distinct, with a maximum value of 13.2 m. The highest site on the K-profile swayed on both sides of the dune ridge and the heights were 19.88 m at the control point K5, 19.61 m at K6 and 19.05 m at K7, respectively. The results indicated that the lateral swing of the linear dune was distinct under the northwesterly wind and it moved toward east gradually.

  16. Local Circulation Maintains the Coexistence of Lake-dune Pattern in the Badain Jaran Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kecun; Cai, Diwen; Ao, Yinhuan; An, Zhishan; Guo, Zichen

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies proposed various hypotheses to the formation of the mega-dunes and water recharge of the lakes in the Badain Jaran Desert but left the coexistence of lake-dune pattern unsolved. This research found that the local circulation, generated from the differences of thermodynamic properties and the unique landscape settings between lakes and mega-dunes, can be applied to interpret the pattern.

  17. Cassini SAR, radiometry, scatterometry and altimetry observations of Titan's dune fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Gall A.; Janssen, M.A.; Wye, L.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Radebaugh, J.; Savage, C.; Zebker, H.; Lorenz, R.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Kirk, R.L.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Wall, S.; Callahan, P.; Stofan, E.R.; Farr, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Large expanses of linear dunes cover Titan's equatorial regions. As the Cassini mission continues, more dune fields are becoming unveiled and examined by the microwave radar in all its modes of operation (SAR, radiometry, scatterometry, altimetry) and with an increasing variety of observational geometries. In this paper, we report on Cassini's radar instrument observations of the dune fields mapped through May 2009 and present our key findings in terms of Titan's geology and climate. We estimate that dune fields cover ???12.5% of Titan's surface, which corresponds to an area of ???10millionkm2, roughly the area of the United States. If dune sand-sized particles are mainly composed of solid organics as suggested by VIMS observations (Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and atmospheric modeling and supported by radiometry data, dune fields are the largest known organic reservoir on Titan. Dune regions are, with the exception of the polar lakes and seas, the least reflective and most emissive features on this moon. Interestingly, we also find a latitudinal dependence in the dune field microwave properties: up to a latitude of ???11??, dune fields tend to become less emissive and brighter as one moves northward. Above ???11?? this trend is reversed. The microwave signatures of the dune regions are thought to be primarily controlled by the interdune proportion (relative to that of the dune), roughness and degree of sand cover. In agreement with radiometry and scatterometry observations, SAR images suggest that the fraction of interdunes increases northward up to a latitude of ???14??. In general, scattering from the subsurface (volume scattering and surface scattering from buried interfaces) makes interdunal regions brighter than the dunes. The observed latitudinal trend may therefore also be partially caused by a gradual thinning of the interdunal sand cover or surrounding sand sheets to the north, thus allowing wave penetration in the underlying

  18. Coastal dune activity and foredune formation on Moreton Island, Australia, 1944-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Noam; Jablon, Pierre-Elie; Phinn, Stuart; Collins, Kerry

    2017-04-01

    The stabilization process of coastal dunes is complex, involving feedback mechanisms and lag times between changes in climatic conditions, vegetation establishment and dune movement. In this study our aim was to examine changes in dune activity and in the establishment of foredunes on Moreton Island, Australia. We used historical aerial photos, satellite images and Lidar data to quantify changes in bare sand areas, dune movement rates, foredune development and coastline changes between 1944 and 2015. We used wind data (1957-2016), to quantify changes in sand drift potential (DP) and in wind directionality, and wave data (1977-2016) to examine changes in wave height and wave direction. We found that transgressive dunes on Moreton Island have started stabilizing in the early 1970s, after a series of continuous foredunes developed on the eastern coast of Moreton Island, in spite of the increase in DP values. Foredunes have started establishing in the 1960s and 1970s during a period of lower wave height and decreased wind directionality. Once established, these foredunes have diminished sand supply to the transgressive dunes, causing a phase shift in the state of dune activity on the island. Coastal dune activity should therefore be examined over time scales of several decades at least, in order to quantify trends and to understand the underlying and causes to observed processes. Understanding the factors responsible for foredune formation is important for explaining dune stabilization on Moreton Island.

  19. An integrated model for dune morphology and sand fluxes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, K. D.; Bridges, N. T.; Ayoub, F.; Newman, C. E.; Quade, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    The transport and deposition of sand is the most prevalent agent of landscape modification on Mars today, with fluxes comparable to some sand dunes on Earth. Until now, the relationship between sand flux and dune field morphology has been poorly constrained. By tracking dune movement over ∼10 km-long dune fields in Herschel Crater and Nili Patera, representative of many dune fields on Mars, we find a downwind flux decrease that correlates with a sequence of changing morphology from barchans to barchanoids and seifs (longitudinal dunes) to isolated dome dunes and ending with sand sheets. We show empirical consistency with atmospheric Internal Boundary Layer (IBL) theory which can describe these broad flux and morphology changes in Martian dune fields. Deviations from IBL flux predictions are from wind streamline compressions up slopes, leading to a speedup effect. By establishing a dune field morphology type example and correlating it with measured and predicted flux changes, we provide an integrated morphology and flux model that can be applied to other areas of Mars and be used to infer paleo-environmental conditions from preserved sandstone.

  20. Restoration of Dune Habitats in Østerild Klitplantage - Baseline Monitoring 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Bettina; Wind, Peter; Ejrnæs, Rasmus

    will lead to clear-felling of up to 266 ha coniferous dune plantations. The agreement parties decided that the vegetation development from coniferous forest to open dune habitats should be monitored. The monitoring programme includes a recording of soil conditions and plant species composition...... prior to clear-cutting of the coniferous dune plantations (baseline monitoring) and a systematic recording of the changes during the first 10 years of the succession towards open dune habitats (postconstruction monitoring). This report presents the sites and plots included in the monitoring programme...

  1. Sand dune patterns on Titan controlled by long-term climate cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Hayes, Alex G.; Lucas, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Linear sand dunes cover the equatorial latitudes of Saturn's moon Titan and are shaped by global wind patterns. These dunes are thought to reflect present-day diurnal, tidal and seasonal winds, but climate models have failed to reproduce observed dune morphologies with these wind patterns. Dunes diagnostic of a specific wind or formative timescale have remained elusive. Here we analyse radar imagery from NASA's Cassini spacecraft and identify barchan, star and reoriented dunes in sediment-limited regions of Titan's equatorial dune fields that diverge by 23° on average from the orientation of linear dunes. These morphologies imply shifts in wind direction and sediment availability. Using a numerical model, we estimate that the observed reorientation of dune crests to a change in wind direction would have taken around 3,000 Saturn years (1 Saturn year ~ 29.4 Earth years) or longer--a timescale that exceeds diurnal, seasonal or tidal cycles. We propose that shifts in winds and sediment availability are the product of long-term climate cycles associated with variations in Saturn's orbit. Orbitally controlled landscape evolution--also proposed to explain the distribution of Titan's polar lakes--implies a dune-forming climate on equatorial Titan that is analogous to Earth.

  2. Giant aeolian dune size determined by the average depth of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudin, P.; Fourrière, A.; Andreotti, B.; Murray, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Depending on the wind regime, sand dunes exhibit linear, crescent-shaped or star-like forms resulting from the interaction between dune morphology and sand transport. Small-scale dunes form by destabilization of the sand bed with a wavelength (a few tens of metres) determined by the sand transport saturation length. The mechanisms controlling the formation of giant dunes, and in particular accounting for their typical time and length scales, have remained unknown. Using a combination of field measurements and aerodynamic calculations, we show here that the growth of aeolian giant dunes, ascribed to the nonlinear interaction between small-scale superimposed dunes, is limited by the confinement of the flow within the atmospheric boundary layer. Aeolian giant dunes and river dunes form by similar processes, with the thermal inversion layer that caps the convective boundary layer in the atmosphere acting analogously to the water surface in rivers. In both cases, the bed topography excites surface waves on the interface that in turn modify the near-bed flow velocity. This mechanism is a stabilizing process that prevents the scale of the pattern from coarsening beyond the resonant condition. Our results can explain the mean spacing of aeolian giant dunes ranging from 300 m in coastal terrestrial deserts to 3.5 km. We propose that our findings could serve as a starting point for the modelling of long-term evolution of desert landscapes under specific wind regimes.

  3. Normal incidence measurement in a subaqueous sand dune field in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Chang, Andrea Y Y

    2014-11-01

    Regions with subaqueous sand dunes have been discovered on the upper continental slope of the northern South China Sea. These large subaqueous sand dunes are expected to cause errors in the measurement of normal incidence reflection. This letter presents experiment results of two normal incidence survey tracks conducted in 2013, and the errors in reflection coefficient estimation and the resulting sediment properties induced by sand dune bedforms. The results demonstrate that the reflected energy is focused and scattered by different parts of sand dune bedforms and that they produce significant variation in the estimated reflection coefficients and the inverted geoacoustic properties.

  4. Restoration of Dune Habitats in Østerild Klitplantage - Baseline Monitoring 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Bettina; Wind, Peter; Ejrnæs, Rasmus

    will lead to clear-felling of up to 266 ha coniferous dune plantations. The agreement parties decided that the vegetation development from coniferous forest to open dune habitats should be monitored. The monitoring programme includes a recording of soil conditions and plant species composition...... prior to clear-cutting of the coniferous dune plantations (baseline monitoring) and a systematic recording of the changes during the first 10 years of the succession towards open dune habitats (postconstruction monitoring). This report presents the sites and plots included in the monitoring programme...

  5. Dune formation on the Cooper Creek floodplain, Strzelecki Desert, Australia - first results of morphodynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryger, Mateusz; Bubenzer, Olaf; Parteli, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Linear Dunes, which align longitudinally to the resultant wind vector, are the prevailing type of the south-north trending and partially vegetated dunes in the Strzelecki Desert, Australia. However, particularly on the Cooper Creek floodplain near Innamincka, striking complex dune features consisting of transversely oriented east-west trending dunes occur. These transverse dunes extend over several kilometers and are superimposed by linear dunes that elongate northwards and are separated by sandy swales. The aeolian features in the Strzelecki Desert are the result of interrelated late quaternary aeolian and fluvial activity and serve, thus, as archives providing information about variations in palaeoclimate and potential changes in fluvial sediment supply and wind strength and directionality. However, since the dunes are currently mostly stabilized by vegetation, it is uncertain whether their formation can be explained by the contemporary wind systems. To understand the dynamic processes underlying the genesis of the dune field in the Strzelecki Desert, the role of vegetation and the wind regimes leading to the observed dune patterns must be elucidated. Here we investigate the formative processes of the dune features occurring on the Cooper Creek floodplain by means of morphodynamic modeling of aeolian sand transport and dune formation in presence of vegetation growth. Our simulations show that a source-bordering dune can be formed out of the sediments of seasonally exposed sandbars of the palaeo-Cooper system by a unidirectional wind, which explains the emergence of the transverse dunes in the field. Moreover, a shift in the wind regime to obtuse bidirectional wind flows combined with a rapid decrease in the vegetation cover leads to the formation of linear dunes on the surface and in the lee of the transverse dunes. These linear dunes elongate over several kilometers downwind as a result of the seasonal wind changes. The dune shapes obtained in our simulations

  6. A field study of the geomorphic effects of sublimating CO2 blocks on dune slopes at Coral Pink Dunes, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Mary; Nield, Jo; Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candy; McElwaine, Jim

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal sublimation of CO2 ice is an active driver of present-day surface change on Mars. Diniega et al (2013) proposed that a discrete type of Martian gully, found on southern hemisphere dunes, were formed by the movement of CO2 seasonal ice blocks. These 'Linear Gullies' consist primarily of long (100 m - 2.5 km) grooves with near-uniform width (few-10 m wide), and typical depth of dune brink. We present the results of a set of field experiments that were undertaken at the Coral Pink sand dunes, Utah. These are sister experiments to those undertaken in Arizona (Bourke et al, 2016). The experiments were undertaken on an active barchan dune with a 16 m long lee slope (30.3°). Ambient air temperature was 30°C and relative humidity was 25%; sand surface temperatures were 26.5°C. A CO2 ice block (60x205x210 mm) was placed at the dune brink and with a gentle nudge it moved downslope. The dynamics of the block movement were recorded using a pair of high resolution video cameras. Geomorphological observations were noted and topographic change was quantified using a Leica P20 terrestrial laser scanner with a resolution of 0.8 mm at 10 m, and change detection limits less than 3 mm. The block run was repeated a total of 10 times and launched from the same location at the dune brink. The experiment ran for 45 minutes. The block size was reduced to (45 x 190 x 195 mm) by the end of the run series. The resultant geomorphology shows that the separate block runs occupied different tracks leading to a triangular plan form shape with a maximum width of 3.5 m. This is different from the findings in Arizona where a narrower track span was recorded (1.7m) (Bourke et al, 2016). Similar block dynamics were observed at both sites (as blocks moved straight, swiveled and bounced downslope). Distinctive pits with arcuate rims on their downslope edge were formed where blocks bounced on the surface. These pits are at an almost equidistant spacing. Despite a longer slope (16 m as

  7. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Conceptual Design Report Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Adams, C.; Adamson, P.; Adhikari, S.; Ahmad, Z.; Albright, C.H.; Alion, T.; Amador, E.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Anjos, J. d.; Ankowski, A.; Antonello, M.; Aranda Fernandez, A.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Aristizabal, D.; Arrieta-Diaz, E.; Aryal, K.; Asaadi, J.; Asner, D.; Athar, M.S.; Auger, M.; Aurisano, A.; Aushev, V.; Autiero, D.; Avila, M.; Back, J.J.; Bai, X.; Baibussinov, B.; Baird, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baller, B.; Ballett, P.; Bambah, B.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Barker, G.J.; Barletta, W.A.; Barr, G.; Barros, N.; Bartosz, B.; Bartoszek, L.; Bashyal, A.; Bass, M.; Bay, F.; Beacom, J.; Behera, B.R.; Bellettini, G.; Bellini, V.; Beltramello, O.; Benekos, N.; Benetti, P.A.; Bercellie, A.; Bergevin, M.; Berman, E.; Berns, H.; Bernstein, R.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhandari, B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bian, J.; Biery, K.; Bishai, M.; Blackburn, T.; Blake, A.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blaufuss, E.; Bleakley, B.; Blucher, E.; Bocean, V.; Boffelli, F.; Boissevain, J.; Bolognesi, S.; Bolton, T.; Bonesini, M.; Boone, T.; Booth, C.; Bordoni, S.; Borysova, M.; Bourguille, B.; Boyd, S.B.; Brailsford, D.; Brandt, A.; Bremer, J.; Brice, S.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brown, G.; Brown, R.; Brunetti, G.; Bu, X.; Buchanan, N.; Budd, H.; Bugg, B.; Calafiura, P.; Calligarich, E.; Calvo, E.; Camilleri, L.; Campanelli, M.; Cantini, C.; Carls, B.; Carr, R.; Cascella, M.; Castromonte, C.; Mur, E.Catano; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Chalifour, M.; Chandratre, V.B.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chaussard, L.; Chembra, S.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, M.; Cherdack, D.; Chi, C.; Childress, S.; Choubey, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christodoulou, G.; Christofferson, C.; Church, E.; Cianci, D.; Cline, D.; Coan, T.; Cocco, A.; Coelho, J.; Cole, P.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.; Corey, R.; Corwin, L.; Cranshaw, J.; Crivelli, P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Curioni, A.; Cushing, J.; Adams, D.L.; Dale, D.; Das, S.R.; Davenne, T.; Davies, G.S.; Davies, J.; Dawson, J.; De, K.; de Gouvea, A.; de Jong, J.K.; de Jong, P.; De Lurgio, P.; Decowski, M.; Delbart, A.; Densham, C.; Dharmapalan, R.; Dhingra, N.; Di Luise, S.; Diamantopoulou, M.; Diaz, J.S.; Diaz Bautista, G.; Diwan, M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolph, J.; Drake, G.; Duchesneau, D.; Duvernois, M.; Duyang, H.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dye, S.; Dytman, S.; Eberly, B.; Edgecock, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elliott, S.; Elnimr, M.; Emery, S.; Endress, E.; Eno, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escobar, C.O.; Evans, J.; Falcone, A.; Falk, L.; Farbin, A.; Farnese, C.; Farzan, Y.; Fava, A.; Favilli, L.; Felde, J.; Felix, J.; Fernandes, S.; Fields, L.; Finch, A.; Fitton, M.; Fleming, B.; Forest, T.; Fowler, J.; Fox, W.; Fried, J.; Friedland, A.; Fuess, S.; Fujikawa, B.; Gago, A.; Gallagher, H.; Galymov, S.; Gamble, T.; Gandhi, R.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Gardiner, S.; Garvey, G.; Gehman, V.M.; Gendotti, A.; Geronimo, G. d.; Ghag, C.; Ghoshal, P.; Gibin, D.; Gil-Botella, I.; Gill, R.; Girardelli, D.; Giri, A.; Glavin, S.; Goeldi, D.; Golapinni, S.; Gold, M.; Gomes, R.A.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Goodman, M.C.; Gorbunov, D.; Goswami, S.; Graf, N.; Graf, N.; Graham, M.; Gramelini, E.; Gran, R.; Grant, C.; Grant, N.; Greco, V.; Greenlee, H.; Greenler, L.; Greenley, C.; Groh, M.; Grullon, S.; Grundy, T.; Grzelak, K.; Guardincerri, E.; Guarino, V.; Guarnaccia, E.; Guedes, G.P.; Guenette, R.; Guglielmi, A.; Habig, A.T.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Hadavand, H.; Haenni, R.; Hahn, A.; Haigh, M.D.; Haines, T.; Hamernik, T.; Handler, T.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Hartnell, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Hatcher, R.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hays, S.; Hazen, E.; Headley, M.; Heavey, A.; Heeger, K.; Heise, J.; Hennessy, K.; Hewes, J.; Higuera, A.; Hill, T.; Himmel, A.; Hogan, M.; Holanda, P.; Holin, A.; Honey, W.; Horikawa, S.; Horton-Smith, G.; Howard, B.; Howell, J.; Hurh, P.; Huston, J.; Hylen, J.; Imlay, R.; Insler, J.; Introzzi, G.; Ioanisyan, D.; Ioannisian, A.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jackson, C.; Jaffe, D.E.; James, C.; James, E.; Jediny, F.; Jen, C.; Jhingan, A.; Jimenez, S.; Jo, J.H.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, J.; Jones, B.J.; Joshi, J.; Jostlein, H.; Jung, C.K.; Junk, T.; Kaboth, A.; Kadel, R.; Kafka, T.; Kalousis, L.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Karagiorgi, G.; Karasavvas, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, P.; Kayser, B.; Kazaryan, N.; Kearns, E.; Keener, P.; Kemboi, S.; Kemp, E.; Kettell, S.H.; Khabibullin, M.; Khandaker, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kirby, B.; Kirby, M.; Klein, J.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kohn, S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopylov, A.; Kordosky, M.; Kormos, L.; Kose, U.; Kostelecky, A.; Kramer, M.; Kreslo, I.; Kriske, R.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Kulagin, S.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, G.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kutter, T.; Laminack, A.; Lande, K.; Lane, C.; Lang, K.; Lanni, F.; Learned, J.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, D.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.; Lee, W.M.; Leigui de Oliveira, M.A.; Li, Q.; Li, S.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Libo, J.; Lin, C.S.; Lin, S.; Ling, J.; Link, J.; Liptak, Z.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N.; Loew, T.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, K.; Lopes, M.D.L.; Lopez, J.P.; Losecco, J.; Louis, W.; Lowery, J.; Luethi, M.; Luk, K.; Lundberg, B.; Lundin, T.; Luo, X.; Lux, T.; Lykken, J.; Machado, A.A.; Macier, J.R.; Magill, S.; Mahler, G.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Malhotra, S.; Malon, D.; Mammoliti, F.; Mancina, S.; Mandal, S.K.; Mandodi, S.; Manly, S.L.; Mann, A.; Marchionni, A.; Marciano, W.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Marino, A.; Marshak, M.; Marshall, C.; Marshall, J.; Marteau, J.; Martin-Albo, J.; Martinez, D.; Matsuno, S.; Matthews, J.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mayilyan, D.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McCluskey, E.; McConkey, N.; McDonald, K.; McFarland, K.S.; McGowan, A.M.; McGrew, C.; McKeown, R.; McNulty, D.; McTaggart, R.; Mefodiev, A.; Mehrian, M.; Mehta, P.; Mei, D.; Mena, O.; Menary, S.; Mendez, H.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Meng, Y.; Mertins, D.; Merritt, H.; Messier, M.; Metcalf, W.; Mewes, M.; Meyer, H.; Miao, T.; Milincic, R.; Miller, W.; Mills, G.; Mineev, O.; Miranda, O.; Mishra, C.S.; Mishra, S.R.; Mitrica, B.; Mladenov, D.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanta, R.; Mokhov, N.; Montanari, C.; Montanari, D.; Moon, J.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C.; Morfin, J.; Morgan, B.; Morris, C.; Morse, W.; Moss, Z.; Mossey, C.; Moura, C.A.; Mousseau, J.; Mualem, L.; Muether, M.; Mufson, S.; Murphy, S.; Musser, J.; Musser, R.; Nakajima, Y.; Naples, D.; Napolitano, J.; Navarro, J.; Navas, D.; Nelson, J.; Nessi, M.; Newcomer, M.; Ng, Y.; Nichol, R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Nikolics, K.; Niner, E.; Norris, B.; Noto, F.; Novakova, P.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; Nunes, M.S.; O'Keeffe, H.; Oldeman, R.; Oliveira, R.; Olson, T.; Onishchuk, Y.; Osta, J.; Ovsjannikova, T.; Page, B.; Pakvasa, S.; Pal, S.; Palamara, O.; Palazzo, A.; Paley, J.; Palomares, C.; Pantic, E.; Paolone, V.; Papadimitriou, V.; Park, J.; Parke, S.; Parsa, Z.; Pascoli, S.; Patterson, R.; Patton, S.; Patzak, T.; Paulos, B.; Paulucci, L.; Pavlovic, Z.; Pawloski, G.; Peeters, S.; Pennacchio, E.; Perch, A.; Perdue, G.N.; Periale, L.; Perkin, J.D.; Pessard, H.; Petrillo, G.; Petti, R.; Petukhov, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potenza, R.; Potukuchi, B.; Poudyal, N.; Prokofiev, O.; Pruthi, N.; Przewlocki, P.; Pushka, D.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Raboanary, R.; Radeka, V.; Radovic, A.; Raffelt, G.; Rakhno, I.; Rakotondramanana, H.T.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramachers, Y.A.; Rameika, R.; Ramsey, J.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.; Ratoff, P.; Rebel, B.; Regenfus, C.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reitzner, D.; Remoto, A.; Renshaw, A.; Rescia, S.; Richardson, M.; Rielage, K.; Riesselmann, K.; Robinson, M.; Rochester, L.; Rodrigues, O.B.; Rodrigues, P.; Roe, B.; Rosen, M.; Roser, R.M.; Ross-Lonergan, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rubbia, C.; Rucinski, R.; von Rohr, C.Rudolph; Russell, B.; Ruterbories, D.; Saakyan, R.; Sahu, N.; Sala, P.; Samios, N.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez, M.; Sands, B.; Santana, S.; Santorelli, R.; Santucci, G.; Saoulidou, N.; Scaramelli, A.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmitt, R.; Schmitz, D.; Schneps, J.; Scholberg, K.; Schukraft, A.; Schwehr, J.; Segreto, E.; Seibert, S.; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J.A.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shahi, J.; Shahsavarani, S.; Shanahan, P.; Shankar, S.U.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, R.K.; Shaw, T.; Shrock, R.; Shyrma, I.; Simos, N.; Sinev, G.; Singh, I.; Singh, J.; Singh, J.; Singh, V.; Sinnis, G.; Sippach, W.; Smargianaki, D.; Smy, M.; Snider, E.; Snopok, P.; Sobczyk, J.; Sobel, H.; Soderberg, M.; Solomey, N.; Sondheim, W.; Sorel, M.; Sousa, A.; Soustruznik, K.; Spitz, J.; Spooner, N.J.; Stancari, M.; Stancu, I.; Stefan, D.; Steiner, H.M.; Stewart, J.; Stock, J.; Stoica, S.; Stone, J.; Strait, J.; Strait, M.; Strauss, T.; Striganov, S.; Sulej, R.; Sullivan, G.; Sun, Y.; Suter, L.; Sutera, C.M.; Svoboda, R.; Szczerbinska, B.; Szelc, A.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Talaga, R.; Tamsett, M.; Tariq, S.; Tatar, E.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, D.; Terao, K.; Thiesse, M.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Thomson, M.; Thorn, C.; Thorpe, M.; Tian, X.; Tiedt, D.; Timm, S.C.; Tonazzo, A.; Tope, T.; Topkar, A.; Torres, F.R.; Torti, M.; Tortola, M.; Tortorici, F.; Toups, M.; Touramanis, C.; Tripathi, M.; Tropin, I.; Tsai, Y.; Tsang, K.V.; Tsenov, R.; Tufanli, S.; Tull, C.; Turner, J.; Tzanov, M.; Tziaferi, E.; Uchida, Y.; Urheim, J.; Usher, T.; Vagins, M.; Vahle, P.; Valdiviesso, G.A.; Valerio, L.; Vallari, Z.; Valle, J.; Van Berg, R.; Van de Water, R.; Van Gemmeren, P.; Varanini, F.; Varner, G.; Vasseur, G.; Vaziri, K.; Velev, G.; Ventura, S.; Verdugo, A.; Viant, T.; Vieira, T.V.; Vignoli, C.; Vilela, C.; Viren, B.; Vrba, T.; Wachala, T.; Wahl, D.; Wallbank, M.; Walsh, N.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, L.; Wang, T.; Warburton, T.K.; Warner, D.; Wascko, M.; Waters, D.; Watson, T.B.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wei, W.; Weinstein, A.; Wells, D.; Wenman, D.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.; Wilking, M.; Willhite, J.; Wilson, P.; Wilson, R.J.; Winslow, L.; Wittich, P.; Wojcicki, S.; Wong, H.H.; Wood, K.; Worcester, E.; Worcester, M.; Wu, S.; Xin, T.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yarritu, K.; Ye, J.; Yeh, M.; Yershov, N.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zalewska, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zang, L.; Zani, A.; Zani, A.; Zavala, G.; Zeller, G.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, E.D.; Zito, M.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  8. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2016-01-22

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  9. Remote sensing and spatial analysis of aeolian sand dunes: A review and outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Levin, Noam; Barchyn, Thomas E.; Baddock, Matthew C.

    2012-03-01

    For more than four decades remote sensing images have been used to document and understand the evolution of aeolian sand dunes. Early studies focused on mapping and classifying dunes. Recent advances in sensor technology and software have allowed investigators to move towards quantitative investigation of dune form evolution and pattern development. These advances have taken place alongside progress in numerical models, which are capable of simulating the multitude of dune patterns observed in nature. The potential to integrate remote sensing (RS), spatial analysis (SA), and modeling to predict the future changes of real-world dune systems is steadily becoming a reality. Here we present a comprehensive review of significant recent advances involving RS and SA. Our objective is to demonstrate the capacity of these technologies to provide new insight on three important research domains: (1) dune activity, (2) dune patterns and hierarchies, and (3) extra-terrestrial dunes. We outline how several recent advances have capitalized on the improved spatial and spectral resolution of RS data, the availability of topographic data, and new SA methods and software. We also discuss some of the key research challenges and opportunities in the application of RS and SA dune field, including: the integration of RS data with field-based measurements of vegetation cover, structure, and aeolian transport rate in order to develop predictive models of dune field activity; expanding the observational evidence of dune form evolution at temporal and spatial scales that can be used to validate and refine simulation models; the development and application of objective and reproducible SA methods for characterizing dune field pattern; and, expanding efforts to quantify three-dimensional topographic changes of dune fields in order to develop improved understanding of spatio-temporal patterns of erosion and deposition. Overall, our review indicates a progressive evolution in the way sand dunes

  10. Tidal dunes versus tidal bars: The sedimentological and architectural characteristics of compound dunes in a tidal seaway, the lower Baronia Sandstone (Lower Eocene), Ager Basin, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olariu, Cornel; Steel, Ronald J.; Dalrymple, Robert W.; Gingras, Murray K.

    2012-11-01

    The Lower Eocene Baronia Formation in the Ager Basin is interpreted as a series of stacked compound dunes confined within a tectonically generated embayment or tidal seaway. This differs from the previous interpretation of lower Baronia sand bodies as tidal bars in the front of a delta. The key architectural building block of the succession, the deposit of a single compound dune, forms a 1-3 m-thick, upward coarsening succession that begins with highly bioturbated, muddy, very fine to fine grained sandstone that contains an open-marine Cruziana ichnofacies. This is overlain gradationally by ripple-laminated sandstone that is commonly bioturbated and contains mud drapes. The succession is capped by fine- to coarse-grained sandstones that contain both planar and trough cross-strata with unidirectional or bi-directional paleocurrent directions and occasional thin mud drapes on the foresets. The base of a compound dune is gradational where it migrated over muddy sandstone deposited between adjacent dunes, but is sharp and erosional where it migrated over the stoss side of a previous compound dune. The cross strata that formed by simple superimposed dunes dip in the same direction as the inclined master bedding planes within the compound dune, forming a forward-accretion architecture. This configuration is the fundamental reason why these sandbodies are interpreted as compound tidal dunes rather than as tidal bars, which, in contrast, generate lateral-accretion architecture. In the Baronia, fields of compound dunes generated tabular sandbodies 100s to 1000s of meters in extent parallel to the paleocurrent direction and up to 6 m thick that alternate vertically with highly bioturbated muddy sandstones (up to 10 m thick) that represent the low-energy fringes of the dune fields or periods of high sea level when current speeds decreased. Each cross-stratified sandstone sheet (compound-dune complexes) contains overlapping lenticular "shingles" formed by individual compound

  11. Numerical study of turbulent flow over complex aeolian dune fields: the White Sands National Monument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of fully developed turbulent flows responding to aeolian dune fields are studied using large-eddy simulation with an immersed boundary method. An aspect of particular importance in these flows is the downwind migration of coherent motions associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities that originate at the dune crests. These instabilities are responsible for enhanced downward transport of high-momentum fluid via the so-called turbulent sweep mechanism. However, the presence of such structures and their role in determining the bulk characteristics of fully developed dune field sublayer aerodynamics have received relatively limited attention. Moreover, many existing studies address mostly symmetric or mildly asymmetric dune forms. The White Sands National Monument is a field of aeolian gypsum sand dunes located in the Tularosa Basin in southern New Mexico. Aeolian processes at the site result in a complex, anisotropic dune field. In the dune field sublayer, the flow statistics resemble a mixing layer: At approximately the dune crest height, vertical profiles of streamwise velocity exhibit an inflection and turbulent Reynolds stresses are maximum; below this, the streamwise and vertical velocity fluctuations are positively and negatively skewed, respectively. We evaluate the spatial structure of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities present in the dune field sublayer (shear length L(s) and vortex spacing Λ(x)) and show that Λ(x)=m(dune)L(s), where m(dune)≈7.2 in the different sections considered (for turbulent mixing layers, 7

  12. River channel bars and dunes - Theory of kinematic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, Walter Basil; Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1968-01-01

    A kinematic wave is a grouping cf moving objects in zones along a flow path and through which the objects pass. These concentrations may be characterized by a simple relation between the speed of the moving objects and their spacing as a result of interaction between them.Vehicular traffic has long been known to have such properties. Data are introduced to show that beads carried by flowing water in a narrow flume behave in an analogous way. The flux or transport of objects in a single lane of traffic is greatest when the objects are spaced about two diameters apart; beads in a single-lane flume as well as highway traffic conform to this property.By considering the sand in a pipe or flume to a depth affected by dune movement, it is shown that flux-concentration curves similar to the previously known cases can be constructed from experimental data. From the kinematic point of view, concentration of particles in dunes and other wave bed forms results when particles in transport become more numerous or closely spaced and interact to reduce the effectiveness of the ambient water to move them.Field observations over a 5-year period are reported in which individual rocks were painted for identification and placed at various spacings on the bed of ephemeral stream in New Mexico, to study the effect of storm flows on rock movement. The data on about 14,000 rocks so observed show the effect of variable spacing which is quantitatively as well as qualitatively comparable to the spacing effect on small glass beads in a flume. Dunes and gravel bars may be considered kinematic waves caused by particle interaction, and certain of their properties can be related to the characteristics of the flux-concentration curve.

  13. Constraints on coastal dune invasion for a notorious plant invader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Alden B; Ahmed, Tania; Hildner, Abigail L G; Kuckreja, Shivani; Long, Shuangxou

    2015-11-10

    Although most biological invasions are not successful, relatively few studies have examined otherwise notorious invaders in systems where they are not highly problematic. The annual grass Bromus tectorum is a dominant invader in western North America, but is usually confined to human-dominated and disturbed systems (e.g. roadsides and parking lots) in the East where it remains virtually unstudied. This study aims to address fundamental ecological questions regarding B. tectorum in a Cape Cod dune ecosystem. (i) What is the range of variation in population dynamics and the potential for population growth? (ii) Which factors influence its local abundance and distribution? We observed substantial variation in population dynamics over 3 years, with the number of adult B. tectorum individuals increasing substantially between the first 2 years (λ = 9.24) and then decreasing (λ = 0.43). Population growth in terms of total seeds was similarly variable, but to a lesser extent (λ = 2.32 followed by λ = 0.32). Experimental soil disturbance led to a more than 10-fold increase in mean seedling emergence, and high sensitivity to differences in emergence carried this effect through the life cycle. In contrast, barriers to seed dispersal had no effect on population dynamics, suggesting limited dispersal in this system. Across the landscape, the presence of B. tectorum was associated with areas of higher plant diversity as opposed to those with a strong dominant (e.g. the foredune, dominated by Ammophila breviligulata, or low heathlands, characterized by Hudsonia tomentosa and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi). Overall, we find that B. tectorum is capable of both substantial population growth and decline in a dune ecosystem, but is likely limited without disturbance and dispersal agents. Thus, management actions that restrict dune access (e.g. for nesting habitat) likely have the co-benefit of limiting the invasive potential of B. tectorum.

  14. Interdune areas of the back-island dune field, North Padre Island, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Gary; Kocurek, Gary

    1984-04-01

    The small, young (about 100 yrs) back-island dune field on north Padre Island, south Texas, consists of fairly persistant oblique dunes (up to 6 m high) with well-developed interdune areas that grade northwestward to small, ephemeral transverse and barchan dunes with interconnected "interdune" areas, thence sheet sand areas. The subhumid climate is marked by rain associated with frontal systems and tropical storms. Winds are seasonally bimodal—prevailing southeasterly are punctuated by northerly and northwesterly winds with the passage of frontal systems in winter. The entire dune field and individual oblique dunes show a net migration of about 15 m yr -1 to the northwest. The dunes however are on a seasonally reversing track, changing their slipface direction and migration direction with frontal systems. One year of monitoring shows sand transport in the dune-interdune system to be complex and cyclic. During the wind reversals of winter, dunes are very ineffecfive sand traps owing to loss of flow separation, and much sand is lost to the interdune areas. Interdune areas store sand during these wet winter months as a result of the wind reversals and higher moisture content. During the summer, the interdune areas deflate and the dunes build in size. The overall dune field deposit appears to consist of three laterally contiguous zones from southeast to northwest: (1) continuous, climbing oblique dune and interdune deposits; (2) discontinuous lenses of dune sand in overall "interdune layers"; and (3) a chaotic mixture of dune and horizontal deposits of the sheet sand areas. One year's mapping and trenching documents that interdune sedimentary structures are extremely variable laterally and vertically reflecting specific microenvironments within the interdune flat. Wet-surface features consist of current and wave ripples, channel fill, miniature deltas, wrinkle marks, mini-ripples, rills, algae and sand volcanoes. Abundant adhesion structures, rain-impacted ripples

  15. 77 FR 36871 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Withdrawal of the Proposed Rule To List Dunes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    .... Competition is mentioned in Sias and ] Snell's 1998 research as a potential stressor for the dunes sagebrush... on dunes sagebrush lizards, and confirms the results provided in the Sias and Snell (1998) report. We...

  16. 2005 annual progress report : Elk and bison grazing ecology in the Great Sand Dunes complex of lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2000 the U.S. Congress authorized the expansion of the former Great Sand Dunes National Monument by establishing a new Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve...

  17. RIGED-RA project - Restoration and management of Coastal Dunes in the Northern Adriatic Coast, Ravenna Area - Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambastiani, Beatrice M. S.; Greggio, Nicolas; Sistilli, Flavia; Fabbri, Stefano; Scarelli, Frederico; Candiago, Sebastian; Anfossi, Giulia; Lipparini, Carlo A.; Cantelli, Luigi; Antonellini, Marco; Gabbianelli, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Coastal dunes play an important role in protecting the coastline. Unfortunately, in the last decades dunes have been removed or damaged by human activities. In the Emilia- Romagna region significant residual dune systems are found only along Ravenna and Ferrara coasts. In this context, the RIGED-RA project “Restoration and management of coastal dunes along the Ravenna coast” (2013-2016) has been launched with the aims to identify dynamics, erosion and vulnerability of Northern Adriatic coast and associated residual dunes, and to define intervention strategies for dune protection and restoration. The methodology is based on a multidisciplinary approach that integrates the expertise of several researchers and investigates all aspects (biotic and abiotic), which drive the dune-beach system. All datasets were integrated to identify test sites for applying dune restoration. The intervention finished in April 2016; evolution and restoration efficiency will be assessed.

  18. Quelques noddees sur l’ecologie de la vedetation des dunes et sur la fonction de l’enraciment dans l’edification de dunes a la Cote Mediterraneenne de la France. I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boterenbrood, A.J.; Donsellaar-Ten Bokkel Huinink, van W.A.E.; Donselaar, van J.

    1956-01-01

    Dans la végétation des dunes du Languedoc J. BRAUN-BLANQUET (1952) distingue trois associations, à savoir; 1) l’Agropyretum mediterraneum parmi et sur les premières dunes basses; 2) l’Ammophiletum arundinaceae sur les dunes plus hautes; et 3) le Crucianelletum maritimae dans les dépressions et en ar

  19. Aeolian processes across transverse dunes. II: Modelling the sediment transport and profile development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P.M.; Arens, S.M.; van Boxel, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a model which simulates dune development resulting from aeolian saltation transport. The model was developed for application to coastal foredunes, but is also applicable to sandy deserts with transverse dunes. Sediment transport is calculated using published deterministic and em

  20. Even low to medium nitrogen deposition impacts vegetation of dry, coastal dunes around the Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remke, E.; Brouwer, E.; Kooijman, A.; Blindow, I.; Esselink, H.; Roelofs, J.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal dunes around the Baltic Sea have received small amounts of atmospheric nitrogen and are rather pristine ecosystems in this respect. In 19 investigated dune sites the atmospheric wet nitrogen deposition is 3-8 kg N ha−1 yr−1. The nitrogen content of Cladonia portentosa appeared to be a suitab

  1. 77 FR 11061 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Endangered Status for the Dunes Sagebrush...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AV97 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Endangered Status for the Dunes Sagebrush Lizard AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior..., 2010, proposed endangered status for the dunes sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus arenicolus) under...

  2. 76 FR 19304 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for Dunes Sagebrush Lizard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AV97 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for Dunes Sagebrush Lizard AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Proposed... rule to list the dunes sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus arenicolus) under the Endangered Species Act...

  3. Non-climatic signal in ice core records: lessons from Antarctic mega-dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ekaykin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of glaciological investigations in the mega-dune area located 30 km to the east from Vostok Station (central East Antarctica implemented during the 58th, 59th and 60th Russian Antarctic Expedition (January 2013–January 2015. Snow accumulation rate and isotope content (δD, δ18O and δ17O were measured along the 2 km profile across the mega-dune ridge accompanied by precise GPS altitude measurements and GPR survey. It is shown that the spatial variability of snow accumulation and isotope content covaries with the surface slope. The accumulation rate regularly changes by one order of magnitude within the distance −1. The full cycle of the dune drift is thus about 410 years. Since the spatial anomalies of snow accumulation and isotopic composition are supposed to drift with the dune, an ice core drilled in the mega-dune area would exhibit the non-climatic 410 year cycle of these two parameters. We simulated a vertical profile of snow isotopic composition with such a non-climatic variability, using the data on the dune size and velocity. This artificial profile is then compared with the real vertical profile of snow isotopic composition obtained from a core drilled in the mega-dune area. We note that the two profiles are very similar. The obtained results are discussed in terms of interpretation of data obtained from ice cores drilled beyond the mega-dune areas.

  4. Impact of anthropogenic disturbances on beetle communities of French Mediterranean coastal dunes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comor, V.N.R.; Orgeas, J.; Ponel, P.; Rolando, C.; Delettre, Y.R.

    2008-01-01

    In coastal dunes, influenced by anthropogenic activities such as tourism, it is important to determine the relative influence of environmental factors at different spatial scales to evaluate the sensitivity of local communities to disturbances. We analyzed beetle communities of 14 dunes of the

  5. Aeolian processes across transverse dunes. II: Modelling the sediment transport and profile development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P.M.; Arens, S.M.; van Boxel, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a model which simulates dune development resulting from aeolian saltation transport. The model was developed for application to coastal foredunes, but is also applicable to sandy deserts with transverse dunes. Sediment transport is calculated using published deterministic and

  6. Ground Truth Mineralogy vs. Orbital Observations at the Bagnold Dune Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, is analyzing rock and sediments in Gale crater to provide in situ sedimentological, geochemical, and mineralogical assessments of the crater's geologic history. Curiosity's recent traverse through an active, basaltic eolian deposit, informally named the Bagnold Dunes, provided the opportunity for a multi-instrument investigation of the dune field.

  7. Biodiversity and ecology of soil fungi in a primary succession of a temperate coastal dune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prenafeta Boldú, F.X.; Summerbell, R.C.; de Boer, W.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Gamsformerly, W.

    2014-01-01

    Soil fungal communities were studied in an actively developing coastal dune system at Goeree Island, the Netherlands. A shore to inland sampling transect was laid out, extending from coastal brackish marshes to recently formed foredunes to older dune pastures to adjacent woodlands. Soil samples from

  8. 44 CFR 65.11 - Evaluation of sand dunes in mapping coastal flood hazard areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation of sand dunes in... Insurance Program IDENTIFICATION AND MAPPING OF SPECIAL HAZARD AREAS § 65.11 Evaluation of sand dunes in...-established with long-standing vegetative cover, such as the placement of sand materials in a...

  9. Low atmospheric nitrogen loads lead to grass encroachment in coastal dunes, but only on acid soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remke, E.; Brouwer, E.; Kooijman, A.; Blindow, I.; Roelofs, J.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of atmospheric N-deposition on succession from open sand to dry, lichen-rich, short grassland, and tall grass vegetation dominated by Carex arenaria was surveyed in 19 coastal dune sites along the Baltic Sea. Coastal dunes with acid or slightly calcareous sand reacted differently to atmos

  10. Multi-fractal-interslipface angle curves of a morphologically simulated sand dune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Daya Sagar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A sand dune is simulated by means of a non-linear mathematical morphological transformation of which the fractal dimensions with corresponding interslipface angles are computed. This exercise has relevance to test the Validity of the model by considering various time series sand dune data that can be retrieved from the robust satellite remote sensing sensors.

  11. Poster 17: Methane storms as a driver of Titan's dune orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnay, Benjamin; Barth, Erika; Rafkin, Scot; Narteau, Clement; Lebonnois, Sebastien; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Courech Du Pont, Sylvain; Lucas, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    Titan's equatorial regions are covered by eastward oriented linear dunes [1,2]. This direction is opposite to mean surface winds simulated by Global Climate Models (GCMs) at these latitudes, oriented westward as trade winds on Earth. We propose that Titan's dune orientation is actually determined by equinoctial tropical methane storms producing a coupling with superrotation and dune formation [3]. Using meso-scale simulations of convective methane clouds [4] with a GCM wind profile featuring the superrotation [5,6], we show that Titan's storms should produce fast eastward gust fronts above the surface. Such gusts dominate the aeolian transport. Using GCM wind calculations and analogies with terrestrial dune fields [7], we show that Titan's dune propagation occurs eastward under these conditions. Finally, this scenario combining global circulation winds and methane storms can explain other major features of Titan's dunes as the divergence from the equator or the dune size and spacing. It also implies an equatorial origin of Titan's dune sand and a possible occurence of dust storms.

  12. Distribution of ephemeral plants and their significance in dune stabilization in Gurbantunggut Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXueqin; JIANGJin; LEIJiaqiang; ZHANGWeimin; QIANYibing

    2003-01-01

    Based on systematically monitoring plants on dune ridges in the southern part of the Gurbantunggut Desert in 2002, this paper, from the angle of dune stabilization by vegetation,describes the temporal and spatial distribution patterns of ephemeral plants on isolated sand dunes,analyses the natural invasion processes of ephemeral plants on human-disturbed sand surface and expounds the importance of ephemeral plants in stabilizing sand dune surface. A total of 45 plant species were identified in the study area, 29 of which are ephemeral plants. Ephemeral plants sprouted in early April and completed their life-circle within about two months. Just as aeolian sand activities came to the strongest stage from April to June in desert regions of northern Xinjiang, the total coverage of trees, shrubs and herbs of long vegetational period on most dune ridges was less than 10%, while the mean coverage of ephemeral plants reached 13.9% in April, 40.2% in May and 14.1% in June. Therefore ephemeral plants acted as the major contributor to dune surface stabilization in the Gurbantunggut Desert.Investigations of vegetation restoration on engineering-disturbed dune surface show that ephemeral plants first recolonized the disturbed dune surface.

  13. Iron-rich dune grasslands: Relations between soil organic matter and sorption of Fe and P

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, A.M.; Lubbers, I.; van Til, M.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of high atmospheric nitrogen-deposition partly depend on availability of phosphate. Lime-poor, but iron-rich dune grasslands are supposedly protected from grass-encroachment, due to P-fixation in iron phosphate. However, in iron-rich Dutch hinterdunes, dunes have low, but dry former beach pl

  14. SPINIFICI-SCAEVOLETEA SERICEAE, A NEW VEGETATION CLASS FOR PSAMMOPHYTIC DUNE VEGETATION IN THAILAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. PIGNATII

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a short account on the coastal dune vegetation of the Gulf of Siam in Thailand. Vegetation is mainly composed by succulent creeping plants with herbaceous habit as to Canavalia maritima (Papilionaceae and Iponwea pes-caprae (Convolvulaceae and the robust stoloniferous grass Spinijex littoreus, the last having an important function for the fonnation of coastal dunes.

  15. SPINIFICI-SCAEVOLETEA SERICEAE, A NEW VEGETATION CLASS FOR PSAMMOPHYTIC DUNE VEGETATION IN THAILAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. PIGNATII

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a short account on the coastal dune vegetation of the Gulf of Siam in Thailand. Vegetation is mainly composed by succulent creeping plants with herbaceous habit as to Canavalia maritima (Papilionaceae and Iponwea pes-caprae (Convolvulaceae and the robust stoloniferous grass Spinijex littoreus, the last having an important function for the fonnation of coastal dunes.

  16. Aeolian processes across transverse dunes. II: Modelling the sediment transport and profile development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P.M.; Arens, S.M.; van Boxel, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a model which simulates dune development resulting from aeolian saltation transport. The model was developed for application to coastal foredunes, but is also applicable to sandy deserts with transverse dunes. Sediment transport is calculated using published deterministic and em

  17. 76 FR 62087 - Draft Conservation Plan and Draft Environmental Assessment; Dunes Sagebrush Lizard, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... Lizard, Texas AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; announcement... application includes the draft Texas Conservation Plan for the Dunes Sagebrush Lizard (TCP). The draft TCP... Service (Service) and the Applicant for the dunes sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus arenicolus) throughout...

  18. Strandline and sand dune vegetation of coasts of Greece and some other Aegean countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sykora, K.V.; Babalonas, D.; Papastergiadou, E.S.

    2003-01-01

    The coastal strandline and sand-dune vegetation of Greece has been reviewed. All published relevés available were collected and classified using numerical methods (TWINSPAN). The communities studied belong to three classes, one for strandline vegetation (Cakiletea maritimae), and two for sand-dune v

  19. Quantifying vegetation and geomorphic patterns within nebkha dune fields using terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nield, Joanna; Gillies, John; Nickling, William

    2014-05-01

    Vegetation and sand in semi-arid and coastal sediment starved environments typically interact and form nebkha dunes. We examine the typical dune and vegetation patterns that form with varying amounts of sediment availability and nebkha maturity at Jornada in the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to separate the plant and sand elements. Manual and automated TLS shrub height extractions compare well at all sites (p=0.48-0.94) enabling the quantification of both solid and plant roughness element components. We find that there is a switch in orientation of the dune elements with respect to dominant wind direction from perpendicular to parallel as the landscape develops from an incipient to mature configuration and mesquite-nebkha streets are enhanced. As the nebkha dunes develop the surface coverage of bare sand increases and dune surfaces exceed the size of their companion shrubs. Roughness density also increases at the mature dune site. Over a three year period up to 20cm of erosion was measured on the upwind faces of the mature nebkha dunes, in agreement with the dominant annual wind direction. However, deposition patterns were more diffuse and influenced by the vegetation patterns. TLS is a useful tool for examining complex sand-vegetation interactions and dune field development.

  20. Strandline and sand dune vegetation of coasts of Greece and some other Aegean countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sykora, K.V.; Babalonas, D.; Papastergiadou, E.S.

    2003-01-01

    The coastal strandline and sand-dune vegetation of Greece has been reviewed. All published relevés available were collected and classified using numerical methods (TWINSPAN). The communities studied belong to three classes, one for strandline vegetation (Cakiletea maritimae), and two for sand-dune

  1. Namib Desert dune/interdune transects exhibit habitat-specific edaphic bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, Sandra; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Jones, Brian E; Seely, Mary; Cowan, Don A

    2015-01-01

    The sand dunes and inter-dune zones of the hyper-arid central Namib Desert represent heterogeneous soil habitats. As little is known about their indigenous edaphic bacterial communities, we aimed to evaluate their diversity and factors of assembly and hypothesized that soil physicochemistry gradients would strongly shape dune/interdune communities. We sampled a total of 125 samples from 5 parallel dune/interdune transects and characterized 21 physico-chemical edaphic parameters coupled with 16S rRNA gene bacterial community fingerprinting using T-RFLP and 454 pyrosequencing. Multivariate analyses of T-RFLP data showed significantly different bacterial communities, related to physico-chemical gradients, in four distinct dune habitats: the dune top, slope, base and interdune zones. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicon sets showed that each dune zone presented a unique phylogenetic profile, suggesting a high degree of environmental selection. The combined results strongly infer that habitat filtering is an important factor shaping Namib Desert dune bacterial communities, with habitat stability, soil texture and mineral and nutrient contents being the main environmental drivers of bacterial community structures.

  2. A Beach and Dune Community. 4-H Marine Science. Member's Guide. Activity I. MSp 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auburn Univ., AL. Cooperative Extension Service.

    The investigation in this booklet is designed to provide 4-H members with opportunities to identify common plants and animals found on beaches and sand dunes and to determine the role of the plants and animals in this community. Learners are provided with a picture of a hypothetical beach and sand dune and a list of organisms (included in the…

  3. Modeling of spatial lag in bed-load transport processes and its effect on dune morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duin, van O.J.M.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Ribberink, J.S.; Dohmen-Janssen, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, two bed-load transport models are introduced in an existing idealized dune model. These allow for the modeling of the spatial lag between the sediment transport rate and bed shear stress along dune surfaces. This lag is an important factor in determining transitions between bed

  4. 3D numerical simulation of the evolutionary process of aeolian downsized crescent-shaped dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaosi; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yuan; Li, Min

    2016-06-01

    A dune constitutive model was coupled with a large eddy simulation (LES) with the Smagorinsky subgrid-scale (SGS) model to accurately describe the evolutionary process of dunes from the macroscopic perspective of morphological dynamics. A 3D numerical simulation of the evolution of aeolian downsized crescent-shaped dunes was then performed. The evolution of the 3D structure of Gaussian-shaped dunes was simulated under the influence of gravity modulation, which was the same with the vertical oscillation of the sand bed to adjust the threshold of sand grain liftoff in wind tunnel experiments under the same wind speed. The influence of gravity modulation intensity on the characteristic scale parameter of the dune was discussed. Results indicated that the crescent shape of the dune was reproduced with the action of gravity during regulation of the saturation of wind-sand flow at specific times. The crescent shape was not dynamically maintained as time passed, and the dunes dwindled until they reached final decomposition because of wind erosion. The height of the dunes decreased over time, and the height-time curve converged as the intensity of modulation increased linearly. The results qualitatively agreed with those obtained from wind tunnel experiments.

  5. Variations in Titan's dune orientations as a result of orbital forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, George D.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Ewing, Ryan C.; Lora, Juan M.; Newman, Claire E.; Tokano, Tetsuya; Lucas, Antoine; Soto, Alejandro; Chen, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Wind-blown dunes are a record of the climatic history in Titan's equatorial region. Through modeling of the climatic conditions associated with Titan's historical orbital configurations (arising from apsidal precessions of Saturn's orbit), we present evidence that the orientations of the dunes are influenced by orbital forcing. Analysis of 3 Titan general circulation models (GCMs) in conjunction with a sediment transport model provides the first direct intercomparison of results from different Titan GCMs. We report variability in the dune orientations predicted for different orbital epochs of up to 70°. Although the response of the GCMs to orbital forcing varies, the orbital influence on the dune orientations is found to be significant across all models. Furthermore, there is near agreement among the two models run with surface topography, with 3 out of the 5 dune fields matching observation for the most recent orbital cycle. Through comparison with observations by Cassini, we find situations in which the observed dune orientations are in best agreement with those modeled for previous orbital configurations or combinations thereof, representing a larger portion of the cycle. We conclude that orbital forcing could be an important factor in governing the present-day dune orientations observed on Titan and should be considered when modeling dune evolution.

  6. Quantifying energy and water fluxes in dry dune ecosystems of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, B. R.; Bartholomeus, R. P.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Bierkens, M. F. P.; Witte, J. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal and inland dunes provide various ecosystem services that are related to groundwater, such as drinking water production and biodiversity. To manage groundwater in a sustainable manner, knowledge of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) for the various land covers in dunes is essential. Aiming at im

  7. Compositional and spatial variations in Titan dune and interdune regions from Cassini VIMS and RADAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy, Léa E.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Hayne, Paul O.; Malaska, Michael J.; Le Gall, Alice; Solomonidou, Anezina; Lucas, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    Dunes cover about 15 % of Titan's visible surface, and represent one of the largest reservoirs of hydrocarbon solids on Titan (Rodriguez, S. et al. [2014]. Icarus 230, 168-179; Lopes, R.M.C. et al. [2016]. Icarus 270, 162-182.). Herein, we use data from the Cassini spacecraft to derive constraints on the compositional and regional variability of Titan's dune and interdune regions by combining spectral information from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and spatial information from Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) data. Using the combined datasets, we extract pure infrared spectra of dune and interdune regions by extrapolating linear correlations between VIMS reflectance and dune area fraction calculated in each VIMS footprint from SAR images. We applied the same method using the Cassini RADAR Radiometer dataset to extract the microwave surface emissivity of the dune and interdune regions. Globally the dune spectra show little variation, but we find that the interdune spectra exhibit several different behaviors. Similarly, we extract from passive radiometry a mean dune emissivity of 0.98 ± 0.01, while interdune emissivity varies from 0.86 to 0.98. We find that the interdune regions are often spectrally similar to other Titan terrain units, namely Caladan Planitia, the Adiri Mountains, and Sinlap crater, while the dunes are spectrally distinct from all terrain units. Around Sinlap crater, the interdune regions correspond to the dark blue VIMS unit: the dunes could be forming on top of the ejecta, or the material corresponding to the blue unit could be depositing preferentially in the interdunes areas. There was one region in the Belet sand sea where we were unable to extract the dune and interdune spectra and emissivities in spite of high-quality data, which we interpret to result from a thick sand cover in the interdune regions, implying inactive or saturated dune fields. However, the fact that we were able to extract distinct dune and interdune

  8. Spatial Patterns of Soil Organic Carbon and Total Nitrogen in Mesquite Coppice Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbs, L. M.; Throop, H. L.

    2008-12-01

    Woody encroachment, an increase in woody plant abundance in formerly grass-dominated ecosystems, has occurred in semi-arid and arid systems worldwide over the past century. Woody encroachment has emerged as a potentially important, but highly uncertain, component of the North American carbon sink. The effects of woody plant encroachment on soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) relative to Prosopis velutina have been explored in the Sonoran Desert, where strong spatial patterns in SOC and TN based on shrub size and subcanopy location exist. Encroachment of Prosopis glandulosa in sandy soils in the Chihuahuan Desert leads to coppice dune formation. We applied spatially-intensive soil sampling methods around P. glandulosa dunes in the Chihuahuan Desert to see how spatial patterns differed from patterns in the Sonoran Desert, where dunes do not form. Approximately 15 soil cores were taken from within and around each of 13 dunes and analyzed for bulk density, SOC, and TN. The aboveground biomass of P. glandulosa in coppice dunes was also collected for a comparison of aboveground biomass and SOC pools. Intercanopy soils had greater bulk density than soils within dunes (P<0.05), although bulk density did not vary predictably with dune size or with spatial position within each dune. No predictable within-dune SOC or TN patterns were found. Within-dune SOC and TN concentrations were significantly greater than intercanopy values (P<0.001 for both SOC and TN). There was a strong positive linear relationship between dune area and aboveground biomass (R2=0.662, P<0.007). These relationships can be used to predict SOC, TN, and aboveground biomass in coppice dunes. In contrast to patterns in the Sonoran Desert with P. velutina, predicting SOC and TN in the P. glandulosa coppice dunes does not require information on individual dune size or spatial position. The differences in SOC and TN accumulation patterns beneath P. velutina and P. glandulosa may result from

  9. Sand transverse dune aerodynamics: 3D Coherent Flow Structures from a computational study

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The engineering interest about dune fields is dictated by the their interaction with a number of human infrastructures in arid environments. The aerodynamic behaviour of sand dunes in atmospheric boundary layer belongs to the class of bluff bodies. Because of their simple geometry and their frequent occurrence in desert area, transverse sand dunes are usually adopted in literature as a benchmark to investigate dune aerodynamics by means of both computational or experimental approach, usually in nominally 2D setups. The writers suspect the flow in the wake is characterised by 3D features and affected by wind tunnel setup - e.g. blockage effect, duct side wall boundary layer, incoming velocity profile - when experimental studies are carried out. The present study aims at evaluating the 3D flow features of an idealised transverse dune under different setup conditions by means of computational simulations and to compare the obtained results with experimental measurements.

  10. Holocene dune formation at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Area, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Nicholas; Mahan, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Small isolated dune fields in the northern Mojave Desert are important centers of biodiversity and archaeological occupation sites. Currently dunes at Ash Meadows, Nevada, are stabilized by vegetation and are experiencing erosion of their upwind margins, indicating a negative sediment budget. New OSL ages from dunes at Ash Meadows indicate continuous eolian accumulation from 1.5 to 0.8 ka, with further accumulation around 0.2 ka. Prior studies (e.g., Mehringer and Warren, 1976) indicate periods of dune accumulation prior to 3.3 ka; 1.9–1 ka; and after 0.9 ka. These periods of eolian accumulation are largely synchronous with those identified elsewhere in the Mojave Desert. The composition of the Ash Meadows dunes indicates their derivation from regional fluvial sources, most likely during periods when axial washes were active as a result of enhanced winter precipitation.

  11. 77 FR 55224 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Management Plan and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Proposed Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area... Impact Statement (EIS), for the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area (ISDRA), and by this notice is... Register. ADDRESSES: Copies of the Proposed Imperial Sand Dunes RAMP and CDCA Plan Amendment/Final EIS...

  12. 75 FR 45653 - Notice of Re-Opening of Comment Period for the Draft Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Re-Opening of Comment Period for the Draft Imperial Sand Dunes... of the comment period on the Draft Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Management Plan (RAMP) and... So. 4th St., El Centro, California 92243. Copies of the Draft Imperial Sand Dunes RAMP/EIS...

  13. 75 FR 20826 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Beach and Dune Restoration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... on Beach and Dune Restoration in St. Lucie County, FL AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers... Erosion Control District (County) to construct a beach nourishment and dune restoration project along St... associated with beach nourishment and dune restoration. The primary Federal involvement associated with...

  14. Environmental controls, morphodynamic processes, and ecogeomorphic interactions of barchan to parabolic dune transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2017-02-01

    The transformation of barchans into parabolic dunes has been observed in various dune systems around the world. Precise details of how environmental controls influence the dune transformation and stabilisation mechanism, however, remain poorly understood. A 'horns-anchoring' mechanism and a 'nebkhas-initiation' mechanism have previously been proposed and selected environmental controls on the transformation have been explored by some modelling efforts, but the morphodynamic processes and eco-geomorphic interactions involved are unclear and comparison between different dune systems is challenging. This study extends a cellular automaton model, informed by empirical data from fieldwork and remote sensing, to fully explore how vegetation characteristics, boundary conditions, and wind regime influence the transformation process and the resulting dune morphologies. A 'dynamic growth function' is introduced for clump-like perennials to differentiate between growing and non-growing seasons and to simulate the development of young plants into mature plants over multiple years. Modelling results show that environmental parameters interact with each other in a complex manner to impact the transformation process. The study finds a fundamental power-law relation between a non-dimensional parameter group, so-called the 'dune stabilising index' (S*), and the normalised migration distance of the transforming dune, which can be used to reconstruct paleo-environmental conditions and monitor the impacts of changes in climate or land-use on a dune system. Four basic eco-geomorphic interaction zones are identified which bear different functionality in the barchan to parabolic dune transformation. The roles of different environmental controls in changing the eco-geomorphic interaction zones, transforming processes, and resulting dune morphologies are also clarified.

  15. Uncertainty Assessment for Numerical Modeling of Dune and Backshore Evolution Under Sea-Level Rise Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, H.; Ye, M.; Niedoroda, A. W.; Kish, S.; Donoghue, J. F.; Saha, B.

    2010-12-01

    The beach dunes play an essential role in the evolution of barrier island shapes and coastlines. The dunes protect the beaches and beach ecology by absorbing energy from the storms and provide sediment to the beaches or backshores when erosion occurs. While a number of models have been developed to simulate the evolution of dunes and backshores, few of the models have comprehensively addressed dune growth, dune erosion, and backshore changes. Based on the assumption that dune shapes are stationary, we develop a new model that can estimate the dune and backshore evolution (including both growth and erosion) under the influence of storms with different sea-level rise scenarios. The modeling results are inherently uncertain due to unknown storm variability and sea-level rise scenarios. The storm uncertainty, characterized as parametric uncertainty, and its propagation to the modeling results are assessed using the Monte Carlo (MC) method. A total of 1500 realizations of storm magnitude, frequency, and track through a barrier island are generated and used for the MC simulation. The numerical modeling and uncertainty analysis is conducted for a synthetic barrier island with physical features and hurrucane exposure similar to Santa Rosa Island, in northwest Florida. Uncertainty in the simulated beach dune heights, dune width, and the backshore positions is assessed for five sea-level rise scenarios. The parametric uncertainty is different for different sea-level rise scenarios. For a given scenario, uncertainty of dune height is the largest and it is mainly caused by uncertainty in storm magnitude. This uncertainty analysis provides guidelines for coastal management and protection of coastal ecology.

  16. Neutrino oscillations at DUNE with improved energy reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Romeri, Valentina; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Sorel, Michel

    2016-09-01

    We study the physics reach of the long-baseline oscillation analysis of the DUNE experiment when realistic simulations are used to estimate its neutrino energy reconstruction capabilities. Our studies indicate that significant improvements in energy resolution compared to what is customarily assumed are plausible. This improved energy resolution can increase the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation in two ways. On the one hand, the CP-violating term in the oscillation probability has a characteristic energy dependence that can be better reproduced. On the other hand, the second oscillation maximum, especially sensitive to δ CP, is better reconstructed. These effects lead to a significant improvement in the fraction of values of δ CP for which a 5 σ discovery of leptonic CP-violation would be possible. The precision of the δ CP measurement could also be greatly enhanced, with a reduction of the maximum uncertainties from 26° to 18° for a 300 MW·kt·yr exposure. We therefore believe that this potential gain in physics reach merits further investigations of the detector performance achievable in DUNE.

  17. Physics Reach of DUNE with a Light Sterile Neutrino

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Palazzo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the implications of one light eV scale sterile neutrino on the physics potential of the proposed long-baseline experiment DUNE. If the future short-baseline experiments confirm the existence of active-sterile oscillations, and the new mixing angles ($\\theta_{14}, \\theta_{24}, \\theta_{34}$) turn out to be comparable to $\\theta_{13}$, then it can have significant impact on mass hierarchy (MH) and CP-violation (CPV) searches at DUNE. We find that the MH sensitivity still remains above 5$\\sigma$ if the three new mixing angles are all close to $\\theta_{13}$. In contrast, it can decrease to 4$\\sigma$ if the least constrained mixing angle $\\theta_{34}$ is close to its upper limit $\\sim 30^0$. We also assess the sensitivity to the CPV induced both by the standard CP-phase $\\delta_{13} \\equiv \\delta$, and the new CP-phases $\\delta_{14}$ and $\\delta_{34}$. In the 3+1 scheme, the discovery potential of CPV induced by $\\delta_{13}$ gets substantially deteriorated compared to the 3$\

  18. Parabolic dune development modes according to shape at the southern fringes of the Hobq Desert, Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Chao; Hasi, Eerdun; Zhang, Ping; Tao, Binbin; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Yanguang

    2017-10-01

    Since the 1970s, parabolic dunes at the southern fringe of the Hobq Desert, Inner Mongolia, China have exhibited many different shapes (V-shaped, U-shaped, and palmate) each with a unique mode of development. In the study area, parabolic dunes are mainly distributed in Regions A, B, and C with an intermittent river running from the south to the north. We used high-resolution remote-sensing images from 1970 to 2014 and RTK-GPS measurements to study the development modes of different dune shapes; the modes are characterized by the relationship between the intermittent river and dunes, formation of the incipient dune patterns, the predominant source supply of dunes, and the primary formation of different shapes (V-shaped, U-shaped, and palmate). Most parabolic dunes in Region A are V-shaped and closer to the bank of the river. The original barchans in this region exhibit "disconnected arms" behavior. With the sand blown out of the riverbed through gullies, the nebkhas on the disconnected arms acquire the external sand source through the "fertile island effect", thereby developing into triangular sand patches and further developing into V-shaped parabolic dunes. Most parabolic dunes in Regions B and C are palmate. The residual dunes cut by the re-channelization of river from transverse dune fields on the west bank are the main sand source of Region B. The parabolic dunes in Region C are the original barchans having then been transformed. The stoss slopes of V-shaped parabolic dunes along the riverbank are gradual and the dunes are flat in shape. The dune crest of V-shaped parabolic dune is the deposition area, which forms the "arc-shaped sand ridge". Their two arms are non-parallel; the lateral airflow of the arms jointly transport sand to the middle part of dunes, resulting in a narrower triangle that gradually becomes V-shaped. Palmate parabolic dunes have a steeper stoss slope and height. The dune crest of the palmate parabolic dune is the erosion area, which forms

  19. Laboratory studies of dune sand for the use of construction industry in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva Jayawardena, Upali; Wijesuriya, Roshan; Abayaweera, Gayan; Viduranga, Tharaka

    2015-04-01

    With the increase of the annual sand demand for the construction industry the excessive excavation of river sand is becoming a serious environmental problem in Sri Lanka. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the possibility for an alternative to stop or at least to minimize river sand mining activities. Dune sand is one of the available alternative materials to be considered instead of river sand in the country. Large quantities of sand dunes occur mainly along the NW and SE coastal belt which belong to very low rainfall Dry Zone coasts. The height of dune deposits, vary from 1m to about 30 meters above sea level. The objective of this paper is to indicate some studies and facts on the dune sand deposits of Sri Lanka. Laboratory studies were carried out for visual observations and physical properties at the initial stage and then a number of tests were carried out according to ASTM standards to obtain the compressive strength of concrete cylinders and mortar cubes mixing dune sand and river sand in different percentages keeping a constant water cement ratio. Next the water cement ratio was changed for constant dune sand and river sand proportion. Microscopic analysis shows that the dune sand consist of 95 % of quartz and 5 % of garnet, feldspar, illmenite and other heavy minerals with clay, fine dust, fine shell fragments and organic matters. Grains are sub-rounded to angular and tabular shapes. The grain sizes vary from fine to medium size of sand with silt. The degree of sorting and particle size observed with dune sands are more suited with the requirement of fine aggregates in the construction industry. The test result indicates that dune sand could be effectively used in construction work without sieving and it is ideal for wall plastering due to its'-uniformity. It could also be effectively used in concrete and in mortars mixing with river sand. The best mixing ratio is 75% dune sand and 25% river sand as the fine aggregate of concrete. For mortar the mixing

  20. Flood-formed dunes in Athabasca Valles, Mars: Morphology, modeling, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, D.M.; Carling, P.A.; Beyer, R.A.; Lancaster, N.

    2004-01-01

    Estimates of discharge for martian outflow channels have spanned orders of magnitude due in part to uncertainties in floodwater height. A methodology of estimating discharge based on bedforms would reduce some of this uncertainty. Such a methodology based on the morphology and granulometry of flood-formed ('diluvial') dunes has been developed by Carling (1996b, in: Branson, J., Brown, A.G., Gregory, K.J. (Eds.), Global Continental Changes: The Context of Palaeohydrology. Geological Society Special Publication No. 115, London, UK, 165-179) and applied to Pleistocene flood-formed dunes in Siberia. Transverse periodic dune-like bedforms in Athabasca Valles, Mars, have previously been classified both as flood-formed dunes and as antidunes. Either interpretation is important, as they both imply substantial quantities of water, but each has different hydraulic implications. We undertook photoclinometric measurements of these forms, and compared them with data from flood-formed dunes in Siberia. Our analysis of those data shows their morphology to be more consistent with dunes than antidunes, thus providing the first documentation of flood-formed dunes on Mars. Other reasoning based on context and likely hydraulics also supports the bedforms' classification as dunes. Evidence does not support the dunes being aeolian, although a conclusive determination cannot be made with present data. Given the preponderance of evidence that the features are flood-formed instead of aeolian, we applied Carling's (1996b, in: Branson, J., Brown, A.G., Gregory, K.J. (Eds.), Global Continental Changes: The Context of Palaeohydrology. Geological Society Special Publication No. 115, London, UK, 165-179) dune-flow model to derive the peak discharge of the flood flow that formed them. The resultant estimate is approximately 2??106 m3/s, similar to previous estimates. The size of the Athabascan dunes' in comparison with that of terrestrial dunes suggests that these martian dunes took at least 1

  1. DIVERSITY OF ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI ALONG A SAND DUNE STABILIZATION GRADIENT: A CASE STUDY AT PRAIA DE JOAQUINA, ILHA DE SANTA CATARINA, SOUTH BRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species diversity of abuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was assessed along a dunes stabilization gradient (embyonic dune, foredune and fixed dune) at Praia da Joaquina (Joaquina Beach), Ilha de Santa Catarina. These dunes served as a case study to assess whether diversity and myc...

  2. Eolian deposition cycles since AD 500 in Playa San Bartolo lunette dune, Sonora, Mexico: Paleoclimatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Beatriz; Schaaf, Peter; Murray, Andrew; Caballero, Margarita; Lozano, Socorro; Ramirez, Angel

    2013-12-01

    Records of past climatic changes in desert environments are scarce due to the poor preservation of biological proxies. To overcome this lack we consider the paleoenvironmental significance and age of a lunette dune at the eastern rim of Playa San Bartolo (PSB) in the Sonoran Desert (Mexico). Thermoluminescence and optical stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) provide the chronology of lunette dune development. Mineralogical, geochemical (major, trace and REE element concentrations) and rock magnetic analyses allow for the assessment of sediment provenance and changes in the composition of the PSB dune over time. The upper 6 m of dune accumulation occurred over the past 1.5 ka, largely during AD 500-1200, a period that correlates with the Medieval climatic anomaly (AD 300-1300). Variability in composition of dune sediments is attributed to changes in sediment sources. Sand sized deposits are mainly eroded from granitoids from nearby outcrops. Sandy silt deposits, rich in evaporative minerals, resulted after the flooding of PSB, later deflation and accumulation of both detritic and authigenic components in the dune. These findings suggest that main dune accretion occurred during regionally extended drought conditions, disrupted by sporadic heavy rainfall.

  3. Ecological and environmental explanation of microbiotic crusts on sand dune scales in the Gurbantonggut Desert, Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yaning; LI Weihong; ZHOU Zhibing; LIU Jiazhen

    2005-01-01

    Results obtained from the field investigation and the analysis in laboratory show that many species of microbiotic crusts of lichens, mosses and algae develop extensively in the Gurbantonggut Desert, Xinjiang. The formation, species and distribution are closely related to the environmental conditions at the different positions of sand dunes. The animalcule crusts develop mainly on the mobile or semi-mobile sand surface of dune tops, the alga crusts develop mainly at the upper to middle parts of dune slopes, the lichen crusts develop at middle and lower parts of dune slopes, and the moss crusts are mainly distributed at the lower part of dune slopes and the interdune lowlands. The species, thickness and developing degree of microbiotic crusts increase from the upper part to the middle and lower parts of dune slopes and the interdune lowlands, and an obvious contrast between the microbiotic crusts and the different species of plant communities forms. The development and differentiation of microbiotic crusts at the different positions of dunes are the ecological appearance and the natural selection of synthetic adaptability of the different microbiotic crust species to the local environmental conditions, and are closely related to the ecological conditions, such as the physiochemical properties of soils and stability of topsoil texture.

  4. The timing of linear dune activity in the Strzelecki and Tirari Deserts, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Kathryn E.; Rhodes, Edward J.; Magee, John W.; Barrows, Timothy T.

    2007-10-01

    Linear dunes occupy more than one-third of the Australian continent, but the timing of their formation is poorly understood. In this study, we collected 82 samples from 26 sites across the Strzelecki and Tirari Deserts in the driest part of central Australia to provide an optically stimulated luminescence chronology for these dunefields. The dunes preserve up to four stratigraphic horizons, bounded by palaeosols, which represent evidence for multiple periods of reactivation punctuated by episodes of increased environmental stability. Dune activity took place in episodes around 73-66, 35-32, 22-18 and 14-10 ka. Intermittent partial mobilisation persisted at other times throughout the last 75 ka and dune activity appears to have intensified during the late Holocene. Dune construction occurred when sediment was available for aeolian transport; in the Strzelecki and Tirari Deserts, this coincided with cold, arid conditions during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 4, late MIS 3 and MIS 2, and the warm, dry climates of the late Pleistocene-Holocene transition period and late Holocene. Localised influxes of sediment on active floodplains and lake floors during the relatively more humid periods of MIS 5 also resulted in dune formation. The timing of widespread dune reactivation coincided with glaciation in southeastern Australia, along with cooler temperatures in the adjacent oceans and Antarctica.

  5. The origin of collapse features appearing in a migrating parabolic dune along the southern coast of Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyilan, Erin P.; Avis, Peter G.; Krekeler, Mark P. S.; Morris, Charles C.

    2015-12-01

    Dune decomposition chimneys are collapse features formed when migrating dunes encroach on a forest and buried trees subsequently decay, leaving a temporarily stable open hole. The recent appearance of holes on the stoss slope of Mount Baldy at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore provided an opportunity for study of such features. Mount Baldy is a large parabolic dune that is rapidly migrating onshore over a late Holocene landscape with stabilized relict parabolic dunes that supported oak (Quercus spp.) trees visible on the 1939 aerial photo. Individual holes were mapped to locations on the dune surface that would directly overlie the arm of a buried relict parabolic dune. Analyses of buried trees and surrounding sediment indicated that saprotrophic wood decay fungi continue to actively decompose trees after burial and biomineralization of a calcium-carbonate-rich cement occurs at the contact between organic material and sands. Scanning electron microscopy of the cement showed neoformed authigenic minerals and organic structures consistent in morphology with fungal hyphae. We propose that, within the dune, portions of the decayed trees progressively collapse and infill, and open holes are temporarily stabilized by the calcium-carbonate-rich cement. Further, holes can exist undetected at the surface, covered by a thin veneer of sand. Migrating dune systems are observed in many coastal and inland areas. Ongoing work must address the relative contributions of individual environmental factors on the formation of dune decomposition chimneys, including the biomineralization of cement, sand mineralogy, rate of dune movement, tree species, climate, and the composition of fungal communities.

  6. Comparison of two Satellite Imaging Platforms for Evaluating Sand Dune Migration in the Ubari Sand Sea (Libyan Fazzan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Els, A.; Merlo, S.; Knight, J.

    2015-04-01

    Sand dunes can change location, form or dimensions depending on wind direction and strength. Sand dune movements can be effectively monitored through the comparison of multi-temporal satellite images. However, not all remote sensing platforms are suitable to study sand dunes. This study compares coarse (Landsat) and fine (Worldview) resolution platforms, specifically focussing on sand dunes within the Ubari Sand Sea (Libya). Sand dune features (crest line, dune ridge basal outlines) were extracted from Landsat and Worldview 2 imagery in order to construct geomorphic maps. These geomorphic maps were then compared using image overlay and differencing, and the Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) was used to determine if the mapped dune patterns were significantly different. It was found that Landsat is a sufficient data source when studying dune patterns within a regional sand sea, but smaller dunes identified from Worldview data were not capable of being extracted in the data sourced from Landsat. This means that for studies concerned with the dune patterns and movements within sand seas, Landsat is sufficient. But in studies where the specific dynamics of specific dunes are required, a finer resolution is required; platforms such as Worldview are needed in order to gain more detailed insight and to link the past and present day climate and environmental change.

  7. Vegetation of semi-stable rangeland dunes of the Navajo Nation, Southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Redsteer, Margaret H.

    2016-01-01

    Dune destabilization and increased mobility is a worldwide issue causing ecological, economic, and health problems for the inhabitants of areas with extensive dune fields. Dunes cover nearly a third of the Navajo Nation within the Colorado Plateau of southwestern USA. There, higher temperatures and prolonged drought beginning in 1996 have produced significant increases in dune mobility. Vegetation plays an important role in dune stabilization, but there are few studies of the plants of the aeolian surfaces of this region. We examined plant species and their attributes within a moderately vegetated dune field of the Navajo Nation to understand the types and characteristics of plants that stabilize rangeland dunes. These dunes supported a low cover of mixed grass-scrubland with fifty-two perennial and annual species including extensive occurrence of non-native annual Salsola spp. Perennial grass richness and shrub cover were positively associated with increased soil sand composition. Taprooted shrubs were more common on sandier substrates. Most dominant grasses had C4 photosynthesis, suggestive of higher water-use efficiencies and growth advantage in warm arid environments. Plant cover was commonly below the threshold of dune stabilization. Increasing sand movement with continued aridity will select for plants adapted to burial, deflation, and abrasion. The study indicates plants tolerant of increased sand mobility and burial but more investigation is needed to identify the plants adapted to establish and regenerate under these conditions. In addition, the role of Salsola spp. in promoting decline of perennial grasses and shrubs needs clarification.

  8. Activation of vegetated parabolic dunes into mobile barchans under potential environmental change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Parabolic dunes are a quintessential example of the co-evolution of soil, landform, and vegetation, and they are found around the world, on coasts, river valleys, lake shores, and margins of deserts and steppes. These areas are often sensitive to changes in natural and anthropogenic forcings and socio-economic activities. Some studies have indicated parabolic dunes can lose vegetation and transform into barchan and transverse dunes by environmental change such as decreased precipitation or lowered water table, as well as anthropogenic stress such as increased burning and grazing. These transformations and shifts between states of eco-geomorphic systems may have significant implications on land management and social-economic development. This study utilises the Extended-DECAL - parameterised by field measurements of dune topography and vegetation characteristics combined with remote sensing - to explore how increases in drought stress, wind strength, and grazing stress may lead to the activation of stabilised parabolic dunes into highly mobile barchans. The modelling results show that the mobility of an initial parabolic dune at the outset of perturbations determines to a large extent the capacity of a system to absorb the environmental change, and a slight increase in vegetation cover of an initial parabolic dune can increase the activation threshold significantly. Plants with a higher deposition tolerance increase the activation threshold for the climatic impact and sand transport rate, whereas the erosion tolerance of plants influences the patterns of resulting barchans. The change in the characteristics of eco-geomorphic interaction zones may indirectly reflect the dune stability and predict an ongoing transformation, whilst the activation angle may be potentially used as a proxy of environmental stresses. In contrast to the natural environmental changes which tend to affect relatively weak and young plants, grazing stress can exert a broader impact on all

  9. Le rêve d'une fille

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁凤

    2011-01-01

    Un jour,après un cours de géographie dans un collège,une petite fille de 13 ans a transformé son argent de poche en une carte du monde dans une librairie.Elle l'a collée sur le mur devant le lit dans sa chambre.Ce monde sur papier entrait dans ses yeux dès qu'elle les ouvrait chaque matin.Elle marquait d'une étoile le pays sur cette carte du monde chaque fois qu'elle l'avait visité.Le rêve de faire un voyage dans le monde entier lui est venu à l'esprit,et est ainsi devenu une force tout au long de son parcours.

  10. Disturbance drives phylogenetic community structure in coastal dune vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunbjerg, A.K.; Borchsenius, Finn; Eiserhardt, Wolf L.

    2012-01-01

    sorting to be the dominant determinant in this metacommunity system, with soil moisture, pH, and fertility requirement patterns explaining ≥77% of the compositional gradients, while geographic factors accounted for ≤2%. Partial Mantel tests confirmed this finding, with 31.6% of the variation in species......It has long been thought that environmental factors determine plant community assembly, but it is now increasingly argued that geographic spatial processes such as dispersal may also matter. Notably, the metacommunity framework considers local communities to be linked by dispersal and different...... by the local environment and broader-scale geographic spatial processes for local plant species composition using a data set of 3924 plots from coastal dunes across a large region (Denmark). We used ordination to identify the main gradients in species composition, and Linear Mixed-Effects modelling (LME...

  11. Water resources of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, A.H.; Stark, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in a water-rich area. It borders Lake Michigan and several small streams flow through the park to the lake. Small lakes are numerous within the park and near its boundaries. Ground water is available at most places in the park and wells yield as much as 100 gallons per minute. Water from streams, lakes, wells, and springs is of good quality. Dissolved solids range from 35 to 180 mg/L in lakes, from 145 to 214 mg/L in streams, and from 136 to 468 mg/L in groundwater. Analyses of samples for pesticides and trace metals indicate that no pesticides are present in the water, and that concentrations of trace metals do not exceed recommended drinking-water standards. Surface and ground water are available in sufficient quantity in most areas of the park for the development of water supplies for visitor 's centers, campgrounds, picnic areas, and other park facilities.

  12. Sécurisation d'une Passerelle XML - SNMP

    OpenAIRE

    Collet, Laurent; Cridlig, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    ESIAL 2A. Rapport de stage.; Ce rapport présente l'implémentation d'extensions de sécurité pour une passerelle XML/SNMP. Le travail effectué se base sur une implémentation existante d'une telle passerelle et y ajoute des fonctionnalités pour établir un "continuum" de sécurité depuis les administrateurs réseaux jusqu'aux agents SNMP. Plusieurs mécanismes de sécurité ont été ajoutés : contrôle d'accès basé sur les rôles, authentification et confidentialité.

  13. Laboratory simulations of Martian gullies on sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Védie, E.; Costard, F.; Font, M.; Lagarde, J. L.

    2008-11-01

    Small gullies, observed on Mars, could be formed by groundwater seepage from an underground aquifer or may result from the melting of near-surface ground ice at high obliquity. To test these different hypotheses, a cold room-based laboratory simulation has been performed. The experimental slope was designed to simulate debris flows on sand dune slopes at a range of angles, different granulometry and permafrost characteristics. Preliminary results suggest that the typical morphology of gullies observed on Mars can best be reproduced by the formation of linear debris flows related to the melting of a near-surface ground ice with silty materials. This physical modelling highlights the role of the periglacial conditions, especially the active-layer thickness during debris-flow formation.

  14. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SOME OF THE SEDIMENT TRANSPORT EQUATIONS FOR AN ALLUVIAL CHANNEL WITH DUNES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajapeyam Srirangachar Srinivasan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a comparative evaluation of some of the well known sediment transport equations for the condition of dunes on the bed. It is fairly clear that no single equation provides reliable estimates of the total load of sediment transported for all types of bed forms. The most frequently occurring bed form being dunes, only this case is considered in this paper. The measurements of sediment transport were realized in the laboratory for various sediment sizes, utilizing a computerized tilting recirculation flume. The Yang equation (1973 was found to provide the best results for dunes.

  15. Geochemical evidence for a complex origin for the Kelso dunes, Mojave National Preserve, California USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel; Lancaster, Nicholas; Skipp, Gary L.

    2017-01-01

    The Kelso Dune field in southern California is intriguing because although it is of limited areal extent (~ 100 km2), it has a wide variety of dune forms and contains many active dunes (~ 40 km2), which is unusual in the Mojave Desert. Studies over the past eight decades have concluded that the dunes are derived primarily from a single source, Mojave River alluvium, under a dominant, westerly-to-northwesterly wind regime. The majority of these studies did not, however, present data to support the Mojave River as the only source. We conducted mineralogical and geochemical studies of most of the 14 geomorphically defined dune groups of the Kelso Dune field as well as potential sand sources, alluvial sediments from the surrounding mountain ranges. Results indicate that sands in the nine western dune groups have K/Rb and K/Ba (primarily from K-feldspar) compositions that are indistinguishable from Mojave River alluvium (westerly/northwesterly winds) and Budweiser Wash alluvium (southwesterly winds), permitting an interpretation of two sources. In contrast, sands from the five eastern dune groups have K/Rb and K/Ba values that indicate significant inputs from alluvial fan deposits of the Providence Mountains. This requires either rare winds from the east or southeast or, more likely, aeolian reworking of distal Providence Mountain fan sediments by winds from the west, at a rate greater than input from the Mojave River or other western sources. The results indicate that even a small dune field can have a complex origin, either from seasonally varying winds or complex alluvial-fan-dune interaction. Application of K/Rb and K/Ba in K-feldspar as a provenance indicator could be used in many of the world's ergs or sand seas, where dune origins are still not well understood or are controversial. Four examples are given from Africa and the Middle East where such an approach could yield useful new information about dune sand provenance.

  16. Debris disks as seen by Herschel/DUNES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhne, T.; Eiroa, C.; Augereau, J.-C.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Mora, A.; Absil, O.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Thébault, P.; Bayo, A.; del Burgo, C.; Danchi, W.; Krivov, A. V.; Lebreton, J.; Letawe, G.; Magain, P.; Maldonado, J.; Montesinos, B.; Pilbratt, G. L.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2012-06-01

    The far-infrared excesses produced by debris disks are common features of stellar systems. These disks are thought to contain solids ranging from micron-sized dust to planetesimals. Naturally, their formation and evolution are linked to those of potential planets. With this motivation, the Herschel open time key programme DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars) aims at further characterising known debris disks and discovering new ones in the regime explored by the Herschel space observatory. On the one hand, in their survey of 133 nearby FGK stars, DUNES discovered a class of extremely cold and faint debris disks, different from well-known disks such as the one around Vega in that their inferred typical grain sizes are rather large, indicating low dynamical excitation and low collision rates. On the other hand, for the more massive disk around the sun-like star HD 207129, well-resolved PACS images confirmed the ring-liked structure seen in HST images and provided valuable information for an in-depth study and benchmark for models. Employing both models for power-law fitting and collisional evolution we found the disk around HD 207129 to feature low collision rates and large grains, as well. Transport by means of Poynting-Robertson drag likely plays a role in replenishing the dust seen closer to the star, inside of the ring. The inner edge is therefore rather smooth and the contribution from the extended halo of barely bound grains is small. Both slowly self-stirring and planetary perturbations could potentially have formed and shaped this disk. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  17. Remotely sensing a cold region dune field using airborne LiDAR and high resolution aerial photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, C. A.; Jones, B. M.; Babcock, E.; Bodony, K. L.; Mann, D. H.; Larson, C. F.; Smith, J.

    2016-12-01

    Sand dunes and sheets respond to global and regional climatic changes, ecological succession, and disturbance events. Approximately 100,000 km2 of active and stable sand sheets occur in the Arctic and Subarctic today. These cold regions dunes are also subject to changes in permafrost conditions. Permafrost can influence soil moisture and vegetation, which then influences sand availability and transport. This study describes the morphometry and dynamics of the Nogahabara Dunes of interior Alaska's discontinuous permafrost zone and local permafrost conditions using 2015 airborne LiDAR, historic aerial photography, ground penetrating radar, and historical climate data. Average active dune height is 10 meters, with a maximum dune height of 28 meters. Dune spacing is approximately 130 meters. Where dunes are irregularly shaped and have variable orientation, dune spacing ranges from 40 to 200+ meters. Average dune migration between 1952 and 2015 is 63cm yr-1. Dune migration direction was variable; however, the predominant direction of movement was to the southeast. This agrees with historical wind records. Despite substantial within-field movement, the overall extent of the active dune field has not changed in 60 years. Small blow-out features were observed in the aftermath of fires that occurred in the vegetated portion of the dune field in 2015. Inferred reflectors in GPR data show that permafrost is present within the active dune field 2-4 meters below ground surface, but there does not appear to be any morphometric features directly related to permafrost. Depth-to-permafrost is shallower within the inactive dunes adjacent to the active dune field due to surface stability and cover by vegetation and insulating soil organics. Recent fire on the inactive dunes has the potential to reactivate dormant dunes through the degradation of underlying permafrost however long term monitoring will be required to validate this scenario. Acquisition of contemporary airborne Li

  18. Coastal Change Potential (CPI) Assessment of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (indu_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal change potential index (CPI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future lake-level change within Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in...

  19. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Lidar-extracted dune features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dune crest and toe positions along a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October...

  20. Coastal Change Potential (CPI) Assessment of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (indu_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal change potential index (CPI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future lake-level change within Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore...

  1. SiPMs characterization and selection for the DUNE far detector photon detection system

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yujing

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) together with the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) hosted at the Fermilab will provide a unique, world-leading program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of neutrino physics and astrophysics. CP violation in neutrino flavor mixing is one of its most important potential discoveries. Additionally, the experiment will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and precisely measure the neutrino mixing parameters which may potentially reveal new fundamental symmetries of nature. Moreover, the DUNE is also designed for the observation of nucleon decay and supernova burst neutrinos. The photon detection (PD) system in the DUNE far detector provides trigger for cosmic backgrounds, enhances supernova burst trigger efficiency and improves the energy resolution of the detector. The DUNE adopts the technology of liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) that requires the PD sensors, silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), to be carefully chosen to not only...

  2. Coastal Change Potential (CPI) Assessment of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (slbe_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal change potential index (CPI) was used to map the relative change potential of the coast to future lake-level change within Sleeping Bear Dunes National...

  3. Restoration of sand dunes along human-altered coasts: a scheme for Miramar beach, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    This paper examines the state of sand dunes of a developed coast by taking the tourist beach of Miramar (Goa), India as an example. Human actions are responsible for the degradation and elimination of these geomorphic features. The associated...

  4. Probing CP violation signal at DUNE in presence of non-standard neutrino interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Masud, Mehedi; Mehta, Poonam

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the impact of non-standard neutrino matter interactions (NSI) in propagation on the determination of CP phase in the context of the long baseline accelerator experiments such as Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). DUNE will mainly address the issue of CP violation in the leptonic sector. Here we study the role of NSI and its impact on the question of observing the CP violation signal at DUNE. We consider two scenarios of oscillation with three active neutrinos in absence and presence of NSI. We elucidate the importance of ruling out subdominant new physics effects introduced by NSI in inferring CP violation signal at DUNE by considering NSI terms collectively as well as by exploiting the non-trivial interplay of moduli and phases of the NSI terms. We demonstrate the existence of NSI-SI degeneracies which need to be eliminated in reliable manner in order to make conclusive statements about the CP phase.

  5. 77 FR 56671 - Draft Shoreline Restoration Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement for Indiana Dunes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... consequences of the alternatives on coastal processes, including sediment transport and dune formation, aquatic fauna, terrestrial habitat, threatened and endangered plant and animal species, wetlands and pannes... critical eroding areas, providing habitat opportunities, allowing for natural processes to continue, and...

  6. Coastal Change Potential (CPI) Assessment of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (indu_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal change potential index (CPI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future lake-level change within Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in...

  7. Geologic factors in the prehistoric establishment of organisms endemic to eolian dunes near Antioch, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Among geologic topics pertaining to endangered inhabitants of Antioch dunes, probably the most important are distribution of eolian sand in central California, which...

  8. Color Infrared Aerial Photosmosaics for Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Color infrared (CIR) aerial photographs were acquired as baseline imagery data to produce vegetation spatial database coverages of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore...

  9. Initiation and early development of barchan dunes: A case study of the Moroccan Atlantic Sahara desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbelrhiti, Hicham

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes field measurements that document the formation of barchan dunes in the Moroccan Atlantic Sahara desert. The first mechanism described is the transformation of patches and proto-dunes at Cap Juby beach to barchan dunes of elementary size. This transformation is discussed in relation to the wind speed and saturation length. The second mechanism is the ejection of small barchans of elementary size by other small barchans in response to the perturbation of the target barchan by two other impacting small barchans. This remote initiation is discussed in relation to the bulk flux transported by the barchan dunes involved in this interaction and to their morphology. Other modes of barchan initiation observed in the field are also presented.

  10. Coastal Change Potential (CPI) Assessment of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (slbe_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal change potential index (CPI) was used to map the relative change potential of the coast to future lake-level change within Sleeping Bear Dunes National...

  11. The Impact of Devegetated Dune Fields on North American Climate During the Late Medieval Climate Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, B. I.; Seager, R.; Miller, R. L.

    2011-01-01

    During the Medieval Climate Anomaly, North America experienced severe droughts and widespread mobilization of dune fields that persisted for decades. We use an atmosphere general circulation model, forced by a tropical Pacific sea surface temperature reconstruction and changes in the land surface consistent with estimates of dune mobilization (conceptualized as partial devegetation), to investigate whether the devegetation could have exacerbated the medieval droughts. Presence of devegetated dunes in the model significantly increases surface temperatures, but has little impact on precipitation or drought severity, as defined by either the Palmer Drought Severity Index or the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration. Results are similar to recent studies of the 1930s Dust Bowl drought, suggesting bare soil associated with the dunes, in and of itself, is not sufficient to amplify droughts over North America.

  12. Survey Data of Amphibians in Northern California Coastal Dune Drainages (2014 - 2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data describe the date, time (night vs. day), observer, and air temperature of each amphibian occupancy survey conducted in coastal dune drainages from 2014...

  13. Snow Dunes: A Controlling Factor of Melt Pond Distribution on Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrich, Chris; Eicken, Hajo; Polashenski, Christopher M.; Sturm, Matthew; Harbeck, Jeremy P.; Perovich, Donald K.; Finnegan, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The location of snow dunes over the course of the ice-growth season 2007/08 was mapped on level landfast first-year sea ice near Barrow, Alaska. Landfast ice formed in mid-December and exhibited essentially homogeneous snow depths of 4-6 cm in mid-January; by early February distinct snow dunes were observed. Despite additional snowfall and wind redistribution throughout the season, the location of the dunes was fixed by March, and these locations were highly correlated with the distribution of meltwater ponds at the beginning of June. Our observations, including ground-based light detection and ranging system (lidar) measurements, show that melt ponds initially form in the interstices between snow dunes, and that the outline of the melt ponds is controlled by snow depth contours. The resulting preferential surface ablation of ponded ice creates the surface topography that later determines the melt pond evolution.

  14. Greater Sand Dunes interagency fire management plan : environmental assessment/assessment of effect

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Assessment (EA) discusses three alternatives for the Greater Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Baca National Wildlife Refuge and...

  15. Key environmental variables determining the occurrence and life span of basiphilous dune slack vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts, EJ; Grootjans, AP

    Environmental processes controlling the occurrence of basiphilous pioneer vegetation were identified in seven representative dune slacks on the Dutch Wadden Sea Islands. The variation in vegetation and relations with soil and groundwater composition were established first. Cluster analysis of the

  16. SIR-A radar images of sand dunes and volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, R.; Elachi, C.; Evans, D.

    1982-01-01

    Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) synthetic aperture radar images of sand dunes and volcanic fields are presented and preliminary interpretation provided. The SIR-A images are compared with Seasat images where available. Unvegetated sand dunes are recorded as black areas on SIR-A images due to the specular reflection away from the sensor at the SIR-A incidence angle. Even a very small amount of vegetation provides some backscatter, however. Interdune areas frequently contain rough lag gravels which outline the dunes. Lava flows are typically very rough surfaces which are bright areas on radar images. Cinder cones are smooth and therefore black on the image unless they have a blocky crater rim at the SIR-A incidence angle. Ash dunes and ash fields are smooth and imaged as dark areas.

  17. Seasonal geomorphic processes and rates of sand movement at Mount Baldy dune in Indiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilibarda, Zoran; Kilibarda, Vesna

    2016-12-01

    Winds are very strong, frequent, and have high energy (annual DP ∼800 VU) along the southern shores of Lake Michigan, allowing the coexistence of fixed and active dunes. Six years (2007-13) of monitoring Mount Baldy in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore reveals that this is the most active coastal dune in the Great Lakes region. This paper documents aeolian processes and changes in the dune's morphology that occur temporarily, following storms, or seasonally, due to weather (climate) variations. Most of the sand transport in this area takes place during strong storms with gale force (>17.5 m/s) winds, which occur in the autumn and winter months. A single storm, such as the October 28-31, 2013 event, can contribute 25% of the annual sand transport and dune movement inland. In its most active year (June 1, 2011 through May 31, 2012), Mount Baldy moved inland on average 4.34 m, with a maximum of 6.52 m along the blowout's axis (155° azimuth). During this particularly active season, there were six storms with sustained gale force winds, winter air temperatures were warmer than average, and shelf ice on Lake Michigan lasted only one day. The dune is least active during the summer season, when the winds are weakest. The late fall and winter winds are the strongest. But in a typical year, most of the dune's advance inland takes place during the spring thaw when sand is released from over-steepened and lumpy slip face, allowing it to avalanche to the toe of the slip face. However, with a warming air temperatures, a reduction in the duration of winter shelf ice, and rising Lake Michigan levels, the annual rates of sand transport and dune movement may increase. The recent Mount Baldy management strategy, which includes planting vegetation and installing wind barriers on the dune's stoss side in an effort to fix the dune and stop its further movement inland, may potentially cause the destruction of the mobile sand, open dune habitat, resulting in the extinction of rare

  18. Dune convergence/divergence controlled by residual current vortices in the Jade tidal channel, south-eastern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Adam; Kösters, Frank; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    A field of large to very large subaqueous dunes was investigated in the Jade tidal channel, south-eastern North Sea, between January 2006 and October 2011. A ground-truthed sidescan sonar sediment map shows that the dunes, which are located on top of a consolidated clay surface, are composed of medium to coarse sand. A series of 35 consecutive high-resolution bathymetric surfaces collected by multibeam echosounder revealed a complex migration pattern induced by the reversing tidal currents. Various parts of the dune field are under the influence of either ebb- or flood-dominated currents, as indicated by dune asymmetries. Although some dunes migrate at a pace exceeding 100 m/year, the majority are displaced by 30 m/year in the direction of the locally dominant current. In the deepest part of the channel, however, dunes were observed to converge head-on, resulting in practically zero net transport with minor oscillations of symmetrical dunes at the apex. Applying the numerical UnTRIM model for the simulation of the fair-weather hydrology, a simplified map of residual current vectors over the dune field was generated. The residual flow vectors are found to perfectly match the derived dune migration vectors, suggesting that dune convergence is controlled by two counter-rotating residual current vortices caused by the local shape of the tidal channel. As no sediment build-up is observed, a mechanism of sediment bypassing with potential recirculation must exist, but has not yet been identified.

  19. Sedimentary rhythms in coastal dunes as a record of intra-annual changes in wind climate (Łeba, Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, J.; Lindhorst, S.; Betzler, C.; Bierstedt, S. E.; Borówka, R. K.

    2017-08-01

    It is shown that coastal dunes bear a so far unread archive of annual wind intensity. Active dunes at the Polish coast near Łeba consist of two genetic units: primary dunes with up to 18 m high eastward-dipping foresets, temporarily superimposed by smaller secondary dunes. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data reveal that the foresets of the primary dunes are bundled into alternating packages imaged as either low- or high-amplitude reflections. High-amplitude packages are composed of quartz sand with intercalated heavy-minerals layers. Low-amplitude packages lack these heavy-mineral concentrations. Dune net-progradation is towards the east, reflecting the prevalence of westerly winds. Winds blowing parallel to the dune crest winnow the lee slope, leaving layers enriched in heavy minerals. Sediment transport to the slip face of the dunes is enhanced during the winter months, whereas winnowing predominantly takes place during the spring to autumn months, when the wind field is bi-directional. As a consequence of this seasonal shift, the sedimentary record of one year comprises one low- and one high-amplitude GPR reflection interval. This sedimentary pattern is a persistent feature of the Łeba dunes and recognized to resemble a sedimentary "bar code". To overcome hiatuses in the bar code of individual dunes and dune-to-dune variations in bar-code quality, dendrochronological methods were adopted to compile a composite bar code from several dunes. The resulting data series shows annual variations in west-wind intensity at the southern Baltic coast for the time period 1987 to 2012. Proxy-based wind data are validated against instrumental based weather observations.

  20. Quantification of Dune Response over the Course of a 6-Day Nor'Easter, Outer Banks, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, K. L.; Spore, N.; Swann, C.

    2014-12-01

    The amount and type of foredune morphologic change during a storm event primarily scales with the level of inundation during that event. Specifically, external hydrodynamic forcing (total water level) can be compared with antecedent beach and foredune morphology to predict an impact regime that relates to the type of expected morphologic evolution of the system. For example, when total water levels are above the dune toe, but below the dune crest, the impact regime is classified as "collision" and the expected morphology response is slumping or scarping of the dune face. While the amount of dune retreat scales largely with the duration of wave attack to the dune face, characteristics of the dune other than its crest or toe elevation may also enhance or impede rates of morphologic change. The aftermath of Hurricane Sandy provided a unique opportunity to observe alongshore variations in dune response to a 6-day Nor'Easter (Hs >4 m in 6 m depth), as a variety of dunes were constructed (or not) by individual home owners in preparation for the winter storm season. Daily terrestrial lidar scans were conducted along 20 km of coastline in Duck, NC using Coastal Lidar And Radar Imaging System (CLARIS) during the first dune collision event following Sandy. Foredunes were grouped by their pre-storm form (e.g. vegetated, pushed, scarped, etc) using automated feature extraction tools based on surface curvature and slope, and daily rates of morphologic volume change were calculated. The highest dune retreat rates were focused along a 1.5 km region where cross-shore erosion of recently pushed, un-vegetated dunes reached 2 m/day. Variations in dune response were analyzed in relation to their pre-storm morphology, with care taken to normalize for alongshore variations in hydrodynamic forcing. Ongoing research is focused on identifying specific metrics that can be easily extracted from topographic DEMs to aid in dune retreat predictions.

  1. Natural and anthropogenic factors affecting freshwater lenses in coastal dunes of the Adriatic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Davide; Greggio, Nicolas; Antonellini, Marco; Giambastiani, Beatrice Maria Sole

    2017-08-01

    This study characterizes the near-shore portion of the shallow coastal aquifer included in the Ravenna area (Northern Italy) with special attention to the roles of coastal dunes as freshwater reservoirs and their buffer on groundwater salinity. The paper focuses on the presence and evolution of freshwater lenses below coastal dunes and highlights the existing differences between preserved natural dunes and dunes strongly affected by human intervention. The influence that multiple natural and anthropogenic factors, such as land cover, local drainage network, and beach erosion have on the presence, size and evolution of the freshwater lenses in the aquifer is quantified and discussed. The methodology includes multiple seasonal monitoring and sampling campaigns of physical (water level, salinity, and temperature) and chemical (major cations and anions) groundwater parameters. Results indicate that freshwater lenses, where existing, are limited in thickness (about 1-2 m). Proximity to drainage ditches as well as limited dune elevation and size do not allow the formation and permanent storage of large freshwater lenses in the aquifer below the dunes. The pine forest land cover, that replaced the typical bush or sand cover, intensifies evapotranspiration reducing net infiltration and freshwater storage. The cation species distribution in the water shows that a freshening process is ongoing in preserved natural sites with stable or advancing beaches, whereas a salinization process is ongoing in anthropogenic-impacted areas with strongly-fragmented dune systems. Currently, the thin freshwater lenses in the shallow Ravenna coastal aquifer are limited in space and have no relevance for irrigation or any other human activity. The dune-beach system, however, is the recharge zone of the coastal aquifer and its protection is important to reduce water and soil salinization, which in turn control the health of the whole coastal ecosystem.

  2. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of aeolian sand in the otindag dune field and holocene climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.L.; Lu, H.Y.; Mason, J.; Miao, X.D.; Swinehart, J.; Goble, R.

    2008-01-01

    The dune system in Otindag sand field of northern China is sensitive to climate change, where effective moisture and related vegetation cover play a controlling role for dune activity and stability. Therefore, aeolian deposits may be an archive of past environmental changes, possibly at the millennial scale, but previous studies on this topic have rarely been reported. In this study, thirty-five optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of ten representative sand-paleosol profiles in Otindag sand field are obtained, and these ages provide a relatively complete and well-dated chronology for wet and dry variations in Holocene. The results indicate that widespread dune mobilization occurred from 9.9 to 8.2 ka, suggesting a dry early Holocene climate. The dunes were mainly stabilized between 8.0 and 2.7 ka, implying a relatively wet climate, although there were short-term penetrations of dune activity during this wet period. After ???2.3 ka, the region became dry again, as inferred from widespread dune activity. The "8.2 ka" cold event and the Little Ice Age climatic deterioration are detected on the basis of the dune records and OSL ages. During the Medieval Warm Period and the Sui-Tang Warm Period (570-770 AD), climate in Otindag sand field was relatively humid and the vegetation was denser, and the sand dunes were stabilized again. These aeolian records may indicate climate changes at millennial time scale during Holocene, and these climatic changes may be the teleconnection to the climate changes elsewhere in the world. ?? Science in China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2008.

  3. Yearly progress report on WA105/ProtoDUNE dual-phase (2017)

    CERN Document Server

    Aimard, B

    2017-01-01

    WA105/ProtoDUNE dual-phase aims at fully demonstrating the concept of a very large dual-phase LAr TPC and calibrating it with a charged particles test beam, in view of the application of this detector design for the construction of DUNE 10 kton far detector modules. In this document we report the general progress of the dual-phase experimental activities at CERN since the last SPSC yearly report.

  4. Coherent Flow Structures and Suspension Events over Low-angle Dunes: Fraser River, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, R. W.; Venditti, J. G.; Kostaschuk, R. A.; Hendershot, M. L.; Allison, M. A.; Church, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Increasing observations show that dunes with low-angle lee-sides (MBES) while an acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp) simultaneously provided flow and suspended sediment measurements over a range of flows through tidal cycles. At high tide, river flow nearly ceases and a salt wedge enters the channel, forcing plumes of salt water towards the surface into the downstream moving fresh water above as the wedge moves upstream over the dunes. The salt wedge persists in the channel causing stratification in water column and one-sided instabilities along the saline-fresh water interface until the late in the falling tide. At low tide, mean velocities peak and force the saline water out of the channel. Flow over the low-angle dunes displays topographically induced flow patterns similar to previously observed over high-angle dunes, but permanent flow separation is notably absent. Sediment-laden kolks emerge as important suspended sediment transport agents during low tide but become more coherent, yet less frequent, structures as the tide begins to rise. Kolks appear to form downstream of dune crests along the shear layer that is likely formed by intermittent flow separation. Kolks also form at the reattachment point and grow over the stoss slope of the dunes. This is consistent with the generation of hairpin vortices formed near the bed that lift into the flow and grow to the surface through an 'autogeneration' mechanism. Persistent downwelling and periodic sweeps at dune crests provide a mechanism for sediment erosion and entrainment while periodic ejection motions or kolks in a zone of persistent upwelling at the lower stoss provide a mechanism sediment suspension. Kolks are estimated to move ~70% of the total sediment in the flow above dunes when they are present in the water column.

  5. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of aeolian sand in the Otindag dune field and Holocene climate change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph; MASON; James; SWINEHART; Ronald; GOBLE

    2008-01-01

    The dune system in Otindag sand field of northern China is sensitive to climate change, where effective moisture and related vegetation cover play a controlling role for dune activity and stability. Therefore, aeolian deposits may be an archive of past environmental changes, possibly at the millennial scale, but previous studies on this topic have rarely been reported. In this study, thirty-five optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of ten representative sand-paleosol profiles in Otindag sand field are ob-tained, and these ages provide a relatively complete and well-dated chronology for wet and dry varia-tions in Holocene. The results indicate that widespread dune mobilization occurred from 9.9 to 8.2 ka, suggesting a dry early Holocene climate. The dunes were mainly stabilized between 8.0 and 2.7 ka, implying a relatively wet climate, although there were short-term penetrations of dune activity during this wet period. After ~2.3 ka, the region became dry again, as inferred from widespread dune activity. The "8.2 ka" cold event and the Little Ice Age climatic deterioration are detected on the basis of the dune records and OSL ages. During the Medieval Warm Period and the Sui-Tang Warm Period (570-770 AD), climate in Otindag sand field was relatively humid and the vegetation was denser, and the sand dunes were stabilized again. These aeolian records may indicate climate changes at millennial time scale during Holocene, and these climatic changes may be the teleconnection to the climate changes elsewhere in the world.

  6. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of aeolian sand in the Otindag dune field and Holocene climate change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YaLi; LU HuaYu; Joseph MASON; MIAO XiaoDong; James SWINEHART; Ronald GOBLE

    2008-01-01

    The dune system in Otindag sand field of northern China is sensitive to climate change, where effective moisture and related vegetation cover play a controlling role for dune activity and stability. Therefore, aeolian deposits may be an archive of past environmental changes, possibly at the millennial scale, but previous studies on this topic have rarely been reported. In this study, thirty-five optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of ten representative sand-paleosol profiles in Otindag sand field are ob-tained, and these ages provide a relatively complete and well-dated chronology for wet and dry varia-tions in Holocene. The results indicate that widespread dune mobilization occurred from 9.9 to 8.2 ka, suggesting a dry early Holocene climate. The dunes were mainly stabilized between 8.0 and 2.7 ka, implying a relatively wet climate, although there were short-term penetrations of dune activity during this wet period. After ~2.3 ka, the region became dry again, as inferred from widespread dune activity. The "8.2 ka" cold event and the Little Ice Age climatic deterioration are detected on the basis of the dune records and OSL ages. During the Medieval Warm Period and the Sui-Tang Warm Period (570-770 AD), climate in Otindag sand field was relatively humid and the vegetation was denser, and the sand dunes were stabilized again. These aeolian records may indicate climate changes at millennial time scale during Holocene, and these climatic changes may be the teleconnection to the climate changes elsewhere in the world.

  7. Les étapes du développement d'une entreprise

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, Urs

    2009-01-01

    Les étapes du développement d'une entreprise s'accompagnent d'une nécessité d'accommodation aux changements de l'environnement: on parle alors d'adaptabilité de l'entreprise. Quels événements et quels changements sont susceptibles de déclencher des mesures d'adaptation? Comment une petite entreprise peut-elle anticiper de tels événements?

  8. On the origin and age of the Great Sand Dunes, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madole, Richard F.; Romig, Joe H.; Aleinikoff, John N.; VanSistine, D. Paco; Yacob, Ezra Y.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past 100 yr, several hypotheses have been proposed for the origin and age of the Great Sand Dunes. These hypotheses differ widely in the descriptions of dune morphometry, the immediate source of eolian sand, and when sand transport occurred. The primary purpose of this paper is to evaluate these hypotheses and, where warranted, to present new ideas about the origin and age of the Great Sand Dunes. To evaluate the previous hypotheses, we had to develop more detailed information about the surficial geology of the northern San Luis Valley. Thus, we mapped the surficial geology of an area extending several tens of kilometers north, south, and west of the Great Sand Dunes and examined subsurface stratigraphy in more than 200 wells and borings. In addition, we used relative-dating criteria and several radiocarbon and OSL ages to establish the chronology of surficial deposits, and we determined the U-Pb ages of detrital zircons to obtain information about the sources of the sand in the Great Sand Dunes. The first principal finding of this study is that the lower part of the closed basin north of the Rio Grande, referred to here as the sump, is the immediate source of the sand in the Great Sand Dunes, rather than the late Pleistocene flood plain of the Rio Grande (the most widely accepted hypothesis). A second principal finding is that the Great Sand Dunes are older than late Pleistocene. They postdate the draining of Lake Alamosa, which began ˜ 440 ka, and predate the time when streams draining the west flank of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains were deflected by incipient dunes that formed near the mountain front. Geomorphic and stratigraphic evidence indicate that this deflection occurred prior to the end of the next to last glaciation (Bull Lake), i.e., prior to ˜ 130 ka.

  9. A Preliminary Account of the Dune Communities at Pennington Park, Mtunzini, Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Moll

    1972-12-01

    Full Text Available A general description of Pennington Park is given, and some of the more important environmental factors affecting the plant communities are discussed. The structure, distribution and ecology of the various dune communities, from pioneers to Dune Forest, is given. The importance of Pennington Park as a conservation area is discussed in the light of the paucity of comparable sites and the human pressure on this type of environment.

  10. Radar Imaging of Volcanic Fields and Sand Dune Fields: Implications for VOIR

    OpenAIRE

    Elachi, C.; Blom, R; Daily, M.; Farr, T; Saunders, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A number of volcanic fields and sand dune fields in the western part of North America were studied using aircraft and Seasat synthetic aperture radar images and LANDSAT images. The capability of radars with different characteristics (i.e., frequency, polarization and look angles was assessed to identify and map different volcanic features, lava flows and sand dune types. It was concluded that: (1) volcanic features which have a relatively large topographic expression (i.e., cinder cones, coll...

  11. Sediment flux from linear dunes morphodynamics in the Ténéré desert (Niger)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Antoine; Narteau, Clément; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Rozier, Olivier; Callot, Yann; Garcia, Amandine; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    Linear dune development under complex wind regimes is hindered by our limited comprehension of the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, sand flux calculation in remote areas relies mainly on the migration rate of barchans using remote-sensing data. Based on more than 50 years of aerial and satellite imagery over the Ténéré desert (Niger), we were able to isolate and therefore show that the observed linear dunes in this area elongate from topographic obstacles in the direction of the resultant sand flux with no lateral migration. These elongating lee dunes are therefore ideal for quantifying the dune growth from extension only. Using photogrammetric techniques we calculated a sediment flux of 30m2/yr. We also emphasized the development sequences from numerical simulations and show how deposition downstream of low hills results in nucleation and development of bedforms that can later break into barchans and ultimately lead to Segmentation and ejection of linear dunes. As consequences, similarly to the classical approach using the barchans migration rates under unidirectional winds, we can now take advantage of the morphodynamics of linear dunes experiencing complex wind regimes for sediment flux and wind conditions assessment.

  12. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in Southwestern Saudi Arabian Dune Sand

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2013-05-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration. Rainwater is commonly stored within them because of the low permeability soils in the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the “extinction depth”, where it is protected from evaporation during long dry periods. Moreover, desert sand dunes have sparse vegetation, which results in low transpiration losses from the stored water. The water accumulated below the extinction depth of the sand dunes can be utilized for various purposes such as in irrigation to support desert agriculture. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. The dune sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation). The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded using transducers and sensors installed at different depths monitored the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS-1D was used to construct the vertical profiles of soil water content and temperature and the results obtained from HYDRUS-1D were compared to the gradients monitored by the sensors.

  13. Plant functional traits and diversity in sand dune ecosystems across different biogeographic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, P.; Bergmeier, E.

    2016-07-01

    Plant species of a functional group respond similarly to environmental pressures and may be expected to act similarly on ecosystem processes and habitat properties. However, feasibility and applicability of functional groups in ecosystems across very different climatic regions have not yet been studied. In our approach we specified the functional groups in sand dune ecosystems of the Mediterranean, Hyrcanian and Irano-Turanian phytogeographic regions. We examined whether functional groups are more influenced by region or rather by habitat characteristics, and identified trait syndromes associated with common habitat types in sand dunes (mobile dunes, stabilized dunes, salt marshes, semi-wet sands, disturbed habitats). A database of 14 traits, 309 species and 314 relevés was examined and trait-species, trait-plot and species-plot matrices were built. Cluster analysis revealed similar plant functional groups in sand dune ecosystems across regions of very different species composition and climate. Specifically, our study showed that plant traits in sand dune ecosystems are grouped reflecting habitat affiliation rather than region and species pool. Environmental factors and constraints such as sand mobility, soil salinity, water availability, nutrient status and disturbance are more important for the occurrence and distribution of plant functional groups than regional belonging. Each habitat is shown to be equipped with specific functional groups and can be described by specific sets of traits. In restoration ecology the completeness of functional groups and traits in a site may serve as a guideline for maintaining or restoring the habitat.

  14. Dune formation in dilute phase pneumatic transport system: PIV & PTV based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhalani, Sumit; Patankar, Atharva; Makawana, Ajay; Bose, Manaswita

    2017-06-01

    Flow of gas-solid mixture through horizontal conveying section show a large variety of phenomena and is broadly classified into dilute and dense unstable regimes. Different types of instabilities are observed in the dense phase flow and are widely studied in literature; however, clustering instabilities are observed in the very dilute regime of flow with volume fraction 0.001. A recent study has shown that regular, stable dune shaped clusters are formed in a small regime of the dilute phase of conveying. The dunes become unstable as the superficial gas velocity is decreased before it finally leads to the dense mode of conveying. The motivation of the current work is to investigate the velocity distribution on the surface of the stable and unstable dunes and thereby understand the cause behind the formation of the dunes in the conveying section. To that end, particle image and tracking velocimetry techniques are employed with the specific objective to determine the volume fraction and the velocity profile of the solid phase on the stable dune surface. A drastic change in the solid fraction within a few particle diameters from the dune surface suggests that PTV is more appropriate in the bulk whereas PIV is suitable for near surface investigation.

  15. CFD evaluation of erosion rate around a bridge near a sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Huang, Ning; Dun, Hongchao; Wang, Wenbo

    2017-04-01

    This study performs a series of simulations through solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the RNG k-ε turbulence model to investigate the wind erosion rates around a bridge in a desert area with sand dunes. The digital elevation model of sand dunes and the bridge model are obtained respectively from hypsographic map and construction drawings. Through combining them into the CFD software of Fluent the simulation zone was formed. The data of wind speed obtained from field observation is fitted into a logarithm format, which was imported into Fluent model as a inlet wind speed condition. Then, the effect of Dun-Go railway on wind-blown sand movement of the neighbouring environment is simulated. The results exhibit that affected by both the sand dune and bridge, the flow field is in a complex condition. It is also shown that the bridge in upstream of the sand dune will not increase the sand transport rate intensively, but change both wind velocity gradient and turbulence kinetic energy over surface of sand dune. On the other hand, when the bridge is built downstream the sand dune, simulation results show that sand deposition rate would be decreased in reference region downstream the pier.

  16. Mesophilic Actinomycetes in the natural and reconstructed sand dune vegetation zones of Fraser Island, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtböke, D I; Neller, R J; Bellgard, S E

    2007-08-01

    The natural coastal habitat of Fraser Island located in the State of Queensland, Australia, has been disturbed in the past for mining of the mineral sand ilmenite. Currently, there is no information available on whether these past mining disturbances have affected the distribution, diversity, and survival of beneficial soil microorganisms in the sand dunes of the island. This in turn could deleteriously affect the success of the natural regeneration, plant growth, and establishment on the sand dunes. To support ongoing restoration efforts at sites like these mesophilic actinomycetes were isolated using conventional techniques, with particular emphasis on the taxa previously reported to produce plant-growth-promoting substances and providing support to mycorrhizal fungi, were studied at disturbed sites and compared with natural sites. In the natural sites, foredunes contained higher densities of micromonosporae replaced by increasing numbers of streptomycete species in the successional dune and finally leading to complex actinomycete communities in the mature hind dunes. Whereas in the disturbed zones affected by previous mining activities, which are currently being rehabilitated, no culturable actinomycete communities were detected. These findings suggest that the paucity of beneficial microflora in the rehabilitated sand dunes may be limiting the successful colonization by pioneer plant species. Failure to establish a cover of plant species would result in the mature hind dune plants being exposed to harsh salt and climatic conditions. This could exacerbate the incidence of wind erosion, resulting in the destabilization of well-defined and vegetated successional dunal zones.

  17. The growth responses of coastal dune species are determined by nutrient limitation and sand burial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Matthew; Pammenter, Norman; Ripley, Brad

    2008-05-01

    Past work suggests that burial and low nutrient availability limit the growth and zonal distribution of coastal dune plants. Given the importance of these two factors, there is a surprising lack of field investigations of the interactions between burial and nutrient availability. This study aims to address this issue by measuring the growth responses of four coastal dune plant species to these two factors and their interaction. Species that naturally experience either high or low rates of burial were selected and a factorial burial by nutrient addition experiment was conducted. Growth characteristics were measured in order to determine which characteristics allow a species to respond to burial. Species that naturally experience high rates of burial (Arctotheca populifolia and Scaevola plumieri) displayed increased growth when buried, and this response was nutrient-limited. Stable-dune species had either small (Myrica cordifolia, N-fixer) or negligible responses to burial (Metalasia muricata), and were not nutrient-limited. This interspecific difference in response to burial and/or fertiliser is consistent with the idea that burial maintains the observed zonation of species on coastal dunes. Species that are unable to respond to burial are prevented from occupying the mobile dunes. Species able to cope with high rates of burial had high nitrogen-use efficiencies and low dry mass costs of production, explaining their ability to respond to burial under nutrient limitation. The interaction between burial and nutrient limitation is understudied but vital to understanding the zonation of coastal dune plant species.

  18. Quantifying wind blown landscapes using time-series airborne LiDAR at White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Wind blown landscapes are a default geomorphic and sedimentary environment in our solar system. Wind sand dunes are ubiquitous features on the surfaces of Earth, Mars and Titan and prevalent within the aeolian rock records of Earth and Mars. Dunes are sensitive to environmental and climatic changes and a complete understanding of this system promises a unique, robust and quantitative record of paleoclimate extending to the early histories of these worlds. However, our understanding of how aeolian dune landscapes evolve and how the details of the wind are recorded in cross-strata is limited by our lack of understanding of three-dimensional dune morphodynamics related to changing boundary conditions such as wind direction and magnitude and sediment source area. We use airborne LiDAR datasets over 40 km2 of White Sands Dune Field collected from June 2007, June 2008, January 2009, September 2009 and June 2010 to quantify 1) three-dimensional dune geometries, 2) annual and seasonal patterns of erosion and deposition across dune topography, 3) spatial changes in sediment flux related to position within the field, 4) spatial changes in sediment flux across sinuous crestlines and 5) morphologic changes through dune-dune interactions. In addition to measurements, we use the LiDAR data along with wind data from two near-by weather stations to develop a simple model that predicts depositional and stratigraphic patterns on dune lee slopes. Several challenges emerged using time series LiDAR data sets at White Sands Dune Field. The topography upon which the dunes sit is variable and rises by 16 meters over the length of the dune field. In order to compare individual dune geometries across the field and between data sets a base surface was interpolated from local minima and subtracted from the dune topography. Co-registration and error calculation between datasets was done manually using permanent vegetated features within the active dune field and structures built by the

  19. Environmental implications of the use of sulfidic back-bay sediments for dune reconstruction — Lessons learned post Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Benzel, William M.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Hageman, Philip L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Adams, Monique; Berry, Cyrus J.; Fischer, Jeffrey; Fisher, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Some barrier-island dunes damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Sandy's storm surges in October 2012 have been reconstructed using sediments dredged from back bays. These sand-, clay-, and iron sulfide-rich sediments were used to make berm-like cores for the reconstructed dunes, which were then covered by beach sand. In November 2013, we sampled and analyzed partially weathered materials collected from the cores of reconstructed dunes. There are generally low levels of metal toxicants in the reconstructed dune materials. However oxidation of reactive iron sulfides by percolating rainwater produces acid-sulfate pore waters, which evaporate during dry periods to produce efflorescent gypsum and sodium jarosite salts. The results suggest use of sulfidic sediments in dune reconstruction has both drawbacks (e.g., potential to generate acid runoff from dune cores following rainfall, enhanced corrosion of steel bulwarks) and possible benefits (e.g., efflorescent salts may enhance structural integrity).

  20. Environmental implications of the use of sulfidic back-bay sediments for dune reconstruction - Lessons learned post Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S; Benzel, William M; Hoefen, Todd M; Hageman, Philip L; Morman, Suzette A; Reilly, Timothy J; Adams, Monique; Berry, Cyrus J; Fischer, Jeffrey M; Fisher, Irene

    2016-06-30

    Some barrier-island dunes damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Sandy's storm surges in October 2012 have been reconstructed using sediments dredged from back bays. These sand-, clay-, and iron sulfide-rich sediments were used to make berm-like cores for the reconstructed dunes, which were then covered by beach sand. In November 2013, we sampled and analyzed partially weathered materials collected from the cores of reconstructed dunes. There are generally low levels of metal toxicants in the reconstructed dune materials. However oxidation of reactive iron sulfides by percolating rainwater produces acid-sulfate pore waters, which evaporate during dry periods to produce efflorescent gypsum and sodium jarosite salts. The results suggest use of sulfidic sediments in dune reconstruction has both drawbacks (e.g., potential to generate acid runoff from dune cores following rainfall, enhanced corrosion of steel bulwarks) and possible benefits (e.g., efflorescent salts may enhance structural integrity).

  1. Dynamic dune management, integrating objectives of nature development and coastal safety: Examples from the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Sebastiaan M.; Mulder, Jan P. M.; Slings, Quirinus L.; Geelen, Luc H. W. T.; Damsma, Petra

    2013-10-01

    This paper discusses and compares results of management interventions to remobilise dunes and obtain more autonomous changes in foredunes resulting from a change in coastal defence policy. In recent decades, nature conservation managers tried to restore aeolian dynamics and dune mobility landward of foredunes to maintain threatened, rare pioneer species. Results indicate that destabilisation activities yielded an important increase of blowing sand and its effects on ecology but with a limited effect on the desired integral remobilization of dunes. Roots remaining in the sand after removal of vegetation and soil is one of the main problems. Follow up removal of roots for 3 to 5 years seems to be essential, but it is not clear whether the dunes will remain mobile in the long term. In 1990 the Dutch government decided to maintain the position of the coastline by artificial sand nourishment. An intensive management of the foredunes was no longer required. Consequently, natural processes in the foredunes revived, and the sediment budget of the beach-dune system changed. Two main types of responses are visible. In some areas, increased input of sand resulted in the development of embryonic dunes seaward of the former foredunes, leading to increased stabilisation of the former foredunes. In other areas, development of embryonic dunes was insignificant despite the increased sand input, but wind erosion features developed in the foredunes, and the environment was more dynamic. The reasons for the differences are not clear, and the interaction between shoreface, beach and dunes is still poorly understood. Until now, attempts to mobilise the inner dunes were independent of changes made to the foredunes. We argue that an integrated, dynamic approach to coastal management, taking account of all relevant functions (including safety and natural values) and the dune-beach system as a whole, may provide new and durable solutions. An integrated approach would ideally provide fresh

  2. Turbulence characteristics of open channel flow over non-equilibrium 3-D mobile dunes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRASHANTH REDDY HANMAIAHGARI; RAM BALACHANDAR

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports velocity measurements over mobile dunes using an acoustic Doppler velocimetry (ADV). Experiments were conducted with two different flow conditions resulting in the formation of two different size mobile dunes. Dunes height, wavelength and velocity of dunes found to be increasing with increase in average flow velocity for a constant flow depth. The quasi-stationary bed condition was assumed while measuring the velocity distribution along the depth. The effect of the non-equilibrium mobile dunes on the flow characteristics and turbulence is examined by computing turbulent intensities, turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stresses using time averaged and time–space averaged velocity measurements. The magnitudes of transverse velocities are approximately 1/10 of streamwise velocities and vertical velocities are approximately half of the transverse velocities. The considerable magnitudes of transverse velocities over mobile bedforms necessitate measurement of 3-D velocity components to analyze the flow field. Computed turbulence intensities are found to be maximum in the region consisting of the trough and the reattachment point of the dunes. It is observed that streamwise turbulence intensities near the bed are twice the transverse turbulence intensities, and transverse turbulence intensities are twice the vertical turbulence intensities. Reynolds stresses (transverse fluxes of streamwise and vertical momentum) are observed to be high on mobile bedforms which shows mobile dunes reinforce the secondary currents. Peak values of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and Reynolds stresses are also found in the region consisting of the trough and the reattachment point. It is visually observed in the present experiments that maximum erosion takes place at the reattachment point and eroded sediment is carried as totalload and dropped on the lee slope of the subsequent downstream dune. This phenomenon is caused by flow expansion in the separation zone

  3. The investigation of active Martian dune fields using very high resolution photogrammetric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungrack; Kim, Younghwi; Park, Minseong

    2016-10-01

    At the present time, arguments continue regarding the migration speeds of Martian dune fields and their correlation with atmospheric circulation. However, precisely measuring the spatial translation of Martian dunes has succeeded only a very few times—for example, in the Nili Patera study (Bridges et al. 2012) using change-detection algorithms and orbital imagery. Therefore, in this study, we developed a generic procedure to precisely measure the migration of dune fields with recently introduced 25-cm resolution orbital imagery specifically using a high-accuracy photogrammetric processor. The processor was designed to trace estimated dune migration, albeit slight, over the Martian surface by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on hierarchical geodetic control for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout the sensor model refinement with a non-rigorous bundle block adjustment, which makes possible the co-alignment of all images in a time series; and 3) improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Moreover, volumetric changes of Martian dunes were additionally traced by means of stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using high-resolution HIRISE time-series images over several Martian dune fields. Dune migrations were iteratively processed both spatially and volumetrically, and the results were integrated to be compared to the Martian climate model. Migrations over well-known crater dune fields appeared to be almost static for the considerable temporal periods and were weakly correlated with wind directions estimated by the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al. 2015). As a result, a number of measurements over dune fields in the Mars Global Dune Database (Hayward et al. 2014) covering polar areas and mid-latitude will be demonstrated

  4. Radar scattering of linear dunes and mega-yardangs: Application to Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillou, Philippe; Seignovert, Benoît; Radebaugh, Jani; Wall, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    The Ku-band (13.8 GHz - 2.2 cm) RADAR instrument onboard the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has revealed the richness of the surface of Titan, as numerous seas, lakes, rivers, cryo-volcanic flows and vast dune fields have been discovered. Linear dunes are a major geomorphological feature present on Titan, covering up to 17% of its surface, mainly in equatorial regions. However, the resolution of the RADAR instrument is not good enough to allow a detailed study of the morphology of these features. In addition, other linear wind-related landforms, such as mega-yardangs (linear wind-abraded ridges formed in cohesive rocks), are likely to present a comparable radar signature that could be confused with the one of dunes. We conducted a comparative study of the radar radiometry of both linear dunes and mega-yardangs, based on representative terrestrial analogues: the linear dunes located in the Great Sand Sea in western Egypt and in the Namib Desert in Namibia, and the mega-yardangs observed in the Lut Desert in eastern Iran and in the Borkou Desert in northern Chad. We analysed the radar scattering of both terrestrial linear dunes and mega-yardangs, using high-resolution radar images acquired by the X-band (9.6 GHz - 3.1 cm) sensor of the TerraSAR-X satellite. Variations seen in the radar response of dunes are the result of a contrast between the dune and interdune scattering, while for mega-yardangs these variations are the result of a contrast between ridges and erosion valleys. We tested a simple surface scattering model, with parameters derived from the local topography and surface roughness estimates, to accurately reproduce the radar signal variations for both landforms. It appears that we can discriminate between two types of dunes - bare interdunes as in Egypt and sand-covered interdunes as in Namibia, and between two types of mega-yardangs - young yardangs as in Iran and older ones as in Chad. We applied our understanding of the radar scattering to the analysis of

  5. Desert dune growth and development: measurements of airflow and morphological change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddock, Matthew; Wiggs, Giles; Nield, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    The early stages of dune development remain a poorly understood aspect of bedform evolution. Flow-form feedbacks, however, are recognised to be fundamental in driving bedform growth across different stages of dune development. Specifically, the growth of aeolian bedforms has been linked theoretically with the location of the maximum windspeed at a point upwind of the bedform crest. This upwind position of maximum velocity, combined with the relaxation length scale for sand transport (Lsat) allows sand deposition in the crestal region of dunes, a necessity for vertical growth of the dune body. To date, there has been only limited empirical evidence of this process on a small number of individual dunes. We present field data from the Skeleton Coast dunefield in Namibia on the morphological change of a suite of bedforms over the full range of dune development stages (i.e. sand patch, protodune, dome and barchan dune). Our investigations include measurements at both high-energy event timescales and over a multi-annual period. For the event-scale periods, near-surface airflow measurements have been undertaken coincident with high frequency surface change allowing the coupling of flow dynamics and morphological change to the stage of dune development. This paper will highlight the extent to which the crestal flow velocity patterns elucidate the distribution of erosion and deposition for the range bedform types. For example, the airflow over the protodune demonstrates the crest-upwind velocity shift coinciding with patterns of sediment deposition and vertical growth. Annual change of the established dunes (dome and barchan) reveals features maintaining their shape while migrating, while also increasing their overall sediment volume. While flow-form measurements indicate the importance of airflow dynamics in driving dune growth as observed over the short term, multi-year change reveals shrinkage of both the sand patch and protodune at our study site. Such long term

  6. Analysis of Wind-blown Sand Movement over Transverse Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanjian

    2014-12-01

    Wind-blown sand movement often occurs in a very complicated desert environment where sand dunes and ripples are the basic forms. However, most current studies on the theoretic and numerical models of wind-blown sand movement only consider ideal conditions such as steady wind velocity, flat sand surface, etc. In fact, the windward slope gradient plays a great role in the lift-off and sand particle saltation. In this paper, we propose a numerical model for the coupling effect between wind flow and saltating sand particles to simulate wind-blown sand movement over the slope surface and use the SIMPLE algorithm to calculate wind flow and simulate sands transport by tracking sand particle trajectories. We furthermore compare the result of numerical simulation with wind tunnel experiments. These results prove that sand particles have obvious effect on wind flow, especially that over the leeward slope. This study is a preliminary study on windblown sand movement in a complex terrain, and is of significance in the control of dust storms and land desertification.

  7. Wind Erosion and Dune Formation on High Frozen Bluffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, W. M.; Marsh, B. D.

    1984-01-01

    Frost penetration increases upslope on barren, windswept bluffs in cold environments. Along the south shore of Lake Superior, near the brow of 100 m high bluffs it typically exceeds 5 m. Frost increases the shear strength of damp sand to a level comparable to that of concrete, making winter slopes highly stable despite undercutting by waves and ground-water sapping along the footslope. Sublimation of interparticle ice in the slope face increases with wind speed and lower vapor pressures. The cold and dry winter winds of Lake Superior ablate these slopes through loss of binding ice. Wind erosion rates, based on measurements of sand accumulation on the forest floor downwind of the brow, show most airborne sand falls out within several meters of the brow, forming a berm 1 to 3 m high after many years. The spatial pattern of sand deposition, however, varies considerably over distances of several hundred meters along the top bluffs in response to frost conditions and the build-up of gravel lag on the slope face, sand exposure from mass movements, and local aerodynamics of the crest slope. The formation of perched sand dunes in the Great Lakes region is clearly related to wind erosion of sand from high bluffs in winter. Broadly similar processes may operate on Mars.

  8. Projet d'une philosophie extra-ordinaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Cassou-Noguès

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Le but de cet article est de discuter d'une méthode philosophique, une façon de faire de la philosophie, fondée sur la fiction narrative. Il s'agit de réfléchir sur le recours à la fiction en philosophie ou d'en rendre l'usage explicite, systématique et de le fonder. L'hypothèse de départ est que la fiction narrative est le mode de donation du possible tel que l'exige l'analyse philosophique. Je commence par discuter de cette hypothèse avant de la confronter à la variation éidétique de Husserl et de l'opposer à l'idée d'ordinaire telle que l'on peut la tirer des remarques du deuxième Wittgenstein.The aim of this paper is to discuss a philosophical method based on narrative fiction. I attempt to make systematic, and to give a foundation to, the use of narrative fictions in philosophy. My hypothesis is that narrative fiction opens up the possible as it is required by the philosophical analysis. I start by introducing this hypothesis. I then compare it with the eidetic variation in Husserl's phenomenology. Finally, I oppose a philosophical method, based on this hypothesis, to a philosophy of the ordinary, drawn from the second Wittgenstein.

  9. Neutrino oscillations at DUNE with improved energy reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    De Romeri, Valentina; Sorel, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We study the physics reach of the long-baseline oscillation analysis of the DUNE experiment when realistic simulations are used to estimate its neutrino energy reconstruction capabilities. Our studies indicate that significant improvements in energy resolution compared to what is customarily assumed are plausible. This improved energy resolution can increase the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation in two ways. On the one hand, the CP-violating term in the oscillation probability has a characteristic energy dependence that can be better reproduced. On the other hand, the second oscillation maximum, especially sensitive to $\\delta_{CP}$, is better reconstructed. These effects lead to a significant improvement in the fraction of values of $\\delta_{CP}$ for which a $5 \\sigma$ discovery of leptonic CP-violation would be possible. The precision of the $\\delta_{CP}$ measurement could also be greatly enhanced, with a reduction of the maximum uncertainties from $26^\\circ$ to $18^\\circ$ for a 300~MW$\\cdot$kt$\\cdot$yr ...

  10. Eye development in the Cape dune mole rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Natalya V; Kidson, Susan H

    2014-03-01

    Studies on mammalian species with naturally reduced eyes can provide valuable insights into the evolutionary developmental mechanisms underlying the reduction of the eye structures. Because few naturally microphthalmic animals have been studied and eye reduction must have evolved independently in many of the modern groups, novel evolutionary developmental models for eye research have to be sought. Here, we present a first report on embryonic eye development in the Cape dune mole rat, Bathyergus suillus. The eyes of these animals contain all the internal structures characteristic of the normal eye but exhibit abnormalities in the anterior chamber structures. The lens is small but develops normally and exhibits a normal expression of α- and γ-crystallins. One of the interesting features of these animals is an extremely enlarged and highly pigmented ciliary body. In order to understand the molecular basis of this unusual feature, the expression pattern of an early marker of the ciliary zone, Ptmb4, was investigated in this animal. Surprisingly, in situ hybridization results revealed that Ptmb4 expression was absent from the ciliary body zone of the developing Bathyergus eye.

  11. Advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar (InSAR) for Dune Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havivi, Shiran; Amir, Doron; Schvartzman, Ilan; August, Yitzhak; Mamman, Shimrit; Rotman, Stanely R.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available lose particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970s, remote sensing imagery, both optical and radar, have been used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two or more images. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR methods. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This work aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the coherence change detection method was used, in order to identify dune stability or instability and the dune activity level. The Nitzanim-Ashdod coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of

  12. Method of Relating Grain Size Distribution to Hydraulic Conductivity in Dune Sands to Assist in Assessing Managed Aquifer Recharge Projects: Wadi Khulays Dune Field, Western Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Lopez Valencia, Oliver M.

    2015-11-12

    Planning for use of a dune field aquifer for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) requires that hydraulic properties need to be estimated over a large geographic area. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of dune sands is commonly estimated from grain size distribution data by employing some type of empirical equation. Over 50 samples from the Wadi Khulays dune field in Western Saudi Arabia were collected and the grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured. An evaluation of 20 existing empirical equations showed a generally high degree of error in the predicted compared to the measured hydraulic conductivity values of these samples. Statistical analyses comparing estimated versus measured hydraulic conductivity demonstrated that there is a significant relationship between hydraulic conductivity and mud percentage (and skewness). The modified Beyer equation, which showed a generally low prediction error, was modified by adding a second term fitting parameter related to the mud concentration based on 25 of the 50 samples analyzed. An inverse optimization process was conducted to quantify the fitting parameter and a new empirical equation was developed. This equation was tested against the remaining 25 samples analyzed and produced an estimated saturated hydraulic conductivity with the lowest error of any empirical equation. This methodology can be used for large dune field hydraulic conductivity estimation and reduce planning costs for MAR systems.

  13. Method of Relating Grain Size Distribution to Hydraulic Conductivity in Dune Sands to Assist in Assessing Managed Aquifer Recharge Projects: Wadi Khulays Dune Field, Western Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver M. Lopez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Planning for use of a dune field aquifer for managed aquifer recharge (MAR requires that hydraulic properties need to be estimated over a large geographic area. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of dune sands is commonly estimated from grain size distribution data by employing some type of empirical equation. Over 50 samples from the Wadi Khulays dune field in Western Saudi Arabia were collected and the grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured. An evaluation of 20 existing empirical equations showed a generally high degree of error in the predicted compared to the measured hydraulic conductivity values of these samples. Statistical analyses comparing estimated versus measured hydraulic conductivity demonstrated that there is a significant relationship between hydraulic conductivity and mud percentage (and skewness. The modified Beyer equation, which showed a generally low prediction error, was modified by adding a second term fitting parameter related to the mud concentration based on 25 of the 50 samples analyzed. An inverse optimization process was conducted to quantify the fitting parameter and a new empirical equation was developed. This equation was tested against the remaining 25 samples analyzed and produced an estimated saturated hydraulic conductivity with the lowest error of any empirical equation. This methodology can be used for large dune field hydraulic conductivity estimation and reduce planning costs for MAR systems.

  14. The role of sexual vs. asexual recruitment of Artemisia wudanica in transition zone habitats between inter-dune lowlands and active dunes in Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongcui; Alberto, Busso Carlos; Jiang, Deming; Ala, Musa; Li, Xuehua; Zhou, Quanlai; Lin, Jixiang; Ren, Guohua; Jia, Lian

    2016-04-01

    Artemisia wudanica is an endemic, perennial, pioneering psammophyte species in the sand dune ecosystems of western Horqin Sand Land in northern China. However, no studies have addressed how sexual and asexual reproduction modes of A. wudanica perform at the transitional zones between active dune inter-dune lowlands and active dunes. In early spring, quadrats were randomly set up in the study area to monitor surviving seedling and/or ramet density and frequency coming from sexual/asexual reproduction of A. wudanica. Iron sticks were inserted near each quadrat to determine wind erosion intensity (WE). Additionally, soil samples were collected nearby each quadrat to test for soil moisture (SM), organic matter (OM) and pH. Surviving seedlings of A. wudanica showed an inverse response in comparison with ramets to SM, OM and WE. Soil moisture showed the most positive effect, and WE the negative effect, on surviving, sexual reproduction seedlings. Contrarily, WE had the most positive effect, and SM the negative effect, on asexual reproduction ramets. This suggests that increases in SM and decreases in WE should benefit recruitment of A. wudanica seedlings. On the contrary, ramets coming from asexual reproduction showed a different response to environmental factors in transition zone habitats. While SM was not a key constraint for the survival of seedlings, they showed a better, positive response to wind erosion environments. Overall, various study environmental parameters could be improved to foster A. wudanica invasion and settlement in the plant community through different reproductive modes, thereby promoting vegetation restoration and rehabilitation.

  15. Post-storm evolution a high-energy remote sandy beach backed by a high and wide coastal dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelle, Bruno; Bujan, Stéphane; Ferreira, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    During the winter 2013/2014, the high-energy meso-macrotidal remote beach of Truc Vert (SW France) was exposed to the most energetic wave conditions over at least the last 65 years with, for instance, the 2-month averaged significant wave height at the coast exceeding 3.6 m. Unprecedented beach and dune erosion was observed with the notable presence of a 700-m long localized megacusp embayment with the erosion scarp height exceeding 6 m in its centre where the dune retreat reached 30 m. Both the beach and the coastal dune eroded by about 90 m3/m within 3 months of severe storm activity, that is, a total beach-dune system sediment loss reaching 180m3/m. Beach and dune evolution after the winter 2013/2014 was inspected from March 2014 to November 2015 using bimonthly topographic surveys covering 1500+ m alongshore. 1.5 years after the winter 2014/2015, the beach-dune system did not fully recover to its pre-winter 2014/2015 level. The dune accreted by only a few m3/m while the beach accreted by an impressive amount of approximately 150m3/m, to reach a total volume that was only exceeded in 2012 within our full 10-year time series. Despite little volumetric changes, the dune showed significant morphological change through slumping and onshore wave- and wind-driven sediment transport. Seasonal natural revegetation was observed with large dune grass growth into the summer berm and within the erosion scarp with slumped clots of dune grass re-establishing their growth during the winter 2014/2015. In late 2015, the onset of morphological foredune development was observed. It is anticipated that, if Truc Vert is not exposed to a cluster of severe storms during the winter 2015/2016, the coastal dune will increase in volume within 2016 at a much higher rate than during 2015. Last but not least, starting in late 2015, the coastal dune of Truc Vert is now intensively monitored through regular 4-km long UAV photogrammetric surveys. Given that, nowadays, some scientists advocate

  16. Observations regarding the movement of barchan sand dunes in the Nazca to Tanaca area of southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker Gay, S.

    1999-03-01

    Significant studies of sand dunes and sand movement made in coastal southern Peru in 1959-1961 [Gay, S.P., 1962. Origen, distribución y movimiento de las arenas eólicas en el área de Yauca a Palpa. Boletin de la Sociedad Geologica del Perú 37, 37-58] have never been published in the English language and consequently have never been referred to in the standard literature. These studies contain valuable information, not developed by later workers in this field, that may be of broad general interest. For example, using airphotos of barchan dunes and plotting the rates of movement vs. dune widths, the author quantified the deduction of Bagnold [Bagnold, R.A., 1941. The Physics of Blown Sand and Desert Dunes. Methuen, London.] that the speed of barchan movement is inversely proportional to barchan size (as characterized by height or width). This led to the conclusion that all barchans in a given dune field, regardless of size, sweep out approximately equal areas in equal times. Another conclusion was that collisions between smaller, overtaking dunes and larger dunes in front of them do not result in destruction or absorption of the smaller dunes if the collision is a `sideswipe'. The dunes simply merge into a compound dune for a time, and the smaller dune then moves on intact, i.e., passes, the larger dune, whilst retaining its approximate original size and shape. Another result of the 1959-1961 studies was a map that documents the Pacific coast beaches as the source of the sand ( Fig. 1), which is then blown inland through extensive dune fields of barchans and other dune forms in great clockwise-sweeping paths, to its final resting place in huge sand masses, sometimes called `sand seas' [Lancaster, N., 1995. Geomorphology of Desert Dunes. Routledge, London], at higher elevations 20 to 60 km from the coast. A minor, but nevertheless interesting, discovery was a small heavy mineral dune located directly in the lee of a large barchan, evidently formed by the winnowing

  17. Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3): North polar region (MC-1) distribution, applications, and volume estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3) now extends from 90??N to 65??S. The recently released north polar portion (MC-1) of MGD3 adds ~844 000km2 of moderate- to large-size dark dunes to the previously released equatorial portion (MC-2 to MC-29) of the database. The database, available in GIS- and tabular-format in USGS Open-File Reports, makes it possible to examine global dune distribution patterns and to compare dunes with other global data sets (e.g. atmospheric models). MGD3 can also be used by researchers to identify areas suitable for more focused studies. The utility of MGD3 is demonstrated through three example applications. First, the uneven geographic distribution of the dunes is discussed and described. Second, dune-derived wind direction and its role as ground truth for atmospheric models is reviewed. Comparisons between dune-derived winds and global and mesoscale atmospheric models suggest that local topography may have an important influence on dune-forming winds. Third, the methods used here to estimate north polar dune volume are presented and these methods and estimates (1130km3 to 3250km3) are compared with those of previous researchers (1158km3 to 15 000km3). In the near future, MGD3 will be extended to include the south polar region. ?? 2011 by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  18. Changes in plant species composition of coastal dune habitats over a 20-year period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Silvia; Prisco, Irene; Acosta, Alicia T. R.; Stanisci, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Coastal sandy ecosystems are increasingly being threatened by human pressure, causing loss of biodiversity, habitat degradation and landscape modifications. However, there are still very few detailed studies focussing on compositional changes in coastal dune plant communities over time. In this work, we investigated how coastal dune European Union (EU) habitats (from pioneer annual beach communities to Mediterranean scrubs on the landward fixed dunes) have changed during the last 20 years. Using phytosociological relevés conducted in 1989–90 and in 2010–12, we investigated changes in floristic composition over time. We then compared plant cover and the proportion of ruderal, alien and habitat diagnostic species (‘focal species’) in the two periods. Finally, we used Ellenberg indicator values to define the ‘preferences’ of the plant species for temperature and moisture. We found that only fore dune habitats showed significant differences in species cover between the two time periods, with higher plant cover in the more recent relevés and a significant increase in thermophilic species. Although previous studies have demonstrated consistent habitat loss in this area, we observed that all coastal dune plant communities remain well represented, after a 20-year period. However, fore dunes have been experiencing significant compositional changes. Although we cannot confirm whether the observed changes are strictly related to climatic changes, to human pressure or to both, we hypothesize that a moderate increment in average yearly temperature may have promoted the increase in plant cover and the spread of thermophilic species. Thus, even though human activities are major driving forces of change in coastal dune vegetation, at the community scale climatic factors may also play important roles. Our study draws on re-visitation studies which appear to constitute a powerful tool for the assessment of the conservation status of EU habitats. PMID:25750408

  19. A meta-analysis of plant facilitation in coastal dune systems: responses, regions, and research gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanho, Camila de Toledo; Lortie, Christopher J; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Prado, Paulo Inácio

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies in salt marshes, arid, and alpine systems support the hypothesis that facilitation between plants is an important ecological process in severe or 'stressful' environments. Coastal dunes are both abiotically stressful and frequently disturbed systems. Facilitation has been documented, but the evidence to date has not been synthesized. We did a systematic review with meta-analysis to highlight general research gaps in the study of plant interactions in coastal dunes and examine if regional and local factors influence the magnitude of facilitation in these systems. The 32 studies included in the systematic review were done in coastal dunes located in 13 countries around the world but the majority was in the temperate zone (63%). Most of the studies adopt only an observational approach to make inferences about facilitative interactions, whereas only 28% of the studies used both observational and experimental approaches. Among the factors we tested, only geographic region mediates the occurrence of facilitation more broadly in coastal dune systems. The presence of a neighbor positively influenced growth and survival in the tropics, whereas in temperate and subartic regions the effect was neutral for both response variables. We found no evidence that climatic and local factors, such as life-form and life stage of interacting plants, affect the magnitude of facilitation in coastal dunes. Overall, conclusions about plant facilitation in coastal dunes depend on the response variable measured and, more broadly, on the geographic region examined. However, the high variability and the limited number of studies, especially in tropical region, indicate we need to be cautious in the generalization of the conclusions. Anyway, coastal dunes provide an important means to explore topical issues in facilitation research including context dependency, local versus regional drivers of community structure, and the importance of gradients in shaping the outcome of net

  20. Morphologic characteristics and migration rate assessment of barchan dunes in the Southeastern Western Desert of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, M. A.; Refaat, A. A.; Abdel Wahed, M.

    2016-03-01

    This work explores the morphologic characteristics of aeolian dune sand in the southeastern part of Western Desert of Egypt. It aims to assess the movement of barchan dunes and evaluate their environmental influence on the Toshka Project. Morphometric investigation of barchan dunes in the Toshka area revealed that most barchans have high length/width (a/c) ratios (fat to pudgy), while one-fifth of the studied barchans have lower a/c ratios and so appear normal in their morphologic forms. Statistical analysis of the main parameters of barchan dunes in Toshka and other desert regions in the Kharga (Egypt), Kuwait, Southern Morocco, California and Southern Peru demonstrates that barchans of the Toshka area are distinctive in their appearance. They are characterized by distinct aspect with higher values of length and width and greater growth in height. The high-energy wind environment in addition to the large amount of drifting sand are principal factors responsible for the unique shape of Toshka barchans. The migration rate of barchan dunes in four chosen test locations, within the central and western Toshka area, ranges from about 3 to 10.82 m/year. The calculated average migration rate of these dunes is about 6 m/year in a SSW direction. Sand encroachment is more extensive in the central and western parts of the investigated Toshka area. Risk evaluation of sand dune movements in the southeastern part of the Western Desert points to medium to high sand encroachment risk values. These may represent serious hazards to the newly-established Toshka Project, threatening roads, as well as cultivated lands in the area.

  1. The persistence of large-scale blowouts in largely vegetated coastal dune fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Fernandez, Irene; Smyth, Thomas; Jackson, Derek; Davidson-Arnott, Robin; Smith, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Coastal dunes move through natural phases of stability and instability during their evolution, displaying various temporal and spatial patterns across the dune field. Recent observations, however, have shown exceptionally rapid rates of stability through increased vegetative growth. This progressive vegetation colonisation and consequent loss of bare sand on coastal dune systems has been noted worldwide. Percentage reductions in bare sand of as much as 80% within just a few decades can been seen in examples from South Africa, Canada and Brazil as well as coastal dune sites across NW Europe. Despite these dramatic trends towards dune stabilisation, it is not uncommon to find particular examples of large-scale active blowouts and parabolic dunes within largely vegetated coastal dunes. While turbulence and airflow dynamics within features such as blowouts and other dune forms has been studied in detail within recent years, there is a lack of knowledge about what maintains dune mobility at these specific points in otherwise largely stabilized dune fields. This work explores the particular example of the 'Devil's Hole' blowout, Sefton Dunes, NW England. Approximately 300 m long by 100 m wide, its basin is below the water-table which leads to frequent flooding. Sefton Dunes in general have seen a dramatic loss of bare sand since the 1940s. However, and coinciding with this period of dune stabilisation, the 'Devil's Hole' has not only remained active but also grown in size at a rate of 4.5 m year-1 along its main axis. An exploration of factors controlling the maintenance of open bare sand areas at this particular location is examined using a variety of techniques including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) airflow modelling and in situ empirical measurements of (short-term experiments) of wind turbulence and sand transport. Field measurements of wind parameters and transport processes were collected over a 2 week period during October 2015. Twenty three 3D ultrasonic

  2. The morphology and morphodynamics of sand-gravel subaquatic dunes: the Raba River estuary, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur RADECKI-PAWLIK

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the outlet of the Raba River to the Vistula, the biggest river in Poland, the morphology and morphodynamics of sand and fine-gravel subaquatic dunes were investigated. The site is situated in highland region just about the entrance to Polish Carpathians. The dunes formed on the Raba River bed estuary are composed of sand and fine gravel (d50 up to 11 mm. Systematic observation (within the 2000-2005 were made of geometry, sediment composition and hydraulic climate under which the dunes grew and decomposed. The investigation focuses here mostly on the geometrical parameters of these bed forms such as height, length, as well as granulometric characteristics of the sediment. Based on in-site measurements different hydraulic parameters were calculated such as shear stresses, resistant coefficient, Froude and Reynolds numbers and roughness coefficient. It was found that the relation between height (H and length (L of the Raba estuary dunes describes the formula: H = 0.05L0.35. Also these dunes are steeper and flatter then classical H/L index is: H/L = 0.0518L0.622. During the field campaign, when the foot access to the estuary was possible and dunes were spotted on the river bed the range of measured water velocity was from v = 0.39 m∙s-1 to v = 0.81 m∙s-1 with the highest velocity over the dune crest. At the same time the measured range of shear stresses within the dune field formation were from t = 0.115 N×m-2 to t = 1.59 N×m-2. On the field investigations the CCHE2D - two-dimensional unsteady flow and sediment transport model for non-equilibrium transport of non-uniform sediment mixtures – was applied. The model was used to simulate the morphodynamic changes along the outlet of the Raba River basing on field observations of the 2005 summer flood as well as calculate hydraulics parameters. It was also used to test and confirm the range of morphodynamic changes, which take place along the research reach where the dunes are being developed

  3. Present-day formation and seasonal evolution of linear dune gullies on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquon, Kelly; Gargani, Julien; Massé, Marion; Conway, Susan J.

    2016-08-01

    Linear dune gullies are a sub-type of martian gullies. As their name suggests they only occur on sandy substrates and comprise very long (compared to their width) straight or sinuous channels, with relatively small source areas and almost non-existent visible deposits. Linear dune gullies have never been observed on terrestrial dunes and their formation process on Mars is unclear. Here, we present the results of the first systematic survey of these features in Mars' southern hemisphere and an in-depth study of six dunefields where repeat-imaging allows us to monitor the changes in these gullies over time. This study was undertaken with HiRISE images at 25-30 cm/pix and 1 m/pix elevation data derived from HiRISE stereo images. We find the latitudinal distribution and orientation of linear dune gullies broadly consistent with the general population of martian gullies. They occur predominantly between 36.3°S and 54.3°S, and occasionally between 64.6°S and 70.4°S. They are generally oriented toward SSW (at bearings between 150° and 260°). We find that these gullies are extremely active over the most recent 5 Martian years of images. Activity comprises: (1) appearance of new channels, (2) lengthening of existing channels, (3) complete or partial reactivation, and (4) disappearance of gullies. We find that gully channels lengthen by ∼100 m per year. The intense activity and the progressive disappearance of linear dune gullies argues against the hypothesis that these are remnant morphologies left over from previous periods of high obliquity millions of years ago. The activity of linear dune gullies reoccurs every year between the end of winter and the beginning of spring (Ls 167.4°-216.6°), and coincides with the final stages of the sublimation of annual CO₂ ice deposit. This activity often coincides spatially and temporally with the appearance of recurrent diffusing flows (RDFs)-digitate-shaped, dark patches with low relative albedo (up to 48% lower than the

  4. Radar scattering of linear dunes and mega-yardangs: Application to Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Paillou, Philippe; Radebaugh, Jani; Wall, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The Ku-band (13.8 GHz - 2.2 cm) RADAR instrument onboard the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has revealed the richness of the surface of Titan, as numerous seas, lakes, rivers, cryo-volcanic flows and vast dune fields have been discovered. Linear dunes are a major geomorphological feature present on Titan, covering up to 17% of its surface, mainly in equatorial regions. However, the resolution of the RADAR instrument is not good enough to allow a detailed study of the morphology of these features. In addition, other linear wind-related landforms, such as mega-yardangs (linear wind-abraded ridges formed in cohesive rocks), are likely to present a comparable radar signature that could be confused with the one of dunes. We conducted a comparative study of the radar radiometry of both linear dunes and mega-yardangs, based on representative terrestrial analogues: the linear dunes located in the Great Sand Sea in western Egypt and in the Namib Desert in Namibia, and the mega-yardangs observed in the Lut Desert in easter...

  5. Radionuclide transfer to invertebrates and small mammals in a coastal sand dune ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M.D., E-mail: mwood@liv.ac.uk [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER)/School of Biological Sciences, Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside, L69 3GP (United Kingdom); Leah, R.T. [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER)/School of Biological Sciences, Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside, L69 3GP (United Kingdom); Jones, S.R. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., The Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria, CA24 3LN (United Kingdom); Copplestone, D. [Environment Agency, PO Box 12, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Latchford, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    International intercomparisons of models to assess the impact of ionising radiation on wildlife have identified radionuclide transfer assumptions as a significant source of uncertainty in the modelling process. There is a need to improve the underpinning data sets on radionuclide transfer to reduce this uncertainty, especially for poorly-studied ecosystems such as coastal sand dunes. This paper presents the results of the first published study of radionuclide transfer to invertebrates and small mammals in a coastal sand dune ecosystem. Activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are reported for detritivorous, herbivorous, carnivorous and omnivorous biota. Differences in activity concentrations measured in the sand dune biota are related to the trophic level of the organisms and the influence of sea-to-land transfer is apparent in the food chain transfer observed at the site. There are notable differences in the concentration ratios (CRs) calculated for the sand dune biota compared to other terrestrial ecosystems, especially for the small mammals which have CRs that are two orders of magnitude lower than the generic terrestrial ecosystem CRs published by the recent EC EURATOM ERICA project. The lower CRs at the sand dunes may be due to the influence of other cations from the marine environment (e.g. K and Na) on the net radionuclide transfer observed, but further research is required to test this hypothesis.

  6. Structural variations of sand-bearing airflow over dune at southeastern fringe of Tengger Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasi Eerdum

    2004-01-01

    From the analytical results of observed data on sand transport rates at different positions of dune surface at southeastern fringe of Tengger Desert, it has been found that the vertical distribution of blown sand flux exhibits a noticeable variation when sand grains move upslope and downslope of dune surface under the action of wind force. Within the height of 20 cm above the sand surface, the vertical distribution of mass flux at different positions from toe to dune crest of stoss slope of sand dunes coincides with a single exponentially decaying law; while the vertical distribution of mass flux over the lee slope occurs as two variable zones, with the height of 8—12 cm as the dividing line, the sand transport rate below this height exponentially decreases with increasing height, but above this height decreases in a power function law. On the stoss slope, the relative sand transport rate in the upper layer of sand flow tends to decrease with the increasing wind velocity and the total sand transport rate towards the dune crest due to the shortened trajectory length of saltation sand grains moving upslope. On the lee slope, the increase in lift-off height and trajectory length of saltation sand grains moving downslope leads to the increase in relative sand transport rate in the upper layer of sand flow.

  7. Early Holocene dune activity linked with final destruction of Glacial Lake Minong, eastern Upper Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, Henry M.; Loope, Walter L.; Goble, Ronald J.; Fisher, Timothy G.; Jol, Harry M.; Seong, J. C.

    2010-07-01

    The early Holocene final drainage of glacial Lake Minong is documented by 21 OSL ages on quartz sand from parabolic dunes and littoral terraces and one radiocarbon age from a lake sediment core adjacent to mapped paleoshorelines in interior eastern Upper Michigan. We employ a simple model wherein lake-level decline exposes unvegetated littoral sediment to deflation, resulting in dune building. Dunes formed subsequent to lake-level decline prior to stabilization by vegetation and provide minimum ages for lake-level decline. Optical ages range from 10.3 to 7.7 ka; 15 ages on dunes adjacent to the lowest Lake Minong shoreline suggest final water-level decline ˜ 9.1 ka. The clustering of optical ages from vertically separated dunes on both sides of the Nadoway-Gros Cap Barrier around 8.8 ka and a basal radiocarbon date behind the barrier (8120 ± 40 14C yr BP [9.1 cal ka BP]) support the hypothesis that the barrier was breached and the final lake-level drop to the Houghton Low occurred coincident with (1) high meltwater flux into the Superior basin and (2) an abrupt, negative shift in oxygen isotope values in Lake Huron.

  8. Three-dimensional airflow and sediment transport patterns over barchan dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander B.; Jackson, Derek W. T.; Cooper, J. Andrew G.

    2017-02-01

    Airflow dynamics and potential sediment transport were measured and modelled across various barchan dune topographies and incident wind conditions. Modification of near surface flow was recorded simultaneously in three dimensions (3D) using dense arrays of high-resolution 3D ultrasonic anemometers. In situ measurements provided rigorous validation and calibration for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. Measured and modelled results show good agreement between flow velocity, directionality, and turbulence intensity. Modelling of characteristic airflow conditions and surface shear stress beyond the instrument locations, elucidated airflow dynamics across the entire landform surface at an unprecedented level of detail. Emergent turbulent airflow patterns were identified in the form of two counter-rotating vortices that converge at the dune centreline downwind of the dune crest. Integrating a sediment transport function with CFD surface airflow allows for the spatial mapping of flux patterns across the entirety of the dune and interdune surface. On the stoss slope and laterally along the outer barchan arms, there is strong potential sediment flux in response to increased streamwise stress. In lee-side locations, sediment transport remains at 'above threshold' conditions and is redirected in response to complex turbulent vortices identified in the overlying wake zone. The precision of the models allows for the identification of complex flow perturbations and associated surface stresses that prove difficult to measure in the field. CFD in combination with a sediment transport function is demonstrated to be a useful tool in investigating morphodynamics of mobile dune systems.

  9. Vulnerability and fate of a coastal sand dune complex, Rosetta-Idku, northwestern Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Banna, Mahmoud M.

    2008-05-01

    Types, distribution, and origin of recent sand dunes between Rosetta and Idku, in the western sector of the Nile Delta, Egypt were investigated. Sand samples from the dunes, beach, and seafloor were studied for grain size distribution and mineralogical composition. It has been found that most of the dunes in the study area have been subjected to deterioration and removal due to the construction of buildings and the International Coastal Highway. The remnant constitutes a damaged belt of foredunes that extends from El Bouseily village to the west of Idku town. The dune’s origin is interpreted to be the result of coastal drifting and the subsequent transport of sediments of the former Canopic Nile branch eastward by the predominant longshore current and by aeolian processes. The blown sand grains accumulated to form a belt of coastal sand dunes of original longitudinal and crescentic forms. Urbanization of the coast has severely altered the landscape. The study area is considered vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and the expected rise in sea level. The outcome of potential sea level rise is serious; erosion problems are expected to be exacerbated and vast areas from land and property would be lost. Thus, protection and preservation the remaining dunes in the study area are vital requirements for shore protection.

  10. Holocene development of parabolic dunes in the central St. Lawrence Lowland, Québec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filion, Louise

    1987-09-01

    Stabilized parabolic dunes in the central St. Lawrence Lowland are oriented NE-SW, in the postulated direction of dune-building winds coming from anticyclonic air circulation induced by the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet about 10,000 yr ago. The eolian chronology reconstructed from several sections in mixed dune-peatland environments indicates that postglacial plant colonization, characterized by a fortuitous assemblage of arctic-subarctic and boreal elements, preceded dune formation during Champlain Sea regression around 10,000 yr B.P. Confined peatlands and small forests were buried by eolian sands between 10,000 and 7500 yr B.P. under dry and temperate conditions. This eolian episode lasted about 2500 14C yr and ended when cyclonic air circulation similar to the present humid climatic regime was established following the breakup and disappearance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet over Hudson Bay and peripheral areas. Dune stabilization, through paludification of well-drained eolian sands about 7500 yr B.P., suggests a major shift in climate toward wetter conditions that have been characteristic during most of the Holocene in eastern North America. Minor eolian erosion induced by wildfire was recorded during late Holocene time (about 1250 yr B.P.). Anthropogenic perturbation (logging and agriculture practice) was also responsible for recent very local eolian activity.

  11. Seasonal habitat preference by the flagship species Testudo hermanni: Implications for the conservation of coastal dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardo, Fabiana; Carranza, Maria Laura; Frate, Ludovico; Stanisci, Angela; Loy, Anna

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we explored if, how, and when the European Union habitats (EU sensu Habitats Directive 92/43/CEE) are used by the flagship species Testudo hermanni in a well-preserved coastal dune system of the Italian peninsula. Radio telemetry data and fine-scale vegetation habitat mapping were used to address the following questions: (a) is each EU habitat used differentially by Hermann's tortoises? (b) is there any seasonal variation in this utilization pattern? (c) how does each habitat contribute to the ecological requirements of the tortoises? Nine tortoises were fitted with transmitters and monitored for the entire season of activity. The eight EU habitats present in the study area were surveyed and mapped using GIS. The seasonal preferential use or avoidance of each habitat was tested by comparing, through bootstrap tests, the proportion of habitat occupied (piTh) with the proportion of available habitat in the entire landscape (piL). The analysis of 340 spatial locations showed a marked preference for the Cisto-Lavanduletalia dune sclerophyllous scrubs (EU code 2260) and a seasonal selection of Juniperus macrocarpa bushes (EU code 2250(*)), wooded dunes with Pinus (EU code 2270) and mosaic of dune grasslands and sclerophyllous scrubs (EU codes 2230, 2240, 2260). Seasonal variation of habitat preference was interpreted in light of the different feeding, thermoregulation and reproductive needs of the tortoises. Our results stress the ecological value of EU coastal dune habitats and suggest prioritization of conservation efforts in these ecosystems.

  12. Adaptation with gene flow across the landscape in a dune sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rose L; Ostevik, Katherine L; Ebert, Daniel P; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2012-05-01

    Isolation by adaptation increases divergence at neutral loci when natural selection against immigrants reduces the rate of gene flow between different habitats. This can occur early in the process of adaptive divergence and is a key feature of ecological speciation. Despite the ability of isolation by distance (IBD) and other forms of landscape resistance to produce similar patterns of neutral divergence within species, few studies have used landscape genetics to control for these other forces. We have studied the divergence of Helianthus petiolaris ecotypes living in active sand dunes and adjacent non-dune habitat, using landscape genetics approaches, such as circuit theory and multiple regression of distance matrices, in addition to coalescent modelling. Divergence between habitats was significant, but not strong, and was shaped by IBD. We expected that increased resistance owing to patchy and unfavourable habitat in the dunes would contribute to divergence. Instead, we found that landscape resistance models with lower resistance in the dunes performed well as predictors of genetic distances among subpopulations. Nevertheless, habitat class remained a strong predictor of genetic distance when controlling for isolation by resistance and IBD. We also measured environmental variables at each site and confirmed that specific variables, especially soil nitrogen and vegetation cover, explained a greater proportion of variance in genetic distance than did landscape or the habitat classification alone. Asymmetry in effective population sizes and numbers of migrants per generation was detected using coalescent modelling with Bayesian inference, which is consistent with incipient ecological speciation being driven by the dune habitat.

  13. Radionuclide transfer to invertebrates and small mammals in a coastal sand dune ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M D; Leah, R T; Jones, S R; Copplestone, D

    2009-06-15

    International intercomparisons of models to assess the impact of ionising radiation on wildlife have identified radionuclide transfer assumptions as a significant source of uncertainty in the modelling process. There is a need to improve the underpinning data sets on radionuclide transfer to reduce this uncertainty, especially for poorly-studied ecosystems such as coastal sand dunes. This paper presents the results of the first published study of radionuclide transfer to invertebrates and small mammals in a coastal sand dune ecosystem. Activity concentrations of (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am are reported for detritivorous, herbivorous, carnivorous and omnivorous biota. Differences in activity concentrations measured in the sand dune biota are related to the trophic level of the organisms and the influence of sea-to-land transfer is apparent in the food chain transfer observed at the site. There are notable differences in the concentration ratios (CRs) calculated for the sand dune biota compared to other terrestrial ecosystems, especially for the small mammals which have CRs that are two orders of magnitude lower than the generic terrestrial ecosystem CRs published by the recent EC EURATOM ERICA project. The lower CRs at the sand dunes may be due to the influence of other cations from the marine environment (e.g. K and Na) on the net radionuclide transfer observed, but further research is required to test this hypothesis.

  14. Debris flows on the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, Alaska: Implications for analogous processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Donald M.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.

    2014-02-01

    We observed niveo-aeolian deposits, denivation features, and small meltwater-induced debris flows that had formed at the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, northwestern interior Alaska in late March 2010. This high-latitude, cold-climate dune field is being studied as a planetary analog to improve our understanding of factors that may trigger debris flows on the lee slopes of martian aeolian dunes. Debris flows consisted of a sand and liquid water mixture that cascaded down the lee slopes of two barchanoid dunes on days when measured ground surface temperatures were below freezing. We hypothesize that relatively dark sand on snow caused local hot spots where solar radiation could be absorbed by the sand and conducted into the underlying snow, enabling meltwater to form and sand to be mobilized. This investigation provides insights into the interactions between niveo-aeolian deposition, slope aspect and insolation, thawing, and initiation of alluvial processes. These debris flows are morphologically similar to those associated with seasonal gullies or erosion tracks visible on the slopes of mid- to high-latitude dune fields in both martian hemispheres. Localized heating and thawing at scales too small for orbital sensors to identify may yield martian debris flows at current climate conditions.

  15. Evaluation of simple geochemical indicators of aeolian sand provenance: Late Quaternary dune fields of North America revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.

    2017-09-01

    Dune fields of Quaternary age occupy large areas of the world's arid and semiarid regions. Despite this, there has been surprisingly little work done on understanding dune sediment provenance, in part because many techniques are time-consuming, prone to operator error, experimental, highly specialized, expensive, or require sophisticated instrumentation. Provenance of dune sand using K/Rb and K/Ba values in K-feldspar in aeolian sands of the arid and semiarid regions of North America is tested here. Results indicate that K/Rb and K/Ba can distinguish different river sands that are sediment sources for dunes and dune fields themselves have distinctive K/Rb and K/Ba compositions. Over the Basin and Range and Great Plains regions of North America, the hypothesized sediment sources of dune fields are reviewed and assessed using K/Rb and K/Ba values in dune sands and in hypothesized source sediments. In some cases, the origins of dunes assessed in this manner are consistent with previous studies and in others, dune fields are found to have a more complex origin than previously thought. Use of K/Rb and K/Ba for provenance studies is a robust method that is inexpensive, rapid, and highly reproducible. It exploits one of the most common minerals found in dune sand, K-feldspar. The method avoids the problem of using simple concentrations of key elements that may be subject to interpretative bias due to changes in mineralogical maturity of Quaternary dune fields that occur over time.

  16. Effects of Sand Dune Stabilization on the Spatial Pattern of Artemisia ordosica Population in Mu Us Desert, Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiachen; Zhang, Yuqing; Fan, Dongqing; Qin, Shugao; Jia, Xin; Wu, Bin; Chen, Dong; Gao, Hao; Zhu, Linfeng

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation patterns are strongly influenced by sand mobility in desert ecosystems. However, little is known about the spatial patterns of Artemisia ordosica, a dominant shrub in the Mu Us desert of Northwest China, in relation to sand fixation. The aim of this study was to investigate and contrast the effects of sand dune stabilization on the population and spatial distribution of this desert shrub. Spatial autocorrelation, semi-variance analysis, and point-pattern analysis were used jointly in this study to investigate the spatial patterns of A. ordosica populations on dunes in Yanchi County of Ningxia, China. The results showed that the spatial autocorrelation and spatial heterogeneity declined gradually, and the distance between the clustered individuals shortened following sand dune fixation. Seedlings were more aggregated than adults in all stage of dune stabilization, and both were more aggregated on shifting sand dunes separately. Spatial associations of the seedlings with the adults were mostly positive at distances of 0-5 m in shifting sand dunes, and the spatial association changed from positive to neutral in semi-fixed sand dunes. The seedlings were spaced in an almost random pattern around the adults, and their distances from the adults did not seem to affect their locations in semi-fixed sand dunes. Furthermore, spatial associations of the seedlings with the adults were negative in the fixed sand dune. These findings demonstrate that sand stabilization is an important factor affecting the spatial patterns of A. ordosica populations in the Mu Us desert. These findings suggest that, strong association between individuals may be the mechanism to explain the spatial pattern formation at preliminary stage of dune fixation. Sand dune stabilization can change the spatial pattern of shrub population by weakening the spatial association between native shrub individuals, which may affect the development direction of desert shrubs.

  17. Oceanobacillus chungangensis sp. nov., isolated from a sand dune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Chae; Kang, Hyeonji; Weerawongwiwat, Veeraya; Kim, Beomjoon; Choi, Young-Wan; Kim, Wonyong

    2013-10-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped, motile, strictly aerobic bacterial strain, designated CAU 1051(T), was isolated from a sand dune and its taxonomic position was investigated using a polyphasic approach. Strain CAU 1051(T) grew optimally at pH 5.0 and 30 °C. NaCl was not required for growth but up to 10.0 % (w/v) NaCl was tolerated. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain CAU 1051(T) formed a distinct lineage within the genus Oceanobacillus and was most closely related to Oceanobacillus profundus CL-MP28(T), Oceanobacillus caeni S-11(T), and Oceanobacillus picturae LMG 19492(T) (96.8 %, 95.6 % and 95.3 % similarity, respectively). DNA-DNA reassociation analysis showed that strain CAU 1051(T) displayed 28.2±0.7 % relatedness to O. profundus KCTC 13625(T). Strain CAU 1051(T) contained MK-7 as the only isoprenoid quinone and anteiso-C15 : 0 as the major fatty acid. The cell wall peptidoglycan of strain CAU 1051(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The polar lipids were composed of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, six unidentified phospholipids, an unidentified glycolipid, and six unidentified polar lipids. The major whole-cell sugars were glucose and ribose. The DNA G+C content was 36.3 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic data and phylogenetic inference, strain CAU 1051(T) represents a novel species of the genus Oceanobacillus for which the name Oceanobacillus chungangensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CAU 1051(T) ( = KCTC 33035(T) = CCUG 63270(T)).

  18. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    CERN Document Server

    Badescu, Viorel; Bolonkin, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with...

  19. A combined study of source, detector and matter non-standard neutrino interactions at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Blennow, Mattias; Ohlsson, Tommy; Pramanik, Dipyaman; Raut, Sushant K

    2016-01-01

    We simultaneously investigate source, detector and matter non-standard neutrino interactions at the proposed DUNE experiment. Our analysis is performed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploring the full parameter space. We find that the sensitivity of DUNE to the standard oscillation parameters is worsened due to the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions. In particular, there are degenerate solutions in the leptonic mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ and the Dirac CP-violating phase $\\delta$. We also compute the expected sensitivities at DUNE to the non-standard interaction parameters. We find that the sensitivities to the matter non-standard interaction parameters are substantially stronger than the current bounds (up to a factor of about 15). Furthermore, we discuss correlations between the source/detector and matter non-standard interaction parameters and find a degenerate solution in $\\theta_{23}$. Finally, we explore the effect of statistics on our results.

  20. A combined study of source, detector and matter non-standard neutrino interactions at DUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Mattias; Choubey, Sandhya; Ohlsson, Tommy; Pramanik, Dipyaman; Raut, Sushant K.

    2016-08-01

    We simultaneously investigate source, detector and matter non-standard neutrino interactions at the proposed DUNE experiment. Our analysis is performed using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploring the full parameter space. We find that the sensitivity of DUNE to the standard oscillation parameters is worsened due to the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions. In particular, there are degenerate solutions in the leptonic mixing angle θ 23 and the Dirac CP-violating phase δ. We also compute the expected sensitivities at DUNE to the non-standard interaction parameters. We find that the sensitivities to the matter non-standard interaction parameters are substantially stronger than the current bounds (up to a factor of about 15). Furthermore, we discuss correlations between the source/detector and matter non-standard interaction parameters and find a degenerate solution in θ 23. Finally, we explore the effect of statistics on our results.

  1. What antineutrinos can tell about octant and $\\delta_{CP}$ in DUNE?

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Newton; Goswami, Srubabati

    2016-01-01

    We study the efficiency of DUNE, a next generation long baseline oscillation experiment to resolve two major unknowns in neutrino oscillation physics. These are, octant of $\\theta_{23}$ (i.e. if $\\theta_{23}$ is $45^\\circ$) and Dirac CP phase $\\delta_{CP}$. We mainly focus on the role of antineutrinos when they travel 1300 km baseline of DUNE. We observe that for DUNE, the antineutrino runs help to remove parameter degeneracies even in the parameter space where the antineutrino probability suffers from various degeneracies. We study these points in detail and find that, due to enhanced matter effect longer baseline experiments create an increased tension between the neutrino and the antineutrino probabilities which helps to increase total sensitivity in case of combined runs. We also find that, antineutrino run increases overall CP sensitivity due to its ability to abolish octant-$\\delta_{CP}$ degeneracy.

  2. The impact of Acacia saligna invasion on Italian coastal dune EC habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Silvia; Acosta, Alicia; Stanisci, Angela

    2013-07-01

    Alien species can represent a threat to several ecosystems because they can alter species relationships and ecosystem function. In Italy, Acacia saligna is a major invader and it forms dense stands in coastal environments. We analyze the impact of A. saligna in Italian Mediterranean dune systems. We randomly sampled coastal dune vegetation and investigated its floristic composition with ordination techniques. We compared species richness in invaded and non-invaded plots with rarefaction curves and analyzed the frequency of focal and ruderal species. A. saligna invaded Mediterranean scrub (habitats 2250* and 2260) and coastal Pinus dune wood (habitat 2270*) and it is particularly prevalent in sunny areas of habitat 2270*. We observed an increase in ruderal species and a decrease in focal species in the invaded plots of habitat 2270*. We suggest that more open and disturbed areas are more prone to A. saligna invasion.

  3. The Physics of antineutrinos in DUNE and resolution of octant degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Newton; Goswami, Srubabati

    2016-01-01

    We study the capability of the DUNE experiment, which will be the first beam based experiment with a wide band flux profile, to uncover the octant of the leptonic mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ (i.e., $\\theta_{23}$ is $45^\\circ$). In this work, we find that for the DUNE baseline of 1300 km, due to enhanced matter effect, the neutrino and antineutrino probabilities are different which creates a tension in the case of combined runs because of which octant sensitivity also can come from disappearance channel. In view of this, we study the physics of antineutrinos in DUNE and explore the role of antineutrinos run that is required to resolve the octant degeneracy at a certain confidence levels.

  4. Influence of grain size, shape and compaction on georadar waves: example of an Aeolian dune

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemoteau, Julien; Dujardin, Jean-Rémi; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05577.x

    2012-01-01

    Many Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) profiles acquired in dry aeolian environment have shown good reflectivity inside present-day dunes. We show that the origin of this reflectivity is related to changes in grain size distribution, packing and/or grain shape in a sandy material. We integrate these three parameters into analytical models for bulk permittivity in order to predict the reflections and the velocity of GPR waves. We consider two GPR cross-sections acquired over Aeolian dunes in the Chadian desert. The 2D migration of GPR data suggests that dunes contain different kinds of bounding surfaces. We discuss and model three kinds of reflections using reasonable geological hypothesis about Aeolian sedimentation processes. The propagation and the reflection of radar waves are calculated using the 1D wavelet modelling method in spectral domain. The results of the forward modelling are in good accordance with real observed data.

  5. Radar imaging of volcanic fields and sand dune fields: Implications for VOIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elachi, C.; Blom, R.; Daily, M.; Farr, T.; Saunders, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A number of volcanic fields and sand dune fields in the western part of North America were studied using aircraft and Seasat synthetic aperture radar images and LANDSAT images. The capability of radars with different characteristics (i.e., frequency, polarization and look angles was assessed to identify and map different volcanic features, lava flows and sand dune types. It was concluded that: (1) volcanic features which have a relatively large topographic expression (i.e., cinder cones, collapse craters, calderas, etc.) are easily identified; (2) lava flows of different ages can be identified, particularly on the L-band images; and (3) sand dunes are clearly observed and their extent and large scale geometric characteristics determined, provided the proper imaging geometry exists.

  6. Impact of invasive Rosa rugosa on the arthropod fauna of Danish yellow dunes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleriis, Pernille; Pedersen, Morten Lauge; Toft, Søren

    2015-01-01

    We compared the arthropod fauna of Rosa rugosa patches to the adjacent native yellow dune vegetation by pitfall trapping in the National Park Thy at the Danish North Sea coast. R. rugosa changes the vegetation from a dune grassland (dominated by Ammophila arenaria) poor in flowering plants to a l...

  7. 78 FR 37845 - Meeting of the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area (ISDRA) Subgroup of the California Desert...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Meeting of the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area (ISDRA) Subgroup of the... 92-463 and 94-579, that the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Area Subgroup of the California...

  8. 75 FR 81307 - Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Tonopah Solar Energy, LLC, Crescent Dunes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ...: 14X5017] Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for the Tonopah Solar Energy, LLC, Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability...) for the Tonopah Solar Energy Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project Environmental Impact Statement...

  9. 76 FR 60475 - Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Tonopah Solar Energy, LLC, for the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to Tonopah Solar Energy, LLC, for the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project... 2009 (Recovery Act), to Tonopah Solar Energy, LLC (TSE), for construction and start-up of the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project (the Project). The Project is a proposed 110- megawatt solar power...

  10. Environmental Conditions of Barchan Dune and Barchan Chain-A Case Study from the Hexi Desert Area of Gansu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Zhaofeng; Wang Qiangqiang; Zhang Jianhui; Xi Junqiang; Wang Qi; Zhang Dekui; Tang Jinnian; Zhang Huiwen

    2015-01-01

    [Objective] The paper was to discuss why the top of tall barchan dunes and barchan chains widespread in single prevailing wind area had not been leveled by wind erosion. [Method] Based on the preliminary survey of distribution status,the morphological characteristics and environmental conditions of barchan dunes and barchan chains in Hexi desert area of Gansu were investigated in details. The significance of difference between samples and significance of correlation between indicators were examined via variance test. [Result] Barchan dunes and barchan chains in Hexi desert area of Gansu distributed at the leeward direction of desert fringe,generally in patch distribution. The distribution area was gravelly beach or cohesive gravel beach,with broader dune slack; winds in distribution area of barchan dunes and barchan chains blew obviously from one direction,while winds at other directions were light or occasionally strong but with low frequency;the barchan dune in the desert fringe of Hexi desert area of Gansu was relatively tall,while barchan chain was even more taller and larger. Coincidence or separation of the dune peak and the sand ridge might be related to distribution frequency of dominant prevailing wind or wind at opposite direction and the observation seasons.[Conclusion]Studying top stability of barchan dune has an important academic value in revealing blowing sand movement rule at desert fringe,invasion of sand flow,and expansion of desert.

  11. Quantifying roughness density of vegetation and nebkha dunes in the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA using terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nield, J. M.; Gillies, J. A.; Nickling, W. G.

    2012-04-01

    The roughness density and patterning of vegetation and nebkha dune elements in semi-arid environments has important implications for aeolian sediment transport. These individual elements often form complex spatial patterns, which are traditionally quantified as a single density or lambda value based on mean shrub height, breath and number of elements within a defined surface area. Measurements of height and width are undertaken using traditional surveying techniques or based on remote sensing imagery analysis, which are limited in their ability to capture the true frontal area of vegetation and dune elements, as well as the relationship between solid and flexible frontal area components. Here we use terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to quantify three-dimensional plant and dune distributions, determining height and width values for individual elements in three different vegetation communities at the Jornada Experimental Range in the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA. These communities include a creosote vegetated surface without dunes, an incipient mesquite nebkha dune environment and a mature mesquite nebkha dune site. TLS measurements compare well to manual measurements using DGPS and survey levels, but have the advantage that larger areas can be systematically quantified more efficiently. More importantly, TLS derived surface, dune and vegetation DEMs enable us to accurately characterise individual dune and shrub frontal areas under different wind directions, improving traditional lambda calculations.

  12. A field study of coherent flow structures over low angle dunes: Fraser Estuary, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, R. W.; Hendershot, M. L.; Venditti, J. G.; Kostaschuk, R. A.; Allison, M. A.; Church, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Aqueous dunes are present in nearly all sand bedded alluvial channels and can significantly influence flow resistance and sediment transport and deposition. The geometry of these bedforms can take on a high angle asymmetrical or low angle symmetrical shape. While advances have been made in understanding the mean and turbulent flow over high angle dunes, far less progress has been made in detailing flow over low angle dunes, commonly observed in large rivers, due to difficulties measuring near the bed and quantifying the turbulence over these bedforms. This field study documents the flow over low angle dunes in the Fraser Estuary, British Columbia, using an acoustic Doppler profiler (aDcp) to measure 3-D flow characteristics and a multi-beam echo sounder (MBES) to provide high-resolution bed topography. Measurements were made over a dune field (~1 km long and ~0.5 wide) through two semi-diurnal tidal cycles during the 2010 freshet. We examine the coupling between the bedform morphology and the generation of coherent flow structures. Bedforms in the dune field range from low-angle symmetric to higher angle asymmetric and vary over tidal cycles; however, none display the classic angle of repose geometry. Mean flow velocity increases on falling tide while it decreases the rising tide. At lower tides, large scale motions caused by topographic forcing emerge on stoss slopes and rise up over the crest producing variations in suspended sediment over the bedforms. Our analysis is intended to contribute insight into what controls the occurrence of low angle bedforms in rivers.

  13. The fate of threatened coastal dune habitats in Italy under climate change scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisco, Irene; Carboni, Marta; Acosta, Alicia T R

    2013-01-01

    Coastal dunes worldwide harbor threatened habitats characterized by high diversity in terms of plant communities. In Italy, recent assessments have highlighted the insufficient state of conservation of these habitats as defined by the EU Habitats Directive. The effects of predicted climate change could have dramatic consequences for coastal environments in the near future. An assessment of the efficacy of protection measures under climate change is thus a priority. Here, we have developed environmental envelope models for the most widespread dune habitats in Italy, following two complementary approaches: an "indirect" plant-species-based one and a simple "direct" one. We analyzed how habitats distribution will be altered under the effects of two climate change scenarios and evaluated if the current Italian network of protected areas will be effective in the future after distribution shifts. While modeling dune habitats with the "direct" approach was unsatisfactory, "indirect" models had a good predictive performance, highlighting the importance of using species' responses to climate change for modeling these habitats. The results showed that habitats closer to the sea may even increase their geographical distribution in the near future. The transition dune habitat is projected to remain stable, although mobile and fixed dune habitats are projected to lose most of their actual geographical distribution, the latter being more sensitive to climate change effects. Gap analysis highlighted that the habitats' distribution is currently adequately covered by protected areas, achieving the conservation target. However, according to predictions, protection level for mobile and fixed dune habitats is predicted to drop drastically under the climate change scenarios which we examined. Our results provide useful insights for setting management priorities and better addressing conservation efforts to preserve these threatened habitats in future.

  14. The fate of threatened coastal dune habitats in Italy under climate change scenarios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Prisco

    Full Text Available Coastal dunes worldwide harbor threatened habitats characterized by high diversity in terms of plant communities. In Italy, recent assessments have highlighted the insufficient state of conservation of these habitats as defined by the EU Habitats Directive. The effects of predicted climate change could have dramatic consequences for coastal environments in the near future. An assessment of the efficacy of protection measures under climate change is thus a priority. Here, we have developed environmental envelope models for the most widespread dune habitats in Italy, following two complementary approaches: an "indirect" plant-species-based one and a simple "direct" one. We analyzed how habitats distribution will be altered under the effects of two climate change scenarios and evaluated if the current Italian network of protected areas will be effective in the future after distribution shifts. While modeling dune habitats with the "direct" approach was unsatisfactory, "indirect" models had a good predictive performance, highlighting the importance of using species' responses to climate change for modeling these habitats. The results showed that habitats closer to the sea may even increase their geographical distribution in the near future. The transition dune habitat is projected to remain stable, although mobile and fixed dune habitats are projected to lose most of their actual geographical distribution, the latter being more sensitive to climate change effects. Gap analysis highlighted that the habitats' distribution is currently adequately covered by protected areas, achieving the conservation target. However, according to predictions, protection level for mobile and fixed dune habitats is predicted to drop drastically under the climate change scenarios which we examined. Our results provide useful insights for setting management priorities and better addressing conservation efforts to preserve these threatened habitats in future.

  15. The integration of Workload Management Systems for the ProtoDUNE Software and Computing cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Oniciuc, Oriana-Maria

    2017-01-01

    The protoDUNE experimental program is designed to test and validate the technologies for DUNE. All of the many elements in the chain of data acquisition, storage, distribution and processing are critically important to derive physics results from the data. To achieve these, a software stack has been chosen to implement automatic propagation of configurations across all the nodes in the NP cluster. This report presents the architecture of the system and the operations through which the cluster features can be scaled.

  16. Dos novelas de culto en la pantalla : 'Dune' y 'El almuerzo desnudo', fracasos gloriosos

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Texto anteriormente publicado como 'Cult Novels on the Screen: Dune and The Naked Lunch'. En Fernando Toda, Juan A. Prieto Pablos, María José Mora y Teresa López Soto (eds.), Actas del XXI Congreso Internacional de AEDEAN. Sevilla: Universidad de Sevilla, 1999. 141-146 La adaptación de las novelas de culto admiradas por un público entusiasta plantea problemas específicos. Aquí examino la adaptación realizada por David Lynch de la novela de culto 'Dune' de Frank Herbert, y la que hizo David...

  17. Effect of the coastal conservation due to beach nourishment of Totori sand dune coast

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Shibutani; Matsubara, Y.; Kuroiwa, M.

    2013-01-01

    Tottori Sand Dune Coast located at western part of Japan is a sandy beach with a length about 8km facing Sea of Japan. The coast has been eroded starting around 1940s and the beach nourishment project has been carried out to restore the shoreline since 2005 at Tottori Sand Dune Coast. In the project, the deposition sands at port and river mouth were transported to the erosional area and injected in the region of the offshore erosional area and the backshore area and the total volumes of the s...

  18. The Contribution of Endozoochory to the Colonization and Vegetation Composition of Recently Formed Sand Coastal Dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Dellafiore

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine whether endozoochory contributes to the dispersal and colonization of plant species in recently formed coastal dunes. At least 5.7% of species present in the study area are being dispersed by wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.. Most dispersed species are perennial herbs with small seeds size. The continuous input of seeds through rabbit feces into newly created areas would ensure the constant arrival of seeds and would facilitate colonization. Therefore, endozoochorous dispersal may play a relevant role for the structure and composition of dune plant communities.

  19. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Sand saltation has complex interactions with turbulent flow and dune form. Most models of wind-blown sand consider ideal circumstances such as steady wind velocity and a flat surface, and the bulk of data on wind flow and sand transport over an individual dune has focused mostly on the influence of dune shape or inter-dune space on the wind flow, neglecting the effect of morphology on sand saltation, particularly airflow and sand transportation over the leeward slope. Wind flow structures over the leeward slope of sand dunes have a fundamental influence on the organization of sand dunes. In order to understand sand dune dynamics, lee face airflow and sediment transportation should be paid more attention. Previous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure well because of the limited observation points and the influence of experiment structure on wind field. In addition, the reverse sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand trap in field. Numerous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure because of the limited observation points and the influence of experimental structures on the wind field. In addition, the reverse transport of sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand traps in field. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the turbulent flow structure and sand transport pattern over the leeward slope. A numerical model of sand saltation over slope terrain is constructed, which also considers the coupling effects between air flow and sand particles. The large eddy simulation method is used to model turbulent flow. Sand transport is simulated by tracking the trajectory of each sand particle. The results show that terrain significantly alters the turbulent air flow structure and wind-blown sand movement, especially over the leeward slope. Here, mass flux increases initially and then decreases with height in the reversed flow region in the direction of wind flow, and the mass flux

  20. Winds measured by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) during Curiosity's Bagnold Dunes Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Claire E.; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Navarro Lopez, Sara; Marin Jimenez, Mercedes; Torres Redondo, Josefina; Richardson, Mark I.

    2016-10-01

    Curiosity's damaged wind sensor has trouble measuring winds coming from behind the rover, due to the loss of its side-pointing boom during landing. During the Bagnold Dunes Campaign, however, the rover was turned to permit measurements of winds from missing directions, capturing upslope/downslope day-night flow on the slopes of Aeolis Mons and blocking of wind in the lee of a dune.The rover's heading is generally determined by the drive direction and often varies little over many tens of sols. Good wind measurements are made when the wind comes from the hemisphere to the front of the rover, but there are sometimes long periods during which winds from certain directions (i.e., at certain times of sol) are largely missed. Since rover turns are often precluded by rover safety and other operational constraints, it is usually not possible to turn to measure such winds properly.During the Bagnold Dunes Campaign, wind measurements were prioritized to provide context for aeolian dune studies. Rover headings were optimized for three wind investigations covering a period of about 90 sols. The first investigation characterized the wind field on approach to the dunes, with the rover turned to face two unusual headings for several sols each and monitoring focused on the 'missing' winds / times of sol. This confirmed the expected primary wind pattern of daytime roughly upslope winds (from ~NW/N) and nighttime downslope winds (from ~S/SE) on the slopes of Aeolis Mons, with significant sol-to-sol variability in e.g. the timing of the reversals. Comparison with the previous year suggests an increasingly upslope-downslope pattern as Curiosity approached the slope.The second investigation studied changes to the wind pattern in the lee of the Namib Dune. This revealed the blocking of northerly winds by the large dune, leaving primarily a westerly component to the daytime winds with weaker wind speeds.The third investigation characterized the wind field at the side of Namib Dune. The

  1. On Beam Matching and the Space-Charge Effect in protoDUNE-SP

    CERN Document Server

    Mandalia, Jesal Paresh

    2017-01-01

    In this project simulations using LArSoft have been analysed in particular looking at how the space-charge effect will affect the matching of particle tracks from the beam line monitor to the TPC and the TPC's performance measuring $\\frac{dE}{dx}$ in protoDUNE-SP. The analysis here provides some preliminary calibrations for protoDUNE-SP to account for the impact the space charge effect will have. Many areas of pion cross section analysis will be affected by the space charge effect so it is vital for a calibration to be developed.

  2. The importance of three dimensional dune morphology on the time dependent flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Richard; Parsons, Dan; Reesink, Arnold; Best, Jim

    2017-04-01

    The flow field over dunes has been extensively studied and there is general understanding of the nature of the flow over dunes formed over two dimensional dunes under equilibrium flow conditions. This model is typically used to explain flow fields over all dunes fields. However, fluvial systems typically experience unsteady flow and therefore the sediment-water interface is constantly reorganizing to form complex three-dimensional morphologies (ripples, dunes and bar forms). Here we investigate how flow over natural three dimensional dunes differs from the accepted model of flow of two dimensional dunes. A series of experiments were undertaken in a flume where fine sand was water worked under a range of unsteady hydraulic conditions to generate quasi-equilibrium three dimensional bed forms. On four occasions, the flume was drained and the bed topography measured with terrestrial LiDAR to create digital elevation models (DEM). Here to demonstrate the approach we choose the DEM with the greatest topographic variation and apply a new Large Eddy Simulation model with an wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity (WALE) turbulence model and a non-linear higher-order numerical differencing scheme. This provided a three dimensional time dependent prediction of the flow field over the static three-dimensional dune morphology at millimeter and hertz scale resolution. The numerically predicted flows were analyzed by standard Reynolds decomposition approaches and Eulerian and Lagrangian coherent flow structure identification methods. The results show that the superimposed bed forms can cause changes in the nature of the classical separated flow regions, in particularly the number of locations where vortices are shed and the points of flow reattachment. Coalescence of vortices generated downstream and can be seen to move to the free surface and form kolk signatures. These structures also correlate in space and time showing a clear flow morphology feedback. The modified flow field

  3. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes

    OpenAIRE

    Britt Michelsen; Severin Strobl; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Thorsten Pöschel

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune’s symmetry axis — that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barc...

  4. Controls on and effects of armoring and vertical sorting in aeolian dune fields: A numerical simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Unlike ripples, there are only few numerical studies on grain size segregation at the scale of dunes in aeolian environments. Here we use a cellular automaton model to analyze vertical sorting in granular mixtures under steady unidirectional flow conditions. We investigate the feedbacks between dune growth and the segregation mechanisms by varying the size of coarse grains and their proportion within the bed. We systematically observe the development of a horizontal layer of coarse grains at the top of which sorted bed forms may grow by amalgamation. The formation of such an armor layer controls the overall sediment transport and availability. The emergence of dunes and the transition from barchan to transverse dune fields depend only on the grain size distribution of the initial sediment layer. As confirmed by observation, this result indicates that armor layers should be present in most arid deserts, where they are likely to control dune morphodynamics.

  5. Soft engineering vs. a dynamic approach in coastal dune management: a case study on the North Sea barrier island of Ameland, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de B.; Keijsers, J.G.S.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Krol, J.; Slim, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Dunes act as flood defences in coastal zones, protecting low-lying interior lands from flooding. To ensure coastal safety, insight is needed on how dunes develop under different types of management. The current study focuses on two types of coastal dune management: (1) a “soft engineering” approach,

  6. Soft engineering vs. a dynamic approach in coastal dune management: a case study on the North Sea barrier island of Ameland, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de B.; Keijsers, J.G.S.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Krol, J.; Slim, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Dunes act as flood defences in coastal zones, protecting low-lying interior lands from flooding. To ensure coastal safety, insight is needed on how dunes develop under different types of management. The current study focuses on two types of coastal dune management: (1) a “soft engineering” approach,

  7. Variation in grain size and morphology of an inland parabolic dune during the incipient phase of stabilization in the Hobq Desert, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meiping; Hasi, Eerdun; Sun, Yu

    2016-05-01

    A significant increase in rainfall in the summer of 2012 on the southern fringe of the Hobq Desert, Inner Mongolia, resulted in the vegetation and thus stability of dunes in this area. Our research focuses on a typical parabolic dune, which was active in 2011 and became stabilized after vegetation colonization. Topographic surveys and surface sediment analysis of the morphology and surface sands of the parabolic dune indicate that decreasing mean grain size and sorting values (better sorting), slightly more positive skewness and increasing kurtosis occurred over the dune surface during the incipient phase of stabilization. There was a strong relationship between grain size sorting and dune mobility. Surface sand from the stabilized dune was generally finer and better sorted than at the same location when the dune was active. During 2011-2012 the dune head had moved eastwards (by approximately 2.3 m) while its two arms expanded outward (by approximately 3.2 m), the height of the dune decreased, and the dune became larger with a decreasing volume. Once anchored (2013-2014), the overall morphology, and the grain size and sorting characteristics of the dune became more constant and quite different than when the dune was active.

  8. Study of Sand Dunes and Their Effect on Desertification of Cultivated Lands in Shaanxi Province, China Using Remote Sensing Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    About half of the arid and semi-arid lands in the world are deserts that comprise various types of aeolian sand dunes deposits. In Shaanxi Province, aeolian sand dunes cover considerable areas of the Yulin desert and northern Jinbian. Sand dunes are moving in the main wind direction and converting some agricultural area to wasteland. Remote sensing of sand dunes helps in the understanding of aeolian process and desertification. Remote sensing data combined with field studies are valuable in studying sand dunes, regional aeolian depositional history. In particular, active and inactive sand dunes of the north Shaanxi Province were studied using remote sensing and geographic information system. In this study, we describe the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) images, covering north Shaanxi Province, which were used to study the distribution, shape, size, trends, density and movement of sand dunes and their effect on desertification of cultivated lands. Estimation was made depending on soil erodibility factor (Ⅰ) and local climatic factor (C) during the period (June to September). The result indicates that soil erosion caused sand drift of 8.957 5, 7.03 ton for Yulin and Jinbian, respectively. The mean sand dunes movement rate were 4.37, 3.11 m, whereas, monthly sand dune advance rate were 1.092 5, 0.777 5 m, for the two locations, respectively. The study reveals that cultivated lands extended obliquely to the direction of sand dune movement are extremely affected, while other segments that extend parallel to the direction of the movement are not affected. Accordingly the north Shaanxi Province was divided into areas of different classes of potential risk. Moreover, blown sands and sand movement from neighboring highlands also affect the area of western desert.

  9. [Crust development and subsurface soil properties under dominant shrubs in the process of dune restoration, Horqin Sand Land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi-rui; Zhao, Ha-lin; Zuo, Xiao-an; Li, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yin-xin; Wang, Shao-kun

    2008-04-01

    Soil crust is a common and widespread phenomenon in desert areas all over the world due to its extraordinary ability to survive desiccation and extreme temperatures, high pH and salinity. Despite its unassuming appearance, biological soil crusts play a significant role in desert ecosystems, including involvement in the process of formation, stability and fertility of soil, preventing soil erosion by water or wind, increasing the possibility of vascular plant colonization, and being responsible for the stabilization of sand dunes. This study taking Horqin Sand Land as research region, by field sampling, crust and topsoil (0-2.5 cm and 2.5-5 cm under crust) samples in different dune habitats and shrub communities were collected, and their physicochemical properties were analyzed, including particle size distribution, bulk density, total nutrients and available nutrients, pH, EC and CaCO3 content. The result revealed that Artemisia halodendron in semi-mobile dune, Caragana microphylla in semi-fix dune, Artemisia frigida in fix dune and Salix microstachya in interdunal lowland were respectively developed physical soil crust, algae crust, lichen crust and moss crust. Crust thickness, hardness, water content, fine fraction, total and available nutrients gradually increased by semi-mobile dune dune dune dune habitats, and by physical soil crust dune to interdunal lowland. As to each crust, the parameters of 0-2.5 cm subsurface soil layer were higher than that in 2.5-5 cm soil layer. The result also showed that the fine fraction and nutrient content of moss crust under Salix microstachya in interdunal lowland were higher than others, so did the 0-5 cm subsurface soil under it.

  10. Summary of the Third International Planetary Dunes Workshop: Remote Sensing and Image Analysis of Planetary Dunes, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, June 12-15, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Lori K.; Hayward, Rosalyn K.; Horgan, Briony H. N.; Rubin, David M.; Titus, Timothy N.; Bishop, Mark A.; Burr, Devon M.; Chojnacki, Matthew; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Kerber, Laura; Le Gall, Alice; Michaels, Timothy I.; Neakrase, Lynn D. V.; Newman, Claire E.; Tirsch, Daniela; Yizhaq, Hezi; Zimbelman, James R.

    2013-03-01

    The Third International Planetary Dunes Workshop took place in Flagstaff, AZ, USA during June 12-15, 2012. This meeting brought together a diverse group of researchers to discuss recent advances in terrestrial and planetary research on aeolian bedforms. The workshop included two and a half days of oral and poster presentations, as well as one formal (and one informal) full-day field trip. Similar to its predecessors, the presented work provided new insight on the morphology, dynamics, composition, and origin of aeolian bedforms on Venus, Earth, Mars, and Titan, with some intriguing speculation about potential aeolian processes on Triton (a satellite of Neptune) and Pluto. Major advancements since the previous International Planetary Dunes Workshop include the introduction of several new data analysis and numerical tools and utilization of low-cost field instruments (most notably the time-lapse camera). Most presentations represented advancement towards research priorities identified in both of the prior two workshops, although some previously recommended research approaches were not discussed. In addition, this workshop provided a forum for participants to discuss the uncertain future of the Planetary Aeolian Laboratory; subsequent actions taken as a result of the decisions made during the workshop may lead to an expansion of funding opportunities to use the facilities, as well as other improvements. The interactions during this workshop contributed to the success of the Third International Planetary Dunes Workshop, further developing our understanding of aeolian processes on the aeolian worlds of the Solar System.

  11. Vertical distribution of soil moisture and surface sandy soil wind erosion for different types of sand dune on the southeastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChaoFeng Fu; JingBo Zhao; FanMin Mei; TianJie Shao; Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Soil moisture is a critical state affecting a variety of land surface and subsurface processes. We report investigation results of the factors controlling vertical variation of soil moisture and sand transport rate of three types of dunes on the south-eastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land. Samples were taken from holes drilled to a depth of 4 m at different topographic sites on the dunes, and were analyzed for soil moisture, grain-size distribution and surface sediment discharge. The results show that: (1) The average soil moisture varies in different types of dunes, with the following sequences ordered from highest to lowest: in the shrubs-covered dunes and the trees-covered dunes the sequence is from inter-dunes lowland to windward slope to leeward slope. The average moisture in the bare-migratory sand dunes is sequenced from inter-dunes lowland to leeward slope to windward slope. (2) Vegetation form and surface coverage affect the range of soil moisture of different types of dunes in the same topographic position. The coefficient of variation of soil moisture for shrubs-covered dunes is higher than that of other types of dune. (3) The effect of shrubs on dune soil moisture is explained in terms of the greater ability of shrubs to trap fine-grained atmospheric dust and hold moisture. (4) The estimated sand transport rates over sand dunes with sparse shrubs are less than those over bare-migratory dunes or sand dunes with sparse trees, indi-cating that shrubs are more effective in inhibiting wind erosion in the sandy land area.

  12. Looking inside out: tracing internal moisture and salinity changes in dunes on the west coast of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Ciaran; Bourke, Mary

    2017-04-01

    Coastal sand dune systems are some of the most physically dynamic landscapes; their susceptibility to geomorphic change is rooted in a host of interconnected processes and feedbacks. Soil moisture and salinity are two fundamental environmental variables capable of exerting a geomorphic influence but have not been thoroughly investigated in coastal dunes. In northwest Europe, coastal dunes are predominantly sediment-limited systems with reduced capacities to avoid severe morphological changes arising from storms. Climatic changes over the next century are predicted to manifest in more frequent and intense storms with the potential to enact severe geomorphic change in coastal settings. A lack of data pertaining to internal dune hydrosaline dynamics suggests we are missing part of the bigger picture. We conducted a pilot study of moisture and salinity dynamics within the upper 50 cm of the vadose zone in a vegetated dune system at Golden Strand, Achill Island on the west coast of Ireland. Golden Strand is a roughly 800 m long embayed sandy beach, backed by vegetated dunes that protect a low-lying machair grassland. A study transect was established across this dune-machair system, perpendicular to the shore. Innovative instrumentation in the form of capacitance probes and internal dune thermochrons were deployed to sample at 10 cm depth intervals at a sampling rate of 10 minutes and coupled with on-site rainfall data. Results indicate that dune moisture tracks rainfall inputs up to 30 cm depth. Antecedent moisture at depth was found to influence infiltration of water through the dune profile. Salinity within the study transect decreased with distance from the beach, suggesting that salt spray is the primary salt delivery mechanism in the dune system. We also noted that moisture and salinity below 30 cm depth failed to respond to rainfall events of varying intensities. Relatively constant moisture and salinity were observed at all depths within the machair. Predictions

  13. Summary of the Second International Planetary Dunes Workshop: Planetary Analogs - Integrating Models, Remote Sensing, and Field Data, Alamosa, Colorado, USA, May 18-21, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, L.K.; Bishop, M.A.; Bourke, M.C.; Bristow, C.S.; Hayward, R.K.; Horgan, B.H.; Lancaster, N.; Michaels, T.I.; Tirsch, D.; Titus, T.N.; Valdez, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Second International Planetary Dunes Workshop took place in Alamosa, Colorado, USA from May 18-21, 2010. The workshop brought together researchers from diverse backgrounds to foster discussion and collaboration regarding terrestrial and extra-terrestrial dunes and dune systems. Two and a half days were spent on five oral sessions and one poster session, a full-day field trip to Great Sand Dunes National Park, with a great deal of time purposefully left open for discussion. On the last day of the workshop, participants assembled a list of thirteen priorities for future research on planetary dune systems. ?? 2010.

  14. State-space modeling indicates rapid invasion of an alien shrub in coastal dunes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Frølund; Nygaard, Bettina; Ejrnæs, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Invasion by alien plants has negative effects on coastal dunes. Monitoring local spread of invasive species depends on long-term data with sufficient spatial resolution. Bayesian state-space models are a new method for monitoring invasive plants based on unbalanced permanent-plot data. The method...

  15. Spring foraging resources and the behaviour of pollinating insects in fixed dune ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife T. O'Rourke

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In temperate climates, foraging resources for pollinating insects are especially important in early spring when animals emerge from hibernation and initiate annual life cycles. One habitat, protected under EU law, which provides resources for a range of pollinating insects, but has received little research attention, is fixed (grey dunes. Fixed dunes often contain creeping willow (Salix repens, Salicaceae, which may be an important early season resource for obligate flower visitors. We examined the springtime activity of flower visitors in fixed dune ecosystems in relation to sugar concentration and composition in nectar, composition of essential amino acids in pollen, and floral abundance. We also investigated whether the presence or absence of S. repens influenced the abundance and species richness of three obligate flower visiting guilds (solitary bees, bumblebees and hoverflies in eight sites along the eastern and southern coasts of Ireland. Higher insect visitation rates were observed to species whose nectar contained greater concentrations of glucose and fructose. Solitary bee visitation rates were related to % Essential Amino Acid (EAA in pollen and floral species richness. Ulex europeaus, and S. repens were the most abundant flowering species, but visitation rates were not related to floral abundance. Higher abundances of bumblebees and hoverflies were discovered at sites where S. repens was present. This study raises further questions about the nutritional requirements and preferences of obligate flower visitors in fixed dune ecosystems in spring time.

  16. Modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching at Fire Island (NY) during hurricane Sandy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vet, P.L.M.; McCall, R.T.; Den Bieman, J.P.; Stive, M.J.F.; Van Ormondt, M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused a breach at Fire Island (NY, USA), near Pelican Island. This paper aims at modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching processes that occured during the hurricane event at this stretch of coast with the numerical model XBeach. By using the default settings, the ero

  17. 75 FR 77801 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for Dunes Sagebrush Lizard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... and Snell 1997, p. 1; Laurencio et al. 2007, p. 1; Chan et al. 2007, p. 337). In Texas, dunes... New Mexico, Sias and Snell (1998, p. 3) reported a negative relationship between oil well density and... sagebrush lizards declined by 50 percent when there were 29 pads per section (Sias and Snell 1998, p. 3...

  18. Hydraulic properties of dune sandebentonite mixtures of insulation barriers for hazardous waste facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.K. Gueddouda; I. Goual; B. Benabed; S. Taibi; N. Aboubekr

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the valorization of local materials such as desert dune sand obtained from Laghouat region in the South Algeria and mine bentonite intended for the realization of liner base layers in the conception of insulation barriers for hazardous waste facilities. In practice, an economical mixture satisfying the hydraulic requirements is generally concerned. First, in order to get an adequate dune sand ebentonite mixture compacted to the optimum Proctor condition, an investigation on saturated hy-draulic behavior is carried out in this study for different mixtures. Using oedometer test (indirect measurement), the adequate mixture of 85% dune sand and 15% bentonite satisfies the conditions of saturated hydraulic conductivity (k 3 MPa). This technique is conducted based on the exploitation of the water retention curve in order to establish the relationships between hydraulic conductivity, degree of saturation, and suction. It shows that the hydraulic conductivity increases with the degree of saturation and decreases with the suction. However, the hydraulic conductivity has a constant value for suctions larger than 20 MPa. The selected dune sandebentonite mixture satisfies the regulation requirements and hence constitutes a good local and economical material for the conception of barrier base liners.

  19. The role of cattle in maintaining plant species diversity in wet dune valleys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aptroot, A.; van Dobben, H. F.; Slim, P. A.; Olff, H.

    2007-01-01

    The succession of species-rich wetland vegetation in dune valleys into species-poor dwarf shrub vegetation was followed by means of permanent vegetation plots, in which the cover of vascular plant, moss and lichen species were recorded over a period of up to 33 years. Low density cattle grazing is a

  20. Introduction to special section on marine sand wave and river dune dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Dohmen-Janssen, C. Marjolein

    2005-01-01

    Marine sand waves and river dunes are rhythmic patterns, formed at the interface between a sandy bed and turbulent flows, driven by tidal and river currents. Their origin, development, and dynamics are far from being fully understood. To enhance the discussion on this topic we organized the internat

  1. De plantengemeenschappen van de Wassenaarse duinen = (The plant communities of the Wassenaar dunes near The Hague)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, J.H.A.

    1960-01-01

    The plant communities on about 1800 ha of dunes were studied before any consequences could be observed of percolation since 1955 of fresh water stored underground for mains supply. Classification was by the French-Swiss and sometimes the Scandinavian sociological system. Some difficulties of

  2. Cas clinique varicelle maligne de l'adulte jeune revelatrice d'une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cas clinique varicelle maligne de l'adulte jeune revelatrice d'une infection a VIH. ... English Title: Malignant chickenpox in young adult revealing HIV infection ... A treatment with acyclovir in high doses orally failing the parenteral route was ...

  3. Domestic Resistance: Gardening, Mothering, and Storytelling in Leslie Marmon Silko's "Gardens in the Dunes"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Leslie Marmon Silko began her most recent work, "Gardens in the Dunes" (1999), intending to write a novel that would not be political. Following the publication of "Almanac of the Dead" (1992), which was simultaneously hailed as one of the most important books of the twentieth century and condemned for its angry self-righteousness, Silko…

  4. Mobile dune fixation by a fast-growing clonal plant : a full life-cycle analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Shou-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai; Werger, Marinus J A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068439199; Dong, Ming; During, Heinjo J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068848625; Zuidema, Pieter A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/204458455

    2015-01-01

    Desertification is a global environmental problem, and arid dunes with sparse vegetation are especially vulnerable to desertification. One way to combat desertification is to increase vegetation cover by planting plant species that can realize fast population expansion, even in harsh environments. T

  5. Application of the ERICA Integrated Approach to the Drigg coastal sand dunes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M.D. [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER)/School of Biological Sciences, Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mwood@liv.ac.uk; Marshall, W.A. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3LN (United Kingdom); Beresford, N.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, Lancashire LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Jones, S.R. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3LN (United Kingdom); Howard, B.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, Lancashire LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Copplestone, D. [Environment Agency, P.O. Box 12, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Latchford, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 1HG (United Kingdom); Leah, R.T. [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER)/School of Biological Sciences, Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GP (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    The EC-funded project 'Environmental Risks from Ionising Contaminants: Assessment and Management' (ERICA) developed an 'Integrated Approach' for assessing the impact of ionising radiation on ecosystems. This paper presents the application of the ERICA Integrated Approach, supported by a software programme (the ERICA Tool) and guidance documentation, to an assessment of the Drigg coastal sand dunes (Cumbria, UK). Targeted sampling provided site-specific data for sand dune biota, including amphibians and reptiles. Radionuclides reported included {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am. Site-specific data were compared to predictions derived using the ERICA Tool. Some under- and over-predictions of biota activity concentrations were identified but can be explained by the specific ecological characteristics and contamination mechanism of the dunes. Overall, the results indicated no significant impact of ionising radiation on the sand dune biota and the Integrated Approach was found to be a flexible and effective means of conducting a radiation impact assessment.

  6. Factors responsible for Honckenya peploides (Caryophyllaceae) and Leymus mollis (Poaceae) spatial segregation on subarctic coastal dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, Jean-Michel; Houle, Gilles

    2002-03-01

    Low water and nutrient availability and significant sand movement, salt spray, and soil salinity are typical of coastal dunes. These conditions are generally unfavorable for the various life stages of plants and especially for seedlings. However, the intensity of these stresses decreases landward, even over short distances, with significant effects on community composition. On coastal dunes in subarctic Québec, Canada, Honckenya peploides (Caryophyllaceae) colonizes the upper beach where it forms small mounds called embryo dunes. Leymus mollis (Poaceae) is mostly restricted to the foredune; however, a few individuals successfully establish on the upper beach, particularly on embryo dunes. We hypothesized that this differential distribution is associated with differences in the tolerance of the two species' seedlings to physical stresses. Honckenya peploides and L. mollis seedling tolerance to sand burial, salt spray, soil salinity, and nutrient and water availability was assessed in greenhouse experiments. Unexpectedly, our results showed that tolerance to sand burial, salt spray, and soil salinity was lower for H. peploides than for L. mollis. If seeds are available and seedlings tolerate the conditions prevailing on the upper beach well, why are mature L. mollis individuals rare in this habitat? We suggest that massive abrasion events (e.g., violent storm waves and ice thrust) restrict the presence of the species on the upper beach.

  7. Hydraulic properties of dune sand–bentonite mixtures of insulation barriers for hazardous waste facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Gueddouda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the valorization of local materials such as desert dune sand obtained from Laghouat region in the South Algeria and mine bentonite intended for the realization of liner base layers in the conception of insulation barriers for hazardous waste facilities. In practice, an economical mixture satisfying the hydraulic requirements is generally concerned. First, in order to get an adequate dune sand–bentonite mixture compacted to the optimum Proctor condition, an investigation on saturated hydraulic behavior is carried out in this study for different mixtures. Using oedometer test (indirect measurement, the adequate mixture of 85% dune sand and 15% bentonite satisfies the conditions of saturated hydraulic conductivity (k  3 MPa. This technique is conducted based on the exploitation of the water retention curve in order to establish the relationships between hydraulic conductivity, degree of saturation, and suction. It shows that the hydraulic conductivity increases with the degree of saturation and decreases with the suction. However, the hydraulic conductivity has a constant value for suctions larger than 20 MPa. The selected dune sand–bentonite mixture satisfies the regulation requirements and hence constitutes a good local and economical material for the conception of barrier base liners.

  8. Enhancing the Internationalisation of Distance Education in the Biological Sciences: The DUNE Project and Genetic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, C. K.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Distance Educational Network of Europe (DUNE) project that aims at enhancing the development of distance education in an international context. Highlights issues relating to the delivery of distance-learning courses in a transnational forum. Describes the genetic engineering course that aims at explaining the core techniques of…

  9. The cumulative effects of using fine particles and cyanobacteria for rehabilitation of disturbed active sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, Eli; Katra, Itzhak; Barkai, Daniel; Knoll, Yaakov; Sarig, Shlomo

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems in desertified lands worldwide is active wind-borne sand dunes, which lead to covering of fertile soils and agricultural fields. In regions with more than 100 mm of annual rainfall, sand dunes may be naturally stabilized by biocrusts (biological soil crusts). One of the main restraints of biocrust development is the typical lack of fine particles in sand dunes. Our study investigated the combined application of fine particles [coal fly-ash <100 micrometer] and bio-inoculant of filamentous cyanobacteria, isolated from nearby natural stabilized sand dunes, on the soil surface of active sands for increasing resistance to wind erosion. Boundary-layer wind tunnel experiments were conducted in experimental plots within a greenhouse for examining the effects of adding coal fly-ash and bio-inoculant to active sands. The biocrust development was evaluated via several physical and bio-physiological variables. In all the physical measurements and the bio-physiological variables, the treatment of "sand+inoculum+coal fly-ash" showed significant differences from the "sand-control". The combination led to the best results of surface stabilization in boundary-layer wind tunnel experiments, with the lowest sand fluxes. The filamentous cyanobacteria use the fine particles of the coal fly-ash as bridges for growing toward and adhering to the large sand particles. The cumulative effects of biocrusts and coal fly-ash enhance soil surface stabilization and may allow long-term sustainability.

  10. INVESTIGATION OF GEOTECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS OF SAND DUNE SOIL: A CASE STUDY AROUND BAIJI IN IRAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas J. Al-Taie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: While more than half the land surface of Iraq consists of deserts covered mainly with sand dunes, little research has taken place to study the characteristics and the behavior of dune soils. This paper directed toward studying the geotechnical properties of dune sands taken from Baiji city (northwest of Iraq. A vast laboratory testing program was carried out to achieve the purpose of this paper. The physical tests, chemical tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, permeability test, compaction characteristics, compressibility and collapsibility tests; and shear strength tests were included in this program. The results indicate that soil of Baiji sand dune exhibits prefer engineering properties according to their state. As such, this soil is considered suitable for use in geotechnical constructions. ABSTRAK: Walaupun lebih separuh daripada bumi Iraq terdiri daripada gurun yang dipenuhi dengan bukit-bukit pasir, tidak banyak penyelidikan dijalankan untuk mengkaji sifat-sifat dan ciri-ciri tanah pasir  tersebut. Kertas kerja ini menyelidik sifat geoteknikal bukit pasir yang diambil dari pekan Baiji (di bahagian barat utara Iraq.  Program penyelidikan makmal yang menyeluruh telah  dijalankan bagi mencapai objektif kajian ini. Ujian fizikal, ujian kimia, analisis belauan sinar-x, ujian kebolehtelapan, ciri pemadatan, faktor ketermampatan, ujian keruntuhan dan ujian kekuatan ricih diambilkira dalam program ini. Keputusan menunjukkan bahawa tanih bukit pasir Baiji mengutamakan ciri kejuruteraan berdasarkan keadaannya. Oleh itu, tanah ini dianggap sesuai untuk kegunaan pembinaan geoteknikal.

  11. Mobile dune fixation by a fast-growing clonal plant : a full life-cycle analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Shou-Li; Yu, Fei-Hai; Werger, Marinus J A; Dong, Ming; During, Heinjo J; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2015-01-01

    Desertification is a global environmental problem, and arid dunes with sparse vegetation are especially vulnerable to desertification. One way to combat desertification is to increase vegetation cover by planting plant species that can realize fast population expansion, even in harsh environments.

  12. Mobile dune fixation by a fast-growing clonal plant: a full life-cycle analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werger, M.J.A.; During, H.J.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Desertification is a global environmental problem, and arid dunes with sparse vegetation are especially vulnerable to desertification. One way to combat desertification is to increase vegetation cover by planting plant species that can realize fast population expansion, even in harsh environments.

  13. Sand erosion at the toe of a gabion-protected dune face

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to study the manner in which erosion takes place the the toe of a dune slope protected by gabions, and to examine the response of the gabions to this erosion. A sand slope overlaid by model gabions was subjected to wave attack in a hydraulic flume, and period

  14. Chronic wind and plant communities in dunes: Total biomass, inter-specific competition, and species abundance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, W.M.; Xi, W.M.; Anten, N.P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wind is an important ecological factor, but its direct roles in shaping plant communities remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chronic wind can modulate community productivity, inter-specific competition, and species abundance in inland dunes. We conducted an experiment with three

  15. Behavior and identification of ephemeral sand dunes at the backshore zone using video images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEDRO V. GUIMARÃES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The backshore zone is transitional environment strongly affected by ocean, air and sand movements. On dissipative beaches, the formation of ephemeral dunes over the backshore zone plays significant contribution in the beach morphodynamics and sediment budget. The aim of this work is to describe a novel method to identify ephemeral dunes in the backshore region and to discuss their morphodynamic behavior. The beach morphology is identified using Argus video imagery, which reveals the behavior of morphologies at Cassino Beach, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Daily images from 2005 to 2007, topographic profiles, meteorological data, and sedimentological parameters were used to determine the frequency and pervasiveness of these features on the backshore. Results indicated that coastline orientation relative to the dominant NE and E winds and the dissipative morphological beach state favored aeolian sand transport towards the backshore. Prevailing NE winds increase sand transportation to the backshore, resulting in the formation of barchans, transverse, and barchanoid-linguiod dunes. Precipitation inhibits aeolian transport and ephemeral dune formation and maintains the existing morphologies during strong SE and SW winds, provided the storm surge is not too high.

  16. Behavior and identification of ephemeral sand dunes at the backshore zone using video images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Pedro V; Pereira, Pedro S; Calliari, Lauro J; Ellis, Jean T

    2016-09-01

    The backshore zone is transitional environment strongly affected by ocean, air and sand movements. On dissipative beaches, the formation of ephemeral dunes over the backshore zone plays significant contribution in the beach morphodynamics and sediment budget. The aim of this work is to describe a novel method to identify ephemeral dunes in the backshore region and to discuss their morphodynamic behavior. The beach morphology is identified using Argus video imagery, which reveals the behavior of morphologies at Cassino Beach, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Daily images from 2005 to 2007, topographic profiles, meteorological data, and sedimentological parameters were used to determine the frequency and pervasiveness of these features on the backshore. Results indicated that coastline orientation relative to the dominant NE and E winds and the dissipative morphological beach state favored aeolian sand transport towards the backshore. Prevailing NE winds increase sand transportation to the backshore, resulting in the formation of barchans, transverse, and barchanoid-linguiod dunes. Precipitation inhibits aeolian transport and ephemeral dune formation and maintains the existing morphologies during strong SE and SW winds, provided the storm surge is not too high.

  17. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flow over Two-Dimensional River Dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    We performed large-eddy simulations of the flow over a typical two-dimensional dune geometry at laboratory scale (the Reynolds number based on the average channel height and mean velocity is 18,900) using the Lagrangian dynamic eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale model. The flow separates at the dune crest and reattaches downstream on the bed (at x=5.7h). A favorable pressure gradient accelerates the flow over the stoss-side (the upward-sloping region for x > 8h) and an unfavorable gradient for x < 8h decelerates the flow over the lee-side of the dune. Due to the separation of the flow, a shear layer is generated after the crest that expands in the wake region towards the next dune. The outer-layer turbulence structures are visualized through isosurfaces of pressure fluctuations colored by distance to the surface. Spanwise vortices are generated in the shear layer separating from the crest due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. They are convected downstream and either interact with the wall or rise to the surfa...

  18. How extensive is the effect of modern farming on bird communities in a sand dune desert?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Khoury

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bird community structure and diversity measures in sand dune habitats far from and close to modern farms in Wadi Araba, south-west Jordan, were compared using 52 line transects for breeding birds and habitat variables. A change in the bird community of sand dunes surrounding farming projects was measured to a distance of 1 km, but could neither be related to changes in habitat structure nor to the activity of op- portunistic predators (Red Fox as these did not vary significantly between the two samples. The farms included lines of trees and offered a constant source of water, which attracted a variety of opportunistic species, thus increasing bird diversity and total bird abundances. The absence of characteristic ground-dwelling species of open sand dune habitats in the structurally intact sand dunes surrounding farms was likely to be the result of localized, but effectively far-reaching habitat modification (farms acting as barriers and/or competition with some of the opportunistic species, which were common around farms.

  19. The role of microbial mats during primary succession in calcareous dune slacks : an experimental approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.P.; Ende, F.P. van den; Walsweer, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    Laminated microbial mats from a sandy beach plain were grown in water-saturated pots in a glass house for six months and then used to assess their effect on the establishment of juveniles of three plant species representing different successional stages in dune slack development. The selected

  20. Plant-feeding nematodes in coastal sand dunes: occurrence, host specificity and effects on plant growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, E.P.; Duyts, H.; Karssen, G.; Stoel, C.D.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Coastal sand dunes have a well-established abiotic gradient from beach to land and a corresponding spatial gradient of plant species representing succession in time. Here, we relate the distribution of plant-feeding nematodes with dominant plant species in the field to host specialization and

  1. The Physics of antineutrinos in DUNE and resolution of octant degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Newton; Goswami, Srubabati

    2015-01-01

    We study the proficiency of the DUNE experiment, which will be the first beam based experiment to use a baseline longer than 1000 km and a wide band flux profile, to unmask the octant of the leptonic mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$. It has been realized, in the context of the off-axis experiments T2K and NO$\

  2. Effect of Non Unitarity on Neutrino Mass Hierarchy determination at DUNE, NO$\

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Debajyoti; Roy, Samiran

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mass ordering is one of the principal unknowns in the neutrino sector. Long baseline neutrino experiments have the potential of resolving this issue as they are sensitive to large matter effects. The superbeam experiment DUNE is one of the most promising candidates to study the neutrino mass hierarchy, along with NO$\

  3. Mobile dune fixation by a fast-growing clonal plant: a full life-cycle analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werger, M.J.A.; During, H.J.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Desertification is a global environmental problem, and arid dunes with sparse vegetation are especially vulnerable to desertification. One way to combat desertification is to increase vegetation cover by planting plant species that can realize fast population expansion, even in harsh environments. T

  4. Modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching at Fire Island (NY) during hurricane Sandy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vet, P.L.M.; McCall, R.T.; Den Bieman, J.P.; Stive, M.J.F.; Van Ormondt, M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused a breach at Fire Island (NY, USA), near Pelican Island. This paper aims at modelling dune erosion, overwash and breaching processes that occured during the hurricane event at this stretch of coast with the numerical model XBeach. By using the default settings, the

  5. SPECIES DYNAMICS AND NUTRIENT ACCUMULATION DURING EARLY PRIMARY SUCCESSION IN COASTAL SAND DUNES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OLFF, H; VANTOOREN, BF; Tooren, B.F. van

    1993-01-01

    1 The present study reports on a primary succession series which started on bare soil on the Dutch island of Schiermonnikoog after the building of a sand dike. Vegetational changes were studied for 18 years by means of permanent transects along a topographic gradient from a moist plain to dry dunes.

  6. Mesure par interférométrie laser du mouvement d'une particule proche d'une paroi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assou, Y.; Joyeux, D.; Azouni, A.; Feuillebois, F.

    1991-02-01

    An experimental technique based on laser interferometry is used to obtain the displacement of a sphere towards a plane wall in a viscous fluid : it consists in inserting the sphere in an interferometric system, in such a way that the displacement of the sphere changes the state of interference. An important feature of the setup is that the shape, the roughness, and the positioning of the sphere in the optical path are relatively uncritical. The spheres used in the experiment are bearing balls, 4 and 5 × 10^{-3} m in diameter. The accuracy on the sphere displacement is of the order of 2 × 10^{-8} m. The interference signal is digitalized and stored in a microcomputer. The data are then processed to yield the friction coefficient f^T_zz of the sphere in its motion very close to the wall. The variation of f^T_zz with the non-dimensional gap \\varepsilon (ratio of the gap to the sphere radius) show three regions: (i) One in which a is small but at least 10 times larger than the non-dimensional rugosity (ratio of the scale of rugosity to the sphere radius) ; there is then a very good agreement with the result valid for a smooth sphere f^T_zz = 1/\\varepsilon from lubrication theory. (ii) When \\varepsilon decreases to the order of the non-dimensional rugosity, the friction coefficient is then smaller than 1/\\varepsilon. The technique thus opens a way to study the effects of rugosity in hydrodynamics. (iii) The technique allows to measure gaps of the order of 10^{-8} m and could thus be used in future studies of short ranges forces. On utilise une technique expérimentale basée sur l'interférométrie laser pour déterminer le déplacement d'une sphère s'approchant d'une paroi plane dans un fluide visqueux: la technique consiste à insérer la sphère dans un système interférométrique, de façon que son déplacement change l'état d'interférence détecté. Une particularité importante du montage utilisé est que la forme, l'état de surface, le positionnement

  7. Dune bedforms produced by dilute pyroclastic density currents from the August 2006 eruption of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillet, Guilhem Amin; Pacheco, Daniel Alejandro; Kueppers, Ulrich; Letort, Jean; Tsang-Hin-Sun, Ève; Bustillos, Jorge; Hall, Minard; Ramón, Patricio; Dingwell, Donald B

    A series of pyroclastic density currents were generated at Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador) during a period of heightened activity in August 2006. Dense pyroclastic flows were confined to valleys of the drainage network, while dilute pyroclastic density currents overflowed on interfluves where they deposited isolated bodies comprising dune bedforms of cross-stratified ash exposed on the surface. Here, the description, measurement, and classification of more than 300 dune bedforms are presented. Four types of dune bedforms are identified with respect to their shape, internal structure, and geometry (length, width, thickness, stoss and lee face angles, and stoss face length). (1) "Elongate dune bedforms" have smooth shapes and are longer (in the flow direction) than wide or thick. Internal stratification consists of stoss-constructional, thick lensoidal layers of massive and coarse-grained material, alternating with bedsets of fine laminae that deposit continuously on both stoss and lee sides forming aggrading structures with upstream migration of the crests. (2) "Transverse dune bedforms" show linear crests perpendicular to the flow direction, with equivalent lengths and widths. Internally, these bedforms exhibit finely stratified bedsets of aggrading ash laminae with upstream crest migration. Steep truncations of the bedsets are visible on the stoss side only. (3) "Lunate dune bedforms" display a barchanoidal shape and have stratification patterns similar to those of the transverse ones. Finally, (4) "two-dimensional dune bedforms" are much wider than long, exhibit linear crests and are organized into trains. Elongate dune bedforms are found exclusively in proximal deposition zones. Transverse, lunate, and two-dimensional dune bedforms are found in distal ash bodies. The type of dune bedform developed varies spatially within an ash body, transverse dune bedforms occurring primarily at the onset of deposition zones, transitioning to lunate dune bedforms in intermediate

  8. Vulnerability Assessment of a Coastal Dune System at São Francisco do Sul Island, Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquini, Fernanda; Bertoni, Duccio; Sarti, Giovanni; Ciccarelli, Daniela; Pozzebon, Alessandro; Ferreira de Melo Júnior, João Carlos; Voos Vieira, Celso

    2016-10-01

    In this paper a Coastal Dune Vulnerability Index (CDVI) has been applied on a beach located in the eastern side of Sao Francisco do Sul Island (Brazil). The aim of this study is to assess the vulnerability of a coastal dune system and to identify the areas that result most sensitive to environmental changes. The CDVI has been applied along six transects traced out on two sectors that have been selected based on dune characteristics: Zone A is characterized by well developed parabolic dunes, whereas Zone B is characterized by transverse dunes. The analysis involved 51 quantitative and qualitative variables, divided into five groups: geomorphological dune system condition, marine influence, Aeolian effect, vegetation condition and human effect. The total CDVI was computed as the unweighted average of the partial vulnerability indices. In summary, the total vulnerability can be classified as medium: the geomorphological factor must be monitored at Grande beach, in particular the blowouts in Zone A and the frontal dune retreat in Zone B. The results of the study confirm that the management of coastal areas might be improved using a tool such as the CDVI, which can be easily applied on a regular basis to take under control the factors that mostly affect the evolution of the site.

  9. Changes in soil and vegetation on moving sand dunes after exclosure in Horqin Sandy Land, Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In the semiarid Horqin Sandy Land of northern China, land desertification is the main causation in vegetation degradation and formation of moving dunes. A study was conducted from 1996 to 2005 to monitor the changes of vegetation characteristics and soil properties after moving dunes were fenced. The changes were compared between moving sand dunes with exclosure and without exclosure to evaluate the effectiveness of vegetation and soil restoration after exclosure establishment. The results show that exlosure establishment facilitated the colonization and development of plant species by ameliorating stressful environmental conditions. Species diversity, average coverage, and plant density significantly increased after exclosure of moving sand dunes along sequence compared with sand dunes without exclosure. Vegetation recovery on moving sand dunes accelerated by exclosure resulted in significant changes in soil properties including increased silt and clay contents, organic C and total N and decreased sand content, especially at the 0-5 cm depth. The results implied that moving sand dunes can be rapidly fixed by construction of exclosure.

  10. From cyclic steps to humpback dunes: bedforms created by glacial lake-outburst floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsemann, Jutta; Lang, Jörg; (Janrik) Van den Berg, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    The largest known terrestrial floods, with immense geomorphological impacts, are linked to flood events from sub- and proglacial lakes. Flows are commonly unstable, turbulent and may be pulsed. The most commonly reported flood-related sedimentary landforms are large bars and (anti)dune fields deposited at sites of spatial flow deceleration. However, the facies architecture of these flood-related deposits has not yet been described in much detail. Reported field examples include sandy and gravelly bedforms that comprise laterally and vertically stacked deposits of cyclic steps, chutes-and-pools, breaking antidunes, stationary antidunes, plane beds and humpback dunes. The dimension and stacking pattern of described bedforms are often very similar and indicate deposition under highly aggradational flow conditions. Deposits of cyclic steps are characterised by shallow, lenticular scours infilled by gently dipping backsets, indicating erosion and re-deposition on the downstream side of the step, which is Froude-supercritical.The cyclic-step deposits are laterally and vertically truncated and unconformably overlain by deposits of chutes-and-pools and (breaking) antidunes. Deposits of chutes-and-pools and breaking antidunes comprise lenticular scours infilled by steeply dipping backsets, gently dipping sigmoidal foresets and concentric trough-fills. Bedforms of the relatively slow moving subcritical zone on the upstream side of cyclic steps are commonly not preserved. In contrast to the gravelly cross-stratification of cyclic steps, chutes-and-pools and breaking antidunes, the (sub)horizontal lamination of transcritical bedforms (plane beds, stationary waves and antidunes) generally consist almost completely of sand, due to gravel overpassing. Under waning flow conditions deposits of chutes-and-pools and antidunes form laterally more extensive bedsets that are interbedded with deposits of humpback dunes and 3D dunes. The gradual lateral and vertical facies changes between

  11. Numerical simulation of dune-flat bed transition and stage-discharge relationship with hysteresis effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y.; Giri, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nelson, Jack L.

    2009-01-01

    This work presents recent advances on morphodynamic modeling of bed forms under unsteady discharge. This paper includes further development of a morphodynamic model proposed earlier by Giri and Shimizu (2006a). This model reproduces the temporal development of river dunes and accurately replicates the physical properties associated with bed form evolution. Model results appear to provide accurate predictions of bed form geometry and form drag over bed forms for arbitrary steady flows. However, accurate predictions of temporal changes of form drag are key to the prediction of stage-discharge relation during flood events. Herein, the model capability is extended to replicate the dune-flat bed transition, and in turn, the variation of form drag produced by the temporal growth or decay of bed forms under unsteady flow conditions. Some numerical experiments are performed to analyze hysteresis of the stage-discharge relationship caused by the transition between dune and flat bed regimes during rising and falling stages of varying flows. The numerical model successfully simulates dune-flat bed transition and the associated hysteresis of the stage-discharge relationship; this is in good agreement with physical observations but has been treated in the past only using empirical methods. A hypothetical relationship for a sediment parameter (the mean step length) is proposed to a first level of approximation that enables reproduction of the dune-flat bed transition. The proposed numerical model demonstrates its ability to address an important practical problem associated with bed form evolution and flow resistance in varying flows. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. A Holocene history of dune-mediated landscape change along the southeastern shore of Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, Walter L.; Fisher, Timothy G.; Jol, Harry M.; Goble, Ronald J.; Anderton, John B.; Blewett, William L.

    2004-08-01

    Causal links that connect Holocene high stands of Lake Superior with dune building, stream damming and diversion and reservoir impoundment and infilling are inferred from a multidisciplinary investigation of a small watershed along the SE shore of Lake Superior. Radiocarbon ages of wood fragments from in-place stumps and soil O horizons, recovered from the bottom of 300-ha Grand Sable Lake, suggest that the near-shore inland lake was formed during multiple episodes of late Holocene dune damming of ancestral Sable Creek. Forest drownings at ˜3000, 1530, and 300 cal. years BP are highly correlated with local soil burial events that occurred during high stands of Lake Superior. During these and earlier events, Sable Creek was diverted onto eastward-graded late Pleistocene meltwater terraces. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) reveals the early Holocene valley of Sable Creek (now filled) and its constituent sedimentary structures. Near-planar paleosols, identified with GPR, suggest two repeating modes of landscape evolution mediated by levels of Lake Superior. High lake stands drove stream damming, reservoir impoundment, and eolian infilling of impoundments. Falling Lake Superior levels brought decreased sand supply to dune dams and lowered stream base level. These latter factors promoted stream piracy, breaching of dune dams, and aerial exposure and forestation of infilled lakebeds. The bathymetry of Grand Sable Lake suggests that its shoreline configuration and depth varied in response to events of dune damming and subsequent dam breaching. The interrelated late Holocene events apparent in this study area suggest that variations in lake level have imposed complex hydrologic and geomorphic signatures on upper Great Lakes coasts.

  13. Ripples and Dunes in Directionally Varying Flows--Three Decades of Experiments, Theory, and Modeling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    The morphology and dynamics of ripples and dunes have received considerable study for the past half-century, but most studies have focused on only the small subset of flows that are convenient to study in a lab: using flumes with flows that are constant in direction or wave tanks with flows that reverse by 180°. Many natural flows are free to change in direction by other angles (seasonal or daily cycles in wind direction; reversing wave-generated flows combined with alongshore currents; reversing tidal currents in curved channels; unsteady separated flows). A handful of studies have addressed a broader set of such flows using specialized lab setups (rotating beds in unidirectional flows; oscillating or pulsed beds in static or flowing water; unsteady flows that arise in channel expansions or topographic depressions). Other studies have applied theory or modeling (usually incorporating simplified relations between topography, flow, and sediment transport) to bedform morphology and orientation. The studies that have addressed this broader variety of natural flows have found that compared to the relatively sinuous barchanoid morphology of ripples and dunes in unidirectional flows, bedforms in bi-directional flows can have relatively long straight crests (wave ripples or linear dunes); and multi-directional flows have been shown to produce brick- or tile-pattern ripples under interfering waves, star dunes in deserts, and polygonal dunes within craters on Mars. The topic receiving most study in directionally varying flows is bedform orientation in bi-directional flows. A number of lab, field, theoretical, and modeling studies have found that bedforms arise with the orientation subject to maximum gross-normal transport, but some recent results suggest other orientations are possible where a bed is only partially covered in sand.

  14. Our evolving understanding of aeolian bedforms, based on observation of dunes on different worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniega, Serina; Kreslavsky, Mikhail; Radebaugh, Jani; Silvestro, Simone; Telfer, Matt; Tirsch, Daniela

    2017-06-01

    Dunes, dune fields, and ripples are unique and useful records of the interaction between wind and granular materials - finding such features on a planetary surface immediately suggests certain information about climate and surface conditions (at least during the dunes' formation and evolution). Additionally, studies of dune characteristics under non-Earth conditions allow for ;tests; of aeolian process models based primarily on observations of terrestrial features and dynamics, and refinement of the models to include consideration of a wider range of environmental and planetary conditions. To-date, the planetary aeolian community has found and studied dune fields on Mars, Venus, and the Saturnian moon Titan. Additionally, we have observed candidate ;aeolian bedforms; on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the Jovian moon Io, and - most recently - Pluto. In this paper, we hypothesize that the progression of investigations of aeolian bedforms and processes on a particular planetary body follows a consistent sequence - primarily set by the acquisition of data of particular types and resolutions, and by the maturation of knowledge about that planetary body. We define that sequence of generated knowledge and new questions (within seven investigation phases) and discuss examples from all of the studied bodies. The aim of such a sequence is to better define our past and current state of understanding about the aeolian bedforms of a particular body, to highlight the related assumptions that require re-analysis with data acquired during later investigations, and to use lessons learned from planetary and terrestrial aeolian studies to predict what types of investigations could be most fruitful in the future.

  15. Positive responses of coastal dune plants to soil conditioning by the invasive Lupinus nootkatensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslin, Hans Martin; Kollmann, Johannes

    2016-11-01

    Invasive nitrogen-fixing plants drive vegetation dynamics and may cause irreversible changes in nutrient-limited ecosystems through increased soil resources. We studied how soil conditioning by the invasive alien Lupinus nootkatensis affected the seedling growth of co-occurring native plant species in coastal dunes, and whether responses to lupin-conditioned soil could be explained by fertilisation effects interacting with specific ecological strategies of the native dune species. Seedling performance of dune species was compared in a greenhouse experiment using field-collected soil from within or outside coastal lupin stands. In associated experiments, we quantified the response to nutrient supply of each species and tested how addition of specific nutrients affected growth of the native grass Festuca arundinacea in control and lupin-conditioned soil. We found that lupin-conditioned soil increased seedling biomass in 30 out of 32 native species; the conditioned soil also had a positive effect on seedling biomass of the invasive lupin itself. Increased phosphorus mobilisation by lupins was the major factor driving these positive seedling responses, based both on growth responses to addition of specific elements and analyses of plant available soil nutrients. There were large differences in growth responses to lupin-conditioned soil among species, but they were unrelated to selected autecological indicators or plant strategies. We conclude that Lupinus nootkatensis removes the phosphorus limitation for growth of native plants in coastal dunes, and that it increases cycling of other nutrients, promoting the growth of its own seedlings and a wide range of dune species. Finally, our study indicates that there are no negative soil legacies that prevent re-establishment of native plant species after removal of lupins.

  16. A unifying model for planform straightness of ripples and dunes in air and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Geologists, physicists, and mathematicians have studied ripples and dunes for more than a century, but despite considerable effort, no general model has been proposed to explain perhaps the most fundamental property of their morphology: why are some bedforms straight, continuous, parallel, and uniform in planform geometry (i.e. two-dimensional) whereas others are irregular (three-dimensional)? Here we argue that physical coupling along the crest of a bedform is required to produce straight crests and that along-crest flow and sand transport provide effective physical mechanisms for that coupling. Ripples and dunes with the straightest and most continuous crests include longitudinal and oblique dunes in unidirectional flows, wave ripples, dunes in reversing flows, wind ripples, and ripples migrating along a slope. At first glance, these bedforms appear quite different (ripples and dunes; air and water; transverse, oblique, and longitudinal orientations relative to the net sand-transport direction), but they all have one property in common: a process that increases the amount of along-crest sand transport (that lengthens and straightens their crests) relative to the across-crest transport (that makes them migrate and take the more typical and more three-dimensional planform geometry). In unidirectional flows that produce straight bedforms, along-crest transport of sand is caused by along-crest flow (non-transverse bedform orientation), gravitational transport along an inclined crest, or ballistic splash in air. Bedforms in reversing flows tend to be straighter than their unidirectional counterparts, because reverse transport across the bedform crest reduces the net across-crest transport (that causes the more typical irregular geometry) relative to the along-crest transport (that smoothes and straightens planform geometry).

  17. Dune advancement 1937—1977 at the Mlalazi Nature Reserve, Mtunzini, Natal, South Africa, and a preliminary vegetation-succession chronology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Weisser

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available Foredune advancement on a 2 km coastline north of the Siaya Lagoon Mouth was studied using air photos. Between 1937 and 1977 the dunes advanced about 95 m (2,4 m per year. Vegetation was dated according to its position on a  profile. If a 2,4 m per year seaward advancement of the dunes is assumed, the following succession chronology is  obtained: Scaevola thunbergii Foredunes from 0 to 30 years; Passerina rigida Open Dune Scrub 30 to60 years; Closed Dune Scrub 60 to 90 years and Dune Forest beginning at about 90 years. Variation in dune advancement rates on different coastal stretches and for different time intervals was observed and will be reported on later. This dune succession chronology should, therefore, only be seen as a first rough approximation.

  18. Fine-scale patterns of vegetation assembly in the monitoring of changes in coastal sand-dune landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Honrado

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding dune ecosystem responses to multi-scale environmental changes can provide the framework for reliable forecasts and cost-efficient protocols for detecting shifts in prevailing coastal dynamics. Based on the hypothesis that stress and disturbance interact as primary community controls in coastal dunes, we studied the fine-scale floristic assembly of foredune vegetation, in its relation to topography, along regional and local environmental gradients in the 200 km long coastline of northern Portugal, encompassing a major biogeographic transition in western Europe. Thirty topographic profiles perpendicular to the shoreline were recorded at ten sites along the regional climate gradient, and vegetation was sampled by recording the frequency of plant species along those profiles. Quantitative topographic attributes of vegetated dune profiles (e.g. length or height exhibited wide variations relatable to differences in prevailing coastal dynamics. Metrics of taxonomic diversity (e.g. total species richness and its additive beta component and of the functional composition of vegetation were highly correlated to attributes of dune topography. Under transgressive dynamics, vegetation profiles have fewer species, increased dominance, lower turnover rates, and lower total vegetation cover. These changes may drive a decrease in structural and functional diversity, with important consequences for resistance, resilience and other ecosystem properties. Moreover, differences in both vegetation assembly (in meta-stable dunes and response to increased disturbance (in eroding dunes between distinct biogeographic contexts highlight a possible decline in facilitation efficiency under extreme physical stress (i.e. under Mediterranean climate and support the significance of functional approaches in the study of local ecosystem responses to disturbance along regional gradients. Our results strongly suggest that assessing fine-scale community assembly can

  19. Particle size variation of aeolian dune deposits in the lower reaches of the Heihe River basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing-Qi; Yu, Jing-Jie; Rioual, Patrick; Ren, Xiao-Zong

    2014-03-01

    The grain-size characteristics of aeolian dune and Gobi sands in the lower reaches of the Heihe River desert basin (Ejina) of northwestern China in central Asia were investigated, aimed at a sedimentological study of the dune sediments and their response to aeolian processes and source area. Grain-size parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis) were determined for sand samples from dune crests, interdunes and Gobi areas. The aeolian dunes are mainly composed of medium and fine-grained sand. Sorting improves with decreasing grain size. A clear relationship occurs between skewness and sorting in that sands become progressively zero-skewed (SK1 ≈ 0) as sorting improves, suggesting that improved sorting is accomplished by loss of both relatively coarser and finer grains in the desert. In comparison with many other desert areas, the dunes in the Ejina are composed of relatively coarse sands, are poorly sorted and relatively platykurtic. In log-probability grain-size distributions, most dune sands in the Ejina are composed of two distinctive saltation populations truncated at about 1.8ϕ and 2.5ϕ. This represents two differing aeolian transport conditions and presumably produces two separate saltation populations in opposite air-flow directions. Sand dunes exhibit grain size and sorting patterns in which sands become finer, better sorted, and more finely skewed from interdune to crest, which is a similar pattern to that in the Namib Desert. This pattern can be best explained by differential movement of sand in creep and saltation populations. At a regional scale, dune sands tend to become finer from southwest to northeast in the desert basin, which coincides with the basin hydrological setting but not with the compound direction of the basin wind system. It appears that local-scale factors, such as hydrological processes and source materials, rather than regional aeolian processes, are responsible for the grain-size variations of dune sands in the

  20. Morphology and flow fields of three-dimensional dunes, Rio Paraná, Argentina: Results from simultaneous multibeam echo sounding and acoustic Doppler current profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Orfeo, O.; Hardy, R. J.; Kostaschuk, R.; Lane, S. N.

    2005-12-01

    Most past studies of river dune dynamics have concentrated on two-dimensional (2-D) bed forms, with constant heights and straight crest lines transverse to the flow, and their associated turbulent flow structure. This morphological simplification imposes inherent limitations on the interpretation and understanding of dune form and flow dynamics in natural channels, where dune form is predominantly three-dimensional. For example, studies over 2-D forms neglect the significant influence that lateral flows and secondary circulation may have on the flow structure and thus dune morphology. This paper details a field study of a swath of 3-D dunes in the Rio Paraná, Argentina. A large (0.35 km wide, 1.2 km long) area of dunes was surveyed using a multibeam echo sounder (MBES) that provided high-resolution 3-D detail of the river bed. Simultaneous with the MBES survey, 3-D flow information was obtained with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), revealing a complicated pattern of dune morphology and associated flow structure within the swath. Dune three-dimensionality appears intimately connected to the morphology of the upstream dune, with changes in crest line curvature and crest line bifurcations/junctions significantly influencing the downstream dune form. Dunes with lobe or saddle-shaped crest lines were found to have larger, more structured regions of vertical velocity with smaller separation zones than more 2-D straight-crested dunes. These results represent the first integrated study of 3-D dune form and mean flow structure from the field and show several similarities to recent laboratory models of flow over 3-D dunes.