WorldWideScience

Sample records for ductile fracture mechanics

  1. Why ductile fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, the engineering application of fracture mechanics has been specific to a description of macroscopic fracture behavior in components and structural parts which remain nominally elastic under loading. While this approach, termed linear elastic fracture mechanics, has been found to be invaluable for the continuum analysis of crack growth in brittle and high strength materials, it is clearly inappropriate for characterizing failure in lower strength ductile alloys where extensive inelastic deformation precedes and accompanies crack initiation and subsequent propagation. Accordingly, much effort has been devoted in recent years toward the development of nonlinear or ductile fracture mechanics methodology to characterize fracture behavior under elastic/plastic conditions; an effort which has been principally motivated by problems in nuclear industry. In this paper, the concepts of ductile (elastic/plastic) fracture mechanics are introduced and applied to the problem of both stationary and nonstationary cracks. Specifically, the limitations inherent in this approach are defined, together with a description of the microstructural considerations and applications relevant to the failure of ductile materials by fracture, fatigue, and creep

  2. Hot ductility and fracture mechanisms of a structural steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, J.; Cabrera, J. M.; Prado, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The hot ductility of a structural steel produced from scrap recycling has been studied to determine the origin of the transverse cracks in the corners that appeared in some billets. Samples extracted both from a billet with transverse cracks and from a billet with no external damage were tested. To evaluate the influence of residual elements and inclusions, the steel was compared to another one impurity free. Reduction in area of the samples tensile tested to the fracture was taken as a measure of the hot ductility. The tests were carried out at temperatures ranging from 1000 degree centigree to 650 degree centigree and at a strain rate of 1.10-3 s-1. The fracture surfaces of the tested samples were observed by scanning electron microscopy in order to determine the embrittling mechanisms that could be acting. The steel with residuals and impurities exhibited lower ductility values for a wider temperature range than the clean steel. The embrittling mechanisms also changed as compared to the impurity free steel. (Author)

  3. Prediction of forming limit in hydro-mechanical deep drawing of steel sheets using ductile fracture criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S.-T.; Chang, H.-J.; Oh, K. H.; Han, H. N.

    2006-04-01

    It has been observed that the forming limit curve at fracture (FLCF) of steel sheets, with a relatively higher ductility limit have linear shapes, similar to those of a bulk forming process. In contrast, the FLCF of sheets with a relatively lower ductility limit have rather complex shapes approaching the forming limit curve at neck (FLCN) towards the equi-biaxial strain paths. In this study, the FLCFs of steel sheets were measured and compared with the fracture strains predicted from specific ductile fracture criteria, including a criterion suggested by the authors, which can accurately describe FLCFs with both linear and complex shapes. To predict the forming limit for hydro-mechanical deep drawing of steel sheets, the ductile fracture criteria were integrated into a finite element simulation. The simulation, results based on the criterion suggested by authors accurately predicted the experimetal, fracture limits of steel sheets for the hydro-mechanical deep drawing process.

  4. Ductile fracture theories for pressurised pipes and containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Two mechanisms of fracture are distinguished. Plane strain fractures occur in materials which do not undergo large-scale plastic deformations prior to and during a possible fracture deformation. Plane stress or high energy fractures are generally accompanied by large inelastic deformations. Theories for analyzing plane stress are based on the concepts of critical crack opening stretch, K(R) characterization, J-integral, and plastic instability. This last is considered in some detail. The ductile fracture process involves fracture initiation followed by a stable crack growth and the onset of unstable fracture propagation. The ductile fracture propagation process may be characterized by either a multiparameter (discrete) model, or some type of a resistance curve which may be considered as a continuous model expressed graphically. These models are studied and an alternative model is also proposed for ductile fractures which cannot be modeled as progressive crack growth phenomena.

  5. Ductile fracture evaluation of ductile cast iron and forged steel by nonlinear-fracture-mechanics. Pt. 1. Tensile test by large scaled test pieces with surface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Ajima, Tatsuro; Inohara, Yasuto

    1999-01-01

    The ductile fracture tests of Ductile Cast Iron and Forged Steel under a tensile stress condition were conducted using large-scaled flat test specimens with a surface crack and were evaluated by the J-integral values, in order to propose an evaluation method of initiation of ductile fracture of a cask body with crack by nonlinear-fracture-mechanics. Following results were obtained. 1) 1 -strain relations of Ductile Cast Iron and Forged Steel under the tensile stress condition were obtained, which is necessary for the development of J-integral design curves for evaluating the initiation of ductile fracture of the cask body. 2) In case of Ductile Cast Iron, the experimental J-integral values obtained from strain-gauges showed a good agreement with the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman at room temperature, in both elastic and plastic regions. But, at 70degC in plastic region, the experimental i-integral values showed middle values between those predicted by the linear-elastic-theory and by the non- linear-elastic- theory (based on the fully plastic solution by Yagawa et al.). 3) In case of Forged Steel at both -25degC and room temperature, the experimental i-integral values obtained from strain-gauges showed a good agreement with those predicted by the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman, in the elastic region. In the plastic region, however, the experimental i-integral values fell apart from the curve predicted by the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman, and also approached to those by the non-linear-elastic-theory with increasing strain.(author)

  6. The elasto plastic fracture mechanics in ductile metal sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Malik, M.N.; Naeem, A.; Haq, A.U.; Atkins, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    The crack initiation of propagation in ductile metal sheets are caused by various micro and macro changes taking place due to material properties, applied loads, shape of the indenter (tool geometry) and the environmental conditions. These microstructural failures are directly related to the atomic bonding, crystal lattices, grain boundary status, material flaws in matrix, inhomogeneities and anisotropy in the metal sheets. The Elasto-Plastic related energy based equations are applied to these Rigid Plastic materials to determine the onset of fracture in metal forming. The combined stress and strain criterion of a critical plastic work per unit volume is no more considered as a universal ductile fracture criterion, rather a critical plastic work per unit volume dependence on all sort of stresses (hydrostatic) are the required features for the sheet metal failure (fracture). In this present study, crack initiation and propagation are related empirically with fracture toughness and the application of the theory in industry to save energy. (author)

  7. Mechanical properties of highly defective graphene: from brittle rupture to ductile fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lanqing; Wei, Ning; Zheng, Yongping

    2013-12-20

    Defects are generally believed to deteriorate the superlative performance of graphene-based devices but may also be useful when carefully engineered to tailor the local properties and achieve new functionalities. Central to most defect-associated applications is the defect coverage and arrangement. In this work, we investigate, by molecular dynamics simulations, the mechanical properties and fracture dynamics of graphene sheets with randomly distributed vacancies or Stone-Wales defects under tensile deformations over a wide defect coverage range. With defects presented, an sp-sp(2) bonding network and an sp-sp(2)-sp(3) bonding network are observed in vacancy-defected and Stone-Wales-defected graphene, respectively. The ultimate strength degrades gradually with increasing defect coverage and saturates in the high-ratio regime, whereas the fracture strain presents an unusual descending-saturating-improving trend. In the dense vacancy defect situation, the fracture becomes more plastic and super-ductility is observed. Further fracture dynamics analysis reveals that the crack trapping by sp-sp(2) and sp-sp(2)-sp(3) rings and the crack-tip blunting account for the ductile fracture, whereas geometric rearrangement on the entire sheet for vacancy defects and geometric rearrangement on the specific defect sites for Stone-Wales defects account for their distinctive rules of the evolution of the fracture strain.

  8. Micromechanics based simulation of ductile fracture in structural steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellavajjala, Ravi Kiran

    The broader aim of this research is to develop fundamental understanding of ductile fracture process in structural steels, propose robust computational models to quantify the associated damage, and provide numerical tools to simplify the implementation of these computational models into general finite element framework. Mechanical testing on different geometries of test specimens made of ASTM A992 steels is conducted to experimentally characterize the ductile fracture at different stress states under monotonic and ultra-low cycle fatigue (ULCF) loading. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the fractured surfaces is conducted to decipher the underlying microscopic damage mechanisms that cause fracture in ASTM A992 steels. Detailed micromechanical analyses for monotonic and cyclic loading are conducted to understand the influence of stress triaxiality and Lode parameter on the void growth phase of ductile fracture. Based on monotonic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanical void growth model is proposed to predict ductile fracture. This model is then incorporated in to finite element program as a weakly coupled model to simulate the loss of load carrying capacity in the post microvoid coalescence regime for high triaxialities. Based on the cyclic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanics based cyclic void growth model is developed to predict the ULCF life of ASTM A992 steels subjected to high stress triaxialities. Furthermore, a computational fracture locus for ASTM A992 steels is developed and incorporated in to finite element program as an uncoupled ductile fracture model. This model can be used to predict the ductile fracture initiation under monotonic loading in a wide range of triaxiality and Lode parameters. Finally, a coupled microvoid elongation and dilation based continuum damage model is proposed, implemented, calibrated and validated. This model is capable of simulating the local softening caused by the various phases of ductile fracture process under

  9. Mechanical properties of highly defective graphene: from brittle rupture to ductile fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Lanqing; Wei, Ning; Zheng, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Defects are generally believed to deteriorate the superlative performance of graphene-based devices but may also be useful when carefully engineered to tailor the local properties and achieve new functionalities. Central to most defect-associated applications is the defect coverage and arrangement. In this work, we investigate, by molecular dynamics simulations, the mechanical properties and fracture dynamics of graphene sheets with randomly distributed vacancies or Stone–Wales defects under tensile deformations over a wide defect coverage range. With defects presented, an sp–sp 2 bonding network and an sp–sp 2 –sp 3 bonding network are observed in vacancy-defected and Stone–Wales-defected graphene, respectively. The ultimate strength degrades gradually with increasing defect coverage and saturates in the high-ratio regime, whereas the fracture strain presents an unusual descending–saturating–improving trend. In the dense vacancy defect situation, the fracture becomes more plastic and super-ductility is observed. Further fracture dynamics analysis reveals that the crack trapping by sp–sp 2 and sp–sp 2 –sp 3 rings and the crack-tip blunting account for the ductile fracture, whereas geometric rearrangement on the entire sheet for vacancy defects and geometric rearrangement on the specific defect sites for Stone–Wales defects account for their distinctive rules of the evolution of the fracture strain. (paper)

  10. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMinn, Chris; Auton, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the high-pressure injection of fluid into the bulk of the rock. The goal is to initiate and propagate fractures that will provide hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir, enabling gas or oil to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We first consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We use this model to show that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. We then complement these results with laboratory experiments in an analogue system, and with numerical simulations based on the discrete element method (DEM), both of which suggest that ductile failure can indeed dramatically change the resulting deformation pattern. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from models that assume purely elastic mechanical behavior.

  11. Unstable ductile fracture conditions in upper shelf region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yoshifumi; Kubo, Takahiro

    1985-01-01

    The phenomenon of unstability of ductile fracture in the upper shelf region of a forged steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels A508 Cl. 3 was studied with a large compliance apparatus, whose spring constants were 100, 170 and 230 kgf/mm, at the test temperatures of 100, 200 and 300 0 C and at the loading rates of 2, 20 and 200 mm/min in the crosshead speed. The main results obtained are as follows: (1) The fracture modes of the specimens consisted of (a) stable fracture, (b) unstable fracture which leads to a complete fracture rapidly and (c) quasiunstable fracture which does not lead to a complete fracture though a rapid extension of ductile crack takes place. (2) Side groove, high temperature or small spring constant made a ductile crack more unstable. (3) High temperature or large spring constant made the occurrence of quasiunstable fracture easier. (4) Quasiunstable ductile fracture took place before the maximum load, that is, at the J integral value of about 10 kgf/mm. The initiation of a microscopic ductile crack, therefore, seems to lead to quasiunstable fracture. (5) The concept that unstable ductile fracture takes place when Tsub(app) exceeds Tsub(mat) seems applicable only to the case in which unstable ductile fracture takes place after the maximum load has been exceeded. (author)

  12. Fracture mechanisms in multilayer phosphorene assemblies: from brittle to ductile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-05-24

    The outstanding mechanical performance of nacre has stimulated numerous studies on the design of artificial nacres. Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has a crystalline in-plane structure and non-bonded interaction between adjacent flakes. Therefore, multi-layer phosphorene assemblies (MLPs), in which phosphorene flakes are piled up in a staggered manner, may exhibit outstanding mechanical performance, especially exceptional toughness. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the dependence of the mechanical properties on the overlap distance between adjacent phosphorene layers and the number of phosphorene flakes per layer. The results indicate that when the flake number is equal to 1, a transition of fracture patterns is observed by increasing the overlap distance, from a ductile failure controlled by interfacial friction to a brittle failure dominated by the breakage of covalent bonds inside phosphorene flakes. Moreover, the failure pattern can be tuned by changing the number of flakes in each phosphorene layer. The results imply that the ultimate strength follows a power law with the exponent -0.5 in terms of the flake number, which is in good agreement with our analytical model. Furthermore, the flake number in each phosphorene layer is optimized as 2 when the temperature is 1 K in order to potentially achieve both high toughness and strength. Moreover, our results regarding the relations between mechanical performance and overlap distance can be explained well using a shear-lag model. However, it should be pointed out that increasing the temperature of MLPs could cause the transition of fracture patterns from ductile to brittle. Therefore, the optimal flake number depends heavily on temperature to achieve both its outstanding strength and toughness. Overall, our findings unveil the fundamental mechanism at the nanoscale for MLPs as well as provide a method to design phosphorene-based structures with targeted properties

  13. Mechanical model for ductility loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    A mechanical model was constructed to probe into the mechanism of ductility loss. Fracture criterion based on critical localized deformation was undertaken. Two microstructure variables were considered in the model. Namely, the strength ratio of grain boundary affected area to the matrix, Ω, and the linear fraction, x, of grain boundary affected area. A parametrical study was carried out. The study shows that the ductility is very sensitive to those microstructure parameters. The functional dependence of ductility to temperature as well as strain-rate, suggested by the model, is demonstrated to be consistent with the observation

  14. The true origin of ductile fracture in aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Toda, Hiroyuki; Oogo, Hideyuki; Horikawa, Keitaro; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakazawa, Mitsuru; Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Kobayashi, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    It has generally been assumed that metals usually fail as a result of microvoid nucleation induced by particle fracture. Here, we concentrate on high-density micropores filled with hydrogen in aluminum, existence of which has been largely overlooked until quite recently. These micropores exhibit premature growth under external loading, thereby inducing ductile fracture, whereas the particle fracture mechanism operates only incidentally. Conclusive evidence of a micropore mechanism is provided...

  15. Crack and fracture behaviour in tough ductile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, R.D.; Hoeppner, D.W.

    1985-10-01

    The report describes various approaches and developments pertaining to the understanding of crack and fracture behaviour in tough ductile materials. The fundamental elastic fracture mechanics concepts based on the concepts of energy, stress field, and displacement are introduced and their interrelationships demonstrated. The extension of these concepts to include elasto-plastic fracture mechanics considerations is reviewed in the context of the preferred options available for the development of appropriate design methodologies. The recommendations of the authors are directed towards the continued development of the J-integral concept. This energy-based concept, in its fundamental form, has a sound theoretical basis and as such offers the possibility of incorporating elasto-plastic fracture mechanics considerations in the crack and fracture behaviour of tough ductile materials. It must however be emphasized that the concise defintion of J becomes increasingly suspect as the crack length increases. J is not a material property, as is J IC , but emerges as a useful empirical parameter which is dependent upon the particular geometry and the loading imposed on the structure. It is proposed that 'lowest bound' J-resistance curves and the associated J-T curves be experimentally developed and employed in the design process. Improvements to these 'lowest bounds' can be developed through extensive analysis of the twin J-CTOA criteria and validation of this approach through near full scale tests

  16. From brittle to ductile fracture in disordered materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picallo, Clara B; López, Juan M; Zapperi, Stefano; Alava, Mikko J

    2010-10-08

    We introduce a lattice model able to describe damage and yielding in heterogeneous materials ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Ductile fracture surfaces, obtained when the system breaks once the strain is completely localized, are shown to correspond to minimum energy surfaces. The similarity of the resulting fracture paths to the limits of brittle fracture or minimum energy surfaces is quantified. The model exhibits a smooth transition from brittleness to ductility. The dynamics of yielding exhibits avalanches with a power-law distribution.

  17. Estimation scheme for unstable ductile fracture of pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Shinsuke

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new scheme for the estimation of unstable ductile fracture using the J-integral. The proposed method uses a load-versus-displacement diagram which is generated using fully plastic solutions. By this method, the phenomena of the ductile fracture can be grasped visually. Thus, the parametrical survey can be executed far more easily than before. Then, using the proposed method, unstable ductile fracture is analyzed for single-edge cracked plates under both uniform tension and pure bending. In addition, several parametrical surveys are performed concerning (1) J-controlled crack growth, (2) compliance of the structure, (3) ductility of the material (i.e., J-resistance curve), and (4) scale of the structure (i.e., screening criterion). As a result, it is shown that the proposed method is especially effective for the paramtrical study of unstable ductile fracture. (author)

  18. Strain rate effects on fracture behavior of Austempered Ductile Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Bonora, Nicola; Gentile, Domenico; Iannitti, Gianluca; Testa, Gabriel; Hörnqvist Colliander, Magnus; Masaggia, Stefano; Vettore, Federico

    2017-06-01

    Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), combining high strength, good ductility and low density, are candidates to be a suitable alternative to high-strength steels. Nevertheless, the concern about a low ductility under dynamic loads often leads designers to exclude cast irons for structural applications. However, results from dynamic tensile tests contradict this perception showing larger failure strain with respect to quasistatic data. The fracture behaviour of ADIs depends on damage mechanisms occurring in the spheroids of graphite, in the matrix and at their interface, with the matrix (ausferrite) consisting of acicular ferrite in carbon-enriched austenite. Here, a detailed microstructural analysis was performed on the ADI 1050-6 deformed under different conditions of strain rates, temperatures, and states of stress. Beside the smooth specimens used for uniaxial tensile tests, round notched bars to evaluate the ductility reduction with increasing stress triaxiality and tophat geometries to evaluate the propensity to shear localization and the associated microstructural alterations were tested. The aim of the work is to link the mechanical and fracture behavior of ADIs to the load condition through the microstructural modifications that occur for the corresponding deformation path.

  19. Analysis Strategy for Fracture Assessment of Defects in Ductile Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillstroem, Peter; Andersson, Magnus; Sattari-Far, Iradj; Weilin Zang (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    The main purpose of this work is to investigate the significance of the residual stresses for defects (cracks) in ductile materials with nuclear applications, when the applied primary (mechanical) loads are high. The treatment of weld-induced stresses as expressed in the SACC/ProSACC handbook and other fracture assessment procedures such as the ASME XI code and the R6-method is believed to be conservative for ductile materials. This is because of the general approach not to account for the improved fracture resistance caused by ductile tearing. Furthermore, there is experimental evidence that the contribution of residual stresses to fracture diminishes as the degree of yielding increases to a high level. However, neglecting weld-induced stresses in general, though, is doubtful for loads that are mostly secondary (e.g. thermal shocks) and for materials which are not ductile enough to be limit load controlled. Both thin-walled and thick-walled pipes containing surface cracks are studied here. This is done by calculating the relative contribution from the weld residual stresses to CTOD and the J-integral. Both circumferential and axial cracks are analysed. Three different crack geometries are studied here by using the finite element method (FEM). (i) 2D axisymmetric modelling of a V-joint weld in a thin-walled pipe. (ii) 2D axisymmetric modelling of a V-joint weld in a thick-walled pipe. (iii) 3D modelling of a X-joint weld in a thick-walled pipe. t. Each crack configuration is analysed for two load cases; (1) Only primary (mechanical) loading is applied to the model, (2) Both secondary stresses and primary loading are applied to the model. Also presented in this report are some published experimental investigations conducted on cracked components of ductile materials subjected to both primary and secondary stresses. Based on the outcome of this study, an analysis strategy for fracture assessment of defects in ductile materials of nuclear components is proposed. A new

  20. Analysis Strategy for Fracture Assessment of Defects in Ductile Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillstroem, Peter; Andersson, Magnus; Sattari-Far, Iradj; Weilin Zang

    2009-06-01

    The main purpose of this work is to investigate the significance of the residual stresses for defects (cracks) in ductile materials with nuclear applications, when the applied primary (mechanical) loads are high. The treatment of weld-induced stresses as expressed in the SACC/ProSACC handbook and other fracture assessment procedures such as the ASME XI code and the R6-method is believed to be conservative for ductile materials. This is because of the general approach not to account for the improved fracture resistance caused by ductile tearing. Furthermore, there is experimental evidence that the contribution of residual stresses to fracture diminishes as the degree of yielding increases to a high level. However, neglecting weld-induced stresses in general, though, is doubtful for loads that are mostly secondary (e.g. thermal shocks) and for materials which are not ductile enough to be limit load controlled. Both thin-walled and thick-walled pipes containing surface cracks are studied here. This is done by calculating the relative contribution from the weld residual stresses to CTOD and the J-integral. Both circumferential and axial cracks are analysed. Three different crack geometries are studied here by using the finite element method (FEM). (i) 2D axisymmetric modelling of a V-joint weld in a thin-walled pipe. (ii) 2D axisymmetric modelling of a V-joint weld in a thick-walled pipe. (iii) 3D modelling of a X-joint weld in a thick-walled pipe. t. Each crack configuration is analysed for two load cases; (1) Only primary (mechanical) loading is applied to the model, (2) Both secondary stresses and primary loading are applied to the model. Also presented in this report are some published experimental investigations conducted on cracked components of ductile materials subjected to both primary and secondary stresses. Based on the outcome of this study, an analysis strategy for fracture assessment of defects in ductile materials of nuclear components is proposed. A new

  1. Ductile fracture surface morphology of amorphous metallic alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miskuf, J; Csach, K; Ocelik, [No Value; Bengus, VZ; Tabachnikova, ED; Duhaj, P; Ocelik, Vaclav

    1999-01-01

    Fracture surfaces of ductile failure of two types bulk amorphous metallic alloys were studied using quantitative and qualitative fractographic analysis. The observed fractographic behaviour of ductile failure in comparison with the ductile failure of amorphous alloy ribbons shows signs of the same

  2. Computer model for ductile fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.; Reaugh, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A computer model is described for predicting ductile fracture initiation and propagation. The computer fracture model is calibrated by simple and notched round-bar tension tests and a precracked compact tension test. The model is used to predict fracture initiation and propagation in a Charpy specimen and compare the results with experiments. The calibrated model provides a correlation between Charpy V-notch (CVN) fracture energy and any measure of fracture toughness, such as J/sub Ic/. A second simpler empirical correlation was obtained using the energy to initiate fracture in the Charpy specimen rather than total energy CVN, and compared the results with the empirical correlation of Rolfe and Novak

  3. Prediction of Ductile Fracture Surface Roughness Scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Needleman, Alan; Tvergaard, Viggo; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    . Ductile crack growth in a thin strip under mode I, overall plane strain, small scale yielding conditions is analyzed. Although overall plane strain loading conditions are prescribed, full 3D analyses are carried out to permit modeling of the three dimensional material microstructure and of the resulting......Experimental observations have shown that the roughness of fracture surfaces exhibit certain characteristic scaling properties. Here, calculations are carried out to explore the extent to which a ductile damage/fracture constitutive relation can be used to model fracture surface roughness scaling...... three dimensional stress and deformation states that develop in the fracture process region. An elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitating plastic solid is used to model the material. Two populations of second phase particles are represented: large inclusions with low...

  4. Modelling of ductile and cleavage fracture by local approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samal, M.K.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2000-08-01

    This report describes the modelling of ductile and cleavage fracture processes by local approach. It is now well known that the conventional fracture mechanics method based on single parameter criteria is not adequate to model the fracture processes. It is because of the existence of effect of size and geometry of flaw, loading type and rate on the fracture resistance behaviour of any structure. Hence, it is questionable to use same fracture resistance curves as determined from standard tests in the analysis of real life components because of existence of all the above effects. So, there is need to have a method in which the parameters used for the analysis will be true material properties, i.e. independent of geometry and size. One of the solutions to the above problem is the use of local approaches. These approaches have been extensively studied and applied to different materials (including SA33 Gr.6) in this report. Each method has been studied and reported in a separate section. This report has been divided into five sections. Section-I gives a brief review of the fundamentals of fracture process. Section-II deals with modelling of ductile fracture by locally uncoupled type of models. In this section, the critical cavity growth parameters of the different models have been determined for the primary heat transport (PHT) piping material of Indian pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR). A comparative study has been done among different models. The dependency of the critical parameters on stress triaxiality factor has also been studied. It is observed that Rice and Tracey's model is the most suitable one. But, its parameters are not fully independent of triaxiality factor. For this purpose, a modification to Rice and Tracery's model is suggested in Section-III. Section-IV deals with modelling of ductile fracture process by locally coupled type of models. Section-V deals with the modelling of cleavage fracture process by Beremins model, which is based on Weibulls

  5. Numerical modeling of ductile tearing effects on cleavage fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Tang, M.; Anderson, T.L.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate a significant effect of specimen size, a/W ratio and prior ductile tearing on cleavage fracture toughness values (J c ) measured in the ductile-to-brittle transition region of ferritic materials. In the lower-transition region, cleavage fracture often occurs under conditions of large-scale yielding but without prior ductile crack extension. The increased toughness develops when plastic zones formed at the crack tip interact with nearby specimen surfaces which relaxes crack-tip constraint (stress triaxiality). In the mid-to-upper transition region, small amounts of ductile crack extension (often c -values. Previous work by the authors described a micromechanics fracture model to correct measured J c -values for the mechanistic effects of large-scale yielding. This new work extends the model to also include the influence of ductile crack extension prior to cleavage. The paper explores development of the new model, provides necessary graphs and procedures for its application and demonstrates the effects of the model on fracture data sets for two pressure vessel steels (A533B and A515)

  6. Computer simulation of ductile fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, M.L.; Streit, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Finite difference computer simulation programs are capable of very accurate solutions to problems in plasticity with large deformations and rotation. This opens the possibility of developing models of ductile fracture by correlating experiments with equivalent computer simulations. Selected experiments were done to emphasize different aspects of the model. A difficult problem is the establishment of a fracture-size effect. This paper is a study of the strain field around notched tensile specimens of aluminum 6061-T651. A series of geometrically scaled specimens are tested to fracture. The scaled experiments are conducted for different notch radius-to-diameter ratios. The strains at fracture are determined from computer simulations. An estimate is made of the fracture-size effect

  7. A new insight into ductile fracture of ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hailiang; Tieu, A Kiet; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Xiong; Liu, Mao; Godbole, Ajit; Kong, Charlie; Qin, Qinghua

    2015-04-08

    It is well known that when coarse-grained metals undergo severe plastic deformation to be transformed into nano-grained metals, their ductility is reduced. However, there are no ductile fracture criteria developed based on grain refinement. In this paper, we propose a new relationship between ductile fracture and grain refinement during deformation, considering factors besides void nucleation and growth. Ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloy sheets were fabricated using different rolling techniques at room and cryogenic temperatures. It is proposed for the first time that features of the microstructure near the fracture surface can be used to explain the ductile fracture post necking directly. We found that as grains are refined to a nano size which approaches the theoretical minimum achievable value, the material becomes brittle at the shear band zone. This may explain the tendency for ductile fracture in metals under plastic deformation.

  8. Effect of Cu on the microstructural and mechanical properties of as-cast ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Siddhartha; Das, J.; Ray, K.K.; Kumar, Hemant; Bhaduri, A.

    2012-01-01

    The application of ductile cast iron in the heavy engineering components like, cask for the storage and transportation of radioactive materials, demands high strength with improved fracture toughness in as cast condition. The mechanical properties and fracture toughness of as-cast ductile iron (DI) is directly related to its structure property which can be controlled by proper inoculation, alloying elements and cooling rate during solidification. The aim of the present investigation is to study the effect of varying amount of Cu (0.07%, 0.11%, and 0.16%) with 1% Ni in the microstructural development of as-cast ductile iron with emphasis on its mechanical properties and fracture toughness. Three different ductile irons have been prepared using induction furnace in batches of 300 kg following industrial practice. Microstructural features (amount of phases, morphology, size and count of graphite nodules) and mechanical properties (tensile strength and hardness) of prepared DI were determined using standard methods. Dynamic fracture toughness was measured using instrumented Charpy impact test on pre-cracked specimens following the standard ISO-FDIS-26843. Additionally, fracture surfaces of broken tensile and pre-cracked specimens were observed by SEM to study the micro-mechanism of fracture. The pearlite fraction and the nodule count are found to increase with increasing amount of copper in ferritic-pearlitic matrix. The hardness and strength values are found to increase with increasing amount of pearlite whereas fracture toughness decreases. Fractographs of broken specimens exhibited decohesion of graphite, crack propagation from graphite interface and transgranular fracture of ferrite. (author)

  9. Mechanical Behaviour of Materials Volume II Fracture Mechanics and Damage

    CERN Document Server

    François, Dominique; Zaoui, André

    2013-01-01

    Designing new structural materials, extending lifetimes and guarding against fracture in service are among the preoccupations of engineers, and to deal with these they need to have command of the mechanics of material behaviour. This ought to reflect in the training of students. In this respect, the first volume of this work deals with elastic, elastoplastic, elastoviscoplastic and viscoelastic behaviours; this second volume continues with fracture mechanics and damage, and with contact mechanics, friction and wear. As in Volume I, the treatment links the active mechanisms on the microscopic scale and the laws of macroscopic behaviour. Chapter I is an introduction to the various damage phenomena. Chapter II gives the essential of fracture mechanics. Chapter III is devoted to brittle fracture, chapter IV to ductile fracture and chapter V to the brittle-ductile transition. Chapter VI is a survey of fatigue damage. Chapter VII is devoted to hydogen embrittlement and to environment assisted cracking, chapter VIII...

  10. Fracture dynamics of a propagating crack in a pressurized ductile cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, A.F.; Love, W.J.; Kobayashi, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    A suddenly-introduced axial through-crack in the wall of a pipe pressurized by hot water is allowed to propagate according to Weiss' notch-strength theory of ductile static fracture. For this somewhat ductile material of A533B steel, Weiss' criterion was extended of dynamic fracture without modification. This dynamic-fracture criterion enabled a unique comparison to be obtained for the results of ductile-fracture with those of brittle-fracture in a fracturing A533B steel pipe. Since the pipe cross-sectional area is likely to increase with large flap motions under ductile tearing, a large deformation-shell-finite-difference-dynamic-code which includes rotary inertia was used in this analysis. The uniaxial-stress-strain curve of A533B steel was approximated by a bilinear stress-strain where Von-Misses yield criterion and associated flow rule were used in the elastic-plastic analysis. The fluid pressure was assumed constant and thus pipe flaps are only lightly loaded by pressure in this analysis. In previous publications, the authors have compared their preliminary results for the shell motion obtained through their model for a fracturing pipe with those of Kanninen, et al., and Freund, et al., to evaluate the effects of pressure loading on the crack flaps and the differences between small and large deflection results. In this paper, the differences in crack-propagation behavior of a fracturing pipe composed of the same A533B but subjected to a brittle or a ductile-fracture criterion are discussed. An important conclusion in fracture dynamics derived from analyses is that a smoothly-varying crack velocity will require a non-unique crack-velocity-versus-dynamic-fracture-parameter-relation while a unique and smoothly-varying crack-velocity-versus-dynamic-fracture-parameter-relation will demand an intermittently-propagating crack

  11. Effects of matrix structures on fracture mechanisms of austempered ductile cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Shigeru; Matsufuji, Kenichi [Oita Univ. (Japan); Mitsunaga, Koichi [Kagoshima Junior Womens College (Japan); Takahara, Masao [Isuzu Motors, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    On the fatigue behavior of Austempered Ductile Iron (so called ADI), rotating fatigue tests in very high cycle region were performed. The S-N curve represented the double bending. This behavior is caused by the high cycle (>10{sup 7} cycles) fracture, and called the complex three region fractures. The main reason is the work hardening in the surface layer. Therefore, it was removed by electropolishing the surface layer with work hardening. The S-N curve did not show the double bending mentioned above. The fatigue strength with bainitic structure of electropolished ADI was higher than those of mother pearlitic structure.

  12. Effect of sized and specimen geometry on the initiation and propagation of the ductile fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frund, J.M.; Marini, B.; Bethmont, M.

    1994-02-01

    Strength to the fracture of the pipe in PWR has to be justified with mechanical analyses. These tests are based on the strength to ductile fracture of steels which are tested in lab. The values of resistance to fracture are obtained through tensile tests on CT specimens (determination of J-R curves). The purpose of this study is to justify the sizes of the specimens which have to be used to characterize the strength to ductile fracture of steel in secondary pipes. Tests were conducted on 0,5T-CT, 1T-CT and 2T-CT specimens. Two materials with different suffer contents were studied. The test results show that the JO,2 values gotten from the different specimens are similar. But the strength to ductile fracture in 2T-CT specimens in lower than the one measured in 0,5t-CT and 1T-CT specimens. The surface of fracture of the different specimens displays splits perpendicular to the notch and parallel to the sheet surface. These splits are produced by the separation of the manganese sulfur inclusions. The effect notes on the J-R curves seems to be relevant to these splits. The reason why these splits might be responsible for a decrease of the tearing modulus are not clearly defined up to this point. The results which have been published show the importance of the geometry effects (presence or not of lateral notches...) and the loading mode on the strength to ductile fracture. We note that the curves determined from tests on CT specimens are conservative. A few preliminary studies showed that the geometry effects on resistance to fracture can be studied and explained by using local approach methods. The Rousselier modeling is useful to explain the behaviour of ferritic steels in ductile fracture. (authors). 20 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  13. A ductile fracture mechanics methodology for predicting pressure vessel and piping failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landes, J.D.; Zhou, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a ductile fracture methodology based on one used more generally for the prediction of fracture behavior that was applied to the prediction of fracture behavior in pressure vessel and piping components. The model uses the load versus displacement record from a fracture toughness test to develop inputs for predicting the behavior of the structural component. The principle of load separation is used to convert the test record into two pieces of information, calibration functions which describe the structural deformation behavior and fracture toughness which describes the response of a crack-like flaw to the loading. These calibration functions and fracture toughness values which relate to the test specimen are then transformed to those appropriate to the structure. Often in this step computation procedures could be used but are not always necessary. The calibration functions and fracture for the structure are recombined to predict a load versus displacement behavior for the structure. The input for the model was generated from tests of compact specimen geometries; this geometry is often used for fracture toughness testing. The predictions were done for five model structures

  14. Fracture toughness for materials of low ductility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilay, S.; Karp, B.; Perl, M.

    1998-05-01

    The results of a survey of methods for evaluating fracture toughness characteristics for semi-brittle and brittle materials are presented in this report. These methods differ considerably from those used for ductile materials by the specimen configurations, the methodology of the experiments and by the problems occurring while using these methods. The survey yields several important findings A. It is possible to create steady state crack growth by cyclic loading in several semi-brittle materials. B. The need for pre-cracking is not yet clear, nevertheless it is recommended to evaluate fracture toughens with pre-cracked specimen. C. As crack length and ligament size may effect fracture toughness results it is necessary to define minimum specimen dimensions to avoid this effect. D. The specimen thickness hardly affects the fracture toughens. E. Loading rate for the test is not well defined. It is commonly accepted to end the test in one minute. F. The main mechanism that causes inelastic deformation in semi-brittle materials is related to the generation of micro-cracks

  15. Fracture toughness of borides formed on boronized ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Ugur; Sen, Saduman; Koksal, Sakip; Yilmaz, Fevzi

    2005-01-01

    In this study, fracture toughness properties of boronized ductile iron were investigated. Boronizing was realized in a salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid and ferro-silicon. Boronizing heat treatment was carried out between 850 and 950 deg. C under the atmospheric pressure for 2-8 h. Borides e.g. FeB, Fe 2 B formed on ductile iron was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, SEM and optical microscope. Experimental results revealed that longer boronizing time resulted in thicker boride layers. Optical microscope cross-sectional observation of borided layers showed dentricular morphology. Both microhardness and fracture toughness of borided surfaces were measured via Vickers indenter. The harnesses of borides formed on the ductile iron were in the range of 1160-2140 HV 0.1 and fracture toughness were in the range of 2.19-4.47 MPa m 1/2 depending on boronizing time and temperature

  16. Ductile fracture behavior of cast structure containing voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, Ph.; Migne, C. [FRAMATOME ANP, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Chapuliot, S. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie

    2001-07-01

    In pressurized water reactors, the primary loop contains cast-piping components made of duplex stainless steel. Due to the presence of ferrite, such steels are susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement, which decrease their fracture resistance. The cast process induces shrinkage cavities, therefore all these components are submitted to liquid penetrant examination and all surface defects are repaired. EDF, CEA and Framatome have conducted experimental and analytical analysis of fatigue and fracture behavior of aged cast stainless steel structures containing shrinkage cavities. The present study considers only ductile tearing and is based on specimen test results and a fracture mechanics model of the interaction between shrinkage cavities. The experimental results presented here show that large groups of shrinkage cavities have almost no influence on the global behavior of the structure. Only for the specimen with the largest reduction of area, a significant reduction of strength has been registered. Using elementary fracture mechanics models, it has been evidenced that failure mechanism of structures containing shrinkage cavities consists in 3 phases: local initiation, macro-crack formation by coalescence and failure by crack instability or collapse depending if J resistance is low or not. No significant changes in global behavior appear in the first phase. (A.C.)

  17. Ductile fracture behavior of cast structure containing voids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilles, Ph.; Migne, C.; Chapuliot, S.

    2001-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors, the primary loop contains cast-piping components made of duplex stainless steel. Due to the presence of ferrite, such steels are susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement, which decrease their fracture resistance. The cast process induces shrinkage cavities, therefore all these components are submitted to liquid penetrant examination and all surface defects are repaired. EDF, CEA and Framatome have conducted experimental and analytical analysis of fatigue and fracture behavior of aged cast stainless steel structures containing shrinkage cavities. The present study considers only ductile tearing and is based on specimen test results and a fracture mechanics model of the interaction between shrinkage cavities. The experimental results presented here show that large groups of shrinkage cavities have almost no influence on the global behavior of the structure. Only for the specimen with the largest reduction of area, a significant reduction of strength has been registered. Using elementary fracture mechanics models, it has been evidenced that failure mechanism of structures containing shrinkage cavities consists in 3 phases: local initiation, macro-crack formation by coalescence and failure by crack instability or collapse depending if J resistance is low or not. No significant changes in global behavior appear in the first phase. (A.C.)

  18. 35. Conference of the DVM Working Group on Fracture Processes: Advances in fracture and damage mechanics - simulation methods of fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Subjects of the meeting were: Simulation of fatigue crack growth in real strucures using FEA (M. Fulland, Paderborn); Modelling of ductile crack growth (W. Brocks, Geesthacht); Advances in non-local modelling of ductile damage (F. Reusch et al., Berlin, Dortmund); Fracture mechanics of ceramics (D. Munz, Karlsruhe); From materials testing to vehicle crash testing (J.G. Blauel, Freiburg); Analytical simulation of crack growth in thin-walled structures (U. Zerbst, Geesthacht); The influence of intrinsic stresses on fatigue crack growth (C. Dalle Donne etc., Cologne, Dortmund, Pisa, and M. Sander, Paderborn); Fracture mechanical strength calculation in case of mixed mode loads on cracks (H.A. Richard, Paderborn); Numeric simulation of intrinsic stresses during welding (C. Veneziano, Freiburg); New research fields of the Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (P. Gumbsch, Head of the Institute, Freiburg); Modern developments and advances in fracture and damage mechanics; Numeric and experimental simulation of crack propagation and damage processes; Exemplary damage cases; Fracture mechanics in product development; Failure characteristics of lightweight constructional materials and joints [de

  19. Fracture dynamics of a propagating crack in a pressurized ductile cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, A.F.; Love, W.J.; Kobayashi, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    A suddenly-introduced axial through-crack in the wall of a pipe pressurized by hot water is allowed to propagate according to Weiss' notch-strength theory of ductile static fracture. The dynamic-fracture criterion used enabled the authors to obtain a unique comparison of the results of ductile-fracture with those of brittle-fracture in a fracturing A533B steel pipe. Since the pipe cross-sectional area is likely to increase with large flap motions under ductile tearing, a large deformation shell-finite-difference-dynamic-code which includes rotary inertia was used in this analysis. The uniaxial-stress-strain curve of A533B steel was approximated by a bilinear-stress-strain where Von-Mises yield criterion and associated flow rule were used in the elastic-plastic analysis. The fluid pressure was assumed constant and thus pipe flaps are only lightly loaded by pressure in this analysis. (Auth.)

  20. Ductility and fracture behavior of polycrystalline Ni/sub 3/Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of the recent work on tensile ductility and fracture behavior of Ni/sub 3/Al alloys tested at ambient and elevated temperatures. Polycrystalline Ni/sub 3/Al is intrinsically brittle along grain boundaries, and the brittleness has been attributed to the large difference in valency, electronegativity, and atom size between nickel and aluminum atoms. Alloying with B, Mn, Fe, and Be significantly increases the ductility and reduces the propensity for intergranular fracture in Ni/sub 3/Al alloys. Boron is found to be most effective in improving room-temperature ductility of Ni/sub 3/Al with <24.5 at.% Al. The tensile ductility of Ni/sub 3/Al alloys depends strongly on test environments at elevated temperatures, with much lower ductilities observed in air than in vacuum. The loss in ductility is accompanied by a change in fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular. This embrittlement is due to a dynamic effect involving simultaneously high localized stress, elevated temperature, and gaseous oxygen. The embrittlement can be alleviated by control of grain shape or alloying with chromium additions. All the results are discussed in terms of localized stress concentration and grain-boundary cohesive strength

  1. Analysis of the competition between brittle and ductile fracture: application for the mechanical behaviour of C-Mn and theirs welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Corre, V.

    2006-09-01

    This study deals with the fracture behaviour of welded thin structures in the ductile to brittle transition range. It aims to propose a criterion to define the conditions for which the risk of fracture by cleavage does not exist on a cracked structure. The literature review shows that the difficulties of prediction of the fracture behaviour of a structure are related to the dependence of the fracture probability to the mechanical fields at the crack tip. The ductile to brittle transition range thus depends on the studied geometry of the structure. A threshold stress, below which cleavage cannot take place, is defined using fracture tests on notched specimens broken at very low temperature. The finite element numerical simulation of fracture tests on CT specimens in the transition range shows a linear relationship between the fracture probability and the volume exceeding the threshold stress, thus showing the relevance of the proposed criterion. Moreover, several relations are established allowing to simplify the identification of the criterion parameters. The criterion is applied to a nuclear structural C-Mn steel, by focusing more particularly on the higher boundary of the transition range. A fracture test on a full-scale pipe is designed, developed, carried out and analysed using its numerical simulation. The results show firstly that, on the structure, the transition range is shifted in temperature, compared to laboratory specimens, due to the low plasticity constraint achieved in thin structures, and secondly that the threshold stress criterion allows to estimate simply this shift. (author)

  2. A fracture mechanics safety concept to assess the impact behavior of ductile cast iron containers for shipping and storage of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelzke, H.; Roedel, R.; Droste, B.

    1994-01-01

    Within the scope of the German licensing procedures for shipping and storage containers for radioactive materials made of ductile cast iron, BAM performs approval design tests including material tests to ensure the main safety goals of shielding, leaktightness and subcriticality under ''Type B accident conditions''. So far the safety assessment concept of BAM is based essentially on the experimental proof of container strength by prototype testing under most damaging test conditions in connection with complete approval design tests, and has been developed especially for cylindrical casks like CASTOR- and TN-design. In connection with the development of new container constructions such as ''cubic cast containers'', and the fast developments in the area of numerical calculation methods, there is a need for a more flexible safety concept especially considering fracture mechanics aspects.This paper presents the state of work at BAM for such an extended safety concept for ductile cast iron containers, based on a detailed brittle fracture safe design proof. The requirements on stress analysis (experimental or numerical), material properties, material qualification, quality assurance provisions and fracture mechanics safety assessment, including well defined and justified factors of safety, are described. ((orig.))

  3. An approach to ductile fracture resistance modelling in pipeline steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pussegoda, L.N.; Fredj, A. [BMT Fleet Technology Ltd., Kanata (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Ductile fracture resistance studies of high grade steels in the pipeline industry often included analyses of the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) parameter using 3-point bend steel specimens. The CTOA is a function of specimen ligament size in high grade materials. Other resistance measurements may include steady state fracture propagation energy, critical fracture strain, and the adoption of damage mechanisms. Modelling approaches for crack propagation were discussed in this abstract. Tension tests were used to calibrate damage model parameters. Results from the tests were then applied to the crack propagation in a 3-point bend specimen using modern 1980 vintage steels. Limitations and approaches to overcome the difficulties associated with crack propagation modelling were discussed.

  4. On key factors influencing ductile fractures of dual phase (DP) steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.; Choi, K.S.; Soulami, A.; Liu, W.N.; Khaleel, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the key factors influencing ductile failure of various grades of dual phase (DP) steels using the microstructure-based modeling approach. Various microstructure-based finite element models are generated based on the actual microstructures of DP steels with different martensite volume fractions. These models are, then, used to investigate the influence of ductility of the constituent ferrite phase and also the influence of voids introduced in the ferrite phase on the overall ductility of DP steels. It is found that with volume fraction of martensite in the microstructure less than 15%, the overall ductility of the DP steels strongly depends on the ductility of the ferrite matrix, hence pre-existing micro-voids in the microstructure significantly reduce the overall ductility of the steel. When the volume fraction of martensite is above 15%, the pre-existing voids in the ferrite matrix does not significantly reduce the overall ductility of the DP steels, and the overall ductility is more influenced by the mechanical property disparity between the two phases. The applicability of the phase inhomogeneity driven ductile failure of DP steels is then discussed based on the obtained computational results for various grades of DP steels, and the experimentally obtained scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures of the corresponding grades of DP steels near fracture surface are used as evidence for result validations.

  5. Transition temperature and fracture mode of as-castand austempered ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnovic, D; Eric, O; Sidjanin, L

    2008-12-01

    The ductile to brittle transition temperature is a very important criterion that is used for selection of materials in some applications, especially in low-temperature conditions. For that reason, in this paper transition temperature of as-cast and austempered copper and copper-nickel alloyed ductile iron (DI) in the temperature interval from -196 to +150 degrees C have been investigated. The microstructures of DIs and ADIs were examined by light microscope, whereas the fractured surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope. The ADI materials have higher impact energies compared with DIs in an as-cast condition. In addition, the transition curves for ADIs are shifted towards lower temperatures. The fracture mode of Dls is influenced by a dominantly pearlitic matrix, exhibiting mostly brittle fracture through all temperatures of testing. By contrast, with decrease of temperature, the fracture mode for ADI materials changes gradually from fully ductile to fully brittle.

  6. Evaluation of static and dynamic fracture toughness in ductile cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Toshiro; Yamada, Shinya

    1994-01-01

    Ductile cast irons have been explored as a cask (container for spent nuclear fuel) material because of their low cost and good formability. The cask, which is a huge casting with 400-mm thickness and 100-Mg weight, envelops the nuclear material. Therefore, the fracture toughness of cask must be evaluated not only under the static loading condition but also under the dynamic loading condition to ensure its safety against an accident during the transport. In this article, crack extension behavior and fracture toughness of ductile cast iron were examined by three-point bend tests, where various detection methods of crack initiation under static and dynamic loading conditions were adopted. Loading on the specimens was interrupted at various displacement points, and the final fracture surfaces of the specimen were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) obtained under the dynamic loading conditions was smaller than that under the static loading condition in ferritic ductile cast iron, and CTOD additionally decreased with increasing pearlite content in the matrix. The relationship between J(ΔC) obtained by the compliance changing rate method and J(R) established by the intersection of the crack extension resistance curve and the theoretical blunting line varied with pearlite content. The average value of J(ΔC) and J(R), that is J(mid), was proposed to define the fracture toughness of ductile cast iron; J(mid) was considered to be a reasonable measure for the fracture toughness of ductile cast iron, irrespective of loading condition and the pearlite content in the matrix

  7. J-integral evaluation and stability analysis in the unstable ductile fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Toshiro; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Shiratori, Masaki.

    1984-01-01

    Concerning unstable ductile fracture, which is an important problem on the structural stability of line pipes, nuclear reactor piping and so on, the research on fracture mechanics parameters which control the beginning of the stable growth and unstable growth of cracks attracts interest. At present, as the parameters, the T-modulus based on J-integral crack tip opening angle, crack opening angle averaged over crack developing part, plastic work coefficient and so on have been proposed. The research on the effectiveness and inter-relation of these parameters is divided into generation phase and application phase, and by these researches, it was reported that all T-modulus, CTOA and COA took almost constant values in relation to crack development, except initial transition period. In order to decide which parameter is most appropriate, the detailed analysis is required. In this study, the analysis of unstable ductile fracture of a central crack test piece and a small tensile test piece was carried out by finite element method, and the evaluation of J-integral in relation to crack development, J-integral resistance value when COA is assumed to be a constant, the form of an unstable fracture occurring point and the compliance dependence were examined. The method of analysis, the evaluation of J-integral, J-integral resistance value, unstable fracture occurring point and stability diagram are described. (Kako, I.)

  8. Influence of intercritical austempering on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron (ADI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, Saranya; Putatunda, Susil K.; Gundlach, Richard; Boileau, James

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this investigation was to examine the influence of intercritical austempering process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low-alloyed austempered ductile cast iron (ADI). The investigation also examined the influence of intercritical austempering process on the plane strain fracture toughness of the material. The effect of both austenitization and austempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties was examined. The microstructural analysis was carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The test results indicate that by intercritical austempering it is possible to produce proeutectoid ferrite in the matrix microstructure. Lower austenitizing temperature produces more proeutectoid ferrite in the matrix. Furthermore, the yield, tensile strength and the fracture toughness of the ADI decreases with decrease in austenitizing temperature. A considerable increase in ductility was observed in the samples with higher proeutectoid ferrite content. The fracture surfaces of the ADI samples revealed that dimple ductile fracture produced higher fracture toughness of 60±5 MPa√m in this intercritically austempered ADI.

  9. Influence of intercritical austempering on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron (ADI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panneerselvam, Saranya [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Putatunda, Susil K., E-mail: sputa@eng.wayne.edu [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Gundlach, Richard [Element Materials Technology, MI (United States); Boileau, James [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2017-05-10

    The focus of this investigation was to examine the influence of intercritical austempering process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low-alloyed austempered ductile cast iron (ADI). The investigation also examined the influence of intercritical austempering process on the plane strain fracture toughness of the material. The effect of both austenitization and austempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties was examined. The microstructural analysis was carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The test results indicate that by intercritical austempering it is possible to produce proeutectoid ferrite in the matrix microstructure. Lower austenitizing temperature produces more proeutectoid ferrite in the matrix. Furthermore, the yield, tensile strength and the fracture toughness of the ADI decreases with decrease in austenitizing temperature. A considerable increase in ductility was observed in the samples with higher proeutectoid ferrite content. The fracture surfaces of the ADI samples revealed that dimple ductile fracture produced higher fracture toughness of 60±5 MPa√m in this intercritically austempered ADI.

  10. Fracture mechanics aspects in the safe design of ductile iron shipping and storage containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappok, M.; Bounin, D.

    1996-01-01

    Containers made of ductile cast iron provide a safe method for transport of radioactive material. Contrary to widespread opinion ductile cast iron is a very tough material and can be manufactured in heavy sections. The containers are designed to withstand the very high impact loads of accidents like free drops onto unyielding targets. The design is based on postulated undetected crack-like flaws at the highest stressed location. Design must show that applied stress intensities are smaller than fracture toughness and no crack initiation and therefore also no crack propagation can occur. The design procedure followed in this paper is given in a new guideline still being drafted by the International Atomic Energy Agency

  11. Modelling of liquid sodium induced crack propagation in T91 martensitic steel: Competition with ductile fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemery, Samuel [Institut PPRIME, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ISAE ENSMA, UPR 3346, Téléport 2, 1 Avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Berdin, Clotilde, E-mail: clotilde.berdin@u-psud.fr [Univ Paris-Sud, SP2M-ICMMO, CNRS UMR 8182, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Auger, Thierry; Bourhi, Mariem [Ecole Centrale-Supelec, MSSMat CNRS UMR 8579, F-92295 Chatenay Malabry Cedex (France)

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of T91 steel is numerically modeled by the finite element method to analyse experimental results in an axisymmetric notched geometry. The behavior of the material is identified from tensile tests then a crack with a constant crack velocity is introduced using the node release technique in order to simulate the brittle crack induced by LME. A good agreement between the simulated and the experimental macroscopic behavior is found: this suggests that the assumption of a constant crack velocity is correct. Mechanical fields during the embrittlement process are then extracted from the results of the finite element model. An analysis of the crack initiation and propagation stages: the ductile fracture probably breaks off the LME induced brittle fracture. - Highlights: • T91 martensitic steel is embrittled by liquid sodium depending on the loading rate at 573 K. • The mechanical behavior is modeled by a von Mises elastic-plastic law. • The LME induced crack propagates at a constant velocity. • The mechanical state at the crack tip does not explain a brittle crack arrest. • The occurrence of the ductile fracture breaks off the brittle fracture.

  12. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-01-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, w......Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro...

  13. Micromechanics modelling of ductile fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zengtao

    2013-01-01

    This book summarizes research advances in micromechanics modelling of ductile fractures made in the past two decades. The ultimate goal of this book is to reach manufacturing frontline designers and materials engineers by providing a user-oriented, theoretical background of micromechanics modeling. Accordingly, the book is organized in a unique way and presents a vigorous damage percolation model developed by the authors over the last ten years. This model overcomes almost all difficulties of the existing models and can be used to completely accommodate ductile damage development within a single, measured microstructure frame. Related void damage criteria including nucleation, growth and coalescence are then discussed in detail: how they are improved, when and where they are used in the model, and how the model performs in comparison with the existing models. Sample forming simulations are provided to illustrate the model’s performance.

  14. A Study On Critical Thinning In Thin-walled Tube Bending Of Al-Alloy 5052O Via Coupled Ductile Fracture Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heng; Yang He; Zhan Mei

    2010-01-01

    Thin-walled tube bending(TWTB) method of Al-alloy tube has attracted wide applications in aerospace, aviation and automobile,etc. While, under in-plane double tensile stress states at the extrados of bending tube, the over-thinning induced ductile fracture is one dominant defect in Al-alloy tube bending. The main objective of this study is to predict the critical wall-thinning of Al-alloy tube bending by coupling two ductile fracture criteria(DFCs) into FE simulation. The DFCs include Continuum Damage Mechanics(CDM)-based model and GTN porous model. Through the uniaxial tensile test of the curved specimen, the basic material properties of the Al-alloy 5052O tube is obtained; via the inverse problem solution, the damage parameters of both the two fracture criteria are interatively determined. Thus the application study of the above DFCs in the TWTB is performed, and the more reasonable one is selected to obtain the critical thinning of Al-alloy tube in bending. The virtual damage initiation and evolution (when and where the ductile fracture occurs) in TWTB are investigated, and the fracture mechanisms of the voided Al-alloy tube in tube bending are consequently discussed.

  15. Development of ductile cast iron for spent fuel cask applications using fracture mechanics principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, K.K.; Tiwari, S.; Hemlata Kumari; Mamta Kumari; Kumar, Hemant; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-property relations of ductile cast irons (DCIs) with varying Cu content and ~1 wt.% Ni has been investigated with an emphasis on examining their fracture toughness property towards the development of suitable materials for large volume containers for transport of spent fuel. The detailed microstructural characteristics, hardness, tensile and fracture toughness properties of three DCIs were assessed in as-cast and annealed conditions. Fracture toughness values were determined using both ball indentation (K BI ) and J-integral (KJ Ic ) test. The obtained results assist to infer that: (i) the amount of pearlite and nodule count increases with increased amount of Cu, (ii) the hardness and strength values increases whereas fracture toughness values marginally decreases with increased Cu content, and (iii) the magnitudes of K BI estimated using a proposed analysis are in good agreement with KJ Ic values for the as-cast materials. (author)

  16. Ductility and fracture of single crystaliine Ni3Al with boron additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heredia, F.E.; Pope, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Low and high temperature tensile tests were performed on single crystals of pure Ni 3 Al and Ni 3 Al+B in order to determine the effect of B additions on the ductility and fracture behavior. Tests were carried out in air at a constant strain rate of 1/3 x 10 -3 s -1 . The orientation tested were [001] for whic the yield stress in tension is always greater than in compression, and those for wich the tension/compression asymmetry is zero ([T=C]) for each particular composition. At room temperature, the results show a positive effect of B additions on both the fracture stress and on the ductility. The ductility at 800K appears to decrease monotonically with B additions. The largest ductilities are found for [T=C] at room temperature where an improvement of about 26% (resolved strain) for an addition of 0.2 at % B was obtained. However, the most dramatic increase in ductility occurs for the [001] oriented samples at room temperature where a 55% improvement was measured over that of pure Ni 3 Al. Fracture surfaces show a combinaton of massive slip, some clevage, and heavily dimpled areas. These observations show that B additions not only increase the ductility of polycrystalline Ni 3 Al, as has been previously observed by many investigators, but also that the already-ductile single crystalline material, indicating that a bulk effect should be added to the grain boundary strengthening effect of B when explaining the improvement in ductility of polycrystalline Ni 3 Al due to B additions

  17. Physical fracture properties (fracture surfaces as information sources; crackgrowth and fracture mechanisms; exemples of cracks)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meny, Lucienne.

    1979-06-01

    Fracture surfaces are considered as a useful source of informations: an introduction to fractography is presented; the fracture surface may be observed through X ray microanalysis, and other physical methods such as Auger electron spectroscopy or secundary ion emission. The mechanisms of macroscopic and microscopic crackgrowth and fracture are described, in the case of unstable fracture (cleavage, ductile with shear, intergranular brittleness) and of progressive crack propagation (creep, fatigue). Exemples of cracks are presented in the last chapter [fr

  18. Prediction of Ductile Fracture Behaviors for 42CrMo Steel at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. C.; Liu, Yan-Xing; Liu, Ge; Chen, Ming-Song; Huang, Yuan-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The ductile fracture behaviors of 42CrMo steel are studied by hot tensile tests with the deformation temperature range of 1123-1373 K and strain rate range of 0.0001-0.1 s-1. Effects of deformation temperature and strain rate on the flow stress and fracture strain of the studied steel are discussed in detail. Based on the experimental results, a ductile damage model is established to describe the combined effects of deformation temperature and strain rate on the ductile fracture behaviors of 42CrMo steel. It is found that the flow stress first increases to a peak value and then decreases, showing an obvious dynamic softening. This is mainly attributed to the dynamic recrystallization and material intrinsic damage during the hot tensile deformation. The established damage model is verified by hot forging experiments and finite element simulations. Comparisons between the predicted and experimental results indicate that the established ductile damage model is capable of predicting the fracture behaviors of 42CrMo steel during hot forging.

  19. Ductile fracture behaviour of primary heat transport piping material ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Design of primary heat transport (PHT) piping of pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR) has to ensure implementation of leak-before-break con- cepts. In order to be able to do so, the ductile fracture characteristics of PHT piping material have to be quantified. In this paper, the fracture resistance of SA333, Grade.

  20. Brittle versus ductile behaviour of nanotwinned copper: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Linqing; Lu, Cheng; Zhao, Xing; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Kuiyu; Michal, Guillaume; Tieu, Kiet

    2015-01-01

    Nanotwinned copper (Cu) exhibits an unusual combination of ultra-high yield strength and high ductility. A brittle-to-ductile transition was previously experimentally observed in nanotwinned Cu despite Cu being an intrinsically ductile metal. However, the atomic mechanisms responsible for brittle fracture and ductile fracture in nanotwinned Cu are still not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different temperatures have been performed to investigate the fracture behaviour of a nanotwinned Cu specimen with a single-edge-notched crack whose surface coincides with a twin boundary. Three temperature ranges are identified, indicative of distinct fracture regimes, under tensile straining perpendicular to the twin boundary. Below 1.1 K, the crack propagates in a brittle fashion. Between 2 K and 30 K a dynamic brittle-to-ductile transition is observed. Above 40 K the crack propagates in a ductile mode. A detailed analysis has been carried out to understand the atomic fracture mechanism in each fracture regime

  1. Effect of Bi on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Liang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To improve the mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron, bismuth (Bi was introduced into the iron. Five castings with different Bi content from 0 to 0.014 wt.% were prepared; and four positions in the casting from the edge to the center, with different solidification cooling rates, were chosen for microstructure observation and mechanical properties test. The effect of the Bi content on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of heavy section ductile cast iron were investigated. Results show that the tensile strength, elongation and impact toughness at different positions in the five castings decrease with a decrease in cooling rate. With an increase in Bi content, the graphite morphology and the mechanical properties at the same position are improved, and the improvement of mechanical properties is obvious when the Bi content is no higher than 0.011wt.%. But when the Bi content is further increased to 0.014wt.%, the improvement of mechanical properties is not obvious due to the increase of chunky graphite number and the aggregation of chunky graphite. With an increase in Bi content, the tensile fracture mechanism is changed from brittle to mixture ductile-brittle fracture.

  2. A study on the ductile fracture of a surface crack, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masanori; Nishio, Tamaki; Yano, Kazunori; Machida, Kenji; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Ductile fracture of surface crack is studied experimentally and numerically. At first, fatigue pre-crack is introduced, and the aspect ratios of the growing fatigue crack are measured. Then the ductile fracture test is carried out and the distributions of SZW and Δa are measured. It is noted that Δa is largest where φ, the angle from surface, is nearly 30deg. J integral distribution is evaluated by the finite element method, and it is shown that the J value is also the largest where φ is nearly 30deg. (author)

  3. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  4. Fracture of a Brittle-Particle Ductile Matrix Composite with Applications to a Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianculli, Steven J.

    In material systems consisting of hard second phase particles in a ductile matrix, failure initiating from cracking of the second phase particles is an important failure mechanism. This dissertation applies the principles of fracture mechanics to consider this problem, first from the standpoint of fracture of the particles, and then the onset of crack propagation from fractured particles. This research was inspired by the observation of the failure mechanism of a commercial zinc-based anti-corrosion coating and the analysis was initially approached as coatings problem. As the work progressed it became evident that failure mechanism was relevant to a broad range of composite material systems and research approach was generalized to consider failure of a system consisting of ellipsoidal second phase particles in a ductile matrix. The starting point for the analysis is the classical Eshelby Problem, which considered stress transfer from the matrix to an ellipsoidal inclusion. The particle fracture problem is approached by considering cracks within particles and how they are affected by the particle/matrix interface, the difference in properties between the particle and matrix, and by particle shape. These effects are mapped out for a wide range of material combinations. The trends developed show that, although the particle fracture problem is very complex, the potential for fracture among a range of particle shapes can, for certain ranges in particle shape, be considered easily on the basis of the Eshelby Stress alone. Additionally, the evaluation of cracks near the curved particle/matrix interface adds to the existing body of work of cracks approaching bi-material interfaces in layered material systems. The onset of crack propagation from fractured particles is then considered as a function of particle shape and mismatch in material properties between the particle and matrix. This behavior is mapped out for a wide range of material combinations. The final section of

  5. Prediction of fracture initiation in square cup drawing of DP980 using an anisotropic ductile fracture criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, N.; Huh, H.; Yoon, J. W.

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of fracture initiation in square cup drawing of DP980 steel sheet with the thickness of 1.2 mm. In an attempt to consider the influence of material anisotropy on the fracture initiation, an uncoupled anisotropic ductile fracture criterion is developed based on the Lou—Huh ductile fracture criterion. Tensile tests are carried out at different loading directions of 0°, 45°, and 90° to the rolling direction of the sheet using various specimen geometries including pure shear, dog-bone, and flat grooved specimens so as to calibrate the parameters of the proposed fracture criterion. Equivalent plastic strain distribution on the specimen surface is computed using Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method until surface crack initiates. The proposed fracture criterion is implemented into the commercial finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit by developing the Vectorized User-defined MATerial (VUMAT) subroutine which features the non-associated flow rule. Simulation results of the square cup drawing test clearly show that the proposed fracture criterion is capable of predicting the fracture initiation with sufficient accuracy considering the material anisotropy.

  6. Fracture Toughness Improvement of Composites Reinforced with Optimally Shaped Short Ductile Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wetherhold, Robert C; Patra, Abani K

    2001-01-01

    The fracture toughness of brittle matrix composites reinforced with ductile fibers has been greatly improved by shaping the fibers so that they fully contribute their plastic work to the fracture process...

  7. A multi-scale correlative investigation of ductile fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, M.; Burnett, T.L.; Pickering, E.J.; Tuck, O.C.G.; Léonard, F.; Kelley, R.; Withers, P.J.; Sherry, A.H.

    2017-01-01

    The use of novel multi-scale correlative methods, which involve the coordinated characterisation of matter across a range of length scales, are becoming of increasing value to materials scientists. Here, we describe for the first time how a multi-scale correlative approach can be used to investigate the nature of ductile fracture in metals. Specimens of a nuclear pressure vessel steel, SA508 Grade 3, are examined following ductile fracture using medium and high-resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) analyses, and a site-specific analysis using a dual beam plasma focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (PFIB-SEM). The methods are employed sequentially to characterise damage by void nucleation and growth in one volume of interest, allowing for the imaging of voids that ranged in size from less than 100 nm to over 100 μm. This enables the examination of voids initiated at carbide particles to be detected, as well as the large voids initiated at inclusions. We demonstrate that this multi-scale correlative approach is a powerful tool, which not only enhances our understanding of ductile failure through detailed characterisation of microstructure, but also provides quantitative information about the size, volume fractions and spatial distributions of voids that can be used to inform models of failure. It is found that the vast majority of large voids nucleated at MnS inclusions, and that the volume of a void varied according to the volume of its initiating inclusion raised to the power 3/2. The most severe voiding was concentrated within 500 μm of the fracture surface, but measurable damage was found to extend to a depth of at least 3 mm. Microvoids associated with carbides (carbide-initiated voids) were found to be concentrated around larger inclusion-initiated voids at depths of at least 400 μm. Methods for quantifying X-ray CT void data are discussed, and a procedure for using this data to calibrate parameters in the Gurson-Tvergaard Needleman (GTN

  8. The effect of loading rate on ductile fracture toughness and fracture surface roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osovski, S.; Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Ponson, L.

    2015-01-01

    The variation of ductile crack growth resistance and fracture surface roughness with loading rate is modeled under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitatin...

  9. Numerical simulation of damage evolution for ductile materials and mechanical properties study

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amri, A.; Hanafi, I.; Haddou, M. E. Y.; Khamlichi, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents results of a numerical modelling of ductile fracture and failure of elements made of 5182H111 aluminium alloys subjected to dynamic traction. The analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook model based on ABAQUS software. The modelling difficulty related to prediction of ductile fracture mainly arises because there is a tremendous span of length scales from the structural problem to the micro-mechanics problem governing the material separation process. This study has been used the experimental results to calibrate a simple crack propagation criteria for shell elements of which one has often been used in practical analyses. The performance of the proposed model is in general good and it is believed that the presented results and experimental-numerical calibration procedure can be of use in practical finite-element simulations.

  10. Numerical simulation of damage evolution for ductile materials and mechanical properties study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amri, A El; Haddou, M E Y; Hanafi, I; Khamlichi, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of a numerical modelling of ductile fracture and failure of elements made of 5182H111 aluminium alloys subjected to dynamic traction. The analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook model based on ABAQUS software. The modelling difficulty related to prediction of ductile fracture mainly arises because there is a tremendous span of length scales from the structural problem to the micro-mechanics problem governing the material separation process. This study has been used the experimental results to calibrate a simple crack propagation criteria for shell elements of which one has often been used in practical analyses. The performance of the proposed model is in general good and it is believed that the presented results and experimental-numerical calibration procedure can be of use in practical finite-element simulations. (paper)

  11. Effects of grain size and test temperature on ductility and fracture behavior of a b-doped Ni/sub 3/Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeyama, M.; Liu, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of grain size on ductility and fracture behavior of boron-doped Ni/sub 3/Al(Ni-23Al-0.5Hf, at.%) was studied by tensile tests using a strain rate of 3.3 x 10/sup -3/s/sup -1/ at temperatures to 1000 0 C under a high vacuum of 0 C, the alloy showed essentially ductile transgranular fracture with more than 30% elongation whereas it exhibited ductile grain-boundary fracture in the temperature range from 700 to 800 0 C. In both cases, the ductility was insensitive to grain size. On the other hand, at room temperatures above 800 0 C, the ductility decreased from about 17 to 0% with increasing grain size. The corresponding fracture mode changed from grain-boundary fracture with dynamic recrystallization to brittle grain-boundary fracture. The ductile transgranular fracture at lower temperatures is explained by stress concentration at the intersection of slip bands. The grain-size dependence of ductility is interpreted in terms of stress concentration at the grain boundaries. Finally, it is suggested that the temperature dependence of ductility in this alloy might be related to the thermal behavior of boron segregated to the grain boundaries

  12. Fracture of longitudinally cracked ductile tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, H.; Bernard, J.

    1978-01-01

    Various bulging factor and plasticity correction factor formulations are discussed and a new plasticity correction factor leading to a simple failure law is proposed. Failure stresses predicted by the usual Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics formula corrected for plasticity are shown to be identical with the Dowling and Townley two-criteria approach if the relevant parameters are chosen in a suitable manner. Burst tests on AISI 304 stainless steel tubes performed at the Joint Research Centre, Ispra are described. The strengthening effect of the sealing patch was taken into account by replacing the Folias bulging factor by a smaller empirical factor determined by Bernard and Henry from fatigue crack growth tests. A flow stress sigma and a toughness Ksub(c) were derived which apply to the prediction of the onset of stable crack growth in 304 stainless steel tubes at room temperature. For other ductile materials and temperatures tentative formulae are proposed. (author)

  13. Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 42CrMo Steel by Compressions at Different Temperatures and Strain Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an inn...

  14. Prevention of non-ductile fracture in 6061-T6 aluminum nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahr, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee has approved rules for the use of 6061-T6 and 6061-T651 aluminum for the construction of Class 1 welded nuclear pressure vessels for temperatures not exceeding 149 C (300 F). Nuclear Code Case N-519 allows the use of this aluminum in the construction of low temperature research reactors such as the Advanced Neutron Source. The rules for protection against non-ductile fracture are discussed. The basis for a value of 25.3 MPa √m (23 ksi √in.) for the critical or reference stress intensity factor for use in the fracture analysis is presented. Requirements for consideration of the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness are discussed

  15. Computational simulation for creep fracture properties taking microscopic mechanism into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    Relationship between creep crack growth rate and microscopic fracture mechanism i.e., wedge-type intergranular, transgranular and cavity-type intergranular crack growth, has been investigated. The growth rate of wedge-type and transgranular creep crack could be characterized by creep ductility. Creep damages formed ahead of the cavity-type crack tip accelerated the crack growth rate. Based on the experimental results, FEM code that simulates creep crack growth has been developed by taking the fracture mechanism into account. The effect of creep ductility and void formation ahead of the crack tip on creep crack growth behavior could be simulated. (author)

  16. The semi-brittle to ductile transition in peridotite on oceanic faults: mechanisms and P-T condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, C.; Warren, J. M.; Kohli, A. H.; Teyssier, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    Experimental and geological-petrological studies suggest that the transition from brittle faulting to ductile flow of olivine, i.e. from seismic to aseismic behavior of mantle rocks (peridotites), occurs close to 600°C. However, recent seismological studies on oceanic transform faults (TFs) and ridges have documented earthquakes to temperatures (T) up to 700-800°C. In this study, we carried out a petrological, microstructural and geochemical analysis of natural samples of peridotites dredged at 3 different oceanic TFs of the Southwest Indian Ridge: Shaka, Prince Edward and Atlantis II. We selected samples displaying variable amounts of ductile deformation (from porphyroclastic tectonites to ultramylonites) prior to serpentinization in order to characterize their relatively high-T mechanical behavior. We find that the most deformed samples record cycles of ductile and brittle deformation. Peridotite ductile flow is characterized by drastic grain size reduction and the development of (ultra)mylonitic shear zones. In these zones, a switch in olivine deformation mechanism from dislocation creep to grain-size sensitive creep is associated with dissolution/precipitation processes. Brittle deformation of these samples is evidenced by the presence of (at least centimetric) transgranular and intragranular fractures that fragment coarser grained minerals. Both kinds of fractures are filled with the same phase assemblage as in the ultramylonitic bands: olivine + amphibole ± orthopyroxene ± Al-phase (plagioclase and/or spinel) ± sulfides. The presence of amphibole indicates that this semi-brittle deformation was assisted by hydrous fluids and its composition (e.g. high concentration of chlorine) suggests that the fluids have most likely a hydrothermal origin. We interpret these fractures to have formed under fluid-assisted conditions, recording paleo-seismic activity that alternated with periods of relatively slow interseismic ductile flow. The presence of Mg

  17. Influence of ageing, inclusions and voids on ductile fracture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The strain hardening capacity has a marked effect on void size, and is an indicator of fracture .... a model of ductile failure based on the concept that the critical step in the .... Ashby M F, Gandhi C and Taplin D M R 1979 Acta Metal. 27. 699.

  18. Mechanical strength and analysis of fracture of titanium joining submitted to laser and tig welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Gabrielli Piveta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the tensile strength and fracture mechanism of tungsten inert gas (TIG welds in cylindrical rods of commercially pure titanium (cp Ti with those of laser welds and intact samples. Thirty dumbbell-shaped samples were developed by using brass rods as patterns. The samples were invested in casings, subjected to thermal cycles, and positioned in a plasma arc welding machine under argon atmosphere and vacuum, and titanium was injected under vacuum/pressure. The samples were X-rayed to detect possible welding flaws and randomly assigned to three groups to test the tensile strength and the fracture mechanism: intact, laser welding, and TIG welding. The tensile test results were investigated using ANOVA, which indicated that the samples were statistically similar. The fracture analysis showed that the cpTi samples subjected to laser welding exhibited brittle fracture and those subjected to TIG welding exhibited mixed brittle/ductile fracture with a predominance of ductile fracture with the presence of microcavities and cleavage areas. Intact samples presented the characteristic straightening in the fracture areas, indicating the ductility of the material.

  19. Effect of yield stress matching on ductile fracture behavior of girth welds for X line pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motohashi, Hiroyuki; Hagiwara, Naoto [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the effects of yield stress matching on the ductile fracture behavior of girth welded joints for X linepipes. Three welded joints were made on an X line pipe using several consumables to obtain about a 20% overmatched, even matched and about a 20% under matched weld metal. For these three welded joints, curved wide plate tensile tests were then conducted with a surface notch in the weld metal. To determine the ductile crack initiation from the surface notch, these tests employed a direct-current electric potential (d-c E P) method. Crack opening displacement, gauge length strain and local strain adjacent to the surface notch were also measured. The ductile crack initiation was successfully detected using the d-c E P method. The yield stress matching significantly affected the ductile crack initiation and fracture behavior, that is, the overmatched welded joint had a higher resistance to ductile fracture than that of the under matched welded joint. The allowable strength matching level was determined from the relationship between the strength matching and the gauge length strain at the ductile crack initiation detected using the d-c E P method. (author)

  20. Ductile Fracture Behaviour of Hot Isostatically Pressed Inconel 690 Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-04-01

    Herein we assess the differences in Charpy impact behavior between Hot Isostatically Pressed and forged Inconel 690 alloy over the temperature range of 300 °C to - 196 °C. The impact toughness of forged 690 exhibited a relatively small temperature dependence, with a maximum difference of ca. 40 J measured between 300 °C and - 196 °C, whereas the HIP'd alloy exhibited a difference of approximately double that of the forged alloy over the same temperature range. We have conducted Charpy impact testing, tensile testing, and metallographic analyses on the as-received materials as well as fractography of the failed Charpy specimens in order to understand the mechanisms that cause the observed differences in material fracture properties. The work supports a recent series of studies which assess differences in fundamental fracture behavior between Hot Isostatically Pressed and forged austenitic stainless steel materials of equivalent grades, and the results obtained in this study are compared to those of the previous stainless steel investigations to paint a more general picture of the comparisons between HIP vs forged material fracture behavior. Inconel 690 was selected in this study since previous studies were unable to completely omit the effects of strain-induced martensitic transformation at the tip of the Chary V-notch from the fracture mechanism; Inconel 690 is unable to undergo strain-induced martensitic transformation due to the alloy's high nickel content, thereby providing a sister study with the omission of any martensitic transformation effects on ductile fracture behavior.

  1. Prediction of fracture toughness based on experiments with sub-size specimens in the brittle and ductile regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahler, Michael, E-mail: Michael.Mahler@kit.edu; Aktaa, Jarir

    2016-04-15

    For determination of fracture toughness in the brittle regime or ductile fracture in the upper shelf region, special standard specifications are in use e.g. ASTM E399 or ASTM E1820. Due to the rigorous size requirements for specimen testing, it is necessary to use big specimens. To circumvent this problem an approach based on finite element (FE) simulations using the cohesive zone model (CZM) is used. The parameters of the cohesive zone model have been determined using sub-size specimens. With the identified parameters, simulations of standard-size specimens have been performed to successfully predict fracture toughness of standard-size specimens in the brittle and ductile regimes. The objective is to establish small size testing technology for the determination of fracture toughness. - Highlights: • Prediction of fracture toughness on standard-size specimens. • Valid fracture toughness based on sub-size specimens. • Triaxiality dependent cohesive zone model. • Approach works independent on fracture appearance (brittle, ductile).

  2. A new in situ technique for studying deformation and fracture in thin film ductile/brittle laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackney, S.A.; Milligan, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique for studying deformation and fracture of thin film ductile/brittle laminates is described. The laminates are prepared by sputtering a brittle coating on top of an electropolished TEM thin foil. The composites are then strained in situ in the TEM. In this preliminary investigation, the composites consisted of a ductile aluminum substrate and a brittle silicon coating. Cracks in the brittle film grew discontinuously in bursts several micrometers in length. The crack opening displacement initiated plastic deformation in the ductile film, thus dissipating energy and allowing crack arrest. The interface was well bonded, and delamination was not observed. Due to the good interfacial bond and the crack opening behind the crack tip, it was possible to study very large plastic deformations and ductile fracture in the aluminum in situ, without buckling of the foil. The possibility of micromechanical modeling of the fracture behavior is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  3. Designing molecular structure to achieve ductile fracture behavior in a stiff and strong 2D polymer, "graphylene".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz-Rosado, E; Beaudet, T D; Balu, R; Wetzel, E D

    2016-06-07

    As the simplest two-dimensional (2D) polymer, graphene has immensely high intrinsic strength and elastic stiffness but has limited toughness due to brittle fracture. We use atomistic simulations to explore a new class of graphene/polyethylene hybrid 2D polymer, "graphylene", that exhibits ductile fracture mechanisms and has a higher fracture toughness and flaw tolerance than graphene. A specific configuration of this 2D polymer hybrid, denoted "GrE-2" for the two-carbon-long ethylene chains connecting benzene rings in the inherent framework, is prioritized for study. MD simulations of crack propagation show that the energy release rate to propagate a crack in GrE-2 is twice that of graphene. We also demonstrate that GrE-2 exhibits delocalized failure and other energy-dissipating fracture mechanisms such as crack branching and bridging. These results demonstrate that 2D polymers can be uniquely tailored to achieve a balance of fracture toughness with mechanical stiffness and strength.

  4. Effect of the As-Forged and Heat-Treated Microstructure on the Room Temperature Anisotropic Ductile Fracture of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Javad; Hosseini, Seyed Rahman; Farmanesh, Khosro

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the effect of primary carbides and the δ-phase on the anisotropic ductile fracture of Inconel 718 in the forging process. Inconel 718 alloys were prepared by VIM + VAR processes with various carbon contents (0.009 and 0.027 wt.%). Then, the alloys were forged and annealed at temperatures of 980 and 1030 °C. The room temperature mechanical anisotropy of the alloys was evaluated at the longitudinal direction (LD) and transverse direction (TD). Tensile and impact tests were used to characterize the mechanical properties of the specimens. The microstructural characterization and the fractography of the alloys were carried out by FE-SEM. The obtained results showed that the fracture strain and the impact energy in the TD were 30-50% lower than the LD. The fracture was accelerated by the δ-phase, leading to the reduction of impact energy in the longitudinal and the lateral directions up to 50%. The low-carbon alloy indicated similar characteristics in both the LD and the TD. Aligned carbides changed the fracture path from a zigzag path in the LD to a fibrous path in the TD, while the δ-phase created a flat fracture path. The shear lip area ratio in the tensile fracture cross section was decreased by reducing ductility.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories cask drop test programme: a demonstration of fracture mechanics principles for the prevention of brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories recently completed a cask drop test programme. The aims of the programme were (1) to demonstrate the applicability of a fracture mechanics-based methodology for ensuring cask integrity, and (2) to assess the viability of using a ferritic materials for cask containment. The programme consisted of four phases: (i) materials characterisation; (ii) non-destructive examination of the cask; (iii) finite element analyses of the drop events; and (iv) a series of drop tests of a ductile iron cask. The first three phases of the programme provided information for fracture mechanics analyses and predictions for the drop test phase. The drop tests were nominally based upon the IAEA 9 m drop height hypothetical accident scenario although one drop test was from 18 m. All tests were performed in the side drop orientation at a temperature of -29 o C. A circumferential, mid-axis flaw was introduced into the cask body for each drop test. Flaw depth ranged from 19 to 76 mm. Steel saddles were welded to the side wall of the cask to enhance the stresses imposed upon the cask in the region of the introduced flaw. The programme demonstrated the applicability of a fracture mechanics methodology for predicting the conditions under which brittle fracture may occur and thereby the utility of fracture mechanics design for ensuring cask structural integrity by ensuring an appropriate margin of safety. Positive assessments of ductile iron for cask containment and the quality of the casting process for producing ductile iron casks were made. The results of this programme have provided data to support IAEA efforts to develop brittle fracture acceptance criteria for cask containment. (author)

  6. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: mail@crism.ru; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-15

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  7. Technical report on micro-mechanical versus conventional modelling in non-linear fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    While conventional fracture mechanics is capable of predicting crack growth behaviour if sufficient experimental observations are available, micro-mechanical modelling can both increase the accuracy of these predictions and model phenomena that are inaccessible by the conventional theory such as the ductile-cleavage temperature transition. A common argument against micro-mechanical modelling is that it is too complicated for use in routine engineering applications. This is both a computational and an educational problem. That micro-mechanical modelling is unnecessarily complicated is certainly true in many situations. The on-going development of micro-mechanical models, computational algorithms and computer speed will however most probably diminish the computational problem rather rapidly. Compare for instance the rate of development of computational methods for structural analysis. Meanwhile micro-mechanical modelling may serve as a tool by which more simplified engineering methods can be validated. The process of receiving a wide acceptance of the new methods is probably much slower. This involves many steps. First the research community must be in reasonable agreement on the methods and their use. Then the methods have to be implemented into computer software and into code procedures. The development and acceptance of conventional fracture mechanics may serve as an historical example of the time required before a new methodology has received a wide usage. The CSNI Working Group on Integrity and Ageing (IAGE) decided to carry out a report on micro-mechanical modeling to promote this promising and valuable technique. The report presents a comparison with non-linear fracture mechanics and highlights key aspects that could lead to a better knowledge and accurate predictions. Content: - 1. Introduction; - 2. Concepts of non-linear fracture mechanics with point crack tip modelling; - 3. Micro-mechanical models for cleavage fracture; - 4, Micro-mechanical modelling of

  8. Ductile fracture estimation of reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Sakai, Shinsuke; Okamura, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new scheme for the estimation of unstable ductile fracture of a reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock conditions. First, it is shown that the bending moment applied to the cracked section can be evaluated by considering the plastic deformation of the cracked section and the thermal deformation of the shell. As the contribution of the local thermal stress to the J-value is negligible, the J-value under thermal shock can be easily evaluated by using fully plastic solutions for the cracked part. Next, the phenomena of ductile fracture under thermal shock are expressed on the load-versus-displacement diagram which enables us to grasp the transient phenomena visually. In addition, several parametrical surveys are performed on the above diagram concerning the variation of (1) thermal shock conditions, (2) initial crack length, and (3) J-resistance curve (i.e. embrittlement by neutron irradiation). (author)

  9. On the major ductile fracture methodologies for failure assessment of nuclear reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Julio R.B.; Andrade, Arnaldo H.P. de; Landes, John D.

    1996-01-01

    In structures like nuclear reactor components there is a special concern with the loads that may occur under postulated accident conditions. These loads can cause the stresses to go well beyond the linear elastic limits, requiring the use of ductile fracture mechanics methods to the prediction of the structure behavior. Since the use of numerical methods to apply EPFM concepts is expensive and time consuming, the existence of analytical engineering procedures are of great relevance. The lack of precision in detail, as compared with numerical nonlinear analyses, is compensated by the possibility of quick failure assessments. This is a determinant factor in situations where a systematic evaluation of a large range of geometries and loading conditions is necessary, like in thr application of the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept on nuclear piping. This paper outlines four ductile fracture analytical methods, pointing out positive and negative aspects of each one. The objective is to take advantage of this critical review to conceive a new methodology, one that would gather strong points of the major existent methods and would try to eliminate some of their drawbacks. (author)

  10. Evaluation of varying ductile fracture criteria for 42CrMo steel by compressions at different temperatures and strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s(-1) are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture.

  11. Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 42CrMo Steel by Compressions at Different Temperatures and Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-zheng Quan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s-1 are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture.

  12. Development of stress-modified fracture strain criterion for ductile fracture of API X65 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang Kyun; Kim, Yun Jae; Park, Jin Moo; Kim, Woo Sik; Baek, Jong Hyun

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a stress-modified fracture strain for API X65 steel used for gas pipeline, as a function of stress triaxiality. To determine the stress-modified fracture strain, tension test of bars with four different notch radii, made of API X65 steel, is firstly performed, from which true fracture strains are determined as a function of notch radius. Then detailed elastic-plastic, large strain Finite Element (FE) analyses are performed to estimate variations of stress triaxiality in the notched bars with load. Combining experimental with FE results provides the true fracture strain as a function of stress triaxiality, which is regarded as a criterion of ductile fracture. Application of the developed stress-modified fracture strain to failure prediction of gas pipes made of API X65 steel with various types of defects is discussed

  13. Fracture mechanism of a dispersion-hardened molybdenum alloy with strong structural interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, A.D.; Malashenko, I.S.; Moiseev, V.F.; Pechkovskij, Eh.P.; Sul'zhenko, V.K.; Trefilov, V.I.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Ehlektrosvarki)

    1978-01-01

    Fracture mechanism in the two-phase Mo-15wt.%Nb-3.5 vol.% TiN alloy known to be of ''brittle matrix-strong interfaces'' type has been investigated depending on tensile test temperature. Several temperature intervals of fracture have been found, each of them having its own peculiarities. A scheme is suggested for fracture mechanism changes in dispersion-hardened alloys with strong interfaces. At low test temperatures brittle cleavage fracture takes place. With temperature increase fracture mechanisms change in the following way: brittle intergranular fracture; fracture of ''microvoid coalescence'' type; fracture typical for reinforced materials with ductile matrix; intergran laru fracture. Particles of strengthening phase have been shown to play different roles depending on the test temperature in the fracture of the alloys studied

  14. Correlation of nodular austempered ductile iron (ADI) microstructural parameters and fatigue properties using an approach based on fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Jose Felipe; Fonseca, Vinicius Rizzuti; Godefroid, Leonardo Barbosa; Ribeiro, Gabriel de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    An investigation has been accomplished to check the effect of temperature and austempering time on austempered ductile iron (ADI) properties by means of fracture toughness (K_C) and fatigue threshold (∆K_t_h) tests. The correlation of ADI microstructural parameters and ADI two mechanical parameters: KC and Kth, is evaluated. Three sets of samples have ben extracted from ADI casting Y blocks produced in industrial conditions.and austenitized at 900°C for 1.5 hour. The austempering process has been performed in the following ways: the first set was austenitized at 300 deg C for 4 hours, the second set at 360°C for 1.5 hour and the third at 360°C for 0.6 hour. These distinct austempering processes have been adopted in order to obtain distinct microstructures containing austenite with two different carbon rates and two ferritic cell sizes. The materials have been characterized by means of optical and electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and mechanical tests. All materials have presented equivalent fatigue crack propagation rates, fracture toughness in the range between 94 and 128 MPa·m"1"/"2 and ∆K_t_h in the range between 5,7 and 6,4 MPa·m"1"/"2. The experimental results have confirmed the effect of microstructural properties (austenitic volumetric rate, austenitic carbon rate, ferritic cell size, total matrix carbon content) on fracture toughness (K_C) and fatigue threshold (∆K_t_h). Further, it was found that following parameters: fracture toughness (K_C), fatigue threshold ((∆K_t_h) and impact strength are correlated with the total matrix carbon content and ferritic cell size. (author)

  15. Fracture and fatigue considerations in the development of ductile-phase reinforced intermetallic-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1994-01-01

    The salient microstructural factors influencing fracture and fatigue-crack growth resistance of ductile-particle reinforced intermetallic-matrix composites at ambient temperature are reviewed through examples from the Nb/MoSi 2 , TiNb/TiAl, Nb/TiAl and Nb/Nb 3 Al systems; specific emphasis is placed on properties and morphology of the reinforcement and its interfacial properties with the matrix. It is shown that composites must be fabricated with a high aspect ratio ductile-reinforcement morphology in order to promote crack-particle interception and resultant crack bridging for improved fracture and fatigue properties. Concurrently, however, the ductile phases have contrasting effects on crack growth under monotonic vs. cyclic loading suggesting that composite microstructures tailored for optimal toughness may not necessarily yield optimal fatigue resistance. Perspectives for the future development of damage-tolerant intermetallic-composite microstructures are discussed

  16. Assessment of Ductile, Brittle, and Fatigue Fractures of Metals Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Hutiu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Some forensic in situ investigations, such as those needed in transportation (for aviation, maritime, road, or rail accidents or for parts working under harsh conditions (e.g., pipes or turbines would benefit from a method/technique that distinguishes ductile from brittle fractures of metals—as material defects are one of the potential causes of incidents. Nowadays, the gold standard in material studies is represented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. However, SEM instruments are large, expensive, time-consuming, and lab-based; hence, in situ measurements are impossible. To tackle these issues, we propose as an alternative, lower-cost, sufficiently high-resolution technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT to perform fracture analysis by obtaining the topography of metallic surfaces. Several metals have been considered in this study: low soft carbon steels, lamellar graphite cast iron, an antifriction alloy, high-quality rolled steel, stainless steel, and ductile cast iron. An in-house developed Swept Source (SS OCT system, Master-Slave (MS enhanced is used, and height profiles of the samples’ surfaces were generated. Two configurations were used: one where the dimension of the voxel was 1000 μm3 and a second one of 160 μm3—with a 10 μm and a 4 μm transversal resolution, respectively. These height profiles allowed for concluding that the carbon steel samples were subject to ductile fracture, while the cast iron and antifriction alloy samples were subjected to brittle fracture. The validation of OCT images has been made with SEM images obtained with a 4 nm resolution. Although the OCT images are of a much lower resolution than the SEM ones, we demonstrate that they are sufficiently good to obtain clear images of the grains of the metallic materials and thus to distinguish between ductile and brittle fractures—especially with the higher resolution MS/SS-OCT system. The investigation is finally extended to the most useful case of

  17. Draft fracture mechanics code case for American Society of Mechanical Engineers NUPACK rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K.; Nickell, R.; Saegusa, T.

    2004-01-01

    The containment boundaries of most spent-fuel casks certified for use in the United States by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are constructed with stainless steel, a material that is ductile in an engineering sense at all temperatures and for which, therefore, fracture mechanics principles are not relevant for the containment application. Ferritic materials may fail in a nonductile manner at sufficiently low temperatures, so fracture mechanics principles may be applied to preclude nonductile fracture. Because of the need to transport and store spent nuclear fuel safely in all types of climatic conditions, these vessels have regulatory lowest service temperatures that range down to -40 C (-40 F) for transport application. Such low service temperatures represent a severe challenge in terms of fracture toughness to many ferritic materials. Linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics principles provide a methodology for evaluating ferritic materials under such conditions

  18. Ductile fracture of cylindrical vessels containing a large flaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Irwin, G. R.; Ratwani, M.

    1976-01-01

    The fracture process in pressurized cylindrical vessels containing a relatively large flaw is considered. The flaw is assumed to be a part-through or through meridional crack. The flaw geometry, the yield behavior of the material, and the internal pressure are assumed to be such that in the neighborhood of the flaw the cylinder wall undergoes large-scale plastic deformations. Thus, the problem falls outside the range of applicability of conventional brittle fracture theories. To study the problem, plasticity considerations are introduced into the shell theory through the assumptions of fully-yielded net ligaments using a plastic strip model. Then a ductile fracture criterion is developed which is based on the concept of net ligament plastic instability. A limited verification is attempted by comparing the theoretical predictions with some existing experimental results.

  19. Characterization of ductile fracture properties of quench-hardenable boron steel: Influence of microstructure and processing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golling, Stefan; Östlund, Rickard; Oldenburg, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Developments of the hot stamping technology have enabled the production of components with differential microstructure composition and mechanical properties. These can increase the performance of certain crash-relevant automotive structures by combining high intrusion protection and energy absorption. This paper presents a comprehensive experimental investigation on the flow and ductile fracture properties of boron-alloyed steel with a wide range of different microstructure compositions. Three types of dual phase microstructures at three different volume fractions, and one triple phase grade, were generated by thermal treatment. Flow curves extending beyond necking and the equivalent plastic strain to fracture for each grade was determined by tensile testing using full-field measurements. The influence of phase composition and microstructural parameters were further investigated by means of a multi-scale modeling approach based on mean-field homogenization in combination with local fracture criteria. Inter-phase and intra-phase fracture mechanisms were considered by adopting two separate fracture criteria formulated in terms of the local average stress field. The micromechanical model captures with useful accuracy the strong influence of microstructure and processing conditions on the flow and fracture properties, implying promising prospects of mean-field homogenization for the constitutive modeling of hot stamped components.

  20. Characterization of ductile fracture properties of quench-hardenable boron steel: Influence of microstructure and processing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golling, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.golling@ltu.se [Luleå University of Technology, SE 971 87 Luleå (Sweden); Östlund, Rickard [Gestamp HardTech, Ektjärnsvägen 5, SE 973 45 Luleå (Sweden); Oldenburg, Mats [Luleå University of Technology, SE 971 87 Luleå (Sweden)

    2016-03-21

    Developments of the hot stamping technology have enabled the production of components with differential microstructure composition and mechanical properties. These can increase the performance of certain crash-relevant automotive structures by combining high intrusion protection and energy absorption. This paper presents a comprehensive experimental investigation on the flow and ductile fracture properties of boron-alloyed steel with a wide range of different microstructure compositions. Three types of dual phase microstructures at three different volume fractions, and one triple phase grade, were generated by thermal treatment. Flow curves extending beyond necking and the equivalent plastic strain to fracture for each grade was determined by tensile testing using full-field measurements. The influence of phase composition and microstructural parameters were further investigated by means of a multi-scale modeling approach based on mean-field homogenization in combination with local fracture criteria. Inter-phase and intra-phase fracture mechanisms were considered by adopting two separate fracture criteria formulated in terms of the local average stress field. The micromechanical model captures with useful accuracy the strong influence of microstructure and processing conditions on the flow and fracture properties, implying promising prospects of mean-field homogenization for the constitutive modeling of hot stamped components.

  1. Effect of plastic strain on elastic-plastic fracture toughness of SM490 carbon steel. Assessment by stress-based criterion for ductile crack initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Although the plastic strain induced in materials increases the mechanical strength, it may reduce the fracture toughness. In this study, the change in fracture toughness of SM490 carbon steel due to pre-straining was investigated using a stress-based criterion for ductile crack initiation. The specimens with blunt notch of various radiuses were used in addition to those with conventional fatigue pre-cracking. The degree of applied plastic strain was 5%, 10% or 20%. The fracture toughness was largest when the induced plastic strain was 5%, although it decreased for the plastic strains of 10% and 20%. The stress and strain distributions near the crack tip of fracture toughness test specimens was investigated by elastic-plastic finite element analyses using a well-correlated stress-strain curve for large strain. It was shown that the critical condition at the onset of the ductile crack was better correlated with the equivalent stress than the plastic strain at the crack tip. By using the stress-based criterion, which was represented by the equivalent stress and stress triaxiality, the change in the fracture toughness due to pre-straining could be reasonably explained. Based on these results, it was concluded that the stress-based criterion should be used for predicting the ductile crack initiation. (author)

  2. Finite element assisted prediction of ductile fracture in sheet bulging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Bryan J. Mac; Lorza, Ruben Lostado; Yoshihara, Shoichiro

    2017-10-01

    With growing demand for energy efficiency, there is much focus on reducing oil consumption rates and utilising alternative fuels. A contributor to the solution in this area is to produce lighter vehicles that are more fuel efficient and/or allow for the use of alternative fuel sources (e.g. electric powered automobiles). Near-net-shape manufacturing processes such as hydroforming have great potential to reduce structural weight while still maintaining structural strength and performance. Finite element analysis techniques have proved invaluable in optimizing such hydroforming processes, however, the majority of such studies have used simple predictors of failure which are usually yield criteria such as von Mises stress. There is clearly potential to obtain more optimal solutions using more advanced predictors of failure. This paper compared the Von Mises stress failure criteria and the Oyane's ductile fracture criteria in the sheet hydroforming of magnesium alloys. It was found that the results obtained from the models which used Oyane's ductile fracture criteria were more realistic than those obtained from those that used Von Mises stress as a failure criteria.

  3. Evaluation of fracture toughness of ductile cast iron for casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hide, Koh-ichiro; Arai, Taku; Takaku, Hiroshi; Shimazaki, Katsunori; Kusanagi, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    We studied the fracture toughness and tensile properties of ductile cast iron for casks, and tried to introduce a fatigue crack into partial cask model. Main results were shown as follows. (1) Fracture toughness were in the upper shelf area above -25deg C, and were in the transition area at -40 and -70deg C. (2) Increasing the value of K I , the fracture toughness decreased. (3) Increasing the specimen thickness, fracture toughness decreased. (4) Fracture toughness of an artificial flaw (ρ=0.1 mm) was the same as that of a fatigue crack at -40deg C. (5) Tensil properties were inferior at -196 and about 400deg C because of low temperature brittleness and blue brittleness. (6) Tensile properties in the middle of cask wall were inferior. (7) It seems to be possible to introduce a fatigue crack into a full size cask. (author)

  4. The application of fracture mechanics on nodular cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Blind, D.; Kockelmann, H.; Roos, E.; Eisele, U.

    1987-01-01

    A series of studies on predominantly thick-walled castings was the first attempt at a characterization of the material of ferritization-annealed ductile cast iron under aspects of fracture mechanics according to today's state of fracture-mechanics research and testing. As in static and dynamic tensile testing, ferritic cast iron meeting specifications was found to be tough down -40 0 C and below in fracture mechanical testing without substantial reduction of the corresponding characteristics at room temperature; this is true for a temperature range where the lowest point of impact notch work has been reached already. Impact-type stresses with and without notching resulted in enhanced deformation resistance and deformability in the longitudinal samples taken from tubes. (orig./DG) [de

  5. Analysis of the competition between brittle and ductile fracture: application for the mechanical behaviour of C-Mn and theirs welds; Etude de la competition dechirure ductile/rupture fragile: application de la tenue mecanique des tubes en acier C-Mn et de leurs joints soudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Corre, V

    2006-09-15

    This study deals with the fracture behaviour of welded thin structures in the ductile to brittle transition range. It aims to propose a criterion to define the conditions for which the risk of fracture by cleavage does not exist on a cracked structure. The literature review shows that the difficulties of prediction of the fracture behaviour of a structure are related to the dependence of the fracture probability to the mechanical fields at the crack tip. The ductile to brittle transition range thus depends on the studied geometry of the structure. A threshold stress, below which cleavage cannot take place, is defined using fracture tests on notched specimens broken at very low temperature. The finite element numerical simulation of fracture tests onspecimens in the transition range shows a linear relationship between the fracture probability and the volume exceeding the threshold stress, thus showing the relevance of the proposed criterion. Moreover, several relations are established allowing to simplify the identification of the criterion parameters. The criterion is applied to a nuclear structural C-Mn steel, by focusing more particularly on the higher boundary of the transition range. A fracture test on a full-scale pipe is designed, developed, carried out and analysed using its numerical simulation. The results show firstly that, on the structure, the transition range is shifted in temperature, compared to laboratory specimens, due to the low plasticity constraint achieved in thin structures, and secondly that the threshold stress criterion allows to estimate simply this shift. (author)

  6. OCA-P, PWR Vessel Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: OCA-P is a probabilistic fracture-mechanics code prepared specifically for evaluating the integrity of pressurized-water reactor vessels subjected to overcooling-accident loading conditions. Based on linear-elastic fracture mechanics, it has two- and limited three-dimensional flaw capability, and can treat cladding as a discrete region. Both deterministic and probabilistic analyses can be performed. For deterministic analysis, it is possible to conduct a search for critical values of the fluence and the nil-ductility reference temperature corresponding to incipient initiation of the initial flaw. The probabilistic portion of OCA-P is based on Monte Carlo techniques, and simulated parameters include fluence, flaw depth, fracture toughness, nil-ductility reference temperature, and concentrations of copper, nickel, and phosphorous. Plotting capabilities include the construction of critical-crack-depth diagrams (deterministic analysis) and a variety of histograms (probabilistic analysis). 2 - Method of solution: OAC-P accepts as input the reactor primary- system pressure and the reactor pressure-vessel downcomer coolant temperature, as functions of time in the specified transient. Then, the wall temperatures and stresses are calculated as a function of time and radial position in the wall, and the fracture-mechanics analysis is performed to obtain the stress intensity factors as a function of crack depth and time in the transient. In a deterministic analysis, values of the static crack initiation toughness and the crack arrest toughness are also calculated for all crack depths and times in the transient. A comparison of these values permits an evaluation of flaw behavior. For a probabilistic analysis, OCA-P generates a large number of reactor pressure vessels, each with a different combination of the various values of the parameters involved in the analysis of flaw behavior. For each of these vessels, a deterministic fracture

  7. A ductile fracture criterion with Zener-Hollomon parameter of pure molybdenum sheet in thermal forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Formability of pure molybdenum in thermal forming process has been greatly improved, but it is still hard to avoid the generation of rupture and other quality defects. In this paper, a ductile fracture criterion of pure molybdenum sheet in thermal forming was established by considering the plastic deformation capacity of material and stress states, which can be used to describe fracture behaviour and critical rupture prediction of pure molybdenum sheet during hot forming process. Based on the isothermal uniaxial tensile tests which performed at 993 to 1143 K with strain rate range from 0.0005 to 0.2 s−1, the material parameters are calculated by the combination method of experiment with FEsimulation. Based on the observation, new fracture criteria can be expressed as a function of Zener-Hollomon parameter. The critical fracture value that calculated by Oyane-Sato criterion increases with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate. The ductile fracture criterion with Zener-Hollomon parameter of pure molybdenum in thermal forming is proposed.

  8. Mechanical properties of ductile cast iron and cast steel for intermediate level waste transport containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.; Sievwright, R.W.T.; Egid, B.; Ajayi, F.; Donelan, P.

    1994-01-01

    UK Nirex Ltd is developing Type B re-usable shielded transport containers (RSTCs) in a range of shielding thicknesses to transport intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW) to a deep repository. The designs are of an essentially monolithic construction and rely principally on the plastic flow of their material to absorb the energies involved in impact events. Nirex has investigated the feasibility of manufacturing the RSTCs from ductile cast iron (DCI) or cast steel instead of from forgings, since this would bring advantages of reduced manufacturing time and costs. However, cast materials are perceived to lack toughness and ductility and it is necessary to show that sufficient fracture toughness can be obtained to preclude brittle failure modes, particularly at low temperatures. The mechanical testing carried out as part of that programme is described. It shows how the measured properties have been used to demonstrate avoidance of brittle fracture and provide input to computer modelling of the drop tests. (author)

  9. Development of Nanostructured Austempered Ductile Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, Saranya

    Austempered Ductile Cast Iron is emerging as an important engineering materials in recent years because of its excellent combination of mechanical properties such as high strength with good ductility, good fatigue strength and fracture toughness together with excellent wear resistance. These combinations of properties are achieved by the microstructure consisting of acicular ferrite and high carbon austenite. Refining of the ausferritic microstructure will further enhance the mechanical properties of ADI and the presence of proeutectoid ferrite in the microstructure will considerably improve the ductility of the material. Thus, the focus of this investigation was to develop nanostructured austempered ductile cast iron (ADI) consisting of proeutectoid ferrite, bainitic ferrite and high carbon austenite and to determine its microstructure-property relationships. Compact tension and cylindrical tensile test samples were prepared as per ASTM standards, subjected to various heat treatments and the mechanical tests including the tensile tests, plane strain fracture toughness tests, hardness tests were performed as per ASTM standards. Microstructures were characterized by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM. Nanostructured ADI was achieved by a unique heat treatment consisting of austenitization at a high temperature and subsequent plastic deformation at the same austenitizing temperature followed by austempering. The investigation also examined the effect of cryogenic treatment, effect of intercritical austenitizing followed by single and two step austempering, effect of high temperature plastic deformation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the low alloyed ductile cast iron. The mechanical and thermal stability of the austenite was also investigated. An analytical model has been developed to understand the crack growth process associated with the stress induced transformation of retained austenite to martensite.

  10. Intrinsic Mechanisms of Ductile-brittle Transition for F460 Steel Welding Coarse Grained Heat Affected Zones with Different Heat Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jing

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Coarse grain heat affected zone (HAZ of F460 steel was simulated by a Gleeble 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator. The microstructure, critical event of the HAZ formed at various heat inputs (E were characterized and determined by optical microscopy (OM and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, and cleavage fracture stress σf was also calculated by ABAQUS software. Based on above systematic analysis, the intrinsic mechanism of ductile-brittle transition for F460 steel heat affected zones with different heat inputs were revealed. The results indicate that:with the improvement of heat input, the microstructures in sequence are a minority of lath martensite and massive fine lath bainite, more lath bainite with less granular bainite, more granular bainite with less lath bainite, bulky of granular bainite; and the maximum size of the original austenite grain and bainite packet becomes bigger with the improvement of heat input. The size of bainite packet is critical event of the cleavage fracture for coarse grain heat affected zone specimens with various heat inputs by comparing the relationships among residual crack length, original austenite grain size and bainite packet size. With the decreasing of the bainitic packet, the ductile to brittle transition temperature decreases. In addition, cleavage fracture stress σf is also calculated by ABAQUS software, σf gradually decreases with the increase of the heat input, which can explain the intrinsic mechanism of ductile to brittle transition temperature Tk with the change of the heat input.

  11. Hot Ductility Behavior of an 8 Pct Cr Roller Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Shuhua; Shi, Zhongping; Wang, Bo; Fu, Wantang

    2015-04-01

    The hot ductility of an 8 pct Cr roller steel was determined between 1173 K and 1473 K (900 °C and 1200 °C) at strain rates of 0.01 to 10 s-1 through tensile testing. The fracture morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy, and the microstructure was examined through optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The dependence of the hot ductility behavior on the deformation conditions, grain size, and precipitation was analyzed. The relationship between the reduction in area and the natural logarithm of the Zener-Hollomon parameter (ln Z) was found to be a second-order polynomial. When ln Z was greater than 40 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by incompatible deformation between the grains. When ln Z was between 32 and 40 s-1, the hot ductility was excellent and the main fracture mechanism was void linking. When ln Z was below 32 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by grain boundary sliding. A fine grain structure is beneficial for homogenous deformation and dynamic recrystallization, which induces better hot ductility. The effect of M7C3 carbide particles dispersed in the matrix on the hot ductility was small. The grain growth kinetics in the 8 pct Cr steel were obtained between 1373 K and 1473 K (1100 °C and 1200 °C). Finally, optimized preheating and forging procedures for 8 pct Cr steel rollers are provided.

  12. Investigation of the hot ductility of a high-strength boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Güler, Hande; Ertan, Rukiye; Özcan, Reşat

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the high-temperature ductility behaviour of an Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 sheet was investigated. The mechanical properties of Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 boron steel were examined via hot tensile tests performed at temperatures ranging from 400 to 900 °C at a strain rate of 0.083 s −1 . The deformation and fracture mechanisms under hot tensile testing were considered in relation to the testing data and to the fracture-surface observations performed via SEM. The hot ductility of the tested boron steel was observed as a function of increasing temperature and the Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 boron steel exhibited a ductility loss at 700 °C

  13. OCA-P, a deterministic and probabilistic fracture-mechanics code for application to pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1984-05-01

    The OCA-P code is a probabilistic fracture-mechanics code that was prepared specifically for evaluating the integrity of pressurized-water reactor vessels when subjected to overcooling-accident loading conditions. The code has two-dimensional- and some three-dimensional-flaw capability; it is based on linear-elastic fracture mechanics; and it can treat cladding as a discrete region. Both deterministic and probabilistic analyses can be performed. For the former analysis, it is possible to conduct a search for critical values of the fluence and the nil-ductility reference temperature corresponding to incipient initiation of the initial flaw. The probabilistic portion of OCA-P is based on Monte Carlo techniques, and simulated parameters include fluence, flaw depth, fracture toughness, nil-ductility reference temperature, and concentrations of copper, nickel, and phosphorous. Plotting capabilities include the construction of critical-crack-depth diagrams (deterministic analysis) and various histograms (probabilistic analysis)

  14. Hot Ductility Behavior of a Peritectic Steel during Continuous Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Merih Arıkan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot ductility properties of a peritectic steel for welded gas cylinders during continuous casting were studied by performing hot tensile tests at certain temperatures ranging from 1200 to 700 °C for some cooling rates by using Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical test and simulation machine in this study. The effects of cooling rate and strain rate on hot ductility were investigated and continuous casting process map (time-temperature-ductility were plotted for this material. Reduction of area (RA decreases and cracking susceptibility increases during cooling from solidification between certain temperatures depending on the cooling rate. Although the temperatures which fracture behavior change upon cooling during continuous casting may vary for different materials, it was found that the type of fracture was ductile at 1100 and 1050 °C; semi-ductile at 1000 °C, and brittle at 800 °C for the steel P245NB. There is a ductility trough between 1000 and 725 °C. The ductility trough gets slightly narrower as the cooling rate decreases.

  15. Fatigue and Fracture Resistance of Heavy-Section Ferritic Ductile Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Benedetti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the effect of a long solidification time (12 h on the mechanical properties of an EN-GJS-400-type ferritic ductile cast iron (DCI. For this purpose, static tensile, rotating bending fatigue, fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness tests are carried out on specimens extracted from the same casting. The obtained results are compared with those of similar materials published in the technical literature. Moreover, the discussion is complemented with metallurgical and fractographic analyses. It has been found that the long solidification time, representative of conditions arising in heavy-section castings, leads to an overgrowth of the graphite nodules and a partial degeneration into chunky graphite. With respect to minimum values prescribed for thick-walled (t > 60 mm EN-GJS-400-15, the reduction in tensile strength and total elongation is equal to 20% and 75%, respectively. The rotating bending fatigue limit is reduced by 30% with respect to the standard EN-1563, reporting the results of fatigue tests employing laboratory samples extracted from thin-walled castings. Conversely, the resistance to fatigue crack growth is even superior and the fracture toughness comparable to that of conventional DCI.

  16. ''Global and local approaches of fracture in the ductile to brittle regime of a low alloy steel''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renevey, S.

    1998-01-01

    The study is a contribution to the prediction of flow fracture toughness of low alloy steel and to a better knowledge of fracture behavior in the ductile to brittle transition region. Experiments were performed on a nozzle cut-off from a pressurized water reactor vessel made of steels A508C13 type steel. Axisymmetrical notched specimens were tested to study the fracture onset in a volume element while pre-cracked specimens were used to investigate cleavage fracture after stable crack growth. Systematic observations of fracture surfaces showed manganese sulfide inclusions (MnS) at cleavage sites or in the vicinity. The experimental results were used for modelling by the local approach to fracture. In a volume element the fracture is described by an original probabilistic model. This model is based on volume fraction distributions of MnS inclusions gathered in clusters and on the assumption of a competition without interaction between ductile and cleavage fracture modes. This model was applied to pre-cracked specimens (CT specimens). It is able to describe the scatter in the toughness after a small stable crack growth if a temperature effect on the cleavage stress is assumed. So, the modelling is able to give a lower bound of fracture toughness as a function of temperature. (author)

  17. Experimental and Computational Study of Ductile Fracture in Small Punch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Gülçimen Çakan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A unified experimental-computational study on ductile fracture initiation and propagation during small punch testing is presented. Tests are carried out at room temperature with unnotched disks of different thicknesses where large-scale yielding prevails. In thinner specimens, the fracture occurs with severe necking under membrane tension, whereas for thicker ones a through thickness shearing mode prevails changing the crack orientation relative to the loading direction. Computational studies involve finite element simulations using a shear modified Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman porous plasticity model with an integral-type nonlocal formulation. The predicted punch load-displacement curves and deformed profiles are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Experimental and Computational Study of Ductile Fracture in Small Punch Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülçimen Çakan, Betül; Soyarslan, Celal; Bargmann, Swantje; Hähner, Peter

    2017-10-17

    A unified experimental-computational study on ductile fracture initiation and propagation during small punch testing is presented. Tests are carried out at room temperature with unnotched disks of different thicknesses where large-scale yielding prevails. In thinner specimens, the fracture occurs with severe necking under membrane tension, whereas for thicker ones a through thickness shearing mode prevails changing the crack orientation relative to the loading direction. Computational studies involve finite element simulations using a shear modified Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman porous plasticity model with an integral-type nonlocal formulation. The predicted punch load-displacement curves and deformed profiles are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Fracture mechanics behaviour of neutron irradiated Alloy A-286

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.

    The effect of fast-neutron irradiation on the fatigue-crack propagation and fracture toughness behaviour of Alloy A-286 was characterized using fracture mechanics techniques. The fracture toughness was found to decrease continuously with increasing irradiation damage at both 24 deg. C and 427 deg. C. In the unirradiated and low fluence conditions, specimens displayed appreciable plasticity prior to fracture, and equivalent Ksub(Ic) values were determined from Jsub(Ic) fracture toughness results. At high irradiation exposure levels, specimens exhibited a brittle Ksub(Ic) fracture mode. The 427 deg. C fracture toughness fell from 129 MPa√m in the unirradiated condition to 35 MPa√m at an exposure of 16.2 dpa (total fluence of 5.2x10 22 n/cm 2 ). Room temperature fracture toughness values were consistently 40 to 60 percent higher than the 427 deg. C values. Electron fractography revealed that the reduction in fracture resistance was attributed to a fracture mechanism transition from ductile microvoid coalescence to channel fracture. Fatigue-crack propagation tests were conducted at 427 deg. C on specimens irradiated at 2.4 dpa and 16.2 dpa. Crack growth rates at the lower exposure level were comparable to those in unirradiated material, while those at the higher exposure were slightly higher than in unirradiated material. (author)

  20. Mechanistic origin and prediction of enhanced ductility in magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaoxuan; Ahmad, Rasool; Yin, Binglun; Sandlöbes, Stefanie; Curtin, W. A.

    2018-01-01

    Development of ductile magnesium alloys is key to their use in reducing the weight of vehicles and other applications. Wu et al. tackle this issue by determining the underlying mechanisms in unprocessed magnesium alloys. Dilute amounts of solutes enhanced certain ductility-improving mechanisms over ones that cause brittle fracture. From this, the authors developed a theory that may be helpful for screening the large number of potential magnesium alloy compositions.

  1. Fracture behavior and deformation mechanisms under fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutard, J.L.; Dupouy, J.M.

    1980-09-01

    We have established the out-of-pile and in-pile deformation mechanism maps of a 316 stainless steel irradiated in a fast reactor. The knowledge of the dominating deformation mechanism either in post irradiation creep experiments or during the in-pile steady state operating conditions allows to rationalize the apparent discrepancy between the very low out-of-pile ductility and the rather high plastic diametral strains which are obtained in the fast reactor environment without fracture

  2. Effect of shrinkage porosity on mechanical properties of ferritic ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zehua

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Casting defects could largely affect the mechanical properties of casting products. A number of test pieces made of ductile iron (EN-GJS-400-18-LT with different levels of shrinkage porosity were prepared and then tensile and fatigue tests were performed to investigate the impact of shrinkage porosity on their mechanical properties. The results showed that the tensile strength decreases linearly with increasing of the shrinkage porosity. The tensile elongation decreases sharply with the increase of the shrinkage porosity mainly due to the non-uniform plastic deformation. The fatigue life also dramatically declines with increasing of the porosity and follows a power law relationship with the area percentage of porosity. The existence of the shrinkage porosity made the fatigue fracture complex. The shrinkage pores, especially those close to the surface usually became the crack initiation sites. For test pieces with less porosity, the fatigue fracture was clearly composed of crack initiation, propagation, and overloading. While for samples with high level of porosity, multiple crack initiation sites were observed.

  3. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Simulation of Solution-Treated AA 5754

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Singh, Akhilendra

    2017-10-01

    In this work, mechanical properties and fracture toughness of as-received and solution-treated aluminum alloy 5754 (AA 5754) are experimentally evaluated. Solution heat treatment of the alloy is performed at 530 °C for 2 h, and then, quenching is done in water. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, impact toughness, hardness, fatigue life, brittle fracture toughness (K_{Ic} ) and ductile fracture toughness (J_{Ic} ) are evaluated for as-received and solution-treated alloy. Extended finite element method has been used for the simulation of tensile and fracture behavior of material. Heaviside function and asymptotic crack tip enrichment functions are used for modelling of the crack in the geometry. Ramberg-Osgood material model coupled with fracture energy is used to simulate the crack propagation. Fracture surfaces obtained from various mechanical tests are characterized by scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Large-scale simulation of ductile fracture process of microstructured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Rong; Wang Chaowei

    2011-01-01

    The promise of computational science in the extreme-scale computing era is to reduce and decompose macroscopic complexities into microscopic simplicities with the expense of high spatial and temporal resolution of computing. In materials science and engineering, the direct combination of 3D microstructure data sets and 3D large-scale simulations provides unique opportunity for the development of a comprehensive understanding of nano/microstructure-property relationships in order to systematically design materials with specific desired properties. In the paper, we present a framework simulating the ductile fracture process zone in microstructural detail. The experimentally reconstructed microstructural data set is directly embedded into a FE mesh model to improve the simulation fidelity of microstructure effects on fracture toughness. To the best of our knowledge, it is for the first time that the linking of fracture toughness to multiscale microstructures in a realistic 3D numerical model in a direct manner is accomplished. (author)

  5. On localization and void coalescence as a precursor to ductile fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekoğlu, C; Hutchinson, J W; Pardoen, T

    2015-03-28

    Two modes of plastic flow localization commonly occur in the ductile fracture of structural metals undergoing damage and failure by the mechanism involving void nucleation, growth and coalescence. The first mode consists of a macroscopic localization, usually linked to the softening effect of void nucleation and growth, in either a normal band or a shear band where the thickness of the band is comparable to void spacing. The second mode is coalescence with plastic strain localizing to the ligaments between voids by an internal necking process. The ductility of a material is tied to the strain at macroscopic localization, as this marks the limit of uniform straining at the macroscopic scale. The question addressed is whether macroscopic localization occurs prior to void coalescence or whether the two occur simultaneously. The relation between these two modes of localization is studied quantitatively in this paper using a three-dimensional elastic-plastic computational model representing a doubly periodic array of voids within a band confined between two semi-infinite outer blocks of the same material but without voids. At sufficiently high stress triaxiality, a clear separation exists between the two modes of localization. At lower stress triaxialities, the model predicts that the onset of macroscopic localization and coalescence occur simultaneously. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. The important role of martensite laths to fracture toughness for the ductile fracture controlled by the strain in EA4T axle steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Yilong; Long, Shaolei; Xu, Pingwei; Lu, Yemao; Jiang, Yun; Liang, Yu; Yang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The Hall-Petch relationship was used to investigate the role of martensite lath on fracture toughness (K IC ) during ductile fracture in a low-carbon EA4T axle steel. The hierarchical structures of lath martensite was clarified by means of optical microscope (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). Firstly, in such hierarchical structures, packet size (d p ) and block size (d b ) increase significantly with the size of prior austenite (d r ), while the martensite lath width (d l ) decreases. Subsequently, K IC was measured and follows the Hall-Petch relationship with d l . It depends on the rotation, bending and direct shear during crack propagation of laths, confirmed by EBSD. Besides, fracture toughness (K IC ) is proportional to a parameter ε v , the matrix strain, which is related to the plastic deformation of laths. Therefore, the martensite lath in hierarchical structures is the effective control unit of K IC during ductile fracture controlled by the strain.

  7. The important role of martensite laths to fracture toughness for the ductile fracture controlled by the strain in EA4T axle steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yilong, E-mail: liangyilong@126.com [College of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Guizhou University (China); Guizhou key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure of Materials (China); National & Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for High-performance Metal Structure Material and Advanced Manufacturing Technology (China); Long, Shaolei; Xu, Pingwei; Lu, Yemao [College of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Guizhou University (China); Guizhou key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure of Materials (China); National & Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for High-performance Metal Structure Material and Advanced Manufacturing Technology (China); Jiang, Yun [Guizhou key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure of Materials (China); National & Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for High-performance Metal Structure Material and Advanced Manufacturing Technology (China); Liang, Yu; Yang, Ming [College of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Guizhou University (China); Guizhou key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure of Materials (China); National & Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for High-performance Metal Structure Material and Advanced Manufacturing Technology (China)

    2017-05-17

    The Hall-Petch relationship was used to investigate the role of martensite lath on fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) during ductile fracture in a low-carbon EA4T axle steel. The hierarchical structures of lath martensite was clarified by means of optical microscope (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). Firstly, in such hierarchical structures, packet size (d{sub p}) and block size (d{sub b}) increase significantly with the size of prior austenite (d{sub r}), while the martensite lath width (d{sub l}) decreases. Subsequently, K{sub IC} was measured and follows the Hall-Petch relationship with d{sub l}. It depends on the rotation, bending and direct shear during crack propagation of laths, confirmed by EBSD. Besides, fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) is proportional to a parameter ε{sub v}, the matrix strain, which is related to the plastic deformation of laths. Therefore, the martensite lath in hierarchical structures is the effective control unit of K{sub IC} during ductile fracture controlled by the strain.

  8. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  9. Phase-field modelling of ductile fracture: a variational gradient-extended plasticity-damage theory and its micromorphic regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehe, C; Teichtmeister, S; Aldakheel, F

    2016-04-28

    This work outlines a novel variational-based theory for the phase-field modelling of ductile fracture in elastic-plastic solids undergoing large strains. The phase-field approach regularizes sharp crack surfaces within a pure continuum setting by a specific gradient damage modelling. It is linked to a formulation of gradient plasticity at finite strains. The framework includes two independent length scales which regularize both the plastic response as well as the crack discontinuities. This ensures that the damage zones of ductile fracture are inside of plastic zones, and guarantees on the computational side a mesh objectivity in post-critical ranges. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. A Micromechanics-Based Elastoplastic Damage Model for Rocks with a Brittle-Ductile Transition in Mechanical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Zhu, Qi-zhi; Chen, Liang; Shao, Jian-fu; Liu, Jian

    2018-06-01

    As confining pressure increases, crystalline rocks of moderate porosity usually undergo a transition in failure mode from localized brittle fracture to diffused damage and ductile failure. This transition has been widely reported experimentally for several decades; however, satisfactory modeling is still lacking. The present paper aims at modeling the brittle-ductile transition process of rocks under conventional triaxial compression. Based on quantitative analyses of experimental results, it is found that there is a quite satisfactory linearity between the axial inelastic strain at failure and the confining pressure prescribed. A micromechanics-based frictional damage model is then formulated using an associated plastic flow rule and a strain energy release rate-based damage criterion. The analytical solution to the strong plasticity-damage coupling problem is provided and applied to simulate the nonlinear mechanical behaviors of Tennessee marble, Indiana limestone and Jinping marble, each presenting a brittle-ductile transition in stress-strain curves.

  11. Identification Damage Model for Thermomechanical Degradation of Ductile Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, A. El; Yakhloufi, M. H. El; Khamlichi, A.

    2017-05-01

    The failure of ductile materials subject to high thermal and mechanical loading rates is notably affected by material inertia. The mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation are examined with particular emphasis on the similarities and differences between cyclic crack growth in ductile materials, such as metals, and corresponding behavior in brittle materials, such as intermetallic and ceramics. Numerical simulations of crack propagation in a cylindrical specimen demonstrate that the proposed method provides an effective means to simulate ductile fracture in large scale cylindrical structures with engineering accuracy. The influence of damage on the intensity of the destruction of materials is studied as well.

  12. Effect of inclusion density on ductile fracture toughness and roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Ponson, L.; Osovski, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional calculations of ductile fracture under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitating solid with two populations of void nucleating second phase particles. Larger inclusions...... that result in void nucleation at an early stage are modeled discretely while smaller particles that require large strains to nucleate voids are homogeneously distributed. Full field solutions are obtained for eight volume fractions, ranging from 1% to 19%, of randomly distributed larger inclusions. For each...... volume fraction calculations are carried out for seven random distributions of inclusion centers. Crack growth resistance curves and fracture surface roughness statistics are calculated using standard procedures. The crack growth resistance is characterized in terms of both JIC and the tearing modulus TR...

  13. Microstructural basis and crack growth theories for post-irradiation ductility loss in Nimonic PE16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been carried out to investigate the degradation of postirradiation ductility at reactor temperatures in Nimonic PE16, a Fe-Cr-Ni-based precipitation-hardened superalloy. Fractographic and microstructural investigations show that the grain matrix is capable of deformation and does not limit the postirradiation tensile ductility. Grain-boundary helium bubbles formed during neutron irradiation seem to be crack nucleation sites under stress. Growth and coalescence of these microcracks under stress lead to intergranular fracture. A rigid-grain fracture model is shown to be able to correlate the observed microstructures with most features of the mechanical properties, except the strain rate dependence of the ductility. By incorporating the interactions between diffusion and plastic deformation, a plastic-grain fracture model has been developed which can explain all postirradiation tensile ductility data quantitatively. 13 references

  14. Application of ductile fracture assessment methods for the assessment of pressure vessels from high strength steels (HSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisele, U.; Schiedermaier, J.

    2003-01-01

    The economical and safe design of pressure vessels requires, besides others, also a detailed knowledge of the vessel failure behaviour in the case of existing imperfections or cracks. The behaviour of a cracked component under a given loading situation depends on material toughness. For ferritic steels, the material toughness is varying with temperature. At low temperature dominantly brittle fracture behaviour is observed, at high temperature the failure mode is dominantly ductile fracture. The transition between these two extremes is floating. In the case of existing or postulated cracks, the safety analysis has to be performed using fracture mechanics methods. In the lower shelf of toughness, K iC as of ASTM E 399 is the characterising value for crack initiation and immediate unstable crack extension (cleavage). In the upper shelf level the characterising value is the ''actual crack initiation toughness'' J i acc. to ISO 12135, characterising the onset of slow stable crack extension. For the transition regime in ASTM E 1921 the instability values K JC are defined, characterising cleavage failure after more or less extended ductile crack growth. The safety analysis of a component operated in the upper shelf of the material toughness, has to consider initiation as well as stable crack extension following initiation. The inclusion of any crack extension into this consideration needs to consider the influence of the constraint in front of a crack tip, leading to multiaxial stress conditions and decreasing the material crack resistance significantly. Thus, the exclusion of crack initiation needs to be proven in a first step of each safety analysis. Assessing the component in a uniform way over the relevant temperature range is possible by using initiation characteristics, which also have the advantage of transferability. A change of criterion considering initiation at the lower shelf, instability in the transition range and again initiation in the upper shelf can be

  15. Ductile fracture mechanism of low-temperature In-48Sn alloy joint under high strain rate loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Woong; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2012-04-01

    The failure behaviors of In-48Sn solder ball joints under various strain rate loadings were investigated with both experimental and finite element modeling study. The bonding force of In-48Sn solder on an Ni plated Cu pad increased with increasing shear speed, mainly due to the high strain-rate sensitivity of the solder alloy. In contrast to the cases of Sn-based Pb-free solder joints, the transition of the fracture mode from a ductile mode to a brittle mode was not observed in this solder joint system due to the soft nature of the In-48Sn alloy. This result is discussed in terms of the relationship between the strain-rate of the solder alloy, the work-hardening effect and the resulting stress concentration at the interfacial regions.

  16. Intrinsic ductility and environmental embrittlement of binary Ni3Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, E.P.; Liu, C.T.; Pope, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Polycrystalline, B-free Ni 3 Al (23.4 at.% Al), produced by cold working and recrystallizing a single crystal, exhibits room temperature tensile ductilities of 3-5% in air and 13-16% in oxygen. These ductilities are considerably higher than anything previously reported, and demonstrate that the 'intrinsic' ductility of Ni 3 Al is much higher than previously thought. They also show that the moisture present in ordinary ambient air can severely embrittle Ni 3 Al (ductility decreasing from a high of 16% in oxygen to a low of 3% in air). Fracture is predominantly intergranular in both air and oxygen. This indicates that, while moisture can further embrittle the GBs in Ni 3 Al, they persist as weak links even in the absence of environmental embrittlement. However, they are not 'intrinsically brittle' as once thought, since they can withstand relatively large plastic deformations prior to fracture. Because B essentially eliminates environmental embrittlement in Ni 3 Al - and environmental embrittlement is a major cause of poor ductility in B-free Ni 3 Al - it is concluded that a significant portion of the so-called B effect must be related to suppression of moisture-induced environmental embrittlement. However, since B-doped Ni 3 Al fractures transgranularly, whereas B-free Ni 3 Al fractures predominantly intergranularly, B must have the added effect that it strengthens the GBs. A comparison with the earlier work on Zr-doped Ni 3 Al shows that Zr improves the ductility of Ni 3 Al, both in air and (and even more dramatically) in oxygen. While the exact mechanism of this ductility improvement is not clear at present, Zr appears to have more of an effect on (enhancing) GB strength than on (suppressing) environmental embrittlement

  17. Effect of finite edge radius on ductile fracture ahead of the cutting tool edge in micro-cutting of Al2024-T3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbiah, Sathyan; Melkote, Shreyes N.

    2008-01-01

    Evidence of ductile fracture leading to material separation has been reported recently in ductile metal cutting [S. Subbiah, S.N. Melkote, ASME J. Manuf. Sci. Eng. 28(3) (2006)]. This paper investigates the effect of finite edge radius on such ductile fracture. The basic question of whether such ductile fracture occurs in the presence of a finite edge radius is explored by performing a series of experiments with inserts of different edge radii at various uncut chip thickness values ranging from 15 to 105 μm. Chip-roots are obtained in these experiments using a quick-stop device and examined in a scanning electron microscope. Clear evidence of material separation is seen at the interface zone between the chip and machined surface even when the edge radius is large compared to the uncut chip thickness. Failure is seen to occur at the upper, middle, and/or the lower edges of the interface zone. Based on these observations, a hypothesis is presented for the events leading to the occurrence of this failure when cutting with an edge radius tool. Finite element simulations are performed to study the nature of stress state ahead of the tool edge with and without edge radius. Hydrostatic stress is seen to be tensile in front of the tool and hence favors the occurrence of ductile fracture leading to material separation. The stress components are, however lower than those seen with a sharp tool

  18. Deformation localization at the tips of shear fractures: An analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Santanu

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical heterogeneities are important features in rocks which trigger deformation localization in brittle, ductile or brittle-ductile modes during deformation. In a recent study Misra et al. (2009) have investigated these different processes of deformation localization at the tips of pre-existing planar shear fractures. The authors identified four mechanisms of deformation, ranging from brittle to ductile, operating at the crack tips. Mechanism A: brittle deformation is the dominant process that forms a pair of long tensile fractures at the two crack tips. Mechanism B: nature of deformation is mixed where the tensile fractures grow to a finite length with incipient plastic deformation at the tips. Mechanism C: mixed mode deformation characterized by dominating macro-scale shear bands, and short, opened-out tensile fissures. Mechanism D: localization of plastic bands in the form of a pair of shear bands at each tip without any discernible brittle fracturing. The transition of the mechanisms is a function of orientation ( α) of the crack with respect to the bulk compression direction and the finite length ( l) of the crack. The aim of this study is to present a theoretical analysis to account for the variability of deformation localization in the vicinity of pre-existing shear cracks considering an elastic-plastic rheological model. The analysis calculates the principal tensile stress ( σ1) and the second stress invariant ( I2) of the stress field at the fracture tip to explain the transition from Mechanism A (tensile fracturing) to Mechanism D (ductile strain). The results show that σ1 at the fracture tip increases non-linearly with increasing α and Ar (aspect ratio of the shear crack), and assumes a large value when α > 50 o, promoting tensile fractures. On the other hand, I2 is a maximum at α < 45°, resulting in nucleation of ductile shear bands.

  19. Multi-scale modeling of ductile failure in metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardoen, Th.; Scheyvaerts, F.; Simar, A.; Tekoglu, C.; Onck, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-mechanical models for ductile failure have been developed in the seventies and eighties essentially to address cracking in structural applications and complement the fracture mechanics approach. Later, this approach has become attractive for physical metallurgists interested by the prediction of failure during forming operations and as a guide for the design of more ductile and/or high-toughness microstructures. Nowadays, a realistic treatment of damage evolution in complex metallic microstructures is becoming feasible when sufficiently sophisticated constitutive laws are used within the context of a multilevel modelling strategy. The current understanding and the state of the art models for the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids are reviewed with a focus on the underlying physics. Considerations are made about the introduction of the different length scales associated with the microstructure and damage process. Two applications of the methodology are then described to illustrate the potential of the current models. The first application concerns the competition between intergranular and transgranular ductile fracture in aluminum alloys involving soft precipitate free zones along the grain boundaries. The second application concerns the modeling of ductile failure in friction stir welded joints, a problem which also involves soft and hard zones, albeit at a larger scale. (authors)

  20. Development of Numerical Analysis Techniques Based on Damage Mechanics and Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon Suk; Lee, Dock Jin; Choi, Shin Beom; Kim, Sun Hye; Cho, Doo Ho; Lee, Hyun Boo

    2010-04-01

    The scatter of measured fracture toughness data and transferability problems among different crack configurations as well as geometry and loading conditions are major obstacles for application of fracture mechanics. To address these issues, recently, concerns on the local approach employing reliable micro-mechanical damage models are being increased again in connection with a progress of computational technology. In the present research, as part of development of fracture mechanical evaluation model for material degradation of reactor pressure boundary, several investigations on fracture behaviors were carried out. Especially, a numerical scheme to determine key parameters consisting both cleavage and ductile fracture estimate models was changed efficiently by incorporating a genetic algorithm. Also, with regard to the well-known master curve, newly reported methods such as bimodal master curve, randomly inhomogeneous master curve and single point estimation were reviewed to deal with homogeneous and inhomogeneous material characteristics. A series of preliminary finite element analyses was conducted to examine the element size effect on micro-mechanical models. Then, a new thickness correction equation was derived from parametric three-dimensional numerical simulations, which was founded on the current test standard, ASTM E1921, but could lead to get more realistic fracture toughness values. As a result, promising modified master curves as well as fracture toughness diagrams to convert data between pre-cracked V-notched and compact tension specimens were generated. Moreover, a user-subroutine in relation to GTN(Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) model was made by adopting Hill's 48 yield potential theory. By applying GTN model combined with the subroutine to small punch specimens, the effect of inhomogeneous properties on fracture behaviors of miniature specimens was confirmed. Therefore, it is anticipated that the aforementioned enhanced research results can be utilized

  1. Relationships between fracture toughness and other material properties. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perra, M.; Finnie, I.

    1974-01-01

    The key experimental and analytical studies which have led to our present understanding of the mechanisms of ductile fracture are reviewed. It is concluded that insufficient progress has been made in the quantitative description of ductile separation mechanisms on a microscale to allow the realistic prediction of fracture toughness from material properties and microstructure. An experimental study of ductile fracture is underway which has the aim of determining the growth rate of voids in known plastic deformation fields as a function of triaxiality of stress and material work-hardening. Novel specimens of particularly well characterized microstructure are utilized

  2. Consistent stress-strain ductile fracture model as applied to two grades of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priddy, T.G.; Benzley, S.E.; Ford, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    Published yield and ultimate biaxial stress and strain data for two grades of beryllium are correlated with a more complete method of characterizing macroscopic strain at fracture initiation in ductile materials. Results are compared with those obtained from an exponential, mean stress dependent, model. Simple statistical methods are employed to illustrate the degree of correlation for each method with the experimental data

  3. Finite element simulations and experimental investigations on ductile fracture in cold forging of aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Amir; Nikpour, Amin; Saraeian, Payam

    2018-05-01

    Forging is one of the manufacturing processes of aluminium parts which has two major categories: called hot and cold forging. In the cold forging, the dimensional and geometrical accuracy of final part is high. However, fracture may occur in some aluminium alloys during the process because of less workability. Fracture in cold forging can be in the form of ductile, brittle or combination of both depending on the alloy type. There are several criteria for predicting fracture in cold forging. In this study, cold forging process of 6063 aluminium alloy for three different parts is simulated in order to predict fracture. The results of numerical simulations of Freudenthal criterion is in conformity with experimental tests.

  4. Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Metallic Glass Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şopu, D; Foroughi, A; Stoica, M; Eckert, J

    2016-07-13

    When reducing the size of metallic glass samples down to the nanoscale regime, experimental studies on the plasticity under uniaxial tension show a wide range of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Simulations on the deformation behavior of nanoscaled metallic glasses report an unusual extended strain softening and are not able to reproduce the brittle-like fracture deformation as found in experiments. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations we provide an atomistic understanding of the deformation mechanisms of metallic glass nanowires and differentiate the extrinsic size effects and aspect ratio contribution to plasticity. A model for predicting the critical nanowire aspect ratio for the ductile-to-brittle transition is developed. Furthermore, the structure of brittle nanowires can be tuned to a softer phase characterized by a defective short-range order and an excess free volume upon systematic structural rejuvenation, leading to enhanced tensile ductility. The presented results shed light on the fundamental deformation mechanisms of nanoscaled metallic glasses and demarcate ductile and catastrophic failure.

  5. Interpreting Fracture Patterns in Sandstones Interbedded with Ductile Strata at the Salt Valley Anticline, Arches National Park, Utah; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LORENZ, JOHN C.; COOPER, SCOTT P.

    2001-01-01

    Sandstones that overlie or that are interbedded with evaporitic or other ductile strata commonly contain numerous localized domains of fractures, each covering an area of a few square miles. Fractures within the Entrada Sandstone at the Salt Valley Anticline are associated with salt mobility within the underlying Paradox Formation. The fracture relationships observed at Salt Valley (along with examples from Paleozoic strata at the southern edge of the Holbrook basin in northeastern Arizona, and sandstones of the Frontier Formation along the western edge of the Green River basin in southwestern Wyoming), show that although each fracture domain may contain consistently oriented fractures, the orientations and patterns of the fractures vary considerably from domain to domain. Most of the fracture patterns in the brittle sandstones are related to local stresses created by subtle, irregular flexures resulting from mobility of the associated, interbedded ductile strata (halite or shale). Sequential episodes of evaporite dissolution and/or mobility in different directions can result in multiple, superimposed fracture sets in the associated sandstones. Multiple sets of superimposed fractures create reservoir-quality fracture interconnectivity within restricted localities of a formation. However, it is difficult to predict the orientations and characteristics of this type of fracturing in the subsurface. This is primarily because the orientations and characteristics of these fractures typically have little relationship to the regional tectonic stresses that might be used to predict fracture characteristics prior to drilling. Nevertheless, the high probability of numerous, intersecting fractures in such settings attests to the importance of determining fracture orientations in these types of fractured reservoirs

  6. Statistical evaluation of fracture characteristics of RPV steels in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa

    1998-01-01

    The statistical analysis method was applied to the evaluation of fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region. Because cleavage fracture in steel is of a statistical nature, fracture toughness data or values show a similar statistical trend. Using the three-parameter Weibull distribution, a fracture toughness vs. temperature curve (K-curve) was directly generated from a set of fracture toughness data at a selected temperature. Charpy V-notch impact energy was also used to obtain the K-curve by a K IC -CVN (Charpy V-notch energy) correlation. Furthermore, this method was applied to evaluate the neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel(RPV) steel. Most of the fracture toughness data were within the 95 percent confidence limits. The prediction of a transition temperature shift by statistical analysis was compared with that from the experimental data. (author)

  7. Interpreting Fracture Patterns in Sandstones Interbedded with Ductile Strata at the Salt Valley Anticline, Arches National Park, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, John C.; Cooper, Scott P.

    2001-01-01

    Sandstones that overlie or that are interbedded with evaporitic or other ductile strata commonly contain numerous localized domains of fractures, each covering an area of a few square miles. Fractures within the Entrada Sandstone at the Salt Valley Anticline are associated with salt mobility within the underlying Paradox Formation. The fracture relationships observed at Salt Valley (along with examples from Paleozoic strata at the southern edge of the Holbrook basin in northeastern Arizona, a...

  8. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, I.; Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Maldonado, C.; Cabrera, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Effect of boron on the hot ductility behavior of a low carbon NiCrVCu AHSS. → Boron addition of 117 ppm improves hot ductility over 100% in terms of RA. → Hot ductility improvement is associated with segregation/precipitation of boron. → Typical hot ductility recovery at lower temperatures does not appear in this steel. → Hot ductility loss is associated with precipitates/inclusions coupled with voids. - Abstract: The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s -1 . Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless, both steels showed poor ductility when tested at the lowest temperatures (650, 750 and 800 deg. C), and such behavior is associated to the precipitation of vanadium carbides/nitrides and inclusions, particularly MnS and CuS particles. The fracture mode of the low carbon advanced high strength steel microalloyed with boron seems to be more ductile than the steel without boron addition. Furthermore, the fracture surfaces of specimens tested at temperatures showing the highest ductility (900 and 1000 deg. C) indicate that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, while in the region of poor ductility the fracture mode is of the ductile-brittle type failure. It was shown that precipitates and/or inclusions coupled with voids play a meaningful role on the crack nucleation mechanism which in turn causes a hot ductility loss. Likewise, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) which always results in restoration of ductility only occurs in the range from 900 to 1000 deg. C. Results are discussed in terms of boron segregation towards

  9. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, I., E-mail: imejia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Maldonado, C. [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Cabrera, J.M. [Departament de Ciencia dels Materials i Enginyeria Metal.lurgica, ETSEIB - Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. de las Bases de Manresa 1, 08240 Manresa (Spain)

    2011-05-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Effect of boron on the hot ductility behavior of a low carbon NiCrVCu AHSS. {yields} Boron addition of 117 ppm improves hot ductility over 100% in terms of RA. {yields} Hot ductility improvement is associated with segregation/precipitation of boron. {yields} Typical hot ductility recovery at lower temperatures does not appear in this steel. {yields} Hot ductility loss is associated with precipitates/inclusions coupled with voids. - Abstract: The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s{sup -1}. Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless, both steels showed poor ductility when tested at the lowest temperatures (650, 750 and 800 deg. C), and such behavior is associated to the precipitation of vanadium carbides/nitrides and inclusions, particularly MnS and CuS particles. The fracture mode of the low carbon advanced high strength steel microalloyed with boron seems to be more ductile than the steel without boron addition. Furthermore, the fracture surfaces of specimens tested at temperatures showing the highest ductility (900 and 1000 deg. C) indicate that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, while in the region of poor ductility the fracture mode is of the ductile-brittle type failure. It was shown that precipitates and/or inclusions coupled with voids play a meaningful role on the crack nucleation mechanism which in turn causes a hot ductility loss. Likewise, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) which always results in restoration of ductility only occurs in the range from 900 to 1000 deg. C. Results are discussed in terms of

  10. Irradiation effects on tensile ductility and dynamic toughness of ferritic-martensitic 7-12 Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preininger, D.

    2006-01-01

    The superimposed effect of irradiation-induced hardening by small defects (clusters, dislocation loops) and chromium-rich - precipitate formations on tensile ductility and Charpy-impact behaviour of various ferritic-martensitic (7-13)CrWVTa(Ti)-RAFM steels have been examined by micro-mechanical deformation and ductile/dynamic fracture models. Analytical relations have been deduced describing irradiation-induced changes of uniform ductility and fracture strain as well as ductile-to-brittle transition temperature DBTT and ductile upper shelf energy USE observed from impact tests. The models apply work-hardening with competitive action of relevant dislocation multiplication and annihilation reactions. The impact model takes into account stress intensity with local plasticity and fracture within the damage zone of main crack. Especially, the influences of radiation-induced changes in ductile and dynamic fracture stresses have been considered together with effects from strain rate sensitivity of strength, precipitate morphology as mean size dp and volume fraction fv as well as deformation temperature and strain rate. For these, particularly the correlation between tensile ductility and impact properties have been examined. Strengthening by clusters and loops generally reduces uniform ductility, and more stronger fracture strain as well as ductile upper shelf energy USE and additionally increases DBTT for constant fracture stresses. A superimposed precipitation hardening by formation of 3-6 nm, f v 6 nm, which clear above the sharable limit of coherent precipitates increases with increasing fraction fv and but strongly reduces with increasing matrix strength due to full martensitic structure, higher C, N alloying contents and pronounced hardening by irradiation-induced cluster and loop formations. A combined increase of fracture stresses due to irradiation-induced changes of the grain boundary structure diminishes the strength-induced increase in DBTT and more stronger

  11. Application of fracture toughness scaling models to the ductile-to- brittle transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, R.E.; Joyce, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition range was conducted. A large number of ASTM A533, Grade B steel, bend and tension specimens with varying crack lengths were tested throughout the transition region. Cleavage fracture toughness scaling models were utilized to correct the data for the loss of constraint in short crack specimens and tension geometries. The toughness scaling models were effective in reducing the scatter in the data, but tended to over-correct the results for the short crack bend specimens. A proposed ASTM Test Practice for Fracture Toughness in the Transition Range, which employs a master curve concept, was applied to the results. The proposed master curve over predicted the fracture toughness in the mid-transition and a modified master curve was developed that more accurately modeled the transition behavior of the material. Finally, the modified master curve and the fracture toughness scaling models were combined to predict the as-measured fracture toughness of the short crack bend and the tension specimens. It was shown that when the scaling models over correct the data for loss of constraint, they can also lead to non-conservative estimates of the increase in toughness for low constraint geometries

  12. Ductile-phase toughening in V-V3Si in situ composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshall, G.; Strum, M.J.; Bewlay, B.P.; Sutliff, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the room-temperature fracture behavior of ductile-phase-toughened V-V 3 Si in situ composites that were produced by arc melting (AM), cold-crucible induction melting (IM), and cold-crucible directional solidification (DS). Composites were produced containing a wide range of microstructures, interstitial impurity contents, and volume fractions of the ductile V-Si solid solution phase, denoted (V). The fracture toughness of these composites generally increases as the volume fraction of (V) increases, but is strongly influenced by the microstructure, the mechanical properties of the component phases, and the crystallographic orientation of the (V) phase with respect to the maximum principal stress direction. For eutectic composites that have a (V) volume fraction of about 50 pct, the fracture toughness increases with decreasing ''''effective'''' interstitial impurity concentration, [I] = [N] + 1.33 [O] + 9 [H]. As [I] decreases from 1,400 ppm (AM) to 400 ppm (IM), the fracture toughness of the eutectic composites increases from 10 to 20 MPa √m. Further, the fracture toughness of the DS eutectic composites is greater when the crack propagation direction is perpendicular, rather than parallel, to the composite growth direction. These results are discussed in light of conventional ductile-phase bridging theories, which alone cannot fully explain the fracture toughness of V-Si in situ composites

  13. On the notch ductility of a magnesium-rare earth alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondori, B., E-mail: bkondori.13034@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Benzerga, A.A. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The room-temperature notch ductility of magnesium-rare earth alloy WE43 is investigated for two loading orientations. This material is endowed with quasi-isotropic plastic flow properties, higher strength and similar uniaxial ductility in comparison with other commercially available Mg alloys. The authors have recently shown that the notch ductility of a Mg–Al–Zn alloy is greater than its uniaxial ductility over a wide range of notch geometries. This paper investigates whether the same trends hold for WE43, discusses the orientation dependence of ductility and the propensity for intergranular fracture at high levels of hydrostatic tension. The latter mode of fracture is analyzed by means of detailed fractography in order to elucidate the role of grain-boundary particles and precipitates in the fracture process.

  14. Multiscale modeling of ductile failure in metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardoen, Thomas; Scheyvaerts, Florence; Simar, Aude; Tekoğlu, Cihan; Onck, Patrick R.

    2010-04-01

    Micromechanical models for ductile failure have been developed in the 1970s and 1980s essentially to address cracking in structural applications and complement the fracture mechanics approach. Later, this approach has become attractive for physical metallurgists interested by the prediction of failure during forming operations and as a guide for the design of more ductile and/or high-toughness microstructures. Nowadays, a realistic treatment of damage evolution in complex metallic microstructures is becoming feasible when sufficiently sophisticated constitutive laws are used within the context of a multilevel modelling strategy. The current understanding and the state of the art models for the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids are reviewed with a focus on the underlying physics. Considerations are made about the introduction of the different length scales associated with the microstructure and damage process. Two applications of the methodology are then described to illustrate the potential of the current models. The first application concerns the competition between intergranular and transgranular ductile fracture in aluminum alloys involving soft precipitate free zones along the grain boundaries. The second application concerns the modeling of ductile failure in friction stir welded joints, a problem which also involves soft and hard zones, albeit at a larger scale.

  15. Implications of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field to the PCI stress corrosion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1980-01-01

    Fractographic observations on irradiated Zircaloy cladding stress corrosion fracture surfaces are considered against the background of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field. Dimples have been observed on the fracture surfaces of failed cladding, even though the cracks in metallographic sections are tight, i.e., crack propagation is associated with a low crack tip opening angle. This result is interpreted as providing evidence for an environmentally assisted ductile mode of fracture. The presence of this fracture mode forms the basis of an argument, which adds further support for the view that power ramp stress corrosion cladding failures are caused by stress concentrations that produce stress gradients in the cladding. (orig.)

  16. Hot ductility behavior of boron microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Chipres, E.; Mejia, I.; Maldonado, C.; Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Cabrera, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The current study analyses the influence of boron contents (between 29 and 105 ppm) on the hot ductility of boron microalloyed steels. For this purpose, hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (700, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s -1 . In general, results revealed an improvement of the hot ductility of steels at increasing boron content. At 700, 900 and 1000 deg. C the ductility is higher than at 800 deg. C, where boron microalloyed steels exhibit a region of ductility loss (trough region). Likewise, dynamic recrystallization only occurred at 900 and 1000 deg. C. The fracture surfaces of the tested steels at temperatures giving the high temperature ductility regime show that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, whereas it is ductile-brittle failure in the trough region. Results are discussed in terms of dynamic recrystallization and boron segregation towards austenite grain boundaries, which may retard the formation of pro-eutectoid ferrite and increase grain boundary cohesion

  17. Influence of side-groove root radius on the ductile fracture toughness of miniature C(T) specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.; Scibetta, M.

    2009-05-15

    The use of miniature C(T) specimens, MC(T), for fracture toughness measurements in the upper shelf regime has been investigated at SCK-CEN since 2004, in the framework of the Electrabel/Tractebel SCK-CEN Convention (now General Framework Agreement SUEZ-SCK-CEN). This geometry has been used and validated on both unirradiated (2004-05) and irradiated (2006) materials, mainly reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. While side-grooved MC(T) specimens have shown in all conditions a systematically lower tearing resistance and ductile crack initiation toughness as compared to standard-size 1TC(T) samples, the only plain-sided MC(T) specimen tested in 2005 exhibited very high ductile fracture toughness, thus pointing at a strong influence of side-grooving on the upper shelf properties of MC(T) specimens. This study investigates the influence of side-grooving on the initiation toughness and tearing resistance of MC(T) specimens, as a function of the root radius of the side-groove (ranging from 0.1 to 1 mm) and in comparison with plain-sided MC(T) and reference 1TC(T) samples. The material used is the well characterized DIN 22NiMoCr37 RPV steel, which had been used in the European project which generated the famous EURO fracture toughness data set.

  18. Mechanisms and mechanics of porosity formation in ductile iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Perzyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage defects in ductile iron castings can be of two basic types: shrinkage cavities associated with the liquid contraction prior to the expansion period of the iron as well as the porosity, which may appear even if the liquid shrinkage is fully compensated. In the present paper two possible mechanisms of the porosity are presented and analyzed. The first one is the Karsay’s mechanism based on the secondary shrinkage concept. The second one is the mechanism acting during the expansion period of the iron, first suggested by Ohnaka and co-authors and essentially modified by the present authors. The mechanical interactions between casting and mould are determined for the both mechanisms. Their analysis leads to the conclusion, that porosity forms during expansion period of the melt. The direct cause is the negative pressure which appears in the central part of the casting due to the differences in expansion coefficients of the fast cooling surface layer and slow cooling inner region. Observations concerning feeding behavior of ductile iron castings, based on this mechanism, agree well with industrial practice. The secondary shrinkage is not only needless to induce the porosity, but the corresponding mechanism of its occurrence, proposed by Karsay, does not seem to be valid.

  19. A fracture mechanics study of tungsten failure under high heat flux loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Muyuan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of fusion devices is highly dependent on plasma-facing components. Tungsten is the most promising candidate material for armors in plasma-facing components in ITER and DEMO. However, the brittleness of tungsten below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is very critical to the reliability of plasma-facing components. In this work, thermo-mechanical and fracture behaviors of tungsten are predicted numerically under fusion relevant thermal loadings.

  20. Ductile failure analysis of API X65 pipes with notch-type defects using a local fracture criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang-Kyun; Kim, Yun-Jae; Baek, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Young-Pyo; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2007-01-01

    A local failure criterion for API X65 steel is applied to predict ductile failure of full-scale API X65 pipes with simulated corrosion and gouge defects under internal pressure. The local failure criterion is the stress-modified fracture strain as a function of the stress triaxiality (defined by the ratio of the hydrostatic stress to the effective stress). Based on detailed finite element (FE) analyses with the proposed local failure criterion, burst pressures of defective pipes are estimated and compared with experimental data. For pipes with simulated corrosion defects, FE analysis with the proposed local fracture criterion indicates that predicted failure takes place after the defective pipes attain maximum loads for all cases, possibly due to the fact that the material has sufficient ductility. For pipes with simulated gouge defects, on the other hand, it is found that predicted failure takes place before global instability, and the predicted burst pressures are in good agreement with experimental data, providing confidence in the present approach

  1. An investigation of ductile and brittle reinforcement on the fracture behavior of molybdenum disilicide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, D.; Soboyejo, W.O.

    1994-01-01

    The results of an ongoing study of the effects of ductile and brittle reinforcement on the fracture toughness of particulate reinforced molybdenum disilicide matrix composites are presented. MoSi 2 composites reinforced with ductile Nb, Mo, and W particles are compared with MoSi 2 composites reinforced with SiC, TiB 2 , and partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) particles. The effects of different degrees of yttria stabilization on zirconia reinforced composites will also be examined, as well as the effect of solid solution alloying with WSi 2 . The effects of multiple reinforcement of MoSi 2 with 20 vol.% Nb and 20 vol.% unstabilized zirconia (TZ-0) are discussed. The toughening is rationalized using micromechanical models for crack bridging, transformation toughening, and crack deflection

  2. High-temperature fracture and fatigue resistance of a ductile β-TiNb reinforced γ-TiAl intermetallic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.T.V.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1998-01-01

    The high-temperature fatigue-crack propagation and fracture resistance of a model γ-TiAl intermetallic composite reinforced with 20 vol. % ductile β-TiNb particles is examined at elevated temperatures of 650 and 800 C and compared with behavior at room temperature. TiNb reinforcements are found to enhance the fracture toughness of γ-TiAl, even at high temperatures, from about 123 to ∼40 MPa m 1/2 , although their effectiveness is lower compared to room temperature due to the reduction in strength of TiNb particles. Under monotonic loading, crack-growth response in the composite is characterized by resistance-curve behavior arising from crack trapping, renucleation and resultant crack bridging effects attributable to the presence of TiNb particles. In addition, crack-tip blunting associated with plasticity increases the crack-initiation (matrix) toughness of the composite, particularly at 800 C, above the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) for γ-TiAl. High-temperature fatigue-crack growth resistance, however, is marginally degraded by the addition of TiNb particles in the C-R (edge) orientation, similar to observations made at room temperature; premature fatigue failure of TiNb ligaments in the crack wake diminishes the role of bridging under cyclic loading. Both fatigue and fracture resistance of the composite are slightly lower at 650 C (just below the DBTT for TiAl) compared to the behavior at ambient and 800 C. Overall, the beneficial effect of adding ductile TiNb reinforcements to enhance the room-temperature fracture and fatigue resistance of γ-TiAl alloys is retained up to 800 C, in air environments. There is concern, however, regarding the long-term environmental stability of these composite microstructures in unprotected atmospheres

  3. Determination of slip systems and their relation to the high ductility and fracture toughness of the B2 DyCu intermetallic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, G.H.; Shechtman, D.; Wu, D.M.; Becker, A.T.; Chumbley, L.S.; Lograsso, T.A.; Russell, A.M.; Gschneidner, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    DyCu single crystals with CsCl-type B2 structure were tensile tested at room temperature. Slip trace analysis shows that the primary slip system in DyCu with a tensile axis orientation of is {1 1 0} and the critical resolved shear stress for {1 1 0} slip is 18 MPa. Slip traces were also observed from a secondary slip system, {1 1 0} , and this slip system appears to be a key contributor to the previously reported high ductility and high fracture toughness of polycrystalline DyCu. Transmission electron microscopy determinations of the Burgers vectors of dislocations in tensile tested specimens revealed and dislocations, with -type dislocations being more abundant. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the mechanical properties of DyCu and the large family of ductile rare earth B2 intermetallics are discussed

  4. The fracture behavior of twinned Cu nanowires: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jiapeng, E-mail: sun.jiap@gmail.com [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Fang, Liang [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China); Ma, Aibin, E-mail: aibin-ma@hhu.edu.cn [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Jiang, Jinghua [College of Mechanics and Materials, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Han, Ying [Key Laboratory of Advanced Structural Materials, Ministry of Education, Changchun University of Technology, Changchun 130012, Jilin Province (China); Chen, Huawei [Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China); Han, Jing [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-05-14

    The molecular dynamics simulations are performed to explore the fracture behavior and the ductility of the twinned Cu nanowires containing orthogonally oriented growth CTBs due to the uniaxial tensile deformation. The results reveal that, the fracture behavior and the ductility of the twinned nanowires are not related to the length of the nanowires but also intensively related to the twin boundary spacing. When the twin boundary space is changed, the twinned nanowires undergo three distinct failure modes which include ductile fracture, brittle fracture and ductile-to-brittle transition depending on the length of the nanowires. We also find a reduction in the ductility of the twinned nanowires, which is ascribed to the deformation localization induced by the Lomer dislocation and the rapid necking resulted from the twinning partial slipping. Finally, the atomic-level process that occurs during deformation until final fracture are examined in detail, and a new formation mechanism of the Lomer dislocation is observed when a 90° partial dislocation transmits across a coherent twin boundary.

  5. The fracture behavior of twinned Cu nanowires: A molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jiapeng; Fang, Liang; Ma, Aibin; Jiang, Jinghua; Han, Ying; Chen, Huawei; Han, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulations are performed to explore the fracture behavior and the ductility of the twinned Cu nanowires containing orthogonally oriented growth CTBs due to the uniaxial tensile deformation. The results reveal that, the fracture behavior and the ductility of the twinned nanowires are not related to the length of the nanowires but also intensively related to the twin boundary spacing. When the twin boundary space is changed, the twinned nanowires undergo three distinct failure modes which include ductile fracture, brittle fracture and ductile-to-brittle transition depending on the length of the nanowires. We also find a reduction in the ductility of the twinned nanowires, which is ascribed to the deformation localization induced by the Lomer dislocation and the rapid necking resulted from the twinning partial slipping. Finally, the atomic-level process that occurs during deformation until final fracture are examined in detail, and a new formation mechanism of the Lomer dislocation is observed when a 90° partial dislocation transmits across a coherent twin boundary

  6. A diffraction based study of the deformation mechanisms in anomalously ductile B2 intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Rupalee Prashant

    For many decades, the brittle nature of most intermetallic compounds (e.g. NiAl) has been the limiting factor in their practical application. Many B2 (CsCl prototypical structure) intermetallics are known to exhibit slip on the {110} slip mode, which provides only 3 independent slip systems and, hence, is unable to satisfy the von Mises (a.k.a. Taylor) criterion for polycrystalline ductility. As a result, inherent polycrystalline ductility is unexpected. Recent discovery of a number of ductile B2 intermetallics has raised questions about possible violation of the von Mises criterion by these alloys. These ductile intermetallic compounds are MR (metal (M) combined with a rare earth metal or group IV refractory metal (R)) alloys and are stoichiometric, ordered compounds. Single crystal slip trace analyses have only identified the presence of {011} or {010} slip systems. More than 100 other B2 MR compounds are known to exist and many of them have already been shown to be ductile (e.g., CuY, AgY, CuDy, CoZr, CoTi, etc.). Furthermore, these alloys exhibit a large Bauschinger effect. The present work uses several diffraction based techniques including electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in-situ neutron diffraction; in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), mechanical testing, and crystal plasticity modeling, to elucidate the reason for ductility in select B2 alloys, explore the spread of this ductility over the B2 family, and understand the Bauschinger effect in these alloys. Several possible explanations (e.g., slip of dislocations, strong texture, phase transformations and twinning) for the anomalous ductility were explored. An X-ray diffraction based analysis ruled out texture, phase purity and departure from order as explanations for the anomalous ductility in MR alloys. In-situ neutron diffraction and post deformation SEM, EBSD, and TEM were unable to detect any evidence for

  7. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for the life extension estimate of the high flux isotope reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    The state of the vessel steel embrittlement as a result of neutron irradiation can be measured by its increase in the nil ductility temperature (NDT). This temperature is sometimes referred to as the brittle-ductile transition temperature (DBT) for fracture. The life extension of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel is calculated by using the method of fracture mechanics. A new method of fracture probability calculation is presented in this paper. The fracture probability as a result of the hydrostatic pressure test (hydrotest) is used to determine the life of the vessel. The hydrotest is performed in order to determine a safe vessel static pressure. It is then followed by using fracture mechanics to project the safe reactor operation time from the time of the satisfactory hydrostatic test. The life extension calculation provides the following information on the remaining life of the reactor as a function of the NDT increase: (1) the life of the vessel is determined by the probability of vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest at several hydrotest pressures and vessel embrittlement conditions, (2) the hydrotest time interval vs the NDT increase rate, and (3) the hydrotest pressure vs the NDT increase rate. It is understood that the use of a complete range of uncertainties of the NDT increase is equivalent to the entire range of radiation damage that can be experienced by the vessel steel. From the numerical values for the probabilities of the vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest, it is estimated that the reactor vessel life can be extended up to 50 EFPY (100 MW) with the minimum vessel operating temperature equal to 85 degrees F

  8. Dynamic fracture toughness and evaluation of fracture in a ferritic nodular cast iron for casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasunaka, T.; Nakano, K.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of loading rate and temperature on fracture toughness of a ferritic nodular cast iron obtained from a thick-walled cylindrical casting has been investigated. Based upon this result, the cast iron is evaluated as a material for casks. (1) In the ductile fracture region, fracture toughness increases with increases in loading rate. (2) Ductile-brittle transition temperature is linearly related to the logarithm of stress intensity rate. (3) In the ductile fracture region, converted plain strain fracture toughness divided by yield stress can be adopted as a material constant which is independent of loading rate and temperature. From the result of a static fracture toughness test, the evaluation of fracture in high loading rate can be made. (4) In the ductile fracture region of the material investigated, the maximum allowable flaw depth exceeded the minimum detectable flaw size by a nondestructive inspection. Ferritic nodular cast iron can be used as a material for casks in the ductile fracture region at least. (J.P.N.)

  9. The feasibility of prefatigued sub size specimens to fracture mechanical studies in inert and in reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toivonen, A.; Moilanen, P.; Taehtinen, S.; Aaltonen, P.; Wallin, K.

    1998-01-01

    The feasibility of sub size specimens to fracture mechanical tests in inert and in reactor environment is studied in this paper. The need for using sub size specimens has arised from the need to study highly irradiated materials as well as to study localised stress corrosion cracking, i.e. stress corrosion cracking in very narrow heat affected zones for example in welded thin walled pipes. This paper focuses on the effects of high J-integral values on ductile tearing and on environmentally assisted crack growth rate. The main focus is on the stress corrosion tests. The subject is approached first by theoretical discussion. The experimental study consists of J-R tests in air and of slow J-R tests in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) environment. In most cases the tests were continued until the J-integral level was significantly above the maximum allowable J values for ductile fracture toughness characterisation prescribed in test standards. The results indicate that the measurement capacity of the specimens depends on the specimen dimensions in J-R tests in air, as could be expected. The measurement capacity limitations are not necessarily important in stress corrosion testing as the environmentally assisted crack growth rate can be measured even without exceeding the J-integral limits given in J-R standards. The theoretical and experimental studies indicate that stress corrosion studies are not limited to linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, but elastic plastic fracture mechanics is applicable as well. (author)

  10. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 Grade B Plate materials, data analysis. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study on one heat of A302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in tests made on recent production materials of A533 grade B and A508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A302 grade B steels or unique to that particular plate. Seven heats of modified A302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A533 grade B steel were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550F. Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, 1T, 2T, and 4T). The fracture mechanics-based evaluation method covered three test orientations and three test temperatures (80, 400, and 550F). However, the coverage of these variables was contingent upon the amount of material provided. Drop-weight NDT temperature was determined for the T-L orientation only. None of the heats of modified A302 grade B showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550F produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and curve fits were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume deals with the evaluation of data and the discussion of technical findings. 8 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 Grade B Plate materials, data analysis. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study on one heat of A302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in tests made on recent production materials of A533 grade B and A508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A302 grade B steels or unique to that particular plate. Seven heats of modified A302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A533 grade B steel were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550F. Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, 1T, 2T, and 4T). The fracture mechanics-based evaluation method covered three test orientations and three test temperatures (80, 400, and 550F). However, the coverage of these variables was contingent upon the amount of material provided. Drop-weight NDT temperature was determined for the T-L orientation only. None of the heats of modified A302 grade B showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550F produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and curve fits were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume deals with the evaluation of data and the discussion of technical findings. 8 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  13. Effect of the build orientation on the mechanical properties and fracture modes of SLM Ti–6Al–4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonelli, M., E-mail: M.Simonelli@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Tse, Y.Y. [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Tuck, C. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-20

    Recent research on the additive manufacturing (AM) of Ti alloys has shown that the mechanical properties of the parts are affected by the characteristic microstructure that originates from the AM process. To understand the effect of the microstructure on the tensile properties, selective laser melted (SLM) Ti–6Al–4V samples built in three different orientations were tensile tested. The investigated samples were near fully dense, in two distinct conditions, as-built and stress relieved. It was found that the build orientation affects the tensile properties, and in particular the ductility of the samples. The mechanical anisotropy of the parts was discussed in relation to the crystallographic texture, phase composition and the predominant fracture mechanisms. Fractography and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) results indicate that the predominant fracture mechanism is intergranular fracture present along the grain boundaries and thus provide and explain the typical fracture surface features observed in fracture AM Ti–6Al–4V.

  14. Effect of the build orientation on the mechanical properties and fracture modes of SLM Ti–6Al–4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonelli, M.; Tse, Y.Y.; Tuck, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on the additive manufacturing (AM) of Ti alloys has shown that the mechanical properties of the parts are affected by the characteristic microstructure that originates from the AM process. To understand the effect of the microstructure on the tensile properties, selective laser melted (SLM) Ti–6Al–4V samples built in three different orientations were tensile tested. The investigated samples were near fully dense, in two distinct conditions, as-built and stress relieved. It was found that the build orientation affects the tensile properties, and in particular the ductility of the samples. The mechanical anisotropy of the parts was discussed in relation to the crystallographic texture, phase composition and the predominant fracture mechanisms. Fractography and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) results indicate that the predominant fracture mechanism is intergranular fracture present along the grain boundaries and thus provide and explain the typical fracture surface features observed in fracture AM Ti–6Al–4V

  15. Hot ductility of medium carbon steel with vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Park, Jun-Young; Chung, JunHo; Park, Dae-Bum; Jang, Jin-Young; Huh, Sungyul; Ju Kim, Sung; Kang, Jun-Yun; Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Hot ductility of medium carbon steel containing 0.52 wt% of carbon and 0.11 wt% of vanadium was investigated using a hot tensile test performed up to fracture. The hot ductility was evaluated by measuring the reduction of area of the fractured specimens, which were strained at a variety of test temperatures in a range of 600–1100 °C at a strain rate of 2×10"−"3/s. The hot ductility was excellent in a temperature range of 950–1100 °C, followed by a decrease of the hot ductility below 950 °C. The hot ductility continued to drop as the temperature was lowered to 600 °C. The loss of hot ductility in a temperature range of 800–950 °C, which is above the Ae_3 temperature, was due to V(C,N) precipitation at austenite grain boundaries. The further decline of hot ductility between 700 °C and 750 °C resulted from the transformation of ferrite films decorating austenite grain boundaries. The hot ductility continued to decrease at 650 °C or less, owing to ferrite films and the pearlite matrix, which is harder than ferrite. The pearlite was transformed from austenite due to relatively high carbon content.

  16. In situ grain fracture mechanics during uniaxial compaction of granular solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, R. C.; Lind, J.; Pagan, D. C.; Akin, M. C.; Herbold, E. B.

    2018-03-01

    Grain fracture and crushing are known to influence the macroscopic mechanical behavior of granular materials and be influenced by factors such as grain composition, morphology, and microstructure. In this paper, we investigate grain fracture and crushing by combining synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and three-dimensional x-ray diffraction to study two granular samples undergoing uniaxial compaction. Our measurements provide details of grain kinematics, contacts, average intra-granular stresses, inter-particle forces, and intra-grain crystal and fracture plane orientations. Our analyses elucidate the complex nature of fracture and crushing, showing that: (1) the average stress states of grains prior to fracture vary widely in their relation to global and local trends; (2) fractured grains experience inter-particle forces and stored energies that are statistically higher than intact grains prior to fracture; (3) fracture plane orientations are primarily controlled by average intra-granular stress and contact fabric rather than the orientation of the crystal lattice; (4) the creation of new surfaces during fracture accounts for a very small portion of the energy dissipated during compaction; (5) mixing brittle and ductile grain materials alters the grain-scale fracture response. The results highlight an application of combined x-ray measurements for non-destructive in situ analysis of granular solids and provide details about grain fracture that have important implications for theory and modeling.

  17. Prediction of non-brittle fracture in the welded joint of C-Mn steel in the brittle-ductile transition domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Thai Ha

    2009-11-01

    This work concerns the nuclear safety, specifically the secondary circuit integrity of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The problem is that of the fracture of a thin tubular structure in ferritic steel with many welded joints. The ferritic steel and weld present a brittle/ductile tenacity transition. Moreover, the welds present geometry propitious to the appearance of fatigue cracks, due to vibrations and expansions. These cracks may cause the complete fracture of the structure. The objectives of this work are to establish a criterion of non-fracture by cleavage of thin welded structures in ferritic steel, applicable to actual structures. Therefore, the present study focuses on the fracture behaviour of welded thin structures in brittle/ductile transition. It aims at developing the threshold stress model initially proposed by Chapuliot, to predict the non-brittle-fracture of this welded structure. The model is identified for the welded joint in C-Mn steel for nuclear construction, specifically in the upper part of the transition. A threshold stress, below which the cleavage cannot take place, is identified using tensile tests at low temperature on axis-symmetrical notched specimens taken in welded joint. This threshold stress is used to define the threshold volume where the maximum principal stress exceeds the threshold stress during the test. The analysis by SEM of specimen fracture surfaces shows that the gross solidification molten zone in the weld is the most likely to cleave. The relation between the brittle fracture probability and the threshold volume in the gross solidification molten zone is established via a sensitivity function, using multi-materials simulations. The model thus identified is tested for the prediction of non-brittle-fracture of SENT specimens taken in the welded joint and tested in tension. The results obtained are encouraging with regards to the transferability of the model to the actual structure. (author)

  18. High-temperature mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of Al–Si piston alloy reinforced with in situ TiB{sub 2} particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Gang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Weizheng, E-mail: zhangwz@bit.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Guohua; Feng, Zengjian; Wang, Yanjun [Shandong Binzhou Bohai Piston Co., Ltd., Binzhou 256602 (China)

    2015-05-01

    In order to assess the high-temperature performance of aluminum–silicon alloy reinforced with titanium diboride particles as potential piston material, the tensile behaviors and fracture mechanisms of in situ 4 wt% TiB{sub 2}/Al–Si composite were investigated in the temperature range 25–350 °C. The tensile results revealed that the composite exhibited higher modulus than the matrix alloy at all testing temperatures, but both the matrix alloy and the composite presented similar strength levels above 200 °C. The ductility of the composite was found to be lower than that of the unreinforced matrix alloy at 25 and 200 °C, but no obvious distinction was observed at 350 °C. The effects of temperature and the presence of TiB{sub 2} particles on tensile properties of the composite had been evaluated. Fractographic morphology studies were done using scanning electron microscope, which indicated that the fracture of the composite altered from brittle to ductile mode with temperature increasing. At 25 and 200 °C, fracture was dominated by cracked silicon particles and separated TiB{sub 2} particles, while decohesion at particle–matrix interface was prevalent at 350 °C. Analysis of the fracture surfaces also showed that regions of clustered TiB{sub 2} particles were found to be the locations prone to damage in the composite at both room and high temperatures.

  19. Effects of degradation on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of a steel pressure-vessel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.J.; Knott, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    A degradation procedure has been devised to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of a steel pressure-vessel weld metal. The procedure combines the application of cold prestrain together with an embrittling heat treatment to produce an increase in yield stress, a decrease in strain hardening rate, and an increased propensity for brittle intergranular fracture. Fracture tests were carried out using blunt-notch four-point-bend specimens in slow bend over a range of temperatures and the brittle/ductile transition was shown to increase by approximately 110 deg. C as a result of the degradation. Fractographic analysis of specimens broken at low temperatures showed about 30% intergranular failure in combination with transgranular cleavage. Predictions have been made of the ductile-brittle transition curves for the weld metal (sharp crack) fracture toughness in degraded and non-degraded states, based on the notched-bar test results and on finite element analyses of the stress distributions ahead of the notches and sharp cracks. The ductile-brittle transition temperature shift (ΔT=110 deg. C) between non-degraded and degraded weld metal at a notch opening displacement of 0.31 mm was combined with the Ritchie, Knott and Rice (RKR) model to predict an equivalent shift of 115 deg. C for sharp-crack specimens at a toughness level of 70 MN/m 3/2

  20. Microstructural origins of high strength and high ductility in an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 eutectic high-entropy alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xuzhou; Lu, Yiping; Zhang, Bo; Liang, Ningning; Wu, Guanzhong; Sha, Gang; Liu, Jizi; Zhao, Yonghao

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that eutectic high-entropy alloys can simultaneously possess high strength and high ductility, which have potential applications in industrial fields. Nevertheless, microstructural origins of the excellent strength–ductility combination remain unclear. In this study, an AlCoCrFeNi 2.1 eutectic high-entropy alloy was prepared with face-centered cubic (FCC)(L1 2 )/body-centered-cubic (BCC)(B2) modulated lamellar structures and a remarkable combination of ultimate tensile strength (1351 MPa) and ductility (15.4%) using the classical casting technique. Post-deformation transmission electron microscopy revealed that the FCC(L1 2 ) phase was deformed in a matter of planar dislocation slip, with a slip system of {111} <110>, and stacking faults due to low stacking fault energy. Due to extreme solute drag, high densities of dislocations are distributed homogeneously at {111} slip plane. In the BCC(B2) phase, some dislocations exist on two {110} slip bands. The atom probe tomography analysis revealed a high density of Cr-enriched nano-precipitates, which strengthened the BCC(B2) phase by Orowan mechanisms. Fracture surface observation revealed a ductile fracture in the FCC(L1 2 ) phase and a brittle-like fracture in the BCC(B2) lamella. The underlying mechanism for the high strength and high ductility of AlCoCrFeNi 2.1 eutectic high-entropy alloy was finally analyzed based on the coupling between the ductile FCC(L1 2 ) and brittle BCC(B2) phases.

  1. Dislocation dynamics modelling of the ductile-brittle-transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennecke, Thomas; Haehner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Many materials like silicon, tungsten or ferritic steels show a transition between high temperature ductile fracture with stable crack grow and high deformation energy absorption and low temperature brittle fracture in an unstable and low deformation mode, the ductile-brittle-transition. Especially in steels, the temperature transition is accompanied by a strong increase of the measured fracture toughness over a certain temperature range and strong scatter in the toughness data in this transition regime. The change in fracture modes is affected by dynamic interactions between dislocations and the inhomogeneous stress fields of notches and small cracks. In the present work a dislocation dynamics model for the ductile-brittle-transition is proposed, which takes those interactions into account. The model can explain an increase with temperature of apparent toughness in the quasi-brittle regime and different levels of scatter in the different temperature regimes. Furthermore it can predict changing failure sites in materials with heterogeneous microstructure. Based on the model, the effects of crack tip blunting, stress state, external strain rate and irradiation-induced changes in the plastic flow properties can be discussed.

  2. Comprehensive Understanding of Ductility Loss Mechanisms in Various Steels with External and Internal Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakuwa, Osamu; Yamabe, Junichiro; Matsunaga, Hisao; Furuya, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Saburo

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen-induced ductility loss and related fracture morphologies are comprehensively discussed in consideration of the hydrogen distribution in a specimen with external and internal hydrogen by using 300-series austenitic stainless steels (Types 304, 316, 316L), high-strength austenitic stainless steels (HP160, XM-19), precipitation-hardened iron-based super alloy (A286), low-alloy Cr-Mo steel (JIS-SCM435), and low-carbon steel (JIS-SM490B). External hydrogen is realized by a non-charged specimen tested in high-pressure gaseous hydrogen, and internal hydrogen is realized by a hydrogen-charged specimen tested in air or inert gas. Fracture morphologies obtained by slow-strain-rate tensile tests (SSRT) of the materials with external or internal hydrogen could be comprehensively categorized into five types: hydrogen-induced successive crack growth, ordinary void formation, small-sized void formation related to the void sheet, large-sized void formation, and facet formation. The mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement are broadly classified into hydrogen-enhanced decohesion (HEDE) and hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP). In the HEDE model, hydrogen weakens interatomic bonds, whereas in the HELP model, hydrogen enhances localized slip deformations. Although various fracture morphologies are produced by external or internal hydrogen, these morphologies can be explained by the HELP model rather than by the HEDE model.

  3. Fracture mechanics based design for radioactive material transport packagings -- Historical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.A.; Salzbrenner, D.; Sorenson, K.; McConnell, P.

    1998-04-01

    The use of a fracture mechanics based design for the radioactive material transport (RAM) packagings has been the subject of extensive research for more than a decade. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has played an important role in the research and development of the application of this technology. Ductile iron has been internationally accepted as an exemplary material for the demonstration of a fracture mechanics based method of RAM packaging design and therefore is the subject of a large portion of the research discussed in this report. SNL's extensive research and development program, funded primarily by the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Transportation, Energy Management and Analytical Services (EM-76) and in an auxiliary capacity, the office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, is summarized in this document along with a summary of the research conducted at other institutions throughout the world. In addition to the research and development work, code and standards development and regulatory positions are also discussed

  4. The causes of geometry effects in ductile tearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Griesbach, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    An adequate understanding of geometry effects in ductile tearing can only be achieved when the different causes of the effects are distinguished and these geometry effects are linked to particular micromechanical fracture processes or global deformation mechanisms. It is shown that the micromechanical process of ductile (fibrous) fracture is dependent on achieving a critical strain, which is only slightly dependent on the stress state for the range of triaxiality conditions in pressure vessels and through-cracked plates. Under certain conditions, the crack tip strain can be shown to scale with the value of the J integral and there is a direct connection between J and the underlying micro mechanical process. This connection is lost for significant crack extension or large-scale plasticity. Nevertheless the J integral may still be use on an empirical basis under some conditions. Under fully-plastic conditions the primary source of geometry dependence in the J-R curves is due to the geometry dependence of the shape and volume of the plastic region that develops around the uncracked ligament. This occurs because J is essentially proportional to the total plastic work done on the specimen. If it can be assured that the fracture mode in both the test specimen and the structure will remain fully fibrous, it is conservative to extrapolate J-R curves generated from small compact specimens for the analysis of pressure vessel crack stability. 132 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Athermal brittle-to-ductile transition in amorphous solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchot, Olivier; Karmakar, Smarajit; Procaccia, Itamar; Zylberg, Jacques

    2011-10-01

    Brittle materials exhibit sharp dynamical fractures when meeting Griffith's criterion, whereas ductile materials blunt a sharp crack by plastic responses. Upon continuous pulling, ductile materials exhibit a necking instability that is dominated by a plastic flow. Usually one discusses the brittle to ductile transition as a function of increasing temperature. We introduce an athermal brittle to ductile transition as a function of the cutoff length of the interparticle potential. On the basis of extensive numerical simulations of the response to pulling the material boundaries at a constant speed we offer an explanation of the onset of ductility via the increase in the density of plastic modes as a function of the potential cutoff length. Finally we can resolve an old riddle: In experiments brittle materials can be strained under grip boundary conditions and exhibit a dynamic crack when cut with a sufficiently long initial slot. Mysteriously, in molecular dynamics simulations it appeared that cracks refused to propagate dynamically under grip boundary conditions, and continuous pulling was necessary to achieve fracture. We argue that this mystery is removed when one understands the distinction between brittle and ductile athermal amorphous materials.

  6. Combined loading effects on the fracture mechanics behavior of line pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, R.E.; Cravero, S.; Ernst, H.A. [Tenaris Group, Campana (Argentina). SIDERCA R and D Center

    2009-12-19

    For certain applications, pipelines may be submitted to biaxial loading situations. In these cases, it is not clear the influence of the biaxial loading on the fracture mechanics behavior of cracked pipelines. For further understanding of biaxial loading effects, this work presents a numerical simulation of ductile tearing in a circumferentially surface cracked pipe under biaxial loading using the computational cell methodology. The model was adjusted with experimental results obtained in laboratory using single edge cracked under tension (SENT) specimens. These specimens appear as the better alternative to conventional fracture specimens to characterize fracture toughness of cracked pipes. The negligible effect of biaxial loadings on resistance curves was demonstrated. To guarantee the similarities of stress and strains fields between SENT specimens and cracked pipes subjected to biaxial loading, a constraint study using the J-Q methodology and the h parameter was used. The constraint study gives information about the characteristics of the crack-tip conditions. (author)

  7. Fracture Mechanics Assessment for Different Notch Sizes Using Finite Element Analysis Based on Ductile Failure Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Keun Hyung; Jeon, Jun Young; Han, Jae Jun; Nam, Hyun Suk; Lee, Dae Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, notch defects are evaluated using fracture mechanics. To understand the effects of notch defects, FE analysis is conducted to predict the limit load and J-integral for middle-cracked and single-edge cracked plates with various sizes of notch under tension and bending. As the radius of the notch increases, the energy release rate also increases, although the limit load remains constant. The values of fracture toughness(J{sub IC}) of SM490A are determined for various notch radii through FE simulation instead of conducting an experiment. As the radius of the notch increases, the energy release rate also increases, together with a more significant increase in fracture toughness. To conclude, as the notch radius increases, the resistance to crack propagation also increases.

  8. Fracture mechanism of coronal teenage dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfilov, P. E.; Kabanova, A. V.; Borodin, I. N.; Guo, J.; Zang, Z.

    2017-10-01

    The structure of coronal teenage dentin and the development of cracks in it are studied on microand nanolevels. The material is found to fail according to a ductile mechanism on a microlelvel and according to a ductile-brittle mechanism on a nanoscale. This behavior is similar to the failure of a polyethylene film and rubber, when significant elastic and irreversible deformation precedes crack growth. The viscoelastic behavior can be considered as the reaction of dentin to an applied mechanical load.

  9. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  10. Ductile-reinforcement toughening in γ-TiAl intermetallic-matrix composites: Effects on fracture toughness and fatigue-crack propagation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.; Odette, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of the type, volume fraction, thickness and orientation of ductile phase reinforcements on the room temperature fatigue and fracture resistance of γ-TiAl intermetallic alloys is investigated. Large improvements in toughness compared to monolithic γ-TiAl are observed in both the TiNb- and Nb-reinforced composites under monotonic loading. Toughness increases with increasing ductile phase content, reinforcement thickness and strength; orientation effect are minimal. Crack-growth behavior is characterized by steep resistance curves primarily due to crack trapping/renucleation and extensive crack bridging by the ductile-phase particles. In contrast, under cyclic loading the influence of ductile phases on fatigue resistance is strongly dependent upon reinforcement orientation. Compared to monolithic γ-TiAl, improvements in fatigue-crack growth resistance are observed in TiNb-reinforced composites only in the face (C-L) orientation; crack-growth rates for the edge (C-R) orientation are actually faster in the composite. In comparison, Nb-particle reinforcements offer less toughening under monotonic loading but enhance the fatigue properties compared to TiNb reinforcements under cyclic loading

  11. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India); Raha, S. [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Computational and Data Sciences (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India)

    2017-02-15

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  12. Microstructural effects of ductile phase toughening of Nb-Nb silicide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewandowski, J.J.; Dimiduk, D.; Kerr, W.; Menddiratta, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    In the Nb-Si system, the terminal Nb phase and Nb 5 Si 3 phase are virtually immiscible up to approximately 2033k. This system offers the potential of producing composites consisting of a ductile refractory metal phase and a strong intermetallic phase. In-situ composites containing different volume fractions of the ductile Nb phase were produced via vacuum arc-casting. Microhardness testing as well as smooth bend bar testing was conducted at temperatures ranging from 298k to 1673k in an attempt to determine microstructural effects on the yield strength and smooth bar fracture strength. Notched bend specimens were similarly tested to determine the effects of the ductile phase (i.e. Nb) on enhancing the notched bend toughness. It is shown that Nb phase often behaves in a ductile manner during testing, thereby toughening the in-situ composite. The mechanism of toughening appears to be due to crack bridging

  13. Local approach on mixed-mode ductile fracture of an aged stainless steel 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, K.L.; Marini, B.

    1993-01-01

    In the frame of the structural integrity of the fast breeder reactor vessel, the local approach of fracture is applied to the ductile crack initiation under mixed-mode I+II loading for a 316L type stainless steel thermally aged for 1000 hours at 700 deg C. Experimental and numerical tests are performed on axisymmetric notched specimens, compact tension specimens and disymmetric four-point bend specimens. From elastoplastic finite element analyses, the damage variables are evaluated with various models: the Beremin model, the McClintock model, the Guennouni-Francois model and the Lemaitre model. The critical values of damage variable obtained on simple tensile specimens and axisymmetric notched specimens are used for the prediction of crack initiation under mixed-mode loading. The damage variable at crack initiation seems to be rather dependent on the fracture mode related to the stress triaxiality and the brittle fracture of banded ferrite of the aged material. The results are compared with those of the J values at crack initiation. (author). 9 ref., 2 figs

  14. Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Properties of NiAl Intermetallic Alloy with Different Copper Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Hsing Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior and fracture characteristics of NiAl intermetallic alloy containing 5~7 at% Cu are investigated at room temperature under strain rates ranging from 1 × 10−3 to 5 × 103 s−1. It is shown that the copper contents and strain rate both have a significant effect on the mechanical behavior of the NiAl alloy. Specifically, the flow stress increases with an increasing copper content and strain rate. Moreover, the ductility also improves as the copper content increases. The change in the mechanical response and fracture behavior of the NiAl alloy given a higher copper content is thought to be the result of the precipitation of β-phase (Ni,CuAl and γ'-phase (Ni,Cu3Al in the NiAl matrix.

  15. The quantification of specimen size effects in the ductile-brittle transition for C-Mn steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knee, N.; Worthington, P.J.; Moskovic, R.

    1989-02-01

    It is now generally accepted that the temperature range of the brittle to ductile transition, determined using fracture mechanics specimens, is dependent of the specimen size for ferritic steels. This size effect arises through increasing constraint at the crack tip as the specimen thickness increases together with an increasing volume of material sampled. The size effect can be quantified in terms of a shift in temperature for a given toughness level. This was determined in the present work from fracture toughness/temperature curves obtained by performing fracture toughness tests on eight 100 mm thick compact tension specimens and 40 25 mm thick compact tension specimens over the ductile-brittle transition range of a C-Mn steel. The emphasis is on the development of a practical methodology to quantify the size effect from a limited but still appreciable number of tests. (author)

  16. A model for predicting pellet-cladding interaction induced fuel rod failure, based on nonlinear fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernkvist, L.O.

    1993-01-01

    A model for predicting pellet-cladding mechanical interaction induced fuel rod failure, suitable for implementation in finite element fuel-performance codes, is presented. Cladding failure is predicted by explicitly modelling the propagation of radial cracks under varying load conditions. Propagation is assumed to be due to either iodine induced stress corrosion cracking or ductile fracture. Nonlinear fracture mechanics concepts are utilized in modelling these two mechanisms of crack growth. The novelty of this approach is that the development of cracks, which may ultimately lead to fuel rod failure, can be treated as a dynamic and time-dependent process. The influence of cyclic loading, ramp rates and material creep on the failure mechanism can thereby be investigated. Results of numerical calculations, in which the failure model has been used to study the dependence of cladding creep rate on crack propagation velocity, are presented. (author)

  17. Initiation of cleavage in a low alloy steel: effect of a ductile damage localized around inclusions; Declenchement du clivage dans un acier faiblement allie: role de l'endommagement ductile localise autour des inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carassou, S

    2000-07-01

    The fracture mechanism in a low alloy steel, used in the pressurised water reactor vessel, has been studied in the ductile to brittle transition temperature range. We used the local approach of fracture in conjunction with both fractographic observations and numerical simulations. Previous studies suggested the onset of cleavage to be favoured by the presence of nearby manganese sulphide (MnS) clusters: the ductile damaged zone localised inside a cluster increases the stress around it, and so contribute to the triggering of cleavage due to nearby classical sites, like carbides. The experimental study of size dependence and anisotropy on the global fracture behaviour, together with fractographic observations, give here the proof of the influence of MnS clusters on the onset of cleavage in this steel. Fracture behaviour of pre-cracked specimens tested in the transition regime has then been simulated, by three dimensional finite element method computations. Ductile tearing process preceding the cleavage onset at those temperatures regime was well reproduced by the Rousselier's model. Failure probabilities, related to given stress states, has been given by post-processor calculations, using a probabilistic model based on the specific cleavage fracture process. Fracture toughness scatter of the steel, tested in the transition regime, is then well reproduced by those calculations. However, the critical cleavage stress of an elementary volume, that scales for the fracture process, is still assumed to be temperature dependant. Numerical simulations of the local fracture process suggest that this temperature effect can partly be explained by the temperature dependant decrease of the stress amplification due to the MnS clusters. (author)

  18. Nonlinear fracture mechanics investigation on the ductility of reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carpinteri

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a numerical algorithm based on the finite element method is proposed for the prediction of the mechanical response of reinforced concrete (RC beams under bending loading. The main novelty of such an approach is the introduction of the Overlapping Crack Model, based on nonlinear fracture mechanics concepts, to describe concrete crushing. According to this model, the concrete dam- age in compression is represented by means of a fictitious interpenetration. The larger is the interpenetration, the lower are the transferred forces across the damaged zone. The well-known Cohesive Crack Model in tension and an elastic-perfectly plastic stress versus crack opening displacement relationship describing the steel reinforcement behavior are also integrated into the numerical algorithm. The application of the proposed Cohesive-Overlapping Crack Model to the assessment of the minimum reinforcement amount neces- sary to prevent unstable tensile crack propagation and to the evaluation of the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, permits to predict the size-scale effects evidenced by several experimental programs available in the literature. According to the obtained numerical results, new practical design formulae and diagrams are proposed for the improvement of the current code provisions which usually disregard the size effects.

  19. Ductile fracture behavior of 6-inch diameter type 304 stainless steel and STS 42 carbon steel piping containing a through-wall or part-through crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Ohba, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Takaichi; Miyazono, Shohachiro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Norio.

    1986-05-01

    The double ended guillotine break philosophy in the design base accident of the nuclear power plant is considered to be overly conservative from the view point of piping design. Through the past experiences and developments of the fabrication, inspection, and operation of nuclear power plants, it has been recognized that the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept can be justified in the LWR pressure boundary pipings. In order to verify the LBB concept, extensive experimental and theoretical works are being conducted in many countries. Furthermore, a revised piping design standard, in which LBB concept is introduced, is under preparation in Japan, U.S.A., and European countries. At JAERI, a research program to investigate the unstable ductile fracture behavior of LWR piping under bending load has been carried out as a part of the LBB verification researches since 1983. This report summarizes the result of the ductile fracture tests conducted at room temperature in 1983 and 84. The 6-inch diameter pipes of type 304 stainless steel and STS 42 carbon steel pipe with a through-wall or part-through crack were tested under bending load with low or high compliance condition at room temperature. Pipe fracture data were obtained from the test as regards to load- displacement curve, crack extension, net section stress, J-resistance curve, and so on. Besides, the influence of the compliance on the fracture behavior was examined. Discussions are performed on the ductile pipe fracture criterion, flaw evaluation criterion, and LBB evaluation method. (author)

  20. Effects of boron additions and solutionizing treatments on microstructures and ductility of forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, J.H.; Jiao, Z.B.; Chen, G.; Liu, C.T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proper boron additions and heat-treatments improve the ductility of Ti64 alloys. • Coarse TiB precipitates embrittle the Ti64 alloys causing ductility loss. • Modified Ti64 forged alloys with high strength and high ductility are developed. - Abstract: The effects of boron additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys in different heat-treatment conditions have been characterized by both experimental studies and thermodynamic calculations. The results indicate a combination of proper post-forging treatments and B additions are helpful for control of the prior-β grain size and the volume fraction of α phase, thereby tuning the ductility of the forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys. However, the B-containing alloys exhibit a significant drop in ductility if the solutionizing temperature is too high, and this embrittlement is mainly due to the coarsening of brittle TiB borides. The mechanism in this case is due to the cleavage fracture of TiB rather than its debonding with the matrix, as indicated by the observation of the aligned TiB borides on the matching areas of both halves of the fracture surfaces. Thus, the TiB size and orientation, the prior-β grain size, and the volume fraction of the α phase all play important roles in controlling the mechanical properties of the forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys. The current findings shed light on the composition–microstructure–ductility relationship in the forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys

  1. Effects of boron additions and solutionizing treatments on microstructures and ductility of forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, J.H.; Jiao, Z.B. [Center for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Chen, G. [Engineering Research Center of Materials Behavior and Design, Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Liu, C.T., E-mail: chainliu@cityu.edu.hk [Center for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-03-05

    Highlights: • Proper boron additions and heat-treatments improve the ductility of Ti64 alloys. • Coarse TiB precipitates embrittle the Ti64 alloys causing ductility loss. • Modified Ti64 forged alloys with high strength and high ductility are developed. - Abstract: The effects of boron additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys in different heat-treatment conditions have been characterized by both experimental studies and thermodynamic calculations. The results indicate a combination of proper post-forging treatments and B additions are helpful for control of the prior-β grain size and the volume fraction of α phase, thereby tuning the ductility of the forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys. However, the B-containing alloys exhibit a significant drop in ductility if the solutionizing temperature is too high, and this embrittlement is mainly due to the coarsening of brittle TiB borides. The mechanism in this case is due to the cleavage fracture of TiB rather than its debonding with the matrix, as indicated by the observation of the aligned TiB borides on the matching areas of both halves of the fracture surfaces. Thus, the TiB size and orientation, the prior-β grain size, and the volume fraction of the α phase all play important roles in controlling the mechanical properties of the forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys. The current findings shed light on the composition–microstructure–ductility relationship in the forged Ti–6Al–4V alloys.

  2. Effects of Eutectic Si Particles on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Toughness of Cast A356 Aluminum Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Hong; Lee, Sung Hak; Kwon, Yong Nam

    2007-01-01

    The present study aims at investigating the effects of eutectic Si particles on mechanical properties and fracture toughness of three A356 aluminum alloys. These A356 alloys were fabricated by casting processes such as rheo-casting, squeeze-casting, and casting-forging, and their mechanical properties and fracture toughness were analyzed in relation with microfracture mechanism study. All the cast A356 alloys contained eutectic Si particles mainly segregated along solidification cells, and the distribution of Si particles was modified by squeeze-casting and casting-forging processes. Microfracture observation results showed that eutectic Si particles segregated along cells were cracked first, but that aluminum matrix played a role in blocking crack propagation. Tensile properties and fracture toughness of the squeeze cast and cast-forged alloys having homogeneous distribution of eutectic Si particles were superior to those of the rheo-cast alloy. In particular, the cast-forged alloy had excellent hardness, strength, ductility, and fracture toughness because of the matrix strengthening and homogeneous distribution of eutectic Si particles due to forging process

  3. An interim report on shallow-flaw fracture technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    Shallow-flaw fracture technology is being developed for application to the safety assessment of radiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVS) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT NDT ) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) a strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness

  4. Numerical modelling in non linear fracture mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viggo Tvergaard

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Some numerical studies of crack propagation are based on using constitutive models that accountfor damage evolution in the material. When a critical damage value has been reached in a materialpoint, it is natural to assume that this point has no more carrying capacity, as is done numerically in the elementvanish technique. In the present review this procedure is illustrated for micromechanically based materialmodels, such as a ductile failure model that accounts for the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence, and a model for intergranular creep failure with diffusive growth of grain boundary cavities leading to micro-crack formation. The procedure is also illustrated for low cycle fatigue, based on continuum damage mechanics. In addition, the possibility of crack growth predictions for elastic-plastic solids using cohesive zone models to represent the fracture process is discussed.

  5. Observations on Mode I ductile tearing in sheet metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, Salim Abdallah; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2013-01-01

    Cracked ductile sheet metals, subject to Mode I tearing, have been observed to display a variety of fracture surface morphologies depending on the material properties, and a range of studies on the fracture surface appearance have been published in the literature. Whereas classical fractures...

  6. The effect of aging on the fracture characteristics and ductility of self-compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beygi, Morteza H.A.; Kazemi, Mohammad T.; Nikbin, Iman M.; Vaseghi Amiri, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fracture properties of SCC were obtained using two different methods. • Results showed with increase of age the fracture toughness increases. • As SCC becomes older, brittleness number is almost doubled. • The Size effect curve showed SCC brittleness increases with increase of age. - Abstract: Good knowledge of fracture parameters and cracking behavior of self-compacting concrete (SCC) from early ages until the SCC becomes mature plays an important role in design of SCC structure and also in evaluation of durability and consequently prevention of damage. In this paper, variation of fracture parameters and corresponding ductility behavior of SCC at different ages (e.g. 3 days, 7 days, 28 days and 90 days) for SCC mixes with w/c ratios of 0.45 and 0.65 have been experimentally studied. To do so, three-point bending tests were carried out on 120 notched beams. Then, size effect method (SEM) and work of fracture method (WFM) were applied to interpret the results. The results of analyses indicated that as the concrete is aging from 3 days to 90 days: (a) fracture energies from SEM (G f ) and WFM (G F ) are increased: (b) effective size of the process zone (C f ) in SEM and characteristic length (L ch ) in WFM are considerably decreased indicating increase of concrete brittleness: (c) fracture surface of concrete passing through the aggregate is increased which is attributed to strength improvement of hardened cement paste and aggregate–paste transition zone: (d) fracture toughness is significantly increased: (e) brittleness number is almost doubled. Also, the ratio of G F /G f , which is applied for calibration of numerical models of cracking at different ages, is equal to 2.70

  7. Effects of ductile phase volume fraction on the mechanical properties of Ti-Al3Ti metal-intermetallic laminate (MIL) composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Richard D.; Jiang Fengchun; Kulin, Robb M.; Vecchio, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Residual Al improves the mechanical properties of Ti-Al 3 Ti MIL composites. → Residual Al can eliminate intermetallic centerline delaminations in MILs. → Low levels of residual Al increase fracture toughness in MIL composites. → MIL stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness can be optimized at low Al levels. - Abstract: Metal-intermetallic laminate (MIL) composites consisting of alternating layers of Ti, Al, and the intermetallic Al 3 Ti have been fabricated by reactive foil sintering in open air. Six initially identical stacks of alternating Ti-3Al-2.5 V and 1100-Al foils were processed for different lengths of time, yielding specimens with different metal and intermetallic volume fractions. Their mechanical properties have been investigated with an emphasis on the effect of residual Al at the intermetallic centerline on composite strength and fracture toughness, as well as fracture and failure modes. Samples were cut from each composite plate (in layer orientations parallel and perpendicular to the intended load direction) for mechanical testing in compression and four-point bending under quasi-static and high-rate loading conditions. Examination of the damaged specimens and their fracture surfaces by optical and scanning electron microscopy was performed to establish a correlation between the failure mechanisms present, composite strength, and microstructure. Results indicated that regardless of loading direction, cracks always initiated in the intermetallic region, rarely at the centerline, and crack propagation and failure were heavily influenced by the thickness of the residual aluminum layers. There is an ideal residual aluminum volume fraction that represents the amount of ductile reinforcement that maximizes the combined properties of strength, toughness and stiffness.

  8. A variational void coalescence model for ductile metals

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiq, Amir

    2011-08-17

    We present a variational void coalescence model that includes all the essential ingredients of failure in ductile porous metals. The model is an extension of the variational void growth model by Weinberg et al. (Comput Mech 37:142-152, 2006). The extended model contains all the deformation phases in ductile porous materials, i.e. elastic deformation, plastic deformation including deviatoric and volumetric (void growth) plasticity followed by damage initiation and evolution due to void coalescence. Parametric studies have been performed to assess the model\\'s dependence on the different input parameters. The model is then validated against uniaxial loading experiments for different materials. We finally show the model\\'s ability to predict the damage mechanisms and fracture surface profile of a notched round bar under tension as observed in experiments. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

  9. Fracture of niobium-base silicide coated alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, A.D.; Zotov, Yu.P.; Ivashchenko, O.V.; Kushnareva, N.P.; Yarosh, I.P.

    1990-01-01

    Mechanical properties and character of fracture of Nb-W-Mo-Zr-C alloy composition with complex by composition and structure silicide coating under different states of stage-by-stage coating are studied. Structural features, character of fracture from ductile to quasibrittle transcrystalline one and, respectively, the composition plasticity level are defined by interrelation of fracture processes in coating, matrix plastic flow and possibility and way of stress relaxation on their boundary

  10. Micromechanisms of ductile stable crack growth in nuclear pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcher, W.P.A.; Druce, S.G.

    1981-10-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the relationship between the micromechanisms of ductile crack growth, the microstructural constituent phases present in nuclear pressure vessel steel, and the observed fracture behavior as determined by impact and fracture mechanics tests. Results from a microstructural and mechanical property comparison of an A508 Class 3 pressurized water reactor nozzle forging cutout and a 150-mm-thick A533B Class 1 plate are reported. The variation of upper-shelf toughness between the two steels and its orientation sensitivity are discussed on the basis of inclusion and precipitate distributions. Inclusion clusters in A533B, deformed to elongated disks in the rolling plane, have a profound effect on short transverse fracture properties. Data derived using the multi-specimen J-integral method to characterize the initiation of ductile crack extension and resistance to stable crack growth are compared with equivalent Charpy results. Results of the J /SUB R/ -curve analyses indicate (1) that the A533B short transverse crack growth resistance is approximately half that observed from transverse and longitudinal specimen orientations, and (2) that the A508 initiation toughness and resistance to stable crack growth are insensitive to position through the forging wall, and are higher than exhibited by A533B at any orientation in the midthickness position.

  11. Improved ductility of Ni3Si by microalloying with boron or carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taub, A.I.; Briant, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of boron and carbon additions on the tendency for intergranular fracture in trinickel silicide intermetallics are reported. Melt spinning of Ni 77 Si 23 alloyed with 0.1 at. pct boron results in full bend ductility and complete transgranular fracture compared with brittle intergranular fracture for the unmodified compound. Alloying with 0.1 at. pct carbon also produced full bend ductility but a mixed mode failure (30 pct transgranular). For both carbon and boron additions, reducing the Ni concentration of the base compound results in a greater percentage of intergranular fracture. For Ni 77 Si 23 , the solubility limit is between 0.1 and 0.2 t. pct boron. For compounds with silicon concentrations of 23.5 and 24.0 at. pct, the solubility limit is less than 0.1 at. pct boron. Boron additions above the solubility limit result in Ni 3 B precipitates which degrade the bend ductility and increase the percentage of intergranular fracture. Alloying with carbon above the solubility limit ( 77 Si 23 , increasing the carbon concentration from 0.1 to 1.0 at. pct resulted in no change in the ductility. Auger examination of the grain boundary composition showed strong segregation of both boron and carbon. Enrichment in silicon concentration was also observed

  12. Ductile fracture prediction of an axially cracked pressure vessel under pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Okamura, Hiroyuki

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the J-value of an axially cracked cylinder under several PTS conditions are evaluated using a simple estimation scheme which we proposed. Results obtained are summerized as follow: (1) Under any PTS conditions, the effect of internal pressure is so predominant upon the J-value and dJ/da that it is very important to grasp the transient of internal pressure under any imaginable accident from the viewpoint of structural integrity. (2) Under any IP, TS, and PTS conditions, J - a/W relation shows that the J-value reaches its maximum at a certain crack depth, then drops to zero at a/W ≅ 0.9. Though the effect of inertia is not taken into account, this fact may explain the phenomena of crack arrest qualitatively. (3) The compliance of a cylindrical shell plays an important role in the fracture prediction of a pressure vessel. (4) Under typical PTS conditions, the region at the crack tip dominated by the Hutchinson-Rice-Rosengren singularity is substantially large enough to apply the J-based criterion to predict unstable ductile fracture. (author)

  13. Fracture mechanics and statistical modeling of ternary blends of polylactide/ethylene-acrylate copolymer /wood-flour composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrifah, Kojo Agyapong

    This study examined the mechanisms of toughening the brittle bio-based poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with a biodegradable rubbery impact modifier to develop biodegradable and cost effective PLA/wood-flour composites with improved impact strength, toughness, high ductility, and flexibility. Semicrystalline and amorphous PLA grades were impact modified by melt blending with an ethylene-acrylate copolymer (EAC) impact modifier. EAC content was varied to study the effectiveness and efficiency of the impact modifier in toughening the semicrystalline and amorphous grades of the PLA. Impact strength was used to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the EAC in toughening the blends, whereas the toughening mechanisms were determined with the phase morphologies and the miscibilities of the blends. Subsequent tensile property analyses were performed on the most efficiently toughened PLA grade. Composites were made from PLA, wood flour of various particle sizes, and EAC. Using two-level factorial design the interaction between wood flour content, wood flour particle size, and EAC content and its effect on the mechanical properties of the PLA/wood-flour composites was statistically studied. Numerical optimization was also performed to statistically model and optimize material compositions to attain mechanical properties for the PLA/wood-flour composites equivalent to at least those of unfilled PLA. The J-integral method of fracture mechanics was applied to assess the crack initiation (Jin) and complete fracture (J f) energies of the composites to account for imperfections in the composites and generate data useful for engineering designs. Morphologies of the fractured surfaces of the composites were analyzed to elucidate the failure and toughening mechanisms of the composites. The EAC impact modifier effectively improved the impact strength of the PLA/EAC blends, regardless of the PLA type. However, the EAC was more efficient in the semicrystalline grades of PLA compared to the

  14. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp 2 carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes.

  15. Interpretation and significance of reverse chevron-shaped markings on fracture surfaces of API X100 pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowards, Jeffrey W.; McCowan, Chris N.; Drexler, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated fractures of X100 steel linepine produced during fracture mechanics testing. ► Fractures exhibited a unique chevron pattern that points in the direction of crack propagation. ► A qualitative model is proposed to explain the fracture pattern formation. ► Findings indicate that careful interpretation of ductile material fractures is necessary. - Abstract: Fracture surfaces of X100 pipeline steels were examined with optical and electron microscopy after crack tip opening angle fracture testing. Some fracture surfaces exhibited chevron-shaped fracture patterns that are markedly different from classic chevron fracture. The chevron-shaped markings on the X100 fracture surfaces point in the direction of crack growth, rather than towards the location of fracture initiation, as observed in classic cases of chevron fracture. Existing models, predicting formation of chevron fracture patterns, do not explain the fracture behavior observed for X100 steel. A mechanism is proposed where reverse chevron-shaped patterns are developed due to the shape of the crack front itself. The chevron shape forms as a result of crack tunneling, and the overall pattern is developed on the fracture surface due to intermittent crack growth, resulting in alternating regions (bands) of fast fracture and slower, more ductile fracture. The contrast between these bands of alternating fracture defines the chevron. Care should be taken during interpretation of intermittent chevron markings on fractures of ductile materials, as they may point away from rather than towards the origin of fracture.

  16. Conclusions regarding fracture mechanics testing and evaluation of small specimens - As evidenced by the finnish contribution to the IAEA CRP3 programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, K; Valo, M; Rintamaa, R; Torronen, K [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Ahlstrand, R [Imatran Voima Oy (IVO), Helsinki (Finland)

    1994-12-31

    An extensive mechanical property evaluation has been carried out on various specimens (a Japanese steel plate (JRQ), a French forging material (FFA) and a Japanese forging material (JFL)) in the as-received and irradiated conditions. The mechanical properties measured at different temperatures include Charpy-V notch and instrumented pre-cracked Charpy data and static and dynamic elastic-plastic fracture toughness based on the J-integral, with various specimen size and geometry. Test analysis lead to conclusions regarding the use of small specimen fracture mechanical tests for investigating irradiation effects: CVN{sub pc} and RCT type specimens are suitable for determining the materials fracture toughness even in the ductile/brittle transition region provided the elastic-plastic parameter K{sub JC} is applied together with a statistical size correction. These two specimen types yield equivalent results for the fracture toughness transition shift. Charpy-V appears not to be suitable for estimating the static fracture toughness transition shift. 8 refs., 11 figs.

  17. Dynamic fracture mechanics with electromagnetic force and its application to fracture toughness and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, G.; Yoshimura, S.

    1986-01-01

    This study is concerned with the application of the electromagnetic force to the determination of the dynamic fracture toughness of materials. Taken is an edge-cracked specimen which carries a transient electric current I and is simply supported in a uniform and steady magnetic field B. As a result of their interaction, the dynamic electromagnetic force occurs in the whole body of the specimen, which is then deformed to fracture in the opening mode of cracking. For the evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness, the extended J integral with the effects of the electromagnetic force and inertia is calculated using the dynamic finite-element method. To determine the dynamic crack-initiation point in the experiment, the electric potential method is used in the case of brittle fracture, and the electric potential and the J-R curve methods in the case of ductile fracture, respectively. Using these techniques, the dynamic fracture toughness values of nuclear pressure vessel steel A508 class 3 are evaluated over a wide temperature range. (author)

  18. Ductile Crack Initiation Criterion with Mismatched Weld Joints Under Dynamic Loading Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Gyubaek; Jeong, Se-Min; Park, Jeongung

    2018-03-01

    Brittle failure of high toughness steel structures tends to occur after ductile crack initiation/propagation. Damages to steel structures were reported in the Hanshin Great Earthquake. Several brittle failures were observed in beam-to-column connection zones with geometrical discontinuity. It is widely known that triaxial stresses accelerate the ductile fracture of steels. The study examined the effects of geometrical heterogeneity and strength mismatches (both of which elevate plastic constraints due to heterogeneous plastic straining) and loading rate on critical conditions initiating ductile fracture. This involved applying the two-parameter criterion (involving equivalent plastic strain and stress triaxiality) to estimate ductile cracking for strength mismatched specimens under static and dynamic tensile loading conditions. Ductile crack initiation testing was conducted under static and dynamic loading conditions using circumferentially notched specimens (Charpy type) with/without strength mismatches. The results indicated that the condition for ductile crack initiation using the two parameter criterion was a transferable criterion to evaluate ductile crack initiation independent of the existence of strength mismatches and loading rates.

  19. Fracture mechanical materials characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, K.; Planman, T.; Nevalainen, M.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental fracture mechanics development has been focused on the determination of reliable lower-bound fracture toughness estimates from small and miniature specimens, in particular considering the statistical aspects and loading rate effects of fracture mechanical material properties. Additionally, materials aspects in fracture assessment of surface cracks, with emphasis on the transferability of fracture toughness data to structures with surface flaws have been investigated. Further a modified crack-arrest fracture toughness test method, to increase the effectiveness of testing, has been developed. (orig.)

  20. Combined macrosopic and microscopic approach to the fracture of metals, period July 1974--June 1975. Technical progress report No. 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurland, J.; Rice, J.R.

    1975-07-01

    During the report period major studies have been completed on (1) the microscale fracture conditions for the brittle and ductile fracture initiation modes at a macroscopic crack tip, (2) the formulation of dilational plasticity constitutive relations for void containing materials as applied to the inception of ductile rupture, (3) cavity growth during diffusive rupture processes as encountered in creep rupture at low stress but high temperature, and (4) particle and boundary strengthening mechanisms in carbon steels. In addition, work has continued on crack tip modeling by finite elements and mechanisms of ductile void growth near a crack tip

  1. Failure Mechanisms and Damage Model of Ductile Cast Iron Under Low-Cycle Fatigue Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Sloss, Clayton

    2014-10-01

    Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were conducted on ductile cast iron (DCI) at strain rates of 0.02, 0.002, and 0.0002/s in the temperature range from room temperature to 1073 K (800 °C). A constitutive-damage model was developed within the integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) framework on the premise of strain decomposition into rate-independent plasticity and time-dependent creep. Four major damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement (IE), (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation were considered in a nonlinear creep-fatigue interaction model which represents the overall damage accumulation process consisting of oxidation-assisted fatigue crack nucleation and propagation in coalescence with internally distributed damage ( e.g., IE and creep), leading to final fracture. The model was found to agree with the experimental observations of the complex DCI-LCF phenomena, for which the linear damage summation rule would fail.

  2. Heavy-Section Steel Technology program fracture issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    Large scale fracture mechanics tests have resulted in the identification of a number of fracture technology issues. Identification of additional issues has come from the reactor vessel materials irradiation test program and from reactor operating experience. This paper provides a review of fracture issues with an emphasis on their potential impact on a reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS) analysis. Mixed mode crack propagation emerges as a major issue, due in large measure to the poor performance of existing models for the prediction of ductile tearing. Rectification of ductile tearing technology deficiencies may require extending the technology to include a more complete treatment of stress state and loading history effects. The effect of cladding on vessel fracture remains uncertain to the point that it is not possible to determine at this time if the net effect will be positive or negative. Enhanced fracture toughness for shallow flaws has been demonstrated for low strength structural steels. Demonstration of a similar effect in reactor pressure vessel steels could have a significant beneficial effect on the probabilistic analysis of reactor vessel fracture. Further development of existing fracture mechanics models and concepts is required to meet the special requirements for fracture evaluation of circumferential flaws in the welds of ring forged vessels. Fracture technology advances required to address the issues discussed in this paper are the major objective for the ongoing Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at ORNL. 24 refs., 18 figs

  3. Heavy-section steel technology program: Fracture issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    Large-scale fracture mechanics tests have resulted in the identification of a number of fracture technology issues. Identification of additional issues has come from the reactor vessel materials irradiation test program and from reactor operating experience. This paper provides a review of fracture issues with an emphasis on their potential impact on a reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS) analysis. Mixed mode crack propagation emerges as a major issue, due in large measure to the poor performance of existing models for the prediction of ductile tearing. Rectification of ductile tearing technology deficiencies may require extending the technology to include a more complete treatment of stress state and loading history effects. The effect of cladding on vessel fracture remains uncertain to the point that it is not possible to determine at this time if the net effect will be positive or negative. Enhanced fracture toughness for shallow flaws has been demonstrated for low-strength structural steels. Demonstration of a similar effect in reactor pressure vessel steels could have a significant beneficial effect on the probabilistic analysis of reactor vessel fracture. Further development of existing fracture mechanics models and concepts is required to meet the special requirements for fracture evaluation of circumferential flaws in the welds of ring-forged vessels. Fracture technology advances required to address the issues discussed in this paper are the major objective for the ongoing Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at ORNL

  4. Techniques developed to evaluate the fracture toughness offast breeder reactor duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Wire, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Large changes in strength and ductility of metals after irradiation are known to occur. The fracture toughness of irradiated metals, which is related to the combined strength and ductility of a material, may be significantly reduced and the potential for unstable crack extension increased. Therefore, the resistance of cladding and duct materials to fracture after exposure to fast neutron environments is of concern. Existing Type 316 stainless steel irradiated ducts are relatively thin and since this material retains substantial ductility, even after irradiation, the fracture behavior of the duct material cannot be analyzed by linear elastic fracture mechanics techniques. Instead, the multispecimen R-curve method and J-integral analysis were used to develop an experimental approach to evaluate the fracture toughness of thin breeder reactor duct materials irradiated at elevated temperatures. Alloy A-286 was chosen for these experiments because the alloy exhibits elastic/plastic behavior and the fracture toughness data of thicker (12 mm) specimens were available for comparison. Technical problems associated with specimen buckling and remote handling were treated in this work. The results are discussed in terms of thickness criterion for plane strain

  5. An analytical model for the ductile failure of biaxially loaded type 316 stainless steel subjected to thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimelfi, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Failure properties are calculated for the case of biaxially loaded type 316 stainless steel tubes that are heated from 300 K to near melting at various constant rates. The procedure involves combining a steady state plastic-deformation rate law with a strain hardening equation. Integrating under the condition of plastic instability gives the time and plastic strain at which ductile failure occurs for a given load. The result is presented as an analytical expression for equivalent plastic strain as a function of equivalent stress, temperature, heating rate and material constants. At large initial load, ductile fracture is calculated to occur early, at low temperatures, after very little deformation. At very small loads deformation continues for a long time to high temperatures where creep rupture mechanisms limit ductility. In the case of intermediate loads, the plastic strain accumulated before the occurrence of unstable ductile fracture is calculated. Comparison of calculated results is made with existing experimental data from pressurized tubes heated at 5.6 K/s and 111 K/s. When the effect of grain growth on creep ductility is taken into account from recrystallization data, agreement between measured and calculated uniform ductility is excellent. The general reduction in ductility and failure time that is observed at higher heating rate is explained via the model. The model provides an analytical expression for the ductility and failure time during transients for biaxially loaded type 316 stainless steel as a function of the initial temperature and load, as well as the material creep and strain hardening parameters. (orig.)

  6. Low-temperature embrittlement and fracture of metals with different crystal lattices – Dislocation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Chernov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of a low-temperature embrittlement (cold brittleness and dislocation mechanisms for formation of the temperature of a ductile-brittle transition and brittle fracture of metals (mono- and polycrystals with various crystal lattices (BCC, FCC, HCP are considered. The conditions for their formation connected with a stress-deformed state and strength (low temperature yield strength as well as the fracture breaking stress and mobility of dislocations in the top of a crack of the fractured metal are determined. These conditions can be met for BCC and some HCP metals in the initial state (without irradiation and after a low-temperature damaging (neutron irradiation. These conditions are not met for FCC and many HCP metals. In the process of the damaging (neutron irradiation such conditions are not met also and the state of low-temperature embrittlement of metals is absent (suppressed due to arising various radiation dynamic processes, which increase the mobility of dislocations and worsen the strength characteristics.

  7. First spinning cylinder test analysis by using local approach to fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eripret, C.; Rousselier, G.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, several experimental programs on large scale specimens were organized to evaluate capabilities of the fracture mechanics concepts employed in structural integrity assessment of PWR pressure vessels. During the first spinning cylinder test, a geometry effect was experimentally pointed out and exhibited the problem of transferability of toughness data from small scale to large scale specimens. An original analysis of this test, by means of local approach to fracture is presented in this paper. Both compact tension specimen and spinning cylinder fracture behaviour were computed by using a continuum damage mechanics model developed at EDF. The authors confirmed by numerical analysis that the cylinder's resistance to ductile tearing was considerably larger than in small scale fracture mechanics specimens tests, about 50 percent. The final crack growth predicted by the model was close to the experimental value. Discrepancies in J-R curves seemed to be due to an effect of stress triaxiality and plastic zone evolution. The geometry effect inducing differences in resistance to ductile tearing of the material involved in the specimens can be investigated and explained by using local approach to fracture methodology. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Value/impact of design criteria for cast ductile iron shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The ductile failure criteria proposed in the Base report appear appropriate except that stress intensity values, S/sub m/ should be based on lower safety factors and ductility should be added as a criterion. A safety factor for stress intensity, s/sub m/ of 4 is recommended rather than 3 on minimum ultimate tensile strength, S/sub u/ in accordance with ASME code philosophy of assigning higher safety factors to cast ductile iron than to steel. This more conservative approach has no impact on costs since the selection of wall thickness is controlled by shielding rather than by stress considerations. The addition of a ductility criterion is recommended because of the problems associated with the selection of appropriate brittle failure criteria and the potential for cast ductile iron to have extremely low elongation at failure. Neither a materials nor a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach appear to be viable for demonstrating the prevention of brittle failure in cast ductile iron shipping casks. It is possible that the analytic methods predict brittle failure because of extremely conservative assumptions whereas real casks may not fail. Model drop tests could be used to demonstrate containment integrity. It is estimated that a risk committment of at least $1,000,000 would be required for engineering, design, model fabrication and testing. Before taking such risks, a mechanism should be found to obtain concurrence from NRC that the results of the test would be acceptable. Probabilistic approaches or model testing could be used to demonstrate the acceptability of cast ductile iron casks from a brittle failure point of view. Before probabilistic methods can be used, the NRC would have to be persuaded to accept the approach of the Competent Authority in West Germany or more formalized methods for probabilistic risk assessments

  9. Influence of austempering heat treatment on mechanical and corrosion properties of ductile iron samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Janjić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of metals are closely related to the microstructure characteristics of the material. The paper compares the results of these two sets of properties after investigating samples of base ductile iron and heat-treated samples of the base austempered ductile iron (ADI. The basic material is perlite ferritic iron alloyed with copper and nickel. To test the corrosion rate of the base material (ductile iron and the heattreated samples (ADI, electrochemical techniques of potentiostatic polarization were used (the technique of Tafel curves extrapolation and the potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  10. Influence of two different heat treatment procedures on mechanical and fracture properties of 65 Si 7 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustaic, D.; Cajner, F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of investigations of two different heat treatment procedures and their influence on some mechanical properties as well as on the magnitude of some fracture mechanics parameters for a particular type of steel. The experimental investigations were performed on the specimens made of 65Si7 steel. The processes occurring by tempering of two different microstructures of the steel, i. e. martensite and lower bainite were investigated. An advantage of austempering over hardening and tempering is in obtaining the bainite microstructure. Steel of bainite microstructure has a greater toughness, ductility, contraction, fatigue strength and a better fracture toughness than a tempered martensite of the same type of steel. A bainite microstructure also gives a better resistance to thermal fatigue in comparison with martensite microstructure. The above mentioned improved values of mechanical properties refer to the untempered state of bainite. (author)

  11. Ductile fracture toughness of modified A 302 grade B plate materials. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D.E.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Swain, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this work was to develop ductile fracture toughness data in the form of J-R curves for modified A 302 grade B plate materials typical of those used in fabricating reactor pressure vessels. A previous experimental study at Materials Engineering Associates (MEA) on one particular heat of A 302 grade B plate showed decreasing J-R curves with increased specimen thickness. This characteristic has not been observed in numerous tests made on the more recent production materials of A 533 grade B and A 508 class 2 pressure vessel steels. It was unknown if the departure from norm for the MEA material was a generic characteristic for all heats of A 302 grade B steels or just unique to that one particular plate. Seven heats of modified A 302 grade B steel and one heat of vintage A 533 grade B steel were provided to this project by the General Electric Company of San Jose, California. All plates were tested for chemical content, tensile properties, Charpy transition temperature curves, drop-weight nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature, and J-R curves. Tensile tests were made in the three principal orientations and at four temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 550 degrees F (288 degrees C). Charpy V-notch transition temperature curves were obtained in longitudinal, transverse, and short transverse orientations. J-R curves were made using four specimen sizes (1/2T, IT, 2T, and 4T). None of the seven heats of modified A 302 grade showed size effects of any consequence on the J-R curve behavior. Crack orientation effects were present, but none were severe enough to be reported as atypical. A test temperature increase from 180 to 550 degrees F (82 to 288 degrees C) produced the usual loss in J-R curve fracture toughness. Generic J-R curves and mathematical curve fits to the same were generated to represent each heat of material. This volume is a compilation of all data developed

  12. Ductile fracture toughness of heavy section pressure vessel steel plate. A specimen-size study of ASTM A 533 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.A.

    1979-09-01

    The ductile fracture toughness, J/sub Ic/, of ASTM A 533, Grade B, Class 1 and ASTM A 533, heat treated to simulate irradiation, was determined for 10- to 100-mm thick compact specimens. The toughness at maximum specimen load was also measured to determine the conservatism of J/sub Ic/. The toughness of ASTM A 533, Grade B, Class 1 steel was 349 kJ/m 2 and at the equivalent upper shelf temperature, the heat treated material exhibited 87 kJ/m 2 . The maximum load fracture toughness was found to be linearly proportional to specimen size, and only specimens which failed to meet ASTM size criteria exhibited maximum load toughness less than J/sub Ic/

  13. A roadmap for tailoring the strength and ductility of ferritic/martensitic T91 steel via thermo-mechanical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, M.; Sun, C.; Fan, Z.; Chen, Y.; Zhu, R.; Yu, K.Y.; Hartwig, K.T.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels with high strength and excellent ductility are important candidate materials for the life extension of the current nuclear reactors and the design of next generation nuclear reactors. Recent studies show that equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) was able to improve mechanical strength of ferritic T91 steels moderately. Here, we examine several strategies to further enhance the mechanical strength of T91 while maintaining its ductility. Certain thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) processes enabled by combinations of ECAE, water quench, and tempering may lead to “ductile martensite” with exceptionally high strength in T91 steel. The evolution of microstructures and mechanical properties of T91 steel were investigated in detail, and transition carbides were identified in water quenched T91 steel. This study provides guidelines for tailoring the microstructure and mechanical properties of T91 steel via ECAE enabled TMT for an improved combination of strength and ductility.

  14. Ductile-brittle transition behaviour of PLA/o-MMT films during the physical aging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ll. Maspoch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ductile-brittle transition behaviour of organo modified montmorillonite-based Poly(lactic acid films (PLA/o-MMT was analysed using the Essential Work of Fracture (EWF methodology, Small Punch Tests (SPT and Enthalpy relaxation analysis. While the EWF methodology could only be applied successfully to de-aged samples, small punch test (SPT was revealed as more effective for a mechanical characterization during the transient behaviour from ductile to brittle. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results, physical aging at 30°C of PLA/o-MMT samples exhibited slower enthalpy relaxation kinetics as compared to the pristine polymer. Although all samples exhibited an equivalent thermodynamic state after being stored one week at 30°C, significant differences were observed in the mechanical performances. These changes could be attributed to the toughening mechanisms promoted by o-MMT.

  15. A ductile fracture analysis using a local damage model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benseddiq, N. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et de Rheologie de Tours, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs du Val de Loire (ENIVL), Rue de la Chocolaterie, 41000 Blois Cedex (France)], E-mail: nbensedd@polytech-lille.fr; Imad, A. [Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR CNRS 8107), USTL, Ecole Polytechnique Universitaire de Lille Cite Scientifique, Avenue P. Langevin, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2008-04-15

    In this study, the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model is used to investigate ductile tearing. The sensitivity of the model parameters has been examined from literature data. Three types of parameters have been reported: the 'constitutive parameters'q{sub 1}, q{sub 2} and q{sub 3}, the 'initial material and nucleation parameters' and the 'critical and final failure parameters'. Each parameter in this model has been analysed in terms of various results in the literature. Both experimental and numerical results have been obtained for notched round and CT specimens to characterize ductile failure in a NiCr steel (12NC6) with a small initial void volume fraction f{sub 0} (f{sub 0}=0.001%). Ductile crack growth, defined by the J-{delta}a curve, has been correctly simulated using the numerical calculations by adjusting the different parameters of the GTN model in the calibration procedure.

  16. The application of fracture mechanics to the safety assessment of transport casks for radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zencker, U.; Mueller, K.; Droste, B.; Roedel, R.; Voelzke, H.

    2004-01-01

    BAM is the German responsible authority for the mechanical and thermal design safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials. The assessment has to cover the brittle fracture safety proof of package components made of potentially brittle materials. This paper gives a survey of the regulatory and technical requirements for such an assessment according to BAM's new ''Guidelines for the Application of Ductile Cast Iron for Transport and Storage Casks for Radioactive Materials''. Based on these guidelines higher stresses than before can become permissible, but it is necessary to put more effort into the safety assessment procedure. The fundamentals of such a proof with the help of the methods of fracture mechanics are presented. The recommended procedure takes into account the guidelines of the IAEA Advisory Material which are based on the prevention of crack initiation. Examples of BAM's research and safety assessment practices are given. Recommendations for further developments towards package designs with higher acceptable stress levels will be concluded

  17. The application of fracture mechanics to the safety assessment of transport casks for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zencker, U.; Mueller, K.; Droste, B.; Roedel, R.; Voelzke, H.

    2004-01-01

    BAM is the responsible authority in Germany for the assessment of the mechanical and thermal design safety of packages for the transport of radioactive materials. The assessment has to cover the brittle fracture safety 'proof of package' for components made of potentially brittle materials. This paper gives a survey of the regulatory and technical requirements for such an assessment according to BAM's new 'Guidelines for the application of ductile cast iron for transport and storage casks for radioactive materials'. Based on these guidelines, higher stresses than before will be permissible, but it is necessary to put more effort into the safety assessment procedure. The fundamentals of such a proof using the methods of fracture mechanics are presented. The recommended procedure takes into account the guidelines of the IAEA's advisory material which are based on the prevention of crack initiation. Examples of BAM's research and safety assessment practices are given. Recommendations for further developments towards package designs with higher acceptable stress levels will conclude the paper. (author)

  18. Flow and fracture of alloys in the fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    The present paper examines both ductile and brittle fracture models of steels and assesses the impact of the fusion reactor environment on the fracture processes. In particular, the connections between plastic flow properties and fracture modes are reviewed for both ductile and brittle crack propagation. Highly radiation-hardened materials exhibit extreme flow location resulting in channel fracture. Physical models for this phenomon are developed and an estimate for the associated fracture toughness is given. The impact of radiation-hardening and ductility loss on fatigue crack growth is examined. Next, models describing the chemical effects on fatigue and fracture are briefly discussed. Finally, fracture design criteria are proposed for first wall structures in fusion reactors. (orig.)

  19. Fracture mechanics. With an introduction to micromechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.

    2006-01-01

    Concerned with the fundamental concepts and methods of fracture mechanics and micromechanics, Fracture Mechanics primarily focuses on the mechanical description of the fracture process; however, material specific aspects are also discussed. The presentation of continuum mechanical and phenomenological foundations is followed by an introduction into classical failure hypotheses. A major part of the book is devoted to linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Further subjects are creep fracture, dynamic fracture mechanics, damage mechanics, probabilistic fracture mechanics, failure of thin films and fracture of piezoelectric materials. The book also contains an extensive introduction into micromechanics. Self-contained and well-illustrated, this text serves as a graduate-level text and reference

  20. Development of small punch tests for ductile-brittle transition temperature measurement of temper embrittled Ni-Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, J.M.; Kameda, J.; Buck, O.

    1983-01-01

    Small punch tests were developed to determine the ductile-brittle transition temperature of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) steels having various degrees of temper embrittlement and various microstructures. It was found that the small punch test clearly shows the ductile-brittle transition behavior of the temper-embrittled steels. The measured values were compared with those obtained from Charpy impact and uniaxial tensile tests. The effects of punch tip shape, a notch, and the strain rate on the ductile-brittle transition behavior were examined. It was found that the combined use of a notch, high strain rates, and a small punch tip strongly affects the ductile-brittle transition behavior. Considerable variations in the data were observed when the small punch tests were performed on coarse-grained steels. Several factors controlling embrittlement measurements of steels are discussed in terms of brittle fracture mechanisms

  1. Prediction of non-brittle fracture in the welded joint of C-Mn steel in the brittle-ductile transition domain; Prediction de la non-rupture fragile dans un joint soude en acier C-Mn dans le domaine de la transition fragile/ductile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thai Ha

    2009-11-15

    This work concerns the nuclear safety, specifically the secondary circuit integrity of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The problem is that of the fracture of a thin tubular structure in ferritic steel with many welded joints. The ferritic steel and weld present a brittle/ductile tenacity transition. Moreover, the welds present geometry propitious to the appearance of fatigue cracks, due to vibrations and expansions. These cracks may cause the complete fracture of the structure. The objectives of this work are to establish a criterion of non-fracture by cleavage of thin welded structures in ferritic steel, applicable to actual structures. Therefore, the present study focuses on the fracture behaviour of welded thin structures in brittle/ductile transition. It aims at developing the threshold stress model initially proposed by Chapuliot, to predict the non-brittle-fracture of this welded structure. The model is identified for the welded joint in C-Mn steel for nuclear construction, specifically in the upper part of the transition. A threshold stress, below which the cleavage cannot take place, is identified using tensile tests at low temperature on axis-symmetrical notched specimens taken in welded joint. This threshold stress is used to define the threshold volume where the maximum principal stress exceeds the threshold stress during the test. The analysis by SEM of specimen fracture surfaces shows that the gross solidification molten zone in the weld is the most likely to cleave. The relation between the brittle fracture probability and the threshold volume in the gross solidification molten zone is established via a sensitivity function, using multi-materials simulations. The model thus identified is tested for the prediction of non-brittle-fracture of SENT specimens taken in the welded joint and tested in tension. The results obtained are encouraging with regards to the transferability of the model to the actual structure. (author)

  2. Future trends in fracture mechanics: theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosbons, R.R.

    1978-05-01

    A brief description of the current methods available for the analysis of fracture in ductile materials is given. Crack-opening displacement, R-curves and J-integrals are discussed and their future incorporation into structural codes assessed. The current areas of research which will probably influence code making bodies are also described. Emphasis is made on J-integral theory and a description of its limitations and extensions. Numerical techniques for calculating J for complicated structure are outlined. (author)

  3. Ductile and brittle transition behavior of titanium alloys in ultra-precision machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, W S; To, S

    2018-03-02

    Titanium alloys are extensively applied in biomedical industries due to their excellent material properties. However, they are recognized as difficult to cut materials due to their low thermal conductivity, which induces a complexity to their deformation mechanisms and restricts precise productions. This paper presents a new observation about the removal regime of titanium alloys. The experimental results, including the chip formation, thrust force signal and surface profile, showed that there was a critical cutting distance to achieve better surface integrity of machined surface. The machined areas with better surface roughness were located before the clear transition point, defining as the ductile to brittle transition. The machined area at the brittle region displayed the fracture deformation which showed cracks on the surface edge. The relationship between depth of cut and the ductile to brittle transaction behavior of titanium alloys in ultra-precision machining(UPM) was also revealed in this study, it showed that the ductile to brittle transaction behavior of titanium alloys occurred mainly at relatively small depth of cut. The study firstly defines the ductile to brittle transition behavior of titanium alloys in UPM, contributing the information of ductile machining as an optimal machining condition for precise productions of titanium alloys.

  4. Ductilization of Cr via oxide dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.P.; Wright, I.G.; Anderson, I.M.; Sikka, V.K.; Ohriner, E.K.; Walls, C.; Westmoreland, G.; Weaver, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Work by Scruggs et al. in the 1960's demonstrated that up to 20 % tensile ductility could be achieved at room-temperature in sintered and extruded powder metallurgical Cr alloyed with MgO. During sintering, much of the MgO converts to a MgCr 2 O 4 spinel, which was hypothesized to getter nitrogen from the Cr, rendering it ductile. Recent efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have succeeded in duplicating this original effect. Preliminary results suggest that the ductilization mechanism may be more complicated than the simple nitrogen gettering mechanism proposed by Scruggs, as some ductility was observed at room-temperature in Cr-MgO alloys containing nitride precipitates. Results of microstructural characterization and room-temperature mechanical property studies are presented for Cr-6MgO-(0-2.2) Ti wt.% as a function of hot-pressing and extrusion. Possible mechanisms by which the MgO additions may improve the room-temperature ductility of Cr are discussed. (author)

  5. Numerical modelling of ductile damage mechanics coupled with an unconventional plasticity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fincato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ductility in metals includes the material’s capability to tolerate plastic deformations before partial or total degradation of its mechanical properties. Modelling this parameter is important in structure and component design because it can be used to estimate material failure under a generic multi-axial stress state. Previous work has attempted to provide accurate descriptions of the mechanical property degradation resulting from the formation, growth, and coalescence of microvoids in the medium. Experimentally, ductile damage is inherently linked with the accumulation of plastic strain; therefore, coupling damage and elastoplasticity is necessary for describing this phenomenon accurately. In this paper, we combine the approach proposed by Lemaitre with the features of an unconventional plasticity model, the extended subloading surface model, to predict material fatigue even for loading conditions below the yield stress

  6. Mechanical properties of fracture zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leijon, B.

    1993-05-01

    Available data on mechanical characteristics of fracture zones are compiled and discussed. The aim is to improve the basis for adequate representation of fracture zones in geomechanical models. The sources of data researched are primarily borehole investigations and case studies in rock engineering, involving observations of fracture zones subjected to artificial load change. Boreholes only yield local information about the components of fracture zones, i.e. intact rock, fractures and various low-strength materials. Difficulties are therefore encountered in evaluating morphological and mechanical properties of fracture zones from borehole data. Although often thought of as macroscopically planar features, available field data consistently show that fracture zones are characterized by geometrical irregularities such as thickness variations, surface undulation and jogs. These irregularities prevail on all scales. As a result, fracture zones are on all scales characterized by large, in-plane variation of strength- and deformational properties. This has important mechanical consequences in terms of non-uniform stress transfer and complex mechanisms of shear deformation. Field evidence for these findings, in particular results from the underground research laboratory in Canada and from studies of induced fault slip in deep mines, is summarized and discussed. 79 refs

  7. Influence of material ductility and crack surface roughness on fracture instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khezrzadeh, Hamed; Wnuk, Michael P; Yavari, Arash

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis for fractal cracks. First, the Westergaard stress functions are proposed for semi-infinite and finite smooth cracks embedded in the stress fields associated with the corresponding self-affine fractal cracks. These new stress functions satisfy all the required boundary conditions and according to Wnuk and Yavari's (2003 Eng. Fract. Mech. 70 1659-74) embedded crack model they are used to derive the stress and displacement fields generated around a fractal crack. These results are then used in conjunction with the final stretch criterion to study the quasi-static stable crack extension, which in ductile materials precedes the global failure. The material resistance curves are determined by solving certain nonlinear differential equations and then employed in predicting the stress levels at the onset of stable crack growth and at the critical point, where a transition to the catastrophic failure occurs. It is shown that the incorporation of the fractal geometry into the crack model, i.e. accounting for the roughness of the crack surfaces, results in (1) higher threshold levels of the material resistance to crack propagation and (2) higher levels of the critical stresses associated with the onset of catastrophic fracture. While the process of quasi-static stable crack growth (SCG) is viewed as a sequence of local instability states, the terminal instability attained at the end of this process is identified with the global instability. The phenomenon of SCG can be used as an early warning sign in fracture detection and prevention.

  8. Status report on experiments and modelling of the cleavage fracture behaviour of F82Hmod using local fracture grid. Task TTMS-005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch-Oppermann, H.; Walter, M.

    2001-09-01

    Within the European Fusion Technology Programme framework, a fracture mechanics description of the material behaviour in the ductile to brittle transition-regime is developed using local fracture criteria. Based on experimental results using axisymmetrically notched and pre-cracked specimens together with a numerical stress analysis at fracture load, a statistical evaluation of cleavage fracture parameters can be performed along the lines described in various code schemes such as the British Energy R6-Code or the ESIS P6 procedure. The report contains results of the experimental characterization of the deformation and fracture behaviour of the fusion candidate RAFM steel variant F82Hmod, details and background of the numerical procedure for cleavage fracture parameter determination as well as additional statistical inference methods for transferability analysis. Fractographic results give important information about fracture mode and fracture origin sites and their location. Numerical prediction of fracture origin distribution is an important tool for transferability assessment. Future issues comprise constraint effect and ductile damage as well as incorporation of irradiation effects, which are topically addressed. The methodology developed and described in the present report will be applied to characterize material behaviour of future RAFM variants as the EUROFER 97, for which analysis is currently under way. (orig.)

  9. Influence of temperature and grain size on the tensile ductility of AISI 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannan, S.L.; Samuel, K.G.; Rodriguez, P.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of tmeperature and grain size on the tensile ductility of AISI 316 stainless steel has been examined in the temperature range 300-1223 K for specimens with grain sizes varying from 0.025 to 0.650 mm at a nominal strain rate of 3 X 10 -4 s -1 . The percentage total elongation and reduction in area at fracture show minimum ductility at an intermediate temperature, and the temperature corresponding to this ductility minimum has been found to increase with increase in grain size. The total elongation is found to decrease with increase in grain size at high temperatures where failures are essentially intergranular in nature. At 300 K, both uniform and total elongation increase with increase in grain size and then show a small decrease for a very coarse grain size. The high ductility observed at low temperatures (300 K) is consistent with the observation of characteristic dimples associated with transgranular ductile fracture. The ductility minimum with respect to temperature is associated with the occurrence of intergranular fracture, as evidenced by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The present results support the suggestion that the ductility minimum coincides with the maximum amount of grain boundary sliding; at temperatures beyond the ductility minimum, grain boundary separation by cavitation is retarded by the occurrence of grain boundary migration, as evidenced by the grain boundary cusps. In tests conducted at various strain rates in the range 10 -3 -10 -6 s -1 at 873 K the ductility was found to decrease with decreasing strain rate, emphasizing the increased importance of grain boundary sliding at lower strain rates. (Auth.)

  10. Fracture of Fully-coated Femoral Stem after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty for Nonunion of Intertrochanteric Fracture: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Young Soo; Juh, Hyung Suk; Cho, Yoon Je; Rhyu, Kee Hyung

    2015-09-01

    Femoral stem fracture is an uncommon reason for the failure of total hip arthroplasty, with only 16 cases of fully coated stem fractures reported to date. Here we report a case in which a fully coated primary femoral stem fracture occurred after conversion to total hip arthroplasty for the non-union of an intertrochanteric fracture of the femur. Metallurgic evaluation of the etiology and mechanism revealed that the fracture was initiated by fatigue-related failure and completed by ductile failure on the posterior side of the fracture. Considering the recent trend of treating an intertrochanteric fracture with hip arthroplasty, possible stem failure should be considered, since most patients will have at least one of the known risk factors for stem fracture.

  11. The effect of advanced ultrasonic forging on fatigue fracture mechanisms of welded Ti-6A1-4V alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, A.; Pochivalov, Yu.; Panin, V.; Panin, S.; Eremin, A.; Gorbunov, A.

    2017-12-01

    The current study is devoted to application of advanced postwelding ultrasonic forging to joints formed by laser welding of Ti-6A1-4V alloy in order to enhance their mechanical properties and fatigue durability. Low cycle fatigue tests were performed via digital image correlation technique used to obtain strain fields and in situ characterization of deformation, crack growth and fracture. Fracture surfaces were studied by SEM analysis accompanied with calculation of fracture patterns percentage. The fatigue tests demonstrate the high increase in the number of cycles until fracture (from 17 000 to 32 000 cycles) which could be explained by high ductility of welded material after treatment. This leads to lower fatigue crack growth rate due to higher energy dissipation. The obtained effect is attributable only for small cracks on micro-/mesoscales and fails to play a significant role for macro cracks.

  12. Analyses of cavitation instabilities in ductile metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    Cavitation instabilities have been predicted for a single void in a ductile metal stressed under high triaxiality conditions. In experiments for a ceramic reinforced by metal particles a single dominant void has been observed on the fracture surface of some of the metal particles bridging a crack......, and also tests for a thin ductile metal layer bonding two ceramic blocks have indicated rapid void growth. Analyses for these material configurations are discussed here. When the void radius is very small, a nonlocal plasticity model is needed to account for observed size-effects, and recent analyses......, while the surrounding voids are represented by a porous ductile material model in terms of a field quantity that specifies the variation of the void volume fraction in the surrounding metal....

  13. Ductile growth of crack like flawing during hydrotest; Propagacao dutil de defeitos planares durante teste hidrostatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Jose C; Donato, Guilherme V [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Silva, Marcinei S. da; Bastian, Fernando L [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE); Lima, Romulo S. de [PETROBRAS/AB-RE, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    In this paper effects of hydrostatic testing on ductile propagation of crack like flaw defects were evaluated in API X-60 steel. The model used was based on the J-tearing theory, supported by elastic - plastic fracture mechanics. The J-initiation resistance values (JIc) were determined by fracture mechanic tests using potential drop technique and compact test specimen. The JIc values were also determined from flow stress and Charpy V-notch at plateau, which are both usually available in mill-test data. Despite of being based on small database it seems it could be extended and it will be useful for future analysis. (author)

  14. The relationship between material fracture resistance and the kinetics of fracture in steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irvine, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    The conditions necessary for the onset of fast brittle fracture are reasonably well understood. However with increasing material ductility at normal engineering stress levels the effects of structure size and type of loading become more important and make the understanding of the behaviour of large structures and laboratory test pieces and their inter-relation, more difficult.By using Berry's concept of a fracture locus, it is shown that the crack size - stress level - material fracture resistance relationship, as typified for instance by the Griffith-Irwin formulae, is necessary and sufficient for defining the point at which fast brittle fracture occurs, but that in the case of fast ductile fracture it is not sufficient by itself and must be supplemented by a description of the unloading path of the structural system. Although the demarcation line between these two types of behaviour is seen to be dependent on stress level it can nevertheless provide a definition of brittle and ductile fracture in engineering structures. Berry's use of the Griffith equation to describe the separation of the crack tip material limits any practical use of his locus equation to stress levels that are low by present day engineering standards. Consideration is given to the use of relationships describing crack tip failure which are more appropriate for the ductilities and stress levels of current engineering interest. These equations explicitly involve the size of the crack tip perturbation and therefore allow a direct check to be made on validity. Examples are given of the application of these methods to describe fractures which have occurred in structural components. (author)

  15. Evaluation of ductile tearing in a cracked component with a simple method (Js)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, D.; Drubay, B.; Clement, G.; Nedelec, M.

    1995-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, it is more and more usual to perform fracture assessment on detective structures made of ductile material with the help of elastoplastic' fracture mechanics relying on the parameter J. Several engineering methods have been developed in the past to calculate this parameter. These results were used to develop a practical procedure noted Js method which simply gives J as function of elastically calculated Je and a plastic correction factor. This method has been introduced in the A16 rule developed jointly by CEA-EdF and Novatome for fast breeder reactors in particular in order to evaluate the loading at crack instability taking into a account ductile tearing. The determination of initiation has already been presented. This determination of the loading at crack instability is examined through two simple but representative examples using the simplified estimation of J. Predicted loadings at crack instability are compared with experimental results. This study was carried out a part of cooperative program with the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire of the CEA. (author) 12 refs., 10 figs

  16. Combined macroscopic and microscopic approach to the fracture of metals. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaro, R.J.; Gurland, J.; Needleman, A.; Rice, R.J.

    1979-06-01

    Progress is reported on microscopic fracture mechanisms, including studies of void and crack initiation in steels in the absence and presence of hydrogen, the effects of hydrogen on ductile fracture in medium and high carbon steels; elastic--plastic crack growth including the quasi-stable growth of cracks in ductile solids under increasing load and conditions of instability; and elevated temperature rupture including analysis of the stress field near a crack tip in an elastic-nonlinear viscous material under tensile load as well as the processes of diffusion, and cavitation of grain boundaries in plastically creeping materials

  17. Energy based methods for determining elastic plastic fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    Several methods are currently in use or under study for calculating various conditions of fracturing for varying degrees of plasticity. Among these are innovations on the J-integral concept, crack opening displacement or angle, the two parameter concept and the equivalent energy method. Methods involving crack arrest and ductile tearing also fall in this category. Each of these methods have many salient points and some efforts are underway to establish the underlying relationship between them. In this paper, the current research directions of J-integral and equivalent energy methodologies are reviewed with a broader discussion presented for the equivalent energy methodology. The fundamental basis of equivalent energy methodology rests with the volumetric energy ratio. For fractures governed by linear elastic fracture mechanics, the volumetric energy ratio is independent of flaw size and geometry and depends only on the scale factor between model and prototype and temperature. The behavioral aspects of the volumetric energy ratios have been investigated throughout the temperature range from brittle fracture to fully ductile fracture. For five different specimen and structural configurations it has been shown experimentally that the volumetric energy ratio retains its basic properties. That is, the volumetric energy ratio while changing in actual value, maintains its independence of geometry and flaw size while retaining a unique dependence on scale factor and temperature. This property interpreted in terms of fracture mechanics leads to the equivalent energy method. (orig.)

  18. Fracture mechanics of hydroxyapatite single crystals under geometric confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libonati, Flavia; Nair, Arun K; Vergani, Laura; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-04-01

    Geometric confinement to the nanoscale, a concept that refers to the characteristic dimensions of structural features of materials at this length scale, has been shown to control the mechanical behavior of many biological materials or their building blocks, and such effects have also been suggested to play a crucial role in enhancing the strength and toughness of bone. Here we study the effect of geometric confinement on the fracture mechanism of hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals that form the mineralized phase in bone. We report a series of molecular simulations of HAP crystals with an edge crack on the (001) plane under tensile loading, and we systematically vary the sample height whilst keeping the sample and the crack length constant. We find that by decreasing the sample height the stress concentration at the tip of the crack disappears for samples with a height smaller than 4.15nm, below which the material shows a different failure mode characterized by a more ductile mechanism with much larger failure strains, and the strength approaching that of a flaw-less crystal. This study directly confirms an earlier suggestion of a flaw-tolerant state that appears under geometric confinement and may explain the mechanical stability of the reinforcing HAP platelets in bone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High temperature tensile properties and fracture characteristics of bimodal 12Cr-ODS steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Ankur; Litvinov, Dimitri; Aktaa, Jarir

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the tensile properties and fracture characteristics of a 12Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. The tensile tests were carried out at four different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 700 °C, at a nominal strain rate of 10"−"3 s"−"1. At room temperature the material exhibits a high tensile strength of 1294 MPa and high yield strength of 1200 MPa. At 700 °C, the material still exhibits relatively high tensile strength of 300 MPa. The total elongation-to-failure exceeds 18% over the whole temperature range and has a maximum value of 29% at 600 °C. This superior ductility is attributed to the material's bimodal grain size distribution. In comparison to other commercial, as well as experimental, ODS steels, the material shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. The fracture surface studies reveal a change in fracture behavior from a mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. At 700 °C, the fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture, which is associated with a reduced ductility. - Highlights: • The steel has a unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. • The steel shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. • Superior ductility in comparison to other commercial and experimental ODS steels. • Fracture behavior changes from mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. • Fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture at 700 °C.

  20. Determination of the fracture thoughness curve within the ductile brittle transition region in ferritic steel AISI4140

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, R.; Orozco, E.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show the validity in the employment of small test tubes (1/2 T) in order to determine the fracture thoughness in ferritic steels that experience the beginning of cracking by cleavage, to elastic instability, and/or elasto-plastic. It was calculated the change of fracture thoughness in the ductile brittle transition region like function of the temperature employing statistic methods for steel to the annealed carbon of the type AISI4140. The testings were carried out within an interval of temperatures, where the cracking by cleavage and/or pop-in occurs. The thoughness curve of the cracking in the transition region was determined, in small test tubes 1/2 T, and in standard test tubes, 1T. It was calculated the beginning of instability of the integral J, J IC , and was converted to its equivalent in K JC units based in the ASTM Standard rev. 6-12-95 (ref. 6). (Author)

  1. Development of a plastic fracture methodology for nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.U.; Jones, R.L.; Kanninen, M.F.; Mowbray, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes research conducted to develop a fundamental basis for flaw tolerance assessment procedures suitable for components exhibiting ductile behavior. The research was composed of an integrated combination of stable crack growth experiments and elastic-plastic analyses. A number of candidate fracture criteria were assembled and investigated to determine the proper basis for plastic fracture mechanics assessments. The results demonstrate that many different fracture criteria can be used as the basis of a resistance curve approach to predicting stable crack growth and fracture instability. While all have some disadvantages, none is completely unacceptable. On balance, the best criteria were found to be the J-integral for initiation and limited amounts of stable crack growth and the local crack-tip opening angle for extended amounts of stable growth. A combination of the two, which may preserve the advantages of each while reducing their disadvantages, also was suggested by these results. The influence of biaxial and mixed flat/shear fracture behavior was investigated and found to not alter the basic results. Further work in the development of simplified ductile fracture analyses for routine engineering assessments of nuclear pressure vessels and piping evolving from this research is also described

  2. Ductility in hot isostatically pressed 250-grade maraging steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, R.M.; Smugeresky, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    Prealloyed 250-grade maraging steel powder produced by the rotating electrode process was fully consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1100 and 1200 0 C. The strength following aging (3 h at 480 0 C) equalled that of wrought material; however, ductility was negligible. This lack of ductility in the powder metallurgy product was traced to titanium segregation which occurred at the powder surface during power production. The formation of a titanium intermetallic at the prior particle boundaries during aging caused failure at low plastic strains. Altered aging treatments successfully broke up the embrittling film and resulted in a significant ductility recovery for the HIP material. Analysis of the fracture process indicates that further ductility gains are possible by reducing the titanium content, refining the particle size, and optimizing the thermal cycles

  3. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This report provides the proceedings of a Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing that was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on October 23-25, 1992. The meeting was jointly sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In particular, the International Working Group (IWG) on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (LMNPP) was the IAEA sponsor, and the Principal Working Group 3 (PWG-3) (Primary System Component Integrity) of the Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) was the NEA's sponsor. This meeting was preceded by two prior international activities that were designed to examine the state-of-the-art in fracture analysis capabilities and emphasized applications to the safety evaluation of nuclear power facilities. The first of those two activities was an IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing that was held at the Staatliche Materialprufungsanstalt (MPA) in Stuttgart, Germany, on May 25-27, 1988; the proceedings of that meeting were published 1991.1 The second activity was the CSNI/PWG-3's Fracture Assessment Group's Project FALSIRE (Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments). The proceedings of the FALSIRE workshop that was held in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on May 8-10, 1990, was recently published by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Those previous activities identified capabilities and shortcomings of various fracture analysis methods based on analyses of six available large-scale experiments. Different modes of fracture behavior, which ranged from brittle to ductile, were considered. In addition, geometry, size, constraint and multiaxial effects were considered. While generally good predictive capabilities were demonstrated for brittle fracture, issues were identified relative to predicting fracture behavior at higher

  4. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.; Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report contains 40 papers that were presented at the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists` Meeting Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing held at the Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the week of October 26--29, 1992. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe recent large-scale fracture (brittle and/or ductile) experiments, analyses of these experiments, and comparisons between predictions and experimental results. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to examine the fracture behavior of various materials and structures under conditions relevant to nuclear reactor components and operating environments. The emphasis was on the ability of various fracture models and analysis methods to predict the wide range of experimental data now available. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  5. Effect of microstructural anisotropy on the mechanical properties of K-doped tungsten rods for plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogami, Shuhei, E-mail: shuhei.nogami@qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Guan, Wenhai, E-mail: wenhai.guan@jupiter.qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Fukuda, Makoto, E-mail: fukuda@jupiter.qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Hasegawa, Akira, E-mail: akira.hasegawa@qse.tohoku.ac.jp

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • K-doping led to improve the tensile strength regardless of the test direction and temperature. • K-doping did not alter the elongation regardless of the test direction in the ductile fracture temperature range. • The ductility at lower temperature range was improved by the K-doping. • The lowest temperature of ductile fracture along both axial and radial directions decreased because of K-doping. • K-doping could suppress the influence of microstructural anisotropy on tensile properties, especially ductility, in large diameter W rods. - Abstract: The effect of microstructural anisotropy in pure tungsten (W) and potassium (K) doped W rods (20 mm in diameter) on their mechanical properties was investigated by tensile tests along the axial and radial directions at temperatures from 473 K to 1573 K and fracture analysis. K-doping led to improved tensile strength regardless of the test direction and temperature. K-doping did not alter the elongation regardless of the test direction in the temperature range showing ductile fracture. The ductility at lower temperature range was improved by the K-doping, especially in tensile tests along the radial direction. The lowest temperature of ductile fracture along both axial and radial directions decreased from 1373 K to 973 K because of K-doping. Thus, K-doping could suppress the influence of microstructural anisotropy on tensile properties, especially ductility, in large diameter W rods.

  6. Ductile mode grinding of reaction-bonded silicon carbide mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhichao; Cheng, Haobo

    2017-09-10

    The demand for reaction-bonded silicon carbide (RB-SiC) mirrors has escalated recently with the rapid development of space optical remote sensors used in astronomy or Earth observation. However, RB-SiC is difficult to machine due to its high hardness. This study intends to perform ductile mode grinding to RB-SiC, which produces superior surface integrity and fewer subsurface damages, thus minimizing the workload of subsequent lapping and polishing. For this purpose, a modified theoretical model for grain depth of cut of grinding wheels is presented, which correlates various processing parameters and the material characteristics (i.e., elastic module) of a wheel's bonding matrix and workpiece. Ductile mode grinding can be achieved as the grain depth of cut of wheels decreases to be less than the critical cut depth of workpieces. The theoretical model gives a roadmap to optimize the grinding parameters for ductile mode grinding of RB-SiC and other ultra-hard brittle materials. Its feasibility was validated by experiments. With the optimized grinding parameters for RB-SiC, the ductile mode grinding produced highly specular surfaces (with roughness of ∼2.2-2.8  nm Ra), which means the material removal mechanism of RB-SiC is dominated by plastic deformation rather than brittle fracture. Contrast experiments were also conducted on fused silica, using the same grinding parameters; this produced only very rough surfaces, which further validated the feasibility of the proposed model.

  7. Potentially exploitable supercritical geothermal resources in the ductile crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Noriaki; Numakura, Tatsuya; Sakaguchi, Kiyotoshi; Saishu, Hanae; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis that the brittle–ductile transition (BDT) drastically reduces permeability implies that potentially exploitable geothermal resources (permeability >10−16 m2) consisting of supercritical water could occur only in rocks with unusually high transition temperatures such as basalt. However, tensile fracturing is possible even in ductile rocks, and some permeability–depth relations proposed for the continental crust show no drastic permeability reduction at the BDT. Here we present experimental results suggesting that the BDT is not the first-order control on rock permeability, and that potentially exploitable resources may occur in rocks with much lower BDT temperatures, such as the granitic rocks that comprise the bulk of the continental crust. We find that permeability behaviour for fractured granite samples at 350–500 °C under effective confining stress is characterized by a transition from a weakly stress-dependent and reversible behaviour to a strongly stress-dependent and irreversible behaviour at a specific, temperature-dependent effective confining stress level. This transition is induced by onset of plastic normal deformation of the fracture surface (elastic–plastic transition) and, importantly, causes no ‘jump’ in the permeability. Empirical equations for this permeability behaviour suggest that potentially exploitable resources exceeding 450 °C may form at depths of 2–6 km even in the nominally ductile crust.

  8. Simultaneous enhancement of strength and ductility in cryogenically treated AISI D2 tool steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi-Nanesa, Hadi; Jahazi, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammad.jahazi@etsmtl.ca

    2014-03-01

    In this research, the effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties enhancement of AISI D2 tool steel was investigated. Cryogenic treatment down to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) was added to the conventional heat treatment between hardening and tempering steps. Electron microscopy investigation showed higher volume fraction of fine carbides with average diameter below 1 μm indicating effective retardation in carbide coarsening process as a results of cryogenic treatment. A modification in types of carbides was also observed after cryogenic treatment. X-ray diffraction diagrams revealed transformation of retained austenite to martensite at cryogenic temperature. Weakening or removal of carbides peak in the X-ray diagram was considered as evidence of carbides different behavior at cryogenic temperature. Mechanical testing results indicated higher ultimate tensile strength, better ductility, and higher elastic modulus after cryogenic treatment. Analysis of stress–strain diagrams revealed different strain hardening behavior for cryogenically treated alloy when compared to the conventionally heat treated one. Fractography results confirmed strain hardening behavior and showed cleavage fracture for conventionally treated alloy but mixed cleavage–ductile fracture mode for cryogenically treated alloy. The improved mechanical properties after cryogenic treatment are interpreted in terms of the influence of higher volume fraction and uniform distribution of fine carbides in reducing the average active dislocations length and enhancement of the flow stress at any given plastic strain.

  9. Simultaneous enhancement of strength and ductility in cryogenically treated AISI D2 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi-Nanesa, Hadi; Jahazi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the effect of cryogenic treatment on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties enhancement of AISI D2 tool steel was investigated. Cryogenic treatment down to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) was added to the conventional heat treatment between hardening and tempering steps. Electron microscopy investigation showed higher volume fraction of fine carbides with average diameter below 1 μm indicating effective retardation in carbide coarsening process as a results of cryogenic treatment. A modification in types of carbides was also observed after cryogenic treatment. X-ray diffraction diagrams revealed transformation of retained austenite to martensite at cryogenic temperature. Weakening or removal of carbides peak in the X-ray diagram was considered as evidence of carbides different behavior at cryogenic temperature. Mechanical testing results indicated higher ultimate tensile strength, better ductility, and higher elastic modulus after cryogenic treatment. Analysis of stress–strain diagrams revealed different strain hardening behavior for cryogenically treated alloy when compared to the conventionally heat treated one. Fractography results confirmed strain hardening behavior and showed cleavage fracture for conventionally treated alloy but mixed cleavage–ductile fracture mode for cryogenically treated alloy. The improved mechanical properties after cryogenic treatment are interpreted in terms of the influence of higher volume fraction and uniform distribution of fine carbides in reducing the average active dislocations length and enhancement of the flow stress at any given plastic strain

  10. Contribution to the research on fracture properties of metals in the elasto-plastic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselier, G.; Electricite de France, 77 - Ecuelles. Dept. Etudes des Materiaux)

    1979-01-01

    Standard Fracture Mechanics theories proved unsuccessful for the treatment of ductile fracture in metals. We have shown the necessity of better knowledge and satisfactory modelling of the fracture process, prior to any application to cracked bodies. In that way we developed stress-strain laws which take into consideration the growth of voids during ductile fracture. The damage resulting from void growth is characterized by internal parameters. Finite strain analysis leads to material instability, corresponding to the stage of void coalescence and material decohesion. This latter result is only true in a finite strain analysis. In the infinitesimal strain finite element numerical analysis of three-point bend specimens, a local fracture criterion is used. The experimental determination of this criterion is performed with axisymmetrical notched tension specimens, which allow the investigation of various stress triaxialities at fracture. The numerical analysis proved effective in the modelling of stable crack growth and size effect, and was compared with experimental results [fr

  11. Numerical ductile tearing simulation of circumferential cracked pipe tests under dynamic loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Hyun Suk; Kim, Ji Soo; Ryu, Ho Wan; Kim, Yun Jae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Weon [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper presents a numerical method to simulate ductile tearing in cracked components under high strain rates using finite element damage analysis. The strain rate dependence on tensile properties and multiaxial fracture strain is characterized by the model developed by Johnson and Cook. The damage model is then defined based on the ductility exhaustion concept using the strain rate dependent multiaxial fracture strain concept. The proposed model is applied to simulate previously published three cracked pipe bending test results under two different test speed conditions. Simulated results show overall good agreement with experimental results.

  12. Ductile damage evolution and strain path dependency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tasan, C.C.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Peerlings, R.H.J.; Geers, M.G.D.; Horn, ten C.H.L.J.; Vegter, H.; Cueto, E.; Chinesta, F.

    2007-01-01

    Forming limit diagrams are commonly used in sheet metal industry to define the safe forming regions. These diagrams are built to define the necking strains of sheet metals. However, with the rise in the popularity of advance high strength steels, ductile fracture through damage evolution has also

  13. Determination of ASTM 1016 structural welded joints fracture toughness through J integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Geraldo de Paula; Villela, Jefferson Jose; Terra, Jose Lucio; Rabello, Emerson Giovani; Martins, Geraldo Antonio Scoralick; Carneiro, Jose Rubens Goncalves

    2009-01-01

    Fracture toughness is an important parameter for studies of materials behavior in nuclear and conventional industry. Crack propagation resistance is, in general, evaluate using one of the fracture mechanics parameters K IC , for the case of the materials that exhibits a linear elastic behavior, the CTOD (crack tip opening displacement) and J IC , the critical value of J Integral, for the case of materials with elastic-plastic behavior. On this work the fracture mechanics parameters of the ASTM 1016 structural steel welded joints were obtained, using the J Integral. Charpy V tests at several temperatures were also obtained, with the purpose to obtain the curves of ductile-brittle of the regions of the welded joints: Base Metal, (MB), and Melted Zone (MZ). The joints were welded by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) with V bevel for evaluation the MZ toughness properties. The tests were accomplished at temperatures varying from -100 deg C to 100 deg C using the technical of compliance variation for J IC determination, the critical value that defines the initial stable crack growth, that applies to brittle and ductile materials. The J Integral alternative specimens has square cross section 10mmX10mm, according ASTM E 1820, with notch localized respectively at the BM and MZ. After the tests, the specimens fractured were analyzed in a scanning microscopic electronic (SME) for verification of the fracture surface. The fractography of the specimens at elevated temperatures presented dimples at the region of stable crack growth, characteristic of ductile fracture. The results of J Integral and Charpy V presented a good correlation between these two parameters. From these correlations it can be concluded that in some applications, the use Charpy V energy to infer fracture toughness can be substitute the Integral J tests. (author)

  14. Correlating Scatter in Fatigue Life with Fracture Mechanisms in Forged Ti-6242Si Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, V.; Pilchak, A. L.; Jha, S. K.; Porter, W. J.; John, R.; Larsen, J. M.

    2018-04-01

    Unlike the quasi-static mechanical properties, such as strength and ductility, fatigue life can vary significantly (by an order of magnitude or more) for nominally identical material and test conditions in many materials, including Ti-alloys. This makes life prediction and management more challenging for components that are subjected to cyclic loading in service. The differences in fracture mechanisms can cause the scatter in fatigue life. In this study, the fatigue fracture mechanisms were investigated in a forged near- α titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si, which had been tested under a condition that resulted in life variations by more than an order of magnitude. The crack-initiation and small crack growth processes, including their contributions to fatigue life variability, were elucidated via quantitative characterization of fatigue fracture surfaces. Combining the results from quantitative tilt fractography and electron backscatter diffraction, crystallography of crack-initiating and neighboring facets on the fracture surface was determined. Cracks initiated on the surface for both the shortest and the longest life specimens. The facet plane in the crack-initiating grain was aligned with the basal plane of a primary α grain for both the specimens. The facet planes in grains neighboring the crack-initiating grain were also closely aligned with the basal plane for the shortest life specimen, whereas the facet planes in the neighboring grains were significantly misoriented from the basal plane for the longest life specimen. The difference in the extent of cracking along the basal plane can explain the difference in fatigue life of specimens at the opposite ends of scatter band.

  15. A brittle-fracture methodology for three-dimensional visualization of ductile deformation micromechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tasan, C.C.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2009-01-01

    An improved experimental methodology is developed and successfully evaluated to visualize deformation-induced microevents in ductile sheet metal. This easy-to-use methodology consists in a well-controlled brittle separation of samples previously deformed in a ductile manner, whereby a

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of ductile iron GJS-500-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuryloa, P.; Tertela, E.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research on mechanical properties (hardness distribution along the cross section towards the cast’s core) and on the structures of ductile iron GJS-500-7. The study defines the range and form of the surface layer of cast iron. It has been shown that the surface layer of the working surface of the cast may be shaped within its transition zone. [es

  17. The role of ductile ligaments and warm prestress on the re-initiation of fracture from a crack arrested during thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1982-01-01

    The protection offered by warm prestress can be important for preserving a nuclear pressure vessel's integrity during a postulated emergency condition involving a loss of coolant, when the emergency core cooling water subjects the pressure vessel to a thermal shock. There are two aspects to the problem: (a) the initial extension of a defect into the vessel wall, and (b) the subsequent re-initiation of fracture at an arrested crack tip. This note considers the effect of warm prestress on the re-initiation of fracture from an arrested crack, and emphasizes the role of ductile ligaments. It is argued that the warm prestress concept is applicable, thus complementing the limited experimental results provided by the HSST Thermal Shock experimental programme. (orig.)

  18. Modelling of Local Necking and Fracture in Aluminium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achani, D.; Eriksson, M.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Lademo, O.-G.

    2007-01-01

    Non-linear Finite Element simulations are extensively used in forming and crashworthiness studies of automotive components and structures in which fracture need to be controlled. For thin-walled ductile materials, the fracture-related phenomena that must be properly represented are thinning instability, ductile fracture and through-thickness shear instability. Proper representation of the fracture process relies on the accuracy of constitutive and fracture models and their parameters that need to be calibrated through well defined experiments. The present study focuses on local necking and fracture which is of high industrial importance, and uses a phenomenological criterion for modelling fracture in aluminium alloys. As an accurate description of plastic anisotropy is important, advanced phenomenological constitutive equations based on the yield criterion YLD2000/YLD2003 are used. Uniaxial tensile tests and disc compression tests are performed for identification of the constitutive model parameters. Ductile fracture is described by the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion and an in-plane shear tests is performed to identify the fracture parameter. The reason is that in a well designed in-plane shear test no thinning instability should occur and it thus gives more direct information about the phenomenon of ductile fracture. Numerical simulations have been performed using a user-defined material model implemented in the general-purpose non-linear FE code LS-DYNA. The applicability of the model is demonstrated by correlating the predicted and experimental response in the in-plane shear tests and additional plane strain tension tests

  19. The effect of pre-deformation on the ductility of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsack, R.; Pippan, R.; Schedler, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Due to their low neutron-induced radioactivity chromium based materials are considered to be candidates as structure materials in fusion technology. Drawbacks for the application of these materials in industrial design are their brittleness at room temperature and their high Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperatures (DBTT). In this paper mechanical and fractographical investigations are presented of pure chromium (DUCROPUR) with a purity of about 99.97 % and the dispersion strengthened chromium alloy Cr 5 Fe 1 Y 2 O 3 (DUCROLLOY). The investigated specimens have been produced in a powder metallurgical route. They have been tested in the as HIPped condition (recrystallized) and after different pre-deformations. DUCROPUR and DUCROLLOY with as HIPped microstructures show in bending tests and tension tests brittle behavior at RT. Plastic deformations are obtained between 200 o C and 250 o C and above 400 o C, respectively. The K Q value of DUCROPUR increases from 12 MPam 1/2 at 290 o C up to a value of 500 MPam 1/2 at 320 o C. In spite of the large fracture toughness value at 320 o C the final fracture occurs again in a cleavage mode. DUCROLLOY shows up to 740 o C only a slight increase of fracture toughness with increasing temperature. An improvement in ductility and a significant increase in fracture strength have been induced by pre-deformation in tension, in bending, by Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE) and by Cyclic Channel Die Compression (CCDC). The developed microstructures of the samples have been investigated in the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) by means of different techniques. In order to determine the typical microstructure sizes Back Scattered Electrons (BSE) imaging has been applied. To differ if the boundaries are large or low angle boundaries the degree of misorientation has been determined with the Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) method. (author)

  20. Fracture behaviour of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys obtained by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, P. P.; Perez-Saez, R. B.; Recarte, V.; San Juan, J.M.; Ruano, O. A.; No, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Polycrystalline Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys have been scarcely employed for technological applications due to their high brittleness. The development of a new elaboration technique based on powder metallurgy has recently overcome this problem, through the improvement of the ductility of the produced alloys without affecting its shape memory properties. The fracture behaviour of an alloy obtained using the elaboration technique has been studied by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy and mechanical testing. The results show a ductile fracture with a maximum strain close to 13%, which is the best fracture behaviour obtained for Cu-Al-Ni polycrystals. The microstructure of such alloys ha been studied by means of Transmission Electron Microscopy, showing a poligonyzed structure in which martensite plated passing through the subboundaries easily. (Author) 19 refs

  1. Reliability Analysis of Fatigue Fracture of Wind Turbine Drivetrain Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berzonskis, Arvydas; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2016-01-01

    in the volume of the casted ductile iron main shaft, on the reliability of the component. The probabilistic reliability analysis conducted is based on fracture mechanics models. Additionally, the utilization of the probabilistic reliability for operation and maintenance planning and quality control is discussed....

  2. Strength and ductility of Ni3Al alloyed with boron and substitutional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, K.; Aoki, K.; Masumoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous alloying of boron (B) and the substitutional elements M on mechanical properties of Ni 3 Al was investigated by the tensile test at room temperature. The yield strength of Ni 3 Al+B increases by alloying with M except for Fe and Ga. In particular, it increases by alloying with Hf, Nb, W, Ta, Pd and Si. The fracture strength of Ni 3 Al+B increases by alloying with Pd, Ga, Si and Hf, but decreases with the other elements. Elongation of Ni 3 Al+B increases by alloying with Ga, Fe and Pd, but decreases with other elements. Hf and Pd is the effective element for the increase of the yield strength and the fracture strength of Ni 3 Al+B, respectively. Alloying with Hf leads to the increases of the yield strength and the fracture strength of Ni 3 Al+B, but to the lowering of elongation. On the other hand, alloying with Pd improves all mechanical properties, i.e. the yield strength, the fracture strength and elongation. On the contrary, alloying with Ti, V and Co leads to the lowering of mechanical properties of Ni 3 Al+B. The reason why ductility of Ni 3 Al+B is reduced by alloying with some elements M is discussed

  3. Prediction of fracture toughness temperature dependence applying neural network

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Hadraba, Hynek; Chlup, Zdeněk; Šmída, T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2011), s. 9-14 ISSN 1451-3749 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/0466 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : brittle to ductile transition * fracture toughness * artificial neural network * steels Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  4. Ductile Binder Phase For Use With Almgb14 And Other Hard Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bruce A.; Russell, Alan; Harringa, Joel

    2005-07-26

    This invention relates to a ductile binder phase for use with AlMgB14 and other hard materials. The ductile binder phase, a cobalt-manganese alloy, is used in appropriate quantities to tailor good hardness and reasonable fracture toughness for hard materials so they can be used suitably in industrial machining and grinding applications.

  5. Fracture mechanics safety approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, E.; Schuler, X.; Eisele, U.

    2004-01-01

    Component integrity assessments require the knowledge of reliable fracture toughness parameters characterising the initiation of the failure process in the whole relevant temperature range. From a large number of fracture mechanics tests a statistically based procedure was derived allowing to quantify the initiation of fracture toughness as a function of temperature as a closed function as well as the temperature dependence of the cleavage instability parameters. Alternatively to the direct experimental determination one also can use a correlation between fracture toughness and notch impact energy. (orig.)

  6. Rolling Contact Fatigue Failure Mechanisms of Plasma-Nitrided Ductile Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, D.; Soares, G. P. P. P.; Grabarski, M. I.; Weigert, N. B.; Escobar, J. A.; Pintaude, G.; Neves, J. C. K.

    2017-05-01

    Rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of a nitrided ductile cast iron was investigated. Flat washers machined from a pearlitic ductile cast iron bar were quenched and tempered to maximum hardness, ground, polished and divided into four groups: (1) specimens tested as quenched and tempered; (2) specimens plasma-nitrided for 8 h at 400 °C; (3) specimens plasma-nitrided and submitted to a diffusion process for 16 h at 400 °C; and (4) specimens submitted to a second tempering for 24 h at 400 °C. Hardness profiles, phase analyses and residual stress measurements by x-ray diffraction, surface roughness and scanning electron microscopy were applied to characterize the surfaces at each step of this work. Ball-on-flat washer tests were conducted with a maximum contact pressure of 3.6 GPa, under flood lubrication with a SAE 90 API GL-5 oil at 50 °C. Test ending criterion was the occurrence of a spalling. Weibull analysis was used to characterize RCF's lifetime data. Plasma-nitrided specimens exhibited a shorter RCF lifetime than those just quenched and tempered. The effects of nitriding on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the ductile cast iron are discussed in order to explain the shorter endurance of nitrided samples.

  7. Ductile failure X-prize.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, James V.; Wellman, Gerald William; Emery, John M.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Foster, John T.; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Mota, Alejandro; Bishop, Joseph E.; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Littlewood, David John; Foulk, James W., III; Dowding, Kevin J.; Dion, Kristin; Boyce, Brad Lee; Robbins, Joshua H.; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-09-01

    Fracture or tearing of ductile metals is a pervasive engineering concern, yet accurate prediction of the critical conditions of fracture remains elusive. Sandia National Laboratories has been developing and implementing several new modeling methodologies to address problems in fracture, including both new physical models and new numerical schemes. The present study provides a double-blind quantitative assessment of several computational capabilities including tearing parameters embedded in a conventional finite element code, localization elements, extended finite elements (XFEM), and peridynamics. For this assessment, each of four teams reported blind predictions for three challenge problems spanning crack initiation and crack propagation. After predictions had been reported, the predictions were compared to experimentally observed behavior. The metal alloys for these three problems were aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and precipitation hardened stainless steel PH13-8Mo H950. The predictive accuracies of the various methods are demonstrated, and the potential sources of error are discussed.

  8. Contact mechanics at nanometric scale using nanoindentation technique for brittle and ductile materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, J J; Rayon, E; Morales, M; Segarra, M

    2012-06-01

    In the last years, Nanoindentation or Instrumented Indentation Technique has become a powerful tool to study the mechanical properties at micro/nanometric scale (commonly known as hardness, elastic modulus and the stress-strain curve). In this review, the different contact mechanisms (elastic and elasto-plastic) are discussed, the recent patents for each mechanism (elastic and elasto-plastic) are summarized in detail, and the basic equations employed to know the mechanical behaviour for brittle and ductile materials are described.

  9. Oxygen-induced intergranular fracture of the nickel-base alloy IN718 during mechanical loading at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupp Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a transition in the mechanical-failure behavior of nickel-base superalloys from ductile transgranular crack propagation to time-dependent intergranular fracture when the temperature exceeds about 600 °C. This transition is due to oxygen diffusion into the stress field ahead of the crack tip sufficient to cause brittle decohesion of the grain boundaries. Since very high cracking rates were observed during fixed-displacement loading of IN718, it is not very likely that grain boundary oxidation governs the grain-boundary-separation process, as has been proposed in several studies on the fatigue-damage behavior of the nickel-base superalloy IN718. Further studies on bicrystal and thermomechanically processed specimens of IN718 have shown that this kind of brittle fracture, which has been termed "dynamic embrittlement", depends strongly on the structure of the grain boundaries.

  10. Ductile crack growth resistance of PWR components. Application for structural integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethmont, M.; Eripret, C.; Le Delliou, P.; Frund, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Structural integrity assessment of PWR components, as pressure vessel and piping, needs to evaluate the ductile crack growth resistance which is generally characterized by J resistance curves (or J-R curves) based on the path-independent J Integral. These curves are more often obtained from laboratory tests with small specimens as CT-specimens and their application to large component safety analysis could be questionable Indeed, it is well known that J-R curves could depend on the specimen size and on the loading mode (i.e. bending stress versus tensile stress) but this dependency could be different from one material to another. This means that it would depend not only on the stress-strain state but also on the actual local fracture mechanisms (i. e. the damage) occurring before the crack initiation or during the crack propagation. The purpose of this paper is to gather some results of crack growth resistance measurement studied at EDF with different materials in order to show how the effect of the parameters, as specimen geometry and mode of loading, is directly related to the local fracture mechanisms or the microstructure of the materials. For that a number of results are analysed by means of the local approach of fracture which is a very useful tool to predict quantitatively the J-R curve dependency, related to fracture mechanisms (authors). 12 refs., 9 figs

  11. Fracturing and Transformation Into Veins Beneath the Crustal Scale Brittle Ductile Transition - a Record of Co-seismic Loading and Post-seismic Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüchter, J. A.; Stöckhert, B.

    2005-12-01

    Metamorphic rocks approaching the crustal scale brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during exhumation are expected to become increasingly affected by short term stress fluctuations related to seismic activity in the overlying seismogenic layer (schizosphere), while still residing in a long-term viscous environment (plastosphere). The structural and microstructural record of quartz veins in low grade - high pressure metamorphic rocks from southern Evia, Greece, yields insight into the processes and conditions just beneath the long-term BDT at temperatures of about 300 to 350°C, which switches between brittle failure and viscous flow as a function of imposed stress or strain rate. The following features are characteristic: (1) The veins have formed from tensile fractures, with a typical length on the order of 10-1 to 101 m; (2) The veins are discordant with respect to foliation and all pre-existing structures, with a uniform orientation over more than 500 km2; (3) The veins show a low aspect ratio of about 10 to 100 and an irregular or characteristic flame shape, which requires distributed ductile deformation of the host rock; (4) Fabrics of the sealing vein quartz indicate that - at a time - the veins were wide open cavities; (5) The sealing quartz crystals reveal a broad spectrum of microstructural features indicative of crystal plastic deformation at high stress and temperatures of about 300 to 350°C. These features indicate that opening and sealing of the fractures commenced immediately after brittle failure, controlled by ductile deformation of the host rock. Vein-parallel shortening was generally less than about 2%. Crystals formed early during sealing were plastically deformed upon progressive deformation and opening of the vein. The structural and microstructural record is interpreted as follows: Brittle failure is proposed to be a consequence of short term co-seismic loading. Subsequent opening of the fracture and sealing to become a vein is interpreted to

  12. Fundamental flow and fracture studies of HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Maiti, R.; Sheckherd, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Results of electron microscopy studies of cleavage crack formation and propagation in HT-9 are consistent with a model for stress-controlled cleavage in which the critical stress sigma/sub f//sup */ is related to the lath packet size. Moreover, sigma/sub f//sup */ appears to undergo a sharp transition at low temperatures and high strain rates; this is probably a result of a change in mechanism from slip- to twinning-nucleated cleavage. This change in sigma/sub f//sup */ effects corresponding changes in lower shelf fracture toughness. A simple two-parameter approach is shown to be a reasonable basis for predicting fracture loads for various size and crack-geometry bend specimens. These results indicated that cleavage fracture will occur near plastic collapse loads for thin wall structures containing shallow surface cracks. Results of an initial study of ductility in the cleavage regime indicate deflectional displacements on the order of 1-2 cm/m will be the limit for such shallow surface cracks in thin walls. The effects of dissolved hydrogen and stress state variations induced by side grooving were investigated. Hydrogen charges resulted in an average reduction in measured K/sub O/ values of about 17% and 5% in the ratio of maximum load fracture-to-collapse stress ratios. No significant effect of hydrogen on ductility was observed. Side grooving resulted in increases in both apparent K/sub O/ toughness levels and fracture-to-collapse stress ratios. Side grooving decreased ductility for shallow cracks and increased it for deep cracks. In general these effects are judged to be relatively modest compared to uncertainties in the measurements and the effects of significant variations in size and strength levels

  13. Fracture mechanics of piezoelectric and ferroelectric solids

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Daining

    2013-01-01

    Fracture Mechanics of Piezoelectric and Ferroelectric Solids presents a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the fracture mechanics of piezoelectric/ferroelectric materials, which includes the theoretical analysis, numerical computations and experimental observations. The main emphasis is placed on the mechanics description of various crack problems such static, dynamic and interface fractures as well as the physical explanations for the mechanism of electrically induced fracture. The book is intended for postgraduate students, researchers and engineers in the fields of solid mechanics, applied physics, material science and mechanical engineering. Dr. Daining Fang is a professor at the School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, China; Dr. Jinxi Liu is a professor at the Department of Engineering Mechanics, Shijiazhuang Railway Institute, China.

  14. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, Jens Peder

    Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high-strength......Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high......-strength concrete. Chapter 2 A description of the factors which influence the strength and cracking of concrete and high strength concrete is made. Then basic linear fracture mechanics is outlined followed by a description and evaluation of the models used to describe concrete fracture in tension. The chapter ends...... and the goveming equations are explicit and simple. These properties of the model make it a very powerful tool, which is applicable for the designing engineer. The method is also extended to reinforced concrete, where the results look very promising. The large experimental investigation on high-strength concrete...

  15. Evaluation of viscoplastic fracture criteria and analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney-Walker, J.; Dexter, R.J.; O'Donoghue, P.E.; Schwartz, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    The role of nonlinear rate-dependent effects in the interpretation of crack run-arrest events in ductile materials is being investigated by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) program through development and applications of viscoplastic-dynamic finite element analysis techniques. This paper describes a portion of these studies wherein various viscoplastic constitutive models and several proposed nonlinear fracture criteria are being installed in general purpose (ADINA) and special purpose (VISCRK) finite element computer programs. The formulations of the Bodner-Partom, the Perzyna, and the Robinson constitutive models installed in the HSST computer programs are summarized. This is followed by a description of three integral functions that are candidate fracture parameters. The capabilities of these nonlinear techniques re compared and evaluated through applications to one of the HSST wide-plate crack-arrest tests. Results are presented from benchmark viscoplastic-dynamic wide-plate analyses performed using the ADINA and VISCRK computer programs. Finally, plans are summarized for additional computational and experimental studies to assess the utility of viscoplastic analysis techniques in constructing a transferable inelastic fracture mechanics model for ductile steels. (author)

  16. The Mechanism of High Ductility for Novel High-Carbon Quenching-Partitioning-Tempering Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Wang, Ying; Chen, Nailu; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua

    2015-09-01

    In this article, a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process was applied to treat Fe-0.6C-1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.6Cr-0.05Nb hot-rolled high-carbon steel and the microstructures including retained austenite fraction and the average dislocation densities in both martensite and retained austenite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The Q-P-T steel exhibits high strength (1950 MPa) and elongation (12.4 pct). Comparing with the steel treated by traditional quenching and tempering (Q&T) process, the mechanism of high ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T steel is revealed as follows. Much more retained austenite existing in Q-P-T steel than in Q&T one remarkably enhances the ductility by the following two effects: the dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect and the transformation-induced plasticity effect. Besides, lower dislocation density in martensite matrix produced by Q-P-T process plays an important role in the improvement of ductility. However, some thin plates of twin-type martensite embedded in dislocation-type martensite matrix in high-carbon Q-P-T steel affect the further improvement of ductility.

  17. ASME codification of ductile cast iron cask for transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, Toshiari; Arai, Taku

    2012-01-01

    The CRIEPI has been executing research and development on ductile cast iron cask for transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel in order to diversify options of the casks. Based on the research results, the CRIEPI proposed materials standards (Section II) and structural design standards (Section III) for the ductile cast iron cask to the authoritative and international ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Codes. For the Section II, the CRIEPI proposed the JIS G 5504 material with additional requirement prohibiting repair of cast body by welding, etc. as well as the ASTM A874 material to the Part A. In addition, the CRIEPI proposed design stress allowables, physical properties (thermal conductivity, modulus of elasticity, etc.), and external pressure chart to the Part D. For the Section III, the CRIEPI proposed a fracture toughness requirement of the ductile cast iron cask at -40degC to WB and WC of Division 3. Additionally, the CRIEPI proposed a design fatigue curve of the ductile cast iron cask to Appendix of Division 1. This report describes the outline of the proposed standards, their bases, and the deliberation process in order to promote proper usage of the code, future improvement, etc. (author)

  18. Characterisation of Ductile Prepregs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, F.; White, A.; Meo, M.

    2013-04-01

    This study is focused on the analysis of micro-perforated prepregs created from standard, off the shelf prepregs modified by a particular laser process to enhance ductility of prepregs for better formability and drapability. Fibres are shortened through the use of laser cutting in a predetermined pattern intended to maintain alignment, and therefore mechanical properties, yet increase ductility at the working temperature. The increase in ductility allows the product to be more effectively optimised for specific forming techniques. Tensile tests were conducted on several specimens in order to understand the ductility enhancement offered by this process with different micro-perforation patterns over standard prepregs. Furthermore, the effects of forming temperature was also analysed to assess the applicability of this material to hot draping techniques and other heated processes.

  19. Post-uniform elongation and tensile fracture mechanisms of Fe-18Mn-0.6C-xAl twinning-induced plasticity steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Ha-Young; Lee, Sang-Min; Nam, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Joon; Fabrègue, Damien; Park, Myeong-heom; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Lee, Young-Kook

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the complicated interrelationship between necking, post-uniform elongation (e_p_u), strain rate sensitivity (SRS), fracture mechanism and Al concentration in Fe-18Mn-0.6C-xAl twinning-induced plasticity steels. Many tensile tests were conducted for in- and ex-situ observations of necking, fracture surfaces, crack propagation and the density and size of micro-voids with the assistance of a high-speed camera and X-ray tomographic equipment. The addition of Al increased e_p_u, SRS and reduction ratios in dimension of the neck part of tensile specimens, and also changed fracture mode from quasi-cleavage to ductile fracture at the edge part. The quasi-cleavage surface of Al-free specimen was induced by edge and side cracks occurring along grain boundary junctions and twin boundaries within the edges and side surfaces where local deformation bands meet. The ductile-fracture surface of 1.5 %Al-added specimen was formed by the coalescence of micro-voids. While the side-to-middle crack propagation occurred in Al-free and 1 %Al-added specimens due to side cracks, the middle-to-side crack propagation was observed in 1.5 %Al-added specimen. The Al-free specimen had the larger size of the 20 largest voids compared to the 1.5 %Al-added specimen despite its lower void density and local strain due to the accelerated growth of voids near the tips of side cracks. Evaluating the negligible e_p_u of Al-free specimen by SRS is not deemed to be reasonable due to its inappreciable necking and side cracks. The improvement of e_p_u in 1.5 %Al-added specimen is primarily due to disappearance of edge and side cracks.

  20. Studies on mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details of laser beam welded thick SS304L plates for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar, E-mail: buddu@ipr.res.in [Fusion Reactor Materials Development and Characterization Division, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Chauhan, N.; Raole, P.M. [Fusion Reactor Materials Development and Characterization Division, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Natu, Harshad [Magod Laser Machining Pvt. Ltd, Jigani, Bengaluru 560105 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • CO{sub 2} laser welding of 8 mm thick SS304L plates has been carried out and full penetration welds fabricated and characterized for mechanical properties and microstructure details. • Welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base indicating good weld quality joints. • Impact fracture tests of weld zone and heat affected zone samples have shown poor toughness compared to the base metal. • SEM analysis of fracture samples of tensile and impact specimens indicated the complex microstructure features in weld zone and combined ductile and brittle fracture features. • Combined features of dendrite and cellular structures are observed in weld microstructures with narrow HAZ and delta ferrite is found in the welds and further confirmed by higher Ferrite Number data. - Abstract: Austenitic stainless steel is widely used structural material for the fabrication of the fusion reactor components. Laser welding is high power density process which offers several advantages over the other conventional processes like Tungsten Inert Gas welding. The features like low distortion, narrow heat affected zone, deep penetration in single pass, good mechanical properties are some of the advantages of laser welding process. The laser weld process parameters optimization has several challenges in terms of overcoming the weld defects like voids due to lack of penetration over depth, undercuts and porosity. The present paper reports the studies carried out with CO{sub 2} laser welding of 8 mm thick austenitic stainless steel SS304L plates and their characterization of mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details. The weld process parameter optimization towards defect free welds with full penetration welding has been carried out. The welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base metal, bend tests are successfully passed. The hardness measurements have shown slightly higher for weld zone compared to base metal

  1. Studies on mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details of laser beam welded thick SS304L plates for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P.M.; Natu, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CO 2 laser welding of 8 mm thick SS304L plates has been carried out and full penetration welds fabricated and characterized for mechanical properties and microstructure details. • Welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base indicating good weld quality joints. • Impact fracture tests of weld zone and heat affected zone samples have shown poor toughness compared to the base metal. • SEM analysis of fracture samples of tensile and impact specimens indicated the complex microstructure features in weld zone and combined ductile and brittle fracture features. • Combined features of dendrite and cellular structures are observed in weld microstructures with narrow HAZ and delta ferrite is found in the welds and further confirmed by higher Ferrite Number data. - Abstract: Austenitic stainless steel is widely used structural material for the fabrication of the fusion reactor components. Laser welding is high power density process which offers several advantages over the other conventional processes like Tungsten Inert Gas welding. The features like low distortion, narrow heat affected zone, deep penetration in single pass, good mechanical properties are some of the advantages of laser welding process. The laser weld process parameters optimization has several challenges in terms of overcoming the weld defects like voids due to lack of penetration over depth, undercuts and porosity. The present paper reports the studies carried out with CO 2 laser welding of 8 mm thick austenitic stainless steel SS304L plates and their characterization of mechanical properties, microstructure and fracture morphology details. The weld process parameter optimization towards defect free welds with full penetration welding has been carried out. The welded samples have shown tensile properties comparable to base metal, bend tests are successfully passed. The hardness measurements have shown slightly higher for weld zone compared to base metal and the

  2. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700 0 C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625 0 C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities

  3. Ultra-sonic testing for brittle-ductile transition temperature of ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomakuchi, Michiyoshi

    1979-01-01

    The ultra-sonic testing for the brittle-ductile transition temperature, the USTB test for short, of ferritic steels is proposed in the present paper. And also the application of the USTB test into the nuclear pressure vessel surveillance is discussed. The USTB test is based upon the experimental results in the present work that the ultrasonic pressure attenuation coefficient of a ferritic steel has the evident transition property with its temperature due to the nature from which the brittle-ductile fracture transition property of the steel come and for four ferritic steels the upper boundary temperatute of the region in which the transition of the attenuation coefficient of a steel takes place is 4 to 5 0 C higher than the sub(D)T sub(E), i.e. the transition temperature of the fracture absorption energy of the steel by the DWTT test. The USTB test estimates the crack arrest temperature which is defined to be the fracture transition elastic temperature by the upper boundary temperature. (author)

  4. Some Aspects of Structural Modeling of Damage Accumulation and Fracture Processes in Metal Structures at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Lepov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of brittle fracture of structures at low temperature conditions connected to damage accumulation and ductile-brittle transition in metals. The data for locomotive tire contact impact fatigue and spalling are presented. The results of experimental testing showed the impact toughness drop at low temperature. The internal friction method was applied to revealing of the mechanism of dislocation microstructure changes during the low temperature ductile-brittle transition. It has been shown for the first time that the transition is not connected to interatomic interactions but stipulated by thermofluctuation on nucleus such as microcracks and by their further growth and coalescence. From now on, the proposed mechanism would be used for theoretical and numerical modeling of damage accumulation and fracture in materials.

  5. Characterization of molybdenum particles reinforced Al6082 aluminum matrix composites with improved ductility produced using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvakumar, S., E-mail: lathaselvam1963@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nehru Institute of Technology, Coimbatore 641105, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Palanivel, R., E-mail: rpalanivelme@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Ganesh Babu, B., E-mail: profbgb@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Roever College of Engineering and Technology, Perambalur 621212, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2017-03-15

    Aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with various ceramic particles suffer a loss in ductility. Hard metallic particles can be used as reinforcement to improve ductility. The present investigation focuses on using molybdenum (Mo) as potential reinforcement for Mo(0,6,12 and 18 vol.%)/6082Al AMCs produced using friction stir processing (FSP). Mo particles were successfully retained in the aluminum matrix in its elemental form without any interfacial reaction. A homogenous distribution of Mo particles in the composite was achieved. The distribution was independent upon the region within the stir zone. The grains in the composites were refined considerably due to dynamic recrystallization and pinning effect. The tensile test results showed that Mo particles improved the strength of the composite without compromising on ductility. The fracture surfaces of the composites were characterized with deeply developed dimples confirming appreciable ductility. - Highlights: •Molybdenum particles used as reinforcement for aluminum composites to improve ductility. •Molybdenum particles were retained in elemental form without interfacial reaction. •Homogeneous dispersion of molybdenum particles were observed in the composite. •Molybdenum particles improved tensile strength without major loss in ductility. •Deeply developed dimples on the fracture surfaces confirmed improved ductility.

  6. Characterization of molybdenum particles reinforced Al6082 aluminum matrix composites with improved ductility produced using friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvakumar, S.; Dinaharan, I.; Palanivel, R.; Ganesh Babu, B.

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) reinforced with various ceramic particles suffer a loss in ductility. Hard metallic particles can be used as reinforcement to improve ductility. The present investigation focuses on using molybdenum (Mo) as potential reinforcement for Mo(0,6,12 and 18 vol.%)/6082Al AMCs produced using friction stir processing (FSP). Mo particles were successfully retained in the aluminum matrix in its elemental form without any interfacial reaction. A homogenous distribution of Mo particles in the composite was achieved. The distribution was independent upon the region within the stir zone. The grains in the composites were refined considerably due to dynamic recrystallization and pinning effect. The tensile test results showed that Mo particles improved the strength of the composite without compromising on ductility. The fracture surfaces of the composites were characterized with deeply developed dimples confirming appreciable ductility. - Highlights: •Molybdenum particles used as reinforcement for aluminum composites to improve ductility. •Molybdenum particles were retained in elemental form without interfacial reaction. •Homogeneous dispersion of molybdenum particles were observed in the composite. •Molybdenum particles improved tensile strength without major loss in ductility. •Deeply developed dimples on the fracture surfaces confirmed improved ductility.

  7. Recent trends in fracture and damage mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zybell, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of topics in fracture and damage mechanics. It presents historical perspectives as well as recent innovative developments, presented by peer reviewed contributions from internationally acknowledged authors.  The volume deals with the modeling of fracture and damage in smart materials, current industrial applications of fracture mechanics, and it explores advances in fracture testing methods. In addition, readers will discover trends in the field of local approach to fracture and approaches using analytical mechanics. Scholars in the fields of materials science, engineering and computational science will value this volume which is dedicated to Meinhard Kuna on the occasion of his 65th birthday in 2015. This book incorporates the proceedings of an international symposium that was organized to honor Meinhard Kuna’s contributions to the field of theoretical and applied fracture and damage mechanics.

  8. Two-parameter fracture mechanics: Theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dowd, N.P.; Shih, C.F.

    1993-02-01

    A family of self-similar fields provides the two parameters required to characterize the full range of high- and low-triaxiality crack tip states. The two parameters, J and Q, have distinct roles: J sets the size scale of the process zone over which large stresses and strains develop, while Q scales the near-tip stress distribution relative to a high triaxiality reference stress state. An immediate consequence of the theory is this: it is the toughness values over a range of crack tip constraint that fully characterize the material's fracture resistance. It is shown that Q provides a common scale for interpreting cleavage fracture and ductile tearing data thus allowing both failure modes to be incorporated in a single toughness locus. The evolution of Q, as plasticity progresses from small scale yielding to fully yielded conditions, has been quantified for several crack geometries and for a wide range of material strain hardening properties. An indicator of the robustness of the J-Q fields is introduced; Q as a field parameter and as a pointwise measure of stress level is discussed

  9. Combined macroscopic and microscopic approach to the fracture of metals. Technical progress report, July 1977--June 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurland, J.; Rice, J.R.; Asaro, R.J.; Needleman, A.

    1978-06-01

    The work reported includes studies on: (1) The role of particles and interfaces in the initiation of fracture, including fundamentals of brittle versus ductile response of interfaces and observations on cavity growth by the cracking of grain or sub-grain boundaries adjacent to carbides in spheroidized steels; (2) Environment sensitive fracture mechanisms, particularly the effect of hydrogen in reducing tensile ductility by acceleration of the crack-like mode of cavity growth along grain boundaries in steels; (3) Models for elevated temperature diffusive processes of cavity growth on grain interfaces, including non-equilibrium effects and crack-like growth modes; (4) Localization of plastic deformation and the inception of ductile rupture; and (5) Elastic-plastic stress analysis, by finite elements, of growing cracks and examination of criteria for stable crack growth

  10. Studies of fracture processes in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel with various types of microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzioba, I., E-mail: pkmid@tu.kielce.p [Fundamentals of Machine Design Chair, Kielce University of Technology, Al.1000-lecia PP 7, 25-314 Kielce (Poland); Gajewski, M., E-mail: gajem@tu.kielce.p [Fundamentals of Machine Design Chair, Kielce University of Technology, Al.1000-lecia PP 7, 25-314 Kielce (Poland); Neimitz, A., E-mail: neimitz@tu.kielce.p [Fundamentals of Machine Design Chair, Kielce University of Technology, Al.1000-lecia PP 7, 25-314 Kielce (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, the authors report on analysis of the influence of microstructure on ductile and cleavage fracture mechanisms. The question investigated was whether microstructure observations alone can provide sufficient information to predict the possible fracture mechanism or change in fracture mechanism. Four different microstructures of ferritic steel were tested after four different heat treatments. The microstructures examined were ferritic, ferritic-pearlitic, ferritic-bainitic, and tempered martensitic types. It was concluded that the ratio (S{sub C}/S{sub 0}) of the area covered by carbides to the total area of a ferritic grain (measured by taking into account large carbides) is the only possible quantitative measure that can be used to predict cleavage fracture.

  11. Fracture toughness evaluation of steels through master curve approach using Charpy impact specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Sriharsha, H.K.; Shah, Priti Kotak

    2007-01-01

    The master curve approach can be used for the evaluation of fracture toughness of all steels which exhibit a transition between brittle to ductile mode of fracture with increasing temperature, and to monitor the extent of embrittlement caused by metallurgical damage mechanisms. This paper details the procedure followed to evaluate the fracture toughness of a typical ferritic steel used as material for pressure vessels. The potential of master curve approach to overcome the inherent limitations of the estimation of fracture toughness using ASME Code reference toughness is also illustrated. (author)

  12. Refinement and fracture mechanisms of as-cast QT700-6 alloy by alloying method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-qiang Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The as-cast QT700-6 alloy was synthesized with addition of a certain amount of copper, nickel, niobium and stannum elements by alloying method in a medium frequency induction furnace, aiming at improving its strength and toughness. Microstructures of the as-cast QT700-6 alloy were observed using a scanning-electron microscope (SEM and the mechanical properties were investigated using a universal tensile test machine. Results indicate that the ratio of pearlite/ferrite is about 9:1 and the graphite size is less than 40 μm in diameter in the as-cast QT700-6 alloy. The predominant refinement mechanism is attributed to the formation of niobium carbides, which increases the heterogeneous nucleus and hinders the growth of graphite. Meanwhile, niobium carbides also exist around the grain boundaries, which improve the strength of the ductile iron. The tensile strength and elongation of the as-cast QT700-6 alloy reach over 700 MPa and 6%, respectively, when the addition amount of niobium is 0.8%. The addition of copper and nickel elements contributed to the decrease of eutectoid transformation temperature, resulting in the decrease of pearlite lamellar spacing (about 248 nm, which is also beneficial to enhancing the tensile strength. The main fracture mechanism is cleavage fracture with the appearance of a small amount of dimples.

  13. Correlation of nodular austempered ductile iron (ADI) microstructural parameters and fatigue properties using an approach based on fracture mechanics; Correlacao entre parametros microestruturais do ferro fundido nodular austemperado (ADI) com suas propriedades a fadiga utilizando uma abordagem baseada na mecanica de fratura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Jose Felipe [Universidade de Itauna (UIT), MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia; Fonseca, Vinicius Rizzuti; Godefroid, Leonardo Barbosa [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Escola de Minas; Ribeiro, Gabriel de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Estruturas

    2010-07-01

    An investigation has been accomplished to check the effect of temperature and austempering time on austempered ductile iron (ADI) properties by means of fracture toughness (K{sub C}) and fatigue threshold (∆K{sub th}) tests. The correlation of ADI microstructural parameters and ADI two mechanical parameters: KC and Kth, is evaluated. Three sets of samples have ben extracted from ADI casting Y blocks produced in industrial conditions.and austenitized at 900°C for 1.5 hour. The austempering process has been performed in the following ways: the first set was austenitized at 300 deg C for 4 hours, the second set at 360°C for 1.5 hour and the third at 360°C for 0.6 hour. These distinct austempering processes have been adopted in order to obtain distinct microstructures containing austenite with two different carbon rates and two ferritic cell sizes. The materials have been characterized by means of optical and electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and mechanical tests. All materials have presented equivalent fatigue crack propagation rates, fracture toughness in the range between 94 and 128 MPa·m{sup 1/2} and ∆K{sub th} in the range between 5,7 and 6,4 MPa·m{sup 1/2}. The experimental results have confirmed the effect of microstructural properties (austenitic volumetric rate, austenitic carbon rate, ferritic cell size, total matrix carbon content) on fracture toughness (K{sub C}) and fatigue threshold (∆K{sub th}). Further, it was found that following parameters: fracture toughness (K{sub C}), fatigue threshold ((∆K{sub th}) and impact strength are correlated with the total matrix carbon content and ferritic cell size. (author)

  14. Post-cracking Behaviour and Fracture Energy of Synthetic Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta KOSIOR-KAZBERUK

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports the results of experimental programme focused on the effect of various synthetic fibres on fracture properties and ductility of concrete. The fracture energy was assessed on beams with initial notches in three-point bend test. The incorporation of synthetic fibres had a slight effect on mechanical properties of concrete but, at the same time, it had a significant influence on the fracture energy by modification of post-cracking behaviour of concrete. It was found that the modern synthetic fibres might be able to impart significant toughness and ductility to concrete. However, the beneficial effect of fibres depends on their length and flexibility. The analysis of load-deflection curves obtained made it possible to fit the simple function, describing the post-peak behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete, which can be useful for the calculation of GF value.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13246

  15. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behaviors of the As-Extruded Mg-5Al-3Ca Alloys Containing Yttrium at Elevated Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hyeon-Taek; Kim, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Seong-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Effects of yttrium (Y) addition on mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the as-extruded Mg-Al-Ca based alloys at elevated temperature were investigated by a tensile test. After hot extrusion, the average grain size was refined by Y addition and eutectic phases were broken down into fine particles. Y addition to Mg-5Al-3Ca based alloy resulted in the improvement of strength and ductility at elevated temperature due to fine grain and suppression of grain growth by formation of thermally stable Al2Y intermetallic compound.

  16. Fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miannay, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This book entitle ''Fracture Mechanics'', the first one of the monograph ''Materiologie'' is geared to design engineers, material engineers, non destructive inspectors and safety experts. This book covers fracture mechanics in isotropic homogeneous continuum. Only the monotonic static loading is considered. This book intended to be a reference with the current state of the art gives the fundamental of the issues under concern and avoids the developments too complicated or not yet mastered for not making reading cumbersome. The subject matter is organized as going from an easy to a more complicated level and thus follows the chronological evolution in the field. Similarly the microscopic scale is considered before the macroscopic scale, the physical understanding of phenomena linked to the experimental observation of the material preceded the understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of structures. In this latter field the relatively recent contribution of finite element computations with some analogy with the experimental observation is determining. However more sensitive analysis is not skipped

  17. Two-criteria method for fracture-mechanical analysis of pipelines - practical application and influencing parameters; Zwei-Kriterien-Verfahren zur bruchmechanischen Befundbewertung in Rohrleitungen - praktische Anwendung und Einflussgroessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beukelmann, D. [TUeV Sued Industrie Service GmbH (Germany); Doerk, O.; Wernicke, R. [TUeV Nord SysTec GmbH und Co. KG (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The findings obtained in recurrent inspections as a rule are evaluated by fracture-mechanical analyses. On the basis of the results, it is decided whether a component must be repaired or if operation can continue as it is for the time being. The two-criteria method is applied as a rule because of its universal applicability. Limited ductile crack growth can be taken into account if crack resistance curves are available that can be transferred to the component in question. In the investigations presented here, the influence of the relevant initial variables, e.g. strength coefficents, fracture-mechanical material coefficients, primary and secondary stresses and the intrinsic state of stress is illustrated by exemplary calculations. Further, the safety concepts underlying the assessment are gone into. (orig.)

  18. Heat treatment effect on ductility of nickel-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnakov, K.K.; Khasin, G.A.; Danilov, V.F.; Oshchepkov, B.V.; Listkova, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    Causes of low ductility of the KhN75MBTYu and KhN78T alloys were studied along with the heat treatment effects. Samples were tested at 20, 900, 1100, 1200 deg C. Large amount of inclusions was found in intercrystalline fractures of the above low-ductile alloys. The inclusions of two types took place: (α-Al 2 O 3 , FeO(Cr 2 O 3 xAl 2 O 3 )) dendrite-like ones and large-size laminated SiO 2 , FeO,(CrFe) 2 O 3 inclusions situated as separate colonies. Heat treatment of the alloys does not increase high-temperature impact strength and steel ductility. The heating above 1000 deg C leads to a partial dissolution and coagulation of film inclusions which results in an impact strength increase at room temperature

  19. Fracture mechanics and microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, M.G.; Morrell, R.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on defects in ceramics, and the consequences of their presence for the application of fracture mechanics theories are reviewed. The complexities of microstructures, especially the multiphase nature, the crystallographic anisotropy and the resultant anisotropic physical properties, and the variation of microstructure and surface finish from point to point in real components, all lead to considerable uncertainties in the actual performance of any particular component. It is concluded that although the concepts of fracture mechanics have been and will continue to be most useful for the qualitative explanation of fracture phenomena, the usefulness as a predictive tool with respect to most existing types of material is limited by the interrelation between material microstructure and mechanical properties. At present, the only method of eliminating components with unsatisfactory mechanical properties is to proof-test them, despite the fact that proof-testing itself is limited in ability to cope with changes to the component in service. The aim of the manufacturer must be to improve quality and consistency within individual components, from component to component, and from batch to batch. The aim of the fracture specialist must be to study longer-term properties to improve the accuracy of behaviour predictions with a stronger data base. Materials development needs to concentrate on obtaining defect-free materials that can be translated into more-reliable products, using our present understanding of the influence of microstructure on strength and toughness

  20. Effect of deep cryogenic treatment and tempering on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of a wear-resistant austempered alloyed bainitic ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liqing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of deep cryogenic treatment in combination with conven- tional heat treatment process was investigated on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of alloyed bainitic ductile iron. Three processing schedules were employed to treat this alloyed ductile iron including direct tempering treatment, tempering.+deep cryogenic treatment and deep cryogenic treatment.+tempering treatments. The microstructure and mechanical behavior, especially the wear resistance, have been evaluated after treated by these three schedules. The results show that martensite microstructure can be obviously refined and the precipitation of dispersed carbides is promoted by deep cryogenic treatment at .−196 ∘C for 3 h after tempered at 450 ∘C for 2 h. In this case, the alloyed bainitic ductile iron possesses rather high hardness and wear-resistance than those processed by other two schedules. The main wear mechanism of the austempered alloyed ductile iron with deep cryogenic treatment and tempering is micro-cutting wear in association with plastic deformation wear.

  1. Fracture of Fe--Cr--Mn austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Tensile tests of Tenelon (U.S. Steel), a nitrogen-strengthened iron-base alloy containing 18% chromium and 15% manganese, demonsterated that cleavage fracture can occur in some austenitic steels and is promoted by the presence of hydrogen. Tensile failure of Tenelon at 78 0 K occurred with no detectable necking at low strain levels. The fracture surface contained cleavage facets that lay along coherent twin boundaries oriented transversely to the tensile axis. Charging gaseous hydrogen at 679 MPa pressure and 650 0 K had no significant effect on the mechanical behavior or fracture mode at 78 0 K, but raised the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature from less than 200 0 K to about 250 0 K

  2. Effect of different fibers on mechanical properties and ductility of alkali-activated slag cementitious material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Zheng, W. Z.; Qin, C. Z.; Xu, Z. Z.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of different fibers on mechanical properties and ductility of alkali-activated slag cementitious material (AASCM) is studied. The research contents include: fiber type (plant fiber, polypropylene fiber), fiber content, mechanical property index, tensile stress-strain relationship curve, treating time. The test results showed that the compressive strength of two fibers reinforced AASCM was about 90 ~ 110MPa, and the tensile strength was about 3 ~ 5MPa. The reinforcement effect of polypropylene fiber is superior to that of plant fiber, and the mechanical properties of polypropylene fiber reinforced AASCM are superior to those of plant fiber, According to the comparison of SEM pictures, the plant fiber and polypropylene fiber are both closely bound with the matrix, and the transition zones are complete and close. Thus, it is proved that plant fiber and polypropylene fiber delay the crack extension and enhance the ductility of AASCM.

  3. Porosity evolution at the brittle-ductile transition in the continental crust: Implications for deep hydro-geothermal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violay, M; Heap, M J; Acosta, M; Madonna, C

    2017-08-09

    Recently, projects have been proposed to engineer deep geothermal reservoirs in the ductile crust. To examine their feasibility, we performed high-temperature (up to 1000 °C), high-pressure (130 MPa) triaxial experiments on granite (initially-intact and shock-cooled samples) in which we measured the evolution of porosity during deformation. Mechanical data and post-mortem microstuctural characterisation (X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy) indicate that (1) the failure mode was brittle up to 900 °C (shear fracture formation) but ductile at 1000 °C (no strain localisation); (2) only deformation up to 800 °C was dilatant; (3) deformation at 900 °C was brittle but associated with net compaction due to an increase in the efficiency of crystal plastic processes; (4) ductile deformation at 1000 °C was compactant; (5) thermally-shocking the granite did not influence strength or failure mode. Our data show that, while brittle behaviour increases porosity, porosity loss is associated with both ductile behaviour and transitional behaviour as the failure mode evolves from brittle to ductile. Extrapolating our data to geological strain rates suggests that the brittle-ductile transition occurs at a temperature of 400 ± 100 °C, and is associated with the limit of fluid circulation in the deep continental crust.

  4. Study on Damage Mechanism of Ductile Cast Iron Cooling Stave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cui; Zhang, Jianliang; Zuo, Haibin; Dai, Bing

    The damage mechanism of ductile cast iron cooling stave applied to No.4 blast furnace of Guofeng steel was analyzed through damage investigation in details, the damage causes: high-temperature gas flow erosion, wear of burden, high-temperature ablation, carburizing damage, improper operation on blast furnace, etc. were given out both in macroscopic and microscopic views. It can be obtained from metallographic diagrams that the diameter of graphite nodules increases, the number per unit area reduces, and roundness declines, successively, from cold to hot surface, which are not conducive to stave longevity. In summary, the material for staves manufacture should be better in comprehensive mechanical properties to prolong the service life, thus making blast furnace long campaign.

  5. Influence of Copper on the Hot Ductility of 20CrMnTi Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong-bing; Chen, Wei-qing; Chen, Lie; Guo, Dong

    2015-02-01

    The hot ductility of 20CrMnTi steel with x% copper (x = 0, 0.34) was investigated. Results show that copper can reduce its hot ductility, but there is no significant copper-segregation at the boundary tested by EPMA. The average copper content at grain boundaries and substrate is 0.352% and 0.318% respectively in steel containing 0.34% copper tensile-tested at 950 °C. The fracture morphology was examined with SEM and many small and shallow dimples were found on the fracture of steel with copper, and fine copper sulfide was found from carbon extraction replicas using TEM. Additionally, adding 0.34% copper caused an increase in the dynamic recrystallization temperature from 950 °C to 1000 °C, which indicates that copper can retard the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of austenite. The detrimental influence of copper on hot ductility of 20CrMnTi steel is due mainly to the fine copper sulfide in the steel and its retarding the DRX.

  6. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.

    1978-07-01

    The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to crack stability in brittle structures is now well understood and widely applied. However, in many structural materials, crack propagation is accompanied by considerable crack-tip plasticity which invalidates the use of LEFM. Thus, present day research in fracture mechanics is aimed at developing parameters for predicting crack propagation under elastic-plastic conditions. These include critical crack-opening-displacement methods, the J integral and R-curve techniques. This report provides an introduction to these concepts and gives some examples of their applications. (author)

  7. Friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winiczenko, Radoslaw; Kaczorowski, Mieczyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The results of the study of the friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers are presented. → The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. → In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. → The process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the interface. -- Abstract: In this paper, ductile cast iron-austenitic stainless steel, ductile cast iron-pure Armco iron and ductile cast iron-low carbon steel interlayers were welded, using the friction welding method. The tensile strength of the joints was determined, using a conventional tensile test machine. Moreover, the hardness across the interface of materials was measured on metallographic specimens. The fracture surface and microstructure of the joints was examined using either light stereoscope microscopy as well as electron microscopy. In this case, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied. The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. It was concluded that the process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the ductile cast iron-stainless steel interface. This leads to increase in carbon concentration in stainless steel where chromium carbides were formed, the size and distribution of which was dependent on the distance from the interface.

  8. Extended Finite Element Method XFEM for ductile tearing: Large crack growth modelization based on the transition from a continuous medium to the crack via a cohesive zone model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simatos, A.

    2010-01-01

    This work extends the applicability of local models for ductile fracture to large crack growth modelization for ductile tearing. This is done inserting a cohesive zone model whose constitutive law is identified in order to be consistent with the local model. The consistency is obtained through the cohesive law incremental construction which ensures the equivalence of the energy and of the mechanical response of the models. The extension of the applicability domain of the local modelization is enabled via the XFEM framework which allows for maintaining the mechanical energy during the crack extension step. This method permits also to introduce the cohesive zone model during the calculation without regards to the mesh of the structure for its maximal tensile stress. To apply the XFEM to ductile tearing, this method is extended to non linear problems (Updated Lagrangian Formulation, large scale yield plasticity). The cohesive zone model grows when the criterion defined in term of porosity, tested at the front of the cohesive crack front, is verified. The cohesive zone growth criterion is determined in order to model most of the damaging phase with the local model to ensure that the modelization takes into account the triaxiality ratio history accurately. The proposed method is applied to the Rousselier local model for ductile fracture in the XFEM framework of Cast3M, the FE software of the CEA. (author) [fr

  9. Effect of mechanical properties on erosion resistance of ductile materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Boris Feliksovih

    Solid particle erosion (SPE) resistance of ductile Fe, Ni, and Co-based alloys as well as commercially pure Ni and Cu was studied. A model for SPE behavior of ductile materials is presented. The model incorporates the mechanical properties of the materials at the deformation conditions associated with SPE process, as well as the evolution of these properties during the erosion induced deformation. An erosion parameter was formulated based on consideration of the energy loss during erosion, and incorporates the material's hardness and toughness at high strain rates. The erosion model predicts that materials combining high hardness and toughness can exhibit good erosion resistance. To measure mechanical properties of materials, high strain rate compression tests using Hopkinson bar technique were conducted at strain rates similar to those during erosion. From these tests, failure strength and strain during erosion were estimated and used to calculate toughness of the materials. The proposed erosion parameter shows good correlation with experimentally measured erosion rates for all tested materials. To analyze subsurface deformation during erosion, microhardness and nanoindentation tests were performed on the cross-sections of the eroded materials and the size of the plastically deformed zone and the increase in materials hardness due to erosion were determined. A nanoindentation method was developed to estimate the restitution coefficient within plastically deformed regions of the eroded samples which provides a measure of the rebounding ability of a material during particle impact. An increase in hardness near the eroded surface led to an increase in restitution coefficient. Also, the stress rates imposed below the eroded surface were comparable to those measured during high strain-rate compression tests (10sp3-10sp4 ssp{-1}). A new parameter, "area under the microhardness curve" was developed that represents the ability of a material to absorb impact energy. By

  10. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700/sup 0/C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625/sup 0/C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities.

  11. Fatigue limit prediction of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron considering stress ratio and notch size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, T.; Kim, H. J.; Ikeda, T.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanical behavior of ductile cast iron is governed by graphite particles and casting defects in the microstructures, which can significantly decrease the fatigue strength. In our previous study, the fatigue limit of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron specimens with small defects ((\\sqrt{{area}}=80˜ 1500{{μ }}{{m}})) could successfully be predicted based on the \\sqrt{{area}} parameter model by using \\sqrt{{area}} as a geometrical parameter of defect as well as the tensile strength as a material parameter. In addition, the fatigue limit for larger defects could be predicted based on the conventional fracture mechanics approach. In this study, rotating bending and tension-compression fatigue tests with ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron containing circumferential sharp notches as well as smooth specimens were performed to investigate quantitatively the effects of defect. The notch depths ranged 10 ˜ 2500 μm and the notch root radii were 5 and 50 μm. The stress ratios were R = -1 and 0.1. The microscopic observation of crack propagation near fatigue limit revealed that the fatigue limit was determined by the threshold condition for propagation of a small crack emanating from graphite particles. The fatigue limit could be successfully predicted as a function of R using a method proposed in this study.

  12. Ductile failure analysis of defective API X65 pipes based on stress-modified fracture strain criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang Kyun; Kim, Yun Jae; Baek, Jong Hyun; Kim, Young Pyo; Kim, Woo Sik

    2006-01-01

    A local failure criterion for the API X65 steel is applied to predict ductile failure of full-scale API X65 pipes with simulated corrosion and gouge defects under internal pressure. The local failure criterion is the stress-modified fracture strain for the API X65 steel as a function of the stress triaxiality (defined by the ratio of the hydrostatic stress to the effective stress). Based on detailed FE analyses with the proposed local failure criteria, burst pressures of defective pipes are estimated and compared with experimental data. The predicted burst pressures are in good agreement with experimental data. Noting that an assessment equation against the gouge defect is not yet available, parametric study is performed, from which a simple equation is proposed to predict burst pressure for API X65 pipes with gouge defects

  13. Effect of low fatigue on the ductile-brittle transition of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, K.; Nagata, N.; Watanabe, R.; Yoshida, H.

    1982-01-01

    An explicit ductile-brittle transition of molybdenum occurring in both tensile and low cycle fatigue tests was investigated. Tests were performed on several sorts of molybdenum and its alloy TZM, and effects of heat treatment, fabrication method and alloying on the transition behavior and fracture mode are described in detail. All the materials exhibited a brittle failure with degraded fatigue behavior at room temperature, while they became ductile as temperature increased up to 573 K. The tendency of fatigue results was qualitatively in accordance with that of reduction of area in tensile tests. Differences among the materials were minor on the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but major on the fatigue life for the embrittled materials. (orig.)

  14. In-Situ Characterization of Deformation and Fracture Behavior of Hot-Rolled Medium Manganese Lightweight Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zheng-zhi; Cao, Rong-hua; Liang, Ju-hua; Li, Feng; Li, Cheng; Yang, Shu-feng

    2018-02-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of hot-rolled medium manganese lightweight (0.32C-3.85Mn-4.18Al-1.53Si) steel was revealed by an in situ tensile test. Deformed δ-ferrite with plenty of cross-parallel deformation bands during in situ tensile tests provides δ-ferrite of good plasticity and ductility, although it is finally featured by the cleavage fracture. The soft and ductile δ-ferrite and high-volume fraction of austenite contribute to the superior mechanical properties of medium manganese lightweight steel heated at 800°C, with a tensile strength of 924 MPa, total elongation of 35.2% and product of the strength and elongation of 32.5 GPa %.

  15. A review on ductile mode cutting of brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Elijah Kwabena; Liu, Kui; Wang, Hao

    2018-06-01

    Brittle materials have been widely employed for industrial applications due to their excellent mechanical, optical, physical and chemical properties. But obtaining smooth and damage-free surface on brittle materials by traditional machining methods like grinding, lapping and polishing is very costly and extremely time consuming. Ductile mode cutting is a very promising way to achieve high quality and crack-free surfaces of brittle materials. Thus the study of ductile mode cutting of brittle materials has been attracting more and more efforts. This paper provides an overview of ductile mode cutting of brittle materials including ductile nature and plasticity of brittle materials, cutting mechanism, cutting characteristics, molecular dynamic simulation, critical undeformed chip thickness, brittle-ductile transition, subsurface damage, as well as a detailed discussion of ductile mode cutting enhancement. It is believed that ductile mode cutting of brittle materials could be achieved when both crack-free and no subsurface damage are obtained simultaneously.

  16. On the prediction of ductile fracture by void coalescence and strain localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tuo; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a unit cell model based on the observation that ductile fracture occurs when plastic flow is localized in a band. The unit cell consists of three void containing material units stacked in the direction normal to the localization plane. Localization takes place in the middle material unit while the two outer units undergo elastic recovery after failure occurs. Thus a failure criterion is established as when the macroscopic effective strain of the outer material units reaches the maximum value. Analyses are conducted to demonstrate the effect of the voids existing outside the localization band. Comparisons of the present model with several previous models suggest that the present model is not only easy to implement in finite element analysis but also more suitable to robustly determine the failure strain. A series of unit cell analyses are conducted for various macroscopic stress triaxialities and Lode parameters. The analysis results confirm that for a fixed Lode parameter, the failure strain decreases exponentially with the stress triaxiality and for a given stress triaxiality, it increases as the stress state approaches the generalized tension and generalized compression. The analysis results also reveal the effect of the stress state on the deformed void shape within and near the localization band.

  17. Comparing the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Welds on Ductile Cast Iron (700 MPa under Different Heat Treatment Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny M. Gouveia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The weldability of ductile iron, as widely known, is relatively poor, essentially due to its typical carbon equivalent value. The present study was developed surrounding the heat treatability of welded joints made with a high strength ductile cast iron detaining an ultimate tensile strength of 700 MPa, and aims to determine which heat treatment procedures promote the best results, in terms of microstructure and mechanical properties. These types of alloys are suitable for the automotive industry, as they allow engineers to reduce the thickness of parts while maintaining mechanical strength, decreasing the global weight of vehicles and providing a path for more sustainable development. The results allow us to conclude that heat treatment methodology has a large impact on the mechanical properties of welded joints created from the study material. However, the thermal cycles suffered during welding promote the formation of ledeburite areas near the weld joint. This situation could possibly be dealt through the implementation of post-welding heat treatments (PWHT with specific parameters. In contrast to a ductile cast iron tested in a previous work, the bull-eye ductile cast iron with 700 MPa ultimate tensile strength presented better results during the post-welding heat treatment than during preheating.

  18. Material specification for ductile cast iron in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.

    1987-01-01

    The United States currently does not have formal design criteria for qualifying ductile cast iron (DCI) transportation casks. There is also no dedicated material standard for DCI for this particular application. Recognizing the importance of a material standard for this application, Lawrence Livermore Laboratories, in a report to the NRC, recommended that steps be taken to develop an ASTM material specification suitable for spent fuel shipping containers. A draft ASTM material specification has been written and is currently in the ASTM approval process. This paper reviews the brief history of the development of the specification, the technical basis for the material properties, the ASTM approval process and the current status of the draft specification. The expected implications of having an adopted ASTM specification on the licensing process are also discussed. The relationship of fracture toughness to composition, microstructure and tensile properties has been evaluated at Sandia National Laboratories. The first main conclusion reached is that static fracture toughness is essentially decoupled from tensile properties such as yield strength, tensile strength and ductility. The significance of this finding is that tensile properties provided for in existing DCI specifications should not be used as an indicator of a material's ability to resist crack initiation. A material specification which includes fracture toughness requirements is needed to address the brittle fracture concerns. Second, static fracture toughness was found to correlate well with material microstructure; specifically, graphite nodule count or nodule spacing

  19. Micro- and macroapproaches in fracture mechanics for interpreting brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekobori, T.; Konosu, S.; Ekobori, A.

    1980-01-01

    Classified are models of the crack growth mechanism, and in the framework of the fracture mechanics suggested are combined micro- and macroapproaches to interpreting the criterion of the brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth as fracture typical examples, when temporal processes are important or unimportant. Under the brittle fracture conditions the crack propagation criterion is shown to be brought with the high accuracy to a form analogous to one of the crack propagation in a linear fracture mechanics although it is expressed with micro- and macrostructures. Obtained is a good agreement between theoretical and experimental data

  20. Size-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Silica Glass Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junhang; Wang, Jiangwei; Bitzek, Erik; Huang, Jian Yu; Zheng, He; Tong, Limin; Yang, Qing; Li, Ju; Mao, Scott X

    2016-01-13

    Silica (SiO2) glass, an essential material in human civilization, possesses excellent formability near its glass-transition temperature (Tg > 1100 °C). However, bulk SiO2 glass is very brittle at room temperature. Here we show a surprising brittle-to-ductile transition of SiO2 glass nanofibers at room temperature as its diameter reduces below 18 nm, accompanied by ultrahigh fracture strength. Large tensile plastic elongation up to 18% can be achieved at low strain rate. The unexpected ductility is due to a free surface affected zone in the nanofibers, with enhanced ionic mobility compared to the bulk that improves ductility by producing more bond-switching events per irreversible bond loss under tensile stress. Our discovery is fundamentally important for understanding the damage tolerance of small-scale amorphous structures.

  1. Development of an evaluation method for fracture mechanical tests on small samples based on a cohesive zone model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The safety and reliability of nuclear power plants of the fourth generation is an important issue. It is based on a reliable interpretation of the components for which, among other fracture mechanical material properties are required. The existing irradiation in the power plants significantly affects the material properties which therefore need to be determined on irradiated material. Often only small amounts of irradiated material are available for characterization. In that case it is not possible to manufacture sufficiently large specimens, which are necessary for fracture mechanical testing in agreement with the standard. Small specimens must be used. From this follows the idea of this study, in which the fracture toughness can be predicted with the developed method based on tests of small specimens. For this purpose, the fracture process including the crack growth is described with a continuum mechanical approach using the finite element method and the cohesive zone model. The experiments on small specimens are used for parameter identification of the cohesive zone model. The two parameters of the cohesive zone model are determined by tensile tests on notched specimens (cohesive stress) and by parameter fitting to the fracture behavior of smalls specimens (cohesive energy). To account the different triaxialities of the specimens, the cohesive stress is used depending on the triaxiality. After parameter identification a large specimen can be simulated with the cohesive zone parameters derived from small specimens. The predicted fracture toughness of this big specimen fulfills the size requirements in the standard (ASTM E1820 or ASTM E399) in contrast to the small specimen. This method can be used for ductile and brittle material behavior and was validated in this work. In summary, this method offers the possibility to determine the fracture toughness indirectly based on small specimen testing. Main advantage is the low required specimen volume. Thereby massively

  2. Hot ductility and flow stress of AISI 4130 and 52100-type steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbier, Damien [Vallourec Research Center France, F-59620 Aulnoye-Aymeries (France); Guérin, Jean-Dominique, E-mail: jean-dominique.guerin@univ-valenciennes.fr [UVHC, LAMIH UMR CNRS 8201, F-59313 Valenciennes (France); Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Dubar, Mirentxu [UVHC, LAMIH UMR CNRS 8201, F-59313 Valenciennes (France); Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Bénard, Thierry; Bonneau, Sébastien [Vallourec Research Center France, F-59620 Aulnoye-Aymeries (France); Cabrera, Eli Saùl Puchi [School of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Universidad Central de Venezuela (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2017-04-06

    The present communication reports the main findings of an investigation that has been conducted in order to examine the ductility of both the AISI 4130 and 52100 steel grades, in a wide range of temperatures, spanning from room temperature up to 1250 °C, deformed in tension at strain rates of approximately 0.005 s{sup −1}. The ductility of the investigated alloys has been determined employing two different methodologies. The first one is based on the classical definition of this property, as determined from the reduction in the cross sectional area of the tensile specimen after fracture. The second method, which is proposed in this work, is based on the measurement of the energy under the engineering stress-strain curve and the decomposition of the total deformation energy into the uniform plastic and non-uniform or fracture energy components. Complementary axisymmetric compression tests have also been carried out in the temperature range of 600 °Cto 900 °C, in order to determine the strain related to the onset of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) at temperatures above 800 °C, as well as the strain corresponding to the occurrence of necking at these temperatures. The ductility values determined from both methods are observed to increase from approximately 10–80% when the testing temperature increases from room temperature to 1200 °C. Both measurements are also observed to agree up to temperatures of about 600 °C. Also, it has been determined that above this temperature, the ductility values derived from the energy criterion are somewhat higher than those computed from the reduction in the cross section area of the specimens. It has been shown that the onset of DRX gives rise to an improvement in the ductility of both steels, which is also related to a significant increase in the strain for the beginning of necking. The advantage of the energy criterion, in comparison with that based on the area reduction after fracture, is discussed.

  3. Statistical study to determine the effect of carbon, silicon, nickel and other alloying elements on the mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic ductile irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, J.; Sertucha, J.; Larranaga, P.; Suarez, R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a great interest in fully ferritic ductile irons due to their structural homogeneity, remarkable ductility and good response when machining. On the other hand the wide variety of raw materials available in foundry plants becomes a problem when controlling the chemical composition of the manufactured alloys. The present work shows a statistical study about the effect of different C, Si, Ni contents and other minor elements on structural and mechanical properties of a group of ferritic ductile iron alloys. A set of equations are finally presented to predict room temperature mechanical properties of ferritic ductile irons by means of their chemical composition and pearlite content. (Author)

  4. Statistical study to determine the effect of carbon, silicon, nickel and other alloying elements on the mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, J.; Sertucha, J.; Larranaga, P.; Suarez, R.

    2016-10-01

    There is a great interest in fully ferritic ductile irons due to their structural homogeneity, remarkable ductility and good response when machining. On the other hand the wide variety of raw materials available in foundry plants becomes a problem when controlling the chemical composition of the manufactured alloys. The present work shows a statistical study about the effect of different C, Si, Ni contents and other minor elements on structural and mechanical properties of a group of ferritic ductile iron alloys. A set of equations are finally presented to predict room temperature mechanical properties of ferritic ductile irons by means of their chemical composition and pearlite content. (Author)

  5. Prediction of fracture toughness temperature dependance from tensile test parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmida, T.; Babjak, J.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2010), s. 345-352 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/0466; GA AV ČR 1QS200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : steels * brittle to ductile transition * fracture Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.471, year: 2010

  6. Mechanical and tribological properties of newly developed Tribaloy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Liu, R.; Patnaik, P.C.; Yao, M.X.; Wu, X.J.

    2007-01-01

    Outstanding combination of mechanical, wear and corrosion performance has been achieved in Laves intermetallic materials, termed Tribaloy alloys. In these two-phase alloys the solid solution provides high mechanical strength and fracture toughness while the Laves intermetallic phase offers excellent wear resistance. However, conventional Tribaloy alloys usually have low tensile strength and fracture toughness compared with ductile materials due to the large volume fraction of Laves phase, which has limited their application in many cases. The present research is aimed at developing advanced Tribaloy alloys with increasing ductility. Two new cobalt base alloys were developed in this research. The specimens were fabricated with a centrifugal casting technique. The material characterization was performed using the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscope (SEM), indentation and ball-on-disc tribological techniques

  7. Investigation of mechanical properties and operative deformation mechanism in nano-crystalline Ni–Co/SiC electrodeposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari Baghal, S.M.; Amadeh, A.; Heydarzadeh Sohi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The tensile properties of Ni–Co and Ni–Co/SiC deposits were investigated. ► The SiC particles enhanced tensile strength and ductility of nano-structured composites. ► The deformation mechanism at low and high strain rates were studied. - Abstract: Ni–Co/SiC nano-composites were prepared via electrodeposition from a modified Watts bath containing SiC particles with average particle size of 50 nm, SDS as surfactant and saccharin as grain refiner in appropriate amounts. The effect of nano-particle incorporation on microstructure, mechanical properties and deformation mechanism of electrodeposits were investigated. The mechanical properties of electrodeposits were investigated by Vickers microhardness and tensile tests. The results indicated that incorporation of SiC particles into a 15 nm Ni–Co matrix had no considerable effect on its microhardness and yield strength, that is, dispersion hardening did not operate in this range of grain size. However it was observed that co-deposition of uniform distributed SiC particles can significantly improve the ultimate tensile strength and elongation to failure of the deposits. Calculation of apparent activation volume from tensile test results at different strain rates proved that incorporation of SiC nano-particles are responsible for stress-assisted activation of GB atoms mechanism that can significantly increase the plasticity. Nano-crystalline Ni–Co matrix showed a mixed mod behavior of ductile and brittle fracture whereas incorporation of SiC particles and increasing the strain rate promoted ductile fracture mode.

  8. Novel alpha-zirconium phosphonates for the reinforcement of ductile thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Benjamin R.

    2007-12-01

    Ductile thermoplastics are useful additives for providing fracture toughness to brittle thermosetting polymers; however, this toughening is usually accompanied by a significant decrease in elastic modulus. Therefore, alpha-zirconium phosphonates (ZrP) were developed and investigated as reinforcing nano-scale fillers that increase the yield strength and elastic modulus of a polyester thermoplastic without causing a reduction in its ductility. ZrP materials are synthetic layered compounds that are imbued with targeted organic surface functionalities and whose structural development can be carefully controlled in the laboratory. Ether-terminal alkyl ZrP materials were designed and synthesized, using a conventional ZrF62--mediated preparation, with the intent of developing strong dipole-dipole interactions between the layer surfaces and polyester macromolecules. Additionally, a general method for using lamellar lyotropic liquid crystals (LLC's) as supramolecular templates for alkyl ZrP was evaluated, whose products showed promising similarity to the conventionally prepared materials. The LLC-forming characteristics of several organophosphonate preparations were determined, showing improved mesophase stability with mixed amphiphiles and preparation with R4N + counterions. A mixed-surface octyl/methoxyundecyl ZrP was produced and combined with polycaprolactone (PCL) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in concentrations up to 50% (w/w). The mechanical properties of the ZrP/PCL nanocomposite were evaluated by tensile, flexural, and dynamic mechanical testing methods. Nanocomposites containing 5% (w/w) ZrP showed significant increases in tensile yield stress and elastic modulus without suffering any loss of ductility versus the unfilled polymer. Layer delamination from the ZrP tactoids was minimal and did not occur through an intercalative mechanism. Higher ZrP loadings resulted in the agglomeration of tactoids, leading to defect structures and loss of strength and ductility

  9. The stability of a hip fracture determines the fatigue of an intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, S; Bauer, C; Gerber, C; von Oldenburg, G; Augat, P

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to address the question of how the stability of a proximal hip fracture determines the fatigue and failure mechanism of an intramedullary implant. To answer this question, mechanical experiments and finite element simulations with two different loading scenarios were conducted. The two load scenarios differed in the mechanical support of the fracture by an artificial bone sleeve, representing the femoral head and neck. The experiments confirmed that an intramedullary nail fails at a lower load in an unstable fracture situation in the proximal femur than in a stable fracture. The nails with an unstable support failed at a load 28 per cent lower than the nails with a stable support by the femoral neck. Hence, the mechanical support of a fracture is crucial to the fatigue failure of an implant. The simulation showed why the fatigue fracture of the nail starts at the aperture of the lag screw. It is the location of the highest von Mises stress, which is the failure criterion for ductile materials.

  10. Physical factors controlling the ductility of bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. [Central South University, China; Liu, Chain T [ORNL; Zhang, Z. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Keppens, V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify key physical factor controlling the deformation and fracture behavior of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), we compiled and analyzed the elastic moduli and compressive ductility for BMGs. In addition, new modulus data were generated in the critical ranges in order to facilitate the analysis. We have found that the intrinsic ductility of BMGs can be correlated with the bulk-to-shear modulus ratio B/G according to Pugh's [Philos. Mag. 45, 823 (1954) ] rule. In some individual BMG systems, for example, Fe based, the relationship seems to be very clear. The physical meaning of this correlation is discussed in terms of atomic bonding and connectivity.

  11. Influence of sulphur and phosphorus impurities on ductility of 25Kh2NMFA steel during forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishchenko, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    Using cylindrical samples of the 25Kh2NMFA steel with sulfur and phosphorus content in the range of 0.001-0.030%, tensile test with the rate of deformation 10 -3 s -1 at the temperatures of 800-1200 deg C has been conducted. Analysis of fracture foci and plasticity diagrams has shown, that to ensure ductility during forging and high mechanical properties, the content of sulfur and phosphorus impurities in the 25Kh2NMFA steel must not exceed 0.015%

  12. Classical fracture mechanics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalbe, K.H.; Heerens, J.; Landes, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.02 of this volume and is structured as follows: Test techniques; Analysis; Fracture behavior; Fracture toughness tests for nonmetals

  13. Mechanical milling of a nano structured ductile iron powder under dry, wet and cryogenic atmospheres; Proceso de molturacion mecanica en medio seco, humedo y criogenico de polvo de hierro ductil nanoestructurado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinca, N.; Hurtado, E.; Cano, I. G.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    The main objective of this study, is to obtain an effective particle and grain size reduction of a nano structured iron powder by mechanical milling under different milling media. One of the main challenges in this study is to work with this material of great ductility.The variables of the study to be optimized have been the following: speed of rotation, powder to ball ratio (PBR) and the percentage of control agent to induce an effective powder fracturing in front of cold welding. The powder has been characterized by a Laser Diffraction Particle Size Analyser, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and, X-ray diffraction.Through the comparative study, it is found that operating under dry milling conditions: there is a more effective particle size reduction of 43 % and grain size reduction of 62 %. In wet conditions has been reduced the amount of oxide, as well as to obtain a more homogenous distribution of the resulting powder. The results under cryogenic media is presented as promising. (Author) 15 refs.

  14. Strain Rate Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of Graphite Platelet Reinforced Vinyl Ester Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmananda Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, the fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces of vinyl ester based nanocomposites were estimated applying classical method on 3D digital microscopic images. The fracture energy and fracture toughness were obtained from fractal dimensions. A noteworthy observation, the strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of vinyl ester based nanocomposites, is reinvestigated in the current study. The candidate materials of xGnP (exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets reinforced and with additional CTBN (Carboxyl Terminated Butadiene Nitrile toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites that are subjected to both quasi-static and high strain rate indirect tensile load using the traditional Brazilian test method. High-strain rate indirect tensile testing is performed with a modified Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. Pristine vinyl ester shows ductile deformation under quasi-static loading and brittle failure when subjected to high-strain rate loading. This observation reconfirms the previous research findings on strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of this material system. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Contribution of nanoreinforcement to the tensile properties is reported in this paper.

  15. Draft ASME code case on ductile cast iron for transport packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, T.; Arai, T.; Hirose, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Tezuka, Y.; Urabe, N.; Hueggenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    The current Rules for Construction of ''Containment Systems for Storage and Transport Packagings of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Material and Waste'' of Division 3 in Section III of ASME Code (2001 Edition) does not include ductile cast iron in its list of materials permitted for use. The Rules specify required fracture toughness values of ferritic steel material for nominal wall thickness 5/8 to 12 inches (16 to 305 mm). New rule for ductile cast iron for transport packaging of which wall thickness is greater than 12 inches (305mm) is required

  16. Fracture propagation in gas pipelines - relevance to submarine lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fearnehough, G D [British Gas Corp., Newcastle upon Tyne. Engineering Research Station

    1976-09-01

    This paper reviews the factors which control fracture propagation in pipes and suggests how they are influenced by submarine environments. If fracture arrest capability is required then these factors should be considered in terms of the design philosophy and the maximum tolerable length of fracture which can be repaired. The paper shows that brittle fracture characteristics of submarine pipelines are probably similar to land based lines and fracture arrest can only be guaranteed by appropriate material toughness specification. Resistance to ductile fracture propagation in submarine lines is enhanced by lower design stresses, thicker pipe, concrete coating and the effect of hydrostatic head on gas dynamics. However, additional factors due to submarine design can be deleterious viz: uncertainty about backfill integrity and a tendency of thicker steels to low fracture resistance arising from 'separation' formation. Attention is drawn to problems which may arise with transportation of gases rich in hydrocarbons and the use of mechanical methods of fracture arrest.

  17. Influence of cooling rate and antimony addition content on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of a ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cooling rate and inoculation practice can greatly affect the graphite morphology of ductile irons. In the present research, the effects of the cooling rate and antimony addition on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of ductile irons have been studied. Three ductile iron castings were prepared through solidification under cooling conditions S (slow, M (medium and F (fast. The cooling rates around the equilibrium eutectic temperature (1,150 ℃ for these cooling conditions (S, M and F were set at 0.21 ℃·min-1, 0.32 ℃·min-1 and 0.37 ℃·min-1, respectively. In addition, four ductile iron castings were prepared by adding 0.01%, 0.02%, 0.03% and 0.04% (by weight antimony, respectively under the slow cooling condition. The results show that the nodularity index, tensile strength and hardness of the ductile iron castings without antimony addition are all improved with the increase of cooling rate, while the ductile iron casting solidified under the medium cooling rate possesses the largest number of graphite nodules. Furthermore, for the four antimony containing castings, the graphite morphology and tensile strength are also improved by the antimony additions, and the effect of antimony addition is intensified when the addition increases from 0.01% to 0.03%. Moreover, the rare earth elements (REE/antimony ratio of 2 appears to be the most effective for fine nodular graphite formation in ductile iron.

  18. Energetic approach for ductile tearing; Approche energetique de la dechirure ductile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, St

    1999-07-01

    This study focuses on ductile crack initiation and propagation. It aims to propose an approach for the engineer allowing the prediction of the evolution of cracks in large scale components, from parameters determined on laboratory specimens. A crack initiation criterion, defining a J{sub i} tenacity related to crack tip blunting proposed in the literature is validated in the study. This criterion is shown to be transferable from laboratory specimens to structures. The literature review shows that an approach based on the dissipated energy in the fracture process during propagation offers an economical and simple solution to simulate large crack growth. A numerical method is proposed to estimate this fracture energy. The existence of an energy parameter G{sub fr} is shown, by simulating the propagation by the simultaneous release of several elements and by the use of the Rice integral with an original integration path. This parameter represents the needed energy for a unit crack extension and appears to be intrinsic to the material. A global energy statement allows to relate this parameter to a variation of the plastic part of J integral. It offers a second numerical method to simulate the propagation just from stationary numerical calculations, as well as the elaboration of a simplified method. This approach, using two parameters J{sub i} and G{sub fr}, intrinsic to the material and experimentally measurable on specimens, is validated on many tests such as crack pipes subjected to four points bending and cracked rings in compression. For example, this approach allows to model up to 90 mm ductile tearing in a pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack in ferritic steel, or to anticipate the evolution of a semi-elliptical crack in an aged austenitic ferritic steel plate subjected to bending. (author)

  19. Improvement in ductility of high strength polycrystalline Ni-rich Ni{sub 3}Al alloy produced by EB-PVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.Y.; Pei, Y.L.; Li, S.S.; Zhang, H.; Gong, S.K., E-mail: gongsk@buaa.edu.cn

    2014-11-25

    Highlights: • High strength and high ductility of polycrystalline Ni-rich Ni{sub 3}Al alloy sheets were produced. • The elongation could be enhanced from ∼0.5% to ∼14.6% by microstructural control. • The fracture strength (∼820 MPa) was enhanced by the precipitation strengthening. • This work provides a general processing for repairing the worn single crystal blades. - Abstract: A 300 μm Ni-rich Ni{sub 3}Al sheet was produced by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and followed by different heat treatments to obtain fine γ′/γ two-phase structures with large elongation. Tensile testing was performed at room-temperature, and the corresponding mechanisms were investigated in detail. Results indicated that the as-deposited Ni{sub 3}Al alloy exhibited non-equilibrium directional columnar crystal, and transited to equiaxed crystal with uniformly distributed tough γ phase after heat treatment. Meanwhile, the fracture mechanism transited from brittleness to a mixture of ductility and brittleness modes. With an appropriate heat treatment, high strength (ultimate tensile strength obtained 828 MPa) and high ductility (elongation obtained 14.6%) Ni{sub 3}Al alloy has been achieved, which was due to the mesh network microstructure. A series of transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterizations confirmed that the increasing flow stress of Ni{sub 3}Al alloy was attributed to the cubical secondary γ′ phase precipitates (25–50 nm) within the γ phase. This work provides a potential strategy for repairing the worn tip of single crystal engine blades using Ni-rich Ni{sub 3}Al alloy by EB-PVD.

  20. Coexistence of ductile and brittle fracture in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohr, S.M.; Chang, S.J.; Park, C.G.; Thomson, R.

    1985-01-01

    It is well known that semibrittle body-centered cubic (bcc) metals fail at low temperatures by cleavage that is preceded by crack tip deformation. Sinclair and Finnis proposed a mechanism by which crack tip deformation may be combined with brittle crack extension. In this model, edge dislocations are emitted from a crack tip on an inclined plane under pure mode I loading conditions. The authors propose a new mechanism of brittle fracture of semibrittle metals preceded by crack tip deformation by extending the model of Sinclair and Finnis and by incorporating experimental evidence on mixed mode crack propagation observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They have shown experimentally that, even when the orientation of the dislocations in the plastic zone indicated pure mode III crack tip deformation, the crack opening displacement determined from the relative displacement of the crack flanks showed the presence of an additional mode I component. They have also shown that zigzag crack propagation observed in many metals can occur only if mode I cleavage is superimposed to mode II crack tip deformation

  1. Pediatric maxillary fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jack; Dinsmore, Robert; Mar, Philip; Bhatt, Kirit

    2011-07-01

    Pediatric craniofacial structures differ from those of adults in many ways. Because of these differences, management of pediatric craniofacial fractures is not the same as those in adults. The most important differences that have clinical relevance are the mechanical properties, craniofacial anatomy, healing capacity, and dental morphology. This article will review these key differences and the management of pediatric maxillary fractures. From the mechanical properties' perspective, pediatric bones are much more resilient than adult bones; as such, they undergo plastic deformation and ductile failure. From the gross anatomic perspective, the relative proportion of the cranial to facial structures is much larger for the pediatric patients and the sinuses are not yet developed. The differences related to dentition and dental development are more conical crowns, larger interdental spaces, and presence of permanent tooth buds in the pediatric population. The fracture pattern, as a result of all the above, does not follow the classic Le Fort types. The maxillomandibular fixation may require circum-mandibular wires, drop wires, or Ivy loops. Interfragmentary ligatures using absorbable sutures play a much greater role in these patients. The use of plates and screws should take into consideration the future development with respect to growth centers and the location of the permanent tooth buds. Pediatric maxillary fractures are not common, require different treatments, and enjoy better long-term outcomes.

  2. Irradiation and inhomogeneity effects on ductility and toughness of (ODS)-7 -13Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preininger, D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The superimposed effect of irradiation defect and structural inhomogeneity formation on tensile ductility and dynamic toughness of ferritic-martensitic 7-13CrW(Mo)VTa(Nb) and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS)-7-13CrWVTa(Ti)- RAFM steels has been examined by work hardening and local stress/strain-induced ductile fracture models. Structural inhomogeneities which strongly promoting plastic instability and localized flow might be formed by the applied fabrication process, high dose irradiation and additionally further during deformation by enhanced local dislocation generation around fine particles or due to slip band formation with localized heating at high impact strain rates ε'. The work hardening model takes into account superimposed dislocation multiplication from stored dislocations, dispersions and also grain boundaries as well as annihilation by cross-slip. Analytical relations have been deduced from the model describing uniform ductility and ductile upper shelf energy (USE) observed from Charpy-impact testes. Especially, the influence of different irradiation defects like atomic clusters, dislocation loops and coherent chromium-rich α'- precipitates have been considered together with effects from strain rate as well as irradiation (TI) and test temperature TT. Strengthening by clusters and more pronounced by dislocation loops formed at higher TI>250 deg. C reduces uniform ductility and also distinctly stronger dynamic toughness USE. A superimposed hardening by the α'- formation in higher Cr containing 9-13Cr steels strongly reduces toughness assisted by a combined grain-boundary embrittlement with reduction of the ductile fracture stress. But that improves work hardening and uniform ductility as observed particularly due to nano-scale Y 2 O 3 - dispersions in ODS-RAFM steels. For ODS- steels additionally the strength-induced reduction of toughness is diminished by a combined microstructural-induced increase of the ductile

  3. Introduction into technical application of fracture mechanics. 3. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckel, K.

    1991-01-01

    Technical components made out of metal material are liable to be defective. Cracks are the most dangerous defects. Based on fracture mechanics methods were developed which permit to estimate the proveness of cracks to intrate fracture. The present book is restricted to the standardised methods of fracture mechanics. Theoretical foundations of various concepts aspect under the fracture mechanics are given. Experimental methods of determining material characteristics of fracture mechanics are explained in detail as a profound knowledge of testing criteria is necessary in order to be able to a characteristic to a component. This book contains the latest level of standardised methods of fracture mechanics. It is meant for advanced students and engineers working in practice. Some fully calculated examples are used as an introduction into the thinking of fracture mechanics. (orig./MM) [de

  4. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of boiling water reactor vessel for cool-down and low temperature over-pressurization transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Soon; Choi, Young Hwan; Jhung, Myung Jo [Safety Research Division, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The failure probabilities of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for low temperature over-pressurization (LTOP) and cool-down transients are calculated in this study. For the cool-down transient, a pressure-temperature limit curve is generated in accordance with Section XI, Appendix G of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code, from which safety margin factors are deliberately removed for the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. Then, sensitivity analyses are conducted to understand the effects of some input parameters. For the LTOP transient, the failure of the RPV mostly occurs during the period of the abrupt pressure rise. For the cool-down transient, the decrease of the fracture toughness with temperature and time plays a main role in RPV failure at the end of the cool-down process. As expected, the failure probability increases with increasing fluence, Cu and Ni contents, and initial reference temperature-nil ductility transition (RTNDT). The effect of warm prestressing on the vessel failure probability for LTOP is not significant because most of the failures happen before the stress intensity factor reaches the peak value while its effect reduces the failure probability by more than one order of magnitude for the cool-down transient.

  5. The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media; Modelisation hydromecanique des milieux fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadiri, I

    2002-10-15

    The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media is quite complex. Simplifications are necessary for the modeling of such media, but, not always justified, Only permeable fractures are often considered. The rest of the network is approximated by an equivalent continuous medium. Even if we suppose that this approach is validated, the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the fractures and of the continuous medium are seldom known. Calibrations are necessary for the determination of these properties. Until now, one does not know very well the nature of measurements which must be carried out in order to carry on a modeling in discontinuous medium, nor elements of enough robust validation for this kind of modeling. For a better understanding of the hydro-mechanical phenomena in fractured media, two different sites have been selected for the work. The first is the site of Grimsel in Switzerland in which an underground laboratory is located at approximately 400 m of depth. The FEBEX experiment aims at the in-situ study of the consecutive phenomena due to the installation of a heat source representative of radioactive waste in the last 17 meters of the FEBEX tunnel in the laboratory of Grimsel. Only, the modeling of the hydro-mechanical of the excavation was model. The modeling of the Febex enabled us to establish a methodology of calibration of the hydraulic properties in the discontinuous media. However, this kind of study on such complex sites does not make possible to answer all the questions which arise on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the fractured media. We thus carried out modeling on an other site, smaller than the fist one and more accessible. The experimental site of Coaraze, in the Maritime Alps, is mainly constituted of limestone and fractures. Then the variation of water pressure along fractures is governed by the opening/closure sequence of a water gate. Normal displacement as well as the pore pressure along these fractures are recorded, and then

  6. Cohesive traction–separation laws for tearing of ductile metal plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Hutchinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The failure process ahead of a mode I crack advancing in a ductile thin metal plate or sheet produces plastic dissipation through a sequence of deformation steps that include necking well ahead of the crack tip and shear localization followed by a slant fracture in the necked region somewhat clos...

  7. A natural example of fluid-mediated brittle-ductile cyclicity in quartz veins from Olkiluoto Island, SW Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Barbara; Garofalo, Paolo S.; Viola, Giulio; Mattila, Jussi; Menegon, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Brittle faults are well known as preferential conduits for localised fluid flow in crystalline rocks. Their study can thus reveal fundamental details of the physical-chemical properties of the flowing fluid phase and of the mutual feedbacks between mechanical properties of faults and fluids. Crustal deformation at the brittle-ductile transition may occur by a combination of competing brittle fracturing and viscous flow processes, with short-lived variations in fluid pressure as a viable mechanism to produce this cyclicity switch. Therefore, a detailed study of the fluid phases potentially present in faults can help to better constrain the dynamic evolution of crustal strength within the seismogenic zone, as a function of varying fluid phase characteristics. With the aim to 1) better understand the complexity of brittle-ductile cyclicity under upper to mid-crustal conditions and 2) define the physical and chemical features of the involved fluid phase, we present the preliminary results of a recently launched (micro)structural and geochemical project. We study deformed quartz veins associated with brittle-ductile deformation zones on Olkiluoto Island, chosen as the site for the Finnish deep repository for spent nuclear fuel excavated in the Paleoproterozoic crust of southwestern Finland. The presented results stem from the study of brittle fault zone BFZ300, which is a mixed brittle and ductile deformation zone characterized by complex kinematics and associated with multiple generations of quartz veins, and which serves as a pertinent example of the mechanisms of fluid flow-deformation feedbacks during brittle-ductile cyclicity in nature. A kinematic and dynamic mesostructural study is being integrated with the detailed analysis of petrographic thin sections from the fault core and its immediate surroundings with the aim to reconstruct the mechanical deformation history along the entire deformation zone. Based on the observed microstructures, it was possible to

  8. Effect of boron on the microstructure and mechanical properties of carbidic austempered ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yuncheng; Jin Huijin; Liu Jinhai; Li Guolu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Boron are applied to carbidic austempered ductile iron (CADI). → Boron microalloying CADI is a new high hardenability of wear-resistant cast iron. → Addition of boron to CADI significantly improves hardenability. → Effect of boron on the CADI grinding ball were investigated. → Optimum property is obtained when boron content at 0.03 wt%. - Abstract: Carbidic austempered ductile iron (CADI) castings provide a unique combination of high hardness and toughness coupled with superior wear resistance properties, but their hardenability restricts their range of applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of boron on the microstructure and mechanical properties of CADI. The experimental results indicate that the CADI comprises graphite nodules, which are dispersive boron-carbides that are distributed in the form of strips, and the matrix is a typical ausferritic matrix. Microscopic amounts of boron can improve the hardenability of CADI, but higher boron content reduces the hardenability and toughness of CADI. The results are discussed in the context of the influence of boron content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of grinding balls.

  9. Rock types and ductile structures on a rock domain basis, and fracture orientation and mineralogy on a deformation zone basis. Preliminary site description. Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Michael [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden); Forssberg, Ola [Golder Associates AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-09-15

    This report presents the results of the analysis of base geological data in order to establish the dominant rock type, the subordinate rock types and the orientation of ductile mineral fabrics within each rock domain included in the regional geological model, version 1.2. An assessment of the degree of homogeneity of each domain is also provided. The analytical work has utilised the presentation of data in the form of histograms and stereographic projections. Fisher means and K values or best-fit great circles and corresponding pole values have been calculated for the ductile structural data. These values have been used in the geometric modelling of rock domains in the regional model, version 1.2. Furthermore, all analytical results have been used in the assignment of properties to rock domains in this model. A second analytical component reported here addresses the orientation and mineralogy of fractures in the deterministic deformation zones that are included in the regional geological model, version 1.2. The analytical work has once again utilised the presentation of data in the form of histograms and stereographic projections. Fisher means and K values are presented for the orientation of fracture sets in the deterministic deformation zones that have been identified with the help of new borehole data. The frequencies of occurrence of different minerals along the fractures in these deformation zones as well as the orientation of fractures in the zones, along which different minerals occur, are also presented. The results of the analyses have been used in the establishment of a conceptual structural model for the Forsmark site and in the assignment of properties to deterministic deformation zones in model version 1.2.

  10. The Effect of Hydrogen on the Mechanical Properties of Cast Irons and ADI with Various Carbon Equivalent and Graphite Morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Gi; Lee, Kyung Sub

    1989-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of cast irons, flake, CV graphite cast iron ductile iron and ADI have been investigated. The effects of various carbon equivalent, graphite morphology and matrix have been analyzed to determine the predominant factor which influences on the hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of various carbon equivalent on the embrittlement was little in the similar graphite morphology. The embrittlement of ferrite matrix changed by heat treatment was less than that of pearlite matrix. In the case of ADI, the tendency of hydrogen embrittlement of lower bainite matrix was less remarkable than that of upper banite matrix. As the result of hydrogen charging, the tendency of interface decohesion between matrix-graphite was increased in flake G.C.I., and the trend from ductile fracture mode to brittle fracture mode was observed in CV G.C.I and ductile iron. Lower bainite in ADI showed the ductile fracture mode. Hydrogen solubility of lower bainite was higher than that of upper bainite

  11. Intermetallic alloys: Deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, B.

    1988-01-01

    The state of the art in intermetallic alloys development with particular emphasis on deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour is documented. This review paper is prepared to lay the ground stones for a future work on mechanical property characterization and fracture behaviour of intermetallic alloys at GKSS. (orig.)

  12. Development of a plastic fracture methodology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanninen, M.F.; Hahn, G.T.; Broek, D.; Stonesifer, R.B.; Marschall, C.W.; Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Zahoor, A.

    1981-03-01

    A number of candidate fracture criteria were investigated to determine the basis for plastic fracture mechanics assessments of nuclear pressure vessels and other components exhibiting fully ductile behavior. The research was comprised of an integrated combination of stable crack growth experiments and elastic-plastic finite element analyses. The results demonstrated that many different fracture criteria can be used as the basis of a resistance curve approach to predicting stable crack growth and fracture instability. All have some disadvantages and none is completely unacceptable. On balance, the best criteria were found to be the J-integral for initiation and limited amounts of stable crack growth and the local crack tip opening angle for extended amounts of stable growth. A combination of the two, which may preserve the advantages of each while reducing their disadvantages, was also suggested by these results

  13. Development of a plastic fracture methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanninen, M.F.; Hahn, G.T.; Broek, D.; Stonesifer, R.B.; Marschall, C.W.; Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Zahoor, A.

    1981-03-01

    A number of candidate fracture criteria were investigated to determine the basis for plastic fracture mechanics assessments of nuclear pressure vessels and other components exhibiting fully ductile behavior. The research was comprised of an integrated combination of stable crack growth experiments and elastic-plastic finite element analyses. The results demonstrated that many different fracture criteria can be used as the basis of a resistance curve approach to predicting stable crack growth and fracture instability. All have some disadvantages and none is completely unacceptable. On balance, the best criteria were found to be the J-integral for initiation and limited amounts of stable crack growth and the local crack tip opening angle for extended amounts of stable growth. A combination of the two, which may preserve the advantages of each while reducing their disadvantages, was also suggested by these results.

  14. Mechanical splicing of superelastic Cu–Al–Mn alloy bars with headed ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, S.; Mohebbi, A.; Saiidi, M. S.; Omori, T.; Kainuma, R.; Shrestha, K. C.; Araki, Y.

    2018-06-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of mechanical splicing using a steel coupler to connect headed ends of superelastic Cu–Al–Mn alloy (Camalloy) bars and steel reinforcing bars to be used in concrete structures. Although threading of Camalloy is as easy as that of steel, mechanical splicing using threaded ends requires machining of Camalloy bars into dog-bone shape to avoid brittle fracture at the threaded ends. The machining process requires significant time and cost and wastes substantial amount of the material. This paper attempts to resolve this issue by applying mechanical splicing using steel couplers to connect headed ends of Camalloy and steel reinforcing bars. To study its feasibility, we prepare 3 specimens wherein both ends of each Camalloy bar (13 mm diameter and 300 mm length) are connected to steel reinforcing bars. The specimens are tested under monotonic, single-cycle, and full-cycle tension loading conditions. From these tests, we observed (1) excellent superelasticity with recoverable strain of around 6% and (2) large ductility with fracture strain of over 19%. It should be emphasized here that, in all the specimens, ductile fracture occurred at the locations apart from the headed ends. This is in sharp contrast with brittle fracture of headed superelastic Ni–Ti SMA bars, most of which took place around the headed ends. From the results of the microstructural analysis, we identified the following reasons for avoiding brittle fracture at the headed ends: (1) Precipitation hardening increases the strength around the boundary between the straight and headed (tapered) portions, where stress concentration takes place. (2) The strength of the straight portion does not increase significantly up to the ductile fracture if its grain orientation is close to 〈0 0 1〉.

  15. Process for improving the low temperature ductility of tungsten-base composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukas, E.G.

    1975-05-01

    At temperatures below about 100 0 C, liquid-phase-sintered tungsten-base composites fail in a brittle manner because of the formation of cleavage cracks in the tungsten spheroids. Improving the ductility, then, would require some alloying addition or treatment which would improve the ductility of these spheroids, or some method of changing the stress distribution, such as putting the surface in compression, which would reduce stress concentrations and thereby require a higher load to initiate fracture. The ductilizing process used here consists of coating the composite with a ductile metal followed by heat treating at a high enough temperature to insure sufficient diffusion so that the coat and base become integral. The ductile coat is now the 'piece' surface, and the initiation of cleavage cracks requires much greater stresses. Coats of copper, nickel, gold, and cobalt have been used successfully. A possible added advantage is that the surface properties can now be controlled if certain reflective properties or corrosion resistance are needed. Also soldering or low temperature brazing operations are feasible, allowing the construction or assembly of intricate shapes which could not be accomplished previously. (U.S.)

  16. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  17. Ductile crack initiation and propagation assessed via in situ synchrotron radiation-computed laminography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgeneyer, T.F.; Helfen, L.; Sinclair, I.; Proudhon, H.; Xu, F.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-01-01

    Ductile crack initiation and propagation within a naturally aged aluminium alloy sheet has been observed in situ via synchrotron radiation-computed laminography, a technique specifically adapted to three-dimensional imaging of thin objects that are laterally extended. Voids and intermetallic particles, and their subsequent evolution during ductile crack extension at different associated levels of stress triaxiality, were clearly observed within fracture coupons of a reasonable engineering length-scale, overcoming the conventional sample size limitation of computed tomography at high resolutions.

  18. Crack blunting, cleavage fracture in transition area and stable crack growth - investigated using the nonlinear fracture mechanics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerens, J.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is developed which allows to estimate crack tip blunting using the stress-strain curve of the material and the J-integral. The second part deals with cleavage fracture in a quenched and tempered pressure vessel steel. It was found that within the ductile to brittle transition regime the fracture toughness is controlled by cleavage initiated at 'weak spots of the material' and by the normal stresses at the weak spots. In the last part of the paper the influence of specimen size on J-, Jm- and δ 5 -R-curves for side grooved CT-specimens under fully plastic condition is investigated. In order to characterize constraint-effects the necking of the specimens was measured. For specimens having similar constraint the parameters Jm and δ 5 yielded size independent R-curves over substantial larger amounts of crack extension than the J-integral. (orig.) With 114 figs., 10 tabs [de

  19. Dependence of the specific essential work of fracture in mode I in commercially pure copper with thickener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa M, Herman; Monsalve G, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Due to the great ductility of DHP copper, the classic characterization of the fracture's lineal mechanics with the critical intensity factor of K 10 tensions fails because of the increased amount of plastic deformation that the material displays before fracturing. For this reason other parameters such as the integral J are also not able to characterize the fracture phenomenon. Therefore there is a need to define a more appropriate parameter, that is able to describe the breakage phenomenon in this type of material: the specific essential work of fracture that includes the large amount of plastic deformation that can absorb materials with definite ductile behavior. Tests with DENT (Double Edge Notched Tension) pieces were carried out for the calculation of the specific essential fracture work, according to the pre-standard ESIS 1995. These tests have been carried out with pieces of different ligament lengths, so that the specific fracture energy (W sf ) correlates with the ligament length, allowing the value of the specific essential fracture work (W sf ) to be calculated. Tests have been made using pieces of different thicknesses to establish the relationship between specific essential fracture work and the thickness of the material, finding that the value of W sf increases with the increased thickness of the material (CW)

  20. Temperature effect on crack resistance and fracture micromechanisms in tungsten-copper pseudoalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, A.V.; Gopkalo, E.E.; Krasovskij, A.Ya.; Nadezhdin, G.N.; Uskov, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the mechanical- and-physical study of peculiarities of the tungsten-copper pseudoalloy fracture in the temperature range of 293-2273 K are presented. It is shown that the studied material possesses maximum crack resistance in the vicinity of the upper temperature range boundary of the ductile-brittle transition and minimum resistance to cracks propagation when it contains melted copper. It is established that the peculiarities of changes in crack-resistance correspond to peculiarities of fracture micromechanisms for tungsten-copper pseudoalloy in the studied tempearture range

  1. Fracture mechanics assessment of thermal aged nuclear piping based on the Leak-Before-Break concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya, E-mail: chenmingya@cgnpc.com.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Weiwei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Qian, Guian [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Wang, Rongshan; Lu, Feng; Zhang, Guodong; Xue, Fei; Chen, Zhilin [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of thermal aging on crack unstable tearing are studied. • The critical size of crack unstable tearing is calculated by different methods. • The critical failure models are compared. • The conservatism of J–T diagram is shown. - Abstract: The Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept has been accepted to design the primary piping system of the pressurized water reactor (PWR). Due to thermal aging of long term operation, the cast stainless steels (CSSs) which are used for the primary piping of PWR, suffer a significant loss of fracture toughness, and as a consequence the safety margin of the thermal aged pipe decreases. Therefore, the aged piping should be analyzed and validated by the LBB concept. In this paper, elastic–plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) assessments of the thermal aged piping are presented according to the LBB concept. The critical break size of crack unstable tearing is calculated by the EPFM method. The crack driving force diagram (J–a diagram), the stability assessment diagram (J–T diagram) and a numerical method are applied to calculate the critical crack size of crack break. The effects of thermal aging on the plastic limit load, J–T diagram, critical crack size of the EPFM and the critical failure mode are studied. The results show that the thermal aging effect decreases the maximum allowed J-integral at a certain ductile tearing modulus by more than 50% and it increases the flow stress and plastic limit load by 11.78%. The results based on the J–T diagram are about 40% conservative than those based on the direct numerical method for the high loading case. For the thermal aged piping, it is important to consider the competition failure modes between plastic collapse and unstable ductile tearing.

  2. The effects of the local fracture stress and carbides on the cleavage fracture characteristics of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels in the transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Won Jon; Huh, Moo Young; Roh, Sung Joo; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Yong Jun; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2000-01-01

    In the ductile-brittle transition temperature region of SA508 C1.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels, the relationship of the local fracture stress and carbides influencing the cleavage fracture behavior was investigated. Based on the ASTM E1921-97 standard method, the reference transition temperatures were determined by three point bending fracture toughness tests. A local fracture stress σ f * , was determined from a theoretical stress distribution in front of crack tip using the cleavage initiation distance measured in each fractured specimen surface. The local fracture stress values showed a strong relationship with toughness characteristics of the materials and those were larger in the materials of smaller carbide size. Quantitative analysis of carbides showed that carbides larger than a certain size are mainly responsible for the cleavage fracture in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region. (author)

  3. On the influence of microscale inertia on dynamic ductile crack extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, N.; Mercier, S.; Molinari, A.

    2012-08-01

    The present paper is devoted to the modelling of damage by micro-voiding in ductile solids under dynamic loading conditions. Using a dynamic homogenization procedure, a constitutive damage model accounting for inertial effects due to void growth (microscale inertia or micro-inertia) has been developed. The role played by microscale inertia in dynamic ductile crack growth is investigated with the use of the proposed micromechanical modelling. It is found that micro-inertia has a significant influence on the fracture behaviour. Micro-inertia limits the velocity at which cracks propagate. It also contributes to increase the apparent dynamic toughness of the material.

  4. A novel aluminum based nanocomposite with high strength and good ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezanalizadeh, Hossein, E-mail: hralizadeh@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Emamy, Masoud [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokouhimehr, Mohammadreza [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Aluminum based nanocomposite containing nano-sized Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} reinforcing was fabricated via mechanical milling followed by hot extrusion techniques. For this, Al and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} powders were mixed mechanically and milled at different times (0, 2, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 h) to achieve Al–10 wt.% Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} composite powders. Hot extrusion of cold pressed powders was done at 400 °C with extrusion ratio of 6:1. Microstructures of the powders and consolidated materials were studied using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. Fracture surfaces were also investigated by scanning electron microscopy equipped with EDS analyzer. The results showed that an increase in milling time caused to reduce the grain size unlike the lattice strain of Al matrix. In addition, the fabricated composites exhibited homogeneous distribution and less agglomerations of the n-Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} with increasing milling time. The mechanical behavior of these nanocomposites was investigated by hardness and tensile tests, which revealed it has four times the strength of a conventional Al along with good ductility. It was found that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of the nanocomposites were significantly improved with increases in milling time up to 15 h. This improvement was attributed to the grain refinement strengthening and homogeneous distribution of the n-Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2}. Fracture surfaces showed that the interfacial bonding between Al and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} could be improved with increasing in milling time. Also HRTEM results from interface showed that a metallurgical clean interface and intimate contact between matrix and second phase. By extending the milling process up to 20 h, there was no significant improvement in mechanical behavior of materials, due to the completion of milling process and dynamic and static recovery of composite at higher milling times. - Highlights: • A novel aluminum

  5. On the applicability of local approaches for the determination of the failure behavior of ductile steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Eisele, U.; Seidenfuss, M.

    1992-01-01

    The strength and deformation behavior of specimens and components is, on one hand, influenced by the local state of stress and strain and, on the other hand by the chemical composition and the microstructure of the material used. Using two different steels it was investigated in how far it is possible to predict the failure behavior of specimens and components qualitatively and quantitatively by means of local approaches. For this purpose two methods differing considerably from the basic idea were chosen. For the description of the failure behavior so-called damage models were used. These damage models try to describe numerically the process developing microscopically and finally leading to fracture by means of continuum mechanical approaches in order to calculate the macroscopical failure behavior. The results show that for ductile materials the damage models allow a very accurate calculation of smooth and notched specimens and components. The efforts presently required for the calculation are however still very high. Analyses using fracture mechanics approaches (J-Integral) in combination with the local stress states (multiaxiality) were performed to describe the failure behavior. With this approach it was tried to calculate crack initiation and maximum load of precracked specimens and components. The fracture mechanics methods are to be preferred for cracked components if an engineering estimation of crack initiation and maximum load is required only, since the calculational efforts of the fracture mechanics methods are much lower than those of the damage models

  6. Dependence of fracture mechanical and fluid flow properties on fracture roughness and sample size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Y.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter study has been carried out to investigate the interdependence of mechanical and fluid flow properties of fractures with fracture roughness and sample size. A rough fracture can be defined mathematically in terms of its aperture density distribution. Correlations were found between the shapes of the aperture density distribution function and the specific fractures of the stress-strain behavior and fluid flow characteristics. Well-matched fractures had peaked aperture distributions that resulted in very nonlinear stress-strain behavior. With an increasing degree of mismatching between the top and bottom of a fracture, the aperture density distribution broadened and the nonlinearity of the stress-strain behavior became less accentuated. The different aperture density distributions also gave rise to qualitatively different fluid flow behavior. Findings from this investigation make it possible to estimate the stress-strain and fluid flow behavior when the roughness characteristics of the fracture are known and, conversely, to estimate the fracture roughness from an examination of the hydraulic and mechanical data. Results from this study showed that both the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the fracture are controlled by the large-scale roughness of the joint surface. This suggests that when the stress-flow behavior of a fracture is being investigated, the size of the rock sample should be larger than the typical wave length of the roughness undulations

  7. Ductile cast irons: microstructure influence on fatigue crack propagation resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cavallini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure influence on fatigue crack propagation resistance in five different ductile cast irons (DCI was investigated. Four ferrite/pearlite volume fractions were considered, performing fatigue crack propagation tests according to ASTM E647 standard (R equals to 0.1, 0.5 and 0.75, respectively. Results were compared with an austempered DCI. Damaging micromechanisms were investigated according to the following procedures: - “traditional” Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM fracture surfaces analysis; - SEM fracture surface analysis with 3D quantitative analysis; - SEM longitudinal crack profile analysis - Light Optical Microscope (LOM transversal crack profile analysis;

  8. Probabilistic application of fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.

    1981-04-01

    The different methods used to evaluate the rupture probability of a pressure vessel are reviewed. Data collection and processing of all parameters necessary for fracture mechanics evaluation are presented with particular attention to the size distribution of defects in actual vessels. Physical process is followed during crack growth and unstable propagation, using LEFM (Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanism) and plastic instability. Results show that the final failure probability for a PWR pressure vessel is 3.5 10 -8 , and is due essentially to LOCAs for any break size. The weakest point is the internal side of the belt line

  9. Influence of strain-rate on the flow stress and ductility of copper and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regazzoni, G.; Montheillet, F.; Dormeval, R.; Stelly, M.

    1981-09-01

    Tensile experiments were carried out at strain-rates in a range from epsilon = 6.10 -5 to 3.10 3 s -1 at 293 K and 673 K or 773 K. Two types of copper (FCC) and pure tantalum (BCC) were tested. The variations of ductility have been investigated in relation with the σ - epsilon equations of the materials and the examinations of fracture surfaces. They can be explained in terms of stability and intrinsic ductility

  10. Dynamic ductile fracture of a central crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y. M.

    1976-01-01

    A central crack, symmetrically growing at a constant speed in a two dimensional ductile material subject to uniform tension at infinity, is investigated using the integral transform methods. The crack is assumed to be the Dugdale crack, and the finite stress condition at the crack tip is satisfied during the propagation of the crack. Exact expressions of solution are obtained for the finite stress condition at the crack tip, the crack shape, the crack opening displacement, and the energy release rate. All those expressions are written as the product of explicit dimensional quantities and a nondimensional dynamic correction function. The expressions reduce to the associated static results when the crack speed tends to zero, and the nondimensional dynamic correction functions were calculated for various values of the parameter involved.

  11. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to bending loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    A plastic fracture mechanics methodology is presented for part-through cracks in pipes under bending. A previous analysis result on the behavior of part-through cracks in pipes is reviewed. Example quantitative results for the initiation and instability of radial growth of part-through cracks are presented and compared with the experimental data to demonstrate the applicability of the method. The analyses in our previous work are further developed to include the instability of circumferential growth of part-through cracks. Numerical results are then presented for a compliant piping system, under displacement controlled bending, which focus on (1) instability of radial growth (unstable wall breakthrough) and (2) instability of circumferential growth of the resulting throughthe-thickness crack. The combined results of the above two types of analyses are presented on a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve of critical combination of length and depth of part-through cracks which delineates leak from fracture. The effect of piping compliance on the leak-before-break assessment is discussed

  12. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to bending loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-10-01

    A plastic fracture mechanics methodology is presented for part-through cracks in pipes under bending. A previous analysis result on the behavior of part-through cracks in pipes is reviewed. Example quantitative results for the initiation and instability of radial growth of part-through cracks are presented and compared with the experimental data to demonstrate the applicability of the method. The analyses in our previous work are further developed to include the instability of circumferential growth of part-through cracks. Numerical results are then presented for a compliant piping system, under displacement controlled bending, which focus on (1) instability of radial growth (unstable wall breakthrough) and (2) instability of circumferential growth of the resulting throughthe-thickness crack. The combined results of the above two types of analyses are presented on a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve of critical combination of length and depth of part-through cracks which delineates leak from fracture. The effect of piping compliance on the leak-before-break assessment is discussed.

  13. Influence of Nickel Particle Reinforcement on Cyclic Fatigue and Final Fracture Behavior of a Magnesium Alloy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure, tensile properties, cyclic stress amplitude fatigue response and final fracture behavior of a magnesium alloy, denoted as AZ31, discontinuously reinforced with nano-particulates of aluminum oxide and micron size nickel particles is presented and discussed. The tensile properties, high cycle fatigue and final fracture behavior of the discontinuously reinforced magnesium alloy are compared with the unreinforced counterpart (AZ31. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the dual particle reinforced magnesium alloy is marginally higher than of the unreinforced counterpart. However, the tensile strength of the composite is lower than the monolithic counterpart. The ductility quantified by elongation to failure over 0.5 inch (12.7 mm gage length of the test specimen showed minimal difference while the reduction in specimen cross-section area of the composite is higher than that of the monolithic counterpart. At the microscopic level, cyclic fatigue fractures of both the composite and the monolithic alloy clearly revealed features indicative of the occurrence of locally ductile and brittle mechanisms. Over the range of maximum stress and at two different load ratios the cyclic fatigue resistance of the magnesium alloy composite is superior to the monolithic counterpart. The mechanisms responsible for improved cyclic fatigue life and resultant fracture behavior of the composite microstructure are highlighted.

  14. Structural signature of a brittle-to-ductile transition in self-assembled networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laurence; Laperrousaz, Arnaud; Dieudonné, Philippe; Ligoure, Christian

    2011-09-30

    We study the nonlinear rheology of a novel class of transient networks, made of surfactant micelles of tunable morphology reversibly linked by block copolymers. We couple rheology and time-resolved structural measurements, using synchrotron radiation, to characterize the highly nonlinear viscoelastic regime. We propose the fluctuations of the degree of alignment of the micelles under shear as a probe to identify a fracture process. We show a clear signature of a brittle-to-ductile transition in transient gels, as the morphology of the micelles varies, and provide a parallel between the fracture of solids and the fracture under shear of viscoelastic fluids.

  15. Intensely irradiated steel components: Plastic and fracture properties, and a new concept of structural design criteria for assuring the structural integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Jitsukawa, Shiro; Okubo, Nariaki; Takada, Fumiki

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a systematic and reasonable concept assuring the structural integrity of components under intense neutron irradiation, two basic tensile properties, true stress-true strain (TS-TS) curves and fracture strain, were investigated on an austenitic stainless steel and martensitic steel. Application of Swift equation is confirmed to a large plastic strain range of TS-TS curves. Fracture strain ε f data were well correlated as ε f + ε 0 = const. where ε 0 is the pre-strain representing the irradiation hardening. Based on those formulations and available experimental information, several critical issues to be dealt with in developing the concept were identified possible reduction in ductility, significant change in mechanical properties, remarkable cyclic softening and other unique cyclic properties observed during a high-cycle fatigue testing, and the redundancy of the plastic collapse concept to bending. Existing structural codes are all based on the assumption that there will be no significant changes in mechanical properties during operation, and of high ductility. Therefore, a new concept for assuring structural integrity is required for application not only to components with high ductility but also components with reduced ductility. First, potential failure modes were identified, and a new and systematic concept was proposed for preventing these modes of failure, introducing a new concept of categorizing the loadings by stability of deformation process to fracture (as type F and M loadings). Based on the basic concept, a detailed concept of how to protect against ductile fracture was given, and loading type-dependent limiting parameters were set. Finally, application of the detailed concept was presented, especially on determination of loading type (in numerical approach, the formulation of TS-TS curves and fracture strain derived above are needed), and on how to determine the limiting parameters as allowable limits. Experiments were done to

  16. Intensely irradiated steel components: Plastic and fracture properties, and a new concept of structural design criteria for assuring the structural integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko, E-mail: suzuki.kazuhiko@jaea.go.j [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Jitsukawa, Shiro; Okubo, Nariaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Takada, Fumiki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Department of JMTR Operation, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki-ken 311-1393 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    In order to develop a systematic and reasonable concept assuring the structural integrity of components under intense neutron irradiation, two basic tensile properties, true stress-true strain (TS-TS) curves and fracture strain, were investigated on an austenitic stainless steel and martensitic steel. Application of Swift equation is confirmed to a large plastic strain range of TS-TS curves. Fracture strain epsilon{sub f} data were well correlated as epsilon{sub f} + epsilon{sub 0} = const. where epsilon{sub 0} is the pre-strain representing the irradiation hardening. Based on those formulations and available experimental information, several critical issues to be dealt with in developing the concept were identified possible reduction in ductility, significant change in mechanical properties, remarkable cyclic softening and other unique cyclic properties observed during a high-cycle fatigue testing, and the redundancy of the plastic collapse concept to bending. Existing structural codes are all based on the assumption that there will be no significant changes in mechanical properties during operation, and of high ductility. Therefore, a new concept for assuring structural integrity is required for application not only to components with high ductility but also components with reduced ductility. First, potential failure modes were identified, and a new and systematic concept was proposed for preventing these modes of failure, introducing a new concept of categorizing the loadings by stability of deformation process to fracture (as type F and M loadings). Based on the basic concept, a detailed concept of how to protect against ductile fracture was given, and loading type-dependent limiting parameters were set. Finally, application of the detailed concept was presented, especially on determination of loading type (in numerical approach, the formulation of TS-TS curves and fracture strain derived above are needed), and on how to determine the limiting parameters as

  17. Models for ductile crack initiation and tearing resistance under mode 1 loading in pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.R.

    1988-06-01

    Micromechanistic models are presented which aim to predict plane strain ductile initiation toughness, tearing resistance and notched bar fracture strains in pressure vessel steels under monotonically increasing tensile (mode 1) loading. The models for initiation toughness and tearing resistance recognize that ductile fracture proceeds by the growth and linkage of voids with the crack-tip. The models are shown to predict the trend of initiation toughness with inclusion spacing/size ratio and can bound the available experimental data. The model for crack growth can reproduce the tearing resistance of a pressure vessel steel up to and just beyond crack growth initiation. The fracture strains of notched bars pulled in tension are shown to correspond to the achievement of a critical volume fraction of voids. This criterion is combined with the true stress - true strain history of a material point ahead of a blunting crack-tip to predict the initiation toughness. An attempt was made to predict the fracture strains of notched tensile bars by adopting a model which predicts the onset of a shear localization phenomenon. Fracture strains of the correct order are computed only if a ''secondary'' void nucleation event at carbide precipitates is taken into account. (author)

  18. Influence of the static strain ageing on the ductile-to-brittle transition in C-Mn steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marais, A.

    2012-01-01

    Ferritic steels for industrial structures have a brittle-ductile transition toughness and impact energy with temperature. Their resistance to the brittle fracture plays an essential role in the safety certification of industrial structures. Nowadays, the performance and the durability are key issues for major players such as EDF. In these approaches ductile-to-brittle transition toughness and impact energy, toughness is predicted from resilience. Several previous studies have shown that the probability of cleavage fracture can be adequately described in brittle plateau by a local approach to fracture. However, these studies assume that the material does not undergo strain aging, which is rarely relevant for low carbon steels and low calmed down. The work consisted firstly to characterize the behavior and secondly to propose a robust and explicit modeling of the observed phenomena. Characterization consisted of performing tensile tests between -150 C and 20 C for several strain rates. A model able to simulate the static aging is identified by implementing an appropriate and systematic strategy. Impact resistance test allows us to build the curve of ductile-to-brittle transition of the material for different conditions to understand and observe the influence of static strain aging on the failure. Finally, the modeling of the brittle fracture has been described for all experimental conditions tested using the model developed and identified in the previous section to predict the transition for different material conditions. (author)

  19. Tensile Fracture Behavior of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Manufactured by Hot Isostatic Pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-02-01

    Herein we investigate how the oxygen content in hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) 316L stainless steel affects the mechanical properties and tensile fracture behavior. This work follows on from previous studies, which aimed to understand the effect of oxygen content on the Charpy impact toughness of HIP'd steel. We expand on the work by performing room-temperature tensile testing on different heats of 316L stainless steel, which contain different levels of interstitial elements (carbon and nitrogen) as well as oxygen in the bulk material. Throughout the work we repeat the experiments on conventionally forged 316L steel as a reference material. The analysis of the work indicates that oxygen does not contribute to a measureable solution strengthening mechanism, as is the case with carbon and nitrogen in austenitic stainless steels (Werner in Mater Sci Eng A 101:93-98, 1988). Neither does oxygen, in the form of oxide inclusions, contribute to precipitation hardening due to the size and spacing of particles. However, the oxide particles do influence fracture behavior; fractography of the failed tension test specimens indicates that the average ductile dimple size is related to the oxygen content in the bulk material, the results of which support an on-going hypothesis relating oxygen content in HIP'd steels to their fracture mechanisms by providing additional sites for the initiation of ductile damage in the form of voids.

  20. Combined macroscopic and microscopic approach to the fracture of metals. Technical annual progress report, 1979-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaro, R.J.; Gurland, J.; Needleman, A.; Rice, J.R.

    1980-06-01

    The following results are reported: (1) extremely good theoretical-experimental correlation was found between our theoretical predictions based on asymptotic analysis with numerical finite element studies and the experimentally monitored crack growth for a large range of stable crack growth in 4140 steel; (2) a theoretical model was developed for the critical conditions of crack initiation at rigid particles as a precursor of ductile rupture in steels; (3) as part of environmentally sensitive fracture mechanisms, it was found that hydrogen can promote a ductile-to-brittle fracture transition with increasing charging current density in low carbon steel; and (4) a new variational principle has been established for the combined processes of plastic creep flow and grain boundary diffusion and has been constructively applied to the problem of cavity growth under creep conditions

  1. Japanese round robin analysis for probabilistic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, G.; Yoshimura, S.; Handa, N.

    1991-01-01

    Recently attention is focused on the probabilistic fracture mechanics, a branch of fracture mechanics with probability theory for a rational mean to assess the strength of components and structures. In particular, the probabilistic fracture mechanics is recognized as the powerful means for quantitative investigation of significance of factors and rational evaluation of life on problems involving a number of uncertainties, such as degradation of material strength, accuracy and frequency of inspection. Comparison with reference experiments are generally employed to assure the analytical accuracy. However, accuracy and reliability of analytical methods in the probabilistic fracture mechanics are hardly verified by experiments. Therefore, it is strongly needed to verify the probabilistic fracture mechanics through the round robin analysis. This paper describes results from the round robin analysis of flat plate with semi-elliptic cracks on the surface, conducted by the PFM Working Group of LE Subcommittee of the Japan Welding Society under the contract of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and participated by Tokyo University, Yokohama National University, the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Corporation, Tokyo Electric Power Co. Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki Heavy Industry Co. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co. (author)

  2. Primer: Fracture mechanics in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, E.T.; Server, W.L.; Kennedy, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This Primer is intended to familiarize utility engineers with the fracture mechanics technology and to provide the basis for a working knowledge of the subject. It is directed towards all the engineering disciplines that are involved either directly or indirectly with the structural reliability of electrical power generation equipment and systems. These engineering disciplines include such areas as: design and stress analysis, metallurgy and materials, nondestructive inspection and quality control, structural analysis and reliability engineering, chemical engineering and water chemistry control, and architectural engineering. This Primer does not provide a comprehensive, in-depth treatment of all the detailed aspects involved in fracture mechanics. It does, however, provide sufficient information and a common vocabulary that should enable engineers to: read and converse intelligently about the subject, understand and utilize ASME Codes and Regulatory Guides involving fracture mechanics, absorb technical information presented and discussed at various technical meetings, and begin to apply this technology towards actual engineering problems encountered in the course of their work. Example problems are provided to further enhance an understanding of fracture mechanics. Also, Appendix A describes fracture mechanics computer codes available through EPRI to analyze rotors, reactor pressure vessels and piping

  3. Microstructural characterization, formation mechanism and fracture behavior of the needle δ phase in Fe–Ni–Cr type superalloys with high Nb content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, Yongquan, E-mail: luckyning@nwpu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science & Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Huang, Shibo [Anshan Iron & Steel Group Corporation Bayuquan Subsidiary Company, Bayuquan 115007 (China); Fu, M.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Dong, Jie [Inspection & Research Institute of Boiler & Pressure Vessel of Jiangxi Province, Nanchang 330029 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Microstructural characterization, formation mechanism and fracture behavior of the needle δ phase in Fe–Ni–Cr type superalloys with high Nb content (GH4169, equivalent to Inconel 718) have been quantitatively investigated in this research. The typical microstructures of δ phases with the stick, mixed and needle shapes obviously present in Inconel 718 after the isothermal upsetting at the temperature of 980–1060 °C with the initial strain rate of 10{sup −3}–10{sup −1} s{sup −1}. It is found that the shape of the δ phase has a great effect on the mechanical properties of the alloy, viz., the stick δ phase behaves good plasticity and the needle δ phase has good strength. In addition, the needle δ phase can be used to control the grain size as it can prevent grain growth. The combined effect of the localized necking and microvoid coalescence leads to the final ductile fracture of the GH4169 components with the needle δ phase. Both dislocation motion and atom diffusion are the root-cause for the needle δ phase to be firstly separated at grain boundary and then at sub-boundary. The formation mechanism of the needle δ phase is the new finding in this research. Furthermore, it is the primary mechanism for controlling the needle δ phase in Fe–Ni–Cr type superalloys with high Nb content. - Highlights: • Shape of the δ phase takes great effect on mechanical property. • Needle δ phase plays a great role to prevent grain growth. • Needle δ phase can enhance the fracture strength. • Microstructure mechanism of the needle δ phase has been investigated. • Fracture behavior of the needle δ phase has been studied.

  4. Crack initiation and fracture features of Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb bulk metallic glass during compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lesz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was investigation crack initiation and fracture features developed during compression of Fe-based bulk metallic glass (BMG. These Fe-based BMG has received great attention as a new class of structural material due to an excellent properties (e.g. high strength and high elasticity and low costs. However, the poor ductility and brittle fracture exhibited in BMGs limit their structural application. At room temperature, BMGs fails catastrophically without appreciable plastic deformation under tension and only very limited plastic deformation is observed under compression or bending. Hence a well understanding of the crack initiation and fracture morphology of Fe-based BMGs after compression is of much importance for designing high performance BMGs. The raw materials used in this experiment for the production of BMGs were pure Fe, Co, Nb metals and nonmetallic elements: Si, B. The Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb alloy was cast as rods with three different diameters. The structure of the investigated BMGs rod is amorphous. The measurement of mechanical properties (Young modulus - E, compressive stress - σc, elastic strain - ε, unitary elastic strain energy – Uu were made in compression test. Compression test indicates the rods of Fe-based alloy to exhibit high mechanical strength. The development of crack initiation and fracture morphology after compression of Fe-based BMG were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM. Fracture morphology of rods has been different on the cross section. Two characteristic features of the compressive fracture morphologies of BMGs were observed. One is the smooth region. Another typical feature of the compressive fracture morphology of BMGs is the vein pattern. The veins on the compressive fracture surface have an obvious direction as result of initial displace of sample along shear bands. This direction follows the direction of the displacement of a material. The formation of veins on the

  5. Fracture toughness of Ceramic-Fiber-Reinforced Metallic-Intermetallic-Laminate (CFR-MIL) composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecchio, Kenneth S.; Jiang, Fengchun

    2016-01-01

    Novel Ceramic-Fiber-Reinforced-Metal-Intermetallic-Laminate (CFR-MIL) composites, Ti–Al 3 Ti–Al 2 O 3 –Al, were synthesized by reactive foil sintering in air. Microstructure controlled material architectures were achieved with continuous Al 2 O 3 fibers oriented in 0° and 90° layers to form fully dense composites in which the volume fractions of all four component phases can be tailored. Bend fracture specimens were cut from the laminate plates in divider orientation, and bend tests were performed to study the fracture behavior of CFR-MIL composites under three-point and four-point bending loading conditions. The microstructures and fractured surfaces of the CFR-MIL composites were examined using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to establish a correlation between the fracture toughness, fracture surface morphology and microstructures of CFR-MIL composites. The fracture and toughening mechanisms of the CFR-MIL composites are also addressed. The present experimental results indicate that the fracture toughness of CFR-MIL composites determined by three- and four-point bend loading configurations are quite similar, and increased significantly compared to MIL composites without ceramic fiber reinforcement. The interface cracking behavior is related to the volume fraction of the brittle Al 3 Ti phase and residual ductile Al, but the fracture toughness values appear to be insensitive to the ratio of these two phases. The toughness appears to be dominated by the ductility/strength of the Ti layers and the strength and crack bridging effect of the ceramic fibers.

  6. Fracture Anisotropy and Toughness in the Mancos Shale: Implications for crack-growth geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M. R.; Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Crawford, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    The hydraulic fracturing of gas-shales has drawn attention to the fundamental fracture properties of shales. Fracture propagation is dependent on a combination of the in-situ stress field, the fracturing fluid and pressure, and the mechanical properties of the shale. However, shales are strongly anisotropic, and there is a general paucity of available experimental data on the anisotropic mechanical properties of shales in the scientific literature. The mode-I stress intensity factor, KI, quantifies the concentration of stress at crack tips. The Fracture Toughness of a linear elastic material is then defined as the critical value of this stress intensity factor; KIc, beyond which rapid catastrophic crack growth occurs. However, shales display significant non-linearity, which produces hysteresis during experimental cyclic loading. This allows for the calculation of a ductility coefficient using the residual displacement after successive loading cycles. From this coefficient, a ductility corrected Fracture Toughness value, KIcc can be determined. In the Mancos Shale this ductility correction can be as large as 60%, giving a Divider orientation KIcc value of 0.8 MPa.m0.5. Tensile strength and mode-I Fracture Toughness have been experimentally determined for the Mancos Shale using the Brazil Disk and Short-Rod methodologies respectively. The three principal fracture orientations; Arrester, Divider and Short-Transverse were all analysed. A significant anisotropy is observed in the tensile strength, with the Arrester value being 1.5 times higher than the Short-Transverse value. Even larger anisotropy is observed in the Fracture Toughness, with KIcc in the Divider and Arrester orientations being around 1.8 times that in the Short-Transverse orientation. For both tensile strength and fracture toughness, the Short-Transverse orientation, where the fracture propagates in the bedding plane in a direction parallel to the bedding, is found to have significantly lower values than

  7. Displacement-length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-11-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement-distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow.

  8. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  9. The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadiri, I.

    2002-10-01

    The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media is quite complex. Simplifications are necessary for the modeling of such media, but, not always justified, Only permeable fractures are often considered. The rest of the network is approximated by an equivalent continuous medium. Even if we suppose that this approach is validated, the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the fractures and of the continuous medium are seldom known. Calibrations are necessary for the determination of these properties. Until now, one does not know very well the nature of measurements which must be carried out in order to carry on a modeling in discontinuous medium, nor elements of enough robust validation for this kind of modeling. For a better understanding of the hydro-mechanical phenomena in fractured media, two different sites have been selected for the work. The first is the site of Grimsel in Switzerland in which an underground laboratory is located at approximately 400 m of depth. The FEBEX experiment aims at the in-situ study of the consecutive phenomena due to the installation of a heat source representative of radioactive waste in the last 17 meters of the FEBEX tunnel in the laboratory of Grimsel. Only, the modeling of the hydro-mechanical of the excavation was model. The modeling of the Febex enabled us to establish a methodology of calibration of the hydraulic properties in the discontinuous media. However, this kind of study on such complex sites does not make possible to answer all the questions which arise on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the fractured media. We thus carried out modeling on an other site, smaller than the fist one and more accessible. The experimental site of Coaraze, in the Maritime Alps, is mainly constituted of limestone and fractures. Then the variation of water pressure along fractures is governed by the opening/closure sequence of a water gate. Normal displacement as well as the pore pressure along these fractures are recorded, and then

  10. Elevated temperature fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, B.

    1979-01-01

    The application of fracture mechanics concepts to cracks at elevated temperatures is examined. Particular consideration is given to the characterisation of crack tip stress-strain fields and parameters controlling crack extension under static and cyclic loads. (author)

  11. Mechanical Integrity of Canisters Using a Fracture Mechanics Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Tomofumi; Guoxiang Zhang; Lanru Jing [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Land and Water Resources Engineering

    2006-07-15

    This report presents the methods and results of a research project about numerical modeling of mechanical integrity of cast-iron canisters for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden, using combined boundary element (BEM) and finite element (FEM) methods. The objectives of the project are: 1) to investigate the possibility of initiation and growth of fractures in the cast-iron canisters under the mechanical loading conditions defined in the premises of canister design by Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB); 2) to investigate the maximum bearing capacity of the cast iron canisters under uniformly distributed and gradually increasing boundary pressure until plastic failure. Achievement of the two objectives may provide some quantitative evidence for the mechanical integrity and overall safety of the cast-iron canisters that are needed for the final safety assessment of the geological repository of the radioactive waste repository in Sweden. The geometrical dimension, distribution and magnitudes of loads and Material properties of the canisters and possible fractures were provided by the latest investigations of SKB. The results of the BEM simulations, using the commercial code BEASY, indicate that under the currently defined loading conditions the possibility of initiation of new fractures or growth of existing fractures (defects) are very small, due to the reasons that: 1) the canisters are under mainly compressive stresses; 2) the induced tensile stress regions are too small in both dimension and magnitude to create new fractures or to induce growth of existing fractures, besides the fact that the toughness of the fractures in the cast iron canisters are much higher that the stress intensity factors in the fracture tips. The results of the FEM simulation show a approximately 75 MPa maximum pressure beyond which plastic collapse of the cast-iron canisters may occur, using an elastoplastic Material model. This figure is smaller compared

  12. Fracture mechanics analysis of reactor pressure vessel under pressurized thermal shock - The effect of elastic-plastic behavior and stainless steel cladding -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Jae Hwang; Kang, Ki Ju; Jhung, Myung Jo

    2002-01-01

    Performed here is an assessment study for deterministic fracture mechanics analysis of a pressurized thermal shock (PTS). The PTS event means an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. The problems consisting of two transients and 10 cracks are solved and maximum stress intensity factors and maximum allowable nil-ductility reference temperatures are calculated. Their results are compared each other to address the general characteristics between transients, crack types and analysis methods. The effects of elastic-plastic material behavior and clad coating on the inner surface are explored

  13. Application of micromechanical models of ductile fracture initiation to reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Walle, E. van; Fabry, A.; Velde, J. van de; Meester, P. de

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the current study is the application of local micromechanical models to predict crack initiation in ductile materials. Two reactor pressure vessel materials have been selected for this study: JRQ IAEA monitor base metal (A533B Cl.1) and Doel-IV weld material. Charpy impact tests have been performed in both un-irradiated and irradiated conditions. In addition to standard tensile tests, notched tensile specimens have been tested. The upper shelf energy of the weld material remains almost un-affected by irradiation, whereas a decrease of 20% is detected for the base metal. Accordingly, the tensile properties of the weld material do not reveal a clear irradiation effect on the yield and ultimate stresses, this in contrast to the base material flow properties. The tensile tests have been analyzed in terms of micromechanical models. A good correlation is found between the standard tests and the micromechanical models, that are able to predict the ductile damage evolution in these materials. Additional information on the ductility behavior of these materials is revealed by this micromechanical analysis

  14. The effect of pearlite on the hydrogen-induced ductility loss in ductile cast irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T.

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen energy systems, such as a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and a hydrogen station, are rapidly developing to solve global environmental problems and resource problems. The available structural materials used for hydrogen equipments have been limited to only a few relatively expensive metallic materials that are tolerant for hydrogen embrittlement. Therefore, for the realization of a hydrogen society, it is important to expand the range of materials available for hydrogen equipment and thereby to enable the use of inexpensive common materials. Therefore, ductile cast iron was, in this study, focused as a structural material that could contribute to cost reduction of hydrogen equipment, because it is a low-cost material having good mechanical property comparable to carbon steels in addition to good castability and machinability. The strength and ductility of common ductile cast irons with a ferritic-pearlitic matrix can be controlled by the volume fraction of pearlitic phase. In the case of carbon steels, the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement increases with increase in the pearlite fraction. Toward the development of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron with reasonable strength for hydrogen equipment, it is necessary to figure out the effect of pearlite on the hydrogen embrittlement of this cast iron. In this study, the tensile tests were conducted using hydrogen-precharged specimens of three kinds of ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast irons, JIS-FCD400, JIS-FCD450 and JIS-FCD700. Based on the results, the role of pearlite in characterizing the hydrogen embrittlement of ductile cast iron was discussed.

  15. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken

  16. Correlation of mechanical properties with nondestructive evaluation of babbitt metal/bronze composite interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Y.; Liaw, P. K.; Taszarek, B. J.; Frohlich, S.; Gungor, M. N.

    1988-09-01

    Interfaces of the babbitt metal-bronze composite were examined ultrasonically and were fractured using the Chalmers test method. It was found that the ultrasonic results correlated with the bond strength, the ductility, and the degree of bonding at the tested interface. Specifically, high ultrasonic reflection percentages were associated with low bond strength, low ductility, and low percentages of bonded regions. The fracture mechanism in the bonded area of the babbitt-bronze interface is related to the presence of the intermetallic compound, Cu6Sn5, at the interface. It is suggested that the non-destructive ultrasonic technique can detect the bond integrity of babbitted metals.

  17. Crack growth and fracture toughness of amorphous Li-Si anodes: Mechanisms and role of charging/discharging studied by atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosrownejad, S. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2017-10-01

    Fracture is the main cause of degradation and capacity fading in lithiated silicon during cycling. Experiments on the fracture of lithiated silicon show conflicting results, and so mechanistic models can help interpret experiments and guide component design. Here, large-scale K-controlled atomistic simulations of crack propagation (R-curve KI vs. Δa) are performed at LixSi compositions x = 0.5 , 1.0 , 1.5 for as-quenched/relaxed samples and at x = 0.5 , 1.0 for samples created by discharging from higher Li compositions. In all cases, the fracture mechanism is void nucleation, growth, and coalescence. In as-quenched materials, with increasing Li content the plastic flow stress and elastic moduli decrease but void nucleation and growth happen at smaller stress, so that the initial fracture toughness KIc ≈ 1.0 MPa√{ m} decreases slightly but the initial fracture energy JIc ≈ 10.5J/m2 is similar. After 10 nm of crack growth, the fracture toughnesses increase and become similar at KIc ≈ 1.9 MPa√{ m} across all compositions. Plane-strain equi-biaxial expansion simulations of uncracked samples provide complementary information on void nucleation and growth. The simulations are interpreted within the framework of Gurson model for ductile fracture, which predicts JIc = ασy D where α ≃ 1 and D is the void spacing, and good agreement is found. In spite of flowing plastically, the fracture toughness of LixSi is low because voids nucleate within nano-sized distances ahead of the crack (D ≈ 1nm). Scaling simulation results to experimental conditions, reasonable agreement with experimentally-estimated fracture toughnesses is obtained. The discharging process facilitates void nucleation but decreases the flow stress (as shown previously), leading to enhanced fracture toughness at all levels of crack growth. Therefore, the fracture behavior of lithiated silicon at a given composition is not a material property but instead depends on the history of charging

  18. Fracture mechanisms and fracture control in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wone-Chul

    Four basic failure modes--delamination, delamination buckling of composite sandwich panels, first-ply failure in cross-ply laminates, and compression failure--are analyzed using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and the J-integral method. Structural failures, including those at the micromechanical level, are investigated with the aid of the models developed, and the critical strains for crack propagation for each mode are obtained. In the structural fracture analyses area, the fracture control schemes for delamination in a composite rib stiffener and delamination buckling in composite sandwich panels subjected to in-plane compression are determined. The critical fracture strains were predicted with the aid of LEFM for delamination and the J-integral method for delamination buckling. The use of toughened matrix systems has been recommended for improved damage tolerant design for delamination crack propagation. An experimental study was conducted to determine the onset of delamination buckling in composite sandwich panel containing flaws. The critical fracture loads computed using the proposed theoretical model and a numerical computational scheme closely followed the experimental measurements made on sandwich panel specimens of graphite/epoxy faceskins and aluminum honeycomb core with varying faceskin thicknesses and core sizes. Micromechanical models of fracture in composites are explored to predict transverse cracking of cross-ply laminates and compression fracture of unidirectional composites. A modified shear lag model which takes into account the important role of interlaminar shear zones between the 0 degree and 90 degree piles in cross-ply laminate is proposed and criteria for transverse cracking have been developed. For compressive failure of unidirectional composites, pre-existing defects play an important role. Using anisotropic elasticity, the stress state around a defect under a remotely applied compressive load is obtained. The experimentally

  19. Development of re-crystallized W-1.1%TiC with enhanced room-temperature ductility and radiation performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, H.; Matsuo, S.; Arakawa, H.; Sakamoto, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Nakai, K.; Takida, T.; Kato, M.; Kawai, M.; Yoshida, N.

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-fine grained (UFG) W-TiC compacts fabricated by powder metallurgical methods utilizing mechanical alloying (MA) are very promising for use in irradiation environments. However, the assurance of room-temperature ductility and enhancement in surface resistances to low-energy hydrogen irradiation are unsettled issues. As an approach to solution to these, microstructural modification by hot plastic working has been applied to UFG W-TiC processed by MA in a purified Ar or H 2 atmosphere and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Hot plastically worked compacts have been subjected to 3-point bend tests at room temperature and TEM microstructural examinations. It is found that the microstructural modification allows us to convert UFG W-1.1%TiC to compacts exhibiting a very high fracture strength and appreciable ductility at room temperature. The compacts of W-1.1%TiC/Ar (MA atmosphere: Ar) and W-1.1%TiC/H 2 (MA atmosphere: H 2 ) exhibit re-crystallized structures with approximately 0.5 and 1.5 μm in grain size, respectively. It is shown that the enhancement of fracture resistance by microstructural modifications is attributed to significant strengthening of weak grain boundaries in the re-crystallized state. As a result the modified compacts exhibit superior surface resistance to low-energy deuteron irradiation.

  20. Impact of Injury Mechanisms on Patterns and Management of Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greathouse, S Travis; Adkinson, Joshua M; Garza, Ramon; Gilstrap, Jarom; Miller, Nathan F; Eid, Sherrine M; Murphy, Robert X

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms causing facial fractures have evolved over time and may be predictive of the types of injuries sustained. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of mechanisms of injury on the type and management of facial fractures at our Level 1 Trauma Center. The authors performed an Institutional Review Board-approved review of our network's trauma registry from 2006 to 2010, documenting age, sex, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, facial fracture patterns (nasal, maxillary/malar, orbital, mandible), and reconstructions. Mechanism rates were compared using a Pearson χ2 test. The database identified 23,318 patients, including 1686 patients with facial fractures and a subset of 1505 patients sustaining 2094 fractures by motor vehicle collision (MVC), fall, or assault. Nasal fractures were the most common injuries sustained by all mechanisms. MVCs were most likely to cause nasal and malar/maxillary fractures (P management. Age and number of fractures sustained were associated with operative intervention. Although there is a statistically significant correlation between mechanism of injury and type of facial fracture sustained, none of the mechanisms evaluated herein are statistically associated with surgical intervention. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, III.

  1. Structural interpretations of deformation and fracture behavior of polypropylene/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganss, Martin; Satapathy, Bhabani K.; Thunga, Mahendra; Weidisch, Roland; Poetschke, Petra; Jehnichen, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    The deformation and crack resistance behavior of polypropylene (PP) multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composites have been studied and their interrelation to the structural attributes studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarization light microscopy has been discussed. The composites were produced from industrial available MWNT by extrusion melt-mixing and injection-molding. In stress-strain measurements a strong increase in the yield stress and the Young's modulus at low MWNT contents has been observed, which was attributed to an efficient load transfer between the carbon nanotubes and polypropylene matrix through a good polymer-nanotube adhesion as indicated by SEM. The extent of enhancement in mechanical properties above 1.5 wt.% of MWNT decreased due to an apparently increased tendency of clustering of carbon nanotubes. Several theoretical models have been taken into account to explain the mechanical properties and to demonstrate the applicability of such models to the system under investigation. The crack resistance behavior has been studied with the essential work of fracture (EWF) approach based on post-yield fracture mechanics (PYFM) concept. A maximum in the non-essential work of fracture was observed at 0.5 wt.% MWNT demonstrating enhanced toughness compared to pure PP, followed by a sharp decline as the MWNT content was increased to 1.5 wt.% reveals a ductile-to-semi-ductile transition. Studies on the kinetics of crack propagation aspects have revealed a qualitative picture of the nature of such a transition in the fracture modes

  2. Hot Ductility Behavior of Boron Containing Microalloyed Steels with Varying Manganese Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Tobias; Senk, Dieter; Walpot, Raphael; Steenken, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The hot ductility is measured for six different steel grades with different microalloying elements and with varying manganese contents using the hot tensile test machine with melting/solidification unit at the Department of Ferrous Metallurgy RWTH Aachen University. To identify the influence of manganese on hot ductility, tests are performed with varying the manganese content from 0.7 to 18.2 wt pct, a high manganese steel. Additionally, the effect of different cooling and strain rates is analyzed by changing the particular rate for selected samples in the minima. To investigate and detect the cause of cracking during testing, the fracture surfaces in the ductility minima are considered with scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermodynamic modeling is conducted on basis of the commercial software ThermoCalc©. A sharp decrease of the hot ductility is recognizable at 1398 K (1125 °C), at only 0.7 wt pct manganese because of the low manganese to sulfur ratio. The grades with a Mn content up to 1.9 wt pct show a good ductility with minimal ductility loss. In comparison, the steel grade with 18.2 wt pct has a poor hot ductility. Because of the formation of complex precipitates, where several alloying elements are involved, the influence of boron on hot ductility is not fully clarified. By increasing the cooling rate, the reduction of area values are shifted to smaller values. For high test temperatures, these measured values are decreased for lower strain rates. Thereby, an early drop of the ductility is noticeable for the high temperatures around 1373 K (1100 °C).

  3. Identification of modes of fracture in a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy using stereophotogrammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas Zamarripa, A., E-mail: a.salaszamarripa@gmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon. Av. Universidad S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, Apartado Postal 076 Suc. ' F' San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico); Pinna, C.; Brown, M.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield. Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Mata, M.P. Guerrero; Morales, M. Castillo; Beber-Solano, T.P. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon. Av. Universidad S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, Apartado Postal 076 Suc. ' F' San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    The identification and the development of a quantification technique of the modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces of a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy were developed during this research. Fatigue tests at room and high temperature (230 Degree-Sign C) were carried out to be able to compare the microscopic fractographic features developed by this material under these testing conditions. The overall observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surfaces showed a mixture of transgranular and ductile intergranular fracture. The ductile intergranular fracture contribution appears to be more significant at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. A quantitative methodology was developed to identify and to measure the contribution of these microscopic fractographic features. The technique consisted of a combination of stereophotogrammetry and image analysis. Stereo-pairs were randomly taken along the crack paths and were then analyzed using the profile module of MeX software. The analysis involved the 3-D surface reconstruction, the trace of primary profile lines in both vertical and horizontal directions within the stereo-pair area, the measurements of the contribution of the modes of fracture in each profile, and finally, the calculation of the average contribution in each stereo-pair. The technique results confirmed a higher contribution of ductile intergranular fracture at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, there was no indication of a direct relationship between this contribution and the strain amplitudes range applied during the fatigue testing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stereophotogrammetry and image analysis as a measuring tool of modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mixture of ductile intergranular and transgranular fracture was identified at room temperature and 230 Degree-Sign C testing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative methodology to

  4. Identification of modes of fracture in a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy using stereophotogrammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas Zamarripa, A.; Pinna, C.; Brown, M.W.; Mata, M.P. Guerrero; Morales, M. Castillo; Beber-Solano, T.P.

    2011-01-01

    The identification and the development of a quantification technique of the modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces of a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy were developed during this research. Fatigue tests at room and high temperature (230 °C) were carried out to be able to compare the microscopic fractographic features developed by this material under these testing conditions. The overall observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surfaces showed a mixture of transgranular and ductile intergranular fracture. The ductile intergranular fracture contribution appears to be more significant at room temperature than at 230 °C. A quantitative methodology was developed to identify and to measure the contribution of these microscopic fractographic features. The technique consisted of a combination of stereophotogrammetry and image analysis. Stereo-pairs were randomly taken along the crack paths and were then analyzed using the profile module of MeX software. The analysis involved the 3-D surface reconstruction, the trace of primary profile lines in both vertical and horizontal directions within the stereo-pair area, the measurements of the contribution of the modes of fracture in each profile, and finally, the calculation of the average contribution in each stereo-pair. The technique results confirmed a higher contribution of ductile intergranular fracture at room temperature than at 230 °C. Moreover, there was no indication of a direct relationship between this contribution and the strain amplitudes range applied during the fatigue testing. - Highlights: ► Stereophotogrammetry and image analysis as a measuring tool of modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces. ► A mixture of ductile intergranular and transgranular fracture was identified at room temperature and 230 °C testing. ► Development of a quantitative methodology to obtain the percentage of modes of fracture within the fracture surface.

  5. Influences of process parameters and microstructure on the fracture mechanisms of ODS steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouffié, A.L.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Delabrouille, F.; Tanguy, B.; Crépin, J.; Pineau, A.; Garat, V.; Fournier, B.

    2013-01-01

    The present work investigates the impact response of three ODS steels containing 9%Cr and 14%Cr. These steels were produced by hot extrusion in the shapes of a rod and a plate. The 9%Cr ODS steel has a quasi-isotropic microstructure and is given as a reference material. In comparison, the 14%Cr ODS steel has a strong morphological and crystallographic texture given by the process route. The impact behaviour is anisotropic and the fracture energies are higher when the material is tested in the longitudinal direction compared to the transverse direction. Moreover, the 14%Cr ODS steel has a better impact behaviour when it is extruded in the shape of a rod rather than in the shape of a plate. This work focuses on the fracture mechanisms involved in the ductile to brittle transition regime and in the brittle regime of these materials. In the case of the 14%Cr ODS steel, the cleavage facets observed at very low temperature are much larger than the actual size of the grains. Packets of grains with less than 15° of internal misorientation were defined as effective grains for cleavage. In the transition range, the texture enhances intergranular delamination on the 14%Cr rod material. The occurrence of delamination consumes a lot of energy and tends to enhance scattering in impact energies

  6. Influences of process parameters and microstructure on the fracture mechanisms of ODS steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouffié, A.L., E-mail: anne-laure.rouffie@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, Bât 453, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Wident, P.; Ziolek, L. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, Bât 453, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delabrouille, F. [EDF – EDF R and D, Département MMC groupe Métallurgie, 77818 Moret sur Loing (France); Tanguy, B. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SEMI, Bât 625, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Crépin, J.; Pineau, A. [Mines ParisTech, Centre des Matériaux PM Fourt, UMR CNRS 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France); Garat, V. [AREVA NP, 10 rue J. Récamier, 69006 Lyon (France); Fournier, B. [Manoir Industries, Metallurgy Dept., 12 rue des Ardennes, BP 8401 Pîtres, 27108 Val de Reuil Cedex (France)

    2013-02-15

    The present work investigates the impact response of three ODS steels containing 9%Cr and 14%Cr. These steels were produced by hot extrusion in the shapes of a rod and a plate. The 9%Cr ODS steel has a quasi-isotropic microstructure and is given as a reference material. In comparison, the 14%Cr ODS steel has a strong morphological and crystallographic texture given by the process route. The impact behaviour is anisotropic and the fracture energies are higher when the material is tested in the longitudinal direction compared to the transverse direction. Moreover, the 14%Cr ODS steel has a better impact behaviour when it is extruded in the shape of a rod rather than in the shape of a plate. This work focuses on the fracture mechanisms involved in the ductile to brittle transition regime and in the brittle regime of these materials. In the case of the 14%Cr ODS steel, the cleavage facets observed at very low temperature are much larger than the actual size of the grains. Packets of grains with less than 15° of internal misorientation were defined as effective grains for cleavage. In the transition range, the texture enhances intergranular delamination on the 14%Cr rod material. The occurrence of delamination consumes a lot of energy and tends to enhance scattering in impact energies.

  7. Thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, F.

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to model Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass regarding a nuclear waste re-depository. For this, a methodology of modeling was proposed and was applied to a real underground site (EDF site at Nouvelle Romanche). This methodology consists, in a first step, to determine hydraulic and mechanical REV. Beyond the greatest of these REV, development of a finite element code allows to model all the fractures in an explicit manner. The homogenized mechanical properties are determined in drained and undrained boundary conditions by simulating triaxial tests that represent rock mass subject to loading. These simulations allow to study the evolution of hydraulic and mechanical properties as a function of stress state. Drained and undrained boundary conditions enable to discuss the validity of assimilation of a fractured rock mass to a porous medium. The simulations lead to a better understanding of the behavior of the fractured rock masses and allow to show the dominant role of the shear behavior of the fractures on the hydraulic and mechanical homogenized properties. From a thermal point of view, as long as conduction is dominant, thermal properties of the rock mass are almost the same as those the intact rock. (author)

  8. Fracture mechanics behavior of a Ni-Fe superalloy sheath for superconducting fusion magnets. Pt. 1. Property measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobler, R.L.; Hwang, I.S.; Steeves, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.2 see ibid., p.269-79 (1997). A seamless extruded conduit for superconductor cabling was fabricated and subjected to mechanical tests. The conduit is made of a nickel-iron alloy having aging and thermal contraction characteristics comparable with Nb 3 Sn conductors. The conduit in liquid helium at 4 K retains its ductility and offers high strength, toughness, and fatigue resistance. Specimens with surface cracks in tension offer substantial fracture resistance for the practical case of crack propagation in the through-wall direction. Fatigue tests indicate that surface cracks adopt a nearly semicircular shape as they grow through the conduit wall (L-S orientation) at rates in the power-law region that are no faster than rates in the transverse direction (L-T orientation). The serviceability of this material is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 8. Microstructure, methods, design, and fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.H.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents information on the following topics: fracture mechanics and microstructures; non-lubricated sliding wear of Al 2 O 3 , PSZ and SiC; mixed-mode fracture of ceramics; some fracture properties of alumina-containing electrical porcelains; transformation toughening in the Al 2 O 3 -Cr 2 O 3 /ZrO 2 -HfO 2 system; strength toughness relationships for transformation toughened ceramics; tensile strength and notch sensitivity of Mg-PSZ; fracture mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate ceramics; loading-unloading techniques for determining fracture parameters of brittle materials utilizing four-point bend, chevron-notched specimens; application of the potential drop technique to the fracture mechanics of ceramics; ceramics-to-metal bonding from a fracture mechanics perspective; observed changes in fracture strength following laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC; crack growth in single-crystal silicon; a fracture mechanics and non-destructive evaluation investigation of the subcritical-fracture process in rock; slow crack growth in sintered silicon nitride; uniaxial tensile fatigue testing of sintered silicon carbide under cyclic temperature change; and effect of surface corrosion on glass fracture

  10. Micromechanisms and toughness for cleavage fracture of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Majumdar, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    A complete understanding of the fracture mechanisms of steel in the ductile/brittle transition region requires analysis not only of crack initiation, but also of crack propagation. This paper reviews micrographic and fractographic experiments that give insight into both phenomena, and suggests a frame-work through which both may be related. Unstable cleavage crack initiation can occur after some blunting of the original fatigue precrack or after some stable crack growth. In either event, instability appears to be triggered by the fracture of a brittle micro-constituent ahead of the precrack. The large scatter in reported K IC values within the transition region reflects the size distribution and relative scarcity of these 'trigger' particles. While a large number of models have attempted to correlate toughness in the ductile/brittle transition regime to events occurring ahead of the crack tip, surprisingly little attention has been paid to events occurring behind the crack front. Fractographic evidence as well as metallographic sectioning of arrested cracks show that the mechanism of rapid crack propagation by cleavage is affected strongly by partial crack-plane deflection which leaves unbroken ligaments in its wake. The tearing of these ligaments by dimple-rupture is the dominant energy-absorbing mechanism. Etch-pit experiments using an Fe-Si alloy show that the crack-tip stress intensity based on plastic zone size is extremely low. It is suggested that the mechanism of crack arrest should be modeled using a sharp crack which is restrained by a distribution of discrete pinching forces along its faces. The same model is applied to crack initiation. (orig.)

  11. Statistical model with two order parameters for ductile and soft fiber bundles in nanoscience and biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Traditional fiber bundles models (FBMs) have been an effective tool to understand brittle heterogeneous systems. However, fiber bundles in modern nano- and bioapplications demand a new generation of FBM capturing more complex deformation processes in addition to damage. In the context of loose bundle systems and with reference to time-independent plasticity and soft biomaterials, we formulate a generalized statistical model for ductile fracture and nonlinear elastic problems capable of handling more simultaneous deformation mechanisms by means of two order parameters (as opposed to one). As the first rational FBM for coupled damage problems, it may be the cornerstone for advanced statistical models of heterogeneous systems in nanoscience and materials design, especially to explore hierarchical and bio-inspired concepts in the arena of nanobiotechnology. Applicative examples are provided for illustrative purposes at last, discussing issues in inverse analysis (i.e., nonlinear elastic polymer fiber and ductile Cu submicron bars arrays) and direct design (i.e., strength prediction).

  12. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  13. Relationship between Microstructure and Ductility Dip Cracking resistance of Alloy 600/690 weld metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Lee, Chang Hee [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Keoung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwang Soo; Shim, Deog Nam [Doosan HEAVY Industries and Construction, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Ni-Cr-Fe alloys are used extensively in nuclear power systems for their resistance to general corrosion, localized corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. However, concerns with stress corrosion cracking of moderate chromium (14.22 wt-%) alloys such as Alloy 600 and its filler metals(FMs) (E-182 and EN82) have driven the application of higher chromium (28.30 wt-%) alloys like Alloy 690. While Alloy 690 and its FMs show outstanding resistance to environmentally assisted cracking in most water-reactor environments, these alloys are prone to welding defects, most notably to ductility dip cracking(DDC). The DDC occurs at temperatures between 0.5 and 0.8 of their melting temperature. This ductility drop may result in intergranular elevated temperature cracking often referred to as DDC. The DDC may occur during the high temperature processing of these alloys or during welding if the imposed strain exhausts the available ductility within this temperature range. Several alloy systems including Ni-base alloys, Ni.Cu alloys, Cu alloys, stainless steels and steels, have been reported to be susceptible to DDC. A complete understanding of the DDC mechanism does not exist, which makes DDC control in actual production conditions a very difficult task. In this study, the DDC resistance was evaluated with different FMs which have different chemical composition. The microstructural features of FMs such as precipitation behavior and grain boundaries morphology were observed, and it were correlated with the DDC susceptibility. The hot ductility test and strainto- fracture test was used to evaluate the DDC susceptibility at high temperature.

  14. Relationship between Microstructure and Ductility Dip Cracking resistance of Alloy 600/690 weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Keoung Ho; Park, Kwang Soo; Shim, Deog Nam

    2009-01-01

    Ni-Cr-Fe alloys are used extensively in nuclear power systems for their resistance to general corrosion, localized corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. However, concerns with stress corrosion cracking of moderate chromium (14.22 wt-%) alloys such as Alloy 600 and its filler metals(FMs) (E-182 and EN82) have driven the application of higher chromium (28.30 wt-%) alloys like Alloy 690. While Alloy 690 and its FMs show outstanding resistance to environmentally assisted cracking in most water-reactor environments, these alloys are prone to welding defects, most notably to ductility dip cracking(DDC). The DDC occurs at temperatures between 0.5 and 0.8 of their melting temperature. This ductility drop may result in intergranular elevated temperature cracking often referred to as DDC. The DDC may occur during the high temperature processing of these alloys or during welding if the imposed strain exhausts the available ductility within this temperature range. Several alloy systems including Ni-base alloys, Ni.Cu alloys, Cu alloys, stainless steels and steels, have been reported to be susceptible to DDC. A complete understanding of the DDC mechanism does not exist, which makes DDC control in actual production conditions a very difficult task. In this study, the DDC resistance was evaluated with different FMs which have different chemical composition. The microstructural features of FMs such as precipitation behavior and grain boundaries morphology were observed, and it were correlated with the DDC susceptibility. The hot ductility test and strainto- fracture test was used to evaluate the DDC susceptibility at high temperature

  15. Mechanical behaviour of Zn–Al–Cu–Mg alloys: Deformation mechanisms of as-cast microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhicheng; Sandlöbes, Stefanie; Wu, Liang; Hu, Weiping; Gottstein, Günter; Korte-Kerzel, Sandra, E-mail: Korte-Kerzel@imm.rwth-aachen.de

    2016-01-10

    We study the effects of dilute Mg addition on the microstructure formation and mechanical properties of a ZnAl4Cu1 alloy. On the basis of the composition of the commercial alloy Z410 (4 wt% Al, 1 wt% Cu, and 0.04 wt% Mg), three laboratory alloys with different Mg contents (0.04 wt%, 0.21 wt% and 0.31 wt%) are characterised in terms of their mechanical properties and microstructures using ex-situ and in-situ tensile tests in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Increasing Mg content causes the precipitation of Mg{sub 2}Zn{sub 11} phase precipitates and refined lamellar spacings in the eutectoid phase. The alloy with a medium Mg content (0.21 wt%) exhibits the highest yield strength both at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. Further, we show that dilute Mg alloying causes an improvement of the ductility of ZnAl4Cu1 base-alloys, especially at elevated temperatures. In addition, the alloys reveal two distinct deformation regimes distinguishable close to room temperature and at commonly employed strain rates, with work hardening and brittle fracture exhibited at room temperature and/or elevated strain rate (5×10{sup −4} s{sup −1}), and work softening and ductile fracture at elevated temperature and/or low strain rate (6×10{sup −6} s{sup −1}). The deformation mechanisms and fracture behaviour in both regimes are investigated and the underlying physical mechanisms of the observed phenomena are discussed.

  16. Mechanical behaviour of Zn–Al–Cu–Mg alloys: Deformation mechanisms of as-cast microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhicheng; Sandlöbes, Stefanie; Wu, Liang; Hu, Weiping; Gottstein, Günter; Korte-Kerzel, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of dilute Mg addition on the microstructure formation and mechanical properties of a ZnAl4Cu1 alloy. On the basis of the composition of the commercial alloy Z410 (4 wt% Al, 1 wt% Cu, and 0.04 wt% Mg), three laboratory alloys with different Mg contents (0.04 wt%, 0.21 wt% and 0.31 wt%) are characterised in terms of their mechanical properties and microstructures using ex-situ and in-situ tensile tests in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Increasing Mg content causes the precipitation of Mg_2Zn_1_1 phase precipitates and refined lamellar spacings in the eutectoid phase. The alloy with a medium Mg content (0.21 wt%) exhibits the highest yield strength both at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. Further, we show that dilute Mg alloying causes an improvement of the ductility of ZnAl4Cu1 base-alloys, especially at elevated temperatures. In addition, the alloys reveal two distinct deformation regimes distinguishable close to room temperature and at commonly employed strain rates, with work hardening and brittle fracture exhibited at room temperature and/or elevated strain rate (5×10"−"4 s"−"1), and work softening and ductile fracture at elevated temperature and/or low strain rate (6×10"−"6 s"−"1). The deformation mechanisms and fracture behaviour in both regimes are investigated and the underlying physical mechanisms of the observed phenomena are discussed.

  17. Fracture assessment of Savannah River Reactor carbon steel piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertz, G.E.; Stoner, K.J.; Caskey, G.R.; Begley, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors have been in operation since the mid-1950's. One postulated failure mechanism for the reactor piping is brittle fracture of the original A285 and A53 carbon steel piping. Material testing of archival piping determined (1) the static and dynamic tensile properties; (2) Charpy impact toughness; and (3) the static and dynamic compact tension fracture toughness properties. The nil-ductility transition temperature (NDTT), determined by Charpy impact test, is above the minimum operating temperature for some of the piping materials. A fracture assessment was performed to demonstrate that potential flaws are stable under upset loading conditions and minimum operating temperatures. A review of potential degradation mechanisms and plant operating history identified weld defects as the most likely crack initiation site for brittle fracture. Piping weld defects, as characterized by radiographic and metallographic examination, and low fracture toughness material properties were postulated at high stress locations in the piping. Normal operating loads, upset loads, and residual stresses were assumed to act on the postulated flaws. Calculated allowable flaw lengths exceed the size of observed weld defects, indicating adequate margins of safety against brittle fracture. Thus, a detailed fracture assessment was able to demonstrate that the piping systems will not fail by brittle fracture, even though the NDTT for some of the piping is above the minimum system operating temperature

  18. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with volume 8, constitutes the proceedings of an international symposium on the fracture mechanics of ceramics. The topics discussed in this volume include the toughening of ceramics by whisker reinforcement; the mechanical properties of SiCwhisker-reinforced TZP; the fracture of brittle rock and oil shale under dynamic explosive loading; impact damage models of ceramic coatings used in gas turbine and diesel engines; the use of exploratory data analysis for the safety evaluation of structural ceramics; and proof testing methods for the reliability of structural ceramics used in gas turbines

  19. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of compact bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahau

    Bone is a composite composed mainly of organics, minerals and water. Most studies on the fracture toughness of bone have been conducted at room temperature. Considering that the body temperature of animals is higher than room temperature, and that bone has a high volumetric percentage of organics (generally, 35--50%), the effect of temperature on fracture toughness of bone should be studied. Single-edged V-shaped notched (SEVN) specimens were prepared to measure the fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib in water at 0, 10, 23, 37 and 50°C. The fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib were found to decrease from 7.0 to 4.3 MPa·m1/2 and from 5.5 to 4.1 MPa·m1/2, respectively, over a temperature range of 50°C. The decreases were attributed to inability of the organics to sustain greater stresses at higher temperatures. We studied the effects of water and organics on fracture toughness of bone using water-free and organics-free SEVN specimens at 23°C. Water-free and organics-free specimens were obtained by placing fresh bone specimen in a furnace at different temperatures. Water and organics significantly affected the fracture toughness of bone. Fracture toughness of the water-free specimens was 44.7% (bovine femur) and 32.4% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh-bone specimens. Fracture toughness of the organics-free specimens was 92.7% (bovine femur) and 91.5% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh bone specimens. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) is widely used to study bone. However, bone often has small to moderate scale yielding during testing. We used J integral, an elastic-plastic fracture-mechanics parameter, to study the fracture process of bone. The J integral of bovine femur increased from 6.3 KJ/mm2 at 23°C to 6.7 KJ/mm2 at 37°C. Although the fracture toughness of bovine bone decreases as the temperature increases, the J integral results show a contrary trend. The energy spent in advancing the crack beyond the linear

  20. Fractographic observations of cleavage initiation in the ductile-brittle transition region of a reactor-pressure-vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Shetty, D.K.; Skidmore, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This note reports the results of a fractographic study conducted on a group of 1T compact fracture toughness specimens of a heavy-section A508 steel denoted TSE6 tested in the ductile-brittle transition region (22 and 82 0 C). The fatigue-precracked specimens were loaded at a rapid rate (760 or 550 mm per second) to promote cleavage-crack growth and lower-bound toughness behavior. All specimens experienced unstable cleavage fracture prior to reaching a maximum in the load displacement curve. Some ductile crack growth occurred in half of the specimens. The objective of fractographic examinations was to understand the observed statistical variations in cleavage initiation by (a) locating the origins of unstable cleavage fracture in the vicinity of the fatigue-precrack or ductilerupture crack fronts, (b) identifying microstructural features associated with the triggering of cleavage, and (c) documenting characteristic fracture surface dimensions such as the extent of stable-crack growth prior to unstable cleavage (Δα) and the distance of the cleavage origin from the ductilerupture front, /chi/ (or fatigue-crack front when Δα = 0)

  1. Numerical simulations of material mismatch and ductile crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestby, Erling

    2002-07-01

    Both the global geometry and inhomogeneities in material properties will influence the fracture behaviour of structures in presence of cracks. In this thesis numerical simulations have been used to investigate how some aspects of both these issues affect the conditions at the crack-tip. The thesis is organised in an introduction chapter, summarising the major findings and conclusions, a review chapter, presenting the main aspects of the developments in the field of fracture mechanics, and three research papers. Paper I considers the effect of mismatch in hardening exponent on the local near-tip stress field for stationary interface cracks in bi-materials under small scale yielding conditions. It is demonstrated that the stress level in the weaker material increases compared to what is found in the homogeneous material for the same globally applied load level, with the effect being of increasing importance as the crack-tip is approached. Although a coupling between the radial and angular dependence of the stress fields exists, the evolving stress field can still be normalised with the applied J. The effect on the increase in stress level can closely be characterised by the difference in hardening exponent, {delta}n, termed the hardening mismatch, and is more or less independent of the absolute level of hardening in the two materials. Paper II and Ill deal with the effects of geometry, specimen size, hardening level and yield stress mismatch in relation to ductile crack growth. The ductile crack growth is simulated through use of the Gurson model. In Paper H the effect of specimen size on the crack growth resistance is investigated for deep cracked bend and shallow cracked tensile specimens. At small amounts of crack growth the effect of specimen size on the crack growth resistance is small, but a more significant effect is found for larger amounts of crack growth. The crack growth resistance decreases in smaller specimens loaded in tension, whereas the opposite is

  2. Microstructure and mechanical properties of stainless steel/calcium silicate composites manufactured by selective laser melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Shanghai Key Lab. of D& A for Metal-Functional Materials, Shanghai 201804 (China); Wang, Lianfeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Shanghai Aerospace Equipments Manufacturer, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jia, Min [Shanghai Aircraft Manufacturing Co., Ltd, Shanghai 200436 (China); Cheng, Lingyu [Shanghai Aerospace Equipments Manufacturer, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yan, Biao, E-mail: 84016@tongji.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Shanghai Key Lab. of D& A for Metal-Functional Materials, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is raised as one kind of additive manufacturing (AM) which is based on the discrete-stacking concept. This technique can fabricate advanced composites with desirable properties directly from 3D CAD data. In this research, 316L stainless steel (316L SS) and different fractions of calcium silicate (CaSiO{sub 3}) composites (weight fractions of calcium silicate are 0%, 5%,10% and 15%, respectively) were prepared by SLM technique with a purpose to develop biomedical metallic materials. The relative density, tensile, microhardness and elastic modulus of the composites were tested, their microstructures and fracture morphologies were observed using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that the addition of CaSiO{sub 3} particles influenced the microstructure and mechanical properties of specimens significantly. The CaSiO{sub 3} precipitates from the overlap of adjacent tracks and became the origin of the defects. The tensile strength of specimens range 320–722 MPa. The microhardness and elastic modulus are around 250 HV and 215 GPa respectively. These composites were ductile materials and the fracture mode of the composites was mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture. The 316L SS/CaSiO{sub 3} composites can be a potential biomedical metallic materials in the medical field. - Highlights: • 316L SS/CaSiO{sub 3} composites were fabricated by selective laser melting. • Microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance of samples was studied. • Composites is a ductile material and mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture. • Composites is a potential biomedical metallic materials in the medical field.

  3. A “fullerene-carbon nanotube” structure with tunable mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, W. M.; Zhang, L. W.; Liew, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures have drawn tremendous research interest and become promising building blocks for the new generation of smart sensors and devices. Utilizing a bottom-up strategy, the chemical interconnecting sp 3 covalent bond between carbon building blocks is an efficient way to enhance its Young's modulus and ductility. The formation of sp 3 covalent bond, however, inevitably degrades its ultimate tensile strength caused by stress concentration at the junction. By performing a molecular dynamics simulation of tensile deformation for a fullerene-carbon nanotube (FCNT) structure, we propose a tunable strategy in which fullerenes with various angle energy absorption capacities are utilized as building blocks to tune their ductile behavior, while still maintaining a good ultimate tensile strength of the carbon building blocks. A higher ultimate tensile strength is revealed with the reduction of stress concentration at the junction. A brittle-to-ductile transition during the tensile deformation is detected through the structural modification. The development of ductile behavior is attributed to the improvement of energy propagation ability during the fracture initiation, in which the released energy from bonds fracture is mitigated properly, leading to the further development of mechanical properties.

  4. The nucleation of austenite in ferritic ductile cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, J.M.; Hon, M.H.; Lee, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Austempered ductile cast iron has recently been receiving increasing attention because of its excellent combination of strength and ductility. Since the austenitization process has a significant influence on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron, several investigations on the nucleation sites of austenite and diffusion paths of carbon from spheroidal graphite have been reported in ferritic ductile cast iron. However, agreement on this subject has not ben reached. The purpose of this paper is to study the preferential nucleation sites of austenite during austenitization at two austenitizing temperatures in ferritic ductile cast iron. An attempt was made to understand the reasons which give rise to preferential austenite nucleation sites. The carbon diffusion paths from spheroidal graphite were also investigated

  5. Effect of porosity on the tensile properties of low ductility aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Waldemar Mugica

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature contains reports of several studies correlating the porosity and mechanical properties of aluminum alloys. Most of these studies determine this correlation based on the parameter of global volumetric porosity. These reports, however, fail to separate the effects of microstructural features and porosity on alloys, though recognizing the influence of the latter on their mechanical properties. Thus, when the decrease in tensile strength due to the porosity effect is taken into account, the findings are highly contradictory. An analysis was made of the correlation between mechanical properties and global volumetric porosity and volumetric porosity in the fracture, as well as of the beta-Al5FeSi phase present in 380 aluminum alloy. Our findings indicate that mechanical properties in tension relating to global volumetric porosity lead to overestimations of the porosity effect in detriment to the mechanical properties. Moreover, the proposed models that take into account the effects of particles, both Si and beta-Al5FeSi, are unapplicable to low ductility alloys.

  6. Finnie's notes on fracture mechanics fundamental and practical lessons

    CERN Document Server

    Dharan, C K H; Finnie, Iain

    2016-01-01

    This textbook consists primarily of notes by Iain Finnie who taught a popular course on fracture mechanics at the University of California at Berkeley. It presents a comprehensive and detailed exposition of fracture, the fundamentals of fracture mechanics and procedures for the safe design of engineering components made from metal alloys, brittle materials like glasses and ceramics, and composites. Interesting and practical problems are listed at the end of most chapters to give the student practice in applying the theory. A solutions manual is provided to the instructor. The text presents a unified perspective of fracture with a strong fundamental foundation and practical applications. In addition to its role as a text, this reference would be invaluable for the practicing engineer who is involved in the design and evaluation of components that are fracture critical. This book also: Presents details of derivations of the basic equations of fracture mechanics and the historical context of the development of f...

  7. Fracture mechanics evaluation of heavy welded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, I.; Ericksson, C.W.; Zilberstein, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes some applications of nondestructive examination (NDE) and engineering fracture mechanics to evaluation of flaws in heavy welded structures. The paper discusses not only widely recognized linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis, but also methods of the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM), such as COD, J-integral, and Failure Assessment Diagram. Examples are given to highlight the importance of interaction between specialists providing input and the specialists performing the analysis. The paper points out that the critical parameters for as-welded structures when calculated by these methods are conservative since they are based on two pessimistic assumptions: that the magnitude of residual stress is always at the yield strength level, and that the residual stress always acts in the same direction as the applied (mechanical) stress. The suggestion is made that it would be prudent to use the COD or the FAD design curves for a conservative design. The appendix examines a J-design curve modified to include residual stresses

  8. Effective Hydro-Mechanical Properties of Fluid-Saturated Fracture Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, N.; Vinci, C.; Renner, J.; Steeb, H.

    2015-12-01

    Consideration of hydro-mechanical processes is essential for the characterization of liquid-resources as well as for many engineering applications. Furthermore, the modeling of seismic waves in fractured porous media finds application not only in geophysical exploration but also reservoir management. Fractures exhibit high-aspect-ratio geometries, i.e. they constitute thin and long hydraulic conduits. Motivated by this peculiar geometry, the investigation of the hydro-mechanically coupled processes is performed by means of a hybrid-dimensional modeling approach. The effective material behavior of domains including complex fracture patterns in a porous rock is assessed by investigating the fluid pressure and the solid displacement of the skeleton saturated by compressible fluids. Classical balance equations are combined with a Poiseuille-type flow in the dimensionally reduced fracture. In the porous surrounding rock, the classical Biot-theory is applied. For simple geometries, our findings show that two main fluid-flow processes occur, leak-off from fractures to the surrounding rock and fracture flow within and between the connected fractures. The separation of critical frequencies of the two flow processes is not straightforward, in particular for systems containing a large number of fractures. Our aim is to model three dimensional hydro-mechanically coupled processes within complex fracture patterns and in particular determine the frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics. Furthermore, the effect of asperities of the fracture surfaces on the fracture stiffness and on the hydraulic conductivity will be added to the approach.

  9. A review on mechanical properties of magnesium based nano composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Nilanjan; Prasad, M. Lakshmi Vara

    2018-04-01

    A review was done on Magnesium (Mg) based composite materials reinforced with different nano particles such as TiO2, Cu, Y2O3, SiC, ZrO2 and Al2O3. TiO2 and Al2O3 nanoparticles were synthesised by melt deposition process. Cu, Y2O3, SiC and ZrO2 nanoparticles were synthesised by powder metallurgy process. Composite microstructural characteristics shows that the nano-size reinforcements are uniformly distributed in the composite matrix and also minimum porosity with solid interfacial integrity. The mechanical properties showed yield strength improvement by 0.2 percentage and Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was also improved for all the nano-particles. But UTS was adversely affected with TiO2 reinforcement while ductility was increased. With Cu reinforcement elastic modulus, hardness and fracture resistance increased and improved the co-efficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Mg based matrix. By Y2O3 reinforcement hardness, fracture resistance was improved and ductility reached maximum by 0.22 volume percentage of Y2O3 and decreased with succeeding increase in Y2O3 reinforcement. The readings exposed that mechanical properties were gathered from the composite comprising 2.0 weight percentage of Y2O3. Ductility and fracture resistance increased with ZrO2 reinforcement in Mg matrix. Using Al2O3 as reinforcement in Mg composite matrix hardness, elastic modulus and ductility was increased but porosity reduced with well interfacial integrity. Dissipation of energy in the form of damping capacity was resolved by classical vibration theory. The result showed that an increasing up to 0.4 volume percentage alumina content increases the damping capacity up to 34 percent. In another sample, addition of 2 weight percentage nano-Al2O3 particles showed big possibility in reducing CTE from 27.9-25.9×10-6 K-1 in Magnesium, tensile and yield strength amplified by 40MPa. In another test, Mg/1.1Al2O3 nanocomposite was manufactured by solidification process followed by hot extrusion

  10. System Reliability of Timber Structures with Ductile Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Čizmar, Dean

    2011-01-01

    The present paper considers the evaluation of timber structures with the focus on robustness due to connection ductility. The robustness analysis is based on the structural reliability framework applied to a simplified mechanical system. The structural timber system is depicted as a parallel system....... An evaluation method of the ductile behaviour is introduced. For different ductile behaviours, the system reliability is estimated based on Monte Carlo simulation. A correlation between the strength of the structural elements is introduced. The results indicate that the reliability of a structural timber system...

  11. Size Effects on Deformation and Fracture of Scandium Deuteride Films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresi, C. S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hintsala, E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hysitron, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yang, Nancy Y. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kammler, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moody, N. R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Gerberich, W. W. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Metal hydride films have been observed to crack during production and use, prompting mechanical property studies of scandium deuteride films. The following focuses on elastic modulus, fracture, and size effects observed in the system for future film mechanical behavior modeling efforts. Scandium deuteride films were produced through the deuterium charging of electron beam evaporated scandium films using X-ray diffraction, scanning Auger microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction to monitor changes in the films before and after charging. Scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation, and focused ion beam machined micropillar compression tests were used for mechanical characterization of the scandium deuteride films. The micropillars showed a size effect for flow stress, indicating that film thickness is a relevant tuning parameter for film performance, and that fracture was controlled by the presence of grain boundaries. Elastic modulus was determined by both micropillar compression and nanoindentation to be approximately 150 GPa, Fracture studies of bulk film channel cracking as well as compression induced cracks in some of the pillars yielded a fracture toughness around 1.0 MPa-m1/2. Preliminary Weibull distributions of fracture in the micropillars are provided. Despite this relatively low value of fracture toughness, scandium deuteride micropillars can undergo a large degree of plasticity in small volumes and can harden to some degree, demonstrating the ductile and brittle nature of this material

  12. Statistics of ductile fracture surfaces: the effect of material parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponson, Laurent; Cao, Yuanyuan; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    distributed. The three dimensional analysis permits modeling of a three dimensional material microstructure and of the resulting three dimensional stress and deformation states that develop in the fracture process region. Material parameters characterizing void nucleation are varied and the statistics...... of the resulting fracture surfaces is investigated. All the fracture surfaces are found to be self-affine over a size range of about two orders of magnitude with a very similar roughness exponent of 0.56 ± 0.03. In contrast, the full statistics of the fracture surfaces is found to be more sensitive to the material...

  13. Brittle and Ductile Behavior in Deep-Seated Landslides: Learning from the Vajont Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paronuzzi, Paolo; Bolla, Alberto; Rigo, Elia

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanical behavior of the unstable Mt. Toc slope before the 1963 catastrophic collapse, considering both the measured data (surface displacements and microseismicity) and the updated geological model of the prehistoric rockslide. From February 1960 up to 9 October 1963, the unstable mass behaved as a brittle-ductile `mechanical system,' characterized by remarkable microseismicity as well as by considerable surface displacements (up to 4-5 m). Recorded microshocks were the result of progressive rock fracturing of distinct resisting stiff parts made up of intact rock (indentations, undulations, and rock bridges). The main resisting stiff part was a large rock indentation located at the NE extremity of the unstable mass that acted as a mechanical constraint during the whole 1960-1963 period, inducing a progressive rototranslation toward the NE. This large constraint failed in autumn 1960, when an overall slope failure took place, as emphasized by the occurrence of the large perimetrical crack in the upper slope. In this circumstance, the collapse was inhibited by a reblocking phenomenon of the unstable mass that had been previously destabilized by the first reservoir filling. Progressive failure of localized intact rock parts progressively propagated westwards as a consequence of the two further filling-drawdown cycles of the reservoir (1962 and 1963). The characteristic brittle-ductile behavior of the Vajont landslide was made possible by the presence of a very thick (40-50 m) and highly deformable shear zone underlying the upper rigid rock mass (100-120 m thick).

  14. Low ductility creep failure in austenitic weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.

    Creep tests have been carried out for times of up to approx. 22,000 hrs on three austenitic weld metals of nominal composition 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo, 19Cr-12Ni-3Mo+Nb and 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo. The two former deposits were designed to produce delta-ferrite contents in the range 3-9% while the latter was designed to be fully austenitic. The common feature of all three weld metals was that they all gave very low strains at failure, typically approx. 1%. The microstructures of the failed creep specimens have been studied using optical and electron microscopy and the precipitate structures related to the occurrence of low creep strains. Creep deformation and fracture mechanisms in austenitic materials in general have been reviewed and this has been used as a basis for discussion of the observations of the present work. Finally, some of the factors that can be controlled to improve long-term creep ductility have been appraised

  15. Probing the structure and mechanical properties of the graphite nodules in ductile cast irons via nano-indentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Fæster, Søren; Winther, Grethe

    2018-01-01

    Little is known today about the mechanical properties of the graphite nodules, despite the key influence these particles have on the performance of ductile cast irons. To address this issue, nano-indentation tests were performed on the cross-section of a nodule whose sub-surface morphology...

  16. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  17. New Mechanism on Synergistic Effect of Nitrite and Triethanolamine Addition on the Corrosion of Ductile Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, we compared the different inhibition mechanisms of organic inhibitor with that of anodic inhibitor. When triethanolamine or nitrite was added separately to tap water for inhibiting the corrosion of ductile cast iron, large amounts of inhibitor were needed. This is because the corrosion inhibitors had to overcome the galvanic corrosion that occurs between graphite and matrix. In this work, we investigated the corrosion of ductile cast iron in tap water with/without inhibitors. The corrosion rate was measured using chemical immersion test and electrochemical methods, including anodic polarization test. The inhibited surface was analyzed using EPMA and XPS. Test solutions were analyzed by performing FT-IR measurement. When triethanolamine and nitrite coexisted in tap water, synergistic effect built up, and the inhibition effect was ca. 30 times more effective than witnessed with single addition. This work focused on the synergistic effect brought about by nitrite and triethanolamine and its novel mechanism was also proposed.

  18. Illustrating the Molecular Origin of Mechanical Stress in Ductile Deformation of Polymer Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Jianning; Liu, Zhuonan; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2018-02-16

    New experiments show that tensile stress vanishes shortly after preyield deformation of polymer glasses while tensile stress after postyield deformation stays high and relaxes on much longer time scales, thus hinting at a specific molecular origin of stress in ductile cold drawing: chain tension rather than intersegmental interactions. Molecular dynamics simulation based on a coarse-grained model for polystyrene confirms the conclusion that the chain network plays an essential role, causing the glassy state to yield and to respond with a high level of intrachain retractive stress. This identification sheds light on the future development regarding an improved theoretical account for molecular mechanics of polymer glasses and the molecular design of stronger polymeric materials to enhance their mechanical performance.

  19. Illustrating the Molecular Origin of Mechanical Stress in Ductile Deformation of Polymer Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Jianning; Liu, Zhuonan; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2018-02-01

    New experiments show that tensile stress vanishes shortly after preyield deformation of polymer glasses while tensile stress after postyield deformation stays high and relaxes on much longer time scales, thus hinting at a specific molecular origin of stress in ductile cold drawing: chain tension rather than intersegmental interactions. Molecular dynamics simulation based on a coarse-grained model for polystyrene confirms the conclusion that the chain network plays an essential role, causing the glassy state to yield and to respond with a high level of intrachain retractive stress. This identification sheds light on the future development regarding an improved theoretical account for molecular mechanics of polymer glasses and the molecular design of stronger polymeric materials to enhance their mechanical performance.

  20. Numerical methods in dynamic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskos, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of numerical methods for the solution of dynamic problems of fracture mechanics is presented. Finite difference, finite element and boundary element methods as applied to linear elastic or viscoelastic and non-linear elastoplastic or elastoviscoplastic dynamic fracture mechanics problems are described and critically evaluated. Both cases of stationary cracks and rapidly propagating cracks of simple I, II, III or mixed modes are considered. Harmonically varying with time or general transient dynamic disturbances in the form of external loading or incident waves are taken into account. Determination of the dynamic stress intensity factor for stationary cracks or moving cracks with known velocity history as well as determination of the crack-tip propagation history for given dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relation are described and illustrated by means of certain representative examples. Finally, a brief assessment of the present state of knowledge is made and research needs are identified

  1. Ductile Damage Evolution and Strain Path Dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasan, C. C.; Hoefnagels, J. M. P.; Peerlings, R. H. J.; Geers, M. G. D.; ten Horn, C. H. L. J.; Vegter, H.

    2007-01-01

    Forming limit diagrams are commonly used in sheet metal industry to define the safe forming regions. These diagrams are built to define the necking strains of sheet metals. However, with the rise in the popularity of advance high strength steels, ductile fracture through damage evolution has also emerged as an important parameter in the determination of limit strains. In this work, damage evolution in two different steels used in the automotive industry is examined to observe the relationship between damage evolution and the strain path that is followed during the forming operation

  2. Use of fracture mechanics in the US industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landes, J.D. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2001-07-01

    The modern fracture mechanics technology began in the US in the 1960's. It was developed in response to failure problems that could not be explained by current technology. Some segments of the US industry were quick to embrace this new technology. The period of 1960 to middle 1980's marked a time of active fracture mechanics research in the US industry. From this various codes and assessment procedures have been developed to apply the fracture mechanics approach to evaluate the safety and reliability of critical structural components. This report discusses the US industry use of fracture mechanics. It considers the historical developments, some of the fracture mechanics tools that are available and present practices. Several different industry segments that have used the fracture mechanics approach are considered. These include aerospace, military, power generation, petrochemical and pipelines, metal producers, and construction/transportation. Their current use of the fracture mechanics methods involves the implementation of codes and procedures, the development of software packages, the use of outside consulting groups and some in-house research efforts. (orig.) [German] Die Entwicklung der modernen Bruchmechanik in den USA begann in den 1960er Jahren im Zusammenhang mit einer Reihe von Versagensfaellen, die auf konventionelle Weise nicht erklaert werden konnten. Die neuen Ansaetze wurden von einigen Branchen schnell aufgegriffen und weiterentwickelt. Die Periode von 1960 bis in die Mitte der 1980er Jahre markiert eine Zeit intensiver Forschungsarbeit in der amerikanischen Industrie. Eine Reihe von Codes und Vorschriften zur Bewertung der Sicherheit und Zuverlaessigkeit gefaehrdeter Strukturen hat ihren Ursprung in dieser Zeit. Der vorliegende Aufsatz thematisiert die Anwendung bruchmechanischer Methoden in der Industrie der USA anhand historischer Aspekte, des heute verfuegbaren Instrumentariums der Bauteilbewertung und der gaengigen Praxis bei der

  3. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Faidy, C.; Valeta, M.P.; Bhandari, S.; Guichard, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moinereau, D [Electricite de France, Dept. MTC, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Faidy, C [Electricite de France, SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France); Valeta, M P [Commisariat a l` Energie Atomique, Dept. DMT, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bhandari, S; Guichard, D [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France)

    1997-09-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs.

  5. Effect of Temperature Reversion on Hot Ductility and Flow Stress-Strain Curves of C-Mn Continuously Cast Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhihua; Li, Wei; Long, Mujun; Gui, Lintao; Chen, Dengfu; Huang, Yunwei; Vitos, Levente

    2015-08-01

    The influence of temperature reversion in secondary cooling and its reversion rate on hot ductility and flow stress-strain curve of C-Mn steel has been investigated. Tensile specimens were cooled at various regimes. One cooling regime involved cooling at a constant rate of 100 °C min-1 to the test temperature, while the others involved temperature reversion processes at three different reversion rates before deformation. After hot tensile test, the evolution of mechanical properties of steel was analyzed at various scales by means of microstructure observation, ab initio prediction, and thermodynamic calculation. Results indicated that the temperature reversion in secondary cooling led to hot ductility trough occurring at higher temperature with greater depth. With increasing temperature reversion rate, the low temperature end of ductility trough extended toward lower temperature, leading to wider hot ductility trough with slightly reducing depth. Microstructure examinations indicated that the intergranular fracture related to the thin film-like ferrite and (Fe,Mn)S particles did not changed with varying cooling regimes; however, the Widmanstatten ferrite surrounding austenite grains resulted from the temperature reversion process seriously deteriorated the ductility. In addition, after the temperature reversion in secondary cooling, the peak stress on the flow curve slightly declined and the peak of strain to peak stress occurred at higher temperature. With increasing temperature reversion rate, the strain to peak stress slightly increased, while the peak stress showed little variation. The evolution of plastic modulus and strain to peak stress of austenite with varying temperature was in line with the theoretical prediction on Fe.

  6. Energetic approach for ductile tearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, St.

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on ductile crack initiation and propagation. It aims to propose an approach for the engineer allowing the prediction of the evolution of cracks in large scale components, from parameters determined on laboratory specimens. A crack initiation criterion, defining a J i tenacity related to crack tip blunting proposed in the literature is validated in the study. This criterion is shown to be transferable from laboratory specimens to structures. The literature review shows that an approach based on the dissipated energy in the fracture process during propagation offers an economical and simple solution to simulate large crack growth. A numerical method is proposed to estimate this fracture energy. The existence of an energy parameter G fr is shown, by simulating the propagation by the simultaneous release of several elements and by the use of the Rice integral with an original integration path. This parameter represents the needed energy for a unit crack extension and appears to be intrinsic to the material. A global energy statement allows to relate this parameter to a variation of the plastic part of J integral. It offers a second numerical method to simulate the propagation just from stationary numerical calculations, as well as the elaboration of a simplified method. This approach, using two parameters J i and G fr , intrinsic to the material and experimentally measurable on specimens, is validated on many tests such as crack pipes subjected to four points bending and cracked rings in compression. For example, this approach allows to model up to 90 mm ductile tearing in a pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack in ferritic steel, or to anticipate the evolution of a semi-elliptical crack in an aged austenitic ferritic steel plate subjected t