WorldWideScience

Sample records for ductility

  1. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  2. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  3. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  4. Ductile failure modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzerga, Ahmed Amine; Leblond, Jean Baptiste; Needleman, Alan

    2016-01-01

    anisotropy, or the influence of nonlocal effects that bring a material size scale into the models. Often the voids are not present in the material from the beginning, and realistic nucleation models are important. The final failure process by coalescence of neighboring voids is an issue that has been given......Ductile fracture of structural metals occurs mainly by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids. Here an overview of continuum models for this type of failure is given. The most widely used current framework is described and its limitations discussed. Much work has focused on extending void...... growth models to account for non-spherical initial void shapes and for shape changes during growth. This includes cases of very low stress triaxiality, where the voids can close up to micro-cracks during the failure process. The void growth models have also been extended to consider the effect of plastic...

  5. Ductility Performance of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    S. Eswari; P.N. Raghunath; Suguna, K

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a study on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete. The influence of fibre content on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens having different fibre volume fractions was investigated. The parameters of investigation included modulus of rupture, ultimate load, service load, ultimate and service load deflection, crack width, energy ductility and deflection ductility. A total of 27 specimens, 100×100×500 mm, were tested to...

  6. Properties investigation of austempered ductile iron

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhanshu Detwal; Deivanathan R

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns microstructural and mechanical properties of an austempered ductile cast iron (ADI). The ductile iron material was produced by the sand mould casting technique. Afterwards, austempering heat treatment was applied to the specimens at two different temperatures of 250°C and 350°C. Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs) were produced successfully by different two-stage heat treatments, to obtain favorable microstructure and hardness. The microstructure and hardness obtained by such ...

  7. Optimal scaling in ductile fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokoua Djodom, Landry

    This work is concerned with the derivation of optimal scaling laws, in the sense of matching lower and upper bounds on the energy, for a solid undergoing ductile fracture. The specific problem considered concerns a material sample in the form of an infinite slab of finite thickness subjected to prescribed opening displacements on its two surfaces. The solid is assumed to obey deformation-theory of plasticity and, in order to further simplify the analysis, we assume isotropic rigid-plastic deformations with zero plastic spin. When hardening exponents are given values consistent with observation, the energy is found to exhibit sublinear growth. We regularize the energy through the addition of nonlocal energy terms of the strain-gradient plasticity type. This nonlocal regularization has the effect of introducing an intrinsic length scale into the energy. We also put forth a physical argument that identifies the intrinsic length and suggests a linear growth of the nonlocal energy. Under these assumptions, ductile fracture emerges as the net result of two competing effects: whereas the sublinear growth of the local energy promotes localization of deformation to failure planes, the nonlocal regularization stabilizes this process, thus resulting in an orderly progression towards failure and a well-defined specific fracture energy. The optimal scaling laws derived here show that ductile fracture results from localization of deformations to void sheets, and that it requires a well-defined energy per unit fracture area. In particular, fractal modes of fracture are ruled out under the assumptions of the analysis. The optimal scaling laws additionally show that ductile fracture is cohesive in nature, i.e., it obeys a well-defined relation between tractions and opening displacements. Finally, the scaling laws supply a link between micromechanical properties and macroscopic fracture properties. In particular, they reveal the relative roles that surface energy and microplasticity

  8. Austempered ductile iron process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, C. D.; Keough, J. R.; Pramstaller, D. M.

    1986-11-01

    Pressure from imports and material substitution has severly affected demand for domestic iron industry products. It is estimated that the potential market for Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) is as large as the market for carburized and/or through hardened forgings. The primary interest in ADI is generated by the economics of process. Improved machinability and reduced processing costs as well as interesting physical properties has created an enormous interest in all metalworking industries towards ADI. The development of gas-fired austempering processes and resoluton of technical and economic uncertainities concerning the process will help improve the outlook for iron founderies.

  9. Strategies for improving ductility of ordered intermetallics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.B. Jiao; J.H.Luan; C.T.Liu

    2016-01-01

    Ordered intermetallics possess attractive high-temperature properties; however, low ductility and brittle fracture limit their use as engineering materials in many cases. This paper provides a comprehensive review on the recent progress in the development of ductile ordered intermetallics and summarizes the strategies used to improve the tensile ductility of ordered intermetallics, including control of ordered crystal structures, engineering grain-boundary structure and chemistry, eliminating environmental embrittlement, microstructure optimization, control of phase stability, and promoting transformation-/twining-induced plasticity. The basic ideas and related mechanisms underlying these ductilizing strategies are discussed. In addition, a brief mention of the current use of intermetallic alloys for structural and corrosion applications is made.

  10. Ductile failure X-prize.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, James V.; Wellman, Gerald William; Emery, John M.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Foster, John T.; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Mota, Alejandro; Bishop, Joseph E.; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Littlewood, David John; Foulk, James W., III; Dowding, Kevin J.; Dion, Kristin; Boyce, Brad Lee; Robbins, Joshua H.; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-09-01

    Fracture or tearing of ductile metals is a pervasive engineering concern, yet accurate prediction of the critical conditions of fracture remains elusive. Sandia National Laboratories has been developing and implementing several new modeling methodologies to address problems in fracture, including both new physical models and new numerical schemes. The present study provides a double-blind quantitative assessment of several computational capabilities including tearing parameters embedded in a conventional finite element code, localization elements, extended finite elements (XFEM), and peridynamics. For this assessment, each of four teams reported blind predictions for three challenge problems spanning crack initiation and crack propagation. After predictions had been reported, the predictions were compared to experimentally observed behavior. The metal alloys for these three problems were aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and precipitation hardened stainless steel PH13-8Mo H950. The predictive accuracies of the various methods are demonstrated, and the potential sources of error are discussed.

  11. Ductility Performance of Hybrid Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Eswari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a study on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete. The influence of fibre content on the ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens having different fibre volume fractions was investigated. The parameters of investigation included modulus of rupture, ultimate load, service load, ultimate and service load deflection, crack width, energy ductility and deflection ductility. A total of 27 specimens, 100×100×500 mm, were tested to study the above parameters. The specimens incorporated 0.0 to 2.0% volume fraction of polyolefin and steel fibres in different proportions. The ductility performance of hybrid fibre reinforced concrete specimens was compared with that of plain concrete. The test results show that addition of 2.0% by volume of hybrid fibres improves the ductility performance appreciably. An adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy based model has been proposed to predict the ductility performance characteristics. A reasonably close agreement has been obtained between the experimental and predicted results.

  12. "Work-Hardenable" ductile bulk metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jayanta; Tang, Mei Bo; Kim, Ki Buem; Theissmann, Ralf; Baier, Falko; Wang, Wei Hua; Eckert, Jürgen

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (< 1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive "work hardening" and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The "work-hardening" capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  13. Properties investigation of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhanshu Detwal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns microstructural and mechanical properties of an austempered ductile cast iron (ADI. The ductile iron material was produced by the sand mould casting technique. Afterwards, austempering heat treatment was applied to the specimens at two different temperatures of 250°C and 350°C. Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs were produced successfully by different two-stage heat treatments, to obtain favorable microstructure and hardness. The microstructure and hardness obtained by such variable heat treatments were compared. The austempering temperature and time were found to be decisive parameters in obtaining a desired ADI microstructure.

  14. Thin wall ductile and austempered iron castings

    OpenAIRE

    E. Fraś; M. Górny

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that it is possible to produce thin wall castings made of ductile iron with wall thickness in the range of 1.2 to 2.9 mm(without chills, cold laps and misruns). Thin wall ductile iron castings can be lighter (380 g) than their substitutes made of aluminium alloys (580g). The kinetics of austenitising transformation was studied in unalloyed ductile iron. The advance of transformations during austenitising was monitored by measurement the fraction of martensite and also by dil...

  15. Thin wall ductile and austempered iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that it is possible to produce thin wall castings made of ductile iron with wall thickness in the range of 1.2 to 2.9 mm(without chills, cold laps and misruns. Thin wall ductile iron castings can be lighter (380 g than their substitutes made of aluminium alloys (580g. The kinetics of austenitising transformation was studied in unalloyed ductile iron. The advance of transformations during austenitising was monitored by measurement the fraction of martensite and also by dilatometic studies. It has been shown that in thin wall ductile iron castings austenitising at 880 oC for 20 minutes is adequate to obtain the austenite matrix at the end of the first stage of austempering heat treatment cycle.

  16. Thin Wall Austempered Ductile Iron (TWADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the analysis of thin walled castings made of ductile iron is considered. It is shown that thin wall austempered ductile iron can be obtained by means of short-term heat treatment of thin wall castings without addition of alloying elements. Metallographic examinations of 2 mm thin walled castings along with casting with thicker wall thickness (20x28 mm after different austempring conditions are presented. It has been proved that short-term heat treatment amounted 20 minutes of austenitizing at 880 oC followed by holding at 400 oC for 5 minutes causes ausferrite matrix in 2 mm wall thickness castings, while casting with thicker wall thickness remain untransformed and martensite is still present in a matrix. Finally there are shown that thin wall ductile iron is an excellent base material for austempering heat treatments. As a result high mechanical properties received in thin wall plates made of austempered ductile iron.

  17. Hot ductility of continuously cast structural steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pytel, S.M. [Materials Science and Technology Institute, Cracow University of Technology, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation was to explain the hot ductility of the structural steels characterized by different amount of carbon and morphology of sulfides. Two different rolling processes were simulated under computer controlled, high temperature deformation MTS system. Results of this study show that morphology of sulfides as well as temperature and amount of deformation are responsible for level of hot ductility of the steel tested. (author). 7 refs, 5 refs, 4 tabs.

  18. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping COAST... Materials § 56.60-15 Ductile iron. (a) Ductile cast iron components made of material conforming to ASTM A... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A...

  19. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe may...

  20. Recent development of ductile cast iron production technology in China

    OpenAIRE

    Cai Qizhou; Wei Bokang

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in the production and technology of ductile cast iron castings in China is reviewed. The manufacture and process control of as-cast ductile iron are discussed. The microstructure, properties and application of partial austenitization normalizing ductile iron and austempered ductile iron (ADI) are briefl y depicted. The new development of ductile iron production techniques, such as cored-wire injection (wire-feeding nodularization) process, tundish cover ladle nodularizing proc...

  1. Recent development of ductile cast iron production technology in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Qizhou

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in the production and technology of ductile cast iron castings in China is reviewed. The manufacture and process control of as-cast ductile iron are discussed. The microstructure, properties and application of partial austenitization normalizing ductile iron and austempered ductile iron (ADI are briefl y depicted. The new development of ductile iron production techniques, such as cored-wire injection (wire-feeding nodularization process, tundish cover ladle nodularizing process, horizontal continuous casting, and EPC process (lost foam for ductile iron castings, etc., are summarized.

  2. Thin Wall Austempered Ductile Iron (TWADI)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Górny; E. Fraś

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the analysis of thin walled castings made of ductile iron is considered. It is shown that thin wall austempered ductile iron can be obtained by means of short-term heat treatment of thin wall castings without addition of alloying elements. Metallographic examinations of 2 mm thin walled castings along with casting with thicker wall thickness (20x28 mm) after different austempring conditions are presented. It has been proved that short-term heat treatment amounted 20 minutes of a...

  3. Analysis of nucleation modelling in ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tutum, Cem Celal; Tiedje, Niels Skat;

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. The experimental part of this work deals with casting of ductile iron samples with two different inoculants in four different thicknesses. Chemical analysis...

  4. A characteristic of austenitic ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tabor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of investigations of the mechanical properties conducted on austenitic ductile iron with an addi-tion of 23-24% Ni. The examined mechanical properties included: tensile strength (Rm, proof stress (Rp0,2, elongation (A5 and reduction of area (Z at reduced and low temperatures.

  5. Prediction of Ductile Fracture Surface Roughness Scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Needleman, Alan; Tvergaard, Viggo; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Experimental observations have shown that the roughness of fracture surfaces exhibit certain characteristic scaling properties. Here, calculations are carried out to explore the extent to which a ductile damage/fracture constitutive relation can be used to model fracture surface roughness scaling....... The scaling properties of the predicted thickness average fracture surfaces are calculated and the results are discussed in light of experimental observations....

  6. Fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, M.N. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Komatsu, S. [Kinki Univ., Higashihiroshima (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Systems Engineering

    1995-12-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature, austempering temperature and austempering time on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron have been presented and discussed in this paper. Statistical design of experiments with a 2{sup 3} matrix was used to determine the effect of the individual variables and their interactions. The desirable combination of the three variables is suggested based on the analysis.

  7. Some Mechanical Properties of Austempered Ductile Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waanders, F. B.; Vorster, S. W.; Vorster, M. J.

    1998-12-01

    In the present investigation the influence of the microstructure, obtained after an austempering treatment in a "process window", on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron has been investigated. These properties include tensile strength, elongation and hardness. Conversion electron Mössbauer spectra (CEMS) were measured, after heat treatment.

  8. Some mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waanders, F.B.; Vorster, S.W.; Vorster, M.V. [Potchefstroom Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Metall. Eng.

    1997-12-01

    In the present investigation the influence of the microstructure, obtained after an austempering treatment in a ``process window``, on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron has been investigated. These properties include tensile strength, elongation and hardness. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectra (CEMS) were measured, after heat treatment. (orig.). 7 refs.

  9. Some Mechanical Properties of Austempered Ductile Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waanders, F.B.; Vorster, S.W.; Vorster, M.J. [Potchefstroom University, Department of Metallurgical Engineering (South Africa)

    1998-12-15

    In the present investigation the influence of the microstructure, obtained after an austempering treatment in a 'process window', on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron has been investigated. These properties include tensile strength, elongation and hardness. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectra (CEMS) were measured, after heat treatment.

  10. Modelling of ductile failure in metal forming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.H.; Huetink, J.

    2009-01-01

    Damage and fracture are important criteria in the design of products and processes. Damage models can be used to predict ductile failure in metal forming processes. Nonlocal models avoid the mesh dependency problems of local damage models. A nonlocal damage model has been implemented in LSDYNA using

  11. Compaction of Ductile and Fragile Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creissac, S.; Pouliquen, O.; Dalloz-Dubrujeaud, B.

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of powders into tablets is widely used in several industries (cosmetics, food, pharmaceutics…). In all these industries, the composition of the initial powder is complex, and the behaviour under compaction is not well known, also the mechanical behaviour of the tablets. The aim of this paper is to understand the behaviour (pressure vs density) of a simplified media made of fragile and ductile powders, varying the relative ratio of each powder. Some compaction experiments were carried out with glass beads (fragile) and Polyethylen Glycol powder (ductile). We observe two typical behaviours, depending on the relative volumic fraction of each component. A transition is pointed out, observing the evolution of the slope of the curve pressure/density. This transition is explained by geometrical considerations during compaction. A model is proposed, based on the assumption that the studied media can be compare to a diphasic material with a continuous phase (the ductile powder) and a discrete phase (the fragile powder). The result of this model is compare to the experimental results of compaction, and give a good prediction of the behaviour of the different mixing, knowing the behaviour of the ductile and the fragile phase separately. These results were also interpreted in terms of Heckel parameter which characterizes the ability of the powder to deform plastically under compaction. Some mechanical tests were also performed to compare the mechanical resitance of the obtained tablets.

  12. Microstructure evolution during surface alloying of ductile iron and austempered ductile iron by electron beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulzar, A.; Akhter, J. I.; Ahmad, M.; Ali, G.; Mahmood, M.; Ajmal, M.

    2009-07-01

    Alloying and microstructural modification of surfaces by electron beam has become popular to tailor the surface properties of materials. Surface modification of as-received ductile iron, Ni-plated ductile iron and Ni-plated austempered ductile iron was carried out by electron beam melting to improve the surface properties. Martensitic structure evolved in the heat affected zone and ledeburite structure was produced in the molten zone of the ductile iron. Microhardness of the melted specimens enhanced considerably as compared to the as-received samples. However the microhardness of melted Ni-plated samples is lower than that of the unplated specimens. X-ray diffraction clearly revealed the formation of an austenite and Fe 3C phases in the electron beam molten zone. The broadening of peaks suggests refinement of the microstructure as well as internal stresses generated during electron beam melting.

  13. Microstructure evolution during surface alloying of ductile iron and austempered ductile iron by electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulzar, A. [Materials Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Akhter, J.I. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, M., E-mail: maqomer@yahoo.com [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, G. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ajmal, M. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2009-07-30

    Alloying and microstructural modification of surfaces by electron beam has become popular to tailor the surface properties of materials. Surface modification of as-received ductile iron, Ni-plated ductile iron and Ni-plated austempered ductile iron was carried out by electron beam melting to improve the surface properties. Martensitic structure evolved in the heat affected zone and ledeburite structure was produced in the molten zone of the ductile iron. Microhardness of the melted specimens enhanced considerably as compared to the as-received samples. However the microhardness of melted Ni-plated samples is lower than that of the unplated specimens. X-ray diffraction clearly revealed the formation of an austenite and Fe{sub 3}C phases in the electron beam molten zone. The broadening of peaks suggests refinement of the microstructure as well as internal stresses generated during electron beam melting.

  14. Seismic force modification factor for ductile structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Gen-shu; HUANG Jin-qiao

    2005-01-01

    The earthquake forces used in design codes of buildings should be theoretically determinable. This work examines the seismic force modification factor R based on elastic-plastic time-history earthquake analysis of SDOF systems, wherein the hysteresis models are elastic-perfectly-plastic (EPP), elastic-linearly-hardening (ELH), shear-slipped and bilinear-elastic. The latter two models are analysed for separating the effect of the ductility and the energy-dissipating capacity. Three-hundred eighty-eight earthquake records from different site conditions are used in analysis. The ductility is taken to be 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, with the damping ratio being 0.02, 0.035 and 0.05 respectively. The post-yield stiffness ratios 0.0, 0.1 and 0.2 are used in the analysis. The R spectra are standardized by the characteristic period of the earthquake records, which leads to a much smaller scatter in averaged numerical results. It was found that the most important factor determining R is the ductility. R increases more than linearly with ductility. The energy-dissipating capacity, damping and the post-yield stiffness are the less important factors. The energy dissipating capacity is important only for structures with short period and moderate period (0.3≤T/Tg<5.0). For EPP and ELH models, R for 0.05 damping is 10% to 15% smaller than for 0.02 damping. For EPP and ELH models, greater post-yield stiffness leads to greater R, but the influence of post-yield stiffness is obvious only when the post-yield stiffness is less than 10% of the initial stiffness. By means of statistical regression analysis the relation of the seismic force modification factor R with the natural period of the system and ductility for EPP and ELH models were established for each site and soil condition.

  15. Analyses of cavitation instabilities in ductile metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    , and also tests for a thin ductile metal layer bonding two ceramic blocks have indicated rapid void growth. Analyses for these material configurations are discussed here. When the void radius is very small, a nonlocal plasticity model is needed to account for observed size-effects, and recent analyses...... analyzed for a material containing a periodic distribution of spherical voids with two different void sizes, where the stress fields around larger voids may accelerate the growth of smaller voids. Another approach has been an analysis of a unit cell model in which a central cavity is discretely represented......, while the surrounding voids are represented by a porous ductile material model in terms of a field quantity that specifies the variation of the void volume fraction in the surrounding metal....

  16. The austempering study of alloyed ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric, Olivera [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: oliverae@vin.bg.ac.yu; Jovanovic, Milan [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Sid-baranin, Leposava [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro); Rajnovic, Dragan [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro); Zec, Slavica [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-07-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) proved to be an excellent material as it possesses attractive properties: high strength, ductility and toughness are combined with good wear resistance and machinability. These properties can be achieved upon adequate heat treatment which yields optimum microstructure for a given chemical composition. In this paper an investigation has been conducted on ADI alloyed with 0.45%Cu and austempered in a range of times and temperatures. The microstructure and fracture mode developed throughout these treatments have been identified by means of light and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It was shown that strength, elongation and impact energy strongly depend on amounts of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. Based on these results an optimal processing window has been established.

  17. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  18. Microstructural Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to quantify the graphite particle phase in nodular ductile iron (NDI). This study provides the basis for initializing microstructure in direct numerical simulations, as part of developing microstructure-fracture response models. The work presented here is a subset of a PhD dissertation on spall fracture in NDI. NDI is an ideal material for studying the influence of microstructure on ductile fracture because it contains a readily identifiable second-phase particle population, embedded in a ductile metallic matrix, which serves as primary void nucleation sites. Nucleated voids grow and coalesce under continued tensile loading, as part of the micromechanisms of ductile fracture, and lead to macroscopic failure. For this study, we used 2D optical microscopy and quantitative metallography relationships to characterize the volume fraction, size distribution, nearest-neighbor distance, and other higher-order metrics of the graphite particle phase. We found that the volume fraction was {Phi} = 0.115, the average particle diameter was d{sub avg} = 25.9 {mu}m, the Weibull shape and scaling parameters were {beta} = 1.8 and {eta} = 29.1 {mu}m, respectively, the (first) nearest neighbor distance was L{sub nn} = 32.4 {mu}m, the exponential coefficients for volume fraction fluctuations was A{sub {Phi}} = 1.89 and B{sub {Phi}} = -0.59, respectively. Based on reaching a coefficient-of-variation (COV) of 0.01, the representative volume element (RVE) size was determined to be 8.9L{sub nn} (288 {mu}m).

  19. Stacking faults in austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermida, J.D. [CNEA, San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Materiales

    1996-06-01

    During last decade, Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) has been successfully used as an acceptable replacement material for steel in many applications, due to the relatively high strength and reasonable ductility obtained. These properties are the result of the special microstructure exhibited by this material at the end of the upper bainite reaction: ferrite platelets surrounded by high carbon stabilized austenite. However, at the beginning of the austempering treatment, the existence of interdendritic low carbon austenite is revealed by its transformation to martensite when cooling the sample or during subsequent deformation. The completion of the upper bainite reaction is of decisive importance to mechanical properties because the remaining martensite reduces ductility. It was observed that the rate of the upper bainite reaction is governed by the carbon content difference between the low and high carbon austenites. The carbon content is obtained by the lattice parameter measurement, because there exists a known expression that relates both magnitudes. Several works have used X-ray diffraction to measure the lattice parameter and phase concentrations as a function of austempering time. In these works, the lattice parameters were obtained directly from the {l_brace}220{r_brace} and {l_brace}311{r_brace} peaks position. The purpose of this work is to show more precise lattice parameters measurement and, very closely related to this, the existence of stacking faults in austenite, even at times within the processing window.

  20. Abrasive wear behaviour of as cast and austempered ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baydogan, M.; Koekden, M.U.; Cimenoglu, H. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science Engineering Istanbul (Turkey)

    2000-07-01

    In this study, abrasive wear behaviour of as cast and austempered GGG 50 and GGG 80 quality ductile irons was investigated. In the as cast condition, GGG 50 and GGG 80 quality ductile irons were having ferritic and pearlitic matrix structures, respectively. Austempering at 250 C after austenitisation at 900 C for 100 minutes produced bainitic matrix structure in both of the investigated ductile irons. Abrasive wear tests performed by rubbing the as cast and austempered specimens on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} abrasive bands, revealed that austempering treatment improves abrasion resistance about 10-70% depending on the abrasive particle size and composition of the base iron. In the as cast condition, pearlitic GGG 80 grade ductile iron, has higher wear resistance than ferritic GGG 50 grade ductile iron. In the austempered condition GGG 50 and GGG 80 grade ductile irons which have bainitic matrix structure, exhibit almost similar wear resistance. (orig.)

  1. Thermomechanical treatment of austempered ductile iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The production of lightweight ferrous castings with increased strength properties became unavoidable hter aluminum and magnesium castings. The relatively new ferrous casting alloy ADI offers promising strength prospects, and the thermo-mechanical treatment of ductile iron may suggest a new fluence of thermomechanical treatment,either by ausforming just after quenching and before the onset of austempering reaction or by cold rolling after of this work, ausforming of ADI up to 25% reduction in height during a rolling operation was found to add a mechanical processing component compared to the conventional ADI heat treatment, thus increasing the rate ics of ausferrite formation was studied using both metallographic as well as XRD-techniques. The effect of ausforming on strength was quite dramatic (up to 70% and 50% increase in the yield and ultimate strength respectively). A mechanism involving both a refined microstructural scale and an elevated dislocation density was suggested. Nickel eformation is necessary to alleviate the deleterious effect of alloy segregation on ductility.luence of cold rolling (CR) on the mechanical properties and structural characteristics ofADI wasinvestigated. The variation in properties was related to the amount of retained austenite nsformation. In the course of tensile deformation of ADI, transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) takes place, indicated by the increase of the instantaneous value of strain-hardening exponent with o partial transformation of γr to martensite under the CR strain. Such strain-induced transformation resulted in higher amounts of mechanically generated therefore increased, while ductility and impact toughness decreased with increasing CR reduction.

  2. Flexural strength and ductility of reinforced concrete beams

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, AKH; Ho, JCM; Pam, HJ

    2002-01-01

    In the design of reinforced concrete beams, especially those made of high-strength concrete and those in earthquake-resistant structures, both the flexural strength and ductility need to be considered. From the numerical results obtained in a previous study on the post-peak behaviour and flexural ductility of reinforced concrete beams, the interrelation between the flexural strength and the flexural ductility that could be simultaneously achieved was evaluated and plotted in the form of chart...

  3. Supporting the model of ductile iron dendritic solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, H.M.C.M. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Metall. and Mater. Dept.; Pinto, A.M.P. [Minho Univ. (Portugal). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Jacinto, M.C.P.L. [Porto Polytechnic Inst. and INEGI, Porto (Portugal). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Sa, C.P.M. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Materials Center

    2000-08-01

    Microsegregation in ductile iron is generally accepted as modelled by a regular pattern: the graphite promoter elements are assumed to concentrate in the neighborhood of the graphite nodules and the carbide forming elements in the eutectic cell boundaries. The authors have conducted several microanalyses in several ductile irons and concluded that the microsegregation pattern does not agree with this model but supports the mechanism of dendritic ductile iron solidification. (orig.)

  4. Neural Network Analysis of Tensile Strength of Austempered Ductile Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Ławrynowicz; S. Dymski; M. Trepczyńska - Łent; T. Giętka

    2007-01-01

    The neural technique was applied to the analysis of the ultimate tensile strength and additionally the yield strength of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Austempered ductile iron is an excellent material and it possesses attractive properties as high strength, ductility and toughness. This paper begins with an introduction to neural networks and demonstrates the ability of the method to investigate new phenomena in cases where the information cannot be accessed experimentally. The model allows...

  5. Polyurethane coating for ductile iron pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG En-qing

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A special polyurethane coating designed for ductile iron pipe was developed. The effects of the ingredients on properties, such as viscosity, flow leveling, solidification-rate, adhesion and hardness, were researched. It was then analyzed in what ways the technical parameters, such as temperature and pressure, influence the coat quality. The results showed that the molar ratio and synthesizing conditions must be strictly controlled to obtain suitable pre-polymer viscosity by adjusting the formula ratio of the B component, satisfactory mechanical properties and cure rate can be obtained and bubbles in the coat can be avoided.

  6. Ductile alloys for sealing modular component interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, John J.; Wessell, Brian J.; James, Allister W.; Marsh, Jan H.; Gear, Paul J.

    2017-08-08

    A vane assembly (10) having: an airfoil (12) and a shroud (14) held together without metallurgical bonding there between; a channel (22) disposed circumferentially about the airfoil (12), between the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14); and a seal (20) disposed in the channel (22), wherein during operation of a turbine engine having the vane assembly (10) the seal (20) has a sufficient ductility such that a force generated on the seal (20) resulting from relative movement of the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14) is sufficient to plastically deform the seal (20).

  7. Ductile Damage Evolution and Strain Path Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasan, C. C.; Hoefnagels, J. M. P.; Peerlings, R. H. J.; Geers, M. G. D.; ten Horn, C. H. L. J.; Vegter, H.

    2007-04-01

    Forming limit diagrams are commonly used in sheet metal industry to define the safe forming regions. These diagrams are built to define the necking strains of sheet metals. However, with the rise in the popularity of advance high strength steels, ductile fracture through damage evolution has also emerged as an important parameter in the determination of limit strains. In this work, damage evolution in two different steels used in the automotive industry is examined to observe the relationship between damage evolution and the strain path that is followed during the forming operation.

  8. Recent development of ductile cast iron production technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Qizhou; Wei Bokang

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in the production and technology of ductile cast iron castings in China is reviewed.The manufacture and process control of as-cast ductile iron are discussed.The microstructure.properties and application of partial austenitization normalizing ductile iron and austempered duclile iron(ADI)are briefly depicted.The new development of duclile iron production techniques,such as cored-wire injection(wire-feeding nodularization)process,tundish cover ladle nodularizing process,horizontal continuous casting,and EPC process (lost foam)for ductile iron castings,etc.,are summarized.

  9. Ductile Fracture Initiation of Anisotropic Metal Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Shuhui; He, Ji

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the influence of material plastic anisotropy on ductile fracture in the strain space under the assumption of plane stress state for sheet metals. For convenient application, a simple expression is formulated by the method of total strain theory under the assumption of proportional loading. The Hill 1948 quadratic anisotropic yield model and isotropic hardening flow rule are adopted to describe the plastic response of the material. The Mohr-Coulomb model is revisited to describe the ductile fracture in the stress space. Besides, the fracture locus for DP590 in different loading directions is obtained by experiments. Four different types of tensile test specimens, including classical dog bone, flat with cutouts, flat with center holes and pure shear, are performed to fracture. All these specimens are prepared with their longitudinal axis inclined with the angle of 0°, 45°, and 90° to the rolling direction, respectively. A 3D digital image correlation system is used in this study to measure the anisotropy parameter r 0, r 45, r 90 and the equivalent strains to fracture for all the tests. The results show that the material plastic anisotropy has a remarkable influence on the fracture locus in the strain space and can be predicted accurately by the simple expression proposed in this study.

  10. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Y. S.; Kingsbury, G. R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  11. Thermomechanical treatment of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Nofal

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The production of lightweight ferrous castings with increased strength properties became unavoidable facing the serious challenge of lighter aluminum and magnesium castings. The relatively new ferrous casting alloy ADI offers promising strength prospects, and the thermo-mechanical treatment of ductile iron may suggest a new route for production of thin-wall products. This work aims at studying the influence of thermomechanical treatment, either by ausforming just after quenching and before the onset of austempering reaction or by cold rolling after austempering. In the first part of this work, ausforming of ADI up to 25% reduction in height during a rolling operation was found to add a mechanical processing component compared to the conventional ADI heat treatment, thus increasing the rate of ausferrite formation and leading to a much finer and more homogeneous ausferrite product. The kinetics of ausferrite formation was studied using both metallographic as well as XRD-techniques. The effect of ausforming on the strength was quite dramatic (up to 70% and 50% increase in the yield and ultimate strength respectively. A mechanism involving both a refined microstructural scale and an elevated dislocation density was suggested. Nickel is added to ADI to increase hardenability of thick section castings, while ausforming to higher degrees of deformation is necessary to alleviate the deleterious effect of alloy segregation on ductility. In the second part of this work, the influence of cold rolling (CR on the mechanical properties and structural characteristics of ADI was investigated. The variation in properties was related to the amount of retained austenite (γr and its mechanically induced ransformation. In the course of tensile deformation of ADI, transformation induced plasticity (TRIP takes place, indicated by the increase of the instantaneous value of strain-hardening exponent with tensile strain. The amount of retained austenite was found to

  12. Hot ductility of medium carbon steel with vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon, E-mail: lee1626@kims.re.kr [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jun-Young [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, JunHo; Park, Dae-Bum; Jang, Jin-Young; Huh, Sungyul; Ju Kim, Sung [R& D Center, Hyundai Steel Company, Dangjin, Chungnam 343-823 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jun-Yun; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-10

    Hot ductility of medium carbon steel containing 0.52 wt% of carbon and 0.11 wt% of vanadium was investigated using a hot tensile test performed up to fracture. The hot ductility was evaluated by measuring the reduction of area of the fractured specimens, which were strained at a variety of test temperatures in a range of 600–1100 °C at a strain rate of 2×10{sup −3}/s. The hot ductility was excellent in a temperature range of 950–1100 °C, followed by a decrease of the hot ductility below 950 °C. The hot ductility continued to drop as the temperature was lowered to 600 °C. The loss of hot ductility in a temperature range of 800–950 °C, which is above the Ae{sub 3} temperature, was due to V(C,N) precipitation at austenite grain boundaries. The further decline of hot ductility between 700 °C and 750 °C resulted from the transformation of ferrite films decorating austenite grain boundaries. The hot ductility continued to decrease at 650 °C or less, owing to ferrite films and the pearlite matrix, which is harder than ferrite. The pearlite was transformed from austenite due to relatively high carbon content.

  13. Thermodynamical Framework for Ductile Damage and Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    César de Sá, José M. A.; Andrade, Filipe X. C.; Andrade Pires, Francisco M.

    2010-05-01

    Many models employed for the prediction of plastic deformation rely exclusively on elastoplastic theories, disregarding significant effects of internal degradation [1]. Constitutive models based on the Continuum Damage Mechanics theory provide more realistic predictions since damage is taken into account as an internal variable. In the present contribution, Lemaire's model for ductile damage [2] is questioned under the assumption of the principle of maximum inelastic dissipation [3]. The model is enhanced with a nonlocal formulation where the damage variable is spatially averaged by means of an integral operator [4]. Thermodynamical admissibility of the nonlocal model is checked by applying the global version of the Clausius-Duhem inequality [5]. Results from numerical analysis show that the constitutive model is insensitive to spatial discretization.

  14. Enhanced ductility in round tensile bars produced by cladding a ductile ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. X.; Wu, P. D.; Embury, J. D.; Huang, Y.

    2010-03-01

    The effect of cladding a ductile ring on necking and fracture in round bars under tension is studied numerically using the finite element method based on the Gurson damage model. It is demonstrated that the cladding increases both the necking strain and the fracture strain. The effects of topological arrangement of cladding ring on necking and fracture are numerically investigated. It is indicated that while a topological arrangement of cladding has no noticeable effect on necking, it significantly influences the fracture strain. For a given volume fraction of cladding, the fracture strain could increase about 11% if the ductile ring is moved from the outmost to the innermost. It is also found that the subtle appearance of fracture surface due to cladding displays strong mesh sensitivity and may even be an artefact of the mesh.

  15. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.C. [Kuang Wu Inst. of Tech. and Commerce, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  16. Fluid migration in ductile shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusseis, Florian; Menegon, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Fluid migration in metamorphic environments depends on a dynamically evolving permeable pore space, which was rarely characterised in detail. The data-base behind our understanding of the 4-dimensional transport properties of metamorphic rocks is therefore fragmentary at best, which leaves conceptual models poorly supported. Generally, it seems established that deformation is a major driver of permeability generation during regional metamorphism, and evidence for metamorphic fluids being channelled in large scale shear zones has been found in all depth segments of the continental crust. When strain localizes in ductile shear zones, the microfabric is modified until a steady state mylonite is formed that supports large deformations. A dynamic porosity that evolves during mylonitisation controls the distinct transport pathways along which fluid interacts with the rock. This dynamic porosity is controlled by a limited number of mechanisms, which are intrinsically linked to the metamorphic evolution of the rock during its deformational overprint. Many mid- and lower-crustal mylonites comprise polyphase mixtures of micron-sized grains that show evidence for deformation by dissolution/precipitation-assisted viscous grain boundary sliding. The establishment of these mineral mixtures is a critical process, where monomineralic layers are dispersed and grain growth is inhibited by the heterogeneous nucleation of secondary mineral phases at triple junctions. Here we show evidence from three different mid- and lower-crustal shear zones indicating that heterogeneous nucleation occurs in creep cavities. Micro- and nanotomographic observations show that creep cavities provide the dominant form of porosity in these ultramylonites. They control a "granular fluid pump" that directs fluid migration and hence mass transport. The granular fluid pump operates on the grain scale driven by viscous grain boundary sliding, and requires only small amounts of fluid. The spatial arrangement of

  17. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  18. Calorimetric examinations of austempered ductile iron ADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the results of calorimetric examinations during heating and cooling of austempered ductile iron ADI after austempering at temperatures of 280, 330 and 380oC. The samples for examinations were taken from cast rods of 20 and 60 mm diameter. Examinations were carried out on a differential scanning calorimeter, type Multi HTC S60. During heating, on a DSC curve one strong exothermic effect has been noted to occur (it does not occur in the case of common-grade cast iron, accompanied by two endothermic effects. The exothermic effect occurs within the range of about 20oC. Depending on the temperature of austempering treatment, its beginning falls to the temperatures from 469 to 490oC. The heat of this effect is proportional to the austenite content in ADI matrix after austempering. The endothermic effects are related with decomposition of pearlite (or bainite and with phase transformation α → γ (ferrite as a constituent of ausferritic matrix.

  19. Neutron diffraction study of austempered ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, C. S.; Sharpe, W.; Barker, J.; Fields, R. J.

    1996-04-01

    Crystallographic properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) were studied by using neutron diffraction. A quantitative phase analysis based on Rietveld refinements revealed three component phases, α-Fe (ferrite), γ-Fe (austenite), and graphite precipitate, with weight fractions of 66.0, 31.5, and 2.5 pct, respectively. The ferrite phases of the samples were found to be tetragonal, 14/mmm, with a c/a ratio of about 0.993, which is very close to the body-centered cubic (bcc) structure. The austenite phase had C atoms occupying the octahedral site of the face-centered cubic (fcc) unit cell with about 8 pct occupancy ratio. A strong microstrain broadening was observed for the two Fe phases of the samples. The particle sizes of the acicular ferrite phase were studied by using small angle neutron scattering. The analysis suggested a mean rod diameter of 700 A. The scattering invariant predicts a ferrite volume fraction consistent with the powder diffraction analysis. A textbook case of nodular graphite segregation, with average diameters ranging from 10 to 20 μm, was observed by optical micrography.

  20. Determining Ductile Fracture Toughness in Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Manneschmidt, Eric T [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Ductile fracture toughness determination, such as the J-integral versus crack growth resistance (J-R) curve, is a useful tool for evaluating material structural integrity in the presence of pre-existing defects. The J-R curve represents a way to calculate the work (energy) per unit fracture surface area needed to drive the crack growth. A typical J-R curve is shown in Fig. 1 from which the material fracture toughness near the initiation of stable crack growth (Jq) can be derived. In addition, tearing modulus (TR), representing the material resistance to stable crack growth, can be calculated based on the slope of the J-R curve between two exclusion lines (red dashed lines in Fig. 1). Since the introduction of the J-R curve, extensive efforts have been continuously devoted to develop simplified and reliable methods for determining the material J-R curve. This article briefly reviews three widely-used J-R curve test methods in metals, i.e. elastic unloading compliance (EUC), normalization, and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The main difference in these methods relates to the determination of the crack size. More details of performing the J-R curve determination can be found in ASTM standard E1820-11.

  1. Non-local models for ductile failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    César de Sá, José; Azinpour, Erfan; Santos, Abel

    2016-08-01

    Ductile damage can be dealt with continuous descriptions of material, resorting, for example, to continuous damage mechanic descriptions or micromechanical constitutive models. When it comes to describe material behaviour near and beyond fracture these approaches are no longer sufficient or valid and continuous/discontinuous approaches can be adopted to track fracture initiation and propagation. Apart from more pragmatic solutions like element erosion or remeshing techniques more advanced approaches based on the X-FEM concept, in particular associated with non-local formulations, may be adopted to numerically model these problems. Nevertheless, very often, for practical reasons, some important aspects are somewhat left behind, specially energetic requirements to promote the necessary transition of energy release associated with material damage and fracture energy associated to a crack creation and evolution. Phase-field methods may combine advantages of regularised continuous models by providing a similar description to non-local thermodynamical continuous damage mechanics, as well as, a "continuous" approach to numerically follow crack evolution and branching

  2. Alloy design for intrinsically ductile refractory high-entropy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Saad; Shafeie, Samrand; Hu, Qiang; Ahlström, Johan; Persson, Christer; Veselý, Jaroslav; Zýka, Jiří; Klement, Uta; Guo, Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Refractory high-entropy alloys (RHEAs), comprising group IV (Ti, Zr, Hf), V (V, Nb, Ta), and VI (Cr, Mo, W) refractory elements, can be potentially new generation high-temperature materials. However, most existing RHEAs lack room-temperature ductility, similar to conventional refractory metals and alloys. Here, we propose an alloy design strategy to intrinsically ductilize RHEAs based on the electron theory and more specifically to decrease the number of valence electrons through controlled alloying. A new ductile RHEA, Hf0.5Nb0.5Ta0.5Ti1.5Zr, was developed as a proof of concept, with a fracture stress of close to 1 GPa and an elongation of near 20%. The findings here will shed light on the development of ductile RHEAs for ultrahigh-temperature applications in aerospace and power-generation industries.

  3. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a hard material whose value for extended engineering applications such as body armor; is limited by its brittleness under impact. To improve the ductility while retaining hardness, we used density functional theory to examine modifying B4C ductility through microalloying. We found that replacing the CBC chain in B4C with Si-Si, denoted as (B11Cp)-Si2, dramatically improves the ductility, allowing a continuous shear to a large strain of 0.802 (about twice of B4C failure strain) without brittle failure. Moreover, (B11C)-Si2 retains low density and high hardness. This ductility improvement arises because the Si-Si linkages enable the icosahedra accommodate additional shear by rotating instead of breaking bonds.

  4. Retention of ductility in high-strength steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. R.; Zackay, V. F.

    1969-01-01

    To produce high strength alloy steel with retention of ductility, include tempering, cooling and subsequent tempering. Five parameters for optimum results are pretempering temperature, amount of strain, strain rate, temperature during strain, and retempering temperature.

  5. Solidification, processing and properties of ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2010-01-01

    Ductile cast iron has been an important engineering material in the past 50 years. In that time, it has evolved from a complicated material that required the foundry metallurgist's highest skill and strict process control to being a commonly used material that can easily be produced with modern...... of the latest years of research indicate that ductile cast iron in the future will become a highly engineered material in which strict control of a range of alloy elements combined with intelligent design and highly advanced processing allows us to target properties to specific applications to a much higher...... and to illustrate how ductile iron's properties are optimised, the essentials of heat treatment are described too. It is the hope that researchers will find a comprehensive treatment of ductile cast iron metallurgy and that engineers and designers will be presented with the latest information on, and references to...

  6. Impact toughness and fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jingcheng; Guoxiong SUN

    2004-01-01

    The impact toughness and fracture toughness ofaustermpered ductile iron (ADI) are described. The notched and un-notched charpy impact toughness of ADI at room temperature are somewhat lower than that of steel castings or forged steel pieces, however, they are approximately three times higher than that of mormal pearlitic ductile iron. The impact toughness of ADI decreases with decreasing temperature; but at -40 ℃ it still maintains about 70% of the value at room temperature. The properties of...

  7. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  8. Influence of phosphorus on the creep ductility of copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandström, Rolf, E-mail: rsand@kth.se [Materials Science and Engineering, KTH, Brinellvägen 23, S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Swerea KIMAB, Box 7074, S-164 07 Kista (Sweden); Wu, Rui [Swerea KIMAB, Box 7074, S-164 07 Kista (Sweden)

    2013-10-15

    Around 1990 it was discovered that pure copper could have extra low creep ductility in the temperature interval 180–250 °C. The material was intended for use in canisters for nuclear waste disposal. Although extra low creep ductility was not observed much below 180 °C and the temperature in the canister will never exceed 100 °C, it was feared that the creep ductility could reach low values at lower temperatures after long term exposure. If 50 ppm phosphorus was added to the copper the low creep ductility disappeared. A creep cavitation model is presented that can quantitatively describe the cavitation behaviour in uniaxial and multiaxial creep tests as well as the observed creep ductility for copper with and without phosphorus. A so-called double ledge model has been introduced that demonstrates why the nucleation rate of creep cavities is often proportional to the creep rate. The phosphorus agglomerates at the grain boundaries and limits their local deformation and thereby reduces the formation and growth of cavities. This explains why extra low creep ductility does not occur in phosphorus alloyed copper.

  9. Ductile streaks in precision grinding of hard and brittle materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V C Venkatesh; S Izman; S Sharif; T T Mon; M Konneh

    2003-10-01

    Ductile streaks produced during diamond grinding of hard and brittle materials have aided the subsequent process of polishing. Two novel techniques were used to study the formation of ductile mode streaks during diamond grinding (primary process) of germanium, silicon, and glass. In the first technique, aspheric surfaces were generated on Ge and Si at conventional speeds (5000 rpm). In the second technique, diamond grinding of plano surfaces on glass and Si surfaces using high speed (100,000 rpm) was carried out. Form accuracy, surface finish and ductile mode grinding streaks are discussed in this paper. It was found that resinoid diamond wheels gave more ductile streaks than metal-bonded wheels but better form accuracy was obtained with the latter. Ductile streaks were obtained more easily with pyrex rather than with BK 7 glass thus necessitating very little time for polishing. Ductile streaks appeared in abundance on germanium rather than silicon. Both the novel grinding techniques were used on CNC machining centres.

  10. Effect of fully and semi austempering treatment on the fatigue properties of ductile cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Gun; Lim, Bok Kyu; Hwang, Jung Gak [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Youl [Samcheok National Univ., Samcheok (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-01

    Single phase bainite structure which is obtained by the conventional austempering treatment reduces the ductility of ductile cast iron. Because of the reduction of ductility it is possible to worsen the fatigue properties. Therefore, semi austempered ductile iron which is treated from {alpha}+{gamma} is prepared to investigate the static strength and fatigue properties in comparison with fully austempered ductile iron (is treated from {gamma}). In spite of semi austempered ductile iron shows the 86% increase of ductility. Also, semi austempered ductile iron shows the higher fatigue limit and lower fatigue crack growth rate as compared with fully austempered ductile iron. By the fractographical analysis, it is revealed that the ferrite obtained by semi austempering process brings about the plastic deformation (ductile striation) of crack tip and gives the prior path of crack propagation. The relatively low crack growth rate in semi austempered specimen is caused by above fractographical reasons.

  11. New measurement technique of ductility curve for ductility-dip cracking susceptibility in Alloy 690 welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Uegaki, Takanori; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2016-08-30

    The coupling of a hot tensile test with a novel in situ observation technique using a high-speed camera was investigated as a high-accuracy quantitative evaluation method for ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility. Several types of Alloy 690 filler wire were tested in this study owing to its susceptibility to DDC. The developed test method was used to directly measure the critical strain for DDC and high temperature ductility curves with a gauge length of 0.5 mm. Minimum critical strains of 1.3%, 4.0%, and 3.9% were obtained for ERNiCrFe-7, ERNiCrFe-13, and ERNiCrFe-15, respectively. The DDC susceptibilities of ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 were nearly the same and quite low compared with that of ERNiCrFe-7. This was likely caused by the tortuosity of the grain boundaries arising from the niobium content of around 2.5% in the former samples. Besides, ERNiCrFe-13 and ERNiCrFe-15 indicated higher minimum critical strains even though these specimens include higher content of sulfur and phosphorus than ERNiCrFe-7. Thus, containing niobium must be more effective to improve the susceptibility compared to sulfur and phosphorous in the alloy system.

  12. Ductile flow by water-assisted cataclasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Brok, Bas

    2003-04-01

    In the presence of water otherwise brittle materials may deform macroscopically ductile by water-assisted cataclastic creep. This is possible as long as (i) solubility is high enough, so that stress-corrosion can occur, and (ii) local stress is low enough, to that fracturing remains subcritical. Water-assisted cataclastic creep (WACC) may play an important role in the middle and lower continental crust where mineral solubilities are high and stresses low. WACC is a poorly understood deformation process. Experiments were performed on very soluble brittle salts (Na-chlorate; K-alum) to study microstructure development by WACC. The experiments were carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a small see-through vessel. In this way the cataclastic deformation process could be studied "in-situ" under the microscope. Crystals were loaded in the presence of saturated salt solution. It appeared that originally straight mineral surfaces were instable when kept under stress. Grooves (or channels) slowly developed in the surface by local dissolution. These grooves behave like so-called Grinfeld instabilities. They develop because the energy of a grooved surface under stress is lower than the energy of a straight surface under stress. The grooves may deepen and turn into subcritical cracks when local stress further increases. These cracks propagate slowly. They propagate parallel to sigma1 but also at an angle and even perpendicular to sigma1, often following crystallographically controlled directions. The fractures mostly change direction while propagating, locally making turns of more than 180 degrees. Irregular fracture fragments thus develop. The fractures may migrate sideways (as with grain bounday migration) probably by solution-redeposition driven by differences in stress between both sides of the fracture. Thus the shape of the fragments changes. The size of the fracture fragments seems to be controlled by the distance of the grooves, which decreases

  13. Mechanical Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to characterize the strength and fracture response of nodular ductile iron (NDI) and its underlying ferritic matrix phase. Quasistatic and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) compression tests were performed on NDI and a model material for the NDI matrix phase (Fe-Si alloy). Smooth and notch round bar (NRB) samples were loaded in tension until fracture to determine strain-at-failure with varying stress triaxiality. Multiple tests were performed on each small and large smooth bar samples to obtain fracture statistics with sample size. Fracture statistics are important for initializing simulations of fragmentation events. Johnson-Cook strength models were developed for the NDI and the Fe-Si alloy. NDI strength model parameters are: A = 525 MPa, B = 650 MPa, n = 0.6, and C = 0.0205. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2312/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. Fe-Si alloy strength model parameters are: A=560 MPa, B = 625 MPa, n = 0.5, and C = 0.02. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2850/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. A Johnson-Cook failure model was developed for NDI with model parameters: D{sub 1} = 0.029, D{sub 2} = 0.44, D{sub 3} = -1.5, and D{sub 4} = D{sub 5} = 0. An exponential relationship was developed for the elongation-at-failure statistics as a function of length-scale with model parameters: S{sub f1} = 0.108, S{sub f2} = -0.00169, and L{sub m} = 32.4 {mu}m. NDI strength and failure models, including failure statistics, will be used in continuum-scale simulations of explosively-driven ring fragmentation. The Fe-Si alloy strength model will be used in mesoscale simulations of spall fracture in NDI, where the NDI matrix phase is captured explicitly.

  14. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B. C.; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M.; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-05-01

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the ``grain size''. On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures.As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different

  15. Effect of Water on Ductility and Fatigue Strength of Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (adi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, Terutoshi; Ferguson, W. George; Goto, Masahiro

    In order to study the mechanism of decreasing tensile strength and elongation of Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (ADI) in the wet condition, various tension tests and impact tests were carried out. Three point bending fatigue tests were carried out on ADI and annealed 0.55% carbon steel to clarify the influence of water on fatigue strength. The main conclusions are as follow. Embrittlement by water begins when plastic deformation starts in a tension test. The fatigue limit of ADI in water showed a lower value than that in air. The influence of a water environment on fatigue behaviour was similar to that of annealed 0.55% carbon steel. Embrittlement such as that in a tension test was not observed in a fatigue test.

  16. Energetic approach for ductile tearing; Approche energetique de la dechirure ductile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, St

    1999-07-01

    This study focuses on ductile crack initiation and propagation. It aims to propose an approach for the engineer allowing the prediction of the evolution of cracks in large scale components, from parameters determined on laboratory specimens. A crack initiation criterion, defining a J{sub i} tenacity related to crack tip blunting proposed in the literature is validated in the study. This criterion is shown to be transferable from laboratory specimens to structures. The literature review shows that an approach based on the dissipated energy in the fracture process during propagation offers an economical and simple solution to simulate large crack growth. A numerical method is proposed to estimate this fracture energy. The existence of an energy parameter G{sub fr} is shown, by simulating the propagation by the simultaneous release of several elements and by the use of the Rice integral with an original integration path. This parameter represents the needed energy for a unit crack extension and appears to be intrinsic to the material. A global energy statement allows to relate this parameter to a variation of the plastic part of J integral. It offers a second numerical method to simulate the propagation just from stationary numerical calculations, as well as the elaboration of a simplified method. This approach, using two parameters J{sub i} and G{sub fr}, intrinsic to the material and experimentally measurable on specimens, is validated on many tests such as crack pipes subjected to four points bending and cracked rings in compression. For example, this approach allows to model up to 90 mm ductile tearing in a pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack in ferritic steel, or to anticipate the evolution of a semi-elliptical crack in an aged austenitic ferritic steel plate subjected to bending. (author)

  17. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMinn, Chris; Auton, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the high-pressure injection of fluid into the bulk of the rock. The goal is to initiate and propagate fractures that will provide hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir, enabling gas or oil to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We first consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We use this model to show that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. We then complement these results with laboratory experiments in an analogue system, and with numerical simulations based on the discrete element method (DEM), both of which suggest that ductile failure can indeed dramatically change the resulting deformation pattern. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from models that assume purely elastic mechanical behavior.

  18. Ductile electroactive biodegradable hyperbranched polylactide copolymers enhancing myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-01

    Myotube formation is crucial to restoring muscular functions, and biomaterials that enhance the myoblast differentiation into myotubes are highly desirable for muscular repair. Here, we report the synthesis of electroactive, ductile, and degradable copolymers and their application in enhancing the differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes. A hyperbranched ductile polylactide (HPLA) was synthesized and then copolymerized with aniline tetramer (AT) to produce a series of electroactive, ductile and degradable copolymers (HPLAAT). The HPLA and HPLAAT showed excellent ductility with strain to failure from 158.9% to 42.7% and modulus from 265.2 to 758.2 MPa. The high electroactivity of the HPLAAT was confirmed by UV spectrometer and cyclic voltammogram measurements. These HPLAAT polymers also showed improved thermal stability and controlled biodegradation rate compared to HPLA. Importantly, when applying these polymers for myotube formation, the HPLAAT significantly improved the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts in vitro compared to HPLA. Furthermore, these polymers greatly promoted myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells as measured by quantitative analysis of myotube number, length, diameter, maturation index, and gene expression of MyoD and TNNT. Together, our study shows that these electroactive, ductile and degradable HPLAAT copolymers represent significantly improved biomaterials for muscle tissue engineering compared to HPLA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Study on Ductility of Prestressed Concrete Pier Based on Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ductility of prestressed concrete pier is studied based on response surface methodology. Referring to the pervious prestressed concrete pier, based on Box-Behnken design, the ductility of 25 prestressed concrete piers is calculated by numerical method. The relationship between longitudinal reinforcement ratio, shear reinforcement ratio, prestressed tendon quantity, concrete compressive strength and ductility factor is gotten. The influence of the longitudinal reinforcement ratio, the shear reinforcement ratio, the prestressed tendon quantity and concrete compressive strength to curvature ductility is discussed. Then the ductility regression equation is deduced. The result showed that the influence of the prestressed tendon quantity to the ductility of prestressed concrete pier is significant. With the increasing of the prestressed tendon quantity, the curvature ductility curved reduces. With the increasing of shear reinforcement ratio and compressive strength of concrete, the curvature ductility increases linearly. And the influence of the longitudinal reinforcement ratio to ductility of the prestressed concrete pier is insignificant.

  20. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, E.G.; Shelly, D.R.; Guyer, R.A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fenglin; Huang, Liping

    2014-05-22

    Current understanding of the brittleness of glass is limited by our poor understanding and control over the microscopic structure. In this study, we used a pressure quenching route to tune the structure of silica glass in a controllable manner, and observed a systematic increase in ductility in samples quenched under increasingly higher pressure. The brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass can be attributed to the critical role of 5-fold Si coordination defects (bonded to 5 O neighbors) in facilitating shear deformation and in dissipating energy by converting back to the 4-fold coordination state during deformation. As an archetypal glass former and one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's crest, a fundamental understanding of the microscopic structure underpinning the ductility of silica glass will not only pave the way toward rational design of strong glasses, but also advance our knowledge of the geological processes in the Earth's interior.

  2. Impact toughness and fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingcheng LIU

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact toughness and fracture toughness ofaustermpered ductile iron (ADI are described. The notched and un-notched charpy impact toughness of ADI at room temperature are somewhat lower than that of steel castings or forged steel pieces, however, they are approximately three times higher than that of mormal pearlitic ductile iron. The impact toughness of ADI decreases with decreasing temperature; but at -40 ℃ it still maintains about 70% of the value at room temperature. The properties of fracture toughness are important in safety design and failure analysis. In this study all fracture toughness data of ADI are higher than that of conventional ductile iron, and are equivalent to or better than that of steel castings o forged steel pieces with the tensile strength equivalent to ADI.

  3. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  4. Engineered Cooling Process for High Strength Ductile Iron Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakh, Simon N.; Mikhailov, Anthony; Kramer, Joseph

    Professor Stefanescu contributed fundamentally to the science of solidification and microstructural evolutions in ductile irons. In this article, the possibility of development of high strength ductile iron by applying an engineered cooling process after casting early shake out from the sand mold was explored. The structures in industrial ductile iron were experimentally simulated using a computer controlled heating/cooling device. CFD modeling was used for process simulation and an experimental bench scale system was developed. The process concept was experimentally verified by producing cast plates with 25 mm wall thickness. The tensile strength was increased from 550 MPa to 1000 MPa in as-cast condition without the need for alloying and heat treatment. The possible practical applications were discussed.

  5. An Improved Ductile Fracture Criterion for Fine-blanking Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhen; ZHUANG Xin-cun; XIE Xiao-long

    2008-01-01

    In order to accurately simnulate the fine-blanking process,a suitable ductile fracture is significant.So an evaluation strategy based on experimental and corresponding simulation results of tensile,compression,torsion and fine-blanking test is designed to evaluate five typical ductile fracture criteria,which are widely-used in metal forming process.The stress triaxiality and ductile damage of each test specimen are analyzed.The results show that none of these five criteria is sufficient for all tests.Furthermore,an improved fracture criterion based on Rice and Tracey model,taking the influence of both volume change and shape change of voids into account,is proposed.The characterization of this model for fine-blanking process is easily done by the tensile test and the prediction result shows good.

  6. Development of Flexible Link Slabs using Ductile Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi

    emphasis oncrack formation and development at the rebar-matrix interface during direct tensile loading. Utilizing a high definition DIC technique in a novel approach, detailed measurements of the crack formation and debonding process are obtained. It is found that ductile ECC, in contrast to conventional...... two adjacent bridge deck segments. The link slab element, composed of GFRP reinforced ECC,exhibited the same tension stiffening and tension strengthening behavior with limited crack widths as was observed in the reinforced prisms under monotonic and cyclic loading. The combination of ductile ECC...

  7. Ductility of metal thin films in flexible electronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Flexible, large area electronics using various organic and inorganic materials are beginning to show great promise. During manufacture and service, large deforma- tion of these hybrid materials will pose significant challenges in terms of high performance and reliability. A deep understanding of the ductility or flexibility of macroelectronics becomes one of the major issues that must be addressed ur- gently. This paper describes the current level of understanding on the thin-film ductility, both free-standing and substrate-supported, and relevant influencing factors.

  8. Robustness Evaluation of Timber Structures with Ductile Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Cizmar, D.

    2009-01-01

    The present paper considers robustness evaluation of timber structures where the ductile behavior of joints of timber material is taken into account. The robustness analysis is based on the structural reliability framework used on a simplified mechanical system modelling a structural timber system...... as a parallel system. A measure of ductile behaviour is introduced. For different values of this measure the system reliability is estimated based on Monte Carlo simulation where correlation between the strength of structural elements and load models for permanent and live load are introduced. The results...

  9. Effect of inclusion density on ductile fracture toughness and roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Ponson, L.; Osovski, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional calculations of ductile fracture under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitating solid with two populations of void nucleating second phase particles. Larger inclusions ...

  10. Numerical determination of parameterised failure curves for ductile structural materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Ulrich; Mohanta, Ashok; Schmauder, Siegfried

    2007-01-01

    Inhomogeneities such as voids or inclusions can lead to stress and strain concentrations under external loading conditions due to the different elastic-plastic and thermal properties of the phases. To describe the damage behavior of ductile materials, a damage parameter was introduced by Rice and Tr

  11. SOME PECULIARITIES OF DUCTILE SHEAR FAILURE OF AMORPHOUS ALLOY RIBBONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BENGUS, VZ; TABACHNIKOVA, ED; SHUMILIN, SE; GOLOVIN, YI; MAKAROV, MV; SHIBKOV, AA; MISKUF, J; CSACH, K; Ocelik, Vaclav

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of a shear crack propagation under ductile shear failure of amorphous alloys ribbons is studied experimentally. Some phenomena that accompany this failure are also studied: repeated alternation of the shear crack orientation, plastic corrugation of a ribbon, extreme local heating at the

  12. High-strength tungsten alloy with improved ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, W. D.; Raffo, P. L.; Rubenstein, L. S.; Witzke, W. R.

    1967-01-01

    Alloy combines superior strength at elevated temperatures with improved ductility at lower temperatures relative to unalloyed tungsten. Composed of tungsten, rhenium, hafnium, and carbon, the alloy is prepared by consumable electrode vacuum arc-melting and can be fabricated into rod, plate, and sheet.

  13. Multiscale modeling of ductile failure in metallic alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pardoen, Thomas; Scheyvaerts, Florence; Simar, Aude; Tekoglu, Cihan; Onck, Patrick R.; Tekoğlu, Cihan

    2010-01-01

    Micromechanical models for ductile failure have been developed in the 1970s and 1980s essentially to address cracking in structural applications and complement the fracture mechanics approach. Later, this approach has become attractive for physical metallurgists interested by the prediction of failu

  14. Neural Network Analysis of Tensile Strength of Austempered Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The neural technique was applied to the analysis of the ultimate tensile strength and additionally the yield strength of austempered ductile iron (ADI. Austempered ductile iron is an excellent material and it possesses attractive properties as high strength, ductility and toughness. This paper begins with an introduction to neural networks and demonstrates the ability of the method to investigate new phenomena in cases where the information cannot be accessed experimentally. The model allows the strength properties to be estimated as a function of heat treatment parameters and the chemical composition. A ‘committee’ model was used to increase the accuracy of the predictions. The model was validated by comparison its predictions with data of tensile tests experiments on austempered samples of ductile cast iron. The model successfully reproduces experimentally determined ultimate tensile strength and it can be exploited in the predictions of both ultimate and yield strength and in the design of chemical composition of cast irons and their heat treatments.

  15. APPLICATION OF AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON TO RAIL WHEEL SETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacit DÜNDAR

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI is made up of a composite structure of acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. The transformation of austenite to martensite under certain stress levels results in a material with a hard rim and a tough internal structure. These properties makes it an alternate material for the production of railcar wheelsets.

  16. APPLICATION OF AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON TO RAIL WHEEL SETS

    OpenAIRE

    Sacit DÜNDAR

    2003-01-01

    Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) is made up of a composite structure of acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. The transformation of austenite to martensite under certain stress levels results in a material with a hard rim and a tough internal structure. These properties makes it an alternate material for the production of railcar wheelsets.

  17. Mechanical properties and structure of austempered ductile iron -ADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzyńska A.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental study of austempered ductile iron are presented. The aim of the investigations was to look closer into the structure – mechanical properties relationships of this very attractive cast material. The experiment was carried out with 500 7 grade ductile iron, which was austempered using different parameters of heat treatment. The specimens were first solution treated 1 hour in 910oC and then isothermally quenched for different time in silicon oil bath of temperature 275, 325, 300 and 350oC. The mechanical properties heat treated specimens were tested in tensile to evaluate yield stress Re, 0.2, tensile strength Rm and elongation A10. Additionally hardness of heat treated samples was measured using Brinell-Rockwell hardness tester. Structure of the specimens was studied either with conventional metallography, scanning (SEM and transmission (TEM electron microscopy. It followed from the study that conventional grade ductile iron enabled to produce both low and high strength ADI, depend on heat treatment parameters. As expected the low temperature isothermal quenching produced higher strength ADI compare to the same ductile iron but austempered at 350oC. It was discovered however, that low yield strength ADI obtained for short time quenching at 275oC exhibited high strengthening effect while strained in tensile. So it was concluded that this had to by cause by large amount of untransformed austenite, which FCC lattice is characterized by high strengthening coefficient.

  18. Thermo-Mechanical Processing and Properties of a Ductile Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, R.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-07-14

    Thermo-mechanical processing of ductile irons is a potential method for enhancing their mechanical properties. A ductile cast iron containing 3.6% C, 2.6% Si and 0.045% Mg was continuously hot-and-warm rolled or one-step press-forged from a temperature in the austenite range (900{degrees}C-1100{degrees}C) to a temperature below the A, temperature. Various amounts of reduction were used (from 60% to more than 90%) followed by a short heat ent at 600`C. The heat ent lead to a structure of fine graphite in a matrix of ferrite and carbides. The hot-and- warm worked materials developed a pearlitic microstructure while the press-forged material developed a spheroidite-like carbide microstructure in the matrix. Cementite-denuded ferrite zones were developed around graphite stringers in the hot-and-warm worked materials, but such zones were absent in the press-forged material. Tensile properties including tensile strength and total elongation were measured along the direction parallel and transverse to the rolling direction and along the direction transverse to the press-forging direction. The tensile ductility and strength both increased with a decrease in the amount of hot-and-warm working. The press- forged materials showed higher strength (645 MPa) than the hot-and-warrn worked materials (575 MPa) when compared at the same ductility level (22% elongation).

  19. The surface layer of austempered ductile iron investment castings properties

    OpenAIRE

    D. Myszka; M. Kłębczyk; Zych, A.; L. Kwiatkowski

    2009-01-01

    The article presents a unique process of carbonnitriding and nitriding the precision casting surfaces of austempered ductile iron. The results of the research are pointing that adequate process parameters allow to obtain multiple increase of wear resistance and a significant increase of corrosion resistance. Also, changes of cast microstructure and hardness are presented.

  20. Wear and scuffing of austempered ductile iron gears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, L. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Instituto Superior de Engenharia, Instituto Politecnico do Porto (Portugal); Seabra, J. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Dept. Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial

    1998-03-01

    This paper enhances actual knowledge of the properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) as a gear material. Results from scuffing tests performed with ADI gears on a FZG test rig are presented and discussed. Contact condition analysis is done using elast-hydrodynamic theory along with several experimental techniques, as surface electronic scanning microscopy, metallurgical spectroscopy and lubricant ferrographic analysis. (orig.)

  1. Wear Performance of Cu-Alloyed Austempered Ductile Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Uma; Batra, Nimish; Sharma, J. D.

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of structural and mechanical properties on wear behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Ductile iron (DI) samples were austenitized at 900 °C for 60 min and subsequently austempered for 60 min at three temperatures: 270, 330, and 380 °C. Microstructures of the as-cast DI and ADIs were characterized using optical and scanning microscopy, respectively. The structural parameters, volume fraction of austenite, carbon content of austenite, and ferrite particle size were determined using x-ray diffraction technique. Mechanical properties including Vicker's hardness, 0.2% proof strength, ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and strain hardening coefficient were determined. Wear tests were carried out under dry sliding conditions using pin-on-disk machine with a linear speed of 2.4 m/s. Normal load and sliding distance were 45 N and 1.7 × 104 m, respectively. ADI developed at higher austempering temperature has large amounts of austenite, which contribute toward improvement in the wear resistance through stress-induced martensitic transformation, and strain hardening of austenite. Wear rate was found to depend on 0.2% proof strength, ductility, austenite content, and its carbon content. Study of worn surfaces and nature of wear debris revealed that the fine ausferrite structure in ADIs undergoes oxidational wear, but the coarse ausferrite structure undergoes adhesion, delamination, and mild abrasion too.

  2. Gears castings from ductile iron of improved abrasion wear resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop an industrial technological process for the manufacturing of castings from alloyed ductile iron characterized by improved resistance to abrasion wear. The outcome of the study was the implementation of developed technology under the industrial conditions of ASPAMET Foundry Plant and start up of production of a wide range of cast gears.

  3. The surface layer of austempered ductile iron investment castings properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a unique process of carbonnitriding and nitriding the precision casting surfaces of austempered ductile iron. The results of the research are pointing that adequate process parameters allow to obtain multiple increase of wear resistance and a significant increase of corrosion resistance. Also, changes of cast microstructure and hardness are presented.

  4. Solidification of Hypereutectic Thin Wall Ductile Cast Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2006-01-01

    Hypereutectic ductile iron was cast in green sand moulds with four plates with thickness of 1.5, 2, 3 and 4 mm in each mould. Temperatures were measured in the 3 and 4 mm plate. The temperature curves showed that eutectic solidification was divided into two stages: primary and secondary eutectic...

  5. Micromechanics based simulation of ductile fracture in structural steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellavajjala, Ravi Kiran

    The broader aim of this research is to develop fundamental understanding of ductile fracture process in structural steels, propose robust computational models to quantify the associated damage, and provide numerical tools to simplify the implementation of these computational models into general finite element framework. Mechanical testing on different geometries of test specimens made of ASTM A992 steels is conducted to experimentally characterize the ductile fracture at different stress states under monotonic and ultra-low cycle fatigue (ULCF) loading. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the fractured surfaces is conducted to decipher the underlying microscopic damage mechanisms that cause fracture in ASTM A992 steels. Detailed micromechanical analyses for monotonic and cyclic loading are conducted to understand the influence of stress triaxiality and Lode parameter on the void growth phase of ductile fracture. Based on monotonic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanical void growth model is proposed to predict ductile fracture. This model is then incorporated in to finite element program as a weakly coupled model to simulate the loss of load carrying capacity in the post microvoid coalescence regime for high triaxialities. Based on the cyclic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanics based cyclic void growth model is developed to predict the ULCF life of ASTM A992 steels subjected to high stress triaxialities. Furthermore, a computational fracture locus for ASTM A992 steels is developed and incorporated in to finite element program as an uncoupled ductile fracture model. This model can be used to predict the ductile fracture initiation under monotonic loading in a wide range of triaxiality and Lode parameters. Finally, a coupled microvoid elongation and dilation based continuum damage model is proposed, implemented, calibrated and validated. This model is capable of simulating the local softening caused by the various phases of ductile fracture process under

  6. Proposal of a new indicator to define ductility applied to corroded steel reinforcement on concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Cobo Escamilla, Alfonso; Moreno Fernandez, Maria Esther; Fernández Cánovas, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The carbonation of concrete or the chlorides ingress in such quantity to reach the level of bars is triggers of reinforcement corrosion. One of the most significant effects of reinforcing steel corrosion on reinforced concrete structures is the decline in the ductility-related properties of the steel. Reinforcement ductility has a decisive effect on the overall ductility of reinforced concrete structures. Different Codes classify the type of steel depending on their ductility defined by...

  7. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  8. Analysis Strategy for Fracture Assessment of Defects in Ductile Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillstroem, Peter; Andersson, Magnus; Sattari-Far, Iradj; Weilin Zang (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    The main purpose of this work is to investigate the significance of the residual stresses for defects (cracks) in ductile materials with nuclear applications, when the applied primary (mechanical) loads are high. The treatment of weld-induced stresses as expressed in the SACC/ProSACC handbook and other fracture assessment procedures such as the ASME XI code and the R6-method is believed to be conservative for ductile materials. This is because of the general approach not to account for the improved fracture resistance caused by ductile tearing. Furthermore, there is experimental evidence that the contribution of residual stresses to fracture diminishes as the degree of yielding increases to a high level. However, neglecting weld-induced stresses in general, though, is doubtful for loads that are mostly secondary (e.g. thermal shocks) and for materials which are not ductile enough to be limit load controlled. Both thin-walled and thick-walled pipes containing surface cracks are studied here. This is done by calculating the relative contribution from the weld residual stresses to CTOD and the J-integral. Both circumferential and axial cracks are analysed. Three different crack geometries are studied here by using the finite element method (FEM). (i) 2D axisymmetric modelling of a V-joint weld in a thin-walled pipe. (ii) 2D axisymmetric modelling of a V-joint weld in a thick-walled pipe. (iii) 3D modelling of a X-joint weld in a thick-walled pipe. t. Each crack configuration is analysed for two load cases; (1) Only primary (mechanical) loading is applied to the model, (2) Both secondary stresses and primary loading are applied to the model. Also presented in this report are some published experimental investigations conducted on cracked components of ductile materials subjected to both primary and secondary stresses. Based on the outcome of this study, an analysis strategy for fracture assessment of defects in ductile materials of nuclear components is proposed. A new

  9. Superior austempered ductile iron (ADI) properties achieved by prior hot isostatic pressing (HIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaGoy, J.L.; Widmer, R.; Zick, D.H. [Industrial Materials Technology Inc., Andover, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Ductile iron obtained from different foundries and cast by dissimilar methods has been successfully hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) before austempering to achieve substantially higher ductilities, without significant detriment to other properties, than those reached by austempering along. HIP was attempted to solve different mechanical deficiencies in austempered ductile iron (ADI) such as the lack of ductility in higher strength grades, inconsistent mechanical properties, and service life limitations. A variety of HIP temperatures were analyzed from near the austenitizing region up to within 56 C (100 F) of the melting point of ductile iron. Microporosity was eliminated by HIP at all temperatures, and subsequent austempering revealed a uniform ADI microstructure. HIP proved successful with both unencapsulated castings and those enclosed within steel canisters. Additional benefits caused by HIP processing of ductile iron castings without the austempering treatment include a significant decrease in mechanical property data scatter, high hardness at reasonable ductility levels, and a substantially reduced scrap rate.

  10. A Study of Solder Alloy Ductility for Cryogenic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupinacci, A.; Shapiro, A. A.; Suh, J-O.; Minor, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    For aerospace applications it is important to understand the mechanical performance of components at the extreme temperature conditions seen in service. For solder alloys used in microelectronics, cryogenic temperatures can prove problematic. At low temperatures Sn-based solders undergo a ductile to brittle transition that leads to brittle cracks, which can result in catastrophic failure of electronic components, assemblies and spacecraft payloads. As industrial processes begin to move away from Pb-Sn solder, it is even more critical to characterize the behavior of alternative Sn-based solders. Here we report on initial investigations using a modified Charpy test apparatus to characterize the ductile to brittle transformation temperature of nine different solder systems.

  11. The effect of yield strength and ductility to fatigue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    The cumulative damage of aluminium alloys with different yield strength and various ductility due to seismic loads was studied. The responses of an idealized beam with a centered mass at one end and fixed at the other end to El Centro's and Taft's earthquakes are computed by assuming that the alloys are perfectly elastoplastic materials and by using numerical technique. Consequently, the corresponding residual plastic strain can be obtained from the stress-strain relationship. The revised Palmgren-Miner cumulative damage theorem is utilized to calculate the fatigue damage. The numerical results show that in certain cases, the high ductility materials are more resistant to seismic loads than the high yield strength materials. The results also show that if a structure collapse during the earthquake, the collapse always occurs in the very early stage.

  12. A variational void coalescence model for ductile metals

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiq, Amir

    2011-08-17

    We present a variational void coalescence model that includes all the essential ingredients of failure in ductile porous metals. The model is an extension of the variational void growth model by Weinberg et al. (Comput Mech 37:142-152, 2006). The extended model contains all the deformation phases in ductile porous materials, i.e. elastic deformation, plastic deformation including deviatoric and volumetric (void growth) plasticity followed by damage initiation and evolution due to void coalescence. Parametric studies have been performed to assess the model\\'s dependence on the different input parameters. The model is then validated against uniaxial loading experiments for different materials. We finally show the model\\'s ability to predict the damage mechanisms and fracture surface profile of a notched round bar under tension as observed in experiments. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

  13. Castability of ductile iron in thin walled castings (TWDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In work it has been presented results of influence of pouring temperature (Tp and carbon equivalent (CE on castability of ductile iron in thin walled castings with wall thickness of 1, 2 and 3 mm, respectively. Analysis was done on ductile iron with carbon equivalent ranging from 4.30 to 5.00 and pouring temperature varied from 1400 to 1500 oC. It has been shown that a statistical liner relationship exists between wall thickness and castability. Influence of CE and Tp on castability of cast iron flowing through channel with wall thickness of 2 and 3 mm can be presented by means of correlation equations (L = f(CE, Tp. Statistical analysis shows that pouring temperature has much higher influence on castability in comparison with influence of carbon equivalent.

  14. PARAMETER OPTIMIZATION OF CARBIDIC AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON USING TAGUCHI METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.DHANAPAL

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbidic austempered ductile iron [CADI] is the family of ductile iron containing wear resistance alloy carbides in the ausferrite matrix. This CADI is manufactured by selecting proper material composition through the melting route.In an effort to obtain the optimal production parameters, Taguchi method is applied. To analyse the effect of production parameters on the machanical properties, signal-to-noise (S/N ratio is calculated based on the design ofexperiments and the linear graph. The analysis of varience is calculated to find the amount of contribution of factors on individual mechanical properties and its significancy. The analytical results of taguchi method are compared with the experimental values, and it shows both are identical.

  15. An austempering study of ductile iron alloyed with copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVERA ERIC

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron (ADI has proved to be an excellent material as it possesses attractive properties: high strength, ductility and toughness are combined with good wear resistance and machinability. These properties can be achieved upon adequate heat treatment which yields the optimum microstructure for a given chemical composition. In this paper the results of an investigation the austempering of ADI alloyed with 0.45 % Cu for a range of times and temperatures are reported. The microstructure and fracture mode developed throughout these treatments have been identified by means of light and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It was shown that the strength, elongation and impact energy strongly depend on the amounts of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. Based on these results, and optimal processing window was established.

  16. Influence of microstructure on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P.P.; Putatunda, S.K. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    1997-07-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of microstructure on the plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron. Austempered ductile iron (ADI) alloyed with nickel, copper, and molybdenum was austenitized and subsequently austempered over a range of temperatures to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized through optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Plane strain fracture toughness of all these materials was determined and was correlated with the microstructure. The results of the present investigation indicate that the lower bainitic microstructure results in higher fracture toughness than upper bainitic microstructure. Both volume fraction of retained austenite and its carbon content influence the fracture toughness. The retained austenite content of 25 vol pct was found to provide the optimum fracture toughness. It was further concluded that the carbon content of the retained austenite should be as high as possible to improve fracture toughness.

  17. Ductile Regime Single Point Diamond Turning of Quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Deepak; Patten, John

    2011-01-01

    Quartz (fused silica) is one of the advanced engineered ceramic materials designed to operate in extreme environments. The mechanics of material removal in glass (Quartz) can be classified in two categories; brittle fracture and ductile plastic deformation. Good optical quality surfaces can be achieved by removing the material in a ductile manner. The strength, hardness and fracture toughness of the work piece material are the governing factors that control the extent of brittle fracture. The main goal of the subject research is to improve the surface quality of Quartz to be used as an optic device (mirrors and windows) via single point diamond turning (SPDT). Surface roughness (Ra) values of less than 50 nm without sub surface damage were obtained.

  18. As-Cast Acicular Ductile Aluminum Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S M Mostafavi Kashani; S M A Boutorabi

    2009-01-01

    The effects of nickel (2.2%)and molybdenum (0.6%)additions on the kinetics, microstructure, and me-chanical properties of ductile aluminum cast iron were studied under the as-cast and tempered conditions. Test bars machined from cast to size samples were used for mechanical and metallurgical studies. The results showed that adding nickel and molybdenum to the base iron produced an upper bainitic structure, resulting in an increase in strength and hardness. The same trend was shown when the test bars were tempered at 300 ℃ in the range of 300℃ to 400 ℃. The elongation increased with increasing the temperature from 300 ℃ to 400 ℃. The carbon content of the retained austenite also increased with increasing the temperature. The results also showed that the kinetics, mi-crostructure, and mechanical properties of this iron were similar to those of Ni-Mo alloyed silicon ductile iron.

  19. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  20. ASME code ductile failure criteria for impulsively loaded pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, Robert E.; Duffey, T. A. (Thomas A.); Rodriguez, E. A. (Edward A.)

    2003-01-01

    Ductile failure criteria suitable for application to impulsively loaded high pressure vessels that are designed to the rules of the ASME Code Section VI11 Division 3 are described and justified. The criteria are based upon prevention of load instability and the associated global failure mechanisms, and on protection against progressive distortion for multiple-use vessels. The criteria are demonstrated by the design and analysis of vessels that contain high explosive charges.

  1. Successive Boronizing and Austempering for GGG-40 Grade Ductile Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murat Baydogan; Seckin Izzet Akray

    2009-01-01

    Boronizing and austempering were successively applied to a GGG-40 grade ductile iron in order to combine the advantages of both process in a single treatment. This new procedure formed a 30 μm thick boride layer on the surface with subsurface matrix structure consisted of acicular ferrite and retained austenite. Reciprocating wear tests showed that successive boronizing and austempering exhibited considerably higher wear resistance than conventional boronizing having a subsurface matrix structure consisting of ferrite and pearlite.

  2. Fluid-Assisted Shear Failure Within a Ductile Shear Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Compton, K.; Holk, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Exhumed shear zones often contain folded and/or dynamically recrystallized structures such as veins and pseudotachylytes that record contemporaneous brittle and ductile deformation representing mixed bulk rheology. Here, we constrain the conditions that promote the transitions between ductile and brittle deformation by investigating quartz veins with shear offsets in the Saddlebag Lake shear zone in the central Sierra Nevada, California. Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks within the shear zone contain transposed bedding, strong cleavage, dextrally rotated porphyroclasts, and a steep mineral lineation, which together suggest an overall transpressive kinematic regime for the ductile deformation. Foliation sub-parallel veins are one subset of the veins in the shear zone. They have observed horizontal trace lengths of up to around 5 meters, though most are obscured by limited exposure, and displacements range from ~3-30 mm, with 1-5 mm of opening. Foliation sub-parallel veins are folded with the foliation and quartz microstructures and fluid inclusion thermobarometry measurements from vein samples indicate temperatures during vein formation by fracture were between 300-680°C. Quartz δ18O values (+5.9 to +16.5) suggest extended fluid-rock interaction that involved magmatic (δ18O ~ +8 to +10) and meteoric (δ18O down to -1) fluids. Foliation sub-parallel veins are most abundant in relatively massive, quartz-rich rocks where they are boudinaged, indicating they were rigid inclusions after formation. Based on the orientation and spatial distribution of the veins, we infer that they formed under high differential stress with pore pressures sufficiently high for the rocks to be critically stressed for shear failure along mechanically weak foliation planes. These observations suggest high pore pressures and mechanical heterogeneity at a variety of scales are necessary conditions for nucleation of shear fractures within ductile shear zones.

  3. Probabilistic assessment of machine parts from Kymenite, austempered ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, I.; Galperin, M.; Alimov, M.; Jokipii, K.

    1992-07-01

    The fatigue properties of Kymenite, austempered ductile iron, were investigated on the basis of the statistical theory of fatigue failure similarity. The fatigue tests were carried out on plain and notched specimens. The S-N curves for a given failure probability and the dependencies of similarity equation parameters on the number of cycles were obtained. These data allow to take into consideration the influence of design factors in the fatigue strength.

  4. Limits to ductility set by plastic flow localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Needleman, A; Rice, J R

    1977-11-01

    The theory of strain localization is reviewed with reference both to local necking in sheet metal forming processes and to more general three dimensional shear band localizations that sometimes mark the onset of ductile rupture. Both bifurcation behavior and the growth of initial imperfections are considered. In addition to analyses based on classical Mises-like constitutive laws, approaches to localization based on constitutive models that may more accurately model processes of slip and progressive rupturing on the microscale in structural alloys are discussed. Among these non-classical constitutive features are the destabilizing roles of yield surface vertices and of non-normality effects, arising, for example, from slight pressure sensitivity of yield. Analyses based on a constitutive model of a progressively cavitating dilational plastic material which is intended to model the process of ductile void growth in metals are also discussed. A variety of numerical results are presented. In the context of the three dimensional theory of localization, it is shown that a simple vertex model predicts ratios of ductility in plane strain tension to ductility in axisymmetric tension qualitatively consistent with experiment, and the destabilizing influence of a hydrostatic stress dependent void nucleation criterion is illustrated. In the sheet necking context, and focussing on positive biaxial stretching, it is shown that forming limit curves based on a simple vertex model and those based on a simple void growth model are qualitatively in accord, although attributing instability to very different physical mechanisms. These forming limit curves are compared with those obtained from the Mises material model and employing various material and geometric imperfections.

  5. Ductile damage prediction in different cold forming processes

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Trong-Son; Bouchard, Pierre-Olivier; Montmitonnet, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The purpose of the present paper is to show how and to what extent the introduction of refined, shear sensitive models improves on previous ones, based on triaxiality only, for the phenomenological description of ductile damage in bulk cold metal forming processes. Wire-drawing and wire rolling are taken as examples. A set of mechanical tests has been conducted: round bar, notched bar and plane strain tensions as well as torsion for pure shear deformation. Both constit...

  6. Solidification and microstructure of thin walled ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin

    2006-01-01

    In the recent years there has been an increasing interest in light constructions in order to save weight in e.g. cars. Ductile cast iron has good mechanical properties but it is necessary to re­duce the wall thicknesses of the castings in order to reduce the weight. Reducing the wall thicknesses...... of the casting will increase the cooling rates and by that change the conditions for nucleation and growth during solidification....

  7. Low-Temperature Strengths and Ductility of Various Tungsten Sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Yutaka Hiraoka; Hiroaki Kurishita

    2011-01-01

    We used three kinds of tungsten sheets in this study. First, we examined microstructure such as grain size distribution using an optical microscope. Secondly, we carried out three-point bend tests at temperatures between about 290 and 500 K. Then, we examined fracture surface of a failed specimen using a scanning electron microscope. Lastly, by analyzing all these results, we evaluated apparent intergranular and transgranular fracture strengths and discussed strengths and ductility of tungs...

  8. A ductile fracture analysis using a local damage model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benseddiq, N. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et de Rheologie de Tours, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs du Val de Loire (ENIVL), Rue de la Chocolaterie, 41000 Blois Cedex (France)], E-mail: nbensedd@polytech-lille.fr; Imad, A. [Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR CNRS 8107), USTL, Ecole Polytechnique Universitaire de Lille Cite Scientifique, Avenue P. Langevin, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2008-04-15

    In this study, the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model is used to investigate ductile tearing. The sensitivity of the model parameters has been examined from literature data. Three types of parameters have been reported: the 'constitutive parameters'q{sub 1}, q{sub 2} and q{sub 3}, the 'initial material and nucleation parameters' and the 'critical and final failure parameters'. Each parameter in this model has been analysed in terms of various results in the literature. Both experimental and numerical results have been obtained for notched round and CT specimens to characterize ductile failure in a NiCr steel (12NC6) with a small initial void volume fraction f{sub 0} (f{sub 0}=0.001%). Ductile crack growth, defined by the J-{delta}a curve, has been correctly simulated using the numerical calculations by adjusting the different parameters of the GTN model in the calibration procedure.

  9. Nano-modification to improve the ductility of cementitious composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeşilmen, Seda [Department of Civil Engineering, Çankaya University, Ankara (Turkey); Al-Najjar, Yazin [Department of Civil Engineering, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep (Turkey); Balav, Mohammad Hatam [Department of Civil Engineering, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Şahmaran, Mustafa, E-mail: sahmaran@gazi.edu.tr [Department of Civil Engineering, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Yıldırım, Gürkan [Department of Civil Engineering, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey); Lachemi, Mohamed [Department of Civil Engineering, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Effect of nano-sized mineral additions on ductility of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) containing high volumes of fly ash was investigated at different hydration degrees. Various properties of ECC mixtures with different mineral additions were compared in terms of microstructural properties of matrix, fiber-matrix interface, and fiber surface to assess improvements in ductility. Microstructural characterization was made by measuring pore size distributions through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). Hydration characteristics were assessed using thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), and fiber-matrix interface and fiber surface characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) through a period of 90 days. Moreover, compressive and flexural strength developments were monitored for the same period. Test results confirmed that mineral additions could significantly improve both flexural strength and ductility of ECC, especially at early ages. Cheaper Nano-CaCO{sub 3} was more effective compared to nano-silica. However, the crystal structure of CaCO{sub 3} played a very important role in the range of expected improvements.

  10. Multiphysics and multiscale modelling of ductile cast iron solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gurgul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented model of ductile cast iron solidification is a typical sample of multiphysics and multiscale engineering system. This model takes into consideration the different time and spatial scales of accounted phenomenon of microstructure formation: heat diffusion, components mass diffusion in the liquid and solid phases, thermodynamic of phase transformation under the condition of inhomogeneous chemical composition of growing and vanishing phases, phase interface kinetics and grains nucleation.The results of two-dimensional modelling of the microstructure formation in the ductile cast iron (so called - Ductile Iron - DI are pre-sented. The cellular automaton model (CA was used for the simulation. Six states of CA cells were adopted to three phases above men-tioned (liquid, austenite and graphite and to three two-phase interfaces. For the modelling of concentration and temperature fields the numerical solution was used. The parabolic nonlinear differential equa-tions with a source term were solved by using the finite difference method and explicit scheme. The overlapping lattices with the same spatial step were used for the concentration field modelling and for the CA. The time scale of the temperature field for this lattice is about 104 times shorter. Due to above reasons the another lattice was used with a multiple spatial step and the same time step.

  11. Wear Behavior of Austempered Ductile Iron with Nanosized Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kaleicheva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI strengthened with nanosized addtives of titanium nitride + titanium carbonitride (TiN + TiCN, titanium nitride TiN and cubic boron nitride cBN are investigated. The TiN, TiCN and cBN, nanosized particles are coated by electroless nickel coating EFTTOM-NICKEL prior to the edition to the melt. The spheroidal graphite iron samples are undergoing an austempering, including heating at 900 оС for an hour, after that isothermal retention at 280 оС, 2 h and 380 оС, 2h. The metallographic analysis by optical metallographic microscope GX41 OLIMPUS and hardness measurements by Vickers Method are performed. The structure of the austempered ductile iron consists of lower bainite and upper bainite.Experimental investigation of the wear by fixed abrasive are also carried out. The influence of the nanosized additives on the microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties of the austempered ductile irons (ADI is studied.

  12. Production of austempered ductile iron gears for transmission cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagin, A. [Metallurgy Engineering Dept., Technical Univ. of Yildiz, Istanbul (Turkey); Topuz, A. [Chemical and Metallurgical Faculty, Technical Univ. of Yildiz, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    The investigations presented in this contribution were targeted to replace a gear group made up of SAE 8620 steel in army jeeps with microstructural controlled austempered ductile iron, in order to reduce the manufacturing steps. Furthermore, the vibrations were also expected to decrease, due to the application of austempered ductile iron. The fatigue resistance of unalloyed and Ni alloyed austempered ductile iron have been investigated to see if some improvement as compared to steels with cementite could be achieved. The effect of the austenization heat treatment on the fatigue resistance was studied in metallographic investigations and it turned out that the alloying elements Cu, Ni and Mo have a beneficial effect. For economical reasons, the gears were fabricated of nodular iron containing 3.98% C, 1.89% Si, 0.269% Mn and 0.028% P. Considering the fatigue resistance, a Ni alloyed material with 3.66% C, about 1.81% Si, 0.134% Mn, 0.031% P and 1.51% Ni was chosen. The roundness of the graphites was about 93-100% and 80-85%. The gears were at first produced by austenization at 900 C for 3 hours and then by austempering at 235 C for 2.5 hours. The fatigue tests were performed at the maximum stresses to be expected. (orig.)

  13. Erosion charcteristics of ductile iron with various matrix structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kazumichi (Oita National Coll. of Technology (Japan)); Noguchi, Toru (Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan))

    1994-08-01

    Erosive wear tests were performed on austempered ductile iron (ADI), ferritic ductile iron (FDI) and pearlitic ductile iron (PDI) using a shot blast machine. Erosion damage was measured by the removed material volume at impact angles between 10 and 90 . The surface metal flow in vertical sections was also observed. The mechanism of erosive wear, the effect of impact angles, and differences in wear features of specimens were discussed. Experiment showed that, after an initial stage, the eroded volume increases almost linearly with blasting time in ADI, FDI and PDI. The erosion rate for ADI is about 1/10-1/25 of that for FDI and PDI. The surface hardness of eroded ADI specimens increased from the initial HV350 to HV700 after 600 s of blasting. The amount of retained austenite was measured as about 40% before the test, but decreased to about 3-5% by transformation of austenite to martensite, hardening the surface and lowering the erosion rate. It was shown that ADI has excellent erosion resistance and it is expected to find wide applications as a wear-resistant material. (orig.)

  14. Potentially exploitable supercritical geothermal resources in the ductile crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Noriaki; Numakura, Tatsuya; Sakaguchi, Kiyotoshi; Saishu, Hanae; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis that the brittle–ductile transition (BDT) drastically reduces permeability implies that potentially exploitable geothermal resources (permeability >10−16 m2) consisting of supercritical water could occur only in rocks with unusually high transition temperatures such as basalt. However, tensile fracturing is possible even in ductile rocks, and some permeability–depth relations proposed for the continental crust show no drastic permeability reduction at the BDT. Here we present experimental results suggesting that the BDT is not the first-order control on rock permeability, and that potentially exploitable resources may occur in rocks with much lower BDT temperatures, such as the granitic rocks that comprise the bulk of the continental crust. We find that permeability behaviour for fractured granite samples at 350–500 °C under effective confining stress is characterized by a transition from a weakly stress-dependent and reversible behaviour to a strongly stress-dependent and irreversible behaviour at a specific, temperature-dependent effective confining stress level. This transition is induced by onset of plastic normal deformation of the fracture surface (elastic–plastic transition) and, importantly, causes no ‘jump’ in the permeability. Empirical equations for this permeability behaviour suggest that potentially exploitable resources exceeding 450 °C may form at depths of 2–6 km even in the nominally ductile crust.

  15. Potentially exploitable supercritical geothermal resources in the ductile crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Noriaki; Numakura, Tatsuya; Sakaguchi, Kiyotoshi; Saishu, Hanae; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis that the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) drastically reduces permeability implies that potentially exploitable geothermal resources (permeability >10-16 m2) consisting of supercritical water could occur only in rocks with unusually high transition temperatures such as basalt. However, tensile fracturing is possible even in ductile rocks, and some permeability-depth relations proposed for the continental crust show no drastic permeability reduction at the BDT. Here we present experimental results suggesting that the BDT is not the first-order control on rock permeability, and that potentially exploitable resources may occur in rocks with much lower BDT temperatures, such as the granitic rocks that comprise the bulk of the continental crust. We find that permeability behaviour for fractured granite samples at 350-500 °C under effective confining stress is characterized by a transition from a weakly stress-dependent and reversible behaviour to a strongly stress-dependent and irreversible behaviour at a specific, temperature-dependent effective confining stress level. This transition is induced by onset of plastic normal deformation of the fracture surface (elastic-plastic transition) and, importantly, causes no `jump' in the permeability. Empirical equations for this permeability behaviour suggest that potentially exploitable resources exceeding 450 °C may form at depths of 2-6 km even in the nominally ductile crust.

  16. Casting Ductile Iron in Layer Moulds Made from Ecological Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rączka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of tests performed under the target project in Hardtop Foundry Charsznica.The objective of the tests and studies was to develop a technology of making high-quality ductile iron castings, combined witheffective means of environmental protection. The studies presented in this article related to castings weighing from 1 to 300 kg made from ductile iron of grades 400-15 and 500-7, using two-layer moulds, where the facing and core sand was the sand with an alkaline organic binder, while backing sand was the sand with an inorganic geopolymer binder.A simplified method of sand reclamation was applied with possible reuse of the reclaim as an addition to the backing sand. The castiron spheroidising treatment and inoculation were selected taking into account the specific conditions of Hardtop Foundry. A pilot batch of castings was made, testing the gating and feeding systems and using exothermic sleeves on risers. The study confirmed the validity of the adopted concept of making ductile iron castings in layer moulds, while maintaining the content of sand with an organic binder at a level of maximum 15%.

  17. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  18. Intercritical heat treatments in ductile iron and steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizabal, Ricardo E.

    Materials such as dual phase (DP) steels, transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels and dual phase ductile irons are produced by intercritical heat treatments. These materials can provide significant weight savings in the automotive industry. The goal of this dissertation is to study intercritical heat treatments in ductile iron and steel to optimize the production parameters. Three different aspects were addressed. First, common steels were intercritically austenitized and austempered (intercritically austempered) under a variety conditions. The results showed that common grade steels that were intercritically austempered exhibited tensile properties in the same range as DP and TRIP steels. The second study consisted of determining the effect of heat treatment conditions on the tensile properties of intercritically austenitized, quenched and tempered ductile iron (IAQ&TDI). The results showed that (1) ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield strength (YS) were determined by the volume fraction of martensite, (2) tempering improved the elongation 1.7-2.5 times with only a slight decrease in strength, (3) the carbon in austenite formed during the intercritical heat treatment of ductile iron with a ferritic-pearlitic matrix came from the carbon available in the matrix and that carbon diffusion from the graphite nodules was restricted, and (4) limited segregation of substitutional elements occurred during intercritical austenitizing. Finally, intercritically austempered ductile iron (IADI) alloyed with different amounts of manganese and nickel was produced. Tensile properties and microstructure were determined. Also, the stability of the austenite during deformation and the lattice strains of the ferrite and the austenite phases were determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron diffraction. The results indicated that: 1) high manganese concentrations produced materials with large blocky, low carbon austenite particles at the intercellular boundaries

  19. Predictive Process Optimization for Fracture Ductility in Automotive TRIP Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jiadong

    In light of the emerging challenges in the automotive industry of meeting new energy-saving and environment-friendly requirements imposed by both the government and the society, the auto makers have been working relentlessly to reduce the weight of automobiles. While steel makers pushed out a variety of novel Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) to serve this market with new needs, TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels is one of the most promising materials for auto-body due to its exceptional combination of strength and formability. However, current commercial automotive TRIP steels demonstrate relatively low hole-expansion (HE) capability, which is critical in stretch forming of various auto parts. This shortcoming on ductility has been causing fracture issues in the forming process and limits the wider applications of this steel. The kinetic theory of martensitic transformations and associated transformation plasticity is applied to the optimization of transformation stability for enhanced mechanical properties in a class of high strength galvannealed TRIP steel. This research leverages newly developed characterization and simulation capabilities, supporting computational design of high-performance steels exploiting optimized transformation plasticity for desired mechanical behaviors, especially for the hole-expansion ductility. The microstructure of the automotive TRIP sheet steels was investigated, using advanced tomographic characterization including nanoscale Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP) microanalysis. The microstructural basis of austenite stability, the austenite carbon concentration in particular, was quantified and correlated with measured fracture ductility through transformation plasticity constitutive laws. Plastic flow stability for enhanced local fracture ductility at high strength is sought to maintain high hole-expansion ductility, through quantifying the optimal stability and the heat-treatment process to achieve it. An additional

  20. Microcosmic analysis of ductile shearing zones of coal seams of brittle deformation domain in superficial lithosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU; Yiwen; WANG; Guiliang; JIANG; Bo; HOU; Quanlin

    2004-01-01

    The ductile shearing zones of coal seams in a brittle deformation domain in superficial lithosphere are put forward based on the study on bedding shearing and ductile rheology of coal seams. The macrocosmic and microcosmic characteristics include wrinkle fold, mymonitized zones and ductile planar structure of coal seams, etc., while the microcosmic characteristics may also include different optic-axis fabrics and the anisotropy of vitrinite reflectance as well as the change of chemical structure and organic geochemistry components. The forming mechanism is analyzed and the strain environment of ductile shearing zones of coal seams discussed. The result indicates that, in the superficial brittle deformation domain, the coal seams are easy to be deformed, resulting in not only brittle deformation but also ductile shearing deformation under the action of force. Because of simple shearing stress, the interlayer gliding or ductile rheology may take place between coal seams and wall rocks. Therefore, many ductile shearing zones come into being in superficial lithosphere (<5 km). The research on ductile shearing zone of brittle deformation domain in superficial lithosphere is significant not only theoretically for the study of ductile shearing and ductile rheology of the lithosphere but also practically for the structural movement of coal seams, the formation and accumulation of coal-bed methane, and the prevention and harness of gas burst in coal mine.

  1. Melt Quality Evaluation of Ductile Iron by Pattern Recognition of Thermal Analysis Cooling Curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhenhua; LI Yanxiang; ZHOU Rong

    2008-01-01

    The melt quality of ductile iron can be related to the melt's thermal analysis cooling curve. The freezing zone of the thermal analysis cooling curve was found to indicate the melt quality of the ductile iron. A comprehensive difference parameter, Ω, of the thermal analysis cooling curves was found to be related to the properties of ductile iron melts such as composition, temperature, and graphite morphology. As Ω ap- proached O, the thermal analysis cooling curves were found to come together with all the properties indicat- ing melt quality about the same. A database of thermal analysis cooling curves related to the properties of the ductile iron melts was set up as a basis for a method to accurately evaluate the melt quality of ductile iron by pattern recognition of thermal analysis cooling curves. The quality of a ductile iron melt can then be immediately determined by comparing its thermal analysis cooling curve freezing zone shape to those in the database.

  2. Numerical simulations of material mismatch and ductile crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestby, Erling

    2002-07-01

    Both the global geometry and inhomogeneities in material properties will influence the fracture behaviour of structures in presence of cracks. In this thesis numerical simulations have been used to investigate how some aspects of both these issues affect the conditions at the crack-tip. The thesis is organised in an introduction chapter, summarising the major findings and conclusions, a review chapter, presenting the main aspects of the developments in the field of fracture mechanics, and three research papers. Paper I considers the effect of mismatch in hardening exponent on the local near-tip stress field for stationary interface cracks in bi-materials under small scale yielding conditions. It is demonstrated that the stress level in the weaker material increases compared to what is found in the homogeneous material for the same globally applied load level, with the effect being of increasing importance as the crack-tip is approached. Although a coupling between the radial and angular dependence of the stress fields exists, the evolving stress field can still be normalised with the applied J. The effect on the increase in stress level can closely be characterised by the difference in hardening exponent, {delta}n, termed the hardening mismatch, and is more or less independent of the absolute level of hardening in the two materials. Paper II and Ill deal with the effects of geometry, specimen size, hardening level and yield stress mismatch in relation to ductile crack growth. The ductile crack growth is simulated through use of the Gurson model. In Paper H the effect of specimen size on the crack growth resistance is investigated for deep cracked bend and shallow cracked tensile specimens. At small amounts of crack growth the effect of specimen size on the crack growth resistance is small, but a more significant effect is found for larger amounts of crack growth. The crack growth resistance decreases in smaller specimens loaded in tension, whereas the opposite is

  3. Evaluation of Floor Response Spectrum considering Ductility of Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junhee; Choi, In-Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The FRS (floor response spectrum) is directly influenced by the behavior of structure under the seismic load. If the structure is nonlinear range, the energy dissipation will be occurred by the damage of structure and the maximum force will be reduced. In Zion method, the inelastic energy abortion factor has been used to consider the nonlinearity of structure. This factor was used for the seismic fragility of structure. For the seismic fragility of equipment, the uncertainty of this factor was used differently according to the story level. But this method is not warranted under the strong earthquake leads to the structural damage. Therefore it is needed to evaluate the FRS considering the nonlinear behavior of structure and to assessment the conservatism related to nonlinear behavior of structure in FRS. In this study, the nonlinear analysis was performed for the conservatism of FRS under the damage of structure. The conservatism of FRS by the nonlinear analysis was compared by that proposed by the Zion method. The conservatism of floor acceleration response for the equipment was evaluated by performing the nonlinear analysis. From the nonlinear analysis results, it was showed that the median and β{sub c} of FRSR was increased with the ductility of structure and the response of equipment had the resonance effect between the frequency of equipment and structure. The seismic capacity of equipment by the Zion method can be different from the real seismic capacity of equipment because the inelastic structure response factor has nothing to do with the ductility of structure. Therefore the median and COV for FRSR should be defined considering the ductility of structure and the frequency of equipment for more exactly evaluating the seismic capacity of equipment.

  4. Displacement ductility for seismic design of RC walls for low-rise housing

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo,Julian; González, Giovanni; Rubiano, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    The paper compares and discusses displacement ductility ratios of reinforced concrete walls typically used in one- and two-story houses. Ductility is investigated by assessing response measured on 39 walls tested under shaking table excitations and quasi-static lateral loads. Variables studied were the height-to-length ratio and walls with openings, type of concrete and, steel ratio and type of web reinforcement. An equation to estimate the available ductility of a wall is proposed. Based on ...

  5. A Study on Ductility of Prestressed Concrete Pier Based on Response Surface Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H.; Zhang, Y; Qin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The ductility of prestressed concrete pier is studied based on response surface methodology. Referring to the pervious prestressed concrete pier, based on Box-Behnken design, the ductility of 25 prestressed concrete piers is calculated by numerical method. The relationship between longitudinal reinforcement ratio, shear reinforcement ratio, prestressed tendon quantity, concrete compressive strength and ductility factor is gotten. The influence of the longitudinal reinforcement ratio, the shea...

  6. Some problems in the production of ductile irons by investment casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Bo; Cai Qizhou; Wei Bokang

    2008-01-01

    Because of the excellent performance of ductile irons and the unique superiority of investment casting, the preparation of complicated and thin-wall ductile iron castings by investment casting shows a good development prospect. In this present work, combined with the actual product experiments, the characteristics of shell making,spheroidization, inoculation and defect prevention are presented, and some suggestions are given for investment casting of ductile iron.

  7. Some problems in the production of ductile irons by investment casting

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Because of the excellent performance of ductile irons and the unique superiority of investment casting, the preparation of complicated and thin-wall ductile iron castings by investment casting shows a good development prospect. In this present work, combined with the actual product experiments, the characteristics of shell making, spheroidization, inoculation and defect prevention are presented, and some suggestions are given for investment casting of ductile iron.

  8. Influence of cooling conditions and amount of retained austenite on the fracture of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VYACHESLAV GORYANY

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available SEM Analysis of fracture surfaces from tensile test specimens of thick-walled, austempered ductile irons (diameter 160 mm shows different fracture behavior depending on the austenite retained in the matrix. The results show ductile fractures only in areas containing retained austenite sections. In section areas without or with a very low content of retained austenite, only brittle fracture without any plastic deformation occurs. The content of retained austenite determines the amount of ductile fracture in the microstructure.

  9. Some problems in the production of ductile irons by investment casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Bo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Because of the excellent performance of ductile irons and the unique superiority of investment casting, the preparation of complicated and thin-wall ductile iron castings by investment casting shows a good development prospect. In this present work, combined with the actual product experiments, the characteristics of shell making, spheroidization, inoculation and defect prevention are presented, and some suggestions are given for investment casting of ductile iron.

  10. A Theoretical Approach for Estimating Fracture Toughness of Ductile Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.T. He; F. Li; G.Q. Zhang; L.J. Ernst; X.J. FU

    2004-01-01

    Fracture toughness is very important when applying Damage Tolerance Design and Assessment Techniques. The traditional testing approach for obtaining fracture toughness values is costly and time consuming. In order to estimate the fracture toughness of ductile metals, the fracture mechanics theory, materials plastic deformation theory and materials constructive relationships are employed here. A series of formulae and a theoretical approach are presented to calculate fracture toughness values of different materials in the plane stress and plane strain conditions. Compared with test results, evaluated values have a good agreement.

  11. Production of carbide-free thin ductile iron castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ashraf Sheikh

    2008-01-01

    The fast cooling rate of thin ductile iron castings requires special consideration to produce carbide-free castings. Extraor-dinary care was taken to select the charge to produce castings of 100-mm long round bars with 16-ram diameter. The castings show the presence of carbides in the bars. Seven melts were made with different temperatures and with different compositions to get rid of carbides. After chemical analyses, it was found that the extra purity of the charge with less than 0.008wt% sulfur in the castings was the cause of carbides. To remove the carbides fi'om the castings, sulfur should be added to the charge.

  12. Evaluation of ductile failure models in Sheet Metal Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaral Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, combination of equivalent plastic strain and stress triaxiality parameters are taken into account when performing characterization of material ductility. Some well-established models like Lemaitre model, GTN based models and many others perform relatively well at high-triaxiality stress states but fail to give adequate answers to low-triaxiality states. In this work, three damage models are presented, applied and assessed to a cross-shaped component. Concerning material, AA5182-O, corresponding damage parameters are characterized by an inverse analysis procedure for each damage model.

  13. Manufacture of Toothed Elements in Nanoausferritic Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myszka D.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The technology currently used for the fabrication of toothed wheels, gear couplings and chain drums involves the induction hardening process or hardening and tempering after carburising. All these processes take a long time and cause adverse changes in the dimensions and surface quality of products, requiring post-treatment machining to remove the resulting cavities. The paper proposes the implementation of gear elements made of ductile iron with nanoausferritic matrix obtained by a new appropriate heat treatment process. The new material offers good performance characteristics and nearly no need for the application of other technological processes commonly used in the manufacture of gears.

  14. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    used in refractory applications, abrasive powders, and body armor and as a neutron radiation absorbent.11−21 However, B4C fractures easily just above...dynamically stable. The B/G criterion is only an empirical rule to estimate ductility for metals .34 To prove that the new structure (B11Cp)−Si2 has good...1994, 6, 549− 560. (3) Veprek, S.; Zeer, A.; Riedel, R. Handbook of Ceramic Hard Materials; Wiley-VCH Press: Weinheim, Germany, 2000. (4) An, Q

  15. Experimental study of the thermal stability of austempered ductile irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M. J.; Cisneros, M. M.; Valdés, E.; Mancha, H.; Calderón, H. A.; Campos, R. E.

    2002-10-01

    A nonisothermal annealing was applied to austempered Ni-Cu-Mo alloyed and unalloyed ductile irons to determine the thermal stability of the ausferritic structure. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) results were used to build the corresponding stability diagrams. The transformation starting temperature of the high carbon austenite was found to be strongly dependent on the austempering temperature, the heating rate, and the chemical composition of the iron. The Ni-Cu-Mo alloying elements and high austempering temperature increased the stability. The transformation of the austenite to ferrite and cementite is achieved via the precipitation of transition carbides identified as silico-carbides of triclinic structure.

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation of the Austempered Ductile Cast Irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. S.; Lee, S. K. [Korea Standards Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-05-15

    Austempered ductile cast iron (ADI) which has been recently developed shows good mechanical properties. These properties are related to the microstructure which is greatly affected by processing variables such as austempering time and temperature. In this study, the relationships between mechanical properties from impact test, and hardness test and the results from ultrasonic velocity measurement and electrical resistivity measurement are studied on the ADI samples which are heat treated at different austempering temperature and time. From the results, we conclude the followings. The ultrasonic velocity measurement could be used for the study of austempering reaction mechanism. The electrical resistivity measurement could be used as quality assurance technique for the ADI

  17. Strain Induced Martensitic Transformation in Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. H.; Saal, P.; Gan, W. M.; Landesberger, M.; Hoelzel, M.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-09-01

    The strain induced martensitic transformation in austempered ductile iron (ADI) has been investigated using high resolution neutron diffraction on samples compressed ex-situ to different plastic strains. In addition bulk texture measurements using neutron diffraction have been performed to calculate the orientation distribution of ferrite and austenite phases for different strain levels. Combing the detailed texture information with neutron diffraction pattern proved to be essential for quantitative phase analysis and extraction of martensite phase fractions. The martensite content induced by strain in ADI depends on austempering temperature and degree of deformation.

  18. The bainite reaction kinetics in austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taran, Yu.N.; Uzlov, K.I.; Kutsov, A.Yu. [State Metall. Acad., Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine). Phys. Metall. Dept.

    1997-11-01

    Bainitic reaction kinetics in ductile iron contained according to Ukrainian standard (weight%) 3.60-3.80 carbon, 2.60-2.80 Si, {proportional_to}0.12 Mn, {proportional_to}0.60 Cu and additionally alloyed by Mo (0.15-0.20) has been studied. It was found that the overall transformation kinetics becomes slower as transformation temperature increase. This is because more intensive redistribution of carbon into austenite at higher temperatures. Two austenites with different carbon content have been fixed and kinetics of their lattices parameters has been studied. (orig.). 6 refs.

  19. Ductilizing Bulk Metallic Glass Composite by Tailoring Stacking Fault Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Zhou, D. Q.; Song, W. L.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Ma, D.; Wang, X. L.; Lu, Z. P.

    2012-12-01

    Martensitic transformation was successfully introduced to bulk metallic glasses as the reinforcement micromechanism. In this Letter, it was found that the twinning property of the reinforcing crystals can be dramatically improved by reducing the stacking fault energy through microalloying, which effectively alters the electron charge density redistribution on the slipping plane. The enhanced twinning propensity promotes the martensitic transformation of the reinforcing austenite and, consequently, improves plastic stability and the macroscopic tensile ductility. In addition, a general rule to identify effective microalloying elements based on their electronegativity and atomic size was proposed.

  20. Low-Temperature Strengths and Ductility of Various Tungsten Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Hiraoka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used three kinds of tungsten sheets in this study. First, we examined microstructure such as grain size distribution using an optical microscope. Secondly, we carried out three-point bend tests at temperatures between about 290 and 500 K. Then, we examined fracture surface of a failed specimen using a scanning electron microscope. Lastly, by analyzing all these results, we evaluated apparent intergranular and transgranular fracture strengths and discussed strengths and ductility of tungsten. Additionally, we compared mechanical properties of tungsten with those of molybdenum.

  1. Investigation on Ductile Property of CePO4 Ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽娟; 刘家臣; 王凯利; 霍伟荣; 高海

    2003-01-01

    Average grain size of chemicalty synthesized CePO4 powder increases with incre asing calcining temperature. The strength 184 Mpa and toughness 4.8 Mpa*m1/ 2 were achieved when the green compacts were sintered at 1500 ℃ for 2 h in air . They show that stepped or multilayered fracture occurs within CePO4 granules. CePO4 ceramic could be cut, drilled or turned easily using conventional metal-machining tools. Continuous machining debris was observed on turned surface. Indentation pressure stress-strain curve showes extensive nonlinear behavior, and a series of microcracks which crack cross and occur along the extrusion stre ss direction were observed on extruded surface, indicating single-phase CePO4 ceramic is "ductile". Based on the fracture analyses in cross-section surface, the ductility of CePO4 ceramic is considered to be associated with the cleavage of multilayered CePO4 grains and the fragment resetting to adapt to stress.

  2. Fracture and ductile vs. brittle behavior -- Theory, modeling and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltz, G.E. [ed.] [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Selinger, R.L.B. [ed.] [Catholic Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Kim, K.S. [ed.] [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Marder, M.P. [ed.] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The symposium brought together the many communities that investigate the fundamentals of fracture, with special emphasis on the ductile/brittle transition across a broad spectrum of material classes, fracture at interfaces, and modelling fracture over various length scales. Theoretical techniques discussed ranged from first-principles electronic structure theory to atomistic simulation to mesoscale and continuum theories, along with studies of fractals and scaling in fracture. Experimental and theoretical talks were interspersed throughout all sessions, rather than being segregated. The contributions to this volume generally follow the topical outline upon which the symposium was organized. The first part, dealing with ductile vs. brittle behavior in metals, concerns itself with investigations of high-strength steel, magnesium alloys, ordered intermetallics, and Fe-Cr-Al alloys. The development of analytical methods based on micromechanical models, such as dislocation mechanics and cohesive/contact zone models, are covered in a follow-up section. Nonmetals, including silicon, are considered in Parts 3 and 4. Fractals, chaos, and scaling theories are taken up in Part 5, with a special emphasis on fracture in heterogeneous solids. Modelling based on large populations of dislocations has substantially progressed during the past three years; hence, a section devoted to crystal plasticity and mesoscale dislocation modelling appears next. Finally, the technologically significant area of interfacial fracture, with applications to composites and intergranular fracture, is taken up in Part 7. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this book.

  3. Thermal analysis of ductile iron in thin walled casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypereutectic ductile iron was cast in self hardening moulding sand to produce castings with the shape of Archimedes spirals and with wall thickness of 1, 2 and 3 mm. Inmould technique was used to produce thin wall ductile iron (TWDI. In this work it has been carried out thermal analysis in spiral with 3 mm wall thickness. The present work provides results of thermal analysis, that are initial temperature of metal in mould cavity, velocity of metal stream as well as solidification time. Measurement of temperature shows that there is essential its drop during filling of mould cavity and amounts 230 oC for distance 700 mm from the beginning of spiral. On the basic on first derivative of temperature versus time characteristic solidification points were distinguish, namely solidification of primary graphite, austenite dendrite and eutectic. Experimental measurements of temperature drop during filling of mould cavity along with microscopic examinations of castings structure can be used to verify computer modeling and simulation of fluid flow and thermal field in TWDI.

  4. Structure of ductile iron in thin walled castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available It this work it has been shown that it is possible to produce thin wall ductile iron (TWDI castings with considerably length using Archimedes spiral with wall thickness of 1, 2 and 3 mm. Inmould technique was used to produce TWDI. It has been estimated castability and metallographic investigations were made using different moulding materials. From castability measurements result that it is possible to obtain thin wall ductile iron castings with wall thickness down to 1 mm with castability of 200 mm. Using mould with small ability to absorb heat castability increases twice. At wall thickness equal 3 mm castability reaches 1000 mm and using LDASC sand its value increases to over 1500 mm. Structure parameters for different wall thickness and moulding materials (graphite nodule count, ferrite and cementite fraction are plotted versus distance from the beginning of spiral. It is shown strong influence of LDASC sand (material with small ability to absorb heat on structure parameters (NF, Vf i VC revealing gradient character of TWDI.

  5. EFFECT OF VELOCITY ON DUCTILITY UNDER HIGH VELOCITY FORMING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong; LI Chunfeng

    2007-01-01

    The ring expansion procedures over various forming velocities are calculated with ANSYS software in order to show the effect of forming velocity on ductility of rate insensitive materials. Ring expansion procedures are simplified to one-dimensional tension by constraining the radial deformation, with element birth and death method, fracture problem of circular ring are considered. The calculated results show that for insensitive materials of 1060 aluminum and 3A21 aluminum alloy, fracture strain increases corresponding to the increase of forming velocity. This trend agrees well with experimental results, and indicates inertia is the key factor to affect ductility; With element birth and death methods, fracture problems can be solved effectively. Experimental studies on formability of tubular workpieces are also conducted, experimental results show that the formability of 1060 aluminum and 3A21 aluminum alloy under electromagnetic forming is higher than that under quasistatic forming, according to the characteristics of electromagnetic forming, the forming limit diagrams of the two materials tube are also built respectively, this is very important to promote the development of electromagnetic forming and guide the engineering practices.

  6. Effects of carbides on fatigue characteristics of austempered ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, B.; Gao, N.; Reed, P. A. S.; Lee, K. K.

    2005-04-01

    Crack initiation and growth behavior of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) austenitized at 800 °C and austempered at 260 °C have been assessed under three-point bend fatigue conditions. Initiation sites have been identified as carbides remaining from the as-cast ductile iron due to insufficient austenization. The number of carbides cracking on loading to stresses greater than 275 MPa is critical in determining the failure mechanism. In general, high carbide area fractions promote coalescence-dominated fatigue crack failure, while low area fractions promote propagation-dominated fatigue crack failure. Individual carbides have been characterized using finite body tessellation (FBT) and adaptive numerical modeling (Support vector Parsimonious Analysis Of Variance (SUPANOVA)) techniques in an attempt to quantify the factors promoting carbide fracture. This indicated that large or long and thin carbides on the whole appear to be susceptible to fracture, and carbides that are locally clustered and aligned perpendicular to the tensile axis are particularly susceptible to fracture.

  7. Analysis of Percent Elongation for Ductile Metal in Uniaxial Tension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-bin; YANG Mei; JIANG Jian

    2005-01-01

    Percent elongation of ductile metal in uniaxial tension due to non-homogeneity was analyzed based on gradient-dependent plasticity. Three assumptions are used to get the analytical solution of percent elongation: one is static equilibrium condition in axial direction; another is that plastic volumetric strain is zero in necking zone;the other is that the diameter in unloading zone remains constant after strain localization is initiated. The strain gradient term was introduced into the yield function of classical plastic mechanics to obtain the analytical solution of distributed plastic strain. Integrating the plastic strain and considering the influence of necking on plastic elongation, a one-dimensional analytical solution of percent elongation was proposed. The analytical solution shows that the percent elongation is inversely proportional to the gauge length, and the solution is formally similar to earlier empirical formula proposed by Barba. Comparisons of existing experimental results and present analytical solutions for relation between load and total elongation and for relation between percent elongation and gauge lengthwere carried out and the new mechanical model for percent elongation was verified. Moreover, higher ductility,toughness and heterogeneity can cause much larger percentage elongation, which coincides with usual viewpoints.

  8. Nitrogen Impurity Gettering in Oxide Dispersion Ductilized Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Anderson, Ian M [ORNL; Weaver, Mark [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Larson, David James [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL; Sikka, Vinod K [ORNL; Rar, Andrei [ORNL; Pharr, George Mathews [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Walls, Claudia Alexandra [ORNL

    2003-01-01

    Work by Scruggs in the 1960s demonstrated that tensile ductility could be achieved at room temperature in powder metallurgically-produced Cr alloyed with MgO. During consolidation, much of the MgO converted to the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase, which was hypothesized to getter nitrogen from the Cr, rendering it ductile. We have duplicated this effect, achieving room temperature tensile elongations of 4% for hot-pressed Cr-6MgO-(0-1)Ti (wt.%) and 10% for hot-pressed and extruded Cr-6MgO-0.75Ti. Direct incorporation of nitrogen into the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase was not detected; however, impurities, particularly nitrogen and sulfur, were observed to segregate to and/or precipitate at interfaces between the MgO/MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases and the Cr matrix. Exploratory studies of other non-spinel forming oxide dispersions (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) showed a similar pattern of impurity segregation/precipitation, suggesting that there is nothing unique about spinel dispersions in Cr with regards to impurities. However, none of these other dispersions resulted in similar levels of tensile elongation.

  9. Mechanisms and mechanics of porosity formation in ductile iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Perzyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage defects in ductile iron castings can be of two basic types: shrinkage cavities associated with the liquid contraction prior to the expansion period of the iron as well as the porosity, which may appear even if the liquid shrinkage is fully compensated. In the present paper two possible mechanisms of the porosity are presented and analyzed. The first one is the Karsay’s mechanism based on the secondary shrinkage concept. The second one is the mechanism acting during the expansion period of the iron, first suggested by Ohnaka and co-authors and essentially modified by the present authors. The mechanical interactions between casting and mould are determined for the both mechanisms. Their analysis leads to the conclusion, that porosity forms during expansion period of the melt. The direct cause is the negative pressure which appears in the central part of the casting due to the differences in expansion coefficients of the fast cooling surface layer and slow cooling inner region. Observations concerning feeding behavior of ductile iron castings, based on this mechanism, agree well with industrial practice. The secondary shrinkage is not only needless to induce the porosity, but the corresponding mechanism of its occurrence, proposed by Karsay, does not seem to be valid.

  10. The effects of steel fibre reinforced concrete on system ductility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilmaz, U. S.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel fibre-reinforced concrete is being used extensively today in both field applications and experimental studies on concrete strength and ductility. The state of passive confinement generated by the fibre delays cracking and enhances ductility. The present paper reports on both experimental and analytical studies. In the former, a series of 16 steel-fibre reinforced concrete prismatic specimens were subjected to axial loads and the respective axial load-unit strain diagrams were subsequently plotted to determine the effect of steel fibres on reinforced concrete column ductility. Secondly, an analytical study was run to determine the additional ductility accruing to a frame system when steel fibres are included in the concrete. Analytical models were generated for 16 two-storey, single-span reinforced concrete frames. The columns in these frames were designed to the same characteristics as the specimens used in the experimental tests. Non-linear static (pushover analyses were performed for each frame to obtain load-displacement curves and determine the effect of steel fibres on reinforced concrete column ductility.El hormigón reforzado con fibra de acero se emplea actualmente tanto en obra como en los trabajos experimentales para estudiar la resistencia mecánica y ductilidad del hormigón. El estado de confinamiento pasivo producido por la fibra retrasa la fisuración y aumenta la ductilidad. El presente trabajo es de índole tanto experimental como analítica. En primer lugar, en la parte experimental se aplica una fuerza axial a 16 probetas prismáticas (160 x 160 x 840 mm de hormigón reforzado con fibra de acero para determinar su comportamiento, obteniéndose las curvas de fuerza axial-deformación unitaria correspondientes a partir de los resultados observados. A partir de una evaluación de dichos resultados experimentales, se determina el efecto que ejercen las fibras de acero sobre la ductilidad de las probetas de hormigón armado

  11. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, I., E-mail: imejia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Maldonado, C. [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Cabrera, J.M. [Departament de Ciencia dels Materials i Enginyeria Metal.lurgica, ETSEIB - Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. de las Bases de Manresa 1, 08240 Manresa (Spain)

    2011-05-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Effect of boron on the hot ductility behavior of a low carbon NiCrVCu AHSS. {yields} Boron addition of 117 ppm improves hot ductility over 100% in terms of RA. {yields} Hot ductility improvement is associated with segregation/precipitation of boron. {yields} Typical hot ductility recovery at lower temperatures does not appear in this steel. {yields} Hot ductility loss is associated with precipitates/inclusions coupled with voids. - Abstract: The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s{sup -1}. Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless, both steels showed poor ductility when tested at the lowest temperatures (650, 750 and 800 deg. C), and such behavior is associated to the precipitation of vanadium carbides/nitrides and inclusions, particularly MnS and CuS particles. The fracture mode of the low carbon advanced high strength steel microalloyed with boron seems to be more ductile than the steel without boron addition. Furthermore, the fracture surfaces of specimens tested at temperatures showing the highest ductility (900 and 1000 deg. C) indicate that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, while in the region of poor ductility the fracture mode is of the ductile-brittle type failure. It was shown that precipitates and/or inclusions coupled with voids play a meaningful role on the crack nucleation mechanism which in turn causes a hot ductility loss. Likewise, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) which always results in restoration of ductility only occurs in the range from 900 to 1000 deg. C. Results are discussed in terms of

  12. Ductile fracture assessment using parameters from small specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talja, H. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The topic of this thesis is the computational aspects in the assessment of ductile failure in metals. The first part briefly describes the micromechanics of ductile crack growth and methods for assessing it. The `classic` approach to describe material behaviour using fracture mechanics is summarised. The limitations of the one parameter approach based on the stress intensity factor K or the J- integral are described. Attempts to extend the application field of fracture mechanics parameters by introducing triaxility or constraint parameters are also presented. Different local approach methodologies are summarised. Special attention is paid to the modified Gurson model, which is based on micro-mechanical studies of void initiation, growth and coalescence. The main part of the work consists of numerical analyses with the modified Gurson model. The parameters of the model are first determined by matching tensile test results by finite element analysis, and then applied to J-R curve prediction. This methodology is applied to several reactor pressure vessel materials: A533B, 20 MnMoNi 5 5 and austenitic VVER 440 cladding. As a result, the applicability of different specimen types for the parameter determination of the modified Gurson model has been evaluated. Because a combination of experimental and numerical work is needed, it proved to be most feasible to use specimens which can be simulated with two-dimensional or axisymmetric finite element models. Further, a practical way to treat anisotropic material behaviour using the modified Gurson model by using separate parameter sets for different orientations has been proposed and verified. The correspondence between the observed scatters in tensile and fracture mechanical test results has been examined. Best agreement was obtained fitting the scatter of tensile tests by varying the values of initial parameters. Reasons for apparently higher ductility measured from sub-sized than standard size tensile specimens were

  13. Ductile-Phase-Toughened Tungsten for Plasma-Facing Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin Hawkins

    A variety of processing approaches were employed to fabricate ductile-phase-toughened (DPT) tungsten (W) composites. Mechanical testing and analytical modeling were used to guide composite development. This work provides a basis for further development of W composites to be used in structural divertor components of future fusion reactors. W wire was tested in tension, showing significant ductility and strength. Coatings of copper (Cu) or tungsten carbide (WC) were applied to the W wire via electrodeposition and carburization, respectively. Composites were fabricated using spark plasma sintering (SPS) to consolidate W powders together with each type of coated W wire. DPT behavior, e.g. crack arrest and crack bridging, was not observed in three-point bend testing of the sintered composites. A laminate was fabricated by hot pressing W and Cu foils together with W wires, and subsequently tested in tension. This laminate was bonded via hot pressing to thick W plate as a reinforcing layer, and the composite was tested in three-point bending. Crack arrest was observed along with some fiber pullout, but significant transverse cracking in the W plate confounded further fracture toughness analysis. The fracture toughness of thin W plate was measured in three-point bending. W plates were brazed with Cu foils to form a laminate. Crack arrest and crack bridging were observed in three-point bend tests of the laminate, and fracture resistance curves were successfully calculated for this DPT composite. An analytical model of crack bridging was developed using the basis described by Chao in previous work by the group. The model uses the specimen geometry, matrix properties, and the stress-displacement function of a ductile reinforcement ("bridging law") to calculate the fracture resistance curve (R-curve) and load-displacement curve (P-D curve) for any test specimen geometry. The code was also implemented to estimate the bridging law of an arbitrary composite using R-curve data

  14. Microstructural evolution in the HAZ of Inconel 718 and correlation with the hot ductility test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. G.; Genculu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The nickel-base alloy 718 was evaluated to study the role of preweld heat treatment in reducing or eliminating heat-affected zone hot cracking. Three heat treatments were studied using the Gleeble hot ductility test. A modified hot ductility test was also used to follow the evolution of microstructure during simulated welding thermal cycles. The microstructural evolution was correlated with the hot ductility data in order to evaluate the mechanism of hot cracking in alloy 718. The correlation of hot ductility with microstructure showed that recrystallization, grain growth, and dissolution of precipitates did not in themselves cause any loss of ductility during cooling. Ductility loss during cooling was not initiated until the constitutional liquation of NbC particles was observed in the microstructure. Laves-type phases were found precipitated in the solidified grain boundaries but were not found to correlate with any ductility loss parameter. Mechanisms are reviewed which help to explain how heat treatment controls the hot crack susceptibility of alloy 718 as measured in the hot ductility test.

  15. Influence of austenization temperature on the erosion behavior of austempered ductile irons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.C.Chang; I.C.Hsui; L.H.Chen; S.T.Lui

    2008-01-01

    The erosion behavior of austempered ductile irons austenized at different temperatures was studied. The results indicate that the erosion rate well correlates with the mechanical properties. At high impact angles, increasing ductility and mechanical energy density results in decreasing erosion rate, whereas increasing hardness reduces the erosion rate at low impact angles.

  16. Microstructural evolution in the HAZ of Inconel 718 and correlation with the hot ductility test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. G.; Genculu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The nickel-base alloy 718 was evaluated to study the role of preweld heat treatment in reducing or eliminating heat-affected zone hot cracking. Three heat treatments were studied using the Gleeble hot ductility test. A modified hot ductility test was also used to follow the evolution of microstructure during simulated welding thermal cycles. The microstructural evolution was correlated with the hot ductility data in order to evaluate the mechanism of hot cracking in alloy 718. The correlation of hot ductility with microstructure showed that recrystallization, grain growth, and dissolution of precipitates did not in themselves cause any loss of ductility during cooling. Ductility loss during cooling was not initiated until the constitutional liquation of NbC particles was observed in the microstructure. Laves-type phases were found precipitated in the solidified grain boundaries but were not found to correlate with any ductility loss parameter. Mechanisms are reviewed which help to explain how heat treatment controls the hot crack susceptibility of alloy 718 as measured in the hot ductility test.

  17. Formability Prediction of Advanced High Strength Steel with a New Ductile Fracture Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yanshan; Lim, Sungjun; Huh, Jeehyang; Huh, Hoon

    2011-08-01

    A ductile fracture criterion is newly proposed to accurately predict forming limit diagrams (FLD) of sheet metals. The new ductile fracture criterion is based on the effect of the non-dimensional stress triaxiality, the stress concentration factor and the effective plastic strain on the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids. The new ductile fracture criterion has been applied to estimate the formability of four kind advanced high strength steels (AHSS): DP780, DP980, TRIP590, and TWIP980. FLDs predicted are compared with experimental results and those predicted by other ductile fracture criteria. The comparison demonstrates that FLDs predicted by the new ductile fracture criterion are in better agreement with experimental FLDs than those predicted by other ductile fracture criteria. The better agreement of FLDs predicted by the new ductile fracture criterion is because conventional ductile fracture criteria were proposed for fracture prediction in bulk metal forming while the new one is proposed to predict the onset of fracture in sheet metal forming processes.

  18. Experimental analysis of flow of ductile cast iron in stream lined gating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Hansen, Søren; Green, Nick; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2008-01-01

    Streamlined gating systems have been developed for production of high integrity ductile cast iron parts. Flow of ductile cast iron in streamlined gating systems was studied in glass fronted sand moulds where flow in the gating system and casting was recorded by a digital video camera. These resul...

  19. Modeling effects of constituents and dispersoids on tensile ductility of aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Min; CHEN Kang-hua; QI Xiong-wei

    2007-01-01

    The modeling effects of constituents and dispersoids on the tensile ductility of aluminum alloy were studied. The results show that the tensile ductility decreases with the increase of the volume fraction and size of constituents. Thus, purification can improve the tensile ductility by decreasing the volume fraction of constituents (normally compositions of Fe and Si) and the first-class microcracks. The model also indicates that the tensile ductility decreases with the increase in the volume fraction of dispersoids. Decreasing the volume fraction of dispersoids along the grain boundaries by proper heat-treatment and improving the cohesion strength between dispersoids and matrix can also improve the tensile ductility by decreasing the volume fraction of the second-class microcracks.

  20. Comparative study of TIG and SMAW root welding passes on ductile iron cast weldability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cárcel-Carrasco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the weldability of ductile iron when: (I a root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG process using an Inconel 625 source rod and filler welds are subsequently applied using coated electrodes with 97,6%Ni; and (II welds on ductile iron exclusively made using the manual shielded metal arc welding technique (SMAW. Both types of welds are performed on ductile iron specimen test plates that are subjected to preheat and post-weld annealing treatments. Samples with TIG root-welding pass shown higher hardness but slightly lower ductility and strength. Both types of welding achieved better ductile and strength properties than ones found in literature.

  1. A LOWER BOUND LIMIT ANALYSIS OF DUCTILE COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hongtao; Liu Yinghua; Xu Bingye

    2005-01-01

    The plastic load-bearing capacity of ductile composites such as metal matrix composites is studied with an insight into the microstructures. The macroscopic strength of a composite is obtained by combining the homogenization theory with static limit analysis, where the temperature parameter method is used to construct the self-equilibrium stress field. An interface failure model is proposed to account for the effects of the interface on the failure of composites.The static limit analysis with the finite-element method is then formulated as a constrained nonlinear programming problem, which is solved by the Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP)method. Finally, the macroscopic transverse strength of perforated materials, the macroscopic transverse and off-axis strength of fiber-reinforced composites are obtained through numerical calculation. The computational results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Statistics of ductile fracture surfaces: the effect of material parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponson, Laurent; Cao, Yuanyuan; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The effect of material parameters on the statistics of fracture surfaces is analyzed under small scale yielding conditions. Three dimensional calculations of ductile crack growth under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive...... distributed. The three dimensional analysis permits modeling of a three dimensional material microstructure and of the resulting three dimensional stress and deformation states that develop in the fracture process region. Material parameters characterizing void nucleation are varied and the statistics...... of the resulting fracture surfaces is investigated. All the fracture surfaces are found to be self-affine over a size range of about two orders of magnitude with a very similar roughness exponent of 0.56 ± 0.03. In contrast, the full statistics of the fracture surfaces is found to be more sensitive to the material...

  3. Ductility of copper films on sandblasting polyimide substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Different surface morphologies of polyimide(PI)foils widely applied in flexible electronics were obtained using the technique of sandblasting.Copper(Cu)films were subsequently deposited on the treated surface of PI substrates.Upon tensile loading, the critical strain,crack density and count of cracks were measured to examine the ductility of Cu films on PI substrates.Obtained results show that after sandblasting treatment,the critical strain of Cu film decreases from 8.0%to 6.9%and,in comparison with the case without sandblasting,its surface crack density decreases remarkably,with no saturation of the crack density.The reduced crack density is attributed to the increase of contact area and interfacial adhesion after sandblasting,and whether the crack density is saturated or not is dependent upon the morphology of the cracks formed as a function of tensile strain.

  4. Kinetic model of ductile iron solidification with experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kapturkiewicz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A solidification model for ductile iron, including Weibull formula for nodule count has been presented. From this model, the following can be determined: cooling curves, kinetics of austenite and eutectic nucleation, austenite and eutectic growth velocity, volume fraction, distribution of Si and P both in austenite and eutectic grain with distribution in casting section.In the developed model of nodular graphite iron casting solidification, the correctness of the mathematical model has been experimentally verified in the range of the most significant factors, which include temperature field, the value of maximum undercooling, and the graphite nodule count interrelated with the casting cross-section. Literature offers practically no data on so confronted process model and simulation program.

  5. Effect of void cluster on ductile failure evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of a non-uniform void distribution in a ductile material is investigated by using a cell model analysis to study a material with a periodic pattern of void clusters. The special clusters considered consist of a number of uniformly spaced voids located along a plane perpendicular...... to the maximum principal tensile stress. A plane strain approximation is used, where the voids are parallel cylindrical holes. Clusters with different numbers of voids are compared with the growth of a single void, such that the total initial volume of the voids, and thus also the void volume fractions...... understanding, different transverse stresses on the unit cell are considered to see the influence of different levels of stress triaxiality. Also considered are different initial ratios of the void spacing to the void radius inside the clusters. And results are shown for different levels of strain hardening...

  6. Ductile damage of porous materials with two populations of voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Pierre-Guy; Monerie, Yann; Suquet, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This study is devoted to the modelling of ductile damage in uranium dioxide. This polycrystalline material contains two populations of voids of well separated size. The problem addressed here is the prediction of the effective flow surface of a Gurson material containing randomly oriented oblate voids. The case of spherical voids is considered first and the variational approach of Gurson is generalized by adding a compressible component to his original velocity field. The case of aligned oblate voids is then considered and a suitable generalization of a velocity field due to Gologanu et al. (ASME J. Engrg. Mater. Technol. 116 (1994) 290-297) is proposed. The extension to randomly oriented voids is achieved by averaging over all orientations. In each case, rigorous upper bounds and approximate estimates are derived and compared (in the case of spherical voids) with Finite Element simulations. To cite this article: P.-G. Vincent et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  7. Dry sliding wear of Ni alloyed austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Akbarzadeh Chiniforush

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of dry sliding wear are presented for ductile irons with composition Fe-3.56C-2.67Si-0.25Mo-0.5Cu and Ni contents of 0.8 and 1.5 in wt.% with applied loads of 50, 100 and 150 N for austempering temperatures of 270, 320, and 370 °C after austenitizing at 870 °C for 120 min. The mechanical property measurements show that the grades of the ASTM 897M: 1990 Standard can be satisfied for the selected austempering conditions. The results show that wear resistance is independent of austempering temperature with an applied load of 50 N, but there is a strong dependence at higher austempering temperatures with applied loads of 100 and 150 N. Observations indicate that wear is due to subsurface fatigue with cracks nucleated at deformed graphite nodules.

  8. Tensile properties of austempered ductile iron under thermomechanical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achary, J.

    2000-02-01

    A new processing method was investigated for improving the strength and elongation of austempered ductile iron (ADI) by grain refinement of parent austenite using thermomechanical treatment. The material was deformed at the austenitization temperature by single and multipass rolling before the austempering treatment. The effects of the amount of deformation, austenitization temperature, austempering temperatures, reaustenitization, and secondary deformation on the tensile properties were studied. The properties obtained using the method were compared with those of the ASTM standards. The effect of deformation on the graphite shape was also studied. Tensile strength/yield strength/elongation values were found to increase with increasing austenite deformation up to 40% and then to start decreasing. Tensile strength/yield strength and elongation values of 1700 MPa/1300 MPa/5% and 1350 MPa/920 MPa/15% can be achieved with this method in the ranges of variables studied.

  9. Tensile properties of austempered ductile iron under thermomechanical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achary, J.

    2000-02-01

    A new processing method was investigated for improving the strength and elongation of austempered ductile iron (ADI) by grain refinement of parent austenite using thermomechanical treatment. The material was deformed at the austenitization temperature by single and multipass rolling before the austempering treatment. The effects of the amount of deformation, austenitization temperature, austempering temperatures, reaustenitization, and secondary deformation on the tensile properties were studied. The properties obtained using the method were compared with those of the ASTM standards. The effect of deformation on the graphite shape was also studied. Tensile strength/yield strength/elongation values were found to increase with increasing austenite deformation up to 40% and then to start decreasing. Tensile strength/yield strength and elongation values of 1,700 MPa/1,300 MPa/5% and 1,350 MPa/920 MPa/15% can be achieved with this method in the ranges of variables studied.

  10. Kinetics of the Bainite Transformation in Austempered Ductile Iron ADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ławrynowicz Z.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to check an analytical model of the kinetics of bainite transformation that will enable the producers of ADI to optimise the microstructure and mechanical properties and minimise the expensive and extensive experimental trials. A combination of thermodynamics and kinetic theory was used successfully to estimate the evolution of bainite as a function of temperature, time, chemical composition and austenite grain size and predict the processing window in austempered ductile iron using a bainite transformation model developed previously for high silicon steels. The results of the present research show that the bainitic model developed for high silicon steels is applicable for calculations of the processing window for ADI.

  11. FATIGUE CRACK PROPAGATION THROUGH AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON MICROSTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Bubenko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron (ADI has a wide range of application, particularly for castings used in automotive and earth moving machinery industries. These components are usually subjected to variable dynamic loading that may promote initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks up to final fracture. Thus, it is important to determine the fatigue crack propagation behavior of ADI. Since fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN vs. stress intensity factor K data describe fatigue crack propagation resistance and fatigue durability of structural materials, da/dN vs. Ka curves of ADI 1050 are reported here. The threshold amplitude of stress intensity factor Kath is also determined. Finally, the influence of stress intensity factor amplitude to the character of fatigue crack propagation through the ADI microstructure is described.

  12. Bending Fatigue Strength of Austempered Ductile Iron Spur Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Masashi; Tamura, Ryo; Inoue, Katsumi; Narita, Yukihito

    This paper deals with an experimental evaluation of bending fatigue strength for austempered ductile iron (ADI) spur gears. The module is 2.5 and the number of teeth is 26 in the test gears. The material of the test gears corresponds to Japan Industrial Standard (JIS) FCAD1100-15. Some gears are processed by one of two types of fine particle bombarding (FPB). The surface roughness is slightly increased by FPB. The obtained strengths are 623 MPa for the as-austempered gears, and 1011 and 1085 MPa for the gears after FPB. The strength is expressed by the fillet stress level, which is calculated by FEM. The strength of a gear with the same dimensions made of carburized SCr420H alloy steel is 1205 MPa, and the strength of the ADI gear is approximately half that of the carburized steel gear. The FPB process has a significant effect on the ADI gear, improving its strength by 62-74%.

  13. Ductile film delamination from compliant substrates using hard overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordill, M.J. [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria); Marx, V.M.; Kirchlechner, C. [Max-Plank-Insitut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2014-11-28

    Flexible electronic devices call for copper and gold metal films to adhere well to polymer substrates. Measuring the interfacial adhesion of these material systems is often challenging, requiring the formulation of different techniques and models. Presented here is a strategy to induce well defined areas of delamination to measure the adhesion of copper films on polyimide substrates. The technique utilizes a stressed overlayer and tensile straining to cause buckle formation. The described method allows one to examine the effects of thin adhesion layers used to improve the adhesion of flexible systems. - Highlights: • Measuring the adhesion energies of ductile metal–polymer interfaces is difficult. • A Cu film would plastically deform under tensile strain without a Cr overlayer. • A Cr overlayer forces cracking and induces buckling between the crack fragments. • The adhesion energy of the metal–polymer interface can be measured.

  14. Construction-friendly ductile shear joints for precast concrete panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Fischer, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the shear capacity of in-situ cast joints between precast concrete panels. Current practice with vertical lowering of the wall panels experiences difficulties in the assembly phase, since the traditional U-bar connection requires an overlap in a horizontal plane to allow...... a construction-friendly design with U-bars overlapping in the same plane as the panel itself. The design allows for a trouble-free vertical lowering of the panels without pre or post processing of the preinstalled reinforcement loops. Furthermore, an overall more ductile behavior of the joint is obtained....... The solution is tested in a push-off experimental setup and the influence of important geometric parameters of the keyed shear joint is investigated. The first peak load carrying capacity is assessed using plasticity models, and the failure modes are identified by the use of digital image correlation...

  15. Modelling of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    This thesis focuses on numerical analysis of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints. Two types of welds are investigated here. First, a study of the localization of plastic flow and failure in aluminum sheets, welded by the relatively new Friction Stir (FS) Welding method, has been...... conducted ([P1], [P2], [P7]-[P9]). The focus in the thesis is on FS-welded 2xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys, which are attractive, for example, to the aerospace industry, since the 2024 aluminum in particular, is typically classified as un-weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. Secondly......, a study of the damage development in Resistance SpotWelded joints, when subject to the commonly used static shear-lab or cross-tension testing techniques, has been carried out ([P3]-[P6]). The focus in thesis is on the Advanced High Strength Steels, Dual-Phase 600, which is used in for example...

  16. Optimization of Abrasive Water Jet Cutting of Ductile Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asif IQBAL; Naeem U DAR; Ghulam HUSSAIN

    2011-01-01

    Full factorial design of experiments was developed in order to investigate the effects of jet pressure, abrasive mixing rate, cutting feed, and plate thickness upon three response variables, surface finish of cutting wear zone, percentage proportion of striation free area, and maximum width of cut. The set of sixteen experiments was performed on each of the following two ductile materials: AISI 4340 (high strength low alloy steel, hardened to 49HRc) and Aluminum 2219. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was performed on experimental data in order to determine the significance of effects of different parameters on the performance measures. It was found that cutting feed and thickness were highly influential parameters, while abrasive mixing rate is influential upon surface roughness only. Strong interaction was found between jet pressure and workpiece material.Multi-criteria numerical optimization was performed in order to simultaneously maximize/minimize different combinations of performance measures.

  17. A Microscale Model for Ausferritic Transformation of Austempered Ductile Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardo, Adrián D.; Dardati, Patricia M.; Celentano, Diego J.; Godoy, Luis A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new metallurgical model for the ausferritic transformation of ductile cast iron. The model allows predicting the evolution of phases in terms of the chemical composition, austenitization and austempering temperatures, graphite nodule count, and distribution of graphite nodule size. The ferrite evolution is predicted according to the displacive growth mechanism. A representative volume element is employed at the microscale to consider the phase distributions, the inhomogeneous austenite carbon content, and the nucleation of ferrite subunits at the graphite nodule surface and at the tips of existing ferrite subunits. The performance of the model is evaluated by comparison with experimental results. The results indicate that the increment of the ausferritic transformation rate, which is caused by increments of austempering temperature and graphite nodule count, is adequately represented by this model.

  18. Ductile fracture of metals under triaxial states of stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrems, Karol Krumrey

    Silver interlayers between maraging steel base metal were examined to evaluate mechanisms leading to ductile failure in constrained thin metals. The constraint of the maraging steel base metal during uniaxial testing of constrained thin silver results in a large hydrostatic tension component, a small von Mises effective stress, and negligible far-field plasticity. The failure theory proposed by Rice and Tracey predicts uniform cavity wall expansion as a result of high triaxiality, in which an increase in plastic strain drives an increase in cavity size. The Rice and Tracey theory predicts significantly greater plastic strain than is experimentally observed. The theory developed by Huang, Hutchinson, and Tvergaard states that a cavitation limit exists at which a cavity continues to grow without an increase in elastic or plastic strain. This occurs when the energy stored in the elastic region is sufficient to drive continued cavity expansion. Inherent in both theories is the assumption of a single cavity in an infinite solid, which implies non-interacting cavities. Modifications have been developed to allow for multiple cavities, but assume pre-existing cavities. By examining silver interlayers previously loaded to various times at a fraction of the tensile strength where time-dependent failure is observed, it was found that some cavities were initially present in the as-bonded samples. Some of the initial cavities were spaced close enough to suggest localized interacting stress fields. This indicates that a failure model should be able to accommodate cavity spacing. The results suggest that cavities are continuously nucleating (from at least the 20 nanometers detectability limit) and grow, sometimes to over 500 nm in diameter. This thesis evaluates the number, size, shape and spacing of cavities in the silver interlayers and uses these results to evaluate ductile failure theories for metals subjected to high triaxial states of stress such as in constrained

  19. The Silumin Coat Structure on Alloy Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymczak T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the research results of the silumin coat structure applied on the carbidic alloy ductile iron with the metal matrix: pearlitic, bainitic and martensitic. The coats were made in the AlSi5 silumin bath at the temperature tk = 750±5°C. The holding time of cast iron element in the bath was τ = 180s. Irrespective of the kind of tested ductile iron the obtained coat consisted of three layers with a different phase composition. The first layer from the cast iron ground “g1`” is built from Fe4CSi carbide which contains selected alloy additives of the cast iron. On it the second layer “g1``” crystallizes. It consists of the AlFeSi inter-metallic phase which can appear in its pure form or contain a small quantity of the alloy additives of the cast iron. The last external part of the layer “g2” mainly consists of the hypo-eutectic phases of silumin. The AlFeSi inter-metallic phases in the form of free precipitations with a lamellar or faceted morphology can also appear there. These phases also can contain a small quantity of the alloy additives of the cast iron. More than that, in all the layers of the coat there are graphite precipitations. The phenomenon of graphite movement to the coat is caused by intensive dissolving of the cast iron element surface by the aluminum of the silumin bath.

  20. Boudinage and folding as an energy instability in ductile deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; Herwegh, Marco; Paesold, Martin K.; Poulet, Thomas; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Veveakis, Manolis

    2016-05-01

    We present a theory for the onset of localization in layered rate- and temperature-sensitive rocks, in which energy-related mechanical bifurcations lead to localized dissipation patterns in the transient deformation regime. The implementation of the coupled thermomechanical 2-D finite element model comprises an elastic and rate-dependent von Mises plastic rheology. The underlying system of equations is solved in a three-layer pure shear box, for constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions. To examine the transition from stable to localized creep, we study how material instabilities are related to energy bifurcations, which arise independently of the sign of the stress conditions imposed on opposite boundaries, whether in compression or extension. The onset of localization is controlled by a critical amount of dissipation, termed Gruntfest number, when dissipative work by temperature-sensitive creep translated into heat overcomes the diffusive capacity of the layer. Through an additional mathematical bifurcation analysis using constant stress boundary conditions, we verify that boudinage and folding develop at the same critical Gruntfest number. Since the critical material parameters and boundary conditions for both structures to develop are found to coincide, the initiation of localized deformation in strong layered media within a weaker matrix can be captured by a unified theory for localization in ductile materials. In this energy framework, neither intrinsic nor extrinsic material weaknesses are required, because the nucleation process of strain localization arises out of steady state conditions. This finding allows us to describe boudinage and folding structures as the same energy attractor of ductile deformation.

  1. Microstructure transformation during plastic deformation of the austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Excellent properties of ADI (Austempered Ductile Iron are widely praised by the world technical literature. These properties depend onthe cast iron microstructure formed during the heat treatment process of a specific type. The matrix of ADI is a mixture of lamellar ferrite and high-carbon austenite. It seems, however, that it is the austenite that is responsible for the high strength and ductility of this material, although investigations and analyses have proved that it is not homogeneous. Various types of austenite found in the ADI matrix include unreacted austenite, stable austenite, and metastable austenite which will be transferred into martensite during machining of castings.In this study an attempt has been made to determine the fraction of metastable austenite and to evaluate its effect on ADI properties.The heat treatment enabled manufacturing ADI characterised by the following properties: T.S.>1000MPa, El.>10%, Y.S.>600MPa. As anext step, the controlled process of plastic deformation of the samples was carried out. Applying the new method it has been established that due to 15% cold work, the structure of the examined ADI contains 9% of martensite; this volume fraction goes up to 17% after 25% cold work. The results of the investigations were cofirmed by X-ray diffraction pattern analysis and magnetic measurements.Consequently, it has been proved that ADI characterised by properties satisfying the criteria of an international standard developed for this particular material contains a large amount of metastable austenite subject to the TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity effect.

  2. Methodology of Fault Diagnosis in Ductile Iron Melting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perzyk M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Statistical Process Control (SPC based on the Shewhart’s type control charts, is widely used in contemporary manufacturing industry, including many foundries. The main steps include process monitoring, detection the out-of-control signals, identification and removal of their causes. Finding the root causes of the process faults is often a difficult task and can be supported by various tools, including data-driven mathematical models. In the present paper a novel approach to statistical control of ductile iron melting process is proposed. It is aimed at development of methodologies suitable for effective finding the causes of the out-of-control signals in the process outputs, defined as ultimate tensile strength (Rm and elongation (A5, based mainly on chemical composition of the alloy. The methodologies are tested and presented using several real foundry data sets. First, correlations between standard abnormal output patterns (i.e. out-of-control signals and corresponding inputs patterns are found, basing on the detection of similar patterns and similar shapes of the run charts of the chemical elements contents. It was found that in a significant number of cases there was no clear indication of the correlation, which can be attributed either to the complex, simultaneous action of several chemical elements or to the causes related to other process variables, including melting, inoculation, spheroidization and pouring parameters as well as the human errors. A conception of the methodology based on simulation of the process using advanced input - output regression modelling is presented. The preliminary tests have showed that it can be a useful tool in the process control and is worth further development. The results obtained in the present study may not only be applied to the ductile iron process but they can be also utilized in statistical quality control of a wide range of different discrete processes.

  3. Ductile damage of porous materials with two populations of voids; Endommagement ductile de materiaux poreux contenant deux populations de cavites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, P.G.; Monerie, Y. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Vincent, P.G.; Suquet, P. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et d' Acoustique, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2008-01-15

    This study is devoted to the modelling of ductile damage in uranium dioxide. This polycrystalline material contains two populations of voids of well separated size. The problem addressed here is the prediction of the effective flow surface of a Gurson material containing randomly oriented oblate voids. The case of spherical voids is considered first and the variational approach of Gurson is generalized by adding a compressible component to his original velocity field. The case of aligned oblate voids is then considered and a suitable generalization of a velocity field due to Gologanu (et al.) is proposed. The extension to randomly oriented voids is achieved by averaging over all orientations. In each case, rigorous upper bounds and approximate estimates are derived and compared (in the case of spherical voids) with Finite Element simulations. (authors)

  4. Hot ductility behavior of Incoloy 901 superalloy in the cast and wrought conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, Fatemeh Mohammadi; Morakabati, Maryam; Mahdavi, Rashid [AMR of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Metallic Material Dept.

    2014-04-15

    Hot ductility was investigated in Incoloy 901 using hot tensile testing over a temperature range of 900 to 1200 C and at strain rates of 0.01 to 1 s{sup -1}, in the cast and wrought conditions. Maximum ductility was detected in the cast and wrought conditions at temperature ranges of 1000 to 1050 C and 1000 to 1100 C, respectively. More voids were seen at the fracture surface of the wrought specimens compared to the cast ones. At 950 C, the formation of large and non-homogeneous voids at the fracture surface, as well as the appearance of transgranular and intergranular cracks in the wrought specimen, support moderate ductility of the alloy. Microstructural analysis does not support the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization in the cast specimens. In contrast, dynamic recrystallization in the wrought specimens at the region of maximum hot ductility promoted diffusion, leading to ductile fracture. At temperatures higher than the maximum ductility range, the formation of intergranular cracks resulted in a remarkable decline in ductility. (orig.)

  5. Ductility demands on buckling-restrained braced frames under earthquake loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Larry A. Fahnestock; Richard Sause; James M. Ricles; Le-Wu Lu

    2003-01-01

    Accurate estimates of ductility demands on buckling-restrained braced frames (BRBFs) are crucial to performance-based design of BRBFs. An analytical study on the seismic behavior of BRBFs has been conducted at the ATLSS Center, Lehigh University to prepare for an upcoming experimental program. The analysis program DRAIN-2DX was used to model a one-bay, four-story prototype BRBF including material and geometric nonlinearities. The bucklingrestrained brace (BRB) model incorporates both isotropic and kinematic hardening. Nonlinear static pushover and timehistory analyses were performed on the prototype BRBF. Performance objectives for the BRBs were defined and uscd to evaluate thc time-history analysis results. Particular emphasis was placed on global ductility demands and ductility demands oa the BRBs. These demands were compared with anticipated ductility capacities. The analysis results, along with results from similar previous studics, are used to evaluate the BRBF design provisions that have been recommended for codification in the United States. Thc results show that BRB maximum ductility demands can be as high as 20 to 25. These demands significantly exceed those anticipated by the BRBF recommended provisions. Results from the static pushover and timehistory analyses are used to demonstrate why the ductility demands exceed those anticipated by the recommended provisions.The BRB qualification testing protocol contained in the BRBF recommended provisions is shown to be inadequate because it requires only a maximum ductility demand of at most 7.5. Modifications to the testing protocol are recommended.

  6. Ductility demands on buckling-restrained braced frames under earthquake loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnestock, Larry A.; Sause, Richard; Ricles, James M.; Lu, Le-Wu

    2003-12-01

    Accurate estimates of ductility demands on buckling-restrained braced frames (BRBFs) are crucial to performance-based design of BRBFs. An analytical study on the seismic behavior of BRBFs has been conducted at the ATLSS Center, Lehigh University to prepare for an upcoming experimental program. The analysis program DRAIN-2DX was used to model a one-bay, four-story prototype BRBF including material and geometric nonlinearities. The buckling-restrained brace (BRB) model incorporates both isotropic and kinematic hardening. Nonlinear static pushover and time-history analyses were performed on the prototype BRBF. Performance objectives for the BRBs were defined and used to evaluate the time-history analysis results. Particular emphasis was placed on global ductility demands and ductility demands on the BRBs. These demands were compared with anticipated ductility capacities. The analysis results, along with results from similar previous studies, are used to evaluate the BRBF design provisions that have been recommended for codification in the United States. The results show that BRB maximum ductility demands can be as high as 20 to 25. These demands significantly exceed those anticipated by the BRBF recommended provisions. Results from the static pushover and time-history analyses are used to demonstrate why the ductility demands exceed those anticipated by the recommended provisions. The BRB qualification testing protocol contained in the BRBF recommended provisions is shown to be inadequate because it requires only a maximum ductility demand of at most 7.5. Modifications to the testing protocol are recommended.

  7. Influence of austempering heat treatment on mechanical and corrosion properties of ductile iron samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Janjić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of metals are closely related to the microstructure characteristics of the material. The paper compares the results of these two sets of properties after investigating samples of base ductile iron and heat-treated samples of the base austempered ductile iron (ADI. The basic material is perlite ferritic iron alloyed with copper and nickel. To test the corrosion rate of the base material (ductile iron and the heattreated samples (ADI, electrochemical techniques of potentiostatic polarization were used (the technique of Tafel curves extrapolation and the potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  8. Evaluation of producing technique factors affecting the matrix microstructure of as-cast ductile iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bockus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to investigate some important parameters related to ductile iron matrix microstructure. Ductile iron round bars of various diameters in order to achieve various cooling rates were obtained in different conditions. None heat treatment was used to obtain different pearlite contents in the microstructures. The correlation between kind of inoculants, specimens size, carbon equivalent, and matrix microstructure was investigated. The results demonstrated that the slow cooling rate, inoculants with rare earth elements, and relatively little residual magnesium content decreased the pearlite content. This study is of great importance for the development of new economical methods for production of ductile iron castings.

  9. Influence of irradiation on the ductile fracture of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haušild, Petr; Kytka, Miloš; Karlík, Miroslav; Pešek, Pavel

    2005-05-01

    The mechanical properties of 15Ch2MFA steel were characterised by tensile and instrumented Charpy tests. The fracture surfaces of Charpy specimens broken in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature range contain a certain proportion of ductile fracture correlated to fracture energy. Measured ductile crack lengths show the same dependence on fracture deflection and/or fracture energy for irradiated and non-irradiated specimens. The decrease of upper shelf energy with increasing neutron fluence could be explained by an increasing amount of shear fracture.

  10. Comparison of ductile-to-brittle transition curve fitting approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, L.W. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), Beijing 100191 (China)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Wu, S.J., E-mail: wusj@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (BUAA), Beijing 100191 (China); Flewitt, P.E.J. [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics, HH Wills Laboratory, University of Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) curve fitting approaches are compared over the transition temperature range for reactor pressure vessel steels with different kinds of data, including Charpy-V notch impact energy data and fracture toughness data. Three DBT curve fitting methods have been frequently used in the past, including the Burr S-Weibull and tanh distributions. In general there is greater scatter associated with test data obtained within the transition region. Therefore these methods give results with different accuracies, especially when fitting to small quantities of data. The comparison shows that the Burr distribution and tanh distribution can almost equally fit well distributed and large data sets extending across the test temperature range to include the upper and lower shelves. The S-Weibull distribution fit is poor for the lower shelf of the DBT curve. Overall for both large and small quantities of measured data the Burr distribution provides the best description. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Burr distribution offers a better fit than that of a S-Weibull and tanh fit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Burr and tanh methods show similar fitting ability for a large data set. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Burr method can fit sparse data well distributed across the test temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S-Weibull method cannot fit the lower shelf well and show poor fitting quality.

  11. Surface Graphite Degeneration in Ductile Iron Castings for Resin Molds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iulian Riposan; Mihai Chisamera; Stelian Stan; Torbjorn Skaland

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the factors influencing the formation of degenerated graph-ite layers on the surfaces of ductile iron castings for chemical rosins-acid molding and coro-making systems and how to reduce this defect. In the rosin mold technique the sulphur in the P-toluol sulphonic acid (PTSA),usually used as the hardener, has been identified as one factor causing graphite degeneration at the metal-mold interface. Less than 0.15% S in the mold (or even less than 0.07% S) can reduce the surface layer depth. Oxygen may also have an effect, especially for sulphur containing systems with turbulent flows in the mold, water-bearing no-bake binder systems, Mg-Silica reactions, or dross formation conditions. Despite the lower level of nitrogen in the iron melt after magnesium treatment (less than 90 ppm), nitrogen bearing res-ins have a profound effect on the frequency and severity of surface pinholes, but a limited influence on sur-face graphite degeneration.

  12. Quantifying Damage Accumulation During Ductile Plastic Deformation Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, Robert M. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rollett, Anthony D. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Under this grant, we have developed and demonstrated the ability of near-field High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (nf-HEDM) to map crystal orientation fields over three dimensions in deformed polycrystalline materials. Experimental work was performed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at beamline 1-ID. Applications of this new capability to ductile deformation of copper and zirconium samples were demonstrated as was the comparison of the experimental observations to computational plasticity models using a fast Fourier transform based algorithm that is able to handle the large experimental data sets. No such spatially resolved, direct comparison between measured and computed microstructure evolutions had previously been possible. The impact of this work is reflected in numerous publications and presentations as well as in the investments by DOE and DOD laboratories of millions of dollars in applying the technique, developing sophisticated new hardware that allows the technique to be applied to a wide variety of materials and materials problems, and in the use of the technique by other researchers. In essence, the grant facilitated the development of a new form of three dimensional microscopy and its application to technologically critical states of polycrystalline materials that are used throughout the U.S. and world economies. On-going collaborative work is further optimizing experimental and computational facilities at the APS and is pursuing expanded facilities.

  13. Fracture toughness in Mode I (GIC) for ductile adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, P.; Carbas, RJC; Campilho, RDSG; Abenojar, J.; Martínez, MA; Silva LFM, da

    2017-05-01

    Works carried out in this publication belong to a project that seeks the replacement of welded joints by adhesive joints at stress concentration nodes in bus structures. Fracture toughness in Mode I (GIC) has been measured for two different ductile adhesives, SikaTack Drive and SikaForce 7720. SikaTack Drive is a single-component polyurethane adhesive with high viscoelasticity (more than 100%), whose main use is the car-glass joining and SikaForce 7720 is double-component structural polyurethane adhesive. Experimental works have been carried out from the test called Double Cantilever Beam (DCB), using two steel beams as adherents and an adhesive thickness according to the problem posed in the Project, of 2 and 3 mm for SikaForce 7720 and SikaTack Drive, respectively. Three different methods have been used for measuring the fracture toughness in mode I (GIC) from the values obtained in the experimental DCB procedure for each adhesive: Corrected Beam Theory (CBT), Compliance Calibration Method (CCM) and Compliance Based Beam Method (CBBM). Four DCB specimens have been tested for each adhesive. Dispersion of each GIC calculation method for each adhesive has been studied. Likewise variations between the three different methods have been also studied for each adhesive.

  14. Mechanisms for Ductile Rupture - FY16 ESC Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, Brad L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carroll, Jay D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Noell, Phillip [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bufford, Daniel Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clark, Blythe G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Ductile rupture in metals is generally a multi-step process of void nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Particle decohesion and particle fracture are generally invoked as the primary microstructural mechanisms for room-temperature void nucleation. However, because high-purity materials also fail by void nucleation and coalescence, other microstructural features must also act as sites for void nucleation. Early studies of void initiation in high-purity materials, which included post-mortem fracture surface characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-voltage electron microscopy (HVEM) and in-situ HVEM observations of fracture, established the presence of dislocation cell walls as void initiation sites in high-purity materials. Direct experimental evidence for this contention was obtained during in-situ HVEM tensile tests of Be single crystals. Voids between 0.2 and 1 μm long appeared suddenly along dislocation cell walls during tensile straining. However, subsequent attempts to replicate these results in other materials, particularly α -Fe single crystals, were unsuccessful because of the small size of the dislocation cells, and these remain the only published in-situ HVEM observations of void nucleation at dislocation cell walls in the absence of a growing macrocrack. Despite this challenge, other approaches to studying void nucleation in high-purity metals also indicate that dislocation cell walls are nucleation sites for voids.

  15. Fatigue properties of ductile cast iron containing chunky graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro, P., E-mail: ferro@gest.unipd.it [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella S. Nicola 3, I-36100 Vicenza (Italy); Lazzarin, P.; Berto, F. [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella S. Nicola 3, I-36100 Vicenza (Italy)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental determination of high cycle fatigue properties of EN-GJS-400. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation of the influence of chunky graphite morphology on fatigue life. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metallurgical analysis and microstructural parameters determination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nodule counting and nodularity rating. - Abstract: This work deals with experimental determination of high cycle fatigue properties of EN-GJS-400 ductile cast iron containing chunky graphite. Constant amplitude axial tests were performed at room temperature under a nominal load ratio R = 0. In order to evaluate the influence of chunky graphite morphology on fatigue life, fatigue tests were carried out also on a second set of specimens without this microstructural defect. All samples were taken from the core of a large casting component. Metallurgical analyses were performed on all the samples and some important microstructural parameters (nodule count and nodularity rating, among others) were measured and compared. It was found that a mean content of 40% of chunky graphite in the microstructure (with respect to total graphite content) does not influence significantly the fatigue strength properties of the analysed cast iron. Such result was attributed to the presence of microporosity detected on the surface fracture of the specimens by means of electron scanning microscope.

  16. Effects of microscale inertia on dynamic ductile crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, N.; Mercier, S.; Molinari, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of microscale inertia in dynamic ductile crack growth. A constitutive model for porous solids that accounts for dynamic effects due to void growth is proposed. The model has been implemented in a finite element code and simulations of crack growth in a notched bar and in an edge cracked specimen have been performed. Results are compared to predictions obtained via the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model where micro-inertia effects are not accounted for. It is found that microscale inertia has a significant influence on the crack growth. In particular, it is shown that micro-inertia plays an important role during the strain localisation process by impeding void growth. Therefore, the resulting damage accumulation occurs in a more progressive manner. For this reason, simulations based on the proposed modelling exhibit much less mesh sensitivity than those based on the viscoplastic GTN model. Microscale inertia is also found to lead to lower crack speeds. Effects of micro-inertia on fracture toughness are evaluated.

  17. Estimation of ductile fracture behavior incorporating material anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Shin Beom; Lee, Dock Jin; Jeong, Jae Uk [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon Suk [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Nuclear Material Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Since standardized fracture test specimens cannot be easily extracted from in-service components, several alternative fracture toughness test methods have been proposed to characterize the deformation and fracture resistance of materials. One of the more promising alternatives is the local approach employing the SP(Small Punch) testing technique. However, this process has several limitations such as a lack of anisotropic yield potential and tediousness in the damage parameter calibration process. The present paper investigates estimation of ductile fracture resistance(J-R) curve by FE(Finite Element) analyses using an anisotropic damage model and enhanced calibration procedure. In this context, specific tensile tests to quantify plastic strain ratios were carried out and SP test data were obtained from the previous research. Also, damage parameters constituting the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model in conjunction with Hill;s 48 yield criterion were calibrated for a typical nuclear reactor material through a genetic algorithm. Finally, the J-R curve of a standard compact tension specimen was predicted by further detailed FE analyses employing the calibrated damage parameters. It showed a lower fracture resistance of the specimen material than that based on the isotropic yield criterion. Therefore, a more realistic J-R curve of a reactor material can be obtained effectively from the proposed methodology by taking into account a reduced load-carrying capacity due to anisotropy.

  18. Novel compaction resistant and ductile nanocomposite nanofibrous microfiltration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaeigohar, Seyed Shahin; Elbahri, Mady

    2012-04-15

    Despite promising filtration abilities, low mechanical properties of extraordinary porous electrospun nanofibrous membranes could be a major challenge in their industrial development. In addition, such kind of membranes are usually hydrophobic and non-wettable. To reinforce an electrospun nanofibrous membrane made of polyethersulfone (PES) mechanically and chemically (to improve wettability), zirconia nanoparticles as a novel nanofiller in membrane technology were added to the nanofibers. The compressive and tensile results obtained through nanoindentation and tensile tests, respectively, implied an optimum mechanical properties after incorporation of zirconia nanoparticles. Especially compaction resistance of the electrospun nanofibrous membranes improved significantly as long as no agglomeration of the nanoparticles occurred and the electrospun nanocomposite membranes showed a higher tensile properties without any brittleness i.e. a high ductility. Noteworthy, for the first time the compaction level was quantified through a nanoindentation test. In addition to obtaining a desired mechanical performance, the hydrophobicity declined. Combination of promising properties of optimum mechanical and surface chemical properties led to a considerably high water permeability also retention efficiency of the nanocomposite PES nanofibrous membranes. Such finding implies a longer life span and lower energy consumption for a water filtration process.

  19. Integrated modeling and heat treatment simulation of austempered ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, E.; Hurevich, V.; Schäfer, W.

    2012-07-01

    The integrated modeling and simulation of the casting and heat treatment processes for producing austempered ductile iron (ADI) castings is presented. The focus is on describing different models to simulate the austenitization, quenching and austempering steps during ADI heat treatment. The starting point for the heat treatment simulation is the simulated microstructure after solidification and cooling. The austenitization model considers the transformation of the initial ferrite-pearlite matrix into austenite as well as the dissolution of graphite in austenite to attain a uniform carbon distribution. The quenching model is based on measured CCT diagrams. Measurements have been carried out to obtain these diagrams for different alloys with varying Cu, Ni and Mo contents. The austempering model includes nucleation and growth kinetics of the ADI matrix. The model of ADI nucleation is based on experimental measurements made for varied Cu, Ni, Mo contents and austempering temperatures. The ADI kinetic model uses a diffusion controlled approach to model the growth. The models have been integrated in a tool for casting process simulation. Results are shown for the optimization of the heat treatment process of a planetary carrier casting.

  20. Fundamental Research on Hobbing of Austempered Ductile Iron Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Hironori; Tsuda, Yoshihiro; Ono, Hajime

    In this study, the influence of graphite particles (number of graphite particles) in austempered ductile iron (ADI) on tool wear and finished surface roughness was investigated, using TiN and (Al, Ti)N coated high-speed steel cutting tools in hobbing. The experiments were performed using a fly tool of the same geometry as that of one blade of a hob, at the cutting speed of 47m/min in dry cutting. As a consequence, the following points were clarified: (1) ADI having an average number of 284 graphite particles per 1mm2 (the average diameter of 28.0µm) showed a good machinability without causing tool failure. The tool life was improved when using the (Al, Ti)N coated tool, and the finished surface roughness Ry was 3.5µm at the end of cutting. (2) It was suggested that the adhesion of deposited metal on the rake face influences the tool failure which occurred when cutting ADI. (3) The interrelation between the center wear and the surface roughness was recognized.

  1. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druschitz, Alan [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Aristizabal, Ricardo [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Druschitz, Edward [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool that can be used to identify the phases present and to measure the spacing of the atomic planes in a material. Thus, the residual stresses can be determined within a component and/or the phases present. New intercritically austempered irons rely on the unique properties of the austenite phase present in their microstructures. If these materials are to see widespread use, methods to verify the quality (behavior consistency) of these materials and to provide guidance for further optimization will be needed. Neutron diffraction studies were performed at the second generation neutron residual stress facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a variety of intercritically austempered irons. For similar materials, such as TRIP steels, the strengthening mechanism involves the transformation of metastable austenite to martensite during deformation. For the intercritically austempered ductile irons two different deformation/strengthening mechanisms, phase transformation and slip, dependent upon the iron chemistry, were observed. Lattice strain and phase fraction data as a function of applied stress are presented.

  2. Standard test methods for bend testing of material for ductility

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover bend testing for ductility of materials. Included in the procedures are four conditions of constraint on the bent portion of the specimen; a guided-bend test using a mandrel or plunger of defined dimensions to force the mid-length of the specimen between two supports separated by a defined space; a semi-guided bend test in which the specimen is bent, while in contact with a mandrel, through a specified angle or to a specified inside radius (r) of curvature, measured while under the bending force; a free-bend test in which the ends of the specimen are brought toward each other, but in which no transverse force is applied to the bend itself and there is no contact of the concave inside surface of the bend with other material; a bend and flatten test, in which a transverse force is applied to the bend such that the legs make contact with each other over the length of the specimen. 1.2 After bending, the convex surface of the bend is examined for evidence of a crack or surface irregu...

  3. Ultrahigh strength and ductility of metallic nanolayered composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mara, Nathan Allan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dickerson, Pat [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoagland, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the high strength of nanomaterials has gathered much interest in the materials community. Nanomaterials (polycrystalline and composites) have already been used, largely by the semiconductor community, as critical length scales for chip design have decreased to tens of nanometers. However, to ensure reliability of nanomaterials in almost any application, the mechanisms underlying their structural integrity must be well understood. For these materials to be put into service on a broader scale, not only should their strength be considered, but also ductility, toughness, formability, and fatigue resistance. While some progress has been made into constructing models for the deformation mechanisms governing these behaviors, the body of experimental knowledge is still limited, especially when length scales drop below 10 nanometers. This work produces stress-strain curves for nanolaminate composites with individual layer thickness of 40 nm and 5 run. Nanolaminate composites fabricated via magnetron sputtering comprised of alternating 5 nm thick Cu and Nb multilayers (two relatively soft metals) exhibit strengths on par with hardened tool steel and deformability in compression in excess of 25% [1]. The deformability of nanoscale composites is found to be limited by the onset of geometric instability, rather than due to intrinsic material behavior.

  4. Alternating brittle and ductile response of coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Tanushree; Kulkarni, Yashashree, E-mail: ykulkarni@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Nanotwinned metals have opened exciting avenues for the design of high strength and high ductility materials. In this work, we investigate crack propagation along coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals using molecular dynamics. Our simulations reveal that alternating twin boundaries exhibit intrinsic brittleness and ductility owing to the opposite crystallographic orientations of the adjoining twins. This is a startling consequence of the directional anisotropy of an atomically sharp crack along a twin boundary that favors cleavage in one direction and dislocation emission from the crack tip in the opposite direction. We further find that a blunt crack exhibits ductility in all cases albeit with very distinct deformation mechanisms and yield strength associated with intrinsically brittle and ductile coherent twin boundaries.

  5. Numerical simulations of interfacial debonding in ductile-phase reinforced intermetallic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henshall, G.A.; Zywicz, E.; Strum, M.J.

    1993-08-10

    The fracture toughness of brittle intermetallic compounds can be improved by ductile-phase reinforcements. Effectiveness of the ductile phase in bridging cracks, and therefore increasing, the composite toughness, is known qualitatively to depend upon the extent of debonding, between the two phases. Numerical crack-growth simulations are used here to provide semi-quantitative predictions of the influence of interfacial debonding on the macroscopic stress-displacement behavior and, hence, the fracture toughness of an idealized Pb/glass composite. The interfacial toughness required to cause debonding, characterized by a constant critical energy release rate, is varied parametrically. As expected, higher interfacial toughness results in less interphase debonding, higher composite strength, and greater ductile-phase constraint. Consequently, the increase in ductile-phase triaxiality can potentially accelerate internal void formation and growth or facilitate cleavage fracture, either of which would likely decrease the toughness of the composite.

  6. Application of damage mechanics modeling to strain based design with respect to ductile crack initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Sueyoshi, Hitoshi; Igi, Satoshi [Steel Research Laboratory, JFE Steel Corporation (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    In the oil and gas sector, with the increase in demand, more and more pipelines are now constructed in permafrost and seismic regions. When installed in such harsh environments, pipelines must be resistant to buckling and weld fracture and the strain based design methodology is preferably used. The aim of this paper is to study the critical condition for ductile crack initiation. Both notched round bar and wide plate tests were carried out on X80 and X100 steel pipes and welds; the equivalent plastic strain criterion and Gurson Tvergaard mechanical damage analysis were used. It was found that to determine ductile crack initiation that is not affected by specimen geometry, the critical equivalent plastic strain can be used as the local criterion. In addition, when ductile crack initiation is independent of specimen geometry, the void volume fraction can be used as a criterion. This paper provided useful information on which criterion to use for ductile crack initiation.

  7. Origin of the extra low creep ductility of copper without phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Rolf [Corrosion and Metals Research Inst., Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Rui Wu [Corrosion and Metals Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    Around 1990 it was discovered that pure copper could have extra low creep ductility in the temperature interval 180 to 250 deg C. If 50 ppm phosphorus was added to the material the low creep ductility disappeared. A creep cavitation model is presented that can quantitatively describe the observed creep ductility for copper with and without phosphorus. A new model called the double ledge model has been introduced that explains why the nucleation rate of creep cavities is often proportional to the creep rate. The phosphorus agglomerates at the grain boundaries, locks their sliding and thereby reduces the formation and growth of cavities. This is the main reason why extra low creep ductility does not occur in phosphorus alloyed copper.

  8. Statistical fatigue properties of ductile cast irons; Kyujo kokuen chutetsu no hiro kyodo no tokeiteki seishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, N.; Nishikawa, Y.; Inaba, K. [Gifu University, Gifu (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Fukuyama, K. [Gifu Prefectural Police Headquarters, Gifu (Japan)

    1995-09-15

    Rotating bending fatigue tests of smooth specimens were carried out at room temperature on a pearlitic ductile cast iron (PDI) and austempered ductile cast iron (ADI). No significant difference due to sampling position from cast blocks in both materials was found in fatigue limit and fatigue life distribution. Then, the statistical fatigue properties of ferritic (FDI), ferritic/pearlitic (FPDI), pearlitic and austempered ductile cast irons were investigated. The fatigue life distributions of all ductile irons were well represented by the three parameter Weibull distribution modified by the saturated probability of failure. The shape parameters of FDI, FPDI and PDI were in proportion to {sigma}/{sigma}w independent on micro structure, while the shape parameters of both stress levels in ADI were smaller than unity. The fatigue strength of ADI was highest, but the scatter of fatigue life was largest among the all cast irons. 13 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Cryogenic ultrahigh strain rate deformation induced hybrid nanotwinned microstructure for high strength and high ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Suslov, Sergey; Lin, Dong; Liao, Yiliang; Cheng, Gary J.

    2014-06-01

    Nanocrystalline metallic materials prepared by severe plastic deformation often possess high strength but low ductility due to the low dislocation accumulation capacity of the nanograins. Here, we report a unique process, namely, cryogenic laser shock peening (CLSP), to generate gradient nanotwinned microstructure that leads to high strength while preserving the ductility. It was observed that gradient structure was generated in copper. Near the top surface, nanocrystalline with high dense nanotwins have been observed; with the depth increasing, the fraction of the twin boundaries reduces and more heavily dislocated subgrains are observed. It has been demonstrated that CLSP can significantly improve material strength while preserving the ductility. The mechanism of the formation of gradient microstructure and high dense nanotwins near the surface was discussed. The reason behind the improvement in strength and ductility was investigated.

  10. Tensile Ductility of Nanostructured Bainitic Steels: Influence of Retained Austenite Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Sourmail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High silicon (>1.5% steels with different compositions were isothermally transformed to bainite at 220 and 250 °C to produce what is often referred to as nanostructured bainite. Interrupted tensile tests were carried out and the retained austenite was measured as a function of strain. Results were correlated with tensile ductility. The role of retained austenite stability is remarkably underlined as strongly affecting the propensity to brittle failure, but also the tensile ductility. A simple quantitative relationship is proposed that clearly delimitates the different behaviours (brittle/ductile and correlates well with the measured ductility. Conclusions are proposed as to the role of retained austenite fraction and the existence of a threshold value associated with tensile rupture.

  11. Influence of sulfide inclusion on ductility and fracture behavior of resulfurized HY-80 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, D. K.; Venkatraman, M.; Narendranath, C. S.; Chatterjee, U. K.

    1992-05-01

    The influence of sulfide inclusions on the ductile fracture process of experimental HY-80 steels having graded sulfur levels from 50 to 500 ppm and heat-treated to different strength levels was studied with respect to mechanical properties, namely, tensile ductility and Charpy impact en-ergy. Sulfide inclusions are found to have deleterious effect on both axisymmetric ductility and Charpy impact properties, whereas the plane strain ductility was found to be less sensitive to sulfide inclusions. The effect of interaction between the inclusion and the matrix and the as-sociated stress strain distribution at the void nucleating sites, which control the fracture process by microvoid coalescence, were discussed in the light of various models to suggest a micro-mechanism of fracture. Other toughness parameters obtained from instrumented impact tests were evaluated and discussed as a function of sulfur content.

  12. Ductile cast iron obtaining by Inmold method with use of LOST FOAM process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pacyniak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of manufacturing of ductile cast iron castings by Inmold method with use of LOST FOAM process was presented in this work. The spheroidization was carried out by magnesium master alloy in amounts of 1% casting mass. Nodulizer was located in the reactive chamber in the gating system made of foamed polystyrene. Pretests showed, that there are technical possibilities of manufacturing of casts from ductile cast iron in the LOST FOAM process with use of spheroidization in mould.

  13. Influece of the austempering temperature on the tensile strength of the austempered ductile iron (ADI) samples

    OpenAIRE

    Savićević, S.; Avdušinović, H.; A. Gigović-Gekić; Z. Jurković; Vukčević, M.; M. Janjić

    2017-01-01

    Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) is a class of ductile iron subjected to a two-step heat treatment process – austenitization and austempering. The heat treatment gives to ADI a high value of tensile strength and an especially good strength-to-weight ratio. However, designers in most cases are unfamiliar with this material that can compete favorably with steel and aluminum castings, weldments and forgings. The high tensile strength of ADI is the result of its unique ausferrite microstructure. In...

  14. Effect of alloying elements on austempered ductile iron (ADI) properties and its process: Review

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Sadighzadeh Benam

    2015-01-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) parts have a unique combination of high strength and toughness with excellent design flexibility and low cost. These excellent properties are directly related to its microstructure called "ausferrite" that is the result of austempering heat treatment applied to ductile irons. Alloying elements increase ADI austemperability and change speeds of austempering reactions. Thus, they can affect ADI resultant microstructure and mechanical properties. In this paper, the...

  15. CHOSEN FACTORS INFLUENCING MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Vaško

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with some factors influencing microstructure and mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI. Final structure and properties of ADI are obtained by exactly controlled process of heat treatment of nodular cast iron. The influence of conditions of isothermal heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron, especially different temperature of isothermal transformation of austenite and different holding time at this temperature, is shown in the paper.

  16. New Possibilities of Shaping the Surface Properties in Austempered Ductile Iron Castings

    OpenAIRE

    D. Myszka

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents recent developments concerning the formation of surface layer in austempered ductile iron castings. It was found thatthe traditional methods used to change the properties of the surface layer, i.e. the effect of protective atmosphere during austenitising or shot peening, are not fully satisfactory to meet the demands of commercial applications. Therefore, new ways to shape the surface layer and the surface properties of austempered ductile iron castings are searched for, to...

  17. CHOSEN FACTORS INFLUENCING MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Vaško

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with some factors influencing microstructure and mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Final structure and properties of ADI are obtained by exactly controlled process of heat treatment of nodular cast iron. The influence of conditions of isothermal heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of austempered ductile iron, especially different temperature of isothermal transformation of austenite and different holding time at this temperature, i...

  18. Application of a second-gradient model of ductile fracture on a Dissimilar Metal Weld

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Jun; Lacroix Rémi; Bergheau Jean-Michel; Leblond Jean-Baptiste; Perrin Gilles

    2016-01-01

    A “micromorphic”, second-gradient model applicable to ductile porous materials has been proposed, as an improvement from the fundamental work of Gurson that take into account the physical mechanisms responsible for ductile damage. The model has been applied to the study of fracture of the decarburized layer of a Dissimilar Metal Weld. The model successfully reproduces the crack path experimentally observed in a notched tensile sample extracted from this weld, different from the one predicted ...

  19. Ductile cast iron obtaining by Inmold method with use of LOST FOAM process

    OpenAIRE

    T. Pacyniak; R. Kaczorowski

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of manufacturing of ductile cast iron castings by Inmold method with use of LOST FOAM process was presented in this work. The spheroidization was carried out by magnesium master alloy in amounts of 1% casting mass. Nodulizer was located in the reactive chamber in the gating system made of foamed polystyrene. Pretests showed, that there are technical possibilities of manufacturing of casts from ductile cast iron in the LOST FOAM process with use of spheroidization in mould.

  20. Creep strength and rupture ductility of creep strength enhanced ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushima, Hideaki; Sawada, Kota; Kimura, Kazuhiro [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Creep strength and rupture ductility of Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic (CSEF) steels were investigated from a viewpoint of stress dependence in comparison with conventional low alloy ferritic creep resistant steels. Inflection of stress vs. time to rupture curve was observed at 50% of 0.2% offset yield stress for both CSEF and conventional ferritic steels. Creep rupture ductility tends to decrease with increase in creep exposure time, however, those of conventional low alloy steels indicate increase in the long-term. Creep rupture ductility of the ASME Grades 92 and 122 steels indicates drastic decrease with decrease in stress at 50% of 0.2% offset yield stress. Stress dependence of creep rupture ductility of the ASME Grades 92 and 122 steels is well described by stress ratio to 0.2% offset yield stress, regardless of temperature. Drop of creep rupture ductility is caused by inhomogeneous recovery at the vicinity of prior austenite grain boundary, and remarkable drop of creep rupture ductility of CSEF steels should be derived from those stabilized microstructure. (orig.)

  1. Pin-On-Disc Characterization of Brass/Ferritic and Pearlitic Ductile Iron Rubbing Pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Melik

    2011-04-01

    Wear behaviour of special brass produced through two different methods (centrifugal and sand casting) was investigated. The wear tests were carried out at sliding velocities of 0.2 ms-1, 0.3 ms-1, 0.4 ms-1 and 0.5 ms-1 and under 10 N, 20 N, and 40 N variable loads. The sliding distance was 600 m for all the tests. A pin-on-disc device with round specimen inserts was used to conduct friction and wear tests in which the friction coefficient, the contact temperature and the linear wear of the tribo-pairs were continuously recorded against sliding distance. Two different materials were used as the counterparts, namely ferritic ductile iron equivalent to GGG40 and pearlitic ductile iron equivalent to GGG60. The microstructures and wear scars of the brass specimens were examined by optical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray microanalyses by EDAX. A correlation between hardness and wear volume rate was established for the investigated centrifugally cast and sand cast brass specimens. The volume rate of specimens produced by sand casting method was generally found to be higher than those of centrifugally cast specimens. Ferritic ductile counterpart led to higher wear volume rate than pearlitic ductile counterpart for the both specimens. Severe abrasive wear scars were observed for the sand cast specimens/ferritic ductile iron pair. However, severe adhesive wear took place for the centrifugally cast specimen/pearlitic ductile iron pair.

  2. The effect of alloy elements on the microstructure and properties of austempered ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, B.Y.; Chen, E.T.; Lei, T.S. [National Taiwan Institute of Technology, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-05-01

    Ductile cast iron has already demonstrated excellent mechanical properties. If given proper austempering, it can exhibit even more outstanding characteristics. The process of austempering for ductile cast iron is similar to steel, and requires an adequate completely, and then rapidly quenching the austenitizing temperature allowing the matrix of ductile iron to be austenitized completely, and then rapidly quenching the austenitized ductile iron down to 300 C--400 C. Caution is required to prevent austenite from transforming into proeutectoid ferrite or pearlite. Finally, the ductile iron must be kept in an isothermal condition for a proper length of time. Many kinds of experimental techniques such as quantitative metallography, magnetic change, dilatometry, X-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity change etc., may be used to measure the phase transformation during the austempering of ductile irons. However, the method of measuring the change of electrical resistivity, not only provides continuous and complete data, but also the time to start and to finish for both stages of the reaction can be significantly determined. In this paper, the effect of alloy elements on the microstructure and property of ADI was investigated. First, the specimens containing Mn, Cu, Ni and Mo were made separately, then a PC-controlled vacuum heat treating system was used for the heat treatments.

  3. Constant-ductility strength demand spectra for seismic design of structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhai Changhai; Xie Lili

    2005-01-01

    In displacement-based seismic design, constant-ductility strength demand spectra (CDSDS) are very useful for preliminary design of new structures where the global displacement ductility capacity is known. The CDSDS can provide the required inelastic lateral strength of new structures from the required elastic lateral strength. Based on a statistical study of nonlinear time-history for an SDOF system, the mean CDSDS corresponding to four site conditions are presented and approximate expressions of the inelastic spectra are proposed, which are functions of the structural period and ductility level.The effects of site conditions, structural period, level of ductility, damping and post-yield stiffness of structures on CDSDS are also investigated. It is concluded that site conditions, ductility level and structural period have important effects on the CDSDS and damping, post-yield stiffness effects are rather complex and of minor importance. The damping, post-yield stiffness effects depend on both the level of ductility and the natural period of structures.

  4. Hot ductility behavior of near-alpha titanium alloy IMI834

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghavam, Mohammad Hadi; Morakabati, Maryam; Abbasi, Seyed Mahdi; Badri, Hassan [Metallic Materials Research Center (MMRC-MA), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The hot ductility of rolled IMI834 titanium alloy (Ti-5.3Al-2.9Sn-3.0Zr-0.65Nb-0.5Mo-0.2Si in wt%) has been studied by conducting tensile tests with a strain rate of 0.1 s{sup -1} and temperature range of 750-1100 C to obtain the optimum hot working conditions. The alloy showed minimum hot ductility in the lower alpha-beta region in the temperature range 750-950 C. Further microstructural characterizations showed improvement in hot ductility by increasing temperature, which was attributed to reduction of volume fraction of high strength alpha phase. The best hot ductility was observed at 1000 C, i.e. in the upper alpha-beta region. The better hot ductility at higher temperature could be related to the increase in the volume fraction of beta phase and the occurrence of dynamic restoration phenomena. The second decline in hot ductility appeared at higher temperatures in the beta region and was attributed to the high stacking fault energy and self-diffusion of beta phase leading to limitation of dynamic recrystallization.

  5. A mechanism-based approach to modeling ductile fracture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Hammi, Youssef; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Klein, Patrick A.; Foulk, James W., III; McFadden, Sam X.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile fracture in metals has been observed to result from the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids. The evolution of this damage is inherently history dependent, affected by how time-varying stresses drive the formation of defect structures in the material. At some critically damaged state, the softening response of the material leads to strain localization across a surface that, under continued loading, becomes the faces of a crack in the material. Modeling localization of strain requires introduction of a length scale to make the energy dissipated in the localized zone well-defined. In this work, a cohesive zone approach is used to describe the post-bifurcation evolution of material within the localized zone. The relations are developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework that incorporates temperature and rate-dependent evolution relationships motivated by dislocation mechanics. As such, we do not prescribe the evolution of tractions with opening displacements across the localized zone a priori. The evolution of tractions is itself an outcome of the solution of particular, initial boundary value problems. The stress and internal state of the material at the point of bifurcation provides the initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of the cohesive zone. The models we develop are motivated by in-situ scanning electron microscopy of three-point bending experiments using 6061-T6 aluminum and 304L stainless steel, The in situ observations of the initiation and evolution of fracture zones reveal the scale over which the failure mechanisms act. In addition, these observations are essential for motivating the micromechanically-based models of the decohesion process that incorporate the effects of loading mode mixity, temperature, and loading rate. The response of these new cohesive zone relations is demonstrated by modeling the three-point bending configuration used for the experiments. In addition, we survey other methods with the potential

  6. Kinetic Study of the Austempering Reactions in Ductile Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M. J.; Cisneros, M. M.; Almanza, E.; Haro, S.

    2012-11-01

    Kinetics of the reaction that occur during the austempering heat treatment in unalloyed and alloyed ductile irons with 1Cu-0.25Mo, 1Ni-0.25Mo, and 0.7Cu-1Ni-0.25Mo, was studied. The austenitization and austempering cycles were achieved by isothermal dilatometry in cylindrical samples of 2 mm in diameter and 12 mm in length. The specimens were austenitized at 870 °C for 120 min, followed by isothermal holding for 300 min at temperatures between 270 and 420 °C. Kinetic parameters such as the order of reaction " n" and the rate of reaction " k" were calculated using the Johnson-Mehl equation while the empirical activation energy was calculated by means of the Arrhenius equation. It was found that the values of " k" decreased with the addition of Cu, Ni, and Mo as well as with the reduction of the isothermal temperature. The activation energy changes with the austempering temperature, in the range 30,348-58,250 J/mol when the heat treatment was carried out between 370 and 420 °C and 10,336-26,683 J/mol when the temperature varied from 270 to 350 °C. The microstructures in samples austempered at 370 and 315 °C were observed by transmission electron microscopy. No carbides precipitation was observed on samples heat treated at 370 °C for less than 120 min, while at 315 °C carbides of hexagonal structure ɛ(Fe2.4C) were found from the beginning of the transformation. The smallest value of activation energy and a slower kinetic transformation seem to be related with the presence of a carbide phase. Additionally, the time results obtained for transformation fractions of 0.05 and 0.95 by the dilatometry analysis were used to build the temperature-time-transformation diagrams for the irons.

  7. Design of engineered cementitious composites for ductile seismic resistant elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Tetsushi

    This dissertation focuses on designing Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC) to achieve high performance seismic resistant elements. To attain this goal, three major tasks have been accomplished. Task 1 aims at achieving new ECCs involving low cost fiber, which often involve fiber rupture in crack bridging, thus named as "Fiber Rupture Type ECC". Achieving the new ECC requires a new practical and comprehensive composite design theory. For this theory, single fiber behavior was first investigated. Specifically, fiber rupture in composite and chemical bond in fiber/matrix interface were experimentally examined and mathematically modeled. Then this model for single fiber behavior was implemented into a proposed bridging law, a theoretical model for relationship between fiber bridging stress of composite and Crack Opening Displacement (COD). This new bridging law was finally employed to establish a new composite design theory. Task 2 was initiated to facilitate structural interpretation of ECC's material behavior investigated in Task 1. For this purpose, uniaxial tensile behavior, one of the most important ECC's properties, was theoretically characterized with stress-strain relation from micromechanics view point. As a result, a theory is proposed to express ECC's tensile stress-strain relation in terms of micromechanics parameters of composites, such as bond strengths. Task 3 primarily demonstrates an integrated design scheme for ductile seismic elements that covers from micromechanics in single fiber level to structural design tool, such as with non-linear FEM analysis. The significance of this design scheme is that the influences of ECC's microstructure on element's structural performance is quantitatively captured. This means that a powerful tool is obtained for tailoring constitutive micromechanics parameters in order to maximize structural performance of elements. While the tool is still preliminary, completing this tool in future studies will enable one to

  8. Comparison of High-Temperature Properties and Thermal Shock Resistance of Austempered Ductile Irons (ADI) with Those of Pearlitic Ductile Cast Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajabshiri, Mehrdad; Sharafi, Shahriar; Moeini, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature strength and thermal shock resistance of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in high temperatures because of instability of ausferrite phase has been less interest. The aim of this study is to investigate the tensile properties of ADI and pearlitic ductile cast iron by using the short-time tensile test in high temperatures. Tensile test was conducted in temperatures of 298 K, 673 K, 873 K, and 1073 K (25 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C, and 800 °C). Thermal shock test also was conducted by using the molten lead bath at 1273 K (1000 °C). In this experiment, samples of pearlitic ductile cast iron and ADI were divided in two groups; that after immersing in the molten lead bath for 25 seconds, one group was cooled in the air and other one was quenched in the water. Results showed that strength and thermal shock resistance of ADI samples are higher than those of the pearlitic ductile cast iron.

  9. Hot Ductility Characterization of Sanicro-28 Super-Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, A.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Abedi, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    The hot ductility behavior of a super-austenitic stainless steel has been studied using tensile testing method in the temperature range from 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) under the strain rates of 0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 s-1. The hot compression tests were also performed at the same deformation condition to identify the activated restoration mechanisms. At lower temperatures [ i.e., 1073 K and 1173 K (800 °C and 900 °C)], the serration of initial grain boundaries confirms the occurrence of dynamic recovery as the predominant restoration process. However, in the course of applied deformation, the initial microstructure is recrystallized at higher temperatures [ i.e., 1273 K and 1373 K (1000 °C and 1100 °C)]. In this respect, annealing the twin boundaries could well stimulate the recrystallization kinetic through initiation new annealing twins on prior annealing twin boundaries. The hot tensile results show that there is a general trend of increasing ductility by temperature. However, two regions of ductility drop are recognized at 1273 K and 1373 K (1000°C)/0.1s-1 and (1100°C)/0.01s-1. The ductility variations at different conditions of temperature and strain rate are discussed in terms of simultaneous activation of grain boundary sliding and restoration processes. The observed ductility troughs are attributed to the occurrence of grain boundary sliding and the resulting R-type and W-type cracks. The occurrence of dynamic recrystallization is also considered as the main factor increasing the ductility at higher temperatures. The enhanced ductility is primarily originated from the post-uniform elongation behavior, which is directly associated with the strain rate sensitivity of the experimental material.

  10. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of a Wear-Resistant Alloyed Ductile Iron Austempered at Various Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Junjun; Chen, Liqing

    2015-08-01

    To further improve the mechanical performance of a new type of alloyed bainitic wear-resistant ductile iron, the effects of the various austempering temperatures have been investigated on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of alloyed ductile iron Fe-3.50C-1.95Si-3.58Ni-0.71Cu-0.92Mo-0.65Cr-0.36Mn (in weight percent). This alloyed ductile iron were firstly austenitized at 1123 K (850 °C) for 1 hour and then austempered in a salt bath at 548 K, 573 K, and 598 K (275 °C, 300 °C, and 325 °C) for 2 hours according to time-temperature-transformation diagram calculated by JMatPro software. The microstructures of austempered wear-resistant ductile irons consist of matrix of dark needle-like ferrite plus bright etching austenite and some amount of martensite and some dispersed graphite nodules. With increasing the austempering temperature, the amount of ferrite decreases in austempered ductile iron, while the amount of austenite and carbon content of austenite increases. There is a gradual decrease in hardness and increase in compressive strength with increasing austempering temperature. The increased austenite content and coarsened austenite and ferrite can lead to a hardness decrease as austempering temperature is increased. The increased compressive strength can be attributed to a decreased amount of martensitic transformation. The alloyed ductile iron behaves rather well wear resistance when the austempering is carried out at 598 K (325 °C) for 2 hours. Under the condition of wear test by dry sand/rubber wheel, the wear mechanisms of austempered ductile irons are both micro-cutting and plastic deformation.

  11. Effects of Copper and Austempering on Corrosion Behavior of Ductile Iron in 3.5 Pct Sodium Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Kuan-Ting

    2013-10-01

    Although alloying and heat treatments are common industrial practices to obtain ductile irons with desired mechanical properties, related information on how the two practices affect corrosion behavior is scarce. In this study, two ductile irons—with and without 1 wt pct copper addition—were austempered to obtain austempered ductile irons (ADIs). Polarization tests and salt spray tests were conducted to explore how both copper-alloying and austempering heat treatments influenced the corrosion behavior of ductile irons. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of 1 wt pct copper-alloyed ductile iron was better than that of the unalloyed one, while ADI had improved corrosion resistance compared with the as-cast. In particular, the ductile iron combined with the copper-alloying and austempering treatments increased the corrosion inhibition efficiency up to 84 pct as tested in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution.

  12. Evaluation of Zinc-Coated Ductile Iron Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipilov, Sergei A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Unocic, Kinga A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) received $1m in funding from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in order to evaluate the performance of zinc-coated ductile iron pipe (DIP) in highly- and severely-corrosive soils. The project started in May 2016 and a final report will be issued March 31, 2017. The project is being led by the Corrosion Science and Technology Group in the Materials Science and Technology Division at ORNL. This interim report is based on the work performed by an ORNL multidisciplinary team in the last two months. The project has been broken down into four tasks. The first task is to characterize commercially available DIP. Specimens from the three major U.S. DIP manufacturers were purchased for this study via third party vendors and are being characterized. The second task is to evaluate available data on DIP corrosion in soils. The largest data set was collected by the National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) from 1910-1952 and included 95 different kinds of soil at 128 sites across the country. Because of the large amount of data and limited agreement on what defines “corrosive” soil, staff from the Computational Sciences and Engineering Division have been consulted and are currently analyzing the data using existing algorithms to look for trends between the corrosion rates and the various soil characteristics such as resistivity and pH. The third task is to develop a long-term test plan to evaluate DIP and the fourth task is to develop an accelerated test procedure to reduce the time required to evaluate soil corrosion by 1-2 orders of magnitude. By developing a better understanding of what makes a soil corrosive, including the chemical and physical properties, it may be possible to model the long-term behavior of DIP. A full report on the work will be submitted by the March 2017 deadline. It appears that a sustained, multi-year effort in this area would be of great benefit to the Bureau of Reclamation, to the DIP industry and to the country

  13. Theoretical study on effect of confinement on flexural ductility of normal and high-strength concrete beams

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, AKH; Au, FTK; Chau, SL

    2004-01-01

    Compared with normal concrete, high-strength concrete has higher strength but is generally more brittle. Its use in a reinforced concrete structure, if not properly controlled, could lead to an unsustainable reduction in ductility. However, confinement could be provided to improve the ductility of the structure. In this study, the effects of concrete strength and confinement on the flexural ductility of reinforced concrete beams have been evaluated by means of complete moment-curvature analys...

  14. Irradiation and inhomogeneity effects on ductility and toughness of (ODS)-7 -13Cr steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preininger, D. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The superimposed effect of irradiation defect and structural inhomogeneity formation on tensile ductility and dynamic toughness of ferritic-martensitic 7-13CrW(Mo)VTa(Nb) and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS)-7-13CrWVTa(Ti)- RAFM steels has been examined by work hardening and local stress/strain-induced ductile fracture models. Structural inhomogeneities which strongly promoting plastic instability and localized flow might be formed by the applied fabrication process, high dose irradiation and additionally further during deformation by enhanced local dislocation generation around fine particles or due to slip band formation with localized heating at high impact strain rates {epsilon}'. The work hardening model takes into account superimposed dislocation multiplication from stored dislocations, dispersions and also grain boundaries as well as annihilation by cross-slip. Analytical relations have been deduced from the model describing uniform ductility and ductile upper shelf energy (USE) observed from Charpy-impact testes. Especially, the influence of different irradiation defects like atomic clusters, dislocation loops and coherent chromium-rich {alpha}'- precipitates have been considered together with effects from strain rate as well as irradiation (TI) and test temperature TT. Strengthening by clusters and more pronounced by dislocation loops formed at higher TI>250 deg. C reduces uniform ductility and also distinctly stronger dynamic toughness USE. A superimposed hardening by the {alpha}'- formation in higher Cr containing 9-13Cr steels strongly reduces toughness assisted by a combined grain-boundary embrittlement with reduction of the ductile fracture stress. But that improves work hardening and uniform ductility as observed particularly due to nano-scale Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}- dispersions in ODS-RAFM steels. For ODS- steels additionally the strength-induced reduction of toughness is diminished by a combined

  15. Improvement of the extended finite element method for ductile crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmodheji, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mashayekhi, M., E-mail: mashayekhi@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    The continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model is added to the extended finite element method (XFEM) to provide a model of ductile crack growth. In this model, the criterion for crack growth in the evaluation of ductile materials is the critical damage parameter obtained from continuum damage mechanics. Numerical implementation of the CDM-XFEM model was used to simulate crack growth modeling in comparison with experimental results, and the results are presented in this paper. The CDM-XFEM model was experimentally validated by the ductile damage evolution measured in A533B1 steel through three-point bending and compact tension tests. The identification of damage parameters was performed under various conditions. The critical load at crack growth initiation, the ductile behavior of cracks and the fracture toughness, J{sub Ic}, were also predicted with the CDM-XFEM model simulations. The results confirm the potential of the CDM-XFEM model for predicting crack growth in ductile materials. Using the proposed model, crack propagation has been simulated within two examples; center inclined crack and single edged notched beam for A533B1 steel.

  16. Effects of Silicon on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Toughness of Heavy-Section Ductile Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of silicon (Si on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of heavy-section ductile cast iron were investigated to develop material for spent-nuclear-fuel containers. Two castings with different Si contents of 1.78 wt.% and 2.74 wt.% were prepared. Four positions in the castings from the edge to the center, with different solidification cooling rates, were chosen for microstructure observation and mechanical properties’ testing. Results show that the tensile strength, elongation, impact toughness and fracture toughness at different positions of the two castings decrease with the decrease in cooling rate. With an increase in Si content, the graphite morphology and the mechanical properties at the same position deteriorate. Decreasing cooling rate changes the impact fracture morphology from a mixed ductile-brittle fracture to a brittle fracture. The fracture morphology of fracture toughness is changed from ductile to brittle fracture. When the Si content exceeds 1.78 wt.%, the impact and fracture toughness fracture morphology transforms from ductile to brittle fracture. The in-situ scanning electronic microscope (SEM tensile experiments were first used to observe the dynamic tensile process. The influence of the vermicular and temper graphite on fracture formation of heavy section ductile iron was investigated.

  17. A new method for chill and shrinkage control in ladle treated ductile iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Torbj(o)rn Skaland

    2006-01-01

    The paper is undertaken with the objective of describing a new method for treating ductile cast iron in a ladle process, where the main objective is to minimize formation of eutectic carbides and shrinkage porosity during solidification. The suppression of carbide formation is associated with the nucleating properties of the nodularizer and inoculant alloys. By nucleating properties it is understood the number and potency of nuclei formed by an alloy addition. The nodularizer and inoculant additions also influence ductile iron solidification shrinkage. Some alloys may give good protection against shrinkage while others tend to promote more shrinkage.The use of vanous rare earth elements is found to have a pronounced impact on these conditions. It has been discovered that the use of pure lanthanum as the primary rare earth source in the magnesium ferrosilicon nodularizer surprisingly further improves the performance of the ductile iron ladle treatment method compared to similar methods using cerium or mishmetal bearing nodularizers. The nucleating properties are substantially improved and the risk for carbides (chill) and shrinkage formation in the sandwich or tundish ladle treated ductile iron is then minimized.The paper describes this new ladle treatment concept in detail, and gives examples from successful testing of the new nodularizing technology and how it simultaneously affects and minimizes critical ductile iron chill and shrinkage tendencies.

  18. Effects of homogenisation treatment on microstructure and hot ductility of aluminium alloy 6063

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, K.B.S.; Claves, S.R.; Geetruyden, W.H. van; Misiolek, W.Z.; Goncalves, M.

    2005-02-15

    Several homogenisation treatments were applied to direct chill (DC) cast ingots of aluminium alloy 6063, in order to analyse the resulting microstructures developed from these diverse conditions and their effects on the hot ductility of this alloy. Imaging was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument. These techniques identified variations in distribution and morphology of second phase particles (AlFeSi and Mg{sub 2}Si). FIB results for the various AlFeSi particles correctly identify their shapes in three dimensions (3D). The particles were identified by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in the SEM, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD) for bulk samples. Hot tensile testing (HTT) was conducted between 470 and 600 deg C to asses the hot ductility for each condition. The inferior ductility of as cast samples was due to the poor bond strength of the {beta} AlFeSi phase at the grain boundaries. Homogenised samples, which contain {alpha} AlFeSi, exhibited improved ductility. Samples that were water quenched following homogenisation were absent of Mg{sub 2}Si precipitates, when these elements remained in solid solution. These exhibited the highest ductility. (Author)

  19. Kinetic Ductility and Force-Spike Resistance of Proteins from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2016-08-23

    Ductile materials can absorb spikes in mechanical force, whereas brittle ones fail catastrophically. Here we develop a theory to quantify the kinetic ductility of single molecules from force spectroscopy experiments, relating force-spike resistance to the differential responses of the intact protein and the unfolding transition state to an applied mechanical force. We introduce a class of unistable one-dimensional potential surfaces that encompass previous models as special cases and continuously cover the entire range from ductile to brittle. Compact analytic expressions for force-dependent rates and rupture-force distributions allow us to analyze force-clamp and force-ramp pulling experiments. We find that the force-transmitting protein domains of filamin and titin are kinetically ductile when pulled from their two termini, making them resistant to force spikes. For the mechanostable muscle protein titin, a highly ductile model reconciles data over 10 orders of magnitude in force loading rate from experiment and simulation. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Alloy-dependent deformation behavior of highly ductile nanocrystalline AuCu thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmiller, Jochen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Spolenak, Ralph [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Gruber, Patric A., E-mail: patric.gruber@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-02-10

    Nanocrystalline thin films on compliant substrates become increasingly important for the development of flexible electronic devices. In this study, nanocrystalline AuCu thin films on polyimide substrate were tested in tension while using a synchrotron-based in situ testing technique. Analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles allowed identifying the underlying deformation mechanisms. Initially, elastic and microplastic deformation is observed, followed by dislocation-mediated shear band formation, and eventually macroscopic crack formation. Particularly the influence of alloy composition, heat-treatment, and test temperature were investigated. Generally, a highly ductile behavior is observed. However, high Cu concentrations, annealing, and/or large plastic strains lead to localized deformation and hence reduced ductility. On the other hand, enhanced test temperature allows for a delocalized deformation and extended ductility.

  1. Investigation on grain size effect in high strain rate ductility of 1100 pure aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, N.; Bourne, N.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Testa, G.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the initial grain size on the material ductility at high strain rates in 1100 pure aluminum was investigated. Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests, at different impact velocities, were performed. Samples have been annealed at 350°C for different exposure times to induce grain growth. Extruded fragments were soft-recovered and the overall length of the extruded jets was used as a measure of material ductility at high strain rates. Numerical simulation of DTE test at different velocity was performed using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko constitutive model. Results indicates that, as reported for pure copper, the overall ductility of the aluminum increases when grain size decreases. Numerical simulation results were in quite good agreement with experimental data.

  2. Thin wall ductile iron casting as a substitute for aluminum alloy casting in automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper it is presented thin wall ductile iron casting (TWDI as a substitute of aluminium alloy casting. Upper control arm made of ductile iron with wall thickness ranging from 2 – 3.7 mm was produced by inmold process. Structure, mechanical properties and computer simulations were investigated. Structural analysis of TWDI shows pearlitic-ferritic matrix free from chills and porosity. Mechanical testing disclose superior ultimate tensile strength (Rm, yield strength (Rp0,2 and slightly lower elongation (E of TWDI in comparison with forged control arm made of aluminium alloy (6061-T6. Moreover results of computer simulation of static loading for tested control arms are presented. Analysis show that the light-weight ductile iron casting can be loaded to similar working conditions as the forged Al alloy without any potential failures.

  3. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  4. A New Ductile Fracture Criterion for Various Deformation Conditions Based on Microvoid Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jian-ke; DONG Xiang-huai

    2009-01-01

    To accurately predict the occurrence of ductile fracture in metal forming processes, the Gurson-Tvergaard (GT) porous material model with optimized adjustment parameters is adopted to analyze the macroscopic stress-strain response, and a practical void nucleation law is proposed with a few material constants for engineering applications. Mechanical and metallographie analyses of uniaxial tension, torsion and upsetting experiments are performed. According to the character of the metal forming processes, the basic mechanisms of ductile fracture are divided into two modes: tension-type mode and shear-type mode. A unified fracture criterion is proposed for wide applicable range, and the comparison of experimental results with numerical analysis results confirms the validity of the newly proposed ductile fracture criterion based on the GT porous material model.

  5. Phase-Transformation Ductilization of Brittle High-Entropy Alloys via Metastability Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hailong; Wu, Yuan; He, Junyang; Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiongjun; An, Ke; Wu, Wei; Lu, Zhaoping

    2017-08-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) in which interesting physical, chemical, and structural properties are being continuously revealed have recently attracted extensive attention. Body-centered cubic (bcc) HEAs, particularly those based on refractory elements are promising for high-temperature application but generally fail by early cracking with limited plasticity at room temperature, which limits their malleability and widespread uses. Here, the "metastability-engineering" strategy is exploited in brittle bcc HEAs via tailoring the stability of the constituent phases, and transformation-induced ductility and work-hardening capability are successfully achieved. This not only sheds new insights on the development of HEAs with excellent combination of strength and ductility, but also has great implications on overcoming the long-standing strength-ductility tradeoff of metallic materials in general. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. High strength and high ductility in as-deposited nanocrystalline Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Pinqiang; Xu Weichang; Tang Dian, E-mail: pqdai@126.co [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China)

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, an electrodeposited nanocrystalline (nc) Ni sample with high strength and superior ductility relative to many other electrodeposited nc-Ni was prepared. The superior ductility in the present nc-Ni sample free of defects was ascribed to mixed grains, the size of which spanned nano- and sub-micro scales at its as-deposited state with a grain size distribution ranged from 5 to 120nm. Obvious dislocation motion happening in coarse-grained polycrystalline was observed in large grains of nc-Ni matrix resulting in a remarkable enhanced ductility without a decrease in the strength. The present nc-Ni with an average grain size of 27.2nm prepared by direct current electrodeposition shows the average ultimate tensile strength of 1200MPa and the average elongation to failure of 10.4%.

  7. Effects of structure and defect on fatigue limit in high strength ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hak; Kim, Min Gun [Kangwon National Univ., Chunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, the influence of several factors such as hardness, internal defect and non-propagating crack on fatigue limits was investigated with three kinds of ductile iron specimens. From the experimental results the fatigue limits were examined in relation with hardness and tensile strength in case of high strength specimens under austempering treatment; in consequence the marked improvement of fatigue limits were not showed. The maximum defect size was an important factor to predict and to evaluate the fatigue limits of ductile irons. And, the quantitative relationship between the fatigue limits({sigma}{sub {omega}}) and the maximum defect size({radical}area{sub max}) was expressed as {sigma}{sub {omega}}{sup n} {center_dot} {radical}area{sub max}=C{sub 2}. Also, it was possible to explain the difference for the fatigue limits in three ductile irons by introduction of the non-propagating crack rates.

  8. Tensile properties of copper alloyed austempered ductile iron: Effect of austempering parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, U.; Ray, S.; Prabhakar, S. R.

    2004-10-01

    A ductile iron containing 0.6% copper as the main alloying element was austenitized at 850 °C for 120 min and was subsequently austempered for 60 min at austempering temperatures of 270, 330, and 380 °C. The samples were also austempered at 330 °C for austempering times of 30 150 min. The structural parameters for the austempered alloy austenite (X γ ), average carbon content (C γ ), the product X γ C γ , and the size of the bainitic ferrite needle (d α ) were determined using x-ray diffraction. The effect of austempering temperature and time has been studied with respect to tensile properties such as 0.2% proof stress, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), percentage of elongation, and quality index. These properties have been correlated with the structural parameters of the austempered ductile iron microstructure. Fracture studies have been carried out on the tensile fracture surfaces of the austempered ductile iron (ADI).

  9. Transition temperature and fracture mode of as-castand austempered ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnovic, D; Eric, O; Sidjanin, L

    2008-12-01

    The ductile to brittle transition temperature is a very important criterion that is used for selection of materials in some applications, especially in low-temperature conditions. For that reason, in this paper transition temperature of as-cast and austempered copper and copper-nickel alloyed ductile iron (DI) in the temperature interval from -196 to +150 degrees C have been investigated. The microstructures of DIs and ADIs were examined by light microscope, whereas the fractured surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope. The ADI materials have higher impact energies compared with DIs in an as-cast condition. In addition, the transition curves for ADIs are shifted towards lower temperatures. The fracture mode of Dls is influenced by a dominantly pearlitic matrix, exhibiting mostly brittle fracture through all temperatures of testing. By contrast, with decrease of temperature, the fracture mode for ADI materials changes gradually from fully ductile to fully brittle.

  10. Analysis and calculation of factors on curvature ductility of unbonded prestressed concrete beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Wen-zhong; XIE Hengyan; YANG Chun-feng

    2007-01-01

    In consideration that behavior of curvature ductility of interior support directly influences the degree of moment modification of unbonded prestressed concrete (UPC) continuous structures, constitutive relationships of concrete, non-prestressed reinforcement and prestressed reinforcement used for nonlinear analysis are given. Through simulation analysis on simple beams subjected to single loading at the middle of the span, the law of factors influencing curvature ductility, such as global reinforcing index, prestressing degree, effective prestress, strength of concrete and grade of non-prestressed reinforcement are explored. Based on these researches, calculating formula of curvature ductility coefficient of UPC beams is established, which provides basic data for further research on plastic design of UPC indeterminate structures.

  11. Automatic quantitative analysis of microstructure of ductile cast iron using digital image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Malage

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ductile cast iron is preferred as nodular iron or spheroidal graphite iron. Ductile cast iron contains graphite in form of discrete nodules and matrix of ferrite and perlite. In order to determine the mechanical properties, one needs to determine volume of phases in matrix and nodularity in the microstructure of metal sample. Manual methods available for this, are time consuming and accuracy depends on expertize. The paper proposes a novel method for automatic quantitative analysis of microstructure of Ferritic Pearlitic Ductile Iron which calculates volume of phases and nodularity of that sample. This gives results within a very short time (approximately 5 sec with 98% accuracy for volume phases of matrices and 90% of accuracy for nodule detection and analysis which are in the range of standard specified for SG 500/7 and validated by metallurgist.

  12. Plastic Strain Induced Damage Evolution and Martensitic Transformation in Ductile Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2002-01-01

    The Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steels are well known for their ductile behaviour at cryogenic temperatures. This implies development and evolution of plastic strain fields in the stainless steel components subjected to thermo-mechanical loads at low temperatures. The evolution of plastic strain fields is usually associated with two phenomena: ductile damage and strain induced martensitic transformation. Ductile damage is described by the kinetic law of damage evolution. Here, the assumption of isotropic distribution of damage (microcracks and microvoids) in the Representative Volume Element (RVE) is made. Formation of the plastic strain induced martensite (irreversible process) leads to the presence of quasi-rigid inclusions of martensite in the austenitic matrix. The amount of martensite platelets in the RVE depends on the intensity of the plastic strain fields and on the temperature. The evolution of the volume fraction of martensite is governed by a kinetic law based on the accumulated plastic strain. Both of thes...

  13. Ductility and Strength Reduction Factors for Degrading Structures Considering Cumulative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edén Bojórquez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cumulative damage on the strength requirements of degrading structures is assessed through the evaluation of the target ductility and corresponding strength reduction factors of simple degrading structures. While the reduction on ductility is established through the use of Park and Ang index, the suggestions given by Bojórquez and Rivera are used to model the degradation of the structural properties of the simple systems. Target ductilities and their corresponding reduced strength reduction factors are established for five sets of ground motions; most of them are recorded in California. The results given in this paper provide insight into all relevant parameters that should be considered during seismic design of earthquake-resistant structures. Finally, some recommendations to evaluate the effect of cumulative damage on seismic design are suggested.

  14. Influence of Technological Parameters of Furane Mixtures on Shrinkage Creation in Ductile Cast Iron Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasková I.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ductile cast iron (GS has noticed great development in last decades and its boom has no analogue in history humankind. Ductile iron has broaden the use of castings from cast iron into areas, which where exclusively domains for steel castings. Mainly by castings, which weight is very high, is the propensity to shrinkage creation even higher. Shrinkage creation influences mainly material, construction of casting, gating system and mould. Therefore, the main realized experiment was to ascertain the influence of technological parameters of furane mixture on shrinkage creation in castings from ductile iron. Together was poured 12 testing items in 3 moulds forto determine and compare the impact of various technological parameters forms the propensity for shrinkage in the casting of LGG.

  15. Investigation of the hot ductility of a high-strength boron steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Güler, Hande, E-mail: handeguler@uludag.edu.tr; Ertan, Rukiye; Özcan, Reşat

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the high-temperature ductility behaviour of an Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 sheet was investigated. The mechanical properties of Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 boron steel were examined via hot tensile tests performed at temperatures ranging from 400 to 900 °C at a strain rate of 0.083 s{sup −1}. The deformation and fracture mechanisms under hot tensile testing were considered in relation to the testing data and to the fracture-surface observations performed via SEM. The hot ductility of the tested boron steel was observed as a function of increasing temperature and the Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 boron steel exhibited a ductility loss at 700 °C.

  16. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sizedd Oxide Dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Kang

    2008-07-31

    The present research is focused on ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) alloys by adding nano-sized oxide particles to the alloy system. The research approach includes: (1) determination of microscopic mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic ductility enhancement effects through atomistic modeling of the metal-ceramic interface; (2) subsequent computer simulation-aided optimization of composition and nanoparticle size of the dispersion for improved performance; (3) synthesis and characterization of nanoparticle dispersion following the guidance from atomistic computational modeling analyses (e.g., by processing a small sample of Mo alloy for evaluation); and (4) experimental testing of the mechanical properties to determine optimal ductility enhancement.Through atomistic modeling and electronic structure analysis using full-potential linearized muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) techniques, research to date has been performed on a number of selected chromium (Cr) systems containing nitrogen (N) and/or magnesium oxide (MgO) impurities. The emphasis has been on determining the properties of the valence electrons and the characteristics of the chemical bonds they formed. It was found that the brittle/ductile behavior of this transitional metal system is controlled by the relative population of valence charges: bonds formed by s valence electrons yield metallic, ductile behavior, whereas bonds formed by d valence electrons lead to covalent, brittle behavior. The presence of valence bands from impurities also affects the metal bonding, thereby explaining the detrimental and beneficial effects induced by the inclusion of N impurities and MgO dispersions. These understandings are useful for optimizing ductility enhancement effects on the dispersion materials.

  17. The Nature of the Tensile Fracture in Austempered Ductile Iron with Dual Matrix Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicli, Volkan; Erdogan, Mehmet

    2010-02-01

    The tensile fracture characteristics of austempered ductile irons with dual matrix structures and different ausferrite volume fractions have been studied for an unalloyed ductile cast iron containing (in wt.%) 3.50 C, 2.63 Si, 0.318 Mn, and 0.047 Mg. Specimens were intercritically austenitized (partially austenitized) in two phase region (α + γ) at various temperatures for 20 min and then quenched into a salt bath held at austempering temperature of 365 °C for various times and then air cooled to room temperature to obtain various ausferrite volume fractions. Conventionally austempered specimens with fully ausferritic matrix and unalloyed as-cast specimens having fully ferritic structures were also tested for comparison. In dual matrix structures, results showed that the volume fraction of proeutectoid ferrite, new (epitaxial) ferrite, and ausferrite [bainitic ferrite + high-carbon austenite (stabilized or transformed austenite)] can be controlled to influence the strength and ductility. Generally, microvoids nucleation is initiated at the interface between the graphite nodules and the surrounding ferritic structure and at the grain boundary junctions in the fully ferritic microstructure. Debonding of the graphite nodules from the surrounding matrix structure was evident. The continuity of the ausferritic structure along the intercellular boundaries plays an important role in determining the fracture behavior of austempered ductile iron with different ausferrite volume fractions. The different fracture mechanisms correspond to the different levels of ausferrite volume fractions. With increasing continuity of the ausferritic structure, fracture pattern changed from ductile to moderate ductile nature. On the other hand, in the conventionally austempered samples with a fully ausferritic structure, the fracture mode was a mixture of quasi-cleavage and a dimple pattern. Microvoid coalescence was the dominant form of fracture in all structures.

  18. Fatigue Life Prediction of Ductile Iron Based on DE-SVM Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiqun, Ma; Xiaoping, Wang; lun, An

    the model, predicting fatigue life of ductile iron, based on SVM (Support Vector Machine, SVM) has been established. For it is easy to fall into local optimum during parameter optimization of SVM, DE (Differential Evolution algorithm, DE) algorithm was adopted to optimize to improve prediction precision. Fatigue life of ductile iron is predicted combining with concrete examples, and simulation experiment to optimize SVM is conducted adopting GA (Genetic Algorithm), ACO (Ant Colony Optimization) and POS (Partial Swarm Optimization). Results reveal that DE-SVM algorithm is of a better prediction performance.

  19. Draft ASME code case on ductile cast iron for transport packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saegusa, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko (Japan); Arai, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka (Japan); Hirose, M. [Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Nippon Chuzo, Kawasaki (Japan); Tezuka, Y. [Mitsubishi Materials Co., Tokyo (Japan); Urabe, N. [Kokan Keisoku K. K., Kawasaki (Japan); Hueggenberg, R. [GNB, Essen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The current Rules for Construction of ''Containment Systems for Storage and Transport Packagings of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Material and Waste'' of Division 3 in Section III of ASME Code (2001 Edition) does not include ductile cast iron in its list of materials permitted for use. The Rules specify required fracture toughness values of ferritic steel material for nominal wall thickness 5/8 to 12 inches (16 to 305 mm). New rule for ductile cast iron for transport packaging of which wall thickness is greater than 12 inches (305mm) is required.

  20. Development of thermal simulation system for heavy section ductile iron solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    A new reliable thermal simulation system for studying solidification of heavy section ductile iron has been developed using computer feedback control and artificial intelligent methods. Results of idle test indicate that the temperature in the system responses exactly to the inputted control data and the temperature control error is less than ± 0.5 %. It is convenient to simulate solidification of heavy section ductile iron using this new system. Results of thermal simulation experiments show that the differences in nodularity and number of graphite nodule per unit area in the thermal simulation specimen and the actual heavy section block is less than 5 % and 10 %, respectively.

  1. Prediction of Hot Ductility of Low-Carbon Steels Based on BP Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to obtain an effective method to predict the hot ductility of low-carbon steels, which will be a re ference to evaluate the crack sensitivity of steels. Several sub-netwo rks modeled from BP network were constructed for different temperature use, and the measured reduction of area (AR) of 12 kinds of low-carbo n steels under the temperature of 600 to 1000℃ were processed as trai ning samples. The result of software simulation shows that the model e stablished is relatively effective for predicting the hot ductility of steels.

  2. Seismic Performance Evaluation of Reinforced Concrete Moment Resisting Frames with Various Ductility in Low Seismic Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Choopool

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Bangkok, the capital of Thailand, is at moderate risk for distant earthquake due to the ability of soft soil to amplify ground motion about 3-4 times although it locates in low seismic zone. In addition, before the enforcement of seismic loading for buildings in the Ministerial Law in 2007, many existing reinforced concrete buildings in Bangkok may have been designed without consideration for seismic loading and did not incorporate the special detailing provisions that required for ductile concrete frames. Now, guidelines for seismic loading of buildings of Thailand (DPT 1302-52 have been recently improved by adopting ASCE7-05. Approach: This study is focused on the effects of the new guidelines on cost estimates and the seismic performance of a nine-story reinforced concrete apartment building with various ductility by the nonlinear static and nonlinear dynamic analyses compared with a Gravity Load Designed (GLD building. Five selected ground motion records are investigated in the analyses. In order to examine the influence of design ductility classes, the seismic forces on moment resisting frame buildings are defined according to the newly proposed seismic specifications of Thailand with ductility from 8, 5 and 3, corresponding to Special Ductile (SDF, Intermediate Ductile (IDF and Ordinary Ductile (ODF frames, respectively. The various frames are assumed to have collapsed if the local drift exceed of 3, 2.5, 2 and 1% for SDF, IDF, ODF and GLD, respectively. Results: SDF is more ductile than that of ODF, however, the strength of SDF is less than ODF. For inelastic designs, SDF decreases stiffness and increases deflection of structures. As for the effect on cost estimates, ODF is the most expensive among ODF, IDF and SDF. Costs of SDF and IDF in Bangkok are quite similar. The study found that the average PGAs for the failure state for SDF, IDF, ODF and GLD are 0.76, 0.60, 0.50 and 0.29g, respectively. Moreover, for the

  3. Application of a second-gradient model of ductile fracture on a Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YangJun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A “micromorphic”, second-gradient model applicable to ductile porous materials has been proposed, as an improvement from the fundamental work of Gurson that take into account the physical mechanisms responsible for ductile damage. The model has been applied to the study of fracture of the decarburized layer of a Dissimilar Metal Weld. The model successfully reproduces the crack path experimentally observed in a notched tensile sample extracted from this weld, different from the one predicted by the first gradient model.

  4. Effect of Microstructure on Exhaust Manifold Cracks Produced From SiMo Ductile Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Havva Kazdal Zeytin; Ceylan Kubilay; H(u)seyin Aydin; Ali Aslan Ebrinc; Bilal Aydemir

    2009-01-01

    Ductile cast irons are used as high temperature materials in internal combustion engines,because they are microstructurally stable at high operating temperatures.SiMo granular graphite cast irons contain Fe2 MoC and M6C carbide precipitates due to their higher concentration of both silicon and molybdenum.The microstructure of these cast irons consists of carbides dispersed within the ferrite matrix.The microstructural change and the crack formation mechanism in manifolds produced from SiMo ductile iron are studied.Chemical analysis,optical and scanning electron microscope studies have been completed and evaluated.

  5. Effect of alloying elements on austempered ductile iron (ADI properties and its process: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sadighzadeh Benam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron (ADI parts have a unique combination of high strength and toughness with excellent design flexibility and low cost. These excellent properties are directly related to its microstructure called "ausferrite" that is the result of austempering heat treatment applied to ductile irons. Alloying elements increase ADI austemperability and change speeds of austempering reactions. Thus, they can affect ADI resultant microstructure and mechanical properties. In this paper, the effects of alloying elements on ADI mechanical properties, microstructural changes, two-stage austempering reactions, processing windows, austemperability, and other aspects are reviewed.

  6. Influece of the austempering temperature on the tensile strength of the austempered ductile iron (ADI samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savićević

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI is a class of ductile iron subjected to a two-step heat treatment process – austenitization and austempering. The heat treatment gives to ADI a high value of tensile strength and an especially good strength-to-weight ratio. However, designers in most cases are unfamiliar with this material that can compete favorably with steel and aluminum castings, weldments and forgings. The high tensile strength of ADI is the result of its unique ausferrite microstructure. In this paper, an investigation of the influence of the austempering temperature on the tensile strength of the ADI samples is presented.

  7. Effect of Cu, Mo, Si on the content of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Y. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the effects of Cu, Mo, Si contents on the volume fraction of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron (ADI) are analyzed exactly by X-ray diffraction, and the fracture modes of test samples with different volume fraction of retained austenite are investigated by SEM. It is shown that the retained austenite content increases with the content of copper, decreases with the content of molybdenum, and reaches the maximum with a certain content of silicon. When the retained austenite content decreases, the fracture modes of test samples change from ductile fracture to cleavage fracture.

  8. Transformation plasticity in ductile solids. Final report, August 1, 1988--November 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, G.B.

    1996-09-01

    Throughout history, the development of stronger materials has enabled the realization of countless technological advances. Unfortunately, any increase in strength is rarely achieved without concomitant decreases in toughness and ductility: a fact which severely limits the utility of materials such as ultrahigh-strength alloy steels. Typical precipitation-strengthened stainless steels have very little toughness at high strength levels. In the last decade, however, several investigators have reported exceptionally large fracture toughness values in high-strength precipitation-hardened metastable austenitic steels. This remarkable achievement is directly attributable to the process of transformation toughening. This report describes studies on tranformations and enhancement of plane-strain ductility in high strength steels.

  9. Influence of the section size and holding time on the graphite parameters of ductile iron production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bockus

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was conducted to establish the conditions required to produce a desirable structure of the castings of various section sizes. This investigation was focused on the study of the influence of cooling rate or section size and holding time on graphite parameters of the ductile iron. Plates having thickness between 3 and 50mm were cast in sand molds using the same melt. The present investigation has shown that the section size of ductile iron castings and holding time had strong effect on the graphite parameters of the castings.

  10. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  11. New Possibilities of Shaping the Surface Properties in Austempered Ductile Iron Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents recent developments concerning the formation of surface layer in austempered ductile iron castings. It was found thatthe traditional methods used to change the properties of the surface layer, i.e. the effect of protective atmosphere during austenitising or shot peening, are not fully satisfactory to meet the demands of commercial applications. Therefore, new ways to shape the surface layer and the surface properties of austempered ductile iron castings are searched for, to mention only detonation spraying, carbonitriding, CVD methods, etc.

  12. Effect of silicon content and defects on the lifetime of ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhussein Akram

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties has been studied for different grades of ferritic ductile cast iron. Mechanical tests were carried out and the effect of silicon on the resistance of material was well noticed. An increasing silicon content increases the strength and decreases the ductility of material. The lifetime and endurance limit of material were affected by the presence of defects in material and microstructure heterogeneity. Metallurgical characterizations showed that the silicon was highly segregated around graphite nodules which leads to the initiation of cracks. The presence of defects causes the stress concentration and leads to the initiation and propagation of cracks.

  13. Numerical ductile tearing simulation of circumferential cracked pipe tests under dynamic loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Hyun Suk; Kim, Ji Soo; Ryu, Ho Wan; Kim, Yun Jae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Weon [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper presents a numerical method to simulate ductile tearing in cracked components under high strain rates using finite element damage analysis. The strain rate dependence on tensile properties and multiaxial fracture strain is characterized by the model developed by Johnson and Cook. The damage model is then defined based on the ductility exhaustion concept using the strain rate dependent multiaxial fracture strain concept. The proposed model is applied to simulate previously published three cracked pipe bending test results under two different test speed conditions. Simulated results show overall good agreement with experimental results.

  14. Investigation of solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron using temperature measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron can be improved using temperature measurement. This article includes some background of the precautions that have to be taken when measuring temperatures in thin walled castings. The aim is to minimize influence of temperature...... measurement on castings and to get sufficient response time of thermocouples. Investigation of thin wall ductile iron has been performed with temperature measurement in plates with thickness between 2,8 and 8mm. The cooling curves achieved are combined with examination of the microstructure in order to reveal...

  15. Modeling the elastic behavior of ductile cast iron including anisotropy in the graphite nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Thorborg, Jesper; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a micro-mechanical approach to model the intrinsic elastic anisotropy of the graphite particles in ductile iron. Contrary to most of the published works in the field, the constitutive behavior is directly derived on the basis of the nodule characteristic internal structure......, composed of graphite platelets arranged into conical sectors. In this way, the large uncertainty traditionally associated with local mechanical measurements of micro-hardness is eliminated. The proposed anisotropic description is validated by simulating the macroscopic ductile iron elastic response...

  16. Thermal distortion of disc-shaped ductile iron castings in vertically parted moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Smith, Nikolaj Kjelgaard; Rasmussen, Jakob; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2015-01-01

    A disc-shaped casting with an inner boss and an outer rim, separated by a thin walled section, was examined. This measurable deformation varied with the feeding modulus. The influence of alloy composition, particularly Si content, was examined with a pearlitic ductile iron (EN-GJS-500......-7) and a fully ferritic ductile iron (EN-GJS-450-10). The experiment showed that both the alloy composition and choice of feeder influenced the degreeof deformation measured in the finished casting. It was found that the deformation of the pearlitic alloy was influenced controllably by changing the feeder...

  17. Development and Testing of a Linear Polarization Resistance Corrosion Rate Probe for Ductile Iron Pipe (Web Report 4361)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The North American water and wastewater community has hundreds of millions of feet of ductile iron pipe in service. Only a portion of the inventory has any form of external corrosion control. Ductile iron pipe, in certain environments, is subject to external corrosion.Linear Pola...

  18. Investigation of Ductility Reduction Factor in Seismic Rehabilitation of Existing Reinforced Concrete School Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Gorgulu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Converting existing Reinforced Concrete (RC frames into RC infill walls is one of the most efficient seismic strengthening technique due to its simplicity in application providing high rigidity, stability and strength in structures. On the other hand, this method affects the seismic behavior of existing RC structure in terms of the energy dissipation capacity or in other words, ductility reduction factor, Rμ. This research is an attempt to investigate the RC infill wall ratio effect on ductility reduction factor in terms of the seismic rehabilitation of the typical RC school buildings. For this purpose, nonlinear static pushover analyses are conducted for existing 3 and 5 story RC school buildings which were rehabilitated with different RC infill wall ratio. Numerical analyses are carried out by using the fiber element based modeling approach in the software, Perform-3D. Based on these analytical results, correlation between the ductility reduction factor and the RC infill wall ratio is obtained for the seismic rehabilitation of the RC school buildings. In addition, two mathematical expressions for the variation of the ductility reduction factor with RC infill wall ratios are proposed in terms of the preliminary seismic rehabilitation assessment of the existing RC school buildings.

  19. Effect of initial void shape on ductile failure in a shear field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2015-01-01

    For voids in a shear field unit cell model analyses have been used to show that ductile failure is predicted even though the stress triaxiality is low or perhaps negative, so that the void volume fraction does not grow during deformation. Here, the effect of the void shape is studied by analyzing...

  20. Ductile damage development in friction stir welded aluminum (AA2024) joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2008-01-01

    Ductile damage development in a friction stir welded aluminum joint subjected to tension is analyzed numerically by FE-analysis, based on a total Lagrangian formulation. An elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation that accounts for nucleation and growth of microvoids is applied. Main focus...

  1. The effects of manganese phosphate coating wear resistance of chilled ductile iron camshafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarık Gün

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ductile iron camshafts are preferred due to high toughness and strength features in the automobile industry. Through the coolants used in the camshaft production high surface hardness is achieved. In this study, the wear resistance effects of ductile iron chill produced camshafts coated with manganese phosphate are researched. The camshaft surfaces produced as ductile iron chill are coated with manganese phosphate. The coating surfaces are observed with scanning electron microscope (SEM. The changes occurring on the cam profiles are measured with running the wear resistance of the manganese phosphate coating on the camshafts on the engine test rig with 30 minutes interval in 1000rpm. In order to compare the results of uncoated camshafts run on engines are checked against simultaneously. As result, the manganese phosphate coated cams were 2,8 times less worn up than the uncoated cams. The manganese phosphate coated ductile iron chill camshafts are less worn up according to uncoated camshafts because of the oil holding feature of manganese phosphate coating.

  2. The effect of loading rate on ductile fracture toughness and fracture surface roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osovski, S.; Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Ponson, L.

    2015-01-01

    The variation of ductile crack growth resistance and fracture surface roughness with loading rate is modeled under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitatin...

  3. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  4. A Study the relationship between composition, structure and properties of ductile iron in continuous casting

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The developed empirical relationships have practical significance and used for determine the structural composition of iron on known data of express-analysis and for optimization technical process of obtaining castings of ductile iron at Public corporation «Gomel foundry «TSENTROLIT».

  5. Study on the serialization and applications of low carbon ductile iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Xin-fu; SHU Rui; CHANG Dian-cun; ZHANG Xiao-long; ZHU Yan-dong; LI Ling-fang; LI Yu-zhong

    2005-01-01

    Both the production process and the chemical composition of Sx were studied, and the serialization of iow carbon ductile iron was also discussed. It was indicated that Sx modifier was sensitive to the carbon equivalent (CE) of molten iron and to some alloying elements too. When the CE of molten iron and the contents of alloying elements were changed, the content of Sx must be revised with the change correspondingly. Low carbon ductile iron can be stably changed into the one that non-carbon acicular ferrite and retained austenite (about 25%-28%) by quasi-casting bainitic process of using Sx-2 modifier treated Si-Mn-Cr-Cu-alloyed low carbon molten iron. The austenitic low carbon as-cast ductile iron could be obtained by the Ni-Si-Cr 35 5 2 percent alloys molten iron with less than 2% carbon treated by type Sx-3 modifier. The high-toughness ferritic low carbon as-cast ductile iron which contained more than 85 % ferrite in matrix could be got after the molten iron treated by type Sx-4 modifier, and it's elongation was more than 10 %.

  6. A comparison of analytical methods with experimental data for earthquake ductility assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelson, B.L.; Steinmetz, R.L.

    1983-05-01

    A two-part study was conducted to help evaluate analytical methods used to assess the ductile behavior of offshore structures subjected to severe earthquake ground motion. Part I of the study consisted of a comparison between analytical time-history responses predicted using the Inelastic Tower Response Analysis (INTRA) program and experimental data gathered during a shake-table experiment performed by the University of California at Berkeley in March 1981. The experiment involved a series of tests on a scaled, two-dimensional model of a prototype offshore platform subjected to various levels of simulated ground motion. Part II of the study consisted of a comparison between the ductile behavior predicted using simplified analysis methods (static pushover and impulse velocity) and the ductile behavior demonstrated by the experimental and analytical time-history results. Results of Part I indicated that the analytical time-history analyses predicted within reasonable accuracy the response of the test structure as measured during the experiment. The results of Part II demonstrated that the simplified methods produce conservative estimates of the test structure's energy absorption capacity and ductile behavior during intense ground motion.

  7. Investigation of solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron using temperature measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels

    2005-01-01

    measurement on castings and to get sufficient response time of thermocouples. Investigation of thin wall ductile iron has been performed with temperature measurement in plates with thickness between 2,8 and 8mm. The cooling curves achieved are combined with examination of the microstructure in order to reveal...

  8. FATIGUE PROPERTIES OF AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON (ADI)IN WATER ENVIRONMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q.Z.Cai; B.K.Wei; Y.Tanaka

    2004-01-01

    The acicular ferrite in austempered ductile iron(ADI)matrix around graphite was corroded preferentially in wet condition,promoting crack origination and propagation and resulting in the disappearance of ADI fatigue limit.ADI fatigue strength was gradually reduced with increasing the time of test and was reduced by 50% in wet condition at 107 cycles compared with the fatigue limit in dry condition.The fatigue strength variation of ferritic ductile iron in wet condition was similar to that of ADI.The ferritic ductile iron,however,has better corrosion resistance so that the fatigue strength was lowered only by 10% in wet condition at 107 cycles compared with the fatigue limit in dry condition.On the other hand,the fatigue limits of A DI and ferritic ductile iron were dropped by 32% and 25% in tap water dipping 480h/dry condition respectively compared with those in dry condition.The reduction of fatigue limit was attributed to corrosion pits formation correlated with stress concentration,resulting in origination and propagation of fatigue crack.

  9. Microstructure vs. Near-threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Heat-treated Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomila KONEČNÁ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Perferritic isothermal ductile iron (IDI® is an intermediate grade between the low-strength grades of austempered ductile iron (ADI and pearlitic ductile iron (DI recently developed by Zanardi Fonderie Italy. IDI is produced by heat-treating an unalloyed nodular cast iron. The specific matrix microstructure is called “Perferritic” and consists predominantly of ferrite and pearlite. Compared to the pearlitic grades of nodular ductile iron, IDI combines similar strength with higher toughness as a result of the isothermal heat treatment. In this contribution the fatigue crack growth resistance and Kath of IDI are investigated and correlated to mechanical properties and microstructural features. The threshold Ka was determined using the load shedding technique as per ASTM Standard E-647 using CT specimens extracted from a cast block. Tensile specimens were extracted from the broken CT halves and used to determine the static mechanical properties. A metallographic investigation was carried out to correlate structural features and mechanical properties.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.1.1336

  10. Study on the serialization and applications of low carbon ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHU Xin-fu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Both the production process and the chemical composition of Sx were studied, and the serialization of low carbon ductile iron was also discussed. It was indicated that Sx modifier was sensitive to the carbon equivalent (CE of molten iron and to some alloying elements too. When the CE of molten iron and the contents of alloying elements were changed, the content of Sx must be revised with the change correspondingly. Low carbon ductile iron can be stably changed into the one that non-carbon acicular ferrite and retained austenite (about 25%-28% by quasi-casting bainitic process of using Sx-2 modifier treated Si-Mn-Cr-Cu-alloyed low carbon molten iron. The austenitic low carbon as-cast ductile iron could be obtained by the Ni-Si-Cr 35 5 2 percent alloys molten iron with less than 2% carbon treated by type Sx-3 modifier. The high-toughness ferritic low carbon as-cast ductile iron which contained more than 85 % ferrite in matrix could be got after the molten iron treated by type Sx-4 modifier, and it's elongation was more than 10 %.

  11. On fatigue crack growth in ductile materials by crack-tip blunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    One of the basic mechanisms for fatigue crack growth in ductile metals is that depending on crack-tip blunting under tensile loads and re-sharpening of the crack-tip during unloading. In a standard numerical analysis accounting for finite strains it is not possible to follow this process during...

  12. Significantly Increasing the Ductility of High Performance Polymer Semiconductors through Polymer Blending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Joshua I; Xue, Xiao; Wang, Ming; Kline, R Joseph; Hoffman, Benjamin C; Dougherty, Daniel; Zhou, Chuanzhen; Bazan, Guillermo; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2016-06-08

    Polymer semiconductors based on donor-acceptor monomers have recently resulted in significant gains in field effect mobility in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). These polymers incorporate fused aromatic rings and have been designed to have stiff planar backbones, resulting in strong intermolecular interactions, which subsequently result in stiff and brittle films. The complex synthesis typically required for these materials may also result in increased production costs. Thus, the development of methods to improve mechanical plasticity while lowering material consumption during fabrication will significantly improve opportunities for adoption in flexible and stretchable electronics. To achieve these goals, we consider blending a brittle donor-acceptor polymer, poly[4-(4,4-dihexadecyl-4H-cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b']dithiophen-2-yl)-alt-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine] (PCDTPT), with ductile poly(3-hexylthiophene). We found that the ductility of the blend films is significantly improved compared to that of neat PCDTPT films, and when the blend film is employed in an OTFT, the performance is largely maintained. The ability to maintain charge transport character is due to vertical segregation within the blend, while the improved ductility is due to intermixing of the polymers throughout the film thickness. Importantly, the application of large strains to the ductile films is shown to orient both polymers, which further increases charge carrier mobility. These results highlight a processing approach to achieve high performance polymer OTFTs that are electrically and mechanically optimized.

  13. Ductile Cement-Based Composites with Wood Fibres - material design and experimental approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierra-Beltran, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    In order to turn a brittle cement matrix into a ductile composite different types of man-made fibres such as steel, glass and polyvinyl alcohol are currently used as reinforcement, as well as some natural fibres. Compared to synthetic fibres, natural fibres are more easily available worldwide and th

  14. Delamination of a strong film from a ductile substrate during indentation unloading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul-Baqi, A.; van der Giessen, E.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, a finite element method was performed to simulate the spherical indentation of a ductile substrate coated by a strong thin film. Our objective was to study indentation-induced delamination of the film from the substrate. The film was assumed to be linear elastic, the substrate was elas

  15. High Strain-Rate and Quasi-Static Ductile Failure Mechanisms in Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    detailed understanding of the interrelated physical mechanisms that can result in ductile material failure in rate-dependent porous crystalline materials subjected...strains and slip-rates, and hydrostatic stresses on failure paths and ligament damage in face centered cubic (f.c.c.) crystalline materials have been

  16. Development,Application and Problem of Ductile Iron Lost Foam Casting Technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Wenhao; Ye Shengping; Han Xiaohong; Tang Suoyun

    2010-01-01

    @@ Lost-foam casting is a 21st century green casting technology.Over the past decade,there has been an extraordinary development in lost-foam casting in China;and ductile iron lost-foam casting has developed even more rapidly in foundry equipment,foundry raw materials,and casting engineers.

  17. Undercooling, nodule count and carbides in thin walled ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2008-01-01

    Ductile cast iron has been cast in plate thicknesses between 2 to 8 mm. The temperature has been measured during the solidification and the graphite nodule count and size distribution together with the type and amount of carbides have been analysed afterwards. Low nodule count gives higher...

  18. Numerical modelling of thin-walled hypereutectic ductile cast iron parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2006-01-01

    Solidification of hypereutectic thin-walled ductile cast iron has been modelled in one dimension taking into account the precipitation of off-eutectic austenite dendrites during solidification. The simulations have been compared with casting experiments on plate geometries with plate thicknesses...

  19. 3-D Analysis of Graphite Nodules in Ductile Cast Iron Using FIB-SEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, Luca; Jespersen, Freja N.; MacDonald, A. Nicole;

    Ductile cast iron samples were analysed in a Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscope, FIB-SEM. The focussed ion beam was used to carefully remove layers of the graphite nodules to reveal internal structures in the nodules. The sample preparation and milling procedure for sectioning graphite...

  20. Nucleation and solidification of thin walled ductile iron - Experiments and numerical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron has been performed based on experiments and numerical simulation. The experiments were based on temperature and microstructure examination. Results of the experiments have been compared with a 1-D numerical solidification model...

  1. Corrosion behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in iron ore slurry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    grinding balls with different austempering treatments in iron ore slurry using weight ... A set of 200 balls of forged EN31 steel and austempered ductile iron were ... CuCl2 solution to prevent it from surface oxidation during the heat treatment.

  2. Industrial vegetable oil by-products increase the ductility of polylactide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ruellan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of industrial by-products of the vegetable oil industry as ductility increasing additives of polylactide (PLA was investigated. Vegetable oil deodorization condensates were melt-blended by twin-screw extrusion up to a maximum inclusion quantity of 20 wt% without preliminary purification. Sample films were obtained by single screw cast extrusion. Compounded PLA films featured largely improved ductility in tensile testing with an elongation at break up to 180%. The glass transition temperature remained higher than room temperature. The native mixture of molecules, which composed the deodorization condensates, had superior performance compared to a synthetic mixture of main compounds. The investigation of the correlation between composition of the additives and the ductility of the PLA blends by Principal Component Analysis showed synergy in property improvement between fatty acids having a melting point below and beyond the room temperature. Furthermore, a compatibilizing effect of molecules present in the native mixture was evidenced. Oil deodorization condensates, which are a price competitive by-product of the vegetable oil industry, are therefore a very promising biobased and biodegradable additive for improving the ductility of PLA.

  3. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sized Oxide Dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Bruce

    2008-07-18

    The objective of this research is to understand and to remedy the impurity effects for room-temperature ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) based alloys by the inclusion of nano-sized metal oxide dispersions. This research combines theoretical, computational, and experimental efforts. The results will help to formulate systematic strategies in searching for better composed Mo-based alloys with optimal mechanical properties. For this project, majority of the research effort was directed to atomistic modeling to identify the mechanisms responsible for the oxygen embrittling and ductility enhancement based on fundamental electronic structure analysis. Through first principles molecular dynamics simulations, it was found that the embrittling impurity species were attracted to the metal oxide interface, consistent with previous experiments. Further investigation on the electronic structures reveals that the presence of embrittling species degrades the quality of the metallic chemical bonds in the hosting matrix in a number of ways, the latter providing the source of ductility. For example, the spatial flexibility of the bonds is reduced, and localization of the impurity states occurs to pin the dislocation flow. Rice’s criterion has been invoked to explain the connections of electronic structure and mechanical properties. It was also found that when impurity species become attracted to the metal oxide interface, some of the detrimental effects are alleviated, thus explaining the observed ductility enhancement effects. These understandings help to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of Mo and other high temperature alloys (e.g. ODS alloys) for fossil energy materials applications. Based on the theoretical and computational studies, the experimental work includes the preparation of Mo powders mixed with candidate nano-sized metal oxides, which were then vacuum hot-pressed to make the Mo alloys. Several powder mixing methods

  4. Ductility contrast induced by silicification in pelitic schist of the Ryoke metamorphic belt, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Tayyaba; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Rehman, Hafiz Ur; Terabayashi, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Contrasting ductility is recognized in the rocks of Cretaceous Ryoke metamorphic belt in Iwakuni area, southwest Japan. Pelitic schist is ubiquitous in the region and differences in mineral assemblages mark increase in metamorphic grade. The area has been graded as chlorite-biotite zone in the north progressing into biotite- and muscovite-cordierite zones in the south. Pelitic schist near the boundary between the biotite- and muscovite-cordierite zones has undergone partial silicification to form whitish silicified schist layers which contain two types of quartz veins: those parallel to foliation in the host rock are called schistosity-concordant veins, and those inclined to host rock foliation, schistosity-discordant veins. In this study we examined the quartz structure in the silicified schist and in both types of veins to understand the ductility contrast induced by the silicification process. Crystallographic orientations of quartz in the veins and silicified schist rocks were studied using the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) based Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) technique. Quartz c-axis orientations in the silicified schist are nearly random, demonstrating an absence of post-silicification ductile deformation. Quartz grains in the schistosity-concordant veins have preferred c-axis orientations perpendicular to the schistosity indicating ductile shortening. In contrast, schistosity-discordant veins display distinct quartz c-axis fabric than that found in the schistosity-concordant veins. This is because the two types of host rocks exhibit a difference in ductility during deformation. The presence of deformed quartz veins in the undeformed silicified schist indicates transformation of the ductile pelitic schist into the brittle silicified schist at mid-crustal levels where these rocks originate, hence forming contrasting rock layers. Schistosity-concordant veins in the biotite-rich pelitic schist deformed with its host rock in a ductile manner while

  5. Brittle versus ductile deformation as the main control of the deep fluid circulation in continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violay, Marie; Madonna, Claudio; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) and the Taupo Volcanic Zone-Deep geothermal drilling project in New Zealand (TVZ-DGDP) proposed a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile rocks. This system has several advantages including (1) a simpler design and control of the reservoir due to homogeneous rock properties and stress states in the ductile domain ,(2) possible extraction of supercritical fluids (3) less probability for induced earthquakes. However, it is at present unknwon what and how porosity and permeability can be engineered in such environments. It has been proposed that the magmatic chamber is surrounded by a hot and ductile carapace through which heat transfer is conductive because the plastic behaviour of the rock will close possible fluid pathways. Further outward, as temperature declines, the rock will encounter the brittle-ductile transition with a concomitant increase in porosity and permeability. The thickness of the conduction-dominated, ductile boundary zone between the magmatic chamber and the convecting geothermal fluid directly determines the rate of heat transfer. To examine the brittle to ductile transition in the context of the Japanese crust, we conducted deformation experiments on very-fine-grain granite in conventional servocontrolled, gas-medium triaxial apparatus (from Paterson instrument). Temperature ranged from 600° C to 1100° C and effective confining pressure from 100 to 150 MPa. Dilatancy was measured during deformation. The method consisted in monitoring the volume of pore fluid that flows into or out of the sample at constant pore pressure. Permeability was measured under static conditions by transient pressure pulse method. Mechanical and micro-structural observations at experimental constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1 indicated that the granite was brittle and dilatant up to 900 ° C. At higher temperatures the deformation mode becomes macroscopically ductile, i

  6. Slip transfer across fault discontinuities within granitic rock at the brittle-ductile transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.; Warren, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fault mechanics are strongly influenced by discontinuities in fault geometry and constitutive differences between the brittle and ductile regions of the lithosphere. This project uses field observations, laboratory analysis and numerical modeling to investigate deformational processes within a contractional step at the brittle-ductile transition, and in particular, how slip is transferred between faults via ductile deformation across the step. The Bear Creek field area (central Sierra Nevada, CA) is comprised of late Cretaceous biotite-hornblende granodiorite and experienced a period of faulting at the brittle-ductile transition. Abundant echelon faults in Bear Creek, some of which were seismically active, provide many textbook examples of contractional steps, which are characterized by well-developed ductile fabrics. The occurrence of hydrothermal alteration halos and hydrothermal minerals in fracture fill documents the presence of water, which we suggest played a weakening role in the constitutive behavior of the granodiorite. Furthermore, the mechanism that accomplishes slip transfer in contractional steps appears to be related to water-enhanced ductile deformation. We focus our investigation on Outcrop SG10, which features a 10cm thick aplite dike that is offset 0.45m through a contractional step between two sub-parallel left-lateral faults. Within the step, the aplite undergoes dramatic thinning (stretch ~1/10) and the granodiorite is characterized by a well-developed mylonitic foliation, in which quartz and biotite plastically flow around larger grains of feldspars, hornblende and opaque minerals. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis gives a more quantitative depiction of the active micromechanics and reveals how slip is accommodated at the crystal scale throughout the step. We use Abaqus, a commercial finite element software, to test several constitutive laws that may account for the deformation observed both macro- and microscopically throughout

  7. A kinematic measurement for ductile and brittle failure of materials using digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Reza Mousavi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses some material level test which is done on quasi-brittle and ductile materials in the laboratory. The displacement control experimental program is composed of mortar cylinders under uniaxial compression shows quasi-brittle behavior and seemingly round-section aluminum specimens under uniaxial tension represents ductile behavior. Digital Image Correlation gives full field measurement of deformation in both aluminum and mortar specimens. Likewise, calculating the relative displacement of two points located on top and bottom of virtual LVDT, which is virtually placed on the surface of the specimen, gives us the classical measure of strain. However, the deformation distribution is not uniform all over the domain of specimens mainly due to imperfect nature of experiments and measurement devices. Displacement jumps in the fracture zone of mortar specimens and strain localization in the necking area for the aluminum specimen, which are reflecting different deformation values and deformation gradients, is compared to the other regions. Since the results are inherently scattered, it is usually non-trivial to smear out the stress of material as a function of a single strain value. To overcome this uncertainty, statistical analysis could bring a meaningful way to closely look at scattered results. A large number of virtual LVDTs are placed on the surface of specimens in order to collect statistical parameters of deformation and strain. Values of mean strain, standard deviation and coeffcient of variations for each material are calculated and correlated with the failure type of the corresponding material (either brittle or ductile. The main limiters for standard deviation and coeffcient of variations for brittle and ductile failure, in pre-peak and post-peak behavior are established and presented in this paper. These limiters help us determine whether failure is brittle or ductile without determining of stress level in the material.

  8. Energy transport processes in a brittle ductile intrusive model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Graham J.

    1998-08-01

    The implications of the findings of recent GPS and micro-seismic studies in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, on models of processes transporting mass, heat and chemicals are discussed. It is argued that in addition to the well established process of groundwater convection extracting heat and chemicals by interacting with magmatic intrusives under the TVZ, that two other processes may be important. Firstly, the existence of a ductile layer with very low permeability between about 8 to 15 km depth will produce a region of `enhanced conduction' in which very high conductive fluxes of energy arise from a temperature distribution which varies exponentially with depth. Secondly, water may transport up through the ductile layer, as a result of extensional processes in the ductile region. If extension is occurring at about 8 mm/yr, then geothermal heat transfer in the TVZ of about 4200 MW is made up from about 1200 MW from the cooling of intrusives in the brittle region in the upper 8 km; of about an additional 1900 MW of conducted heat entering the brittle region from the ductile region; and about an additional 1100 MW from water transport through the ductile region. Provided this water flow has a chloride concentration similar to that emitted from nearby volcanoes, then the total chloride transport from the TVZ is about 3.5 kg/s, as suggested by average enthalpy to chloride ratios in the TVZ of about 1.2 MJ/g. The present high heat and mass transport processes in the TVZ are assumed to result from the passive filling of volume created from extensional processes under the TVZ, plus conductive and/or convective heating processes below 15 km depth.

  9. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength-ductility trade-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind’s most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength-ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy should

  10. Effects of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus on creep rupture ductility of high purity Ni-Cr austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Takanori; Abo, Hideo; Tanino, Mitsuru; Komatsu, Hazime.

    1989-05-01

    Creep rupture ductility becomes one of the important properties of austenitic stainless steels as structural materials for fast breeder reactors. Using high purity nickel-chromium austenitic steels, the effects of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus on creep rupture ductility were investigated. Creep rupture tests were conducted at 600deg C and extensive microstructural works were performed. The results were as follows. Rupture strength increases with carbon or nitrogen content. Although the rupture ductility decreases with carbon, change in ductility with nitrogen is small. The ductility loss with carbon is due to the grain boundary embrittlement by carbides. With nitrogen, there is no precipitation during creep. Addition of phosphorus to ultra low carbon and nitrogen steels increases their rupture strength and ductility. Fine precipitates of (Fe,Cr)/sub 2/P are uniformly dispersed in the grains and coarse (Fe,Cr)/sub 2/P also precipitates on the grain boundary during creep. Grain boundary migration occurs extensively and few wedge type cracks are observed in the P containing steels. It is concluded that, from the viewpoint of increasing creep rupture ductility, nitrogen is much more effective than carbon and phosphorus is also beneficial. (author).

  11. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  12. Influence of cooling rate and antimony addition content on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of a ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cooling rate and inoculation practice can greatly affect the graphite morphology of ductile irons. In the present research, the effects of the cooling rate and antimony addition on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of ductile irons have been studied. Three ductile iron castings were prepared through solidification under cooling conditions S (slow, M (medium and F (fast. The cooling rates around the equilibrium eutectic temperature (1,150 ℃ for these cooling conditions (S, M and F were set at 0.21 ℃·min-1, 0.32 ℃·min-1 and 0.37 ℃·min-1, respectively. In addition, four ductile iron castings were prepared by adding 0.01%, 0.02%, 0.03% and 0.04% (by weight antimony, respectively under the slow cooling condition. The results show that the nodularity index, tensile strength and hardness of the ductile iron castings without antimony addition are all improved with the increase of cooling rate, while the ductile iron casting solidified under the medium cooling rate possesses the largest number of graphite nodules. Furthermore, for the four antimony containing castings, the graphite morphology and tensile strength are also improved by the antimony additions, and the effect of antimony addition is intensified when the addition increases from 0.01% to 0.03%. Moreover, the rare earth elements (REE/antimony ratio of 2 appears to be the most effective for fine nodular graphite formation in ductile iron.

  13. Statistical Assessment of the Impact of Elevated Contents of Cu and Ni on the Properties of Austempered Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawrocki P.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a statistical analysis of data collected from the observation of the production of austempered ductile iron. The impact assessment of the chemical composition, i.e. high contents of Cu and Ni on the properties of ductile iron isothermal tempered is critical to find the right chemical composition of austempered ductile iron. Based on the analyses range of the percentage of Cu and Ni which were selected in the cast iron to obtain material with high strength properties.

  14. A 3D ductile constitutive mixed-mode model of cohesive elements for the finite element analysis of adhesive joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2013-01-01

    criterion and damage propagation with the linear energetic fracture criterion. For verification and validation purposes of the proposed laws and mixed-mode model, steel adherends have been adhesively bonded with a structural ductile adhesive material in order to fabricate a series of single and double strap......In this paper, a new traction-separation law is developed that represents the constitutive relation of ductile adhesive materials in Modes I, II, and III. The proposed traction-separation laws model the elastic, plastic, and failure material response of a ductile adhesive layer. Initially...

  15. Transportation of REE in the Ductile Shear Zone in Hetai Gold Deposit, Guangdong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨凤根; 王鹤年; 华仁民

    2003-01-01

    The REE transportation in two sorts of mylonites of ductile shear zone, in Hetai gold deposit, Guangdong province was studied. The results show that there is REE compositional variation regularly in the ductile shear zone. When mica-quartz schist and migmatite are changing into mylonites or ultramylonites, I.e., along with intensifying deformation, the contents of each rare earth element and the total contents of the LREE, HREE and REE increase or decrease regularly, but the REE patterns of the rock are accordant. The isocon diagram of the tectonic rocks before and after deformation shows that the REE compositional variation of the mylonites or ultramylonites are very small, but there is a few REE moving in or out in the rock deformation. The reason of the REE compositional variation is that there are volume change and fluid flow in the rock deformation, and it leads to the LREE relative enrichment and HREE relative loss.

  16. Theoretical investigation on improving the ductility of Rh{sub 3}V by ternary addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjula, M.; Sundareswari, M., E-mail: sundare65@gmail.com; Jayalakshmi, D. S.; Viswanathan, E. [Department of Physics, Sathyabama University, Chennai-600119, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-06-24

    The band structure calculations are performed on the intermetallic compounds Rh{sub 3}V and Rh{sub 3}V{sub x}(Al){sub 1-x} by Full Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave(FP-LAPW) method. Total energies are calculated as a function of volume and fitted to Birch-Murnaughan equation of state to find the lattice parameter and the other ground state properties. The ductility of these compounds has been analyzed using Cauchy’s Pressure, Pugh Rule and Poisson’s ratio. From this study we observed that Rh{sub 3}V is brittle while its alloy Rh{sub 3}V{sub 0.875}Al{sub 0.125} is ductile. Electron density plots are illustrated and compared.

  17. Thermal Stability of Austempered Ductile Iron Evaluated in a Temperature Range of 20-300K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid MYSZKA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to determine through changes in magnetic properties the stability of the austempered ductile iron (ADI microstructure during temperature changes in a range of 20 – 300 K. The measurements were taken in a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM using Fe27Ni2TiMoAlNb austenitic stainless steel and four types of austempered ductile iron obtained under various heat treatment conditions. The plotted curves showing changes in the magnetisation degree as a function of temperature had a number of characteristic points illustrating changes taking place in the microstructure. For each of the materials examined, the martensite start temperature Ms and the temperature range within which the martensitic transformation takes place were identified.

  18. Optimal scaling laws for ductile fracture derived from strain-gradient microplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokoua, Landry; Conti, Sergio; Ortiz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We perform an optimal-scaling analysis of ductile fracture in metals. We specifically consider the deformation up to failure of a slab of finite thickness subject to monotonically increasing normal opening displacements on its surfaces. We show that ductile fracture emerges as the net outcome of two competing effects: the sublinear growth characteristic of the hardening of metals and strain-gradient plasticity. We also put forth physical arguments that identify the intrinsic length of strain-gradient plasticity and the critical opening displacement for fracture. We show that, when Jc is renormalized in a manner suggested by the optimal scaling laws, the experimental data tends to cluster—with allowances made for experimental scatter—within bounds dependent on the hardening exponent but otherwise material independent.

  19. The effect of plastic constraint on the initiation of ductile tears in shipbuilding structural steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qing-fen; WANG Peng; REN Zheng-yi; LONG Ping

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of plastic constraint on the initiation of ductile tears in four different shipbuilding structural steels has been experimentally studied by measuring the J-integral and crack opening displacement COD at initiation in three-point bend specimens with deep and shallow notches. Experimental results of seven groups of different strength alloy steels show that both δì and Jì values of ductile tear from the shallow crack specimens which have less constraint flow field are significantly higher than those of deeply notched specimens. Slip-line-field analysis shows that, for shallow crack, the hydrostatic stress is lower than that from standard deeply cracked bend specimen, which develops a high level of crack tip constraint, provides a lower bound estimate of toughness, and will ensure an unduly conservative approach when applied to structural defects, especially if initiation values of COD and J-integral are used.

  20. Cohesive traction–separation laws for tearing of ductile metal plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Hutchinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    tip has advanced a distance of one or two plate thicknesses. Traction–separation laws are an essential component of finite element methods currently under development for analyzing fracture of large scale plate or shell structures. The present study resolves the sequence of failure details using......The failure process ahead of a mode I crack advancing in a ductile thin metal plate or sheet produces plastic dissipation through a sequence of deformation steps that include necking well ahead of the crack tip and shear localization followed by a slant fracture in the necked region somewhat closer....... For ductile structural materials, the dissipation generated during necking prior to the onset of shear localization is the dominant contribution; it scales with the plate thickness and is mesh-independent in the present numerical model. The energy associated with the shear localization and fracture...

  1. Brittle-ductile behavior of a nanocrack in nanocrystalline Ni: A quasicontinuum study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Yu-Fei; Yang Xin; Zhao Xing; Wang Shao-Qing

    2012-01-01

    The effects of stacking fault energy,unstable stacking fault energy,and unstable twinning fault energy on the fracture behavior of nanocrystalline Ni are studied via quasicontinuum simulations.Two semi-empirical potentials for Ni are used to vary the values of these generalized planar fault energies.When the above three energies are reduced,a brittle-to-ductile transition of the fracture behavior is observed.In the model with higher generalized planar fault energies,a nanocrack proceeds along a grain boundary,while in the model with lower energies,the tip of the nanocrack becomes blunt.A greater twinning tendency is also observed in the more ductile model.These results indicate that the fracture toughness of nanocrystalline face-centered-cubic metals and alloys might be efficiently improved by controlling the generalized planar fault energies.

  2. Hypersonic Velocities and Submicrocrack Formation in Ductile Polymers under Uniaxial Tensile Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichijyo, Shiro; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Shirouzu, Shigenori; Matsushige, Kazumi; Takemura, Tetuo

    1984-07-01

    Longitudinal hypersonic sound velocities in two kinds of ductile polymer, polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), were examined by Brillouin scattering. These two materials exhibited a decrease in hypersonic sound velocity (the softening phenomenon) when stress was applied, but the amount of softening as well as its angular dependence with respect to the stress direction were much smaller than those for a typical brittle polymer, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Furthermore, a correlation between these acoustic properties and the formation of submicrocracks was demonstrated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements. The difference in the anisotropies in the softening of sound velocity between ductile and brittle polymers is discussed from the viewpoint of the shape and density of the submicrocracks

  3. Ductile shear failure or plug failure of spot welds modelled by modified Gurson model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    For resistance spot welded shear-lab specimens, interfacial failure under ductile shearing or ductile plug failure are analyzed numerically, using a shear modified Gurson model. The interfacial shear failure occurs under very low stress triaxiality, where the original Gurson model would predict...... void nucleation and very limited void growth. Void coalescence would therefore be largely postponed. However, using the shear modification of the Gurson model, recently introduced by Nahshon and Hutchinson (2008) [1], failure prediction is possible at zero or even negative mean stress. Since......, this shear modification has too large effect in some cases where the stress triaxiality is rather high, an extension is proposed in the present study to better represent the damage development at moderate to high stress triaxiality, which is known to be well described by the Gurson model. Failure prediction...

  4. Influence of casting size and graphite nodule refinement on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.C.; Hsu, C.H.; Chang, C.C.; Feng, H.P. [Tatung Inst. of Tech., Raipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    1998-10-01

    Casting size affects the solidification cooling rate and microstructure of casting materials. Graphite nodules existing in the structure of ductile iron are an inherent and inert second phase that cannot be modified in subsequent heat-treatment processing. The matrix and the fineness of the second phase undoubtedly have some impact on the fracture toughness of the as-cast material, as does the subsequent heat treatment, as it alters the microstructure. This research applied austempering heat treatment to ductile iron of different section sizes and graphite nodule finenesses. The influence of these variables on the plane strain fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) of the castings so treated was compared to that of the as-cast state. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  5. Unnotched Charpy Impact Energy Transition Behavior of Austempered Engineering Grade Ductile Iron Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisakurek, Sukru Ergin; Ozel, Ahmet

    2014-04-01

    Unnotched Charpy impact energy transition behavior of five different engineering grade ductile iron castings, as specified by EN 1563 Standards, were examined in as-cast, as well as in austempered states. ADIs were produced with the maximum impact energy values permissible for the grades. Austempering treatment detrimented the sub-zero impact properties of the ferritic castings, but considerably enhanced those of the pearlitic-ferritic irons. The impact energy transition behavior of the austempered states of all the grades examined were noted to be determined by the progressive transformation of the unavoidable carbon-unsaturated and untransformed regions of the austenite remaining in the matrix of the austempered ductile iron to martensite with decreasing temperature.

  6. The abrasion and impact-abrasion behavior of austempered ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Lerner, Y.S. (University of Northern Iowa)

    1998-01-01

    Austempering of ductile irons has led to a new class of irons, Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), with improved mechanical strength and fracture toughness lacking in gray cast irons. Laboratory wear tests have been used to evaluate the abrasive and impact-abrasive wear behavior of a suite of ADIs. The use of high-stress, two-body abrasion, low-stress, three-body abrasion, and impact-abrasion tests provides a clear picture of the abrasive wear behavior of the ADIs and the mechanisms of material removal. When combined with hardness measurements, fracture toughness and a knowledge of the microstructure of the ADIs, the overall performance can be assessed relative to more wear resistant materials such as martensitic steels and high-chromium white cast irons

  7. Effect of Graphite Nodule Diameter on Water Embrittlement of Austempered Ductile Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Qi-zhou; WEI Bo-kang; TANAKA Yuichi

    2005-01-01

    Effects of graphite nodule diameter on the water embrittlement of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is studied. The water embrittlement mechanism is discussed. Due to water adhesion, local embrittlement occurs on the surface of ADI specimen, resulting in early fracture and significant reduction in tensile strength and elongation. The water embrittlement is the cracking of stress induced martensite formed during tensile deformation caused by hydrogen diffusion decomposed from water and as a result tensile strength and elongation of ADI are remarkably reduced. The segregation of alloying elements in ductile iron is weakened with decreasing nodule diameter, reducing the residual austenite in grain boundaries, then decreasing the amount of stress induced martensite during tensile plastic deformation and finally restraining ADI water embrittlement.

  8. Multi-Response Optimization of Carbidic Austempered Ductile Iron Production Parameters using Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapal, P.; Mohamed Nazirudeen, S. S.; Chandrasekar, A.

    2012-04-01

    Carbide Austempered Ductile Iron (CADI) is the family of ductile iron containing wear resistance alloy carbides in the ausferrite matrix. This CADI is manufactured by selecting and characterizing the proper material composition through the melting route done. In an effort to arrive the optimal production parameters of multi responses, Taguchi method and Grey relational analysis have been applied. To analyze the effect of production parameters on the mechanical properties signal-to-noise ratio and Grey relational grade have been calculated based on the design of experiments. An analysis of variance was calculated to find the amount of contribution of factors on mechanical properties and their significance. The analytical results of Taguchi method were compared with the experimental values, and it shows that both are identical.

  9. Thermal Stability of Austempered Ductile Iron Evaluated in a Temperature Range of 20-300K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid MYSZKA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to determine through changes in magnetic properties the stability of the austempered ductile iron (ADI microstructure during temperature changes in a range of 20 – 300 K. The measurements were taken in a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM using Fe27Ni2TiMoAlNb austenitic stainless steel and four types of austempered ductile iron obtained under various heat treatment conditions. The plotted curves showing changes in the magnetisation degree as a function of temperature had a number of characteristic points illustrating changes taking place in the microstructure. For each of the materials examined, the martensite start temperature Ms and the temperature range within which the martensitic transformation takes place were identified.

  10. In-Situ Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Iron Using Neutron Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druschitz, Alan [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Aristizabal, Ricardo [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Druschitz, Edward [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Ostrander, M [Rex Heat Treat, Anniston, AL

    2012-01-01

    Intercritically austempered ductile irons hold promise for applications requiring fatigue durability, excellent castability, low production energy requirements, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and excellent machinability. In the present study, four different ductile iron alloys, containing manganese and nickel as the primary austenite-stabilizing elements, were heat treated to obtain different quantities of austenite in the final microstructure. This paper reports the microstructures and phases present in these alloys. Further, lattice strains and diffraction elastic constants in various crystallographic directions and the transformation characteristics of the austenite as a function of applied stress were determined using in-situ loading with neutron diffraction at the second generation Neutron Residual Stress Facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  11. In Situ Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Iron Using Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschitz, Alan P.; Aristizabal, Ricardo E.; Druschitz, Edward; Hubbard, C. R.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Walker, L.; Ostrander, Mel

    2012-05-01

    Intercritically austempered ductile irons hold promise for applications requiring fatigue durability, excellent castability, low production energy requirements, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and excellent machinability. In the present study, four different ductile iron alloys, containing manganese and nickel as the primary austenite-stabilizing elements, were heat treated to obtain different quantities of austenite in the final microstructure. This article reports the microstructures and phases present in these alloys. Furthermore, lattice strains and diffraction elastic constants in various crystallographic directions and the transformation characteristics of the austenite were determined as a function of applied stress using in situ loading during neutron diffraction at the second generation Neutron Residual Stress Facility at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  12. Influence of Microstructure on Strength and Ductility in Fully Pearlitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Toribio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the relationship between the microstructure and both strength and ductility in eutectoid pearlitic steel. It is seen how standard mechanical properties and fracture micromechanisms are affected by heat treatment and the resulting microstructure in the material. The yield stress, the ultimate tensile strength and the ductility (measured by means of the reduction in area exhibit a rising trend with the increasing cooling rate (associated with smaller pearlite interlamellar spacing and a lower pearlitic colony size, while the strain for maximum load shows a decreasing tendency with the afore-said rising cooling rate. With regard to the fracture surface, its appearance becomes more brittle for lower cooling rates, so that the fracture process zone exhibits a larger area with observable pearlite lamellae and a lower percentage of microvoids.

  13. High strength and high ductility behavior of 6061-T6 alloy after laser shock processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Saklakoglu, Nursen

    2016-02-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of 6061-T6 alloy which was subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) at high strain rates during laser shock processing (LSP) was researched. In LSP-treated materials, the near surface microstructural change was examined by TEM and fracture surfaces after tensile testing were examined by SEM. An increase in strength of metallic materials brings about the decrease in ductility. In this study, the results showed that LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy exhibited both high strength and high ductility. TEM observation showed that stacking fault (SF) ribbon enlarged, deformation twins formed and twin boundary increased in LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy. This observation was an indication of stacking fault energy (SFE) decrease. Work hardening capability was recovered after LSP impacts.

  14. Bifurcation and neck formation as a precursor to ductile fracture during high rate extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, L.B.; Soerensen, N.J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A block of ductile material, typically a segment of a plate or shell, being deformed homogeneously in simple plane strain extension commonly undergoes a bifurcation in deformation mode to nonuniform straining in the advanced stages of plastic flow. The focus here is on the influence of material inertia on the bifurcation process, particularly on the formation of diffuse necks as precursors to dynamic ductile fracture. The issue is considered from two points of view, first within the context of the theory of bifurcation of rate-independent, incrementally linear materials and then in terms of the complete numerical solution of a boundary value problem for an elastic-viscoplastic material. It is found that inertia favors the formation of relatively short wavelength necks as observed in shaped charge break-up and dynamic fragmentation.

  15. Manufacturing of High-Strength and High-Ductility Pearlitic Steel Wires Using Noncircular Drawing Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Hyun Moo; Joo, Ho Seon; Im, Yong-Taek [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sun Kwang [KITECH, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Son, Il-Heon; Bae, Chul Min [POSCO, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    In this study, a noncircular drawing (NCD) sequence for manufacturing high-strength and high-ductility pearlitic steel wires was investigated. Multipass NCD was conducted up to the 12th pass at room temperature with two processing routes (defined as the NCDA and NCDB), and compared with the wire drawing (WD). During the torsion test, delamination fracture in the drawn wire was observed in the 10th pass of the WD whereas it was not observed until the 12th pass of the NCDB. From X-ray diffraction, the circular texture component that increases the likelihood of delamination fracture of the drawn wire was rarely observed in the NCDB. Thus, the improved ability of the multipass NCDB to manufacture high-strength pearlitic steel wires with high torsional ductility compared to the WD (by reducing the likelihood of delamination fracture) was demonstrated.

  16. Predictions of mixed mode interface crack growth using a cohesive zone model for ductile fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    Special interface elements that account for ductile failure by the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence are used to analyse crack growth. In these elements the stress component tangential to the interface is accounted for, as determined by the requirement of compatibility with the surrou......Special interface elements that account for ductile failure by the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence are used to analyse crack growth. In these elements the stress component tangential to the interface is accounted for, as determined by the requirement of compatibility...... with the surrounding material in the tangential direction. Thus, the present interface description incorporates the important effect of stress triaxiality on damage evolution, which is not part of the usual cohesive zone models. The interface elements have been used previously for mode I loading conditions...... Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. Damage initiation in brittle and ductile materials as revealed from a fractoluminescence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Chmel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A set of heterogeneous and homogeneous materials differing in their brittle and ductile characteristics (granite, marble, silica ceramics, silicon carbide, organic glass were subjected to impact damaging by a falling weight. Multiple chemical bond ruptures produced by elastic waves propagating from a damaged zone were accompanied by the photon emission generated throughout the sample (tribo- or fractoluminescence, FL. The statistical analysis of the FL time series detected with high resolution (10 ns showed that the energy release distributions in brittle solids follow the power law typical for the correlated nucleation of primary defects. At the same time, the formation of damaged sites in ductile materials (marble and organic glass was found to be fully random.

  18. DUCTILITY BEHAVIOR FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAMS STRENGTHENED WITH EXTERNALLY BONDED GLASS FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER LAMINATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariappan Mahalingam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the results of an experimental investigation conducted on Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC beams with externally bonded Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP laminates with a view to study their strength and ductility. A total of ten beams, 150×250 mm in cross-section were tested in the laboratory over an effective span of 2800 mm. Three fiber reinforced concrete beams were used as reference beams. Six fiber reinforced concrete beams were provided with externally bonded GFRP laminates. One concrete beam was left virgin without any fiber reinforcement and external GFRP laminates. All the beams were tested until failure. The variables considered included volume fraction of fiber reinforcement and stiffness of GFRP laminates. The static responses of all the beams were evaluated in terms of strength, stiffness and ductility. The test results show that the beams provided with externally bonded GFRP laminates exhibit improved performance over the beams with internal fiber reinforcement.

  19. Production and Machining of Thin Wall Gray and Ductile Cast Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischman, E.H. (INEEL POC); Li, H.; Griffin, R.; Bates, C.E.; Eleftheriou, E.

    2000-11-03

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham, in cooperation with the American Foundry Society, companies across North America, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a project to develop an understanding of the factors that control the machinability of cast gray and ductile iron. Differences of as much as 500% have been found in machinability have been observed at the same strength. The most machinable irons were those with a high cell counts and few carbonitride inclusions. Additions of tin and copper can be added to both gray and ductile iron to stabilize the pearlite, but excessive additions (above those required to produce the desired pearlite content) degrade the machinability.

  20. Statistical model with two order parameters for ductile and soft fiber bundles in nanoscience and biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Traditional fiber bundles models (FBMs) have been an effective tool to understand brittle heterogeneous systems. However, fiber bundles in modern nano- and bioapplications demand a new generation of FBM capturing more complex deformation processes in addition to damage. In the context of loose bundle systems and with reference to time-independent plasticity and soft biomaterials, we formulate a generalized statistical model for ductile fracture and nonlinear elastic problems capable of handling more simultaneous deformation mechanisms by means of two order parameters (as opposed to one). As the first rational FBM for coupled damage problems, it may be the cornerstone for advanced statistical models of heterogeneous systems in nanoscience and materials design, especially to explore hierarchical and bio-inspired concepts in the arena of nanobiotechnology. Applicative examples are provided for illustrative purposes at last, discussing issues in inverse analysis (i.e., nonlinear elastic polymer fiber and ductile Cu submicron bars arrays) and direct design (i.e., strength prediction).

  1. Numerical modelling of solidification of thin walled hypereutectic ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Hattel, Jesper; Tiedje, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of solidification of ductile cast iron is normally based on a model where graphite nodules are surrounded by an austenite shell. The two phases are then growing as two concentric spheres governed by diffusion of carbon through the austenite shell. Experiments have however shown...... simulation of thin-walled ductile iron castings. Simulations have been performed with a 1-D numerical solidi¬fication model that includes the precipitation of non-eutectic austenite during the eutectic stage. Results from the simulations have been compared with experimental castings with wall thick...... the presence of austenite dendrites even in hypereutectic castings. In thin-walled castings the presence of austenite dendrites is even more pronounced, which increases the risk of shrinkage porosities. This off-eutectic austenite is therefore an important part that should be taken into account during...

  2. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: Heliumisotope trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2007-10-07

    Heat and mass are injected into the shallow crust when mantle fluids are able to flow through the ductile lower crust. Minimum 3He/4He ratios in surface fluids from the northern Basin and Range province, western North America increase systematically from low, crustal values in the east to high, mantle values in the west, a regional trend that correlates with the rates of active crustal deformation. The highest ratios occur where the extension and shear strain rates are greatest. The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active trans-tensional deformation indicates a deformation enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere in regions even where there is no significant magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high-{sup 3}He/{sup 4}He anomalies signifying hidden magmatic activity and/or deep fluid production with locally enhanced permeability, identifying zones with high resource potential, particularly for geothermal energy development.

  3. Application of percolation model on the brittle to ductile transition for polystyrene and polyolefin elastomer blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The percolation model was applied in the study of brittle to ductile transition (BDT of polystyrene (PS and polyolefin elastomer (POE blends. Based on the interparticle distance and percolation model, stress volume (Vs can be expressed by volume fraction (Vr and ratio of the diameter of stress volume and the diameter of the domain (S/d. The percolation threshold (Vsc varied from π/6 to 0.65. From the results of the Charpy impact strength of the blends, the percolation threshold for the brittle to ductile transition of PS/POE blend is 14 wt% POE, corresponding to Vsc~0.5, which is consistent with the calculated value of π/6. Morphology observations show that the percolation point is correlated with the phase inversion of the blend.

  4. Strain and shear types of the Louzidian ductile shear zone in southern Chifeng, Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Louzidian ductile shear zone at the south of Chifeng strikes NE-SW and dips SE at low-medium- angles. This ductile shear zone is mainly composed of granitic mylonite, which grades structurally upward into a chloritized zone, a microbreccia zone, a brittle fault and a gouge zone. All these zones share similar planar attitudes, but contain different linear attitudes and kinematic indicators. Finite strain measurements were performed on feldspar porphyroclasts using the Fry method. These meas- urements yield Fulin indexes of 1.25―3.30, Lode’s parameters of -0.535―-0.112 and strain parameters of 0.41―0.75 for the protomylonite, respectively. These data are plotted within the apparent constric- tional field in Fulin and Hossack diagrams. In contrast, for the mylonite, corresponding parameters are 0.99―1.43, -0.176―-0.004 and 0.63―0.82, respectively, and located in the apparent constrictional field close to the plane strain. The mean kinematic vorticity numbers of the protomylonite and mylonite by using three methods of polar Mohr circle, porphyroclast hyperbolic and oblique foliation, are in the range of 0.67―0.95, suggesting that the ductile shearing is accommodated by general shearing that is dominated by simple shear. Combination of the finite strain and kinematic vorticity indicates that shear type was lengthening shear and resulted in L-tectonite at the initial stage of deformation and the shear type gradually changed into lengthening-thinning shear and produced L-S-tectonite with the uplifting of the shear zone and accumulating of strain. These kinds of shear types only produce a/ab strain facies, so the lineation in the ductile shear zone could not deflect 90° in the progressively deformation.

  5. Optimal Scaling in Solids Undergoing Ductile Fracture by Void Sheet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokoua, Landry; Conti, Sergio; Ortiz, Michael

    2014-04-01

    This work is concerned with the derivation of optimal scaling laws, in the sense of matching lower and upper bounds on the energy, for a solid undergoing ductile fracture. The specific problem considered concerns a material sample in the form of an infinite slab of finite thickness subjected to prescribed opening displacements on its two surfaces. The solid is assumed to obey deformation-theory of plasticity and, in order to further simplify the analysis, we assume isotropic rigid-plastic deformations with zero plastic spin. When hardening exponents are given values consistent with observation, the energy is found to exhibit sublinear growth. We regularize the energy through the addition of nonlocal energy terms of the strain-gradient plasticity type. This nonlocal regularization has the effect of introducing an intrinsic length scale into the energy. Under these assumptions, ductile fracture emerges as the net result of two competing effects: whereas the sublinear growth of the local energy promotes localization of deformation to failure planes, the nonlocal regularization stabilizes this process, thus resulting in an orderly progression towards failure and a well-defined specific fracture energy. The optimal scaling laws derived here show that ductile fracture results from localization of deformations to void sheets, and that it requires a well-defined energy per unit fracture area. In particular, fractal modes of fracture are ruled out under the assumptions of the analysis. The optimal scaling laws additionally show that ductile fracture is cohesive in nature, that is, it obeys a well-defined relation between tractions and opening displacements. Finally, the scaling laws supply a link between micromechanical properties and macroscopic fracture properties. In particular, they reveal the relative roles that surface energy and microplasticity play as contributors to the specific fracture energy of the material.

  6. Homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage model for ductile failure of materials containing heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Bai, Jie; Paquet, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This paper develops an accurate and computationally efficient homogenization-based continuum plasticity-damage (HCPD) model for macroscopic analysis of ductile failure in porous ductile materials containing brittle inclusions. Example of these materials are cast alloys such as aluminum and metal matrix composites. The overall framework of the HCPD model follows the structure of the anisotropic Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) type elasto-plasticity model for porous ductile materials. The HCPD model is assumed to be orthotropic in an evolving material principal coordinate system throughout the deformation history. The GTN model parameters are calibrated from homogenization of evolving variables in representative volume elements (RVE) of the microstructure containing inclusions and voids. Micromechanical analyses for this purpose are conducted by the locally enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) [Hu, C., Ghosh, S., 2008. Locally enhanced Voronoi cell finite element model (LE-VCFEM) for simulating evolving fracture in ductile microstructures containing inclusions. Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. 76(12), 1955-1992]. The model also introduces a novel void nucleation criterion from micromechanical damage evolution due to combined inclusion and matrix cracking. The paper discusses methods for estimating RVE length scales in microstructures with non-uniform dispersions, as well as macroscopic characteristic length scales for non-local constitutive models. Comparison of results from the anisotropic HCPD model with homogenized micromechanics shows excellent agreement. The HCPD model has a huge efficiency advantage over micromechanics models. Hence, it is a very effective tool in predicting macroscopic damage in structures with direct reference to microstructural composition.

  7. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions - description of the principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, L.

    2012-08-01

    The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic materials. The so-called Gurson-Perrin model allows representing damage development with respect to strain-rate conditions. In order to fill a lack in current experimental procedures, we propose an experimental project able to test and validate the Gurson-Perrin model under various dynamic conditions and for different stress triaxiality levels.

  8. Effect of small additions of vanadium and niobium on structure and mechanical properties of ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraś E.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of investigations of influence of small additions of vanadium (up to 0,15 % V and niobium (up to 0,04% Nb on structure of ductile iron is presented in this work. Effect of these additions on distribution of graphite nodule diameter, nodule count, fraction and carbide count have been determined. Investigations of effect of small additions of vanadium and niobium on mechanical properties taking into account tensile strength, yield strength and elongation have also been made.

  9. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials

    OpenAIRE

    K. Woll; Bergamaschi, A; Avchachov, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Gier, S.; Pauly, C.; Leibenguth, P.; Wagner, C; Nordlund, K.; Mücklich, F

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the ...

  10. Effect of low temperatures on charpy impact toughness of austempered ductile irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabov, Mikhail V.; Lerner, Yury S.; Fahmy, Mohammed F.

    2002-10-01

    Impact properties of standard American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) grades of austempered ductile iron (ADI) were evaluated at subzero temperatures in unnotched and V-notched conditions and compared with ferritic and pearlitic grades of ductile irons (DIs). It was determined that there is a decrease in impact toughness for all ADI grades when there is a decrease in content of retained austenite and a decrease in test temperature, from room temperature (RT) to -60 °C. However, the difference in impact toughness values was not so noticeable for low retained austenite containing grade 5 ADI at both room and subzero temperatures as it was for ADI grade 1. Furthermore, the difference in impact toughness values of V-notched specimens of ADI grades 1 and 5 tested at -40 °C was minimal. The impact behaviors of ADI grade 5 and ferritic DI were found to be more stable than those of ADI grades 1, 2, 3, and 4 and pearlitic DI when the testing temperature was decreased. The impact toughness of ferritic DI was higher than that of ADI grades 1 and 2 at both -40 °C and -60 °C. The impact properties of ADI grades 4 and 5 were found to be higher than that of pearlitic DI at both -40 °C and -60 °C. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of fracture surfaces revealed mixed ductile and quasicleavage rupture morphology types in all ADI samples tested at both -40 °C and -60 °C. With decreasing content of retained austenite and ductility, the number of quasicleavage facets increased from ADI grade 1-5. It was also found that fracture morphology of ADI did not experience significant changes when the testing temperature decreased. Evaluation of the bending angle was used to support impact-testing data. Designers and users of ADI castings may use the data developed in this research as a reference.

  11. Effect of Austempering on Plastic Behavior of Some Austempered Ductile Iron Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Jakob; Larsson, Dan; Svensson, Ingvar L

    2011-01-01

    A numerical description relating microstructure to elastic and plastic deformation behavior would make it possible to simulate the mechanical behavior of complex cast components with tailored material properties. Limited work and data have however been published regarding the connection between microstructure and plastic behavior of austempered ductile irons (ADI). In the current work the effects of austempering temperature and austempering time on the strength coefficient and the strain hard...

  12. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions - description of the principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillon L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic materials. The so-called Gurson-Perrin model allows representing damage development with respect to strain-rate conditions. In order to fill a lack in current experimental procedures, we propose an experimental project able to test and validate the Gurson-Perrin model under various dynamic conditions and for different stress triaxiality levels.

  13. INVESTIGATION ON HOT DUCTILITY AND STRENGTH OF CONTINUOUS CASTING SLAB FOR AH32 STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Y. Li; X.F. Li; L.G. Ao

    2006-01-01

    By means of Gleeble-1500 testing machine, the simulation of continuous casting process for AH32 steel was carried out and hot ductility and strength were determined. The cracking sensitivity was studied under the different temperatures and strain rates. The Precipitations of AlN at different temperatures and the fractures of high-temperature tensile samples were observed by using TEM (transmission electron microscope) and SEM (scanning electron microscope). The factors affecting the brittle temperature zone were discussed.

  14. Non-Local Ductile Damage Formulations for Sheet Bulk Metal Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beese, Steffen; Loehnert, Stefan; Wriggers, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A ductile damage model for sheet bulk metal forming processes and its efficient and accurate treatment in the context of the Finite Element Method is presented. The damage is introduced as a non-local field to overcome pathological mesh dependency. Since standard elements tend to show volumetric locking in the bulk forming process a mixed formulation is implemented in the commercial software simufact.forming to obtain better results.

  15. Influence of rare earths on shrinkage porosity in thin walled ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2009-01-01

    Ductile cast iron has been cast in test bars with thickness from 2 to 10 mm. The rare earth elements La and Ce have been added to some of the castings to evaluate their influence on microstructure and shrinkage tendency. Both La and Ce increased the graphite nodule count, especially for thickness...... the temperature T-1, which is controlled by the growth of off-eutectic austenite dendrites, increased the shrinkage tendency....

  16. Machinable, Thin-Walled, Gray and Ductile Iron Casting Production, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Bates; Hanjun Li; Robin Griffin

    2003-12-08

    This report presents the results of research conducted to determine the effects of normal and abnormal processing and compositional variations on machinability (tool wear rate) of gray and ductile iron. The procedures developed allow precise tool wear measurements to be made and interpreted in terms of microstructures and compositions. Accurate data allows the most efficient ways for improving machinability to be determined without sacrificing properties of the irons.

  17. Hot Ductility and Compression Deformation Behavior of TRIP980 at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Li, Haiyang; Gan, Bin; Zhao, Xue; Yao, Yi; Wang, Li

    2017-04-01

    The hot ductility tests of a kind of 980 MPa class Fe-0.31C (wt pct) TRIP steel (TRIP980) with the addition of Ti/V/Nb were conducted on a Gleeble-3500 thermomechanical simulator in the temperatures ranging from 873 K to 1573 K (600 °C to 1300 °C) at a constant strain rate of 0.001 s-1. It is found that the hot ductility trough ranges from 873 K to 1123 K (600 °C to 850 °C). The recommended straightening temperatures are from 1173 K to 1523 K (900 °C to 1250 °C). The isothermal hot compression deformation behavior was also studied by means of Gleeble-3500 in the temperatures ranging from 1173 K to 1373 K (900 °C to 1100 °C) at strain rates ranging from 0.01 s-1 to 10 s-1. The results show that the peak stress decreases with the increasing temperature and the decreasing strain rate. The deformation activation energy of the test steel is 436.7 kJ/mol. The hot deformation equation of the steel has been established, and the processing maps have been developed on the basis of experimental data and the principle of dynamic materials model (DMM). By analyzing the processing maps of strains of 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9, it is found that dynamic recrystallization occurs in the peak power dissipation efficiency domain, which is the optimal area of hot working. Finally, the factors influencing hot ductility and thermal activation energy of the test steel were investigated by means of microscopic analysis. It indicates that the additional microalloying elements play important roles both in the loss of hot ductility and in the enormous increase of deformation activation energy for the TRIP980 steel.

  18. Controlling factors for the brittle-to-ductile transition in tungsten single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbsch; Riedle; Hartmaier; Fischmeister

    1998-11-13

    Materials performance in structural applications is often restricted by a transition from ductile response to brittle fracture with decreasing temperature. This transition is currently viewed as being controlled either by dislocation mobility or by the nucleation of dislocations. Fracture experiments on tungsten single crystals reported here provide evidence for the importance of dislocation nucleation for the fracture toughness in the semibrittle regime. However, it is shown that the transition itself, in general, is controlled by dislocation mobility rather than by nucleation.

  19. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp(2) carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes.

  20. Relationship between ductile shear zone and gold mineralization——Taking Jinchangyu gold mine, Eastern Hebei Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林传勇; 何永年; 陈孝德; 史兰斌; 张小鸥; 祁学义; 郝荣; 龚瑞勋; 张继林

    1995-01-01

    Take Jinchangyu gold mine in Eastern Hebei Province, China, for example, the characteristics, formation conditions, evolution process of ductile shear zone, as well as its relation to gold mineralization have been in detail studied. It is suggested that the ductile shear zone developed in source bed may have a close relation to gold mineralization. The stress cycle during the development of the ductile shear zone acts as a driving force of the directional migration of the auriferous fluid, while the associated retrograde metamorphism may provide geochemical conditions necessary to the activation, migration, enrichment and precipitation of gold. The development of ductile shear zone provides not only the channel way for the migration of the auriferous fluid, but also a suitable site for gold precipitation.

  1. Fabrication of a 2014Al-SiC/2014Al Sandwich Structure Composite with Good Tensile Strength and Ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xian; Zhao, Yu-Guang; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Wu, Min; Pei, Chang-hao; Chen, Chao; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    A sandwich structure laminate composed of a ductile 2014Al inter-layer and two nanoscale SiC reinforced 2014Al (SiC/2014Al) composite outer layers was successfully fabricated through the combination of powder metallurgy and hot rolling. The ductile 2014Al inter-layer effectively improved the processability of the sandwiched laminates. Tensile test revealed that the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the sandwiched laminate were 287 and 470 MPa, respectively, compared with 235 and 425 MPa for monolithic 2014Al. The good performance of the sandwiched laminate results from the strong bonding between the SiC/2014Al composites layer and the ductile 2014Al layer. Thus, the sandwich structure with a composite surface and ductile core is effective for increasing the strength and toughness of composite laminates.

  2. Fabrication of a 2014Al-SiC/2014Al Sandwich Structure Composite with Good Tensile Strength and Ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xian; Zhao, Yu-Guang; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Wu, Min; Pei, Chang-hao; Chen, Chao; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2016-09-01

    A sandwich structure laminate composed of a ductile 2014Al inter-layer and two nanoscale SiC reinforced 2014Al (SiC/2014Al) composite outer layers was successfully fabricated through the combination of powder metallurgy and hot rolling. The ductile 2014Al inter-layer effectively improved the processability of the sandwiched laminates. Tensile test revealed that the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the sandwiched laminate were 287 and 470 MPa, respectively, compared with 235 and 425 MPa for monolithic 2014Al. The good performance of the sandwiched laminate results from the strong bonding between the SiC/2014Al composites layer and the ductile 2014Al layer. Thus, the sandwich structure with a composite surface and ductile core is effective for increasing the strength and toughness of composite laminates.

  3. High temperature strength and ductility of the (C+N) strengthening Fe-Cr-Mn(W,V) steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Fe-Cr-Mn(W, V) austenite steels used as low radioactive structural materials in fusion reactor have been investigated. The resultsshow that the high temperature strength and the creep fracture life of Fe-Cr-Mn(W, V) steels can be effectively improved through (C+N) complex-strengthening, so can be the high temperature ductility. The strength and ductility of the steels are superior to that of SUS316 steels and JPCAS below 673K. The relationship between strength, ductility andthe formation temperature is related to the evolution of deformation microstructure. The fracture and microstructure observation above 673Kindicates that the main way to further improve ductility at high temperature is the control of carbide coarsening at the grain boundaries.

  4. Identification of Relevant Work Parameters of Ladle Furnace While Melting the High Ductility Steel and High-Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warzecha M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, secondary metallurgical treatment in ladle furnace during smelting the high carbon steel and steel with improved ductility for cold-deforming, under industrial conditions were analyzed.

  5. Shear Capacity and Failure Behavior of Steel-Reinforced High Ductile Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingke Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The shear behavior of six high ductile fiber reinforced concrete (HDC beams is studied to investigate the influence of shear-span ratio and HDC mechanical property on the improvement of the shear failure mode and shear capacity of short beams. Four steel-reinforced high ductile concrete beams (SHDC beams with different shear span ratios are tested under concentrated load at midspan. To study the effect of stirrups and steel on the shear capacity of short beams, two additional specimens without steel but one including stirrups are investigated. The main aspects of SHDC beams are discussed in detail, such as failure mode, deformability, and shear capacity. Test results show that the SHDC short beams keep high residual bearing capacity and great integrity when suffering from large deformation. It is revealed that HDC increased the shear ductility and improved the shear failure mode of short beams. A comparison with the shear equations of Chinese YB9082-2006 shows that the Chinese Code equation provides conservative estimation for HDC beams. This study proposes modifications to the equation for predicting the shear capacity of HDC beams.

  6. Improved Seismic Risk Assessment of Non-ductile Reinforced Concrete Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, Blaine Jacob

    Existing reinforced concrete (RC) buildings built to non-ductile specifications are highly susceptible to damage given lateral loads induced from earthquake ground motions. To explore the effects of these ground motions, non-linear finite element analyses are being used in research and practice to model representations of non-ductile RC buildings as well as conduct probabilistic analyses of their seismic fragility in as-built and retrofitted conditions. This study examines the influence of modeling fidelity on the response and fragility of non-ductile RC buildings, testing the role of explicitly capturing local failure in the finite element model as well as providing new insight into the probability of component damage levels given system level failure. Also, a survey is presented to assess the tagging decisions made during post-earthquake rapid evaluations of reinforced concrete buildings and compare these results to empirical data from past earthquake reconnaissance reports. The results of this study will provide insight into several key issues in seismic performance assessment for RC buildings.

  7. Ductility of a 60-Story Shearwall Frame-Belt Truss (Virtual Outrigger Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudjisuryadi P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches have been conducted to study Shearwall-frame combined with belt truss as structural system (SFBT, in which the post-elastic behavior and ductility of this structural system are explored. A 60-story SFBT building, with a ductility set equal to 3.75 (value for fully ductile cantilever wall is considered. The Elastic Response Spectrum used for design is taken from Zone 2 of Indonesian Seismic Map. Capacity design method according to Indonesian Concrete Code is employed. The seismic performance is analyzed using static non-linear push-over analysis and dynamic non-linear time-history analysis. Spectrum consistent ground motions of the May 18, 1940 El-Centro earthquake N-S components scaled to maximum accelerations of various return periods (50, 200, and 500 years are used for analysis. The results of this study show that plastic hinges mainly developed in beams above the truss, columns below the truss, and bottom levels of the wall. The building shows no indication of structural instability.

  8. Dislocation Strengthening without Ductility Trade-off in Metastable Austenitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiabin; Jin, Yongbin; Fang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chenxu; Feng, Qiong; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yuzeng; Suo, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Tianlin; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xi; Fang, Youtong; Wei, Yujie; Meng, Liang; Lu, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Strength and ductility are mutually exclusive if they are manifested as consequence of the coupling between strengthening and toughening mechanisms. One notable example is dislocation strengthening in metals, which invariably leads to reduced ductility. However, this trend is averted in metastable austenitic steels. A one-step thermal mechanical treatment (TMT), i.e. hot rolling, can effectively enhance the yielding strength of the metastable austenitic steel from 322 ± 18 MPa to 675 ± 15 MPa, while retaining both the formability and hardenability. It is noted that no boundaries are introduced in the optimized TMT process and all strengthening effect originates from dislocations with inherited thermal stability. The success of this method relies on the decoupled strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metastable austenitic steels, in which yield strength is controlled by initial dislocation density while ductility is retained by the capability to nucleate new dislocations to carry plastic deformation. Especially, the simplicity in processing enables scaling and industrial applications to meet the challenging requirements of emissions reduction. On the other hand, the complexity in the underlying mechanism of dislocation strengthening in this case may shed light on a different route of material strengthening by stimulating dislocation activities, rather than impeding motion of dislocations.

  9. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-10-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  10. Near-fault ground motions with prominent acceleration pulses: pulse characteristics and ductility demand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mai Tong; Vladimir Rzhevsky; Dai Junwu; George C Lee; Qi Jincheng; Qi Xiaozhai

    2007-01-01

    Major earthquakes of last 15 years (e.g., Northridge 1994, Kobe 1995 and Chi-Chi 1999) have shown that many near-fault ground motions possess prominent acceleration pulses. Some of the prominent ground acceleration pulses are related to large ground velocity pulses, others are caused by mechanisms that are totally different from those causing the velocity pulses or fling steps. Various efforts to model acceleration pulses have been reported in the literature. In this paper, research results from a recent study of acceleration pulse prominent ground motions and an analysis of structural damage induced by acceleration pulses are summarized. The main results of the study include: (1) temporal characteristics of acceleration pulses; (2) ductility demand spectrum of simple acceleration pulses with respect to equivalent classes of dynamic systems and pulse characteristic parameters; and (3) estimation of fundamental period change under the excitation of strong acceleration pulses. By using the acceleration pulse induced linear acceleration spectrum and the ductility demand spectrum,a simple procedure has been developed to estimate the ductility demand and the fundamental period change of a reinforced concrete (RC) structure under the impact of a strong acceleration pulse.

  11. Strain Rate Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of Graphite Platelet Reinforced Vinyl Ester Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmananda Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, the fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces of vinyl ester based nanocomposites were estimated applying classical method on 3D digital microscopic images. The fracture energy and fracture toughness were obtained from fractal dimensions. A noteworthy observation, the strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of vinyl ester based nanocomposites, is reinvestigated in the current study. The candidate materials of xGnP (exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets reinforced and with additional CTBN (Carboxyl Terminated Butadiene Nitrile toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites that are subjected to both quasi-static and high strain rate indirect tensile load using the traditional Brazilian test method. High-strain rate indirect tensile testing is performed with a modified Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. Pristine vinyl ester shows ductile deformation under quasi-static loading and brittle failure when subjected to high-strain rate loading. This observation reconfirms the previous research findings on strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of this material system. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Contribution of nanoreinforcement to the tensile properties is reported in this paper.

  12. The influence of strain rate and hydrogen on the plane-strain ductility of Zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-strain deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high strain rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-strain deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit strain at the onset of localized necking and the fracture strain. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of strain rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-strain conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture strain but no clear effect on limit strain. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.

  13. Ductility Enhancement of Post-Northridge Connections by Multilongitudinal Voids in the Beam Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepanta Naimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the earthquakes in Northridge and Kobe in 1994 and 1995, respectively, many investigations have been carried out towards improving the strength and ductility of steel beam to column pre- and post-Northridge connections. In order to achieve these objectives, recent researches are mainly focused on three principles: reducing the beam section to improve the beam ductility, adding different kinds of slit damper to beam and column flanges to absorb and dissipate the input earthquake energy in the connection and strengthening the connection area using additional elements such as rib plates, cover plates, and flange plates to keep the plastic hinges away from the column face. This paper presents a reduced beam section approach via the introduction of multilongitudinal voids (MLV in the beam web for various beam depths varying from 450 mm to 912 mm. ANSYS finite element program was used to simulate the three different sizes of SAC sections: SAC3, SAC5, and SAC7. Results showed an improvement in the connection ductility since the input energy was dissipated uniformly along the beam length and the total rotation of the connection was over four percent radian.

  14. Views of TAGSI on effects of neutron irradiation on ductile tearing in ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, J.F. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lidbury, D.P.G. [Serco Technical and Assurance Services, Walton House, 404 Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6GA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: david.lidbury@serco.com

    2009-07-15

    The paper reviews information pertaining to effects of neutron irradiation on 'upper-shelf' Charpy impact behaviour and on elastic/plastic fracture mechanics characterising parameters, again for 'upper shelf' conditions, in which the initiation and early growth of a crack involve ductile tearing. The hardening and associated reduction in strain-hardening capacity induced by irradiation gives rise to a decrease in Charpy upper shelf energy. Effects on J-based parameters are more complicated. The material resistance parameters tend to increase for low dose, but decrease at high dose, when the decrease in crack-tip ductility outweighs the effect of hardening. High doses can produce 'fast shear' fracture, which propagates rapidly and is therefore more likely to induce brittle cleavage fracture. The situation is exacerbated if the irradiation also promotes inter-granular segregation and fracture, hence reducing the local brittle fracture stress. For the levels of irradiation experienced by the types of UK civil reactors in operation, no fracture instability is expected to arise as a result of ductile fracture mechanisms alone.

  15. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, K; Bergamaschi, A; Avchachov, K; Djurabekova, F; Gier, S; Pauly, C; Leibenguth, P; Wagner, C; Nordlund, K; Mücklich, F

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (± 0.33) ms(-1) and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material.

  16. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2010-03-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  17. Mechanical, physical, and corrosion characteristics of 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Jaafar, Roseleena; Ramli, Abdullah; Faitullah, Ahmad

    2010-03-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of 2% vanadium alloyed austempered ductile iron on mechanical properties and microstructure and also to determine the desired austempering temperatures of vanadium alloyed ductile iron. In this study, specimens of 2%vanadium DI were produced by using the Y-block casting in the foundry lab. The specimen produced were machine according to the tensile and impact dimension followed the TSEN1002-1 and ASTM E23 standard. Then, austempering process was performed at the three different temperatures to the sample which are 500°, 600° and 700° in high temperature furnace. The specimens has been machine were undergoes the tensile, impact, density and hardness test. The microstructures were observed by using Olympus BX 41 M Microscopes image analysis system before and after etching by Nital 15%. Polarization test also were conduct between commercial DI and 2%V-DI. The results show that 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron (2% V-DI) not only increases the nodule count and ferrite content in the microstructure, but also improves the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, impact toughness proportional to the austempered temperature as compared to unalloyed DI. The low corrosion rates also show for the 2% of vanadium alloyed compare to the commercial DI.

  18. Non-Local Analysis of Forming Limits of Ductile Material Considering Void Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youngsuk Kim

    2003-01-01

    The current study performed a finite element analysis of the strain localization behavior of a voided ductile material using a non-local plasticity formulation in which the yield strength depends on both an equivalent plastic strain measurement (hardening parameter) and Laplacian equivalent. The introduction of gradient terms to the yield function was found to play an important role in simulating the strain localization behavior of the voided ductile material. The effect of the mesh size and characteristic length on the strain localization were also investigated. An FEM simulation based on the proposed non-local plasticity revealed that the load-strain curves of the voided ductile material subjected to plane strain tension converged to one curve, regardless of the mesh size. In addition, the results using non-local plasticity also exhibited that the dependence of the deformation behavior of the material on the mesh size was much less sensitive than that with classical local plasticity and could be successfully eliminated through the introduction of a large value for the characteristic length.

  19. Cost and Ductility Effectiveness of Concrete Columns Strengthened with CFRP and SFRP Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Abdelrahman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, steel fibre reinforced polymers (SFRP sheets have been introduced for the repair and rehabilitation of concrete structures. Few researchers studied the behaviour of the concrete columns wrapped with SFRP sheets; however, several critical parameters such as the cost and ductility effectiveness of the SFRP wrapped concrete columns have been lightly addressed. Thus, the main objective of this paper is to study the cost and ductility effectiveness of SFRP wrapped concrete columns and compare the results with the conventionally used carbon FRP (CFRP wrapped concrete columns. In addition, an analytical procedure to predict the cost effectiveness of SFRP wrapped concrete columns is also suggested, from which, a parametric study was conducted. The parametric study investigated the effect of the concrete strength, the number of SFRP layers, and the size and slenderness effects on the cost effectiveness of the concrete columns wrapped with SFRP sheets. The results from the cost and ductility effectiveness study indicated that the SFRP wrapped concrete columns showed enhanced performance over the CFRP wrapped concrete columns. The suggested analytical procedure proved to be a reliable and accurate method to predict the cost effectiveness parameter of SFRP wrapped concrete columns. The parametric study showed the significant impact of the investigated parameters on the cost effectiveness of concrete columns wrapped with SFRP sheets.

  20. Effect of Lanthanum on Nodule Count and Nodularity of Ductile Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The present study aims at finding out the effect of the addition of a single rare earth element, that is, lanthanum on the nodularity and nodule count of ductile iron under controlled conditions. For this purpose, four melts with different compositions were made, using a 28 kg inductotherm medium frequency induction furnace. The temperature was carefully maintained between 1400 and 1450 ℃ for these heats. A good quality charge consisting of Sorel metal, ferrosilicon, Swedish iron, ferrosilicon magnesium, and ferrosilicon lanthanum was used for the production of melts. A vertically parted sand mould was used for casting of 10 test bars made from local silica sand. Standard coin samples were chill-cast to conduct chemical analysis of the ductile iron. Microstructure study of the samples was conducted using a Leica optical microscope. Nodule count and nodularity of the samples were carried out using an image analyzer. The results obtained indicated that with the increased addition of lanthanum the nodule count of ductile iron increased, thus making it evident that it played a significant role in increasing the mechanical properties. The highest nodule count of 467 was obtained with the addition of 0.03% lanthanum. However, the effect of lanthanum on nodularity was negligible with nodularity ranging from 81% to 83%.

  1. A rare-earth free magnesium alloy with improved intrinsic ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlöbes, S; Friák, M; Korte-Kerzel, S; Pei, Z; Neugebauer, J; Raabe, D

    2017-09-05

    Metals are the backbone of manufacturing owing to their strength and formability. Compared to polymers they have high mass density. There is, however, one exception: magnesium. It has a density of only 1.7 g/cm(3), making it the lightest structural material, 4.5 times lighter than steels, 1.7 times lighter than aluminum, and even slightly lighter than carbon fibers. Yet, the widespread use of magnesium is hampered by its intrinsic brittleness. While other metallic alloys have multiple dislocation slip systems, enabling their well-known ductility, the hexagonal lattice of magnesium offers insufficient modes of deformation, rendering it intrinsically brittle. We have developed a quantum-mechanically derived treasure map which screens solid solution combinations with electronic bonding, structure and volume descriptors for similarity to the ductile magnesium-rare earth alloys. Using this insight we synthesized a surprisingly simple, compositionally lean, low-cost and industry-compatible new alloy which is over 4 times more ductile and 40% stronger than pure magnesium. The alloy contains 1 wt.% aluminum and 0.1 wt.% calcium, two inexpensive elements which are compatible with downstream recycling constraints.

  2. Size effect on brittle and ductile fracture of two-dimensional interlinked carbon nanotube network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuhang; Aluru, N. R.

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical properties of two-dimensional (2D) interlinked carbon nanotube (CNT) network are investigated using ab initio calculation and molecular dynamics simulations (MD) with Reaxff force field. The simulation results show that bulk 2D interlinked CNT network has good mechanical properties along the axial direction which can be comparable to that of single-walled CNT and graphene, but has better ductility along the radial direction than single-walled CNT and graphene. In addition, the mechanical properties of 2D interlinked CNT network ribbon along the radial direction depend strongly on the size of the ribbon. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio decrease as the size increases while the fracture strain increases with the size increasing. By analyzing the atomic structural (both bond length and atomic von Mises stress) evolution of the ribbons, the mechanism of a brittle-to-ductile transition is revealed. The exploration of the mechanical properties of the 2D interlinked CNT network paves the way for application of the relevant devices that can benefit from the high Young's modulus, high tensile strength, and good ductility.

  3. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effect of Bi on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Liang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To improve the mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron, bismuth (Bi was introduced into the iron. Five castings with different Bi content from 0 to 0.014 wt.% were prepared; and four positions in the casting from the edge to the center, with different solidification cooling rates, were chosen for microstructure observation and mechanical properties test. The effect of the Bi content on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron were investigated. Results show that the tensile strength, elongation and impact toughness at different positions in the five castings decrease with a decrease in cooling rate. With an increase in Bi content, the graphite morphology and the mechanical properties at the same position are improved, and the improvement of mechanical properties is obvious when the Bi content is no higher than 0.011wt.%. But when the Bi content is further increased to 0.014wt.%, the improvement of mechanical properties is not obvious due to the increase of chunky graphite number and the aggregation of chunky graphite. With an increase in Bi content, the tensile fracture mechanism is changed from brittle to mixture ductile-brittle fracture.

  5. Rolling Contact Fatigue Failure Mechanisms of Plasma-Nitrided Ductile Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, D.; Soares, G. P. P. P.; Grabarski, M. I.; Weigert, N. B.; Escobar, J. A.; Pintaude, G.; Neves, J. C. K.

    2017-05-01

    Rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of a nitrided ductile cast iron was investigated. Flat washers machined from a pearlitic ductile cast iron bar were quenched and tempered to maximum hardness, ground, polished and divided into four groups: (1) specimens tested as quenched and tempered; (2) specimens plasma-nitrided for 8 h at 400 °C; (3) specimens plasma-nitrided and submitted to a diffusion process for 16 h at 400 °C; and (4) specimens submitted to a second tempering for 24 h at 400 °C. Hardness profiles, phase analyses and residual stress measurements by x-ray diffraction, surface roughness and scanning electron microscopy were applied to characterize the surfaces at each step of this work. Ball-on-flat washer tests were conducted with a maximum contact pressure of 3.6 GPa, under flood lubrication with a SAE 90 API GL-5 oil at 50 °C. Test ending criterion was the occurrence of a spalling. Weibull analysis was used to characterize RCF's lifetime data. Plasma-nitrided specimens exhibited a shorter RCF lifetime than those just quenched and tempered. The effects of nitriding on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the ductile cast iron are discussed in order to explain the shorter endurance of nitrided samples.

  6. The influence of self-compacting steel fibre reinforced concrete infill on the flexure strength and ductility of masonry walls

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Luiz António Pereira de; Bernardo, Luís Filipe Almeida

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the influence of longitudinal reinforcement ratio and steel fibre volume in self-compacting concrete infill on the strength and ductility of reinforced masonry walls subjected to flexure. Flexure tests were performed as four-point bending tests on twelve walls. The analysis of the concrete infill contribution to the walls capacity is made considering recent recommendations for steel fibre reinforced concrete design. A ductility...

  7. Simulation of seismic waves at the Earth crust (brittle-ductile transition) based on the Burgers model

    OpenAIRE

    Carcione, J.M.; Poletto, F.; B. Farina; A. Craglietto

    2014-01-01

    The Earth crust presents two dissimilar rheological behaviours depending on the in-situ stress-temperature conditions. The upper, cooler, part is brittle while deeper zones are ductile. Seismic waves may reveal the presence of the transition but a proper characterization is required. We first obtain a stress–strain relation including the effects of shear seismic attenuation and ductility due to shear deformations and plastic flow. The anelastic behaviour i...

  8. Simulation of seismic waves at the earth's crust (brittle–ductile transition) based on the Burgers model

    OpenAIRE

    Carcione, J.M.; Poletto, F.; B. Farina; A. Craglietto

    2014-01-01

    The earth's crust presents two dissimilar rheological behaviors depending on the in situ stress-temperature conditions. The upper, cooler part is brittle, while deeper zones are ductile. Seismic waves may reveal the presence of the transition but a proper characterization is required. We first obtain a stress–strain relation, including the effects of shear seismic attenuation and ductility due to shear deformations and plastic flow. The anelastic behavior is based on the Bur...

  9. The Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 3Cr20Ni10W2 Austenitic Heat-Resistant Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Feng Xia; Gui-Chang Luo; Dong-Sen Wu; Guo-Zheng Quan; Jie Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Most bulk metal forming processes may be limited by ductile fracture, such as an internal or surface fracture developing in the workpiece. Finding a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and strain-softening behavior of 3Cr20Ni10W2 heat-resistant alloy is very important, which, however, is a nontrivial issue that still needs to be addressed in greater depth. Based on cumulative damage theory, an innovative approach involvin...

  10. Effect of austempering parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of horizontal continuous casting ductile iron dense bars

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-jie Xu; Pan Dai; Zheng-yang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    In the present research, the orthogonal experiment was carried out to investigate the influence of different austempering process parameters (i.e. austenitizing temperature and time, and austempering temperature and time) on microstructure and mechanical properties of LZQT500-7 ductile iron dense bars with 172 mm in diameter which were produced by horizontal continuous casting (HCC). The results show that the major factors influencing the hardness of austempered ductile iron (ADI) are austeni...

  11. Development of acceptance criteria and damage tolerance analyzes of the ductile iron insert; Framtagning av acceptanskriterier samt skadetaalighetsanalyser av segjaernsinsatsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillstroem, Peter; Alverlind, Lars; Andersson, Magnus (Inspecta Technology AB (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    SKB intends to qualify a test system for detection and sizing of defects deemed to be relevant to the ductile iron insert. In support of this qualification, a damage tolerance analysis indicating the current qualification targets, given assumed damage and failure modes. This report describes the damage tolerance analyzes of different types of defects that are considered relevant of the ductile iron insert. The results are reported separately for each test area (zone) and type of insert (BWRs and PWRs)

  12. Review of current research and application of ductile cast iron quality monitoring technologies in Chinese foundry industry

    OpenAIRE

    Da-yong Li; Zhen-yu Xu; Xu-liang Ma

    2015-01-01

    There is a long history of studying and making use of ductile cast iron in China. Over the years, the foundrymen in China have carried out a lot of valuable research and development work for measuring parameters and controlling the quality in ductile cast iron production. Many methods, such as rapid metallographic phase, thermal analysis, eutectic expansion ratio, surface tension measurement, melt electrical resistivity, oxygen and sulfur activity measurement, ultrasonic measurement and sound...

  13. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DUCTILE-PHASE-TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN LAMINATES FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Kevin; Odette, G Robert; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Yamamoto, Takuya; Zok, Frank W.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.

    2015-09-23

    A promising approach to increasing the fracture toughness of W-alloys is ductile-phase toughening (DPT). A ductile phase reinforcement in a brittle matrix increases toughness primarily by crack bridging. A W-Cu laminate was fabricated and the properties of the constituent metals were characterized along with those for the composite. Development of a design model for large-scale crack bridging continued.

  14. Porosity evolution at the brittle-ductile transition in the continental crust: Implications for deep hydro-geothermal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violay, M; Heap, M J; Acosta, M; Madonna, C

    2017-08-09

    Recently, projects have been proposed to engineer deep geothermal reservoirs in the ductile crust. To examine their feasibility, we performed high-temperature (up to 1000 °C), high-pressure (130 MPa) triaxial experiments on granite (initially-intact and shock-cooled samples) in which we measured the evolution of porosity during deformation. Mechanical data and post-mortem microstuctural characterisation (X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy) indicate that (1) the failure mode was brittle up to 900 °C (shear fracture formation) but ductile at 1000 °C (no strain localisation); (2) only deformation up to 800 °C was dilatant; (3) deformation at 900 °C was brittle but associated with net compaction due to an increase in the efficiency of crystal plastic processes; (4) ductile deformation at 1000 °C was compactant; (5) thermally-shocking the granite did not influence strength or failure mode. Our data show that, while brittle behaviour increases porosity, porosity loss is associated with both ductile behaviour and transitional behaviour as the failure mode evolves from brittle to ductile. Extrapolating our data to geological strain rates suggests that the brittle-ductile transition occurs at a temperature of 400 ± 100 °C, and is associated with the limit of fluid circulation in the deep continental crust.

  15. A multiscale approach for the deformation mechanism in pearlite microstructure: Atomistic study of the role of the heterointerface on ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimokawa, Tomotsugu, E-mail: simokawa@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [School of Mechanical Engineering, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Oguro, Takuma [Division of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaki; Higashida, Kenji [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Ohashi, Tetsuya [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kitami Institute of Technology, Hokkaido 090-8507 Japan (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    The role of the ferrite/cementite heterointerface on the mechanical properties of heavily-drawn-pearlitic steel is investigated via tensile deformation tests of multilayered composite models with brittle and ductile virtual materials in a two-dimensional triangle-lattice system by using molecular dynamics simulations. The interface strength is controlled by introducing a heterointerface potential. The dominant role of heterointerface on the mechanical properties of multilayered composite models is influenced by the interface strength. In case of weak interface strength, the heterointerface acts as a strong barrier to dislocation motion in the ductile phase; hence, the multilayered composite model shows high strength but extremely low ductility. This tendency corresponds well to that of as-drawn pearlitic steel with cementite decomposition. In case of strong interface strength, the heterointerface acts as a dislocation source of the brittle phase by dislocation transmission through the heterointerface from the ductile to brittle phase; hence, the multilayered composite model shows good ductility with a small decrease in strength. This tendency corresponds well to annealed pearlitic steel recovered from cementite decomposition. These results suggest that cementite decomposition decreases the plastic deformation potential of the heterointerface. The conditions necessary for the heterointerface to simultaneously exhibit high strength and ductility are discussed on the basis of the results of atomic simulations.

  16. Microstructure and Hot Oxidation Resistance of SiMo Ductile Cast Irons Containing Si-Mo-Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mervat M.; Nofal, Adel; Mourad, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    SiMo ductile cast irons are used as high-temperature materials in automotive components, because they are microstructurally stable at high operating temperatures. The effect of different amounts of Si and Mo as well as the addition of 3 wt pct Al on the microstructure, high-temperature oxidation, and mechanical properties of SiMo ductile cast iron was studied. Dilatometric measurements of SiMo ductile iron exhibited obvious differences in the transformation temperature A 1 due to presence of Al and the increase of Si. The microstructure of the SiMo alloys without Al addition showed outstanding nodularity and uniform nodule distribution. However, by adding 3 wt pct Al to low Si-SiMo ductile iron, some compacted graphite was observed. The results of oxidation experiments indicated that high Si-SiMo ductile iron containing 4 and 4.9 wt pct Si had superior resistance to lower Si-SiMo and SiMo ductile iron containing 3 wt pct Al. The results showed also that with increasing Si up to 4.9 wt pct or by replacing a part of Si with 3 wt pct Al, tensile strength increased while elongation and impact toughness decreased.

  17. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transformation temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Saxena, Ashok; Cullers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    One of the ongoing challenges of the aerospace industry is to develop more efficient turbine engines. Greater efficiency entails reduced specific strength and larger temperature gradients, the latter of which means higher operating temperatures and increased thermal conductivity. Continued development of nickel-based superalloys has provided steady increases in engine efficiency and the limits of superalloys have probably not been realized. However, other material systems are under intense investigation for possible use in high temperature engines. Ceramic, intermetallic, and various composite systems are being explored in an effort to exploit the much higher melting temperatures of these systems. NiAl is considered a potential alternative to conventional superalloys due to its excellent oxidation resistance, low density, and high melting temperature. The fact that NiAl is the most common coating for current superalloy turbine blades is a tribute to its oxidation resistance. Its density is one-third that of typical superalloys and in most temperature ranges its thermal conductivity is twice that of common superalloys. Despite these many advantages, NiAl requires more investigation before it is ready to be used in engines. Binary NiAl in general has poor high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. On-going research in alloy design continues to make improvements in the high-temperature strength of NiAl. The factors controlling low temperature ductility have been identified in the last few years. Small, but reproducible ductility can now be achieved at room temperature through careful control of chemical purity and processing. But the mechanisms controlling the transition from brittle to ductile behavior are not fully understood. Research in the area of fatigue deformation can aid the development of the NiAl system in two ways. Fatigue properties must be documented and optimized before NiAl can be applied to engineering systems. More importantly though

  18. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J.

    2015-02-01

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others.

  19. Numerical investigation of ductile crack growth behavior in a dissimilar metal welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.T. [MOE Key Laboratory of Pressurized System and Safety, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, G.Z., E-mail: gzwang@ecust.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Pressurized System and Safety, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Xuan, F.Z.; Tu, S.T. [MOE Key Laboratory of Pressurized System and Safety, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Ductile crack growth behavior in a dissimilar metal welded joint was simulated. > Interface crack growth tends to deviate into material with lower yield stress. > Crack locations and mismatches affect local stress-strain distribution. > Local stress-strain leads to different crack growth resistances and paths. - Abstract: In this paper, the finite element method (FEM) based on GTN model is used to investigate the ductile crack growth behavior in single edge-notched bend (SENB) specimens of a dissimilar metal welded joint (DMWJ) composed of four materials in the primary systems of nuclear power plants. The J-{Delta}a resistance curves, crack growth paths and local stress-strain distributions in front of crack tips are calculated for eight initial cracks with different locations in the DMWJ and four cracks in the four homogenous materials. The results show that the initial cracks with different locations in the DMWJ have different crack growth resistances and growth paths. When the initial crack lies in the centers of the weld Alloy182 and buttering Alloy82, the crack-tip plastic and damage zones are symmetrical, and the crack grow path is nearly straight along the initial crack plane. But for the interface cracks between materials and near interface cracks, the crack-tip plastic and damage zones are asymmetric, and the crack growth path has significant deviation phenomenon. The crack growth tends to deviate into the material whose yield stress is lower between the two materials on both sides of the interface. The different initial crack locations and mismatches in yield stress and work hardening between different materials in the DMWJ affect the local stress triaxiality and plastic strain distributions in front of crack tips, and lead to different ductile crack growth resistances and growth paths. For the accurate integrity assessment for the DMWJ, the fracture toughness data and resistance curves for the initial cracks with different locations in the

  20. A review of the creep ductility of copper for nuclear waste canister application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Kjell

    2012-11-01

    Background: The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) reviews the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Company's (SKB) applications under the Act on Nuclear Activities (SFS 1984:3) for the construction and operation of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and for an encapsulation facility. As part of the review, SSM commissions consultants to carry out work in order to obtain information on specific issues. The results from the consultants' tasks are reported in SSM's Technical Note series. Objectives of the project: This project is part of SSM:s review of SKB:s license application for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The assignment concerns review of creep mechanisms for copper material used as a corrosion barrier in canisters for nal disposal of nuclear fuel in Sweden. Summary by the author: SKB has presented insufficient evidence to justify their position that the OFP copper has an adequate creep ductility during long term storage. Their large body of experiments only serves to prove that the creep ductility is sufficient for much shorter time spans than the intended storage times. There is a clear need for a credible theory of creep brittleness of OFP copper which will permit extrapolations to long term storage. The theory presented by SKB does not in its present state permit credible extrapolations. Alternatively SKB needs to find an explanation to the effect of phosphorus on the creep ductility and that it ensures the absence of creep brittleness in OFP copper. It is interesting to note that SKB has presented experimental evidence that intergranular cracks can form in OFP material tested in cracked specimens. Perhaps it is possible to more systematically study formation and growth of intergranular cracks in specimens of OFP copper with cracks.

  1. Structural Evidence for Fluid-Assisted Shear Failure within a Ductile Shear Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations of seismic slip occurring below the seismogenic zone of large fault zones have emphasized the significance of coeval ductile and brittle processes at high temperatures. We present observations of a shear zone contained within the Saddlebag Lake pendant of the eastern Sierra Nevada, CA, where Triassic and Jurassic metavolcanics and metasediments are highly strained in a high-temperature shear zone. Transposed bedding and cleavage that define a flattening fabric, dextrally rotated porphyroclasts, and a steep, pervasive lineation together suggest an overall transpressive kinematic regime for the ductile deformation. The high-strain rocks exhibit multiple episodes of vein formation, indicating a prolonged migration of hydrothermal fluids throughout the system. Crosscutting relationships and mineral assemblages define discrete sets of differently oriented veins. The veins form by fracture, but many veins are folded and boudinaged, showing synkinematic brittle and ductile deformation. We document foliation-parallel quartz veins that show shear displacement from the geometry of pull-apart structures and offsets of earlier veins. Synkinematic equilibrium mineral assemblages within the host rock and dynamic recrystallization of the quartz veins show they formed at temperatures around 400 to 500°C. The shear fractures have horizontal trace lengths of up to a few meters and displacements range from 2-3 mm to ~3 cm, with 1-5 mm of opening. Assuming the observed offset in the fractures occurred in a single event, these measurements are consistent with stress drops of 1 to 10 MPa. We interpret these observations to show that the veins formed as a result of high pore fluid pressure that caused shear failure at low effective stresses. Because foliated rocks are mechanically anisotropic, the foliation provided planes of weakness for failure with a preferred orientation. Evidence for shear failure occurring within crystal-plastic shear zones at high temperatures

  2. Effect of austempering time on mechanical properties of a low manganese austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putatunda, S.K.; Gadicherla, P.K.

    2000-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of austempering time on the resultant microstructure and the room-temperature mechanical properties of an unalloyed and low manganese ductile cast iron with initially ferritic as-cast structure. The effect of austempering time on the plane strain fracture toughness of this material was also studied. Compact tension and round cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from unalloyed ductile cast iron with low manganese content and with a ferritic as-cast (solidified) structure. These specimens were then austempered in the upper (371 C) and lower (260 C) bainitic temperature ranges for different time periods, ranging from 30 min. to 3 h. Microstructural features such as type of bainite and the volume fraction of ferrite and austenite and its carbon content were evaluated by X-ray diffraction to examine the influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of this material. The results of the present investigation indicate that for this low manganese austempered ductile iron (ADI), upper ausferritic microstructures exhibit higher fracture toughness than lower ausferritic microstructures. Yield and tensile strength of the material was found to increase with an increase in austempering time in a lower bainitic temperature range, whereas in the upper bainitic temperature range, time has no significant effect on the mechanical properties. A retained austenite content between 30 to 35% was found to provide optimum fracture toughness. Fracture toughness was found to increase with the parameter (X{gamma}C{gamma}/d){sup 1/2}, where X{gamma} is the volume fraction of austenite, C{gamma} is the carbon content of the austenite, and d is the mean free path of dislocation motion in ferrite.

  3. Effect of austempering time on mechanical properties of a low manganese austempered ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putatunda, Susil K.; Gadicherla, Pavan K.

    2000-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of austempering time on the resultant microstructure and the room-temperature mechanical properties of an unalloyed and low manganese ductile cast iron with initially ferritic as-cast structure. The effect of austempering time on the plane strain fracture toughness of this material was also studied. Compact tension and round cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from unalloyed ductile cast iron with low manganese content and with a ferritic as-cast (solidified) structure. These specimens were then austempered in the upper (371 °C) and lower (260 °C) bainitic temperature ranges for different time periods, ranging from 30 min. to 4 h. Microstructural features such as type of bainite and the volume fraction of ferrite and austenite and its carbon content were evaluated by X-ray diffraction to examine the influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of this material. The results of the present investigation indicate that for this low manganese austempered ductile iron (ADI), upper ausferritic microstructures exhibit higher fracture toughness than lower ausferritic microstructures. Yield and tensile strength of the material was found to increase with an increase in austempering time in a lower bainitic temperature range, whereas in the upper bainitic temperature range, time has no significant effect on the mechanical properties. A retained austenite content between 30 to 35% was found to provide optimum fracture toughness. Fracture toughness was found to increase with the parameter ( XγCγ/d)1/2, where Xγ is the volume fraction of austenite, Cγ is the carbon content of the austenite, and d is the mean free path of dislocation motion in ferrite.

  4. Effect of initial microstructure on the activation energy of second stage during austempering of ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos-Cambranis, R.E.; Narvaez Hernandez, L. [UASLP, San Luis Potosi (Mexico). Instituto de Metalurgia; Cisneros-Guerrero, M.M. [Inst. Tecnologico de Saltillo (Mexico). Dept. Metal-Mecanica; Perez-Lopez, M.J. [Inst. Tecnologico de Zacatecas (Mexico)

    1998-03-13

    The good balance among mechanical properties of austempered ductile irons (ADI) mainly depends on the matrix microstructure, which basically consists of acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. This structure is produced by isothermal transformation of the austenite over the temperature range of 523 to 673 K. It is well accepted that during the isothermal holding, the transformation takes place in two stages. In the first stage, the austenite decomposes into acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. When the austenite is transformed at temperatures higher than 623 K, the acicular ferrite is free of carbides; at temperatures below 623 K, besides the formation of the acicular ferrite and austenite, precipitation of carbides takes place over the plates of the acicular ferrite. The mixture of ferrite and austenite is known as ausferrite being the responsible for the good mechanical properties of ADI. In this work, the ausferrite obtained above and below 623 K will be termed high and low temperature ausferrite respectively. Although ausferrite does not transform at room temperature, it is not a thermodynamically stable structure. Consequently, if the isothermal holding is extended, or if ADI is heated at high temperatures (523 to 800 K), the second stage of the austempering reaction will occur. During this stage, the carbon rich austenite will decompose into ferrite and carbides. In order to establish the maximum working temperature of ADI, it is necessary to characterize the thermal stability of ausferrite microstructure, since once stage II takes place, the mechanical properties, in particular ductility and toughness, are adversely affected. In the present work the influence of previous ausferrite microstructure (that obtained during first stage) of an alloyed ductile iron (0.6%Ni, 0.15%Mo) on the empirical activation energy of stage II is studied.

  5. Fracture mechanics behaviour of ductile cast iron and martensitic steel at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udoh, A.; Klenk, A.; Roos, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). MPA; Sasikala, G. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam (India)

    2010-07-01

    Ductile cast iron is employed increasingly due to the advantages regarding foundry practice, design as well as economic advantages in the thermal machinery and power plant construction. It is employed preferably where higher toughness is required, e.g. in valves or thickwalled components of thermal or nuclear power plants. For this reason the safety and availability criteria for fracture mechanics assessment of components are necessary in addition to the conventional strength design. Alloys with silicon and molybdenum are developed for the application at higher temperatures. The increase in the thermal efficiency of fossil fired steam power plant that can be achieved by increasing the steam temperature and pressure has provided the incentive for development of the 9% chromium steels towards improved creep rupture strength. During the last twenty years, three such steels, P91 (9Cr-1Mo-VNb), E911 (9Cr-1Mo-1W-V-Nb) and P92 (9Cr-0,5Mo-1,8W-V-Nb), have been developed for commercial production. For application in piping systems and boiler construction sufficient reliable information concerning the long-term behaviour are necessary as well as knowledge about fracture mechanical behaviour in order to ensure integrity of components. Different methods to characterize fracture behaviour of ductile cast iron and martensitic steel at elevated temperature have been employed. The RBR method is a novel and simple method developed at IGCAR for characterizing the ductile fracture behaviour of materials from tensile tests of cylindrical specimens. Using the data evaluated at both institutes, a fracture mechanics characterisation by determining crack initiation and crack resistance by J{sub R}-curves and RBR parameters is presented. (orig.)

  6. Particle size evolution in non-adhered ductile powders during mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Paz, J. [Centro de Investigaciones en Materiales y Metalurgica, UAEH (Mexico); Robles-Hernandez, F.C.; Hernandez-Silva, D.; Jaramillo-Vigueras, D. [Dept. de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE - Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Martinez-Sanchez, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The interaction among events as deformation, cold-welding and fracture, occurring during the mechanical milling of powders is unclear and controversial. We believe that the understanding of such interaction can be deduced from particle size evolution studies. It is well known that the elemental ductile powders adhere to the milling media. However when some of these powders are combined to form an alloy by milling, the adherence phenomenon is not observed. Systems which include ductile powders, such as, Cu-15at.%Al, Co-68at.%Al and Ni-25at.%Al were processed with not adherence to the milling media, thus allowing to follow up the particle size evolution during the complete milling process. The particle size was measured by the sedimentation-photometry technique. Those results were supported by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed a high proportion near 95% in number of particles of submicrometric size at early milling times for the three systems. However its particle size evolution for each system was different. Such findings can be important to understand some mechanisms as the grain size refinement, the alloy formation and the microstructural evolution. In the studied systems, the particle size measurements are presented based on volume or mass, area, line and number of the particles. The particle size results based on volume and line or number of the particles can give an idea of the evolution of the biggest particles and the finest ones respectively during the milling. Also the behavior of the complete particle system can be deduced from the results based in the area of the particles. Results of particle size as well as observations by microscopy helped to suggest the particle size and shape evolution of the studied systems. Such findings were employed to previously propose a grain size refinement mechanism for ductile powder systems non-adherent to the milling media during the mechanical alloying. (orig.)

  7. Effect of austempering temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties of unalloyed ductile iron: Vpliv austempering temperature na mikrostrukturo in mehanske lastnosti nelegirane duktilne sive litine:

    OpenAIRE

    Bošnjak, Branka; Radulović, Branko

    1999-01-01

    Austempered ductile cast iron (ADI) has emerged in the last several decades as a major engeneering material. The heat-treating of the ductile cast iron produces austempered ductile iron (ADI) with an excellent combination of strength, fracture toughness and wear resistance for a wide variety of applications in automotive, rail and heavy engineering industries. The austempering temperature is the most important parameter in determining both the structure and the mechanical properties of unallo...

  8. Ultraprecision, high stiffness CNC grinding machines for ductile mode grinding of brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Patrick A.; Carlisle, Keith; Shore, Paul; Read, R. F.

    1990-10-01

    Under certain controlled conditions it is now possible to machine brittle materials such as glasses and ceramics using single or multi-point diamond tools (grinding), so that material is removed by plastic flow, leaving crack-free surfaces. This process is called 'shear' or 'ductile' mode grinding. It represents a major breakthrough in modern manufacturing engineering since it promises to enable: - complex optical components, both transmission and reflecting to be generated by advanced CNC machines with very little (or even zero) subsequent polishing. - complex shaped components such as turbine blades, nozzle guide vanes, etc. to be finish machined after near net shape forming, to high precision in advanced ceramics such as silicon nitride, without inducing micro-cracking and thus lowering ultimate rupture strength and fatigue life. Ductile mode "damage free" grinding occurs when the volume of materials stressed by each grit of the grinding wheel is small enough to yield rather than exhibit brittle fracture, i.e. cracking. In practice, this means maintaining the undeformed chip thickness to below the ductile-brittle transition value; this varies from material to material but is generally in the order of 0.1 pm or 100 nm, (hence the term "nanogrinding" is sometimes used) . Thus the critical factors for operating successfully in the ductile regime are machine system accuracy and dynamic stiffness between each grit and the workpiece. In detail this means: (i) High precision 'truing' of the diamond grits, together with dressing of the wheel bond to ensure adequate ' openness'; (ii) Design and build of the grinding wheel spindle with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, radial and axial, must be considerably less than 100 nfl. (iii) Design and build of the workpiece carriage motion system with very high dynamic stiffness; error motions, linear or rotary, must be well within 100 nm. (iv) Smooth, rumble-free, high-stiffness servo-drives controlling the motions

  9. Application of 3-D numerical simulation software SRIFCAST to produce ductile iron castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on a method using numerical simulation equations and their solution schemes for liquid metal flows and heat transfer during mold filling and the solidification process of casting, 3-D numerical simulation software SRIFCAST was created. This includes enmeshment of casting; velocity and temperature fields calculation; displaying iso-temperature lines;velocity vectors and 3-D temperature fields on a Windows 9x operating system. SRIFCAST was applied to produce sound castings of automobile and diesel engines, and also to connect with microstructure simulation for ductile iron castings.

  10. Material specification and quality control program for ductile iron spent fuel casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehmer, B.; Frenz, H.; Weidlich, S.; Kuehn, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    In the process of testing spent fuel casks, BAM is gaining a lot of relevant data regarding the quality level of Ductile Cast Iron (DCI). This paper discusses the basic parameters governing the material behavior of ferritic and ferritic-pearlitic DCI and reviews the development of cask quality over the last years. The effect of microstructure and sample size on the fracture toughness of DCI is discussed. The results of a test program show the prominent effect of pearlite content and graphite nodule structure in the mechanical and fracture toughness characteristics of DCI. This observation is important for quality assurance programs for shipping and storage casks of radioactive materials.

  11. Graphite nodules and local residual stresses in ductile iron: Thermo-mechanical modelingand experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito

    this as point of departure, the present work initially focuses on finding a satisfactory description of the nodules’ thermo-elastic behavior, which is shown to be missing in the published literature, by means of micro-mechanical homogenization analyses based on a representative unit cell. These, combined...... their characteristic internal structure, composed of graphite platelets arranged into conical sectors, in an explicit manner. The resulting anisotropic model turns out to provide homogenized values for the ductile iron thermo-elastic properties at the macro-scale in excellent agreement with the experiments...

  12. Plug shear failure in nailed timber connections:avoiding brittle and promoting ductile failures

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsson, Helena

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical timber connections can fail both in a brittle and a ductile manner depending on the joint layout. Plug shear failure in nailed timber connections is a brittle failure mode, which shall be avoided in timber structures. This failure mode occurs in nailed connections loaded in tension parallel to the grain, for instance in the lower chord of a timber truss. The failure mode is not described in the Swedish building code of today, but there is an informative annex in the upcoming Euroco...

  13. Simulation and Experimental Analysis of Super High-Speed Grinding of Ductile Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIMIZU; Jun; EDA; Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    This study aims to reduce the work-affected layer of the machined surface by carrying out the grinding at the speed over static pr o pagation speed of plastic wave of ductile materials and also aims to clarify suc h super high-speed machining mechanism.This paper reports on the result obtain ed through the molecular dynamics simulations and experiments on the super-spee d grinding below and beyond static propagation speed of aluminum.From the simul ation results,it is verified that the plastic deformation ...

  14. Experimental validation of error in temperature measurements in thin walled ductile iron castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2007-01-01

    An experimental analysis has been performed to validate the measurement error of cooling curves measured in thin walled ductile cast iron. Specially designed thermocouples with Ø0.2 mm thermocouple wire in Ø1.6 mm ceramic tube was used for the experiments. Temperatures were measured in plates...... to a level about 20C lower than the actual temperature in the casting. Factors affecting the measurement error (oxide layer on the thermocouple wire, penetration into the ceramic tube and variation in placement of thermocouple) are discussed. Finally, it is shown how useful cooling curve may be obtained...

  15. Ductile growth of crack like flawing during hydrotest; Propagacao dutil de defeitos planares durante teste hidrostatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Jose C.; Donato, Guilherme V. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Silva, Marcinei S. da; Bastian, Fernando L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE); Lima, Romulo S. de [PETROBRAS/AB-RE, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    In this paper effects of hydrostatic testing on ductile propagation of crack like flaw defects were evaluated in API X-60 steel. The model used was based on the J-tearing theory, supported by elastic - plastic fracture mechanics. The J-initiation resistance values (JIc) were determined by fracture mechanic tests using potential drop technique and compact test specimen. The JIc values were also determined from flow stress and Charpy V-notch at plateau, which are both usually available in mill-test data. Despite of being based on small database it seems it could be extended and it will be useful for future analysis. (author)

  16. High-pressure structural stability of the ductile intermetallic compound, ErCu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Meenakshi

    2014-10-01

    High-pressure angle dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements up to 23.6 GPa have been carried out on the ductile intermetallic compound, ErCu. Our measurements show that the ambient CsCl structure (: -3) is stable up to the highest pressure of the present measurements. A second-order Birch–Murnaghan equation of state fit to the pressure, volume data yielded a bulk modulus of 67.6 GPa with the pressure derivative of bulk modulus fixed at 4.

  17. Temperature measurement during solidification of thin wall ductile cast iron. Part 1: Theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2008-01-01

    Temperature measurement using thermocouples (TC’s) influence solidification of the casting, especially in thin wall castings. The problems regarding acquisition of detailed cooling curves from thin walled castings is discussed. Experiments were conducted where custom made TC’s were used to acquire...... cooing curves in thin wall ductile iron castings. The experiments show how TC’s of different design interact with the melt and how TC design and surface quality affect the results of the data acquisition. It is discussed which precautions should be taken to ensure reliable acquisition of cooling curves...

  18. Influence of ageing, inclusions and voids on ductile fracture mechanism in commercial Al-alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Chennakesava Reddy; S Sundar Rajan

    2005-02-01

    The objective of the paper is to study the effect of ageing, inclusions and voids on the mechanism of fracture and resultant toughness. It has been found that the voids are initiated at only a fraction of the larger inclusions present. The initiation of voids at small particles in the ductile fracture process appears to have little effect on fracture toughness. The strain hardening capacity has a marked effect on void size, and is an indicator of fracture toughness in the commercial Al alloy.

  19. Enhancement of Fatigue Properties of Ductile Irons by Successive Austempering Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, M. R.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili; Farhangi, H.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of austempering heat treatment on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and bending fatigue behavior of an alloyed ductile iron with chemical composition of 1.6 wt.% Ni, 0.47 wt.% manganese and 0.6 wt.% copper. Based on the results of tensile and impact tests, as well as metallographic studies, optimum heat-treating cycles were determined and applied on the standard fatigue specimens. The results showed that the fatigue strength of specimens austempered successively was practically comparable to those austempered at high temperatures and considerably greater than those austempered at low temperatures.

  20. Effects of various austempering temperatures on fatigue properties in ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salman, S. [Marmara University, Technical Education Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Findik, F. [Materials Technology Department, Technical Education Faculty, Sakarya University, Sakarya (Turkey)]. E-mail: findik@sakarya.edu.tr; Topuz, P. [Yildiz Technical University, Department of Metallurgy and Material, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-07-01

    Austempering is an isothermal heat treatment which when applied to ferrous materials, produces a structure that is stronger and tougher than comparable structures produced with conventional heat treatments. In this paper, ductile iron specimens were applied to various austempering temperatures and interpreted fatigue properties. In this test, Denison 7615 fatigue machine was used for doing double sided bending stresses. The iron was austenitized at 900 deg. C and then austempered at 235, 300 and 370 deg. C for 2 h within a salt bath to obtain various austempered microstructures. Also, the fatigue properties of the bainitic structures which occurred by austempering are examined by scanning electron microscope.

  1. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile irons austenitized at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-05-25

    Ductile cast iron was austenitized at four different temperatures and subsequently austempered at six different temperatures. Plane strain fracture toughness was evaluated under all the heat treatment conditions and correlated with the microstructural features such as the austenite content and the carbon content of the austenite. Fracture mechanism was studied by scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the optimum austempering temperature for maximum fracture toughness decreased with increasing austenitizing temperature. This could be interpreted in terms of the microstructural features. A study of the fracture mechanism revealed that good fracture toughness is unlikely to be obtained when austempering temperature is less than half of the austenitizing temperature on the absolute scale.

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of CuNiMo austempered ductile iron

    OpenAIRE

    Erić Olivera; Jovanović Marina P.; Šiđanin Leposava P.; Rajnović Dragan M.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of Cu, Ni and Mo alloyed cast ductile iron have been investigated after austempering. Samples were austenitised at 860oC for 1h and then austempered at 320oC and 400oC in the interval from 0,5 to 5h. The X-ray diffraction technique and the light microscopy were utilized to investigate the bainitic transformation, while tensile and impact tests were performed for characterization of mechanical properties. By austempering at 320oC in the range between 2 ...

  3. Morphology and constitution of the phases in as-welded microstructure of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.Y.; Zhou, Z.F.; Sun, D.Q.

    2005-06-15

    It was found by optical and electron microscopic examination of the microstructure of as-weld austempered ductile iron that the weld matrix is composed of austenite and bainite, the volume fractions of which were determined. In addition, the carbon content of austenite was measured and therefore the average carbon content of the matrix was calculated. In the matrix of the weld metal two types of bainite, bainite ferrite and lower bainite, were found. According to the morphology and distribution of the bainite plates, the nucleation and growth modes of bainite was inferred. (author)

  4. Effects of matrix structures on fracture mechanisms of austempered ductile cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Shigeru; Matsufuji, Kenichi [Oita Univ. (Japan); Mitsunaga, Koichi [Kagoshima Junior Womens College (Japan); Takahara, Masao [Isuzu Motors, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    On the fatigue behavior of Austempered Ductile Iron (so called ADI), rotating fatigue tests in very high cycle region were performed. The S-N curve represented the double bending. This behavior is caused by the high cycle (>10{sup 7} cycles) fracture, and called the complex three region fractures. The main reason is the work hardening in the surface layer. Therefore, it was removed by electropolishing the surface layer with work hardening. The S-N curve did not show the double bending mentioned above. The fatigue strength with bainitic structure of electropolished ADI was higher than those of mother pearlitic structure.

  5. Behavior Of Austempered Ductile Irons (ADI) Subjected To Laser Surface Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. L.; Fagoaga, I.; Liceaga, J. F.; Sanz Justes, Pedro; Jasnowski, Kazie S.

    1989-03-01

    The near surface microstructure of 3 austempered ductile irons has been modified using laser surface melting (LSM). A white cast iron layer was produced to depths of up to 500 microns. The microstructure of this region varied depending upon the parameters used. A heat affected zone (HAZ) appeared at an abrupt transition between the LSM zone and the substrate. The size of the HAZ, which varied between 20 and 200 microns was predominately affected by the pass velocity in the range of energies used. The hardness profiles showed large variations in the Haz probably due to varing tempering effects from the subsequent passes.

  6. Mathematical formalisms to represent knowledge concerning the production process of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wilk-Kołodziejczyk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop computer tools for calculation of the Fe - Fe3C phase equilibrium diagram. The phase equilibrium diagram is of fundamental importance in materials science and heat treatment processes of ferrous alloys. It enables prediction of carbon steel microstructure in the annealed condition, and facilitates selection of proper temperature for the heat treatment process. Choosing the right values of the heat treatment process parameters is essential in the production of Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI.

  7. MEKANISME DEFORMASI, PERGERAKAN (SENSE SHEAR DAN PERKEMBANGAN STRUKTUR DALAM PROSES DEFORMASI DUCTILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahrudin Fahrudin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The deformation mechanisme in ductile – transition zone show microfracture cataclasis activities,intracrystalline deformations, twinning, kinking, solid-sate diffusion creep, recovery and recrystallisation. Thatactivities to extend the sense shear indication. Sense shear can see i.e porfiroclast, mica fish, porfiroblast, veins,strain shadow, strain fringe and boudin. Commonly sense shear indications to get the form of ellipsoid geometry.That geometry experience to development the structure along progressive deformations process. Thedevelopment of inclusion and fabric also occur at that process.

  8. Influencing factors on as-cast and heat treated 400-18 ductile iron grade characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As-cast and heat-treated 400-18 ductile iron (DI) grade was obtained in different foundry conditions, as metallic charge, Mg-treatment alloy and inoculation. It was found that the Pearlitic Influence Factor (Px) and Antinodulizing Complex Factor (K1) have an important influence on property of DI, depending on the Mn and P level, the metallurgical quality of iron melt, rare earth (RE) and inoculation. It was also found that the influence of Mn is depended on the phosphorus and residual elements level in ductile iron. Less than 0.03%P and 0.2%Mn and Px<2.0 are the basic conditions to obtain as-cast ferritic structure. At the same lower level of Mn and P, the increasing of residual elements (Px>2.0) determines presence of pearlite in as-cast structure, while ferrite structure is obtained after a short annealing heat treatment. Lower level of phosphorus (P<0.025%) and residual elements (Px<2.0) allow to use relative high Mn content (0.32%-0.38%), in condition of ferritic structure, including in as-cast state. High P (0.04%-0.045%) and Mn (0.25%-0.35%) content stabilized pearlite, especially at lower level of residual elements (Px <2.0). Antinodulizing action of elements was counteracted up to K1=2.0 level, by RE included in Mg-treatment alloy, which are beneficial for K1<1.2 and compulsory for K1>1.2. Si has a significant influence on the mechanical properties of heat treated ductile irons: an important decreasing of elongation level and a moderate increasing of yield and tensile strength and their ratio in 150-170 HB typical hardness field. A typical final chemical composition for as-cast 400-18 ductile iron could include 3.5%-3.7%C, 2.4%-2.5%Si, max.0.18%Mn, max.0.025%P, max.0.01%S, 0.04%-0.05%Mgres.for Px<1.5 and K1<1.1. High purity pig iron, RE-bearing FeSiMg and powerful inoculant are also recommended.

  9. Strain localization in carbonate rocks experimentally deformed in the ductile field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Dresen, G.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's crust is often localized, varying from brittle fault gauges in shallow environments to mylonites in ductile shear zones at greater depth. A number of theoretical, experimental, and field studies focused on the evolution and extend of brittle fault zones, but little is known so far about initiation of ductile shear zones. Strain localization in rocks deforming at high temperature and pressure may be induced by several physical, chemical, or structurally-related mechanisms. We performed simple and pure shear deformation experiments on carbonate rocks containing structural inhomogenities in the ductile deformation regime. The results may help to gain insight into the evolution of high temperature shear zones. As starting material we used cylindrical samples of coarse-grained Carrara marble containing one or two 1 mm thin artificially prepared sheets of fine-grained Solnhofen limestone, which act as soft inclusions under the applied experimental conditions. Length and diameter of the investigated solid and hollow cylinders were 10-20 mm and 10-15 mm, respectively. Samples were deformed in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900° C temperature and confining pressures of 300 and 400 MPa. Three samples were deformed in axial compression at a bulk strain rate of 8x10-5 s-1to axial strains between 0.02 and 0.21 and 15 samples were twisted in torsion at a bulk shear strain rate of 2x10-4 s-1 to shear strains between 0.01 and 3.74. At low strain, specimens deformed axially and in torsion show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at shear strains in excess of about 0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed condition is about 20 MPa. Strain localized strongly within the weak inclusions as indicated by inhomogeneous bending of initially straight strain markers on sample jackets. Maximum strain concentration within inclusions with respect to the adjacent matrix was between 4 and 40, depending on total strain and

  10. Fabrication and Investigation of Intermetallic Compound-Glassy Phase Composites having Tensile Ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    with Mg-Y-Cu BGA, MgY phase also has a cP2 B2 structure), Mg-Y-Ag (AgMg phase also has a cP2 B2 structure and is ductile) and Y-Cu-Zn and some other...result were obtained is connected with cP2 TiNi phase which demonstrates martensitic transformations. Choice of alloys and sample preparation...1. The tentative compositions at which bulk glassy phase formation and possible formation of cP2 crystal-glassy composites are Cu-Y (starting from

  11. Modelling the solidification of ductile cast iron parts with varying wall thicknesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Mathias Karsten; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Thorborg, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    ] with a 2D FE solution of the heat conduction equation is developed in an in-house code and model parameters are calibrated using experimental data from representative castings made of ductile cast iron. The main focus is on the influence of casting thickness and resulting local cooling conditions......In the present paper modelling the solidification of cast iron parts is considered. Common for previous efforts in this field is that they have mainly considered thin walled to medium thickness castings. Hence, a numerical model combining the solidification model presented by Lesoultet al. [1...

  12. Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperature on the Ductility of High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Burtseva, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister and/or cask drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in, and potential embrittlement of, high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures (PCT) and hoop stresses. Extensive precipitation of radial hydrides could lower the failure hoop stresses and strains, relative to limits established for as-irradiated cladding from discharged fuel rods stored in pools, at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  13. Significance of grain bondary sliding for localization of ductile deformation in rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J. L.; Gharbi, H.; Ludwig, W.

    2016-12-01

    Ductile strain localizes in mylonites, with microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. Crystal plasticity dominates in volume, but grain boundary sliding and diffusive/solution mass transport act along interfaces. Because the chronology and the interactions between these mechanisms are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. In order to clarify these aspects we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of synthetic rock salt. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray tomography (MCT). Digital image correlation (DIC) techniques allowed for measurements and characterization of the multiscale organization of 2D and 3D full strain fields. Macroscopic and mesoscopic shear bands appear at the sample and microstructure scales, respectively. Discrete slip bands within individual grains allowed for identification of dominant crystal plasticity and of the activated slip systems. Conversely, we clearly evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS). DIC allowed the precise quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. GBS is continuously operational along with crystal slip plasticity, which indicates that in spite of being a secondary mechanism (< 5% contribution) it is a necessary one. Both the localized activity of secondary slip systems in the vicinity of interfaces and GBS are inferred to be necessary in order to accommodate for plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. More specifically, GBS accommodation mechanisms allow for relaxation of local stress enhancement and reduction of strain hardening. GBS appears to be directly involved in the formation of localized shear bands at the microstructural scale, but also to allow for the transmission of ductile strain throughout the whole specimen. Finite element (FE) modeling of the viscoplastic behavior of rock salt based on crystal plasticity alone is inadequate

  14. A Finite Element Implementation of a Ductile Damage Model for Small Strains

    CERN Document Server

    Gates, Robert Lee

    2013-01-01

    Lemaitre's ductile damage model and a simplified variant excluding kinematic hardening were studied and implemented into computer code. For purposes of verifying the model, results from computations with the finite element method are compared to literature. It is found that the behavior expected from theory is modeled by both implementations. Quadratic levels of convergence were observed for the simplified model, while results show that convergence of the kinematic hardening implementation deteriorates with damage. It is concluded that further examination is needed to verify the correct implementation of the kinematic hardening model.

  15. A study on controlled cooling process for making bainitic ductile iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In the present research, TTT curve of bainitic ductile iron under the condition of controlled cooling was generated. The cooling rate of grinding ball and its temperature distribution were also measured at the same time. It can be concluded that the bainitic zone of TTT curve is separated from the pearlitic zone. As compared to the water-quenching condition, more even cooling rate and temperature distribution can be achieved in the controlled cooling process. The controlled cooling can keep away from pearlitic zone in the high temperature cooling stage and produce similar results to the process of traditional isothermal cooling with a low cooling rate in the low temperature cooling stage.

  16. Feeding Against Gravity with Spot Feeders in High Silicon Ductile Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Smith, Nikolaj Kjelgaard; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2014-01-01

    A test pattern, with three different moduli castings was developed to investigate methods to optimise feeding of high silicon ductile cast irons. Different feeder types, modulus, and locations were investigated using both an insulating and an exothermal sleeve material. Porosities were analysed......-hill against gravity. This effect may contribute to the thermal expansion created by the exothermal reaction. It was also found that the optimum feeder size does not scale linearly with the casting modulus but that larger casting modulus requires relatively smaller modulus feeders. The thermal gradient created...

  17. Three-dimensional local residual stress and orientation gradients near graphite nodules in ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yubin; Andriollo, Tito; Fæster, Søren

    2016-01-01

    A synchrotron technique, differential aperture X-ray microscopy (DAXM), has been applied to characterize the microstructure and analyze the local mesoscale residual elastic strain fields around graphite nodules embedded in ferrite matrix grains in ductile cast iron. Compressive residual elastic...... but with a significant overprediction of the maximum strain. This is discussed in terms of stress relaxation during cooling or during storage by plastic deformation of the nodule, the matrix or both. Relaxation by plastic deformation of the ferrite is demonstrated by the formation of low energy dislocation cell...... structure also quantified by the DAXM technique....

  18. Influence of mean stress on fatigue strength of ferritic-pearlite ductile cast iron with small defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, T.; Kim, H. J.; Ikeda, T.; Yanase, K.

    2017-05-01

    Because of their excellent mechanical properties, low cost and good workability, the application of ductile cast iron has been increased in various industries such as the automotive, construction and rail industries. For safety designing of the ductile cast iron component, it is necessary to understand the effect of stress ratio, R, on fatigue limit of ductile cast iron in the presence of small defects. Correspondingly in this study, rotating bending fatigue tests at R = -1 and tension-compression fatigue tests at R = -1 and 0.1 were performed by using a ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron. To study the effects of small defects, we introduced a small drilled hole at surface of a specimen. The diameter and depth of a drilled hole were 50, 200 and 500 μm, respectively. The non-propagating cracks emanating from graphite particles and holes edge were observed at fatigue limit, irrespective of the value of stress ratio. From the microscopic observation of crack propagation behavior, it can be concluded that the fatigue limit is determined by the threshold condition for propagation of a small crack. It was found that the effect of stress ratio on the fatigue limit of ductile cast iron with small defects can be successfully predicted based on \\sqrt {area} parameter model. Furthermore, a use of the tensile strength, σ B, instead of the Vickers hardness, HV, is effective for fatigue limit prediction.

  19. A Large Ductile Sinistral Strike-Slip Shear Zone and Its Movement Timing in the South Qilian Mountains, Western China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许志琴; 李海兵; 陈文; 吴才来; 杨经绥; 金小赤; 陈方远

    2002-01-01

    There is a large ductile shear zone, 2 km wide and more than 350 km long, in the South Qilian Mountains,western China. It is composed of volcanic, granitic and calcareous mylonites. The microstructures of the ductile shear zone show nearly E-W extending subvertical foliation, horizontal and oblique stretching lineations, shearing sense from sinistral to oblique sinistral strike-slip from east to west, "A" type folds and abundant granitic veins. Measured lattice preferred orientations (LPOs) of the mylonitic and recrystallized quartz of the granitic mylonite in the west segment suggest a strong LPO characterized by the dominant slip systems { 1010} formed at high temperature (>650℃). K-feldspar of the mylonite shows an 39Ar/40Ar high-temperature plateau age of 243.3±1.3 Ma, and biotite, 250.5±0.5 Ma, which represent the formation age of the ductile shear zone. The 39Ar/40Ar plateau ages of 169.7±0.3 Ma and 160.6±0.1 Ma and the 39Ar/40Ar isochron ages of 166.99±2.37 Ma and 160.6±0.1 Ma of biotites in the mylo. nite represent the subsequent deformation age. These ages indicate that this ductile shear zone is similar to the Altun and South Kunlun sinistral ductile shear zones in its ages of movement, formation, reactivation and duration.

  20. Three Dimensional Forming Simulation of the Shielded Slot Plate for the MCFC Using a Ductile Fracture Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. H.; Yang, D. Y.; Lee, S. R.; Chang, I. G.; Lee, T. W.

    2011-08-01

    The shielded slot plate, which has a sheared corrugated trapezoidal pattern, is a component of the metallic bipolar plate for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). In order to increase the efficiency of the fuel cell, the unit cell of the shielded slot plate should have a relatively large upper area. Additionally, defects from the forming process should be minimized. In order to simulate the slitting process, whereby sheared corrugated patterns are formed, ductile fracture criteria based on the histories of stress and strain are employed. The user material subroutine VUMAT is employed for implementation of the material and ductile fracture criteria in the commercial FEM software ABAQUS. The variables of the ductile fracture criteria were determined by comparing the simulation results and the experimental results of the tension test and the shearing test. Parametric studies were conducted to determine the critical value of the ductile fracture criterion. Employing these ductile fracture criteria, the three dimensional forming process of the shielded slot plate was numerically simulated. The effects of the slitting process in the forming process of the shielded slot plate were analyzed through a FEM simulation and experimental studies. Finally, experiments involving microscopic and macroscopic observations were conducted to verify the numerical simulations of the 3-step forming process.

  1. The Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 3Cr20Ni10W2 Austenitic Heat-Resistant Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most bulk metal forming processes may be limited by ductile fracture, such as an internal or surface fracture developing in the workpiece. Finding a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC and identify the relationships between damage evolution and strain-softening behavior of 3Cr20Ni10W2 heat-resistant alloy is very important, which, however, is a nontrivial issue that still needs to be addressed in greater depth. Based on cumulative damage theory, an innovative approach involving heat physical compression experiments, numerical simulations, and mathematical computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions. It is concluded that, as for strain-softening material, ductile damage starts at work hardening phase, and the damage cumulation is more sensitive in work hardening phase than in work softening phase. In addition, DFC of 3Cr20Ni10W2 heat-resistant alloy in a wide temperature range of 1203∼1403 K and the strain rate of 0.01∼10 s−1 are not constant but change in a range of 0.099∼0.197; thus they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC and characterized by a function of strain rate and temperature. According to VDFC diagram, the exact fracture moment and position during various forming processes will be predicted conveniently.

  2. Effects of Alloying Elements (Mo, Ni, and Cu on the Austemperability of GGG-60 Ductile Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Konca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The interest in austempered ductile irons (ADI is continuously increasing due to their various advantageous properties over conventional ductile irons and some steels. This study aimed to determine the roles of alloying elements Ni, Cu, and Mo, on the austemperability of GGG-60 ductile cast iron. Two different sets of GGG-60 (EN-GJS-600-3 samples, one set alloyed with Ni and Cu and the other set alloyed with Mo, Ni, and Cu, were subjected to austempering treatments at 290 °C, 320 °C, and 350 °C. A custom design heat treatment setup, consisting of two units with the top unit (furnace serving for austenitizing and the 200 L capacity bottom unit (stirred NaNO2-KNO3 salt bath serving for isothermal treatment, was used for the experiments. It was found that austempering treatment at 290 °C increased the hardness of the Ni-Cu alloyed GGG-60 sample by about 44% without causing a loss in its ductility. In the case of the Mo-Ni-Cu alloyed sample, the increase in hardness due to austempering reached to almost 80% at the same temperature while some ductility was lost. Here, the microstructural investigation and mechanical testing results of the austempered samples are presented and the role of alloying elements (Mo, Ni, and Cu on the austemperability of GGG-60 is discussed.

  3. EVALUATION OF MACHINABILITY OF DUCTILE IRONS ALLOYED WITH Ni AND Cu IN TERMS OF CUTTING FORCES AND SURFACE QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yücel AŞKUN

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the enhanced strength, ductility and thoughness of Ductile Iron (DI when compared to the other types cast iron, its machinability is relatively poor. When a steel part is replaced with ductile iron, however, better machinability is considered to be the most important gain. This study presents the results of machining tests of ductile irons alloyed with Ni and Cu at various contents to determine the effect of their microstructure and mechanical properties on cutting forces and surface roughness. Six different specimen groups of ductile iron alloyed with various amounts of nickel and copper were subjected to machining tests and their machinabilities were investigated based on cutting forces and surface roughness criteria. The results were evaluated according to microstructure and mechanical properties of specimens determined before. In terms of both criterion, the best result obtained was specimen added 0.7 % Ni and 0.7 % Cu. When the specimens were evaluated according to their mechanical properties, the specimens alloyed 1 % Ni and 0.65 % Cu seemed promising.

  4. Ductile Damage and Fatigue Behavior of Semi-Finished Tailored Blanks for Sheet-Bulk Metal Forming Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Hildenbrand, Philipp; Gerstein, Gregory; Rodman, Dmytro; Nürnberger, Florian; Merklein, Marion; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    To produce parts from sheet metal with thickened functional elements, bulk forming operations can be employed. For this new process class, the term sheet-bulk metal forming has been established recently. Since sheet-bulk metal forming processes such as orbital forming generates triaxial stress and strain states, ductile damage is induced in the form of voids in the microstructure. Typical parts will experience cyclic loads during service, and thus, the influence of ductile damage on the fatigue life of parts manufactured by orbital forming is of interest. Both the formation and growth of voids were characterized following this forming process and then compared to the as-received condition of the ferritic deep drawing steel DC04 chosen for this study. Subsequent to the forming operation, the specimens were fatigued and the evolution of ductile damage and the rearrangement of the dislocation networks occurring during cyclic loading were determined. It was shown, that despite an increased ductile damage due to the forming process, the induced strain hardening has a positive effect on the fatigue life of the material. However, by analyzing the fatigued specimens a development of the ductile damage by an increasing number of voids and a change in the void shape were detected.

  5. Statistical study to determine the effect of carbon, silicon, nickel and other alloying elements on the mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, J.; Sertucha, J.; Larranaga, P.; Suarez, R.

    2016-10-01

    There is a great interest in fully ferritic ductile irons due to their structural homogeneity, remarkable ductility and good response when machining. On the other hand the wide variety of raw materials available in foundry plants becomes a problem when controlling the chemical composition of the manufactured alloys. The present work shows a statistical study about the effect of different C, Si, Ni contents and other minor elements on structural and mechanical properties of a group of ferritic ductile iron alloys. A set of equations are finally presented to predict room temperature mechanical properties of ferritic ductile irons by means of their chemical composition and pearlite content. (Author)

  6. Effect of Sulfur Content and Sulfide Shape on Fracture Ductility in Case Hardening Steel%Effect of Sulfur Content and Sulfide Shape on Fracture Ductility in Case Hardening Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Guo-hua; DONG Han; WANG Mao-qiu; HUI Wei-jun

    2011-01-01

    The effects of sulfur content and calcium addition on smooth axisymmetric tensile fracture ductility of case hardening steel DIN 18CrNiMo7-6 have been investigated. The quantitative metallographic analysis of sulfide inclusions and the correlations between sulfide inclusions and fracture ductility were examined. Sulfide inclusions were found to have deleterious effect on fracture ductility, whereas the effect can be offset to some extent by calcium-treat- ment due to less easily deforming of sulfides during hot-working. The product (AA·λAW) of sulfide inclusion area fraction (An) and its area-weighted aspect ratio (λAW) can be used as a parameter to describe the effect of sulfide inclusions on fracture true strain.

  7. Ductility of Advanced High-Strength Steel in the Presence of a Sheared Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Tim; Cluff, Stephen; Miles, Michael; Fullwood, David; Daniels, Craig; Avila, Alex; Chen, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The ductility of dual-phase (DP) 980 and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted bainitic ferritic (TBF) 980 steels was studied in the presence of a sheared edge. Specimens were tested in uniaxial tension in a standard test frame as well as in situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Incremental tensile straining was done in the SEM with images taken at each strain increment. Then digital image correlation (DIC) was used to compute the effective strain at the level of the individual phases in the microstructure. Shear banding across multiple phases was seen in strained TBF specimens, while the DP specimens exhibited more of a patchwork strain pattern, with high strains concentrated in ferrite and low strains observed in the martensite. Two-point statistics were applied to the strain data from the DIC work and the corresponding microstructure images to evaluate the effect of phase hardness on localization and fracture. It was observed that the DP 980 material had a greater tendency for localization around hard phases compared to the TBF 980. This at least partially explains the greater ductility of the TBF material, especially in specimens where a sheared edge was present.

  8. Effects of Alloying Elements on the Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Heavy Section Ductile Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.S. Cho; K.H. Choe; K.W. Lee; A.Ikenaga

    2007-01-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the as-cast microstructures and mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron were investigated to develop press die material having high strength and high ductility.Measurements of ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% proof strength, elongation and unnotched Charpy impact energy are presented as a function of alloy amounts within 0.25 to 0.75 wt pct range. Hardness is measured on the broken tensile specimens. The small additions of Mo, Cu, Ni and Cr changed the as-cast mechanical properties owing to the different as-cast matrix microstructures. The ferrite matrix of Mo and Ni alloyed cast iron exhibits Iow strength and hardness as well as high elongation and impact energy. The increase in Mo and Ni contents developed some fractions of pearlite structures near the austenite eutectic cell boundaries, which caused the elongation and impact energy to drop in a small range. Adding Cu and Cr elements rapidly changed the ferrite matrix into pearlite matrix, so strength and hardness were significantly increased. As more Mo and Cr were added. the size and fraction of primary carbides in the eutectic cell boundaries increased through the segregation of these elements into the intercellular boundaries.

  9. Burst Ductility of Zirconium Clads: The Defining Role of Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gulshan; Kanjarla, A. K.; Lodh, Arijit; Singh, Jaiveer; Singh, Ramesh; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Saibaba, N.; Doherty, R. D.; Samajdar, Indradev

    2016-08-01

    Closed end burst tests, using room temperature water as pressurizing medium, were performed on a number of industrially produced zirconium (Zr) clads. A total of 31 samples were selected based on observed differences in burst ductility. The latter was represented as total circumferential elongation or TCE. The selected samples, with a range of TCE values (5 to 35 pct), did not show any correlation with mechanical properties along axial direction, microstructural parameters, crystallographic textures, and outer tube-surface normal ( σ 11) and shear ( τ 13) components of the residual stress matrix. TCEs, however, had a clear correlation with hydrostatic residual stress ( P h), as estimated from tri-axial stress analysis on the outer tube surface. Estimated P h also scaled with measured normal stress ( σ 33) at the tube cross section. An elastic-plastic finite element model with ductile damage failure criterion was developed to understand the burst mechanism of zirconium clads. Experimentally measured P h gradients were imposed on a solid element continuum finite element (FE) simulation to mimic the residual stresses present prior to pressurization. Trends in experimental TCEs were also brought out with computationally efficient shell element-based FE simulations imposing the outer tube-surface P h values. Suitable components of the residual stress matrix thus determined the burst performance of the Zr clads.

  10. A ductile fracture criterion with Zener-Hollomon parameter of pure molybdenum sheet in thermal forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Formability of pure molybdenum in thermal forming process has been greatly improved, but it is still hard to avoid the generation of rupture and other quality defects. In this paper, a ductile fracture criterion of pure molybdenum sheet in thermal forming was established by considering the plastic deformation capacity of material and stress states, which can be used to describe fracture behaviour and critical rupture prediction of pure molybdenum sheet during hot forming process. Based on the isothermal uniaxial tensile tests which performed at 993 to 1143 K with strain rate range from 0.0005 to 0.2 s−1, the material parameters are calculated by the combination method of experiment with FEsimulation. Based on the observation, new fracture criteria can be expressed as a function of Zener-Hollomon parameter. The critical fracture value that calculated by Oyane-Sato criterion increases with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate. The ductile fracture criterion with Zener-Hollomon parameter of pure molybdenum in thermal forming is proposed.

  11. PREDICTION OF CHARACTERISTIC LENGTH AND FRACTURE TOUGHNESS IN DUCTILE-BRITTLE TRANSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P

    2008-04-15

    Finite element method was used to analyze the three-point bend experimental data of A533B-1 pressure vessel steel obtained by Sherry, Lidbury, and Beardsmore [1] from -160 to -45 C within the ductile-brittle transition regime. As many researchers have shown, the failure stress ({sigma}{sub f}) of the material could be approximated as a constant. The characteristic length, or the critical distance (r{sub c}) from the crack tip, at which {sigma}{sub f} is reached, is shown to be temperature dependent based on the crack tip stress field calculated by the finite element method. With the J-A{sub 2} two-parameter constraint theory in fracture mechanics, the fracture toughness (J{sub C} or K{sub JC}) can be expressed as a function of the constraint level (A{sub 2}) and the critical distance r{sub c}. This relationship is used to predict the fracture toughness of A533B-1 in the ductile-brittle transition regime with a constant {sigma}{sub f} and a set of temperature-dependent r{sub c}. It can be shown that the prediction agrees well with the test data for wide range of constraint levels from shallow cracks (a/W= 0.075) to deep cracks (a/W= 0.5), where a is the crack length and W is the specimen width.

  12. Brittle and Ductile Behavior in Deep-Seated Landslides: Learning from the Vajont Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paronuzzi, Paolo; Bolla, Alberto; Rigo, Elia

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanical behavior of the unstable Mt. Toc slope before the 1963 catastrophic collapse, considering both the measured data (surface displacements and microseismicity) and the updated geological model of the prehistoric rockslide. From February 1960 up to 9 October 1963, the unstable mass behaved as a brittle-ductile `mechanical system,' characterized by remarkable microseismicity as well as by considerable surface displacements (up to 4-5 m). Recorded microshocks were the result of progressive rock fracturing of distinct resisting stiff parts made up of intact rock (indentations, undulations, and rock bridges). The main resisting stiff part was a large rock indentation located at the NE extremity of the unstable mass that acted as a mechanical constraint during the whole 1960-1963 period, inducing a progressive rototranslation toward the NE. This large constraint failed in autumn 1960, when an overall slope failure took place, as emphasized by the occurrence of the large perimetrical crack in the upper slope. In this circumstance, the collapse was inhibited by a reblocking phenomenon of the unstable mass that had been previously destabilized by the first reservoir filling. Progressive failure of localized intact rock parts progressively propagated westwards as a consequence of the two further filling-drawdown cycles of the reservoir (1962 and 1963). The characteristic brittle-ductile behavior of the Vajont landslide was made possible by the presence of a very thick (40-50 m) and highly deformable shear zone underlying the upper rigid rock mass (100-120 m thick).

  13. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullers, Cheryl L.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1993-01-01

    The intermetallic compound NiAl is one of many advanced materials which is being scrutinized for possible use in high temperature, structural applications. Stoichiometric NiAl has a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, and good thermal conductivity. Past research has concentrated on improving monotonic properties. The encouraging results obtained on binary and micro-alloyed NiAl over the past ten years have led to the broadening of NiAl experimental programs. The purpose of this research project was to determine the low cycle fatigue properties and dislocation mechanisms of stoichiometric NiAl at temperatures near the monotonic brittle-to-ductile transition. The fatigue properties were found to change only slightly in the temperature range of 600 to 700 K; a temperature range over which monotonic ductility and fracture strength increase markedly. The shape of the cyclic hardening curves coincided with the changes observed in the dislocation structures. The evolution of dislocation structures did not appear to change with temperature.

  14. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: a general microscopic picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-11-10

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies.

  15. Strong, ductile, and thermally stable Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusoe, Keith J.; Vijayan, Sriram; Bissell, Thomas R.; Chen, Jie; Morley, Jack E.; Valencia, Leopolodo; Dongare, Avinash M.; Aindow, Mark; Lee, Seok-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and nanocrystalline metals (NMs) have been extensively investigated due to their superior strengths and elastic limits. Despite these excellent mechanical properties, low ductility at room temperature and poor microstructural stability at elevated temperatures often limit their practical applications. Thus, there is a need for a metallic material system that can overcome these performance limits of BMGs and NMs. Here, we present novel Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites (MINCs), which exhibit high ultimate compressive strengths (over 2 GPa), high compressive failure strain (over 20%), and superior microstructural stability even at temperatures above the glass transition temperature of Cu-based BMGs. Rapid solidification produces a unique ultra-fine microstructure that contains a large volume fraction of Cu5Zr superlattice intermetallic compound; this contributes to the high strength and superior thermal stability. Mechanical and microstructural characterizations reveal that substantial accumulation of phase boundary sliding at metal/intermetallic interfaces accounts for the extensive ductility observed.

  16. Micromechanical and macroscopic models of ductile fracture in particle reinforced metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chao; Bai, Jie; Ghosh, Somnath

    2007-06-01

    This paper is aimed at developing two modules contributing to the overall framework of multi-scale modelling of ductile fracture of particle reinforced metallic materials. The first module is for detailed micromechanical analysis of particle fragmentation and matrix cracking of heterogeneous microstructures. The Voronoi cell FEM for particle fragmentation is extended in this paper to incorporate ductile failure through matrix cracking in the form of void growth and coalescence using a non-local Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model. In the resulting enriched Voronoi cell finite element model (VCFEM) or E-VCFEM, the assumed stress-based hybrid VCFEM formulation is overlaid with narrow bands of displacement based elements to accommodate strain softening in the constitutive behaviour. The second module develops an anisotropic plasticity-damage model in the form of the GTN model for macroscopic analysis in the multi-scale material model. Parameters in this model are calibrated from results of homogenization of microstructural variables obtained by E-VCFEM analysis of microstructural representative volume element. Numerical examples conducted yield satisfactory results.

  17. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Laurianne; Adolf, Lise-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Fracture in ductile materials finds its origin in microscopic mechanisms: the nucleation of voids that grow and coalesce in order to form a crack. The most popular of these models, proposed by Gurson, aims at describing the damage development with respect to the plastic behavior of porous material. The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic porous materials. The Gurson-Perrin model (GPm) allows representing damage development with respect to the stress triaxiality and strain-rate conditions. We propose a new experimental design able to test and validate the GPm under various dynamic conditions and for different triaxiality levels. The experimental project will be detailed. A notch is drawn in the Cu cylindrical target where damage develops and the local failure occurs. A variation of the notch radius enables a variation in the triaxiality level. Three notch radii have been tested. Observations with numerical cameras allow following the shape of the notch, a characteristic of damage development. Several PDV measurements have been performed around the target. A first analysis of this experimental process will be shown and comparisons with numerical simulations will be presented.

  18. Reliability model for ductile hybrid FRP rebar using randomly dispersed chopped fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnam, Bashar Ramzi

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites or simply FRP composites have become more attractive to civil engineers in the last two decades due to their unique mechanical properties. However, there are many obstacles such as low elasticity modulus, non-ductile behavior, high cost of the fibers, high manufacturing costs, and absence of rigorous characterization of the uncertainties of the mechanical properties that restrict the use of these composites. However, when FRP composites are used to develop reinforcing rebars in concrete structural members to replace the conventional steel, a huge benefit can be achieved since FRP materials don't corrode. Two FRP rebar models are proposed that make use of multiple types of fibers to achieve ductility, and chopped fibers are used to reduce the manufacturing costs. In order to reach the most optimum fractional volume of each type of fiber, to minimize the cost of the proposed rebars, and to achieve a safe design by considering uncertainties in the materials and geometry of sections, appropriate material resistance factors have been developed, and a Reliability Based Design Optimization (RBDO), has been conducted for the proposed schemes.

  19. Mechanical Property Stability of Cu-Mo-Ni Alloyed Austempered Ductile Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Sheng-fa; WANG Zhong-fan

    2005-01-01

    The aim of present work is to investigate the influencing factors on mechanical property stability of Cu-Mo-Ni alloyed austempered ductile iron (ADI). The results show that after austenitized at 900 ℃ for 2 h followed by austempered at 370 ℃ for another 2 h, the mechanical property of the alloyed ADI can reach the Germanite GGG-100 standard, i.e.σb≮1 000 MPa, δ≮5%, at 95% confidence level. And the satisfactory mechanical properties were obtained when the alloyed ADI was austenitized at 850 ℃ to 1 000 ℃ for 1-4 h, and austempered at 355 ℃ to 400 ℃ for another 1 h to 4 h. The microstructures, including nodule number, white bright zone content (martensite-containing interdendritic segregation zone) and retained austenite content, can significantly influence the mechanical properties of the ADI. In order to obtain the good combinations of strength and ductility, the volume fraction of white bright zone should be less than 5%, and the retained austenite contents maintain between 30 % and 40 %. The application of inoculation techniques to increase graphite nodule number can effectively reduce the white bright zone content in the structure.

  20. Un-lubricated sliding wear performance of unalloyed austempered ductile iron under high contact stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimba, J.; Samandi, M.; Yu, D.; Chandra, T.; Navara, E.; Simbi, D.J

    2004-08-15

    The dry sliding wear behaviour of unalloyed austempered ductile iron (ADI) was studied in a reciprocating tribotester using contact loads in the range 40-140 N. The results obtained show that austempering in the temperature range 325-375 deg. C significantly improves the tribological properties of the unalloyed spheroidal graphite iron. The friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of ten (10) with the wear resistance increasing by several orders of magnitude. The improvement in wear performance was attributed to: the lubricity inherent the graphite nodules, the increase in initial hardness brought about by the ausferrite structure, and the work hardening of the surface as retained austenite is transformed to martensite by plastic deformation, and in the process reducing considerably the sensitivity of the specific wear rate to loading. Optical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results pertaining to the wear tracks suggest that two main wear mechanisms are responsible for material removal in the unlubricated sliding wear of ADI, namely, plastic yielding and oxidation, with the latter producing hard oxide particles that act as abrasives. Massive plastic yielding followed by delamination and sometimes oxidation accounts for material loss in the much softer as cast ductile spheroidal graphite iron.

  1. Development of austempered ductile iron timing gears; Austemper kyujo kokuen chutetsu timing gear no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Numajiri, S.; Nakajima, K. [Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    To reduce vibration and noise of gears compared with ordinary steel gears for four cycle diesel engine of small commercial vehicles, austempered ductile iron (ADI) gears have been developed, which have excellent mechanical properties and vibration damping properties equivalent to steel gears. ADI is a material with tensile strength of 1,000 MPa, which is made by austempering the ductile iron to change matrix texture into tough bainite. For a new process method of ADI gears, austempering is conducted after gear cutting, and shaving is conducted, finally. Gear materials before austempering can be smoothly machined without deteriorating their machinability, to produce highly accurate gears. Fifteen percent of noise can be reduced for ADI gears during idling of engine, where 0.7 dB can be reduced in the noise level. The ADI gears provide superior pitting resistance to ordinary steel gears. They have nearly equivalent dedendum bending fatigue strength to ordinary soft nitrided steel gears. 6 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Wear behavior of an austempered ductile iron containing Mo-Ni-Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, S.; Rahimi, M.A. [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand Univ. of Technology, Tabriz (Iran)

    2005-07-01

    The aim of the this investigation is to study the influence of Ni on tribiological behavior of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing Mo, Ni and Cu. Ductile irons with chemical composition Fe-3.56%C-2.67%Si -0.25%Mo-0.5%Cu and Ni contents of 0.8 and 1.5% were cast into standard Y-blocks. Wear test samples were machined off from the bottom section of blocks. Austenitizing heat treatment was carried out at 870 C temperature followed by austempering at 270, 320, and 370 C for 5-1140 minutes. The wear test was carried out by using block-on-ring test machine. Sliding dry wear behavior was studied under applied loads of 50, 100 and 150 N. The results show that wear resistance is independent of austempering temperature with an applied load of 50 N, but there is a strong dependence at higher austempering temperatures with applied loads of 100 and 150 N. Wear mechanism is described as being due to subsurface fatigue, with cracks nucleated at plastically, deformed graphite interfaces. The wear controlling mechanism is the crack growth when wear shows a dependence on applied load and austempering temperature. (orig.)

  3. Mechanical properties of a low alloyed austempered ductile iron in the upper ausferrite region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, D.C.

    1999-05-01

    Microstructural observations, X-ray diffraction testing and measurements of mechanical properties were used to study the characteristics of austempering and the influence of tempered martensite on mechanical properties as a function of austempering time at 400 degree C after austenitising at 900 degree C for a 0.77%Cu-0.5%Ni ductile iron. The austempering times were derived from a resistivity curve measured by a vacuum heat treatment system. The experimental results show that the resistivity change curve could be used effectively for selecting the isothermal holding times of austempering treatment, with all The mechanical properties of ADI austempering at times corresponding to the processing window defined by the electrical resistance measurement satisfying the standard requirement. The formation of martensite in austempering reduced the mechanical properties of ADI but these properties could be increased by a treatment tempering at 200 degree C after cooling and to obtain more ductility and toughness as compared with that undergoing single heat treatment. This increase also extended the effective austempering time interval of ADI over which the ASTM standards were satisfied. (author)

  4. Influence of matrix structure on the fatigue properties of an alloyed ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toktas, Guelcan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Balikesir University, 10145 Balikesir (Turkey)], E-mail: gzeytin@balikesir.edu.tr; Toktas, Alaaddin; Tayanc, Mustafa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Balikesir University, 10145 Balikesir (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    Rotary bending fatigue tests were conducted on ductile iron containing 1.25 wt% nickel, 1.03 wt% copper and 0.18 wt% molybdenum with various matrix structures. Several heat treatments were applied to obtain ferritic, pearlitic/ferritic, pearlitic, tempered martensitic, lower and upper ausferritic structures in the matrix of a pearlitic as-cast alloyed ductile iron. The tensile properties (ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% yield strength and percent elongation), the hardness and the microstructures of the matrixes were also investigated in addition to fatigue properties. Fractured surfaces of the fatigue specimens were examined by the scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the lowest hardness, tensile and fatigue properties were obtained for the ferritic structure and the values of these properties seemed to increase with rising pearlite content in the matrix. While the lower ausferritic structure had the highest fatigue strength, the upper ausferritic one showed low fatigue and tensile properties due to the formation of the second reaction during the austempering process.

  5. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of low alloyed Ni-Mo-Cu austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosnjak, B.

    2000-12-01

    The present study investigated the effect of austempering temperature and austempering time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low alloyed Ni-Mo-Cu ductile iron. The effect of austempering parameters and alloying additions on the austemperability of treated ductile iron has been estimated, too. Specimens were austenitised at 900 degree C for 120 mm, then austempered for 10, 30, 60, 120, 240 and 360 mm at 300, 350 and 400 degree C respectively, and examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. The structure consisted of bainitic ferrite containing retained austenite. the amount of which increased, and the carbon content of which decreased, with increasing austempering temperature. The carbon content of austenite has been evaluated by measuring the lattice parameter by X-ray diffraction. After short periods of austempering time in iron, the carbon content of the retained austenite decreases and on subsequent cooling to room temperature it transforms to martensite. The volume fractions of retained austenite, bainitic ferrite, martensite and austenite carbon content was correlated with microstructural changes and mechanical properties. Optimum properties are obtained at intermediate austempering periods (120-240 mm) when both the amount of retained austenite and austenite carbon content are maximum. (author)

  6. Ameliorated Austenite Carbon Content Control in Austempered Ductile Irons by Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron has emerged as a notable material in several engineering fields, including marine applications. The initial austenite carbon content after austenization transform but before austempering process for generating bainite matrix proved critical in controlling the resulted microstructure and thus mechanical properties. In this paper, support vector regression is employed in order to establish a relationship between the initial carbon concentration in the austenite with austenization temperature and alloy contents, thereby exercising improved control in the mechanical properties of the austempered ductile irons. Particularly, the paper emphasizes a methodology tailored to deal with a limited amount of available data with intrinsically contracted and skewed distribution. The collected information from a variety of data sources presents another challenge of highly uncertain variance. The authors present a hybrid model consisting of a procedure of a histogram equalizer and a procedure of a support-vector-machine (SVM- based regression to gain a more robust relationship to respond to the challenges. The results show greatly improved accuracy of the proposed model in comparison to two former established methodologies. The sum squared error of the present model is less than one fifth of that of the two previous models.

  7. Evolution of Microstructures During Austempering of Ductile Irons Alloyed with Manganese and Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Ranjan Kumar; Mondal, Dipak Kumar; Chakrabarti, Ajit Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The influences of relatively high manganese (0.45 through 1.0 wt pct) and copper (0.56 through 1.13 wt pct) contents on microstructure development and phase transformation in three austempered ductile irons have been studied. The experimental ductile irons alloyed with copper and manganese are found to be practically free from intercellular manganese segregation. This suggests that the positive segregation of manganese is largely neutralized by the negative segregation of copper when these alloying elements are added in appropriate proportions. The drop in unreacted austenite volume (UAV) with increasing austempering temperature and time is quite significant in irons alloyed with copper and manganese. The ausferrite morphology also undergoes a transition from lenticular to feathery appearance of increasing coarseness with the increasing austempering temperature and time. SEM micrographs of the austempered samples from the base alloy containing manganese only, as well as copper plus manganese-alloyed irons, clearly reveal the presence of some martensite along with retained austenite and ferrite. X-ray diffraction analysis also confirms the presence of these phases. SEM examination further reveals the presence of twinned martensite in the copper plus manganese-alloyed samples. The possibility of strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite during austempering heat treatment is suggested.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of CuNiMo austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erić Olivera

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure and mechanical properties of Cu, Ni and Mo alloyed cast ductile iron have been investigated after austempering. Samples were austenitised at 860oC for 1h and then austempered at 320oC and 400oC in the interval from 0,5 to 5h. The X-ray diffraction technique and the light microscopy were utilized to investigate the bainitic transformation, while tensile and impact tests were performed for characterization of mechanical properties. By austempering at 320oC in the range between 2 and 5h, a microstructure typical for austempered ductile iron was produced, i.e. a mixture of free bainitic ferrite and highly carbon enriched retained austenite. The characteristic of the whole range of austempering at 400oC is the appearance of martensitic structure. The maximum impact energy (133 J coincides with the maximum value of volume fraction of retained austenite that was obtained after 2,5h of austempering at 320oC. The appearance of martensite during austempering at 400oC is the main cause for much lower tensile properties than at 320oC.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy study of high temperature bainitic transformation in 1 wt.% Mn ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadabadi, M.N. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Niyama, E. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Echigoya, J. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    A 1 wt.% Mn ductile iron austenitized at 900 C for 90 min and austempered at 375 C for different periods was used to study some aspects of bainitic reaction in high Mn austempered ductile iron with reference to carbide precipitation in bainitic ferrite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) study shows that precipitation of carbide in the ferritic component of bainite is a function of the local concentration of alloying elements. In other words, in the region near graphite where Si segregates and there is negative Mn segregation as well as carbon, the bainitic ferrite is carbide free. However, in the intercellular region where Mn segregates and Si is depleted, the ferritic component of bainite occurs together with very fine and almost uniformly distributed carbide. Furthermore, TEM-EDXA results show that the increase in Mn content not only delays stage I (the initial transformation of austenite to ferrite and retained austenite) of the bainitic reaction, but also delays stage II (decomposition of retained austenite to ferrite and carbide). ((orig.))

  10. The Performance Evalution of Ceramic And Carbide Cutting Tools In Machining of Austemepered Ductile Irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya IŞIK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to compare TiN (PVD coated Al2O3+Ti[C,N] mixed alumina-based (KY4400 ceramic and CVD coated carbide TiC+AI2O3+TiN (ISO P25 cutting tools in turning austempered ductile irons. Ductile cast iron samples were austenitized at 927°C and subsequently austempered for 1 hour at 400°C. The hardness of the workpiece material was measured and found to be 43.5 HRC. In the present work a series of tests were conducted in order to evaluate the tool performances by adopting tool life. In all experiments cutting forces, flank wear and surface roughness values were measured throughout the tool life. No cutting fluid was used during the turning operations. Study of the tool life and failure modes shows that tool life was determined by the flank wear and surface roughness generated on the workpiece. The main conclusion is that tool life of ceramic insert was longer than the coated carbide insert although much higher cutting speeds were used. 

  11. Effect of boron on the microstructure and mechanical properties of carbidic austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Yuncheng; Jin Huijin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Liu Jinhai, E-mail: pyc_wanhj@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Li Guolu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} Boron are applied to carbidic austempered ductile iron (CADI). {yields} Boron microalloying CADI is a new high hardenability of wear-resistant cast iron. {yields} Addition of boron to CADI significantly improves hardenability. {yields} Effect of boron on the CADI grinding ball were investigated. {yields} Optimum property is obtained when boron content at 0.03 wt%. - Abstract: Carbidic austempered ductile iron (CADI) castings provide a unique combination of high hardness and toughness coupled with superior wear resistance properties, but their hardenability restricts their range of applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of boron on the microstructure and mechanical properties of CADI. The experimental results indicate that the CADI comprises graphite nodules, which are dispersive boron-carbides that are distributed in the form of strips, and the matrix is a typical ausferritic matrix. Microscopic amounts of boron can improve the hardenability of CADI, but higher boron content reduces the hardenability and toughness of CADI. The results are discussed in the context of the influence of boron content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of grinding balls.

  12. Microstructural investigation of austempered ductile irons with ultrasonic method; Ultraschall-Gefuegeuntersuchungen von zwischenstufenverguetetem Sphaeroguss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topuz, A. [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Metallurgical Engineering Dept.; Topcu, E. [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Metallurgical Engineering Dept.; Bakkaloglu, A. [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Metallurgical Engineering Dept.; Marsoglu, M. [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Metallurgical Engineering Dept.

    1997-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between the matrix structure and the sonic velocity of ductile iron in the as-cast and austempered heat treatment conditions was investigated. The sonic velocity in 12 different ductile irons (unalloyed, alloyed with Ni, Mo, Cu, Ni+Cu and Ni+Mo+Cu) has been measured in the as-cast condition and austempered conditions. The investigations have shown that cast iron that should meet the minimum specification of 90% nodularity requires the minimum velocity of 5680 m/s in the as-cast condition and 5450 m/s in the at 235 C austempered condition. From experimental data the equation CT{sup a}=B has been found for austempered conditions. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde der Zusammenhang zwischen dem Matrixgefuege und der Schallgeschwindigkeit von Sphaeroguss im Guss- und Zwischenstufenverguetungszustand untersucht. Die Schallgeschwindigkeit wurde in 12 verschiedenen Proben aus Sphaeroguss (unlegiert, legiert mit Ni, Mo, Cu, Ni+Cu und Ni+Mo+Cu) im gegossenen und vergueteten Zustand gemessen. Die Untersuchungen ergaben, dass Gusseisen mit einem Grad der Sphaerolitbildung von mindestens 90% die geringste Schallgeschwindigkeit von 5680 m/s im Gusszustand und 5450 m/s im zwischenstufenvergueteten Zustand erreichte. Aus den experimentellen Ergebnissen wurde die Formel CT{sup a}=B fuer den zwischenstufenvergueteten Zustand errechnet. (orig.)

  13. The influence of the hardening conditions on the mechanical properties of ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Giętka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ductile cast iron has been austempered according to two variants. The first treatment variant was austenitizing at a temperature tγ = 830, 860 and 900 0C and holding at a temperature tpi = 400 and 300 0C for 8 ÷ 64 min. Second variant treatment was two-phase austenitizing. Firstly, it was heated at a temperature tγ = 950 0C and after forecooling and chilling at a temperature tγ’ = 900, 860 and 830 0C isothermal process was conducted in the same conditions as in the first variant. The cast iron with ferritic matrix was austempered. After hardening the mechanical (Rp0,2, Rm and plastic (A5 properties were examined as well as the microstructure of matrix and hardness. It was noticed that the heat treatment carried out according to variants I and II lead to attaining cast iron of grade: ADI EN-GJS-800-8, EN-GJS-1200-2, EN-GJS-1400-1 according to PN–EN 1564 : 2000; in addition, ductility of these grades was 1,5÷4 times bigger than the mini-mum standard material requirements.

  14. The influence of chromium on mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosiewicz, L.; Singh, I.; Alberts, F. A.; Krause, A. R.; Putatunda, S. K.

    1995-02-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of microstructure and chromium on the tensile properties and plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile cast iron (ADI). The investigation also examined the growth kinetics of ferrite in these alloys. Compact tension and round cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from ductile cast iron with Cr as well as without Cr. These specimens were then given four different heat treatments to produce four different microstructures. Tensile tests and fracture toughness tests were carried out as per ASTM standards E-8 and E-399. The crack growth mechanism during fracture toughness tests was also determined. The test results indicate that yield strength, tensile strength, and fracture toughness of ADI increases with an increase in the volume fractions of ferrite, and the fracture toughness reaches a peak when the volume fractions of the ferrite are approximately 60% in these alloys. The Cr addition was found to reduce the fracture toughness of ADI at lower hardness levels (<40 HRC); at higher hardness levels (≥40 HRC), the effect of chromium on the fracture toughness was negligible. The crack growth mechanism was found to be a combination of quasi-cleavage and microvoid coalescences, and the crack trajectories connect the graphite nodules along the way.

  15. Analysis of damage localization for ductile metal in process of shear band propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Distribution of localized damage in shear band can' t be predicted theoretically based on classical elastoplastic theory. The average damage variable in shear band was considered to be a non-local variable. Based on non-local theory, an analytical expression for the localized damage in strain-softening region of shear band in the process of shear band propagation was presented using boundary condition and symmetry of local damage variable, etc. The results show that dynamic shear softening modulus, dynamic shear strength and shear elastic modulus influence the distribution of the localized damage in shear band. Internal length of ductile metal only governs the thickness of shear band. In the strain-softening region of shear band, the local damage variable along shear band's tangential and normal directions is non-linear and highly non-uniform. The non-uniformities in the normal and tangential directions of shear band stem from the interactions and interplaying among microstructures and the non-uniform distribution of shear stress, respectively. At the tail of the strain-softening region, the maximum value of local damage variable reaches 1. This means that material at this position fractures completely. At the tip of shear band and upper as well as lower boundaries, no damage occurs. Local damage variable increases as dynamic shear softening modulus decreases or shear elastic modulus increases, leading to difficulty in identification or detection of damage for less ductile metal material at higher strain rates.

  16. Study on the cutting mechanism and the brittle ductile transition model of isotropic pyrolyric graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghai; Wang, Hujun; Liu, Zhonghai

    2011-05-01

    Isotropic pyrolyric graphite (IPG) is a new kind of brittle material, it can be used for sealing the aero-engine turbine shaft and the ethylene high-temperature equipment. It not only has the general advantages of ordinal carbonaceous materials such as high temperature resistance, lubrication and abrasion resistance, but also has the advantages of impermeability and machinability that carbon/carbon composite doesn't have. Therefore, it has broad prospects for development. Mechanism of brittle-ductile transition of IPG is the foundation of precision cutting while the plastic deformation of IPG is the essential and the most important mechanical behavior of precision cutting. Using the theory of strain gradient, the mechanism of this material removal during the precision cutting is analyzed. The critical cutting thickness of IPG is calculated for the first time. Furthermore, the cutting process parameters such as cutting depth, feed rate which corresponding to the scale of brittle-ductile transition deformation of IPG are calculated. In the end, based on the theory of micromechanics, the deformation behaviors of IPG such as brittle fracture, plastic deformation and mutual transformation process are all simulated under the Sih.G.C fracture criterion. The condition of the simulation is that the material under the pressure-shear loading conditions .The result shows that the best angle during the IPG precision cutting is -30°. The theoretical analysis and the simulation result are validated by precision cutting experiments.

  17. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-01-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, w......Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro......-cracks, which rotate and elongate until interaction with neighbouring micro-cracks gives coalescence. Thus, the failure mechanism is very different from that under tensile loading. Also, the Gurson model has recently been extended to describe failure in shear, by adding a damage term to the expression...... for the growth of the void volume fraction, and it has been shown that this extended model can represent experimental observations. Here, numerical studies are carried out to compare predictions of the shear-extended Gurson model with the shear failures predicted by the micro-mechanical cell model. Both models...

  18. Modern Cored Wire Injection 2PE-9 Method in the Production of Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guzik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the use of modern two cored wires injection method for production of nodular graphite cast iron with use of unique implementation of drum ladle as a treatment/ transport and casting ladle instead vertical treatment ladle was described. The injection of length of Ø 9mm wires, cored: in FeSi + Mg nodulariser mixture and inoculant master alloy is a treatment method which can be used to produce iron melted in coreless induction furnace. This paper describes the results of using this method for possibility production of ductile iron under specific industrial conditions. In this case was taken ductile iron with material designation: EN-GJS-450- 10 Grade according PN-EN 1563:2000. Microstructure of 28 trials was controlled on internally used sample which has been correlated with standard sample before. The paper presents typical metallic matrix and graphite characteristic. Additionally, mechanical properties were checked in one experiment. Because of further possibility treatment temperature reduction only the rough magnesium recovery and cost of this new method are given.

  19. Influence of copper on effects of precipitation hardening of ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Szykowny

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Ductile cast iron with different copper content was precipitation hardened. Cast iron with 0.48 % Cu content was ferritized. That operation was ended with rapid quenching, and then aged. Cast iron with 1.27 or 2.10 % Cu content was spheroid annealing. After rapid quenching cast iron was aged. Not alloy cast iron with small copper content (0.04 % had a chemical composition similar to cast iron with 0.48 % Cu content. Such copper was for tests in order to obtain an answer for the question whether only copper is responsible for precipitate hardening effects. Metalographic microscope tests (LM, SEM of mechanical properties (Rm, Rp, A5, Z, K and H and x-ray diffraction tests were performed. It has been stated, that hardening of ferretic cast iron let to obtain tensile strength above 500 MPa and elongation approx. 23 %.Precipitation hardening of ductile cast iron efficiently compensates reducing of hardening caused by partial graphitization and spheroidization of pearlitic cementite.

  20. 3D Quantitative Analysis of Graphite Morphology in Ductile Cast Iron by X-ray Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yajun; Tu, Zhixin; Zhou, Jianxin; Zhang, Dongqiao; Wang, Min; Guo, Zhao; Liu, Changchang; Chen, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    In this article, X-ray microtomography and color metallographic techniques have been used to perform three-dimensional quantitative characterization of graphite nodule morphology in a step-shaped ductile cast iron casting. Statistical analyses of the graphite nodule count, diameter, sphericity, and spatial distribution have been processed for three samples in detail. The results reveal that graphite nodules in ductile cast iron can be categorized into two categories. The first types are nodules located in eutectic cells (NIECs), and the other one refers to nodules located between the eutectic cells (NBECs). The NIECs possess a larger average diameter but smaller sphericity compared with the NBECs, and the sphericity decreases along with the increasing of diameter. The increasing casting thickness results in an increasing count and percentage of NBECs. In addition, most nodules are NIECs in thin walls instead of NBECs in thick walls. Nonuniform spatial distributions of graphite nodules caused by the existence of NBECs have been found to become more obvious along with the increase of cast thickness.