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Sample records for dual-cured resin cement

  1. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. RESULTS: GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. CONCLUSION: It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation. PMID:28028417

  2. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation

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    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity6 and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  3. CURING EFFICIENCY OF DUAL-CURE RESIN CEMENT UNDER ZIRCONIA WITH TWO DIFFERENT LIGHT CURING UNITS

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    Pınar GÜLTEKİN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. Materials and Methods: 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm were prepared. For each group (n=12 resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96. The values of depth of cure (in mm and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN were evaluated for each specimen. Results: The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (p<0.05.At 100μm and 300 μm depth, the LED unit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (p<0.05. At 500 μm depth, the difference between the VHN values of LED and QTH groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Light curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  4. Shear bond strength of three dual-cured resin cements to dentin analyzed by finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Pallav, P.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the shear bond strength to bovine dentin of dual-cured resin cements cured in different circumstances, the contraction stress and volumetric shrinkage in both polymerization modes, and to review the failure stress distribution at the cement-tooth interface with finite element

  5. Influence of polymerization mode and C-factor on cohesive strength of dual-cured resin cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Pallav, P.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to determine the influence of the C-factor and the mode of polymerization on the cohesive strength of various dual-cure resin cements. Methods Three curing conditions were tested; chemical curing with free shrinkage conditions (C = 0), and constraint shrinkage con

  6. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

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    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  7. Hardening of a dual-cure resin cement using QTH and LED curing units

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Maria Jacinta Moraes Coelho; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Encarnação, Monalisa Olga Lessa da; Santos Junior,Gildo Coelho; Bottino, Marco Antonio [UNESP

    2010-01-01

    p. 110-115 OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the surface hardness of a resin cement (RelyX ARC) photoactivated through indirect composite resin (Cristobal) disks of different thicknesses using either a light-emitting diode (LED) or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light source. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighteen resin cement specimens were prepared and divided into 6 groups according to the type of curing unit and the thickness of resin disks interposed between the cement surface and light sourc...

  8. Effect of Different Thicknesses of Pressable Ceramic Veneers on Polymerization of Light-cured and Dual-cured Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Lopez, Arnaldo; Berzins, David W.; Prasad, Soni; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the effects of ceramic veneer thicknesses on the polymerization of two different resin cements. Materials and Methods A total of 80 ceramic veneer discs were fabricated by using a pressable ceramic material (e.max Press; Ivoclar Vivadent) from a Low Translucency (LT) ingot (A1 shade). These discs were divided into light-cured (LC; NX3 Nexus LC; Kerr) and dual-cured (DC; NX3 Nexus DC; Kerr) and each group was further divided into 4 subgroups, based on ceramic disc thickness (0.3 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.2 mm). The values of Vickers microhardness (MH) and degree of conversion (DOC) were obtained for each specimen after a 24-hour storage period. Association between ceramic thickness, resin cement type, and light intensity readings (mW/cm2) with respect to microhardness and degree of conversion was statistically evaluated by using ANOVA. Results For the DOC values, there was no significant difference observed among the LC resin cement subgroups, except in the 1.2 mm subgroup; only the DOC value (14.0 ± 7.4%) of 1.2 mm DC resin cement had significantly difference from that value (28.9 ± 7.5%) of 1.2 mm LC resin cement (P.05). Conclusion The degree of conversion and hardness of the resin cement was unaffected with veneering thicknesses between 0.3 and 0.9 mm. However, the DC resin cement group resulted in a significantly lower DOC and MH values for the 1.2 mm subgroup. Clinical Significance While clinically adequate polymerization of LC resin cement can be achieved with a maximum 1.2 mm of porcelain veneer restoration, the increase of curing time or light intensity is clinically needed for DC resin cements at the thickness of more than 0.9 mm. PMID:26162252

  9. Hardening of a dual-cure resin cement using QTH and LED curing units

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    Maria Jacinta Moraes Coelho Santos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the surface hardness of a resin cement (RelyX ARC photoactivated through indirect composite resin (Cristobal disks of different thicknesses using either a light-emitting diode (LED or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH light source. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighteen resin cement specimens were prepared and divided into 6 groups according to the type of curing unit and the thickness of resin disks interposed between the cement surface and light source. Three indentations (50 g for 15 s were performed on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and a mean Vickers hardness number (VHN was calculated for each specimen. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test was used for post-hoc pairwise comparisons. RESULTS: Increased indirect resin disk thickness resulted in decreased mean VHN values. Mean VHN values for the top surfaces of the resin cement specimens ranged from 23.2 to 46.1 (QTH and 32.3 to 41.7 (LED. The LED curing light source produced higher hardness values compared to the QTH light source for 2- and 3-mm-thick indirect resin disks. The differences were clinically, but not statistically significant. Increased indirect resin disk thickness also resulted in decreased mean VHN values for the bottom surfaces of the resin cement: 5.8 to 19.1 (QTH and 7.5 to 32.0 (LED. For the bottom surfaces, a statistically significant interaction was also found between the type of curing light source and the indirect resin disk thickness. CONCLUSION: Mean surface hardness values of resin cement specimens decreased with the increase of indirect resin disk thickness. The LED curing light source generally produced higher surface hardness values.

  10. Polymerization kinetics of dual-curing adhesive systems when used solely or in conjunction with chemically-cured resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Kyung; Chun, Ju-Na; Kwon, Pyung Cheol; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the chemical polymerization kinetics of commercial dual-curing adhesive systems when used solely or in conjunction with chemically-curing resin cement. Four adhesive systems comprising simplified-step adhesives and activators (Prime&Bond NT with Self Cure Activator, Excite DSC, AQ Bond Plus, All-Bond SE) were used. The pH values of the adhesives and adhesive/activator blends were measured. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to investigate the extent of the chemical polymerization of the adhesives when used alone or directly intermixed with a chemically-cured resin cement (C&B Cement) for 60 min (n = 5). The data derived from the DSC analysis were statistically compared using one-way ANOVA and the Games-Howell post-hoc test (α = 0.05). All the adhesives were highly acidic; when they were blended with the respective activators, their pH values increased. Neither the adhesive/activator blends nor the adhesive alone/cement mixtures showed any detectable heat generation. The Prime&Bond NT/activator showed delayed heat generation only when intermixed with the catalyst/base paste. The other three adhesive systems produced similar exotherms when intermixed with the catalyst paste alone or with the catalyst/base paste (p > 0.05), but at significantly different maximum rates of polymerization (p adhesive system/resin cement interface appears highly dependent on the adhesive system used and may be considerably delayed.

  11. Treatment of a Vertical Root Fracture Using Dual-Curing Resin Cement: A Case Report

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    Nima Moradi Majd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vertical root fracture (VRF is one of the most frustrating complications of root canal treatment. The prognosis of the root with VRF is poor therefore tooth extraction and root amputation are usually the only treatment options. However, bonding of the fracture line with adhesive resin cement during the intentional replantation procedure was recently suggested as an alternative to tooth extraction. Methods. A vertically fractured left maxillary incisor was carefully extracted, fracture line was treated with adhesive resin cement, a retrograde cavity was produced and filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM cement, and tooth was replanted. Results. After 12 months the tooth was asymptomatic. The size of periapical radiolucency was noticeably reduced and there was no clinical sign of ankylosis. Conclusion. Using adhesive resin cement to bond the fracture lines extraorally in roots with VRF and intentional replantation of the reconstructed teeth could be considered as an alternative to tooth extraction, especially for anterior teeth.

  12. The Effects of Exposure Time on the Surface Microhardness of Three Dual-Cured Dental Resin Cements

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    Matheus C. Bandéca

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the exposure time of light-curing of the polymers used for cementation on microhardness test in different storage times. The polymers (specifically called resin cements were RelyX ARC, RelyX U100, and SET. Five specimens of each group were prepared and photo-polymerized with exposure times of 20 s and 180 s, using a LED polymerization unit with wavelength of 440 ~ 480 nm and light output was consistently 1,500 mW/cm2. The Vickers hardness test was performed in a MMT-3 Microhardness Tester. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. The values of RelyX ARC showed statistically significant difference to groups with light exposure when considering only chemical cure (p < 0.05. The groups with light exposure (20 s and 180 s showed no significant difference between them (p > 0.05. The RelyX U100 cured only chemically showed statistically significant difference between 48 h and 7 days (p < 0.05. The SET resin cement showed no significant difference to groups without light exposure for all storage times (p > 0.05. The values of hardening of the dual-cured resin cements improved after setting by light and chemical activation demonstrating the importance of light curing.

  13. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liu; Hong Liu; Yue-Tong Qian; Song Zhu; Su-Qian Zhao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested:(i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements were used for luting posts:DMG LUXACORE Smartmix Dual, Multilink Automix, RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0. All the specimens were subjected to micro push-out test. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were performed (a50.05) to analyze the data. Bond strength was significantly affected by the type of resin cement, and bond strengths of RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0 to the fiber posts were significantly higher than the other cement groups. Sandblasting significantly increased the bond strength of DMG group to the fiber posts.

  14. Effect of various surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia after thermal aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Nijhuis, Henk; Felipe Valandro, Luiz

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of chairside and laboratory types of surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia ceramic after thermocycling. Disk-shaped (diameter: 10 mm, thickness: 2 mm) Y-TZP ceramics (Lava(TM), 3M ESPE) were used

  15. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

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    Kerem KiLiC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05. Conclusions Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination.

  16. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    KİLİC, Kerem; ARSLAN, Soley; DEMETOGLU, Goknil Alkan; ZARARSIZ, Gokmen; KESİM, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods: Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results: There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS) between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05). Conclusions: Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination. PMID:23559118

  17. Influence of Curing Units and Indirect Restorative Materials on the Hardness of Two Dual-curing Resin Cements Evaluated by the Nanoindentation Test.

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    Kuguimiya, Rosiane Noqueira; Rode, Kátia Martins; Carneiro, Paula Mendes Acatauassú; Aranha, Ana Cecilia Corrêa; Turbino, Miriam Lacalle

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the hardness of a dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200) and a conventional dual-curing resin cement (RelyX ARC) cured with different light curing units of different wavelengths (Elipar Freelight 2 LED [430 to 480 nm, conventional], Bluephase LED [380 to 515 nm, polywave], AccuCure 3000 Laser [488 nm]) by means of the nanoindentation test. Bovine incisors were cleaned and then sectioned at the cementoenamel junction to remove the crown. After embedding in acrylic, dentin surfaces of the specimens were exposed and ground flat to standardize the surfaces. To simulate clinically placing indirect restorations, ceramic (IPS e.maxPress/Ivoclar Vivadent) or indirect composite resin (SR Adoro/Ivoclar Vivadent) slabs were cemented on dentin surfaces. The specimens were sectioned longitudinally at low speed under constant irrigation and then polished. In the positive control group, the cement was light cured without the interposition of indirect restorative material; in the negative control group, after the indirect restorative material was cemented, no light curing was performed, allowing only chemical polymerization of the cement. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Nanoindentadion hardness of the cement layer was measured under a 100-mN load. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Although the self-adhesive cement is technically simple, conventional cement showed the best polymerization performance. The polywave LED technology did not differ significantly from other light-curing units. The hardness of the resin cements evaluated was negatively influenced by the interposition of an indirect restorative material; only the LEDs were able to maintain the same degree of cement polymerization when an indirect restorative material was used. The photoactivation step is required during the cementation of indirect restorations to ensure adequate polymerization of dual-curing resin cements.

  18. Influence of energy density of different light sources on knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement

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    Evandro Piva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin-based luting cement irradiated with different light sources as well energy density through a ceramic sample. Three light-curing unit (LCUs were tested: tungsten halogen light (HAL, light-emitting diode (LED and xenon plasma-arc (PAC lamp. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from a resin-based cement (Enforce. Three energy doses were used by modifying the irradiance (I of each LCU and the irradiation time (T: 24 Jcm-2 (I/2x2T, 24 Jcm-2 (IxT and 48 Jcm-2 (Ix2T. Energy doses were applied through a 2.0-mm-thick ceramic sample (Duceram Plus. Three groups underwent direct irradiation over the resin cement with the different LCUs and a chemically-activated group served as a control. Thirteen groups were tested (n=10. Knoop hardness number (KHN means were obtained from cross-sectional areas. Two-way ANOVA and the Holm-Sidak method were used for statistical comparisons of activation mode and energy doses (a=5%. Application of 48 J.cm-2 energy dose through the ceramic using LED (50.5±2.8 and HAL (50.9±3.7 produced significantly higher KHN means (p<0.05 than the control (44.7±3.8. LED showed statistically similar performance to HAL. Only HAL showed a relationship between the increase of LCU energy dose and hardness increase.

  19. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength, between IPS-Empress2 ceramics and three dual-cured resin cements

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    Hajimiragha H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cementation is one of the most critical steps of the porcelain restoration technique. However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of current ceramic bonding systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of three dual-cure resin cements to IPS-Empress2 ceramics. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 pairs of IPS-Empress 2 ceramic discs were fabricated with 10 and 8 mm diameters and 2.5 mm thickness. After sandblasting and ultrasonic cleaning, the surfaces of all specimens were etched with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 60 seconds. Then, the three groups of 10 bonded specimens were prepared ceramic bonding resin systems including Panavia F2, Variolink II and Rely X ARC. After storage in 37±1c water for 24 hours and thermocycling in 5c and 55c water for 500 cycles with 1-minute dwell time, the shear bond strengths were determined using Instron machine at speed of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by One Way ANOVA test. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey HSD method was used. The mode of failure was evaluated by scanning electro microscope (SEM. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: Significant differences were found between different cement types (P<0.05. Variolink II provided the highest bonding values with IPS-Empress2. A combination of different modes of failure was observed. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, according to the highest mode of cohesive failure, Variolink II seems to have the strongest bond with IPS-Empress2 ceramics.

  20. Evaluation of the Effect of Porcelain Laminate Thickness on Degree of Conversion of Light Cure and Dual Cure Resin Cements Using FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorizad Ganjkar, Maryam; Heshmat, Haleh; Hassan Ahangari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Increasing the thickness of the veneering porcelain may affect the polymerization of resin cements. Incomplete polymerization of resin cements can lead to compromised quality of restoration and decrease the longevity of indirect restorations. Purpose: This study sought to assess the effect of IPS Empress porcelain thickness on the degree of conversion of light-cure and dual-cure resin cements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, IPS Empress porcelain discs (A2 shade) with 10mm diameter and 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm thicknesses were fabricated. Choice2 (Bisco, USA) and Nexus3 (Kerr, USA) resin cements were light cured through the three porcelain thicknesses in two groups of 3 samples using a LED light-curing unit (LEDemetron II; Kerr, USA). The control group samples were cured individually with no porcelain disc. The degree of conversion of resin cements was determined using FTIR (Bruker; Equinox55, Germany). The data were analyzed using Dunn’s test. Results: The degree of conversion (in percent) beneath the 0.5, 1.5 and 2 mm thicknesses of IPS Empress was 68.67±0.88, 71.06±0.94 and 72.51±0.41 for Choice2 resin cement and 69.60±2.12, 69.64±1.63 and 69.24±2.12 for Nexus3, respectively. Porcelain thickness and type of resin cement had no significant effect on degree of conversion (p≥ 0.05). Conclusion: It seems that increasing the porcelain thickness by up to 1.5 mm has no adverse effect on degree of conversion of both dual cure and light cure resin cements evaluated in this study. PMID:28280757

  1. Evaluation of bond strength of D.T.Light- post to root canal using dual-cure and self-cure resin cements after irrigation with various solutions

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    Atai M.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Nonmetallic tooth- colored posts adhere to canal walls by dentin bonding agents and resin cements. Better retention and proper distribution of stress result from enough and proper bonding. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of D.T. Light - post with two different resin cements (self-cure & dual-cure and to investigate the effect of irrigating solutions applied in root canal on bond strength of the resin cements and D.T.Light- post to root canal wall. "nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study 40 single root teeth (maxillary canine & central were selected and stored in 0.1% thymol solution for one week and transferred to distilled water. The teeth were decoronated 2mm above CEJ. The canal space was mechanically enlarged using k-files (up to # 70. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups. The first group was irrigated with 2.6% NaOCl, and the second was irrigated with normal saline. After drying, the teeth were filled with gutta percha cones using lateral condensing method. After two weeks the post space was prepared and D.T.Light- post was inserted in each subgroup using self or dual-cure cements according to manufacturer's instructions. After thermocycling, the apical part was cut 1cm below CEJ. The remained length was divided into 9 equal sequential sections. Each section was submitted to shear push-out test in universal testing machine. Statistical analysis of the bond strength data was performed using ANOVA and post hoc tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. All failed specimens were examined under stereomicroscope. Degrees of conversion of the cements were determined by FTIR. "nResults: Significant difference in bond strength values were found among sites (P=0.001 and cements (P=0.03. With increasing in depth, bond strength decreased. The mean bond strength value in dual-cure resin cement was higher than self-cure cement. The irrigating solutions caused no significant

  2. Micromorphology of resin/dentin interfaces using 4th and 5th generation dual-curing adhesive/cement systems: a confocal laser scanning microscope analysis.

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    Arrais, Cesar A G; Miyake, Katsuia; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Pashley, David H; Giannini, Marcelo

    2009-02-01

    This study evaluated the differential composition of resin/dentin interfaces of indirect restorations created by the application of 4th and 5th generation dual-curing luting systems (bonding agents/resin cements), when each material was either light cured or allowed to self-cure. Occlusal flat dentin surfaces of 60 human third molars were assigned into 12 groups (n = 5) according to curing mode and dual-curing cementing system: 4th generation All Bond2 (AB2)/Duolink (Bisco) and 5th generation (B1) Bond1/Lute-it (Pentron). Fluorescein-labeled dextran (FDx) was mixed with the bonding agents, while rhodamine-labeled dextran (RhDx) was incorporated into resin cements and Pre-Bond resin from AB2. Resin cements were applied to 2-mm-thick, precured resin composite disks (Z250, 3M ESPE), which were fixed to dentin surfaces containing adhesive resin in either cured (light cured; LC) or uncured (self-cured; SC) states. The restored teeth were light activated (XL3000, 3M ESPE) according to the manufacturers' instructions (LRC) or allowed to self-cure (SRC), were stored for 24 h, and then vertically, serially sectioned into l-mm-thick slabs, which were analyzed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescent additives indicated where individual components of the bonding/cement systems were located. Additional specimens were prepared and analyzed using a conventional scanning electron microscope. AB2/LC and B1/LC exhibited nonuniform primer/adhesive layer thickness. AB2/SC showed adhesive resin penetration within the primed dentin, and resin cement penetration at the entrance of the dentin tubules. B1/SC/LRC demonstrated resin cement penetration within the hybrid layer and into the dentin tubules. More resin cement penetration was observed in B1/SC/SRC groups than in its LRC equivalent. The morphological features and component interactions among materials at resin/dentin interfaces are related to the activation modes of the primer/adhesive layer and of the resin cement

  3. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  4. The effect of curing light and chemical catalyst on the degree of conversion of two dual cured resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different curing lights and chemical catalysts on the degree of conversion of resin luting cements. A total of 60 disk-shaped specimens of RelyX ARC or Panavia F of diameter 5 mm and thickness 0.5 mm were prepared and the respective chemical catalyst (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus or ED Primer) was added. The specimens were light-cured using different curing units (an argon ion laser, an LED or a quartz-tungsten-halogen light) through shade A2 composite disks of diameter 10 mm and thickness 2 mm. After 24 h of dry storage at 37°C, the degree of conversion of the resin luting cements was measured by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. For statistical analysis, ANOVA and the Tukey test were used, with p ≤ 0.05. Panavia F when used without catalyst and cured using the LED or the argon ion laser showed degree of conversion values significantly lower than RelyX ARC, with and without catalyst, and cured with any of the light sources. Therefore, the degree of conversion of Panavia F with ED Primer cured with the quartz-tungsten-halogen light was significantly different from that of RelyX ARC regardless of the use of the chemical catalyst and light curing source. In conclusion, RelyX ARC can be cured satisfactorily with the argon ion laser, LED or quartz-tungsten-halogen light with or without a chemical catalyst. To obtain a satisfactory degree of conversion, Panavia F luting cement should be used with ED Primer and cured with halogen light.

  5. Effect of pre-heated dual-cured resin cements on the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin

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    Alexandre Morais

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of resin luting agents (LA polymerized using increased temperature on the in vitro microtensile bond strength (mTBS of indirect restorations to dentin. The occlusal dentin surfaces of 40 human third molars were exposed and flattened. The teeth were assigned to 8 groups (n = 5 according to the LA temperature (25°C o r 50°C, curing mode (dual- or self-curing mode, and product (Excite DSC/Variolink II [VII] and XP Bond/Calibra [Cal]. The bonding agents were applied to the dentin surfaces according to manufacturers' instructions. For preheated groups, the LAs were heated to 50°C, subsequently mixed on a heated stirrer surface, and applied to the previously heated pre-polymerized resin discs (2 mm thickness, TPH-Spectrum. The discs were bonded to the dentin surfaces, and the LAs were either exposed to a curing light according to manufacturers' instructions or allowed to self-cure. Specimens were stored in relative humidity at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were mesio-distally and bucco-lingually sectioned to obtain multiple bonded beams with a 1-mm² cross-sectional area for mTBS testing. Data (MPa were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (a = 5% for each product. Specimen failure patterns were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope. VII groups showed higher mTBS at 50°C than at 25°C regardless of curing mode (p = 0.05. Cal groups showed similar mTBS at 25°C and 50°C in all activation modes. The use of some dual-polymerizing LAs at 50°C may improve the mTBS of indirect restorations to dentin.

  6. The effect of flowable and dual-cure resin composite liners on gingival microleakage of posterior resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirani F.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Microleakage has been always a major concern in restorative dentistry. The curing contraction of composites still presents a problem with controlling microleakage and postoperative sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of flowable and dual-cure resin composite liners on gingival microleakage of packable resin composite restorations. "nMaterials and Methods: Sixty Class II cavities with cervical margins 1 mm below the CEJ were prepared in 30 extracted human molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups of 12 each. In control group, each tooth was restored incrementally with Tetric Ceram composite without applying any liner. In the second and forth groups, flowable materials- Tetric Flow and dual-cure composite resin cement Relay X ARC were placed respectively as a 1-mm thick gingival increment and cured before the resin composite restoration, whereas, in the third and fifth groups liners were cured with the first increment of packable composite.The restored teeth were stored for one week in distilled water at 370C, and thermocycled between 50C and 550C, sealed with nail varnish except the tooth - composite interface in cervical restoration margins and immersed in 2% basic fuchsin for 24 hours. Dye penetration was evaluated using a stereomicroscope with 28x magnification. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. "nResults: The results of this study indicated that there were significant statistical differences between control - cured flowable liner, control-flowable liner without separately curing, control-cured dual cure composite resin cement groups.However there were no significant differences between dual-cure composite resin cement without separately curing-control,cured flowable liner-cured dual cure composite resin cement, flowable liner without separately curing-dual cure composite resin cement without separately

  7. Influence of activation modes on diametral tensile strength of dual-curing resin cements Influência dos métodos de ativação na resistência à tração diametral de cimentos resinosos duais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Garcia Fonseca

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In metallic restorations, the polymerization of dual-curing resin cements depends exclusively on chemical activation. The effect of the lack of photoactivation on the strength of these cements has been rarely studied. This study evaluated the influence of activation modes on the diametral tensile strength (DTS of dual-curing resin cements. Base and catalyst pastes of Panavia F, Variolink II, Scotchbond Resin Cement, Rely X and Enforce were mixed and inserted into cylindrical metal moulds (4 x 2 mm. Cements were either: 1 not exposed to light (chemical activation = self-cured groups or 2 photoactivated through mylar strips (chemical and photo-activation = dual-cured groups (n = 10. After a 24 h storage in 37ºC distilled water, specimens were subjected to compressive load in a testing machine. A self-curing resin cement (Cement-It and a zinc phosphate cement served as controls. Comparative analyses were performed: 1 between the activation modes for each dual-curing resin cement, using Student’s t test; 2 among the self-cured groups of the dual-curing resin cements and the control groups, using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = 0.05. The dual-cured groups of Scotchbond Resin Cement (53.3 MPa, Variolink II (48.4 MPa and Rely X (51.6 MPa showed higher DTS than that of self-cured groups (44.6, 40.4 and 44.5 MPa respectively (p 0.05. The self-cured groups of all the dual-curing resin cements presented statistically the same DTS as that of Cement-It (44.1 MPa (p > 0.05, and higher DTS than that of zinc phosphate (4.2 MPa. Scotchbond Resin Cement, Variolink II and Rely X depended on photoactivation to achieve maximum DTS. In the absence of light, all the dual-curing resin cements presented higher DTS than that of zinc phosphate and statistically the same as that of Cement-It (p > 0.05.Em restaurações metálicas, a polimerização dos cimentos resinosos duais depende exclusivamente da ativação química. Há poucas pesquisas sobre o efeito

  8. The Effect of Simplified Bonding Agents on the Bond Strength to Dentin of Self-Activated Dual-Cure Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    barbituric acids , aromatic sulphonate amides and tert-butyl peroxymaleic acid in dental adhesive resin. J Polym Sci 1999;72:1655- 1668. Lee Ann...is the aim of this study to verify the accuracy of the claim so that clinicians can take advantage of its properties with the comfort of knowing it...the Incompatibilities between Simplified Dental Adhesives and Self-Cure Resin Cements……………..……30 I. Eliminate the Acid -Base Reaction…………..……………31

  9. Curing units' ability to cure restorative composites and dual-cured composite cements under composite overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Sun; Cho, Yong-Sik; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Noh, Byng-Duk

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of using conventional low-power density QTH (LQTH) units, high-power density QTH (HQTH) units, argon (Ar) laser and Plasma arc curing (PAC) units for curing dual-cured resin cements and restorative resin composites under a pre-cured resin composite overlay. The microhardness of the two types of restorative resins (Z100 and Tetric Ceram) and a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II) were measured after they were light cured for 60 seconds in a 2 mm Teflon mold. The recorded microhardness was determined to be the optimum microhard-ness (OM). Either one of the two types of restorative resins (Z100, Tetric Ceram) or the dual cured resin cement (Variolink II) were placed under a 1.5-mm thick and 8 mm diameter pre-cured Targis (Vivadent/Ivoclar AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein) overlay. The specimens that were prepared for each material were divided into four groups depending upon the curing units used (HQTH, PAC, Laser or LQTH) and were further subdi-vided into subgroups according to light curing time. The curing times used were 30, 60, 90 and 120 seconds for HQTH; 12, 24, 36 and 48 seconds for the PAC unit; 15, 30, 45 and 60 for the Laser and 60, 120 or 180 seconds for the LQTH unit. Fifteen specimens were assigned to each sub- group. The microhardness of the upper and and lower composite surfaces under the Targis overlay were measured using an Optidur Vickers hardness-measuring instrument (Göttfert Feinwerktechnik GmbH, Buchen, Germany). In each material, for each group, a three-way ANOVA with Tukey was used at the 0.05 level of significance to compare the microhardnesses of the upper and lower composite surfaces and the previously measured OM of the material. From the OM of each material, 80% OM was calculated and the time required for the microhardness of the upper and lower surface of the specimen to reach 100% and 80% of OM was determined. In Z100 and Tetric Ceram, when the composites were light cured for 120 seconds using the HQTH lamp

  10. Thio-urethanes improve properties of dual-cured composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, A; Dobson, A; Ferracane, J L; Consani, R; Pfeifer, C S

    2014-12-01

    This study aims at modifying dual-cure composite cements by adding thio-urethane oligomers to improve mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, and reduce polymerization stress. Thiol-functionalized oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate, at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol. Oligomer was added at 0, 10 or 20 wt% to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, with 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers) or to one commercial composite cement (Relyx Ultimate, 3M Espe). Near-IR was used to measure methacrylate conversion after photoactivation (700 mW/cm(2) × 60s) and after 72 h. Flexural strength and modulus, toughness, and fracture toughness were evaluated in three-point bending. Polymerization stress was measured with the Bioman. The microtensile bond strength of an indirect composite and a glass ceramic to dentin was also evaluated. Results were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). For BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA cements, conversion values were not affected by the addition of thio-urethanes. Flexural strength/modulus increased significantly for both oligomer concentrations, with a 3-fold increase in toughness at 20 wt%. Fracture toughness increased over 2-fold for the thio-urethane modified groups. Contraction stress was reduced by 40% to 50% with the addition of thio-urethanes. The addition of thio-urethane to the commercial cement led to similar flexural strength, toughness, and conversion at 72h compared to the control. Flexural modulus decreased for the 20 wt% group, due to the dilution of the overall filler volume, which also led to decreased stress. However, fracture toughness increased by up to 50%. The microtensile bond strength increased for the experimental composite cement with 20 wt% thio-urethane bonding for both an indirect composite and a glass ceramic. Novel dual-cured composite cements containing thio-urethanes showed increased toughness, fracture toughness and

  11. Thio-urethanes Improve Properties of Dual-cured Composite Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, A.; Dobson, A.; Ferracane, J.L.; Consani, R.; Pfeifer, C.S.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at modifying dual-cure composite cements by adding thio-urethane oligomers to improve mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, and reduce polymerization stress. Thiol-functionalized oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate, at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol. Oligomer was added at 0, 10 or 20 wt% to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, with 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers) or to one commercial composite cement (Relyx Ultimate, 3M Espe). Near-IR was used to measure methacrylate conversion after photoactivation (700 mW/cm2 × 60s) and after 72 h. Flexural strength and modulus, toughness, and fracture toughness were evaluated in three-point bending. Polymerization stress was measured with the Bioman. The microtensile bond strength of an indirect composite and a glass ceramic to dentin was also evaluated. Results were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05). For BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA cements, conversion values were not affected by the addition of thio-urethanes. Flexural strength/modulus increased significantly for both oligomer concentrations, with a 3-fold increase in toughness at 20 wt%. Fracture toughness increased over 2-fold for the thio-urethane modified groups. Contraction stress was reduced by 40% to 50% with the addition of thio-urethanes. The addition of thio-urethane to the commercial cement led to similar flexural strength, toughness, and conversion at 72h compared to the control. Flexural modulus decreased for the 20 wt% group, due to the dilution of the overall filler volume, which also led to decreased stress. However, fracture toughness increased by up to 50%. The microtensile bond strength increased for the experimental composite cement with 20 wt% thio-urethane bonding for both an indirect composite and a glass ceramic. Novel dual-cured composite cements containing thio-urethanes showed increased toughness, fracture toughness and

  12. Correlation between the cytotoxicity of self-etching resin cements and the degree of conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís FSA Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that photopolymerization of dual cure self-etching resin cements decrease toxic effects on cell culture. Adequate photopolymerization should be considered during cementation when using dual polymerization self-etching resin cements.

  13. Luting of CAD/CAM ceramic inlays: direct composite versus dual-cure luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Bonroy, Kim; Elsen, Caroline; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Suyama, Yuji; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bonding effectiveness in direct restorations. A two-step self-etch adhesive and a light-cure resin composite was compared with luting with a conventional dual-cure resin cement and a two-step etch and rinse adhesive. Class-I box-type cavities were prepared. Identical ceramic inlays were designed and fabricated with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. The inlays were seated with Clearfil SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical) or ExciTE F DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), each by two operators (five teeth per group). The inlays were stored in water for one week at 37°C, whereafter micro-tensile bond strength testing was conducted. The micro-tensile bond strength of the direct composite was significantly higher than that from conventional luting, and was independent of the operator (P<0.0001). Pre-testing failures were only observed with the conventional method. High-power light-curing of a direct composite may be a viable alternative to luting lithium disilicate glass-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations.

  14. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  15. Polimerización de un cemento de composite a través de restauraciones de cerómero utilizando lámparas halógenas y LEDs Polymerization of dual-cure resin luting cements through laboratory-processed-resins: LED versus halogen lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Grau Grullón

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio evaluó la influencia del grosor de una restauración indirecta de cerómero, el tipo de lámpara fotoactivadora y el tiempo de almacenamiento en la dureza Vickers de un cemento de composite. Dos lámparas de diodos (Optilight CL [CL] y Ultra-Lume 5 [UL] fueron comparadas con la lámpara halógena (Optilux 401 [OH]. Fueron confeccionados especímenes en cerómero con un diámetro de 5 mm y una espesura de 1 y 2 mm, los cuales fueron interpuestos entre la luz y la matriz metálica de 5 mm de ancho y 0,5 mm de grosor que contenía el cemento de composite. Los 45 cuerpos de prueba fueron divididos en 9 grupos: G1: exposición directa de luz DLE/OH; G2: 1 mm/OH; G3: 2 mm/OH; G4: DLE/CL; G5: 1 mm/CL; G6: 2 mm/CL; G7: DLE/UL; G8: 1 mm/UL y G9: 2 mm/UL. La fotoactivación fue realizada durante 60 segundos. La dureza Vickers (50 g/30s fue medida en la superficie tope de todos los especímenes luego de 24 horas y 180 días de almacenamiento. La lámpara fotoactivadora y el grosor del cerómero fueron estadísticamente significativas (pThis study evaluated the influence of indirect composite resin thickness, the storage time and light-curing units on the Vickers hardness of a dual-cure resin luting cement. Two light-emitting diodes lights (Optilight CL [CL] and UltraLume5 [UL] were compared with a quartz tungsten halogen unit (Optilux 401 [OH]. Laboratory-processed composite specimens with a diameter of 5mm and thickness of 1 and 2 mm were constructed to be interposed between the light guide and the metal matrix (5mm wide and 0.5 mm deep with the resin luting cement. Then, 45 dual-cure resin luting specimens were divided in nine groups: G1: direct light exposure DLE/OH; G2: 1 mm/OH; G3: 2 mm/OH; G4: DLE/CL; G5: 1 mm/CL; G6: 2 mm/CL; G7: DLE/UL; G8: 1 mm/UL and G9: 2 mm/UL. The light curing was performed for 60 seconds. The Vickers hardness (50g/30s was measured at the top surface of all specimens, either after 24 hours or 180 days. The Light

  16. Influence of ceramic thickness on mechanical properties and polymer structure of dual-cured resin luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Yoshida, Keiichi; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the influence of ceramic thickness on the mechanical properties and polymer structure (degree conversion and cross-linking density) of three dual-cured resin luting agents. Three dual-cured resin luting agents [Linkmax HV (GC), Nexus 2 (Kerr), and Variolink IIHV (Ivoclar-Vivadent)] were polymerized with or without 800 mW/cm2 irradiation through 0-3-mm-thick GN-I (GC) machinable ceramic. Bar-shape specimens were subjected to three-point bending to determine flexural strength (FS) and elastic modulus (EM) after dry storage at 37 degrees C for 24 h. Knoop hardness was measured on the irradiated surface of disk-shaped specimens before (KHN1) and after (KHN2) storage of 100% ethanol solution at 37 degrees C for 24 h. KHN1 and KHN2 were estimated as indirect indicators of degree of conversion (DC) and cross-linking density, respectively. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test for each luting agent, and four mechanical properties were subjected to regression analysis. For three resin luting agents with dual-cured mode, FS, EM, KHN1, and KHN2 decreased with the increase of ceramic thickness. FS except for Nexus 2 and EM for three resin luting agents had a positive linear relationship with both KHN1 and KHN2. The variables tested behaved differently. When the ceramic thickness increased, the chemical cured components of dual-cured resin luting agents did not produce significant compensation for all variables. Mechanical properties and polymer structure of dual-cured resin luting agents was dependent on the intensity of light irradiation.

  17. Morphological analysis of glass, carbon and glass/carbon fiber posts and bonding to self or dual-cured resin luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloísio Oro Spazzin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology of glass (GF, carbon (CF and glass/carbon (G/CF fiber posts and their bond strength to self or dual-cured resin luting agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Morphological analysis of each post type was conducted under scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Bond strength was evaluated by microtensile test after bisecting the posts and re-bonding the two halves with the luting agents. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05. Failure modes were evaluated under optical microscopy and SEM. RESULTS: GF presented wider fibers and higher amount of matrix than CF, and G/CF presented carbon fibers surrounded by glass fibers, and both involved by matrix. For CF and GF, the dual-cured material presented significantly higher (p0.05, but higher than that of G/CF (p0.05 were detected, irrespective of the post type. For GF and G/CF, all failures were considered mixed, while a predominance of adhesive failures was detected for CF. CONCLUSION: The bonding between fiber posts and luting agents was affected by the type of fibers and polymerization mode of the cement. When no surface treatment of the post is performed, the bonding between glass fiber post and dual-cured agent seems to be more reliable.

  18. Comparison of Film Thickness of Two Commercial Brands of Glass lonomer Cement and One Dual-cured Composite: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Rajat R; Singh, Rishav; Barua, Pranamee; Hajira, Nausheen; Gupta, Naveen; Thakkar, Rohit R

    2017-08-01

    The present study is undertaken to examine the film thickness of three most commonly used luting cements and to determine their usage as a luting agent. This study was carried out strictly according to the guidelines of American Dental Association (ADS) specification no. 8. Two glass slabs of 5 cm in length and 2 cm in width were used. One glass slab was kept over the other glass slab and the space between the two glass slabs was measured using metallurgical microscope at the power of 10*. Two brands of glass ionomer cement (GIC) and one dual-cured resin cement were used in this study. The test cement is sandwiched between two glass slabs. A static load of 15 kg was applied using universal testing machine on the glass slabs for 1 hour and the space present between the two glass slabs was measured using metallurgical microscope at the power of 10*. Greatest film thickness was found in group III (Paracore) followed by group II (micron) and lowest in group I (GC luting and lining cement). All the tested samples can be used for luting purposes. Greatest film thickness was observed in Paracore followed by micron and lowest in GC luting and lining cement. This suggests that the 25 to 27°C is ideal for mixing of the cement when used for luting consistency. The cement with film thickness more than 30 urn should never be used for luting purposes. The dentist should choose the luting cement with utmost care noting the film thickness and bond strength of the cement. The cement with low exothermic heat production and good bond strength should be encouraged.

  19. Degree of Conversion and Mechanical Properties of Resin Cements Cured Through Different All-Ceramic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Camila de Carvalho Almança; Rodrigues, Renata Borges; André Luis Faria e Silva; Paulo Cézar SIMAMOTO JÚNIOR; Soares, Carlos José; Novais,Veridiana Resende

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The aim of this study was to verify the degree of conversion (DC), Vickers microhardness (VH) and elastic modulus (E) of resin cements cured through different ceramic systems. One 1.5-mm-thick disc of each ceramic system (feldspathic, lithium dissilicate and zircônia veneered with feldspathic) was used. Three dual-cured (Allcem, Variolink II and RelyX U200) and one chemically-cured (Multilink) resin cements were activated through ceramic discs. For dual-cured resin cements was used ...

  20. Light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness and microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Cekic Nagas, Isil; Egilmez,Ferhan; Ergün, Gülfem; Kaya, Bekir-Murat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia and the light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness. Study design: A total of 126 disc-shaped specimens (2 mm in height and 5 mm in diameter) were prepared from dual-cured resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Panavia F and Clearfil SA cement). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen and light emitting diode light curing units under differen...

  1. Dental Cements for Luting and Bonding Restorations: Self-Adhesive Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2017-10-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements combine easy application of conventional luting materials with improved mechanical properties and bonding capability of resin cements. The presence of functional acidic monomers, dual cure setting mechanism, and fillers capable of neutralizing the initial low pH of the cement are essential elements of the material and should be understood when selecting the ideal luting material for each clinical situation. This article addresses the most relevant aspects of self-adhesive resin cements and their potential impact on clinical performance. Although few clinical studies are available to establish solid clinical evidence, the information presented provides clinical guidance in the dynamic environment of material development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of curing mode of resin cements on the bond strength of a titanium post: An intraradicular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Reza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare push-out bond strength between self-cured and dual-cured resin cement using a titanium post. Background: Dual-cured resin cements have been found to be less polymerized in the absence of light; thus the bond strength of cements would be compromised due to the absence of light with a metallic post. Materials and Methods: Ten extracted teeth were prepared for cement titanium PARAPOST, of five specimens each, with Panavia F [dual-cured (PF] and Rely×Luting 2 [self-cured resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement (RL]; the push-out bond strength (PBS at three different levels of the sectioned roots was measured. The failure modes were observed and the significance of the differences in bond strength of the two types of cement at each level and at different levels of the same type was analyzed with non-parametric tests. Results: The push-out bond strength of the RL group was greater at all the three levels; with significant differences at the coronal and middle levels (P<0.05. No significant differences in PBS at different levels of the same group were observed. Cement material around the post was obvious in the PF group. The failure mode was mostly adhesive between the post and resin cement in the RL group. Conclusion: Bond strength was greater with self-cured, resin-modified glass ionomer luting cement, using titanium post.

  3. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of three resin based dual-cure core build-up materials: An In-vitro study

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    Gaurav Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The in-vitro study compared the shear bond strength (SBS of three recently introduced dual-cure resin based core build-up materials namely ParaCore, FluoroCore, and MultiCore. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty extracted permanent human mandibular molar teeth were taken and sectioned horizontally beneath the dentinoenamel junction to expose the coronal dentin. The specimens obtained were divided into three main groups based on the materials used and then further divided into four sub-groups based on time interval with ten samples each. The dentin surface was treated with the respective adhesives of the groups and then bulk filled with core build-up materials. The attained samples were than subjected to shear loading in Instron Universal Testing Machine. The data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey′s HSD, and Levene′s test. Results: The mean SBS was highest in MultiCore at all time periods as compared to FluoroCore and ParaCore and was also higher at 48 h thermocycling in all three groups studied. Conclusion: MultiCore dual-cure resin based core build-up material showed the highest mean SBS as compared to FluoroCore and ParaCore. SBS was not negatively affected by thermocycling.

  4. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of three resin based dual-cure core build-up materials: An In-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Gaurav; Narad, Aditi; Boruah, Lalit C; Rajkumar, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    The in-vitro study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three recently introduced dual-cure resin based core build-up materials namely ParaCore, FluoroCore, and MultiCore. One hundred twenty extracted permanent human mandibular molar teeth were taken and sectioned horizontally beneath the dentinoenamel junction to expose the coronal dentin. The specimens obtained were divided into three main groups based on the materials used and then further divided into four sub-groups based on time interval with ten samples each. The dentin surface was treated with the respective adhesives of the groups and then bulk filled with core build-up materials. The attained samples were than subjected to shear loading in Instron Universal Testing Machine. The data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's HSD, and Levene's test. The mean SBS was highest in MultiCore at all time periods as compared to FluoroCore and ParaCore and was also higher at 48 h thermocycling in all three groups studied. MultiCore dual-cure resin based core build-up material showed the highest mean SBS as compared to FluoroCore and ParaCore. SBS was not negatively affected by thermocycling.

  5. Additional chemical polymerization of dual resin cements: reality or a goal to be achieved?

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    Luzia Sakaguti UMETSUBO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This study serves as a warning to dentists and researchers that dual-cured resin cements may not polymerize completely under some prosthetic crowns. Objective The aim of this study was to analyse the polymerization degree of dual-cured resin cements under prosthetic barrier, by microhardness test. Material and method Three cements (Bistite II, RelyX ARC and Variolink II were light-cured through different barriers, placed between the cement and the light source: G1: without barrier; G2: composite resin (Cesead; G3: Inceram alumina; G4: IPS Empress; G5: Inceram zirconia; G6: tooth fragment. Photopolymerization was carried out using a halogen light unit (650 mW/cm2; microhardness was evaluated using the Microhardness Tester FM 700, under a load of 50gf with a dwell time of 15s, at two evaluation times (30min and 24h. Result The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (5%. Both Inceram alumina and Inceram zirconia ceramic barriers hindered polymerization. Bistite, followed by RelyX and Variolink, exhibited the highest microhardness values (p<0.05. As the highest values were obtained without a barrier, it was determined that the barrier, followed by the tooth, influenced microhardness. Both Empress and Cesead had the smallest microhardness values but with no statistically significant difference between them. Conclusion The barrier negatively affected the microhardness of dual-cured resin cements; evaluation time did not affect microhardness values for most of the conditions tested. There is a limited effect of the chemical activator on the polymerization of some dual-cured cements, and their performance is product specific.

  6. Correlation between flexural and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, Gianluca; Fischer, Jens; Rohr, Nadja

    2016-11-04

    To evaluate a potential correlation between flexural strength and indirect tensile strength in assessing the mechanical strength of resin composite cements. Flexural strength (n = 5) and indirect tensile strength (n = 5) of 7 resin composite cements (RelyX Unicem 2 Automix [RXU], Panavia SA [PSA], Clearfil SA [CSA], Panavia F2.0 [PF2], Multilink Implant [MLI], DuoCem [DCM], Panavia 21 [P21]) were determined. Specimens were either auto-polymerized or dual-cured (except P21) and stored in water at 37 °C for 1 day prior to measurement. Flexural and indirect tensile strength of 4 cements (RXU, PSA, PF2, MLI) was additionally measured directly after curing and after 96 h water storage at 37 °C. Except for PF2, dual-cured specimens achieved higher flexural strength than auto-polymerized specimens. In the indirect tensile strength test differences in auto-polymerized and dual-cured specimens were only detected for RXU and DCM. A general non-linear correlation was found between flexural and indirect tensile strength values. However, strength values of auto-polymerized and dual-cured specimens did not generally correlate. Flexural strength and indirect tensile strength of resin composite cements are correlated. At high strength values the indirect tensile test is less sensitive than the flexural test. The results suggest that the indirect tensile test may only be recommended as a screening test especially for low or medium strength resin composite cements.

  7. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOVAIS, Veridiana Resende; RAPOSO, Luís Henrique Araújo; de MIRANDA, Rafael Resende; LOPES, Camila de Carvalho Almança; SIMAMOTO, Paulo Cézar; SOARES, Carlos José

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC) and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer). The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst) and light-activation mode (base paste only). For degree of conversion (DC) (n=5), a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick. PMID:28198977

  8. Degree of conversion and bond strength of resin-cements to feldspathic ceramic using different curing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Resende NOVAIS

    Full Text Available Abstract Resin cements have led to great advances in dental ceramic restoration techniques because of their ability to bond to both dental structures and restorative materials. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the performance of resin cements when different curing modes are used, by evaluating the degree of conversion and bond strength to a ceramic substrate. Material and Methods Three resin cements were evaluated, two dual-cured (Variolink II and RelyX ARC and one light-cured (Variolink Veneer. The dual-cured resin cements were tested by using the dual activation mode (base and catalyst and light-activation mode (base paste only. For degree of conversion (DC (n=5, a 1.0 mm thick feldspathic ceramic disc was placed over the resin cement specimens and the set was light activated with a QTH unit. After 24 h storage, the DC was measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. For microshear bond strength testing, five feldspathic ceramic discs were submitted to surface treatment, and three cylindrical resin cement specimens were bonded to each ceramic surface according to the experimental groups. After 24 h, microshear bond testing was performed at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until the failure. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test (p<0.05. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used for classifying the failure modes. Results Higher DC and bond strength values were shown by the resin cements cured by using the dual activation mode. The Variolink II group presented higher DC and bond strength values when using light-activation only when compared with the Variolink Veneer group. Conclusion The base paste of dual-cured resin cements in light-activation mode can be used for bonding translucent ceramic restorations of up to or less than 1.0 mm thick.

  9. Influence of the interposition of ceramic spacers on the degree of conversion and the hardness of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Angelica Milani Calgaro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated: I the effect of photo-activation through ceramics on the degree of conversion (DC and on the Knoop hardness (KHN of light- and dual-cured resin cements; and II two different protocols for obtaining the spectra of uncured materials, to determine the DC of a dual-cured resin cement. Thin films of cements were photo-activated through ceramics [feldspathic porcelain (FP; lithium disilicate glass-ceramics of low translucency (e.max-LT, medium opacity (e.max-MO and high translucency (e.max-HT; glass-infiltrated alumina composite (IC and polycrystalline zirconia (ZR] with thicknesses of 1.5 and 2.0 mm. DC was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Two protocols were used to obtain the spectra of the uncured materials: I base and catalyst pastes were mixed, and II thin films of base and catalyst pastes were obtained separately, and an average was obtained. KHN assessment was performed with cylindrical specimens. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. The light-cured cement showed higher DC (61.9% than the dual-cured cement (55.7%. The DC varied as follows: FP (65.4%, e.max-HT (65.1%, e.max-LT (61.8%, e.max-MO (60.9%, ZR (54.8%, and IC (44.9%. The light-cured cement showed lower KHN (22.0 than the dual-cured (25.6 cement. The cements cured under 1.5 mm spacers showed higher KHN (26.2 than when polymerized under 2.0 mm ceramics (21.3. Regarding the two protocols, there were significant differences only in three groups. Thus, both methods can be considered appropriate. The physical and mechanical properties of resin cements may be affected by the thickness and microstructure of the ceramic material interposed during photo-activation.

  10. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test.

  11. Silver nanoparticles in resin luting cements: Antibacterial and physiochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Francine-Couto-Lima; Alves, Denise-Ramos-Silveira; Estrela, Cyntia-Rodrigues-Araújo; Estrela, Carlos; Carrião, Marcus-Santos; Bakuzis, Andris-Figueiroa; Lopes, Lawrence-Gonzaga

    2016-01-01

    Background Silver has a long history of use in medicine as an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agent. Silver nanoparticles (NAg) offer the possibility to control the formation oral biofilms through the use of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive, and delivery abilities. This study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect of resin luting cements with and without NAg, and their influence on color, sorption and solubility. Material and Methods NAg were incorporated to two dual-cured resin cements (RelyX ARC (RA) color A1 and RelyX U200 (RU) color A2) in two concentrations (0.05% and 0.07%, in weight), obtaining six experimental groups. Disc specimens (1x6mm) were obtained to verify the antibacterial effect against Streptococcus mutans in BHI broth after immersion for 1min, 5min, 1h, 6h, and 24h (n=3), through optical density readings. Specimens were evaluated for color changes after addition of NAg with a spectrophotometer (n=10). Sorption and solubility tests were also performed, considering storage in water or 75% ethanol for 28 days (n=5), according to ISO 4049:2010. Data were subjected to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Tukey (p=0.05). Results The optical density of the culture broths indicated bacterial growth, with and without NAg. NAg produced significant color change on the resin cements, especially in RA. Solubility values were very low for all groups, while sorption values raised with NAg. The cements with NAg did not show antibacterial activity against S. mutans. They also showed perceptible color change and higher sorption than the materials without NAg. Conclusions The resin luting cements with NAg addition did not show antibacterial activity against SS. mutans. They also showed perceptible color change and higher sorption than the materials without NAg. Key words:Silver, resin cements, products with antimicrobial action, solubility, color perception tests. PMID:27703610

  12. Influence of light-exposure methods and depths of cavity on the microhardness of dual-cured core build-up resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi YOSHIDA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness number (KHN of dual-cured core build-up resin composites (DCBRCs at 6 depths of cavity after 3 post-irradiation times by 4 light-exposure methods. Material and Methods: Five specimens each of DCBRCs (Clearfil DC Core Plus [DCP] and Unifil Core EM [UCE] were filled in acrylic resin blocks with a semi-cylindrical cavity and light-cured using an LED light unit (power density: 1,000 mW/cm2at the top surface by irradiation for 20 seconds (20 s, 40 seconds (40 s, bonding agent plus 20 seconds (B+20 s, or 40 seconds plus light irradiation of both sides of each acrylic resin block for 40 seconds each (120 s. KHN was measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days post-irradiation. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's compromise post-hoc test with a significance level of p0.05. In DCP, and not UCE, at 24 hours and 7 days post-irradiation, the B+20 s method showed significantly higher KHN at all depths of cavity, except the depth of 0.5 mm (p<0.05. Conclusion: KHN depends on the light-exposure method, use of bonding agent, depth of cavity, post-irradiation time, and material brand. Based on the microhardness behavior, DCBRCs are preferably prepared by the effective exposure method, when used for a greater depth of cavity.

  13. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  14. Effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual – cure resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rashi; Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual-cure resin cement. Materials and Methods: Dual-cure resin cement (SoloCem) was used to prepare disk-shaped samples (0.5 mm thick × 5 mm diameter). Study group samples (n = 5) were light-cured for 40, 60, and 80 s through all ceramic leucite-reinforced (Cergo Kiss), lithium disilicate-reinforced (IPS e.max), and monolithic zirconia-reinforced (Ziecon) of three thicknesses (2, 3, and 4 mm). Negative control group samples were cured through metal disks and positive control samples were cured without the presence of ceramic. The degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The recorded data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance, followed by post hoc analysis (Tukey HSD). Results and Conclusion: Greatest light transmission and DC were seen through Cergo Kiss, followed by IPS e.max Press and Ziecon, with insignificant difference between the latter two. The attenuation of light irradiance increased with increasing thickness of ceramic disks, with statistically significant values between 3 and 4 mm. Increasing time of irradiation to cure dual-cure resin cement did not always result in greater degree of polymerization. PMID:27656058

  15. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  16. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Grace; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  17. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace DE SOUZA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractResin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  18. Dual cure photocatalyst systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVoe, R.J.; Brown-Wensley, K.A.; Holmes, G.L.; Mathis, M.D.; McCormick, F.B.; Palazzotto, M.C.; Spurgeon, K.M. (Minnesota Mining and Mfg. Co., St. Paul, MN (USA). Corporate Research Labs.)

    1990-01-01

    A family of dual cure photocatalyst systems is being developed to be used in the solventless processing of organic coatings. The photocatalyst systems consist of organometallic compounds often in combination with other agents. Upon photolysis, the photocatalyst system generates a Lewis acid and a free radical. The Lewis acid can initiate the polymerization of epoxies or the addition of isocyanates and polyols to form polyurethanes while the free radical can initiate the polymerization of acrylates. The performance of the various photocatalyst systems will be compared on the basis of the physical properties of the cured compositions they produce. 17 figs.

  19. Hardness of resin cement cured under different thickness of lithium disilicate-based ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuan; WANG Fu

    2011-01-01

    Background The lithium disilicate-based ceramic is a newly developed all-ceramic material,which is lithium disilicate-based and could be used for fabricating almost all kinds of restorations.The extent of light attenuation by ceramic material was material-dependent.Ceramic materials with different crystal composition or crystalline content would exhibit distinct light-absorbing characteristics.The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of ceramic thickness and light-curing time on the polymerization of a dual-curing resin luting material with a lithium disilicate-based ceramic.Methods A lithium disilicate-based ceramic was used in this study.The light attenuation caused by ceramic with different thickness was determined using a spectral radiometer.The commercial dual-cured resin cement was light-cured directly or through ceramic discs with different thickness (1,2 and 3 mm,respectively) for different times (10,20,30,40,50 and 60 seconds,respectively).The polymerization efficiency of resin cement was expressed in terms as Vickers hardness (VHN) measured after 24 hours storage.Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD tests were used to determine differences.Results Intensity of polymerizing light transmitted through ceramic discs was reduced from 584 mW/cm2 to about 216 mW/cm2,80 mW/cm2 and 52 mW/cm2 at thicknesses of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,respectively.Resin cement specimens self-cured alone showed significantly lower hardness values.When resin cement was light-cured through ceramic discs with a thickness of 1 mm,2 mm and 3 mm,no further increasing in hardness values was observed when light-curing time was more than 30 seconds,40 seconds and 60 seconds,respectively.Conclusions Within the limitation of the present study,ceramic thickness and light-curing time had remarkable influence on the polymerization of dual-cured resin cement.When resin cement is light-cured beneath a lithium disilicate ceramic with different thickness,prolonging light

  20. Changes in degree of conversion and microhardness of dental resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong Li; Kim, Young Kyung; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2010-01-01

    There are few studies available on the post-light activation or post-mix polymerization of dental resin cements as a function of time. This in vitro study evaluated the successive changes in the degree of conversion (DC) and microhardness during polymerization of six commercial resin cements (light-cured [Choice 2, RelyX Veneer], chemical-cured [Multilink, C&B Cement] and dual-cured [Calibra, RelyX ARC]) within the first 24 hours and up to seven days. Resin specimens were prepared for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness testing to determine the DC and Vickers hardness (VH), respectively. The light-cured materials or mixed pastes of the dual-cured materials were irradiated with a light-curing unit (Elipar TriLight) through a precured composite overlay for 40 seconds. The FTIR spectra and microhardness readings were taken at specified times: 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes; 24 hours and after two days and seven days. According to the FTIR study, most of the curing reaction of Choice 2 and RelyX Veneer occurred within 10 and 30 minutes, respectively. Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra exhibited gradual increases in the DC up to 24 hours, with no further statistically significant increase (p > 0.05). RelyX ARC attained a DC value within five minutes, similar to that at seven days (p > 0.05). Choice 2 and RelyXARC showed gradual increases in the VH, up to 15 minutes, with no further significant change over the remaining observation time (p > 0.05). For RelyX Veneer, Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra, there were no significant increases in the VH value after 24 hours (p > 0.05). The light-cured materials produced significantly higher DC values than the chemical-cured materials (p < 0.05). The DC values of the two dual-cured resin cements were significantly different from each other (p < 0.001). The results suggest that the significant polymerization reaction was finished within 24 hours post-mix or post-light activation for all resin

  1. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    OpenAIRE

    Daiana Kelly Lopes HERNANDES; ARRAIS,Cesar Augusto Galvão; LIMA, Erick; Paulo Francisco CESAR; Rodrigues,José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED...

  2. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3,...

  3. Effects of barriers on chemical and biological properties of two dual resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocca, Giuseppina; Iori, Andrea; Rossini, Carlo; Martorana, Giuseppe E; Ciasca, Gabriele; Arcovito, Alessandro; Cordaro, Massimo; Lupi, Alessandro; Marigo, Luca

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of conversion, monomer release, and cytotoxicity of two dual-cure resin cements (Cement-One and SmartCem2), light-cured across two indirect restorative materials in an attempt to simulate in vitro the clinical conditions. The results obtained show that the degree of conversion was influenced by both barriers, but the effect of the composite material was greater than that of the ceramic one. The amount of monomers released from the polymerized materials in the absence of barriers was significantly lower than that released in the presence of either the ceramic or the composite barrier. However, a higher amount of monomers was released in the presence of the ceramic barrier. All materials, in all the experimental conditions employed, induced slight cytotoxicity (5-10%) on human pulp cells. Our examinations showed that the two resin cements had similar chemical and biological properties. The decreased degree of conversion of the dual-curing self-adhesive composite showed that the light-curing component of these materials has an important role in the polymerization process. In clinical practice, it is therefore important to pay attention to the thickness of the material used for the reconstruction.

  4. Color difference of composite resins after cementation with different shades of resin luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Esra; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Karakaya, Izgen; Aktore, Huseyin

    2017-07-26

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color difference of nanohybrid and ormocer-based composite resins with different thicknesses when 4 different shades of resin luting cement were used. 56 disc specimens of each composite resin (Aelite aesthetic enamel, Ceram-X mono) with 0.5 and 1 mm thicknesses were fabricated. Baseline color measurements were performed using a clinical spectrophotometer. The specimens of each thicknesses of each resin were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the shades of resin luting cement (white/A1, yellow/universal/A3, transparent and white opaque) (n = 7). Mixed resin cement was applied onto the resin specimens using a Teflon mold in 0.1 mm thickness. Color measurements of cemented composite resin specimens were repeated and color difference (∆E) between baseline and after cementation measurements was calculated. ANOVA and Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis. The opaque shade had significantly increased ∆E values as compared to the other shades (p resins in terms of ∆E values. The shade of resin cement and the type of the resin affected the final color; however, the thickness of composite resin had no influence on the final color of restoration. Selecting the shade of resin luting cement before cementation of indirect composite laminate restoration is important to achieve final color match.

  5. The efficiency of different light sources to polymerize resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usumez, A; Ozturk, A N; Usumez, S; Ozturk, B

    2004-02-01

    Plasma arc light units for curing resin composites have been introduced with the claim of relatively short curing times. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of two different light sources to polymerize dual curing resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers. Twenty extracted healthy human maxillary centrals were used. Teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cemento-enamel junction and crown parts were embedded into self-cure acrylic resin, labial surface facing up. Cavity preparation was carried out on labial surfaces. These teeth were divided into two groups of 10 each. The resin cement/veneer combination was exposed to two different photo polymerization units. A conventional halogen light (Hilux 350, Express Dental Products) and a plasma arc light (Power PAC, ADT) were used to polymerize resin cement. Ten specimens were polymerized conventionally (40 s) and the other specimens by plasma arc curing (PAC) (6 s). Two samples from each tooth measuring 1.2 x 1.2 x 5 mm were prepared. These sections were subjected to microshear testing and failure values were recorded. Statistically significant differences were found between the bond strength of veneers exposed to conventional light and PAC unit (P < 0.001). Samples polymerized with halogen light showed better bond strength. The results of this study suggest that the curing efficiency of PAC through ceramic was lower compared with conventional polymerization for the exposure durations tested in this study.

  6. Effect of different light curing methods on mechanical and physical properties of resin-cements polymerized through ceramic discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Cekic-nagas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the polimerization ability of three different light-curing units (quartz tungsten halogen, light-emitting diodes and plasma arc and their exposure modes (high-intensity and soft-start by determination of microhardness, water sorption and solubility, and diametral tensile strength of 5 dual-curing resin cements. Material and methods: A total of 720 disc-shaped samples (1 mm height and 5 mm diameter were prepared from different dual-curing resin cements (Duolink, Nexus, Bifix-QM, Panavia F and RelyX Unicem. Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen (high-power and soft-up modes, light-emitting diode (standard and exponential modes and plasma arc (normal and ramp-curing modes curing units through ceramic discs. Then the samples (n=8/per group were stored dry in the dark at 37°C for 24 h. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the resin cement layer with a microhardness tester (Shimadzu HMV. For sorption and solubility tests; the samples were stored in a desiccator at 37°C and weighed to a constant mass. The samples were weighed both before and after being immersed in deionized water for different periods of time (24 h and 7 days and being desiccated. The diametral tensile strength of the samples was tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Resin cement and light-curing unit had significant effects (p0.05 were obtained with different modes of LCUs. Conclusion: The study indicates that polymerization of resin cements with different light-curing units may result in various polymer structures, and consequently different mechanical and physical properties.

  7. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Light-curing units, curing time, and veneering materials are important factors for achieving adequate dual cure resin composite microhardness. High-intensity light and longer curing times resulted in the highest microhardness values.

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Indirect Composite Resin Restorations Cemented with Different Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Maurem; Souza, Niélli; Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    To clinically evaluate the performance of indirect composite resin restorations cemented with conventional and self-adhesive resin cements over a 12-month period. Ten patients fulfilled all the inclusion criteria. Twenty-four composite resin restorations were performed using an indirect technique and cemented with a resin cement (RelyX ARC) or a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100). Two independent evaluators analyzed the restorations using modified USPHS criteria after periods of two weeks and 6 and 12 months. Statistical significance between the cements at each timepoint was evaluated with the Wilcoxon test and between timepoints with the Mann-Whitney test, both at a significance level of 5%. Fisher's exact test was used to assess the occurrence of absolute failures. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups at the same timepoint nor between groups at different timepoints. The only significant difference was found for color match for both groups after 12 months. After 12 months, indirect composite resin restorations cemented with self-adhesive resin cement performed similarly to those cemented with conventional resin cement.

  9. Effect of High-Irradiance Light-Curing on Micromechanical Properties of Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of light-curing at high irradiances on micromechanical properties of resin cements. Three dual-curing resin cements and a light-curing flowable resin composite were light-cured with an LED curing unit in Standard mode (SM), High Power mode (HPM), or Xtra Power mode (XPM). Maximum irradiances were determined using a MARC PS radiometer, and exposure duration was varied to obtain two or three levels of radiant exposure (SM: 13.2 and 27.2 J/cm2; HPM: 15.0 and 30.4 J/cm2; XPM: 9.5, 19.3, and 29.7 J/cm2) (n = 17). Vickers hardness (HV) and indentation modulus (EIT) were measured at 15 min and 1 week. Data were analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests, and Spearman correlation analyses (α = 0.05). Irradiation protocol, resin-based material, and storage time and all interactions influenced HV and EIT significantly (p ≤ 0.0001). Statistically significant correlations between radiant exposure and HV or EIT were found, indicating that high-irradiance light-curing has no detrimental effect on the polymerization of resin-based materials (p ≤ 0.0021). However, one resin cement was sensitive to the combination of irradiance and exposure duration, with high-irradiance light-curing resulting in a 20% drop in micromechanical properties. The results highlight the importance of manufacturers issuing specific recommendations for the light-curing procedure of each resin cement. PMID:28044129

  10. Effect of High-Irradiance Light-Curing on Micromechanical Properties of Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Peutzfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of light-curing at high irradiances on micromechanical properties of resin cements. Three dual-curing resin cements and a light-curing flowable resin composite were light-cured with an LED curing unit in Standard mode (SM, High Power mode (HPM, or Xtra Power mode (XPM. Maximum irradiances were determined using a MARC PS radiometer, and exposure duration was varied to obtain two or three levels of radiant exposure (SM: 13.2 and 27.2 J/cm2; HPM: 15.0 and 30.4 J/cm2; XPM: 9.5, 19.3, and 29.7 J/cm2 (n=17. Vickers hardness (HV and indentation modulus (EIT were measured at 15 min and 1 week. Data were analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests, and Spearman correlation analyses (α=0.05. Irradiation protocol, resin-based material, and storage time and all interactions influenced HV and EIT significantly (p≤0.0001. Statistically significant correlations between radiant exposure and HV or EIT were found, indicating that high-irradiance light-curing has no detrimental effect on the polymerization of resin-based materials (p≤0.0021. However, one resin cement was sensitive to the combination of irradiance and exposure duration, with high-irradiance light-curing resulting in a 20% drop in micromechanical properties. The results highlight the importance of manufacturers issuing specific recommendations for the light-curing procedure of each resin cement.

  11. A resin composite material containing an eugenol derivative for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaroof, A; Rojo, L; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2016-02-01

    To formulate and evaluate new dual cured resin composite based on the inclusion of eugenyl methacrylate monomer (EgMA) with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin systems for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration of endodontically treated teeth. EgMA was synthesized and incorporated at 5% (BTEg5) or 10% (BTEg10) into dual-cure formulations. Curing properties, viscosity, Tg, radiopacity, static and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined and compared with Clearfil™DC Core-Plus, a commercial dual-cure, two-component composite. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey's post-hoc test. The experimental composites were successfully prepared, which exhibited excellent curing depths of 4.9, 4.7 and 4.2 mm for BTEg0, BTEg5 and BTEg10 respectively, which were significantly higher than Clearfil™DC. However, the inclusion of EgMA initially led to a lower degree of cure, which increased when measured at 24 h with values comparable to formulations without EgMA, indicating post-curing. The inclusion of EgMA also lowered the polymerization exotherm thereby reducing the potential of thermal damage to host tissue. Both thermal and viscoelastic analyses confirmed the ability of the monomer to reduce the stiffness of the composites by forming a branched network. The compressive strength of BTEg5 was significantly higher than the control whilst flexural strength increased significantly from 95.9 to 114.8 MPa (BTEg5) and 121.9 MPa (BTEg10). Radiopacity of the composites was equivalent to ∼3 mm Al allowing efficient diagnosis. The incorporation of EgMA within polymerizable formulations provides a novel approach to prepare reinforced resin composite material for intracanal post cementation and core build-up and the potential to impart antibacterial properties of eugenol to endodontic restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of glazed zirconia on dual-cure luting agent bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, T A; Borges, G A; Borges, L H; Platt, J A; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2012-01-01

    The current study evaluated the influence of a novel surface treatment that uses a low-fusing porcelain glaze for promoting a bond between zirconia-based ceramic and a dual-cure resin luting agent. Bond strengths were compared with those from airborne particle abrasion, hydrofluoric acid etching, and silanization-treated surfaces. Twenty-four yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Cercon Smart Ceramics, Degudent, Hanau, Germany) discs were fabricated and received eight surface treatments: group 1: 110 μm aluminum oxide air-borne particle abrasion; group 2: 110 μm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion and silane; group 3: 50 μm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion; group 4: 50 pm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion and silane; group 5: glaze and hydrofluoric acid;group 6: glaze, hydrofluoric acid, and silane;group 7: glaze and 50 pm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion; and group 8: glaze,50 pm aluminum oxide airborne particle abrasion and silane. After treatment, Enforce resin cement (Dentsply, Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) was used to fill an iris cut from microbore Tygontubing that was put on the ceramic surface to create 30 cylinders of resin cement in each treatment group (n=30). Micro shear bond test-ing was performed at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. One-way analysis of variance, and multiple comparisons were made using Tukey's test (phydrofluoric acid showed bond strength values statistically superior to groups that utilized conventional airborne particle abrasion treatments with 50 or 110 pm aluminum oxide (phydrofluoric acid showed bond strength values statistically superior to remaining groups (p<0.001). Treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces with a glaze of low-fusing porcelain significantly increased the bond strength of a dual-cure resin luting agent to the ceramic surface.

  13. Changes on degree of conversion of dual-cure luting light-cured with blue LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandéca, M. C.; El-Mowafy, O.; Saade, E. G.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2009-05-01

    The indirect adhesive procedures constitute recently a substantial portion of contemporary esthetic restorative treatments. The resin cements have been used to bond tooth substrate and restorative materials. Due to recently introduction of the self-bonding resin luting cement based on a new monomer, filler and initiation technology has become important to study the degree of conversion of these new materials. In the present work the polymerization reaction and the filler content of dual-cured dental resin cements were studied by means of infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry (TG). Twenty specimens were made in a metallic mold (8 mm diameter × 1 mm thick) from each of 2 cements, Panavia® F2.0 (Kuraray) and RelyX™ Unicem Applicap (3M/ESPE). Each specimen was cured with blue LED with power density of 500 mW/cm2 for 30 s. Immediately after curing, 24 and 48 h, and 7 days DC was determined. For each time interval 5 specimens were pulverized, pressed with KBr and analyzed with FT-IR. The TG measurements were performed in Netzsch TG 209 under oxygen atmosphere and heating rate of 10°C/min from 25 to 700°C. A two-way ANOVA showed DC (%) mean values statistically significance differences between two cements ( p 0.05). The Relx-Y™ Unicem mean values were significantly higher than Panavia® F 2.0. The degree of conversion means values increasing with the storage time and the filler content showed similar for both resin cements.

  14. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Kasraei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15. In control group (CNT no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001. The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001. In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples.

  15. Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts

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    Marcelo Barbosa Ramos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-eSPe and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray used for cementing fiberreinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a no light activation; b light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. RESULTS: Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. CONCLUSIONS: The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent.

  16. Tensile bond strength of resin luting cement to glass infiltrated porous aluminium oxide cores (In-Ceram).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidor, F; Stokholm, R; Ravnholt, G

    1995-09-01

    The effect of various methods of surface treatment of glass infiltrated aluminium oxide (In-Ceram) on tensile bond strength was evaluated. Test specimens were formed as bars. After surface treatment of the flat ends, two bars were bonded together with either a dual curing resin (Twinlook) or a chemical curing resin with a phosphate monomer (Panavia Ex). After cementation the specimens were stored in humid conditions for 1 week and then thermocycled 1,000 times between 15 degrees C and 60 degrees C. The highest median tensile bond strengths were obtained with the Silicoater MD-method without the Opaquer and Twinlook as luting agent (23.9 MPa) or with sandblasting with 250 micrometers Al2O3 particles and Panavia Ex as luting agent (22.0 MPa).

  17. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  18. In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001). However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time. For the tested cements, the strongest bonds

  19. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, padhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  20. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Science.gov (United States)

    HERNANDES, Daiana Kelly Lopes; ARRAIS, Cesar Augusto Galvão; de LIMA, Erick; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; RODRIGUES, José Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3) layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP), and chroma of low (LT) and high (HT) translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick) under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE) of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B) and white (W) background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C* ab=(a*2+b*2)½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable. PMID:27556211

  1. Influence of resin cement shade on the color and translucency of ceramic veneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Kelly Lopes HERNANDES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective This in vitro study evaluated the effect of two different shades of resin cement (RC- A1 and A3 layer on color change, translucency parameter (TP, and chroma of low (LT and high (HT translucent reinforced lithium disilicate ceramic laminates. Material and Methods One dual-cured RC (Variolink II, A1- and A3-shade, Ivoclar Vivadent was applied to 1-mm thick ceramic discs to create thin RC films (100 µm thick under the ceramics. The RC was exposed to light from a LED curing unit. Color change (ΔE of ceramic discs was measured according to CIEL*a*b* system with a standard illuminant D65 in reflectance mode in a spectrophotometer, operating in the light range of 360-740 nm, equipped with an integrating sphere. The color difference between black (B and white (W background readings was used for TP analysis, while chroma was calculated by the formula C*ab=(a*2+b*2½. ΔE of 3.3 was set as the threshold of clinically unacceptable. The results were evaluated by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results HT ceramics showed higher ΔE and higher TP than LT ceramics. A3-shade RC promoted higher ΔE than A1-shade cement, regardless of the ceramic translucency. No significant difference in TP was noted between ceramic discs with A1- and those with A3-shade cement. Ceramic with underlying RC showed lower TP than discs without RC. HT ceramics showed lower chroma than LT ceramics, regardless of the resin cement shade. The presence of A3-shade RC resulted in higher chroma than the presence of A1-shade RC. Conclusions Darker underlying RC layer promoted more pronounced changes in ceramic translucency, chroma, and shade of high translucent ceramic veneers. These differences may not be clinically differentiable.

  2. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  3. Effect of light-curing method and indirect veneering materials on the Knoop hardness of a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Tetsu Iriyama

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement (Rely-X ARC activated solely by chemical reaction (control group or by chemical / physical mode, light-cured through a 1.5 mm thick ceramic (HeraCeram or composite (Artglass disc. Light curing was carried out using conventional halogen light (XL2500 for 40 s (QTH; light emitting diodes (Ultrablue Is for 40 s (LED; and Xenon plasma arc (Apollo 95E for 3 s (PAC. Bovine incisors had their buccal face flattened and hybridized. On this surface a rubber mold (5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in height was bulk filled with the resin cement. A polyester strip was seated for direct light curing or through the discs of veneering materials. After dry storage in the dark (24 h 37°C, the samples (n = 5 were sectioned for hardness (KHN measurements, taken in a microhardness tester (50 gF load 15 s. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. The cement presented higher Knoop hardness values with Artglass for QTH and LED, compared to HeraCeram. The control group and the PAC/Artglass group showed lower hardness values compared to the groups light-cured with QTH and LED. PAC/HeraCeram resulted in the worst combination for cement hardness values.

  4. Self-adhesive resin cements - chemistry, properties and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Stansbury, J W; Burke, F J T

    2011-04-01

    Self-adhesive resin cements were introduced to dentistry within the past decade but have gained rapidly in popularity with more than a dozen commercial brands now available. This review article explores their chemical composition and its effect on the setting reaction and adhesion to various substrates, their physical and biological properties that may help to predict their ultimate performance and their clinical performance to date and handling characteristics. The result of this review of self-adhesive resin cements would suggest that these materials may be expected to show similar clinical performance as other resin-based and non-resin based dental cements. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. A comparison study on the flexural strength and compressive strength of four resin-modified luting glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Xuehui; Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in flexural strength and compressive strength between four resin-modified luting glass ionomer cements that are commonly used in clinics. Furthermore, this study investigates the influence of curing mode on the flexural strength and compressive strength of dual-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Initially, flexural strength and compressive strength test specimens were prepared for RL, NR, GCP, and GCC. The RL group and NR group were cured by the light-curing mode and chemical-curing mode. Five specimens were prepared for each test group, and the flexural strength and compressive strength of each were measured. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA with SPSS 13.0. Furthermore, the fracture morphology of the flexural specimens was observed by SEM. The result of the mean flexural strength of each group is as follows: the NR light-cured group > NR chemically-cured group > GCP > RL light-cured group > GCC > RL chemically-cured group. More specifically, the flexural strength of the NR light-cured group ((42.903±4.242) MPa) is significantly higher (P NR chemically-cured group > NR light-cured group > GCC > RL light-cured group > RL chemically-cured group. Although the compressive strengths of the NR and GCP groups are higher than those of the GCC and RL groups, there are no significant differences (P>0.05) between NR and GCP, and no significant differences between GCC and RL. Furthermore, there are no significant differences (P>0.05) between the two curing modes on NR and RL. From the present study, it can be concluded that NR has superior flexural strength and compressive strength compared to the other three materials. Additionally, the curing mode can affect the flexural strength of dual-cured RMGIC because with the light-curing mode, the flexural strength is higher than with the chemical-curing mode. Therefore, light curing is an essential procedure when using dual-cured RMGIC in clinics.

  6. The effect of environmental pressure and resin cements on the push-out bond strength of a quartz fiber post to teeth root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramipanah, F; Sadighpour, L; Assadollahi, R

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of environmental pressure changes on the bond strength between a fiber post and one of three resin cements using different mixing methods and modes of application. Sixty single-canal human teeth were divided into three groups (n = 20) and endodontically treated. Post spaces were prepared, and a quartz fiber post was secured with either a self-adhesive machine-mixed cement (RelyX Unicem, Aplicap), a self-adhesive hand-mixed cement (RelyX Unicem), or a self-etching dual-cured resin cement (Panavia F2). Half of each group was subjected to 24 pressure cycles from 0 to 5 atmospheres. The mean push-out bond strength of the posts was calculated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). Regardless of the pressure, Unicem Aplicap achieved the highest bond strength (P pressure cycles (P environmental pressure while the type of resin cements, their mixing methods and modes of application incorporated lower porosity, achieving higher bond strength.

  7. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Geeta; Trehan, Mridula; Sharma, Sunil

    2013-09-01

    To measure and compare the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of light-cure composite. (Enlight, Ormco.) and dual-cure composite (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho). Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were divided into two groups: group I (blue): conventional light cure composite resin. (Enlight, Ormco.) and group II (green): dual cure composite resin. (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho.) with 30 teeth in each group. These samples were tested on the universal testing machine to measure the shear bond strength. Student t-test showed that the mean shear bond strength of the conventional light cure group (8.54 MPa - 10.42 MPa) was significantly lower than dual cure group (10.45 MPa -12.17 MPa). These findings indicate that the shear bond strength of dual-cure composite resin (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho) is comparatively higher than conventional light-cure composite resin (Enlight, Ormco). In the majority of the samples, adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were 4 and 5 in both the groups whereas score 1 is attained by the least number of samples in both the groups. How to cite this article: Verma G, Trehan M, Sharma S. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):166-170.

  8. Dual cure low-VOC coating process. Final technical report, Phase 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzer, K.E.

    1993-12-01

    US EPA is implementing increasingly stringent environmental regulations on the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which amount to about 7 {times} 10{sup 9} lb/year, largely from paints and other coating systems in industry. Objective of this project is to develop Dual Cure Photocatalyst coating technology for aerospace topcoats (urethane/acrylate), aerospace primers (epoxy/acrylate), and solventless tape backings. Some problems (moisture etc.) were encountered in the primer area. Cost, economic, and energy analyses were conducted. The dual cure technology has already been commercialized in 3M`s flexible diamond resin products. Tabs.

  9. Development of a ceramic primer with higher bond durability for resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui

    2010-07-01

    To increase the bond durability of resin to the CAD/CAM ceramic surface, two types of two-bottle type ceramic primers, consisting of Primer A1 or A2 and Primer B, were designed. Primer A1 was prepared by dissolving 25, 50, or 100 mg of gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane in 1 mL of ethanol. Primer A2 was prepared by dissolving 50 mg of mixed silanes, consisting of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane to gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, in 1 mL of ethanol. Mole fractions of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane to gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane were 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mol%. Primer B was prepared after dissolving 0.01, 0.05 or 0.1 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid in ethanol by 50 vol%. Ceramic surface was silanated with a mixture of Primers A1 and B or Primers A2 and B for 1 min, and then air-dried. Commercial GC ceramic primer and Porcelain Liner M were utilized. Thereafter, dual-curing type resin cement was bonded to silanated ceramic surface through visible-light irradiation. Shear bond strength of resin to the ceramic surface was measured, before and after thermo-cycling. Addition of 0.01 or 0.05 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid to the gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane allowed for significant increases in the bond strength. However, thermo-cycling resulted in significant decreases of approximately 5 MPa in the bond strength. Conversely, when the mixed silane, where 30 mol% of 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane dissolved in gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, was utilized with 0.05 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid, the reduction in the bond strength decreased to approximately 2 MPa. The designed ceramic primers exhibited higher ceramic bond durability than commercial ceramic primers.

  10. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyeh Feiz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite resin cements.

  11. Comparison of the effect of light-cure and dual-cure bondings on regional bond strength of fiber reinforced posts to root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminsalehi E.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The use of fiber reinforced posts in endodontically treated teeth has become increasingly common. But their retention in root canals must be considered seriously. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-cure and dual-cure bondings on regional bond strength of a fiber composite post.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 20 endodontically treated teeth were randomly divided into two groups. In the first group, a dual-cure bonding (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE/USA [SBMP] was used and in the other group, a light-cure bonding (Single Bond, 3M ESPE/USA [SB] was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions. A dual-cure resin cement (Rely X ARC, 3M ESPE/USA was used to cement the post (Glassix, Harald Nordin SA,Switzerland. Coronal 8mm of cemented posts were sectioned in equal thirds using a 0.1mm diamond disc. Each slice was polished by a soft and wet abrasive paper in order to get a 2mm thickness. Loading was performed by a testing machine (Zwick/Germany at a speed of 1mm/min until the post was dislodged. Data were analyzed using one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov, T and ANOVA tests with P<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: There was a significant difference between the two adhesive systems in the middle third of the canal block with higher bond strength in SBMP group (p=0.02. In SB group the bond strength of the cervical region was higher than the middle and apical thirds (p<0.05. In SBMP group, there was no statistically difference between bond strength of the three regions (p=0.117.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, dual-cure bonding could be recommended for composite post cementation into root canals, because its bond strength was more uniform in different regions of root and greater in the middle and third regions.

  12. Adhesion of different resin cements to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Ella A; Ernst, Saskia; Schaper, Katharina; Arnold, Wolfgang H; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of five different resin cements to human enamel and dentin under different storage conditions. Five resin cements and their dedicated systems were tested. Teeth were embedded, ground flat to expose enamel or dentin and polished with sandpaper. Adhesive systems were applied according to the manufacturers'instructions. V2A steel cylinders with were silicated, coated, and cemented onto the teeth. Specimens were stored at three different conditions and subsequently thermocycled. SBS was measured. Significant differences were observed between the tested resin cements depending on the tooth surface. Different storage conditions influenced the bond strength, independent of the tooth surface, in all test cements. The bond strength of all experimental materials to enamel is higher than that to dentin surfaces. Furthermore, the adhesiveness decreases after wetness (hydro-) and hydrothermal stress, regardless of the tooth surface.

  13. Solidification of Spent Ion Exchange Resin Using ASC Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周耀中; 云桂春; 叶裕才

    2002-01-01

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) have been widely used in nuclear facilities. However, the spent radioactive IERs result in major quantities of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. This article describes a laboratory experimental study on solidification processing of IERs using a new type of cement named ASC cement. The strength of the cementation matrix is in the range of 18-20 MPa (28 d); the loading of the spent IER in the cement-resin matrix is over 45% and leaching rates of 137Cs, 90Sr and 60Co are 7.92×10-5, 5.7×10-6, and 1.19×10-8 cm/d. The results show that ASC cement can be a preferable cementation material for immobilization of radioactive spent IER.

  14. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Roots Restored with Fiber Posts Using Different Resin Cements- An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irodi, Sujatha; Mehta, Deepak; Subramanya, Shankar; Govindaraju, Vinay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The influence of the remaining coronal tooth structure along with intra-radicular esthetic posts increases fracture resistance of fractured teeth especially in the anterior region. The advent of resin based luting cements improves the adhesion of fiber posts. Aim To evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots restored with fiber posts using different resin cements – Calibra (etch and rinse), PermaFlo® DC (self-etch primer) and SmartCem2 (self-adhesive). Materials and Methods Extracted human maxillary central incisors having similar dimensions were decoronated at the Cemento-Enamel Junction (CEJ) to create 16mm long specimens and endodontically treated. A total of 45 teeth were divided into three groups with 15 teeth each for cementation of easy fiber posts (size1, 0.8mm diameter). Post spaces were prepared to a depth of 10mm. Group 1 – Caulk 34% phosphoric acid gel, dual cure adhesive Prime and Bond NT followed by luting of post with Calibra cement. Group 2 – Ultra – etch then Primer A and Primer B, and PermaFlo® DC was used to cement the post. Group 3 – SmartCem2 [1:1 ratio] was used to cement the post. The excess lengths of posts were seared and teeth were mounted on acrylic blocks and loaded under compressive force to the long axis of the tooth which increased in periodic pattern of 1mm/min. The value of the force at which each root section gets fractured was noted. The data were statistically analysed using ANOVA and Tukey’s Test. Results The mean fracture load (and SD) were as follows Group 1 – 762.400 (251.490); Group 2 – 662.933 (206.709); Group 3 – 657.800 (57.372). No statistically significant differences were seen among all three Groups, p-value (0.228). Conclusion Posts cemented using self -adhesive resin cement SmartCem2 have highest fracture resistance and bonding efficacy of self-adhesive technique showed reliably better results but was comparable to total–etch and self–etch techniques.

  15. Bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement: the effect of surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement. Two types of CAD/CAM restorative materials (Vita Enamic [VE] and Lava Ultimate [LU]) were used. The specimens were divided into five groups in each test according to the surface treatment performed; Gr 1 (control; no treatment), Gr 2 (sandblasted [SB]), Gr 3 (SB+silane [S]), Gr 4 (hydrofluoric acid [HF]), and Gr 5 (HF+S). A dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE [BF]) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion after 24 h of storage in distilled water or after 30 days using the μTBS test. Following fracture testing, specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and morphology of the CAD/CAM restorative materials were characterized after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment, type of CAD/CAM restorative material, and water storage periods showed a significant effect on the μTBS (p0.05). On the other hand, for the VE/BF system, surface treatment with HF+S showed higher bond strength values compared with SB and HF surface treatments (pCAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement is material dependent. The VE/BF CAD/CAM material provided higher bond strength values compared with the LU/BF CAD/CAM material.

  16. Adhesion of adhesive resin cements to dental zirconia ceramic and human dentin

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the long-term bond strengths of adhesive resin cements to zirconia ceramic and human dentin were evaluated, and resin-ceramic and resin-dentin bonding mechanisms were investigated. In chapter 3, the influence of surface pre-treatment on the bonding durability of three resin cements (Super-Bond C&B resin cement : SB, Clearfil™ Esthetic cement: CEC, Chemiace II: CH) to zirconia ceramic was studied. Most importantly, the influence of chemical reactions of functional monomers in...

  17. Influence of the temperature on the cement disintegration in cement-retained implant restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Vindasiute, Egle; Puisys, Algirdas; Linkeviciene, Laura; Svediene, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the average disintegration temperature of three dental cements used for the cementation of the implant-supported prostheses. One hundred and twenty metal frameworks were fabricated and cemented on the prosthetic abutments with different dental cements. After heat treatment in the dental furnace, the samples were set for the separation to test the integration of the cement. Results have shown that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RGIC) exhibited the lowest disintegration temperature (pcement (ZPC) and dual cure resin cement (RC) (p>0.05). Average separation temperatures: RGIC - 306 ± 23 °C, RC - 363 ± 71 °C, it could not be calculated for the ZPC due to the eight unseparated specimens. Within the limitations of the study, it could be concluded that RGIC cement disintegrates at the lowest temperature and ZPC is not prone to break down after exposure to temperature.

  18. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimmada Kesrak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3 were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm, Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 37∘C storage in an incubator, Knoop hardness measurements were obtained at the bottom. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA, t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results. The KHN of NX3 was of significantly higher than that of Variolink Veneer (<0.05. The KHN of resin cement polymerized under different ceramic types and thicknesses was significant difference (<0.05. Conclusion. Resin cements polymerized under different ceramic materials and thicknesses showed statistically significant differences in KHN.

  19. Ceramic inlay movement during polymerization of resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J A; Munksgaard, E C

    1995-06-01

    In cavities with no support for inlays, polymerization contraction of the resin cement may move the ceramic inlay axially. The purpose of this study was to determine the velocity and extent of such movement. Cylindrical ceramic inlays were placed in dentin cavities filled with one of four commercially available resin composite cements. An initial standardized 200-microns-thick cement film was created. The movement of the ceramic inlay during polymerization of one of the resin cements was measured by a dial gauge. The velocity of the inlay movement decreased exponentially with time and with a velocity constant of 0.09 min-1. The majority of the movement occurred within the first 12 min after photopolymerization and probably continued for several days, reaching an estimated value of 5.8 microns. After 1-2 d of water storage, 1-2-microns contraction gaps at the cavity floors were observed microscopically for every cement used. It is concluded that in cavities without support for the inlay, about 2/3 of the resin cement contraction results in movement of the inlay and about 1/3 results in formation of gaps at the cavity floors.

  20. Coating glass-ionomer cements with a nanofilled resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifacio, C.C.; Werner, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a nanofilled resin coat on the flexural strength (FS) and the early wear (after 50 000 and 200 000 cycles) of the glass-ionomer cements Fuji IX GP Extra (FIXE) and Ketac Molar Aplicap (KM). Materials and methods. Specimens were

  1. Coating glass-ionomer cements with a nanofilled resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifacio, C.C.; Werner, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a nanofilled resin coat on the flexural strength (FS) and the early wear (after 50 000 and 200 000 cycles) of the glass-ionomer cements Fuji IX GP Extra (FIXE) and Ketac Molar Aplicap (KM). Materials and methods. Specimens were

  2. Bond strength of resin cements to leucitereinforced ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Nazareno Garcia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of two resin cements to four leucite-reinforced ceramics. Material and methods: Forty ceramic blocks (4 mm wide, 14 mm length and 2 mm thick were used and the samples abraded with aluminum oxide (90 µm. The samples were divided into eight groups (n = 5. Two resin cements (conventional RelyX ARC and self-adhesive RelyX U100 – 3M ESPE were bonded to Creapress (CRE-Creation/Klema, Finesse All-Ceramic (FIN-Dentsply/ Ceramco, IPS Empress Esthetic (IEE-Ivoclar Vivadent and Vita PM9 (PM9-Vita. For all groups and in each ceramic block, after application of 10% hydrofluoric acid and silanation, three Tygon tubings were positioned over the ceramics, which were filled in with the resin cements (light-cure for 40 s. The tubings were removed to expose the specimens in format of cylinders (area: 0.38 mm2 and samples were stored in relative humidity at 24±2 °C for one week. After this period, each sample was attached to testing machine and the specimens were submitted to shear bond test (applied at the base of the specimen/cement cylinder with a thin wire/0.2 mm at speed of 0.5 mm/ min, until failure. The results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (resin cements and ceramic systems and Tukey test (p<0.05. Results: The means (SD were (in MPa: ARC + CRE = 32.1±4.3; ARC + FIN = 28.3±3.7; ARC + IEE = 25.9±4.4; ARC + PM9 = 22.2±2.1; U100 + CRE = 38.0±5.2; U100 + FIN = 36.9±2.8; U100 + IEE = 38.4±2.9; U100 + PM9 = 34.3 ±7.3. U100 showed higher SBS to ceramics than ARC. U100 had higher SBS when applied on IEE ceramic than on PM9. For ARC, SBS obtained with CRE was higher than with IEE and PM9. Conclusion: RelyX U100 can provide higher SBS to leucite-reinforced ceramics than conventional resin cement. The resin cements applied on the PM9 ceramic surface resulted in lower SBS.

  3. Polymerization of a dual-cured cement through ceramic: LED curing light vs halogen lamp Polimerização de um cimento resinoso dual através de uma porcelana: LED vs lâmpada halógena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Gonzaga Lopes

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light source, LED unit and halogen lamp (HL, on the effectiveness of Enforce dual-cured cement cured under a ceramic disc. Three exposure times (60, 80 and 120 s were also evaluated. Two experimental groups, in which the polymerization of the dual-cured cement was performed through a ceramic disc, and two control groups, in which the polymerization of the dual-cured cement was performed directly without presence of ceramic disc were subdivided into three subgroups (three different exposure times, with five specimens each: G1A- HL 60s; G1B- HL 80s; G1C- HL 120s; G2A- LED 60s; G2B- LED 80s; G2C- LED 120s; and control groups: G3A- HL 60s; G3B- HL 80s; G3C- HL 120s; G4A- LED 60s; G4B- LED 80s and G4C- LED 120s. Cement was applied in a steel matrix (4mm diameter, 1.2mm thickness. In the experimental groups, a ceramic disc was placed on top. The cement was light-cured through the ceramic by a HL and LED, however, the control groups were cured without the ceramic disc. The specimens were stored in a light-proof container at 37ºC for 24 hours, then Vickers hardness was determined. A four-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p£ 0.05 were performed. All specimens cured by LED for 60s showed inferior values compared with the halogen groups. In general, light-curing by LED for 80s and 120s was comparable to halogen groups (60s and 80s and their control groups. LED technology can be viable for light-curing through conventional ceramic indirect restorations, when curing time is increased in relation to HL curing time.O objetivo deste estudo foi estudar a influência da fonte de luz, LED e lâmpada halógena (LH, na efetividade de polimerização do cimento resinoso dual Enforce fotoativado sob um disco de porcelana. Três tempos de exposição (60, 80 e 120 segundos foram também avaliados. Dois grupos experimentais, na qual a polimerização do cimento resinoso foi feita através de um disco cerâmico, e dois

  4. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15 according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [2] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of Panavia F; [3] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of RelyX ARC; [4] Clearfil AP-X block + Clearfil SE Bond adhesive + cylinder of Panavia F. The adhesive systems and the resin cements were applied according to the experimental groups, using a Tygon matrix.The samples were stored in distilled water at 37±2ºC for 24 hours.Microshear bond strengths were determined using an apparatus attached to an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Results: The results obtained in MPa (SD were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, p<0.05, and showed the following results: [1] 39.76 (5.34; [2] 45.01 (8.53; [3] 46.39 (9.22; [4]45.78 (9.06.There was no statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [2]; and between groups [3] and [4]. However, there was statistically significant difference between groups [1] and [3]. Conclusion:When Clearfil AP-X block was used with Clearfil SE Bond adhesive or RelyX resin cement, the microshear bond strength values were higher.The results suggest that in the union of the resin cements to the restorative composites, hydrophobic adhesives are necessary.

  5. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Hattar

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Regardless of their clinical simplicity, the self-adhesive resin cements examined in this study exhibit limited bond performance to tooth structures; therefore, these cements must be used with caution.

  6. Effect of Imaging Powders on the Bond Strength of Resin Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Strength of Resin Cement " is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond brief excerpts, is with the permission of the copyright owner. #lIZ Christopher R...Strength of Resin Cement 7. Intended publication/meeting: General Dentistry (the journal of the Academy of General Dentistry) 8. "Required by" date...of Imaging Powders on the Bond Strength of Resin Cement ABSTRACT The application and incomplete removal of a CAD/CAM imaging powder may affect

  7. Light-activation through indirect ceramic restorations: does the overexposure compensate for the attenuation in light intensity during resin cement polymerization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Luis Novaes Bueno

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of light exposure through simulated indirect ceramic restorations (SICR on hardness (KHN of dual-cured resin cements (RCs, immediately after light-activation and 24 h later. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three dual-cured RCs were evaluated: Eco-Link (Ivoclar Vivadent, Rely X ARC (3M ESPE, and Panavia F (Kuraray Medical Inc.. The RCs were manipulated in accordance to the manufacturers' instructions and were placed into cylindrical acrylic matrixes (1-mm-thick and 4-mm diameter. The RC light-activation (Optilux 501; Demetron Kerr was performed through a glass slide for 120 s (control group, or through 2-mm or 4-mm thick SICRs (IPS Empress II; Ivoclar Vivadent. The specimens were submitted to KHN analysis immediately and 24 h after light-activation. The data obtained at the 2 evaluation intervals were submitted to 2-way ANOVA repeated measures and post-hoc Tukey's test (pre-set alpha of 5%. RESULTS: Lower KHN was observed when light-activation was performed through SICRs for Eco-Link at all evaluation intervals and for Rely X ARC 24 h later. For Panavia F, no significant difference in KHN was observed between control and experimental groups, regardless of evaluation interval. Most groups exhibited higher KHN after 24 h than immediately after light-activation, with the exception of Rely X ARC light-activated through SICR, as no significant difference in KHN was found between evaluation intervals. CONCLUSIONS: Light overexposure did not compensate for light intensity attenuation due to the presence of SICR when Rely X and Eco-Link were used. Although hardness of such RCs increased over a 24-h interval, the RCs subjected to light overexposure did not reach the hardness values exhibited after direct light exposure.

  8. Longevity of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement: a prospective clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Lucas Pradebon; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Wandsher, Vinicius Felipe; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil; Valandro, Luis Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin

    2017-04-10

    Resin cements are often used for single crown cementation due to their physical properties. Self-adhesive resin cements gained widespread due to their simplified technique compared to regular resin cement. However, there is lacking clinical evidence about the long-term behavior of this material. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to assess the survival rates of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with self-adhesive resin cement up to six years. One hundred and twenty-nine subjects received 152 metal-ceramic crowns. The cementation procedures were standardized and performed by previously trained operators. The crowns were assessed as to primary outcome (debonding) and FDI criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier statistics and descriptive analysis. Three failures occurred (debonding), resulting in a 97.6% survival rate. FDI criteria assessment resulted in scores 1 and 2 (acceptable clinical evaluation) for all surviving crowns. The use of self-adhesive resin cement is a feasible alternative for metal-ceramic crowns cementation, achieving high and adequate survival rates.

  9. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  10. The influence of fatigue loading on the quality of the cement layer and retention strength of carbon fiber post-resin composite core restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Peter; de Gee, Anton; Feilzer, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that endodontically treated teeth restored with short posts or deficient ferrules show a high failure risk. This study. evaluated the influence of fatigue loading on the quality of the cement layer between prefabricated quartz coated carbon fiber posts with restricted length and the root canal wall in maxillary pre-molars. Two adhesive resin composite cements, chemical-cured Panavia 21 (Group 1) and dual-cured RelyX-ARC (Group 2), and one resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, chemical-cured RelyX (Group 3), delta were selected for this study. Post- and-core restorations were made on single-rooted human maxillary premolars from which the coronal sections were removed at the level of the proximal cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Following endodontic treatment, a post-and-core restoration with 6-mm post length was prepared for each tooth. The posts were directly cemented into the root canal and, after applying an adhesive (Clearfil Photo Bond), they were built up with a core build-up composite (Clearfil Photo Core). For each group (n=8), half of the specimens were exposed to fatigue loading (10(6) load cycles) almost perpendicular to the axial axis (85 degrees), while the other half were used as the control. Three parallel, transverse root sections, 1.5-mm thick, were cut from each specimen at the apical, medial and coronal location. These sections were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to evaluate the integrity of the cement layer, while the retention strength of the cemented post sections was determined with the push-out test. The multivariate results of MANOVA showed that the condition main effect (fatigue or control) was not significant (p=0.059); the two other main effects, type of cement and section location, were significant (p=0.001 and p=0.008). For both the push-out strength and SEM evaluation of the cement layer integrity, the results significantly improved from RelyX to RelyX-ARC to Panavia 21 and also from apical to

  11. Adhesion to root canal dentine using one and two-step adhesives with dual-cure composite core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, R M; Nakajima, M; Tagami, J; Miura, H

    2005-02-01

    The regional tensile bond strengths of two dual-cure composite resin core materials to root canal dentine using either a one or two-step self-etching adhesive were evaluated. Extracted premolar teeth were decoronated and their root canals prepared to a depth of 8 mm and a width of 1.4 mm. In one group, a one-step self-etching adhesive (Unifil Self-etching Bond) was applied to the walls of the post-space and light-cured for 10 s. After which, the post-spaces were filled with the a dual-cure composite resin (Unifil Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. In the second group, a self-etching primer (ED Primer II) was applied for 30 s, followed by an adhesive resin (Clearfil Photo Bond), which was light-cured for 10 s. The post-spaces were filled with a dual-cure composite resin (DC Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. Chemical-cure composite resin was placed on the outer surfaces of all the roots, which were then stored in water for 24 h. They were serially sliced perpendicular to the bonded interface into 8, 0.6 mm-thick slabs, and then transversely sectioned into beams, approximately 8 x 0.6 x 0.6 mm, for the microtensile bond strength test (muTBS). Data were divided into two (coronal/apical half of post-space) and analysed using three-way anova and Scheffe's test (P composite resins and curing strategies, there were no significant differences in muTBS between the coronal and apical regions (P > 0.05). In addition, both dual-cure composite resins exhibited no significant differences in muTBS irrespective of whether polymerization was chemically or photoinitiated (P > 0.05). Both dual-cure composite resins exhibited good bonding to root canal dentin, which was not dependent upon region or mode of polymerization.

  12. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kiyoshi ISHIKIRIAMA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10: Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC; RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100; and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2. Initial roughness (Ra, µm was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles, and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05. The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm/wear (µm were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175; ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263; U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952; and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876. Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations.

  13. Effect of light emission on polymerization of luting resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Indirect esthetic restorations have recently gained popularity, and choosing suitable cement is"nan important concern in this regard. A wide variety of resin cements with different curing models:"n(chemical, light, dual, have been introduced to the profession, and among them the dual systems are"nclaimed to be able to continue polymerization after stopping the light. In order to study and compare the"npolymerization process of different curing systems, this research was performed."nThe present study measured the degree of conversion (DC of three types of resin cements: a self cured,"na light cured and a dual cured cement. The samples were prepared as follows:"n1-The self cured samples were made according to the manufacturer."n2-The light cured samples were exposed to the curing light for 60 seconds, through a 2 mm thick wafer"nof porcelain."n3- The dual cured samples were divided into 2 groups. The first was lighted similar to the light cured"nsamples, and the second did not receive any light."nThe degree of polymerization was measured by FTIR at time levels of 5, 10,20,30,45,60 minutes and 24"nhours post mixing. The infrared spectrum of the samples were recorded and degree of conversion were"ndetermined. The results demonstrated an increase in mean DC of all groups at post mixing time, but this"nwas significant only in the lighted dual cured cement (PO.05. The light cure resin showed high DC at"nthe base line time (5min. At the end of 60 minutes, the self cure resin had the most DC. The unlighted"ndual cement had a very low DC and didn't improve in polymerization during the post mixing controls."nThe lighted dual cement had a significant improve in curing at post mixing times, and it was"nsignificantly different from unlighted dual cement. So the dual cure cement needs to receive sufficient"nlight energy to initiate the curing process and the chemical component of this cement could not improve"nthe DC completely."nAfter 24 hours migration

  14. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  15. The postoperative sensitivity of fixed partial dentures cemented with self-adhesive resin cements: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Diaa El-Din; Atta, Osama; El-Mowafy, Omar

    2010-12-01

    The authors investigated the postcementation sensitivity associated with self-adhesive resin cements used with fixed partial dentures (FPDs). The authors recruited 20 patients who needed posterior porcelain-fused-to-metal FPDs and divided them randomly into three groups. They prepared 50 abutments, then cemented FPDs with one of two self-adhesive resin cements (Breeze Self-Adhesive Resin Cement, Pentron Clinical Technologies, Wallingford, Conn., and RelyX Unicem Self-Adhesive Universal Resin Cement, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) or an etch-and-rinse resin cement (RelyX ARC Adhesive Resin Cement, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.). The authors measured participants' tooth sensitivity to cold water, air blast and biting at 24 hours and at two, six and 12 weeks after FPD cementation by using a continuous visual analog scale (VAS). Data were analyzed statistically by means of the Mann-Whitney test. For cold tests, the highest VAS scores occurred 24 hours after cementation. The mean VAS scores associated with RelyX ARC were significantly higher than those associated with Breeze and RelyX Unicem (P cold-test VAS scores associated with Breeze and RelyX Unicem were not significantly different (P > .05). With all cements, sensitivity to cold decreased significantly after two to six weeks; however, with RelyX ARC, VAS scores stayed above the 30 percent level even after 12 weeks. The biting sensitivity associated with RelyX ARC was significantly higher than that associated with Breeze and RelyX Unicem (P benefit from their bonding potential, without fear of patients' developing tooth sensitivity.

  16. A new resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement for use with orthodontic attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M; Silverman, E

    1997-08-01

    Resin cements are commonly used to bond orthodontic appliances. However, etching enamel and bracket bonding is an extremely technique-sensitive process. Moisture and saliva control, particularly in the gingival third of posterior teeth, is difficult and time-consuming, but is critical to success. Recently, a light-cure resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement was shown to perform with equal bonding capacity. This is accomplished in a wet field, without etching, and with the glass ionomer feature of fluoride release. Now, a self-cure resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement has been introduced. The self-cure cement will provide equal clinical success in areas where light curing is not possible or desired. This article compares traditional resin cements and glass ionomer cements for bonding orthodontic appliances.

  17. Indirect resin onlay cemented with self-adhesive resin cement: a comprehensive clinical overview

    OpenAIRE

    Bandéca,Matheus Coelho; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues [UNESP; Barros, Érico Damasceno; Pinto,Shelon Cristina Souza; Firoozmand,Leily Macedo; Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi de [UNESP; Saad, José Roberto Cury [UNESP; Maia Filho,Etevaldo Matos; Queiroz, Rejane Christine De Souza

    2012-01-01

    Advances in adhesive technology and esthetic dental materials have permitted clinicians to perform conservative preparation of the dentition for onlay restorations. Indirect resin onlays are a great alternative to dental crowns for reestablishment the function and esthetic in teeth with great destruction.

  18. Resin cement to indirect composite resin bonding: effect of various surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Barutcugil, Cagatay; Harorli, Osman; Kapdan, Alper; Er, Kursat

    2015-01-01

    Debonding at the composite-adhesive interface is a major problem for indirect composite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength (BS) of an indirect composite resin after various surface treatments (air-abrasion with Al2O3, phosphoric acid-etchig and different applications of NdYAG laser irradiations). Fifty composite disks were subjected to secondary curing to complete polymerization and randomly divided into five experimental groups (n = 10) including Group 1, untreated (control); Group 2, phosphoric acid-etched; Group 3, air-abrasion with Al2 O3 ; Group 4, Nd:YAG laser irradiated with non-contact and Group 5, Nd:YAG laser irradiated with contact. They were then bonded to resin cement and shear BS was determined in a universal testing device at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze the BS values. The highest BS value was observed in Group 4 and followed by Group 3. Tukey test showed that there was no statistical difference between Group1, 2 and 5. Furthermore, differences in BSs between Group 4 and the other groups except Group 3 were significant (p composite and resin cement. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite. PMID:26855700

  20. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashibhushan, KK; Poornima, P; Reddy, VV Subba

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess and compare the retentive strength of two dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE & SmartCem2, Dentsply Caulk) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; RelyX Luting 2, 3M ESPE) on stainless steel crown (SSC). Materials and methods Thirty extracted teeth were mounted on cold cured acrylic resin blocks exposing the crown till the cemento-enamel junction. Pretrimmed, precontoured SSC was selected for a particular tooth. Standardized tooth preparation for SSC was performed by single operator. The crowns were then luted with either RelyX U200 or SmartCem2 or RelyX Luting 2 cement. Retentive strength was tested using Instron universal testing machine. The retentive strength values were recorded and calculated by the formula: Load/Area. Statistical analysis One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple comparisons followed by post hoc Tukey’s test for groupwise comparisons. Unpaired t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. Results RelyX U200 showed significantly higher retentive strength than rest of the two cements (p 0.05). Conclusion The retentive strength of dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements was better than RMGIC, and RelyX U200 significantly improved crown retention when compared with SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2. How to cite this article Pathak S, Shashibhushan KK, Poornima P, Reddy VVS. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):197-200. PMID:27843249

  1. Bond strength of a resin cement to a cured composite inlay material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, M A; Barkmeier, W W

    1994-08-01

    Although resin cements have been effectively bonded to mineralized tooth structures, bonding to a cured composite material has remained a challenge. This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a cured composite inlay material by use of a variety of composite surface treatments: (1) hydrofluoric acid/60 seconds, (2) ammonium bifluoride/60 seconds, (3) resin adhesive, (4) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide, and (5) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide and application of a resin adhesive. The resin cement was also bonded to human enamel that was etched with phosphoric acid. Scanning electron microscopy examinations were completed to evaluate the effects of the composite surface treatments. The results indicated that microabrasion of a cured composite enhances bonding of a resin cement. The bond strength of a resin cement to a composite surface that was air abraded with aluminum oxide, with or without the application of a resin adhesive, was higher than surface treatments with hydrofluoric acid or ammonium bifluoride. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that an irregular surface on the composite was created with aluminum oxide air abrasion.

  2. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis

    2014-02-01

    Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. COMPOSITE DISCS WERE SUBJECT TO ONE OF SIX DIFFERENT SURFACE PRETREATMENTS: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm(2) diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate.

  3. SEM analysis of microstructure of adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Yoshida, Eiji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the microstructure of the adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with a self-etching primer by SEM in order to clarify the adhesive efficiencies of four self-etch type resin cement systems, Bistite II (BII), Linkmax (LM), Panavia F2.0 (PF), and ResiCem (RC) to dentin. The fluidity and inorganic filler content of these cements were also determined to examine their influences on the adhesion. A hybrid layer with 0.5-1.5 µm thickness and many resin tags could be confirmed clearly at the interface between BII cement and dentin, but was not observed distinctly for the other resin cements. It was suggested that the hybrid layer and resin tags might contribute to the high adhesive efficiency for BII. As the fluidity of cement had been adjusted to be suitable for luting in all cements, it did not significantly influence the adhesive efficiency of cement.

  4. Bonding between CAD/CAM resin and resin composite cements dependent on bonding agents: three different in vitro test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Simona; Keul, Christine; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bonding properties between CAD/CAM resin and three resin composite cements combined with different bonding agents using three test methods. Four hundred twenty CAD/CAM resin substrates were fabricated and divided into three test methods (shear bond strength (SBS, n = 180), tensile bond strength (TBS, n = 180) and work of adhesion (WA, n = 60)), further into four pretreatment methods (VP connect (VP), visio.link (VL), Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP) and no pretreatment (CG)) and three cements (RelyX ARC, Variolink II and Clearfil SA Cement). Each subgroup contained 15 specimens. SBS and TBS were measured after 24 h H2O/37 °C + 5000 thermal-cycles (5/55 °C) and failure types were assessed. WA was determined for pretreated CAD/CAM resin and non-polymerized resin composite cements. Data were analysed with Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H, Chi(2) and Spearman's Rho tests. Within SBS and TBS tests, CGs and groups pretreated with CP (regardless of resin composite cements), and VP pretreated with Clearfil SA Cement showed no bond. However, CG combined with RelyX ARC showed a TBS of 5.6 ± 1.3 MPa. In general, highest bond strength was observed for groups treated with VL. CG and groups pretreated using VL showed lower WA than the groups treated with VP or CP. Measured TBS values were higher than SBS ones. In general, SBS and TBS showed similar trends for the ranges of the values for the groups. WA results were not comparable with SBS/TBS results and admitted, therefore, no conclusions on it. For a clinical use of XHIP-CAD/CAM resin, the bond surface should be additionally pretreated with visio.link as bonding agent.

  5. Effect of Self-adhesive Resin Cement and Tribochemical Treatment on Bond Strength to Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    LIN, JIE; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the interactive effects of different self-adhesive resin cements and tribochemical treatment on bond strength to zirconia. Methodology The following self-adhesive resin cements for bonding two zirconia blocks were evaluated: Maxcem (MA), Smartcem (SM), Rely X Unicem Aplicap (UN), Breeze (BR), Biscem (BI), Set (SE), and Clearfil SA luting (CL). The specimens were grouped according to conditioning as follows: Group 1, polishing with 600 grit polishing paper; Group 2, silica coat...

  6. Aspects of adhesion between CAD/CAM ceramics and resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Tian(Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006, China); 田恬

    2016-01-01

    Glass ceramics are one of the preferred choices in the case for preservation of tooth structure. They also exhibit excellent aesthetic outcomes, and life-like translucency. Moreover, glass ceramics can provide better adhesion to the underlying tooth preparation, compared with metal-bonded ceramics and oxide ceramics. This is achieved by application of HF etching and silanization, followed by bonding with resin cement. The resin cement is applied as the means to provide a seal, adhesion and ‘f...

  7. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to different treated indirect composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M Victoria; Ceballos, Laura; González-López, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin of three self-adhesive and a total-etch resin cements used for luting different treated indirect composites. Composite overlays (Filtek Z250) were prepared. Their intaglio surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC papers and randomly assigned to three different surface treatments: no treatment, silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer), and silane agent followed by a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). The composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, Maxcem Elite and G-Cem, and a total-etch resin cement, RelyX ARC. The bonded assemblies were stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) and subsequently prepared for μTBS testing. Beams of approximately 1 mm(2) were tested in tension at 1 mm/min in a universal tester (Instron 3345). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α = 0.05). A significant influence of the resin cement used was detected. Composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not affect μTBS. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite did not improve the μTBS results of dentin/composite overlay complex. Self-adhesive resin cements tested obtained lower μTBS than the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. Specimens luted with Maxcem Elite exhibited the highest percentage of pretesting failures. Surface treatment of indirect resin composite with silane or silane followed by a bonding agent did not affect bond strength to dentin.

  8. Surface hardness properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and polyacid-modified composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2004-11-15

    In this study the top and bottom surface hardness of two polyacid-modified composite resins (PMCRs), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), and one composite resin were evaluated. The affect of water storage on their hardness was also investigated. The study was conducted using four different groups, each having five specimens obtained from fiberglass die molds with a diameter of 5 mm and a height of 2 mm. Measurements were made on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and recorded after 24 hours and again at 60 days. All tested materials showed different hardness values, and the values of top surfaces of the specimens were found to be higher than the bottom surface in all test groups. There was no statistical difference in the Vickers hardness (HV) values when the test specimens were kept in water storage. In conclusion Hytac displayed microhardness values higher than Vitremer and Dyract. We found the order of HV values to be Surfil > Hytac > Dyract > Vitremer, respectively. Vitremer presented the lowest microhardness level and Surfil the highest.

  9. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  10. Sandblasting and tin-plating-surface treatments to improve bonding with resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, A D

    1993-05-01

    The superior cementation strengths of the adhesive resin cements can now be used in the dental surgery for posts, crowns and bridges and for intra-oral repairs to fractured porcelain fused to metal crowns or bridges, thanks to the availability of miniature sandblasters and portable tin-platers. The author describes the techniques involved.

  11. Influence of storage times on bond strength of resin cements to root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coêlho Bandéca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The resin cements are responsible to retention of the indirect materials decreasing marginal leakage, increasing failure resistance compared with conventional cementation. The cementation within root canal is very hard due unfavorable conditions regarding the application of adhesive techniques caused by inadequate access. Therefore, considering the possibility to decrease steps of cementation, this study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX TM U100, 3M ESPE and resin cement combined with self-ecthing adhesive system (Panavia® F 2.0, Kuraray light-cured with Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH following storage at 37 °C immediately after light-curing, 24 and 48 hours and 7 days. The root canals were prepared to receive the glass fiber post in the depth of 10 mm, irrigated with 17% EDTA and NaOCl, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The roots were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections, obtaining ninety-six slices (n = 12. The slices were trimmed using a cylindrical diamond bur in the proximal surfaces until it touched the post and attached into a device, which were mounted on a strength tester (Bisco and loaded in tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred at specimens. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences (P .05. The resin cements 24 and 48 hours after light-curing were statistically similar among themselves (P > .05. The both resin cement showed similar bond strength into root canal on different storage times. The highest bond strength values of the resin cements were showed 7 days after curing.

  12. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María-Victoria; Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-02-01

    No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (pcomposite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite.

  13. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  14. Modification of resin modified glass ionomer cement by addition of bioactive glass nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valanezhad, Alireza; Odatsu, Tetsuro; Udoh, Koichi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Sawase, Takashi; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, sol-gel derived nanoparticle calcium silicate bioactive glass was added to the resin-modified light cure glass-ionomer cement to assess the influence of additional bioactive glass nanoparticles on the mechanical and biological properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. The fabricated bioactive glass nanoparticles added resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (GICs) were immersed in the phosphate buffer solution for 28 days to mimic real condition for the mechanical properties. Resin-modified GICs containing 3, 5 and 10 % bioactive glass nanoparticles improved the flexural strength compared to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement and the samples containing 15 and 20 % bioactive glass nanoparticles before and after immersing in the phosphate buffer solution. Characterization of the samples successfully expressed the cause of the critical condition for mechanical properties. Cell study clarified that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement with high concentrations of bioactive glass nanoparticles has higher cell viability and better cell morphology compare to control groups. The results for mechanical properties and toxicity approved that the considering in selection of an optimum condition would have been a more satisfying conclusion for this study.

  15. Push-out bond strength of different translucent fiber posts cemented with self-adhesive resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzo, João Fernando; Pedriali, Maria Beatriz Bergonse Pereira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Moura, Sandra Kiss; de de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the bond strength of different translucent fiber posts in the cervical, middle, and apical root thirds cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the fiber post used: Reforpost (opaque [control]), exacto, white post, radix, and Macro-Lock Illusion X-RO. The roots were subjected to chemomechanical preparation and cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. The teeth were sectioned into slices of the different root thirds and tested for bond strength (push-out). Two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test were used to verify statistical differences between groups (P 0.05). However, the performance of the posts demonstrated a significant difference (P < 0.05). RDX had a lower performance in the apical third (P < 0.05). The other fiber posts had the same performance irrespective of the root third evaluated. The predominant failure pattern was adhesive between resin cement and root dentin. Conclusion: In general, the different translucent fiber posts showed the same performance. Yet, translucent fiber posts did not show superior bond strength compared with the opaque fiber post in any of the root thirds evaluated. PMID:27994324

  16. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and

  17. Effect of curing modes of dual-curing core systems on microtensile bond strength to dentin and formation of an acid-base resistant zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Sadr, Alireza; Waidyasekera, Kanchana; Ikeda, Masaomi; Chen, Jihua; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) of two dualcuring core systems to dentin using four curing modes. Sixty-four caries-free human molars were randomly divided into two groups according to two dual-curing resin core systems: (1) Clearfil DC Core Automix; (2) Estelite Core Quick. For each core system, four different curing modes were applied to the adhesive and core resin: (1) dual-cured and dual-cured (DD); (2) chemically cured and dual-cured (CD); (3) dual-cured and chemically cured (DC); (4) chemically cured and chemically cured (CC). The specimens were sectioned into sticks (n = 20 for each group) for the microtensile bond test. μTBS data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and the Dunnett T3 test. Failure patterns were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the proportion of each mode. Dentin sandwiches were produced and subjected to an acid-base challenge. After argon-ion etching, the ultrastructure of ABRZ was observed using SEM. For Clearfil DC Core Automix, the μTBS values in MPa were as follows: DD: 29.1 ± 5.4, CD: 21.6 ± 5.6, DC: 17.9 ± 2.8, CC: 11.5 ± 3.2. For Estelite Core Quick, they were: DD: 48.9 ±5.7, CD: 20.5 ± 4.7, DC: 41.4 ± 8.3, CC: 19.1 ± 6.0. The bond strength was affected by both material and curing mode, and the interaction of the two factors was significant (p core systems affects bond strength to dentin, but has no significant effect on the formation of ABRZ.

  18. An evaluation of commercial and experimental resin-modified glass-ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanavasita, Widchaya

    Glass-ionomer cement (GIG) has become widely accepted as a restorative material due to its bonding ability and sustained release of fluoride. The cement is, however, sensitive to moisture imbalance and lacks toughness. Recently, resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGIC) have been introduced. These materials contain monomeric species, such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in addition to the components of the conventional glass-ionomer cements. Disadvantages of RMGICs include a relatively high contraction and exotherm on polymerisation. HEMA is known to be cytotoxic, leading to problems of biocompatibility, and polyHEMA swells on exposure to water, leading to dimensional instability of the cements. Addressing these problems is important in the development of the RMGICs. Using alternative monomers to replace or reduce the amount of HEMA used in the current RMGIC formulations would be appropriate. This study was divided into two parts. Initially certain properties such as water sorption, micro-hardness, flexural strength and polymerisation exotherm of commercially available RMGICs were evaluated. Long-term storage of RMGICs in aqueous solutions resulted in their high water uptakes and solubilities and large volumetric expansions. However, the surface hardness and strengths of the restorative grade RMGICs were not affected on storage in distilled water. When the materials were immersed in artificial saliva, significantly higher water uptake were obtained; the equilibrium water uptake were not reached after 20 months. As a consequence, plastic behaviour and reduced surface hardness were observed. The RMGICs also produced high exotherm during polymerisation. The second part of the study investigated the use of an experimental resin as an alternative to HEMA. The experimental resin has the advantage of low toxicity to the pulp and relatively low polymerisation shrinkage. This study compared the polymerisations of the resin and HEMA, and of mixtures of these two

  19. Shear bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin using three dentin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogos, C; Stavrianos, C; Kolokouris, I; Economides, N; Papadoyannis, I

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin when used with three bonding agents. The materials used were Rely X ARC and Perma Cem, two one-bottle bonding agents (Single Bond, Bond-1) and one self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). The dentin was obtained from single rooted human teeth, and the specimens were treated with either 15% EDTA or 37% phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, except in groups where the self-etching bonding agent was used. The resin cements were placed on dentin surfaces with the use of bonding agents. Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a single plane shear test assembly. The dentin specimens were divided into 10 groups. Eight groups were pre-treated with EDTA or phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, followed by a bonding agent (Bond-1 or Single Bond) and resin cement (Rely X or Perma Cem). In the two remaining groups, the smear layer was left intact, and the two resins cements were used in combination with the self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). No statistically significant differences were observed among the eight groups treated with one-bottle bonding agents. The mean bond strengths of the two groups treated with the self-etching bonding agent did not differ significantly from each other but were both significantly greater than the bond strengths of all the other groups. The results of this study also showed that EDTA can be used as an alternative to phosphoric acid in bonding procedures for resin cements. However, the bond strengths of resin cements, in combination with a self-etching bonding agent, were significantly greater than those of the same cements when used with one-bottle bonding agents.

  20. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laili, Zalina, E-mail: liena@nm.gov.my [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Muhamad Samudi [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Wahab, Mohd Abdul [Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  1. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Influence of primers ' chemical composition on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagodzińska, Paulina; Bociong, Kinga; Dejak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Resin cements establish a strong durable bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tissues of teeth. It is essential to use primers with proper chemical composition before cementation. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of primer's chemical composition on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to resin cements. 132 zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to four groups. There were four resin systems used. They included resin cement and respective primer, dedicated to zirconia: Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F2.0, Monobond Plus/Multilink Automix, AZ - Primer/ResiCem, Z - Prime Plus/Duo-Link. In each group the protocol of cementation was as follows: application of primer to the zirconia surface and application of the respective resin cement in cylindric mold (dimensions: 3.0 mm height and 3.0 mm diameter). Then, the shear bond strength was evaluated and the failure type was assessed in lupes (×2.5 magnification), also random specimens under SEM. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the data, the level of significance was α = 0.05. Finally, the known chemical composition of each primer was analysed in reference to probable chemical bonds, which may occure between primers and zirconia. The mean shear bond strength between resin cements and zirconia was the highest for Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (8.24 ± 3,21 MPa) and lowest for Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 (4.60 ± 2.21 MPa). The analysis revealed significant difference between all groups, except pair Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem. The failure type in groups of Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem was mainly adhesive, in groups Monobond Plus/ /Multilink Automix and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link mainly mixed. The chemical composition of primers affects different bond mechanisms between resin cements and zirconia. The highest shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia can be obtained for the primer composed of 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen

  3. Correlation between Microleakage and Absolute Marginal Discrepancy in Zirconia Crowns Cemented with Four Resin Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Martínez-Rus; Guillermo, Pradíes

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate microleakage and absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD) and to assess correlation between AMD and microleakage with four resin luting cements. Material and Methods. 20 extracted human third molars were prepared for full-coverage crowns. 20 zirconia copings were made (LAVA, 3M ESPE) and cemented. Specimens were randomly allocated for each used type of cement into 4 groups, RelyX® (Rx), Multilink® (Mk), PANAVIA 2.1® (P), and Maxcem® (Mx) and immersed in 10% safranin for 72 hours. 20x magnification lenses were used to observe microleakage areas (μm2) and images software was used to measure AMD areas (μm). Discrepancy and microleakage between the cements were compared with one-way ANOVA test with confidence interval of 95%. Results. Rx Group showed microleakage has lowest value and AMD has highest value. P Group showed microleakage has the highest value and Mk Group presented AMD has lowest value. There were no significative differences between the cements. There were no linear correlations between microleakage and AMD; however a complex regression statistical model obtained allowed formulating an association between both variables (microleakage = AMD0,896). Conclusions. No significative differences were found among 4 types of cements. No linear correlations between AMD and microleakage were found. Clinical Significance. AMD is not easily related to microleakage. Characteristics of cements are fundamental to decreasing of microleakage values. PMID:27721830

  4. Correlation between Microleakage and Absolute Marginal Discrepancy in Zirconia Crowns Cemented with Four Resin Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad-Coronel Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate microleakage and absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD and to assess correlation between AMD and microleakage with four resin luting cements. Material and Methods. 20 extracted human third molars were prepared for full-coverage crowns. 20 zirconia copings were made (LAVA, 3M ESPE and cemented. Specimens were randomly allocated for each used type of cement into 4 groups, RelyX® (Rx, Multilink® (Mk, PANAVIA 2.1® (P, and Maxcem® (Mx and immersed in 10% safranin for 72 hours. 20x magnification lenses were used to observe microleakage areas (μm2 and images software was used to measure AMD areas (μm. Discrepancy and microleakage between the cements were compared with one-way ANOVA test with confidence interval of 95%. Results. Rx Group showed microleakage has lowest value and AMD has highest value. P Group showed microleakage has the highest value and Mk Group presented AMD has lowest value. There were no significative differences between the cements. There were no linear correlations between microleakage and AMD; however a complex regression statistical model obtained allowed formulating an association between both variables (microleakage = AMD0,896. Conclusions. No significative differences were found among 4 types of cements. No linear correlations between AMD and microleakage were found. Clinical Significance. AMD is not easily related to microleakage. Characteristics of cements are fundamental to decreasing of microleakage values.

  5. Adhesion of indirect MOD resin composite inlays luted with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, T; Abe, T; Ito, Y; Pilecki, P; Wilson, R F; Watson, T F; Foxton, R M

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of loading on the bond strength to dentin and microleakage of MOD indirect composite restorations bonded with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements with or without acid etching of the proximal enamel margins. Class II MOD cavities were prepared in 48 molar teeth into dentin and divided into three groups of 16 teeth. Impressions were taken and indirect composite inlays fabricated (Estenia C & B). The enamel margins of the proximal boxes of half the specimens were phosphoric acid etched, and the inlays were cemented with one of three cements (Panavia F 2.0, SA Cement, or Rely X Unicem). After luting, eight teeth in each cement group were mechanically loaded at 2.5 cycles/s for 250,000 cycles. Unloaded teeth acted as controls. Teeth were stored in Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours, sectioned buccolingually at the proximal boxes to examine microleakage using confocal microscopy, and further sectioned for μTBS testing of the resin-dentin interface. Analysis of variance was performed to assess the effect of loading and acid etching on microleakage and bond strength. Acid etching had no effect on microleakage. No significant difference in the dentin bond strengths between the three cements existed after loading. Panavia F 2.0 exhibited a significant reduction in bond strength. With regard to microleakage at the proximal boxes, loading had no effect on dye penetration at the cavity floor. However, at the axial walls, loading had a significant deleterious effect on Panavia F 2.0. No difference in microleakage existed between the three cements at both sites before and after loading. In conclusion, the two tested self-adhesive cements exhibited similar bond strengths before and after loading to the self-etching resin cement. Loading reduced dentin bond strengths and increased microleakage at the resin-dentin interface. However, acid etching of the enamel margins had no significant effect on microleakage in the approximal regions of

  6. Effect of Surface Treatment with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Bond Strength between Cement Resin and Zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Kasraei, Shahin; Atefat, Mohammad; Beheshti, Maryam; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mojtahedi, Maryam; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Since it is not possible to form an adequate micromechanical bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using common surface treatment techniques, laser pretreatment has been suggested for zirconia ceramic surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic.

  7. Post cementation sensitivity evaluation of glass Ionomer, zinc phosphate and resin modified glass Ionomer luting cements under class II inlays: An in vivo comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to compare the patient-perceived post-cementation sensitivity of class II metal restorations preoperatively, immediately after cementation, one week after cementation and one month after cementation with (1 Glass Ionomer luting cement (2 Zinc Phosphate cement and (3 Resin-modified Glass Ionomer luting cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, irrespective of sex, in the age group of 15-50 years were selected and the teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 20 each. Twenty inlay cast restorations were cemented with three different luting cements. The criteria adapted to measure tooth sensitivity in the present study were objective examination for sensitivity.(1 Cold water test (2 Compressed air test and (3 Biting pressure test. Results: The patients with restorations cemented with Resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity when compared with Glass Ionomer and zinc phosphate cement at all different intervals of time evaluated by different tests. Conclusion: The patients with restorations cemented with resin-modified Glass ionomer demonstrated the least postoperative sensitivity.

  8. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik;

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test...... by the application of a primer or in the form of the Cojet system. After surface treatment, the post was embedded in a cylinder of resin cement (diameter = 4.0 mm, height = 4.0 mm). The surface-treated post was centered in the resin cement-filled mold with the aid of fixation apparatus. Fifteen minutes from...... the start of mixing the resin cement, the specimen was freed from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Following water storage, the specimen was wet-ground to a final length of approximately 3 mm. The DTS of specimens was determined in a Universal Testing Machine. The bonding...

  9. Comparison of the microshear bond strength of two resin cements to Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nokar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Nowadays, the application of all ceramic restorations are being raised, because of their physical characteristics, such as translucency and good appearance. Numerous researchers investigated the impact of surface treatments on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cements. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength of Cercon and Zirkonzahn (two kind of zirconia ceramics, to two types of resin cements after thermocycling.   Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 rectangular specimens were made from each group of Cercon and Zirkonzahn ceramics. After sandblasting, these specimens were connected to 3×1 mm2 composite cylinders by two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Unicem2. After performing a thermocycling regime for 5000 cycles (5-55 ◦ C, the microshear bond strengths were measured by a universal testing machine. The mode of failures were determined by a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA.   Results: Type of ceramics had no significant impact on the microshear bond strength (P=0.317. The highest bond strengths in both ceramics were obtained with Reply X Unicem (P=0.035. The predominant failure mode was adhesive between the cement and ceramic.   Conclusion: Type of resin cement had a significant effect on their bond strengths to zirconia ceramics.

  10. Solidification of ion exchange resins saturated with Na+ ions: Comparison of matrices based on Portland and blast furnace slag cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafond, E.; Cau dit Coumes, C.; Gauffinet, S.; Chartier, D.; Stefan, L.; Le Bescop, P.

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to the conditioning of ion exchange resins used to decontaminate radioactive effluents. Calcium silicate cements may have a good potential to encapsulate spent resins. However, certain combinations of cement and resins produce a strong expansion of the final product, possibly leading to its full disintegration. The focus is placed on the understanding of the behaviour of cationic resins in the Na+ form in Portland or blast furnace slag (CEM III/C) cement pastes. During hydration of the Portland cement paste, the pore solution exhibits a decrease in its osmotic pressure, which causes a transient expansion of small magnitude of the resins. At 20 °C, this expansion takes place just after setting in a poorly consolidated material and is sufficient to induce cracks. In the CEM III/C paste, swelling of the resins also occurs, but before the end of setting, and induces limited stress in the matrix which is still plastic.

  11. [Effect of ceramic thickness and resin cement shades on final color of heat-pressed ceramic veneers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, D F; Zhan, K R; Chen, X D; Xing, W Z

    2017-02-09

    Objective: To analyze the effect of ceramic materials thickness and resin cement shades on the final color of ceramic veneers in the discolored teeth, and to investigate the color agreement of try-in pastes to the corresponding resin cements. Methods: Sixty artificial maxillary central incisor teeth (C2 shade) were used to simulate the natural discolored teeth and prepared according to veneer tooth preparation protocol. Veneers of different thickness in the body region (0.50 and 0.75 mm) were fabricated using ceramic materials (LT A2 shade, IPS e.max Press). The ceramic veneer specimens were bonded to the artificial teeth using the 6 shades of resin cements (Variolink Veneer: shades of LV-3, LV-2, HV+3; RelyX™ Veneer: shades of TR, A3, WO) (n=5). A clinical spectrophotometer was used to measure the color parameters of ceramic veneers at the cervical, body and incisal regions. Color changes of veneers before and after cementation were calculated and registered as ΔE1, and the changes between try-in paste and the corresponding resin cements were registered as ΔE2. Results: Three-way ANOVA indicated that ΔE1 and ΔE2 values were significantly affected by the ceramic thickness, resin cement shades and measuring regions (Pveneers were cemented with resin cements in shades of HV+3 and WO. The ΔE2 values of six shades ranged from 0.60-2.56. The shades of HV+3, WO and A3 resin cements were more than 1.60. Conclusions: Different thickness of ceramic materials, resin cement shades and measuring regions could affect the final color of ceramic veneers. The color differences of some resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes might be observed in clinical practice.

  12. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  13. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to tooth structure

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Hattar; Hatamleh, Muhanad M.; Faleh Sawair; Mohammad Al-Rabab’ah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the strength of the bond between newly introduced self-adhesive resin cements and tooth structures (i.e., enamel and dentin). Methods: Three self-adhesive cements (SmartCem2, RelyX Unicem, seT SDI) were tested. Cylindrical-shaped cement specimens (diameter, 3 mm; height, 3 mm) were bonded to enamel and dentin. Test specimens were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. The shear bond strength (SBS) was tested in a Zwick Roll testing machine. Results w...

  14. Bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic with different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usumez, Aslıhan; Hamdemirci, Nermin; Koroglu, Bilge Yuksel; Simsek, Irfan; Parlar, Ozge; Sari, Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics offer strong restorations in dentistry, but the adhesive bond strength of resin cements to such ceramics is not optimal. This study evaluated the influence of surface treatments on the bond strength of resin cement to yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic. Seventy-five plates of Y-TZP ceramic were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 15) according to the surface treatments [airborne particle abrasion, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation (Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona; 2 W, 200 mJ, 10 Hz, with two different pulse durations 180 or 320 μs), glaze applied, and then 9.5 % hydrofluoric acid gel conditioned, control]. One specimen from each group was randomly selected, and specimens were evaluated with x-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. The resin cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces with its corresponding adhesive components. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strengths were analyzed through one-way ANOVA/Tukey tests. Surface treatments significantly modified the topography of the Y-TZP ceramic. The Nd:YAG laser-irradiated specimens resulted in both increased surface roughness and bond strength of the resin cement. The highest surface roughness and bond strength values were achieved with short pulse duration. Nd:YAG laser irradiation increased both surface roughness of Y-TZP surfaces and bond strength of resin cement to the zirconia surface.

  15. Effect of various surface treatments of tooth – colored posts on bonding strength of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzaei M.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Various studies have shown that reliable bond at the root - post - core interfaces are critical for the clinical success of post - retained restorations. Severe stress concentration at post - cement interface increases post debonding from the root. To form a bonded unit that reduces the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, some post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of tooth - colored posts on the bonding of resin cement. "nMaterials and Methods: In this interventional study, 144 tooth colored posts were used in 18 groups (8 samples in each group. The posts included quartz fiber (Matchpost, glass fiber (Glassix, and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost and the resin cement was Panavia F 2.0. The posts received the following surface treatments: 1- No surface treatment (control group, 2- Etching with HF and silane, 3- Sandblasting with Cojet sand, 4- Sandblasting with Cojet sand and application of silane, 5- Sandblasting with alumina particles, 6- Sandblasting with alumina particles and application of silane. Then, posts were cemented into acrylic molds with Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The specimens were placed in water for 2 days and debonded in pull - out test. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA followed by Tamhane and Tukey HSD. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope (10 . P<0.05 was considered as the significant level. "nResults: Surface treatments (sandblasting with Cojet and alumina particles ,with or without silane resulted in improved bond strength of resin cement to glass fiber post (Glassix and zirconia ceramic (Cosmopost [p<0/05], but not to the quartz fiber post (Matchpost. In general, higher bond strengths resulted in a to higher percentage of cohesive failures within the cement. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, sandblasting with cojet and alumina

  16. Effect of exposure time on the polymerization of resin cement through ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShaafi, Maan M; AlQahtani, Mohammed Q; Price, Richard B

    2014-04-01

    This study measured the effects of using three different exposure times to cure one resin cement through two types of ceramic. One light-curing resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent) was exposed for 20 s, 40 s, or 60 s with a BluePhase G2 light (Ivoclar Vivadent) on the high power setting through 1.0 mm of either ZirPress (ZR) or Empress Esthetic (EST) ceramic (Ivoclar Vivadent). The degree of conversion (DC) of the resin was measured 100 s after light exposure. The Knoop microhardness (KHN) was measured 5 min after light exposure and again after 24 h. The DC and KHN results were analyzed with ANOVA followed by Scheffe's post-hoc multiple comparison tests at α = 0.05. Increasing exposure time had a significant effect on the KHN and DC values for the resins exposed through both ceramics. As exposure times increased, the influence of the ceramic was reduced; however, the microhardness values were greater for the cement exposed through EST ceramic. When the exposure time was increased from 20 s to 40 s, microhardness values for the resin increased by 39.6% through the EST ceramic. When exposed for 60 s, there were no differences between the 100-s DC values or 5-min KHN values using either ceramic (p > 0.05). There was an excellent correlation between the DC at 100 s and the microhardness values measured at 5 min. Resin polymerization was greater through EST than ZR ceramic. At least 40 s to 60 s from the Blue- Phase G2 on high power mode is required to cure this resin cement through 1.0 mm of ceramic.

  17. Can a soda-lime glass be used to demonstrate how patterns of strength dependence are influenced by pre-cementation and resin-cementation variables?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To determine how the variability in biaxial flexure strength of a soda-lime glass analogue for a PLV and DBC material was influenced by precementation operative variables and following resin-cement coating.

  18. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffó, G.S. [Departamento de Materiales, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas – CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Farina, S.B., E-mail: farina@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Materiales, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas – CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schulz, F.M. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas – CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • There are no works related to the corrosion of drums containing radioactive waste. • Chloride induces high corrosion rate and after 1 year it drops abruptly. • Decrease in the corrosion rate is due to the lack of water to sustain the process. • Cementated ion-exchange resins do not pose risks of corrosion of the steel drums. -- Abstract: Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums.

  19. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-15

    Nov 15, 2014 ... were built up with a self‑adhesive resin cement (Rely X‑U200) 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm height. ... This research was designed to identify ideal surface ..... combinations with a particular look at the additional use of flow‑composites ... composite and new ceramic/polymer materials: A review of the literature ...

  20. Effect of Ultrasonic Versus Manual Cementation on the Fracture Strength of Resin Composite Laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Mese, A.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of conventional versus ultrasonic cementation techniques on the fracture strength of resin composite laminates. In addition, the failure modes were assessed. Window-type preparations I mm above the cemento-enamel junction were made on intact human maxillary central in

  1. Effect of Ultrasonic Versus Manual Cementation on the Fracture Strength of Resin Composite Laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Mese, A.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of conventional versus ultrasonic cementation techniques on the fracture strength of resin composite laminates. In addition, the failure modes were assessed. Window-type preparations I mm above the cemento-enamel junction were made on intact human maxillary central in

  2. Application of mixture design to optimize cementation of simulated spent radioactive ion exchange resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Xue-Ying; BAO Liang-Jin; LIN Mei-Qiong; James D.NAVRATIL

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of a mixture design for spent resin immobilization in cement as well as to examine the cement-slag-ash system for spent resin solidification. Eighteen distinct combinations, consisting of Portland cement, blast furnace slag, fly ash, organic ion exchange resins and water, were selected by a mixture design computer procedure to compose representative experiment points. The measured properties of solidified forms resulting from the combinations included 28-day compressive strength, 42-day immersion strength,42-day immersion weight and slump. These data were fit to a mathematic model with the aid of Scheffe quadratic polynomial, and the effects of each ingredient on the measured properties were identified through an analysis of the response trace plots and contour plots. Utilization of an optimality function singled out an optimal combination comprising water=0.16(wt/wt), slag=0.21, ash=0.10, cement=0.27 and resin=0.26 from which the resulting response was 1 1MPa for the 28-day strength, 110mm for the slump and 5.4% for the 42-day increase in strength.

  3. Novel fabrication method for zirconia restorations: bonding strength of machinable ceramic to zirconia with resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Soichi; Terui, Yuichi; Higuchi, Daisuke; Goto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A novel method was developed to fabricate all-ceramic restorations which comprised CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic bonded to CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using resin cement. The feasibility of this fabrication method was assessed in this study by investigating the bonding strength of a machinable ceramic to zirconia. A machinable ceramic was bonded to a zirconia plate using three kinds of resin cements: ResiCem (RE), Panavia (PA), and Multilink (ML). Conventional porcelain-fused-to-zirconia specimens were also prepared to serve as control. Shear bond strength test (SBT) and Schwickerath crack initiation test (SCT) were carried out. SBT revealed that PA (40.42 MPa) yielded a significantly higher bonding strength than RE (28.01 MPa) and ML (18.89 MPa). SCT revealed that the bonding strengths of test groups using resin cement were significantly higher than those of Control. Notably, the bonding strengths of RE and ML were above 25 MPa even after 10,000 times of thermal cycling -adequately meeting the ISO 9693 standard for metal-ceramic restorations. These results affirmed the feasibility of the novel fabrication method, in that a CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic is bonded to a CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using a resin cement.

  4. Micro-shear bond strength of resin cement to dentin after application of desensitizing toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Goktas, Baris; Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of three desensitizing toothpastes on bonding of resin cements to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of 72 maxillary third molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and then divided into three groups according to three desensitizing toothpastes used: Sensodyne Rapid Relief (GlaxoSmithKline, SmithKline Beecham Ltd., Slough, UK), Signal Sensitive Expert (Unilever Sanayi ve Ticaret Türk A.Ş., Ümraniye, İstanbul, Turkey) and Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (Colgate Palmolive, New York, NY). Following bonding of the resin cement (Clearfil™ SA Cement, Kuraray Co, Osaka, Japan) to dentin, the specimens were light cured for 40 s with a LED (Elipar S10, 3M Espe, St. Paul, MN). The strength measurements were accomplished with a micro-shear testing machine (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL) at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). ANOVA revealed that the application of desensitizing toothpastes had significant effects on bond strength of the resin cement tested to dentin (p < 0.05). Mixed failures were observed in all of the groups. The use of a desensitizing toothpaste before cementation might alter the bond strength of adhesively luted restorations.

  5. Cementation of residue ion exchange resins at Rocky Flats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dustin, D.F.; Beckman, T.D.; Madore, C.M.

    1998-03-03

    Ion exchange resins have been used to purify nitric acid solutions of plutonium at Rocky Flats since the 1950s. Spent ion exchange resins were retained for eventual recovery of residual plutonium, typically by incineration followed by the aqueous extraction of plutonium from the resultant ash. The elimination of incineration as a recovery process in the late 1980s and the absence of a suitable alternative process for plutonium recovery from resins led to a situation where spent ion exchange resins were simply placed into temporary storage. This report describes the method that Rocky Flats is currently using to stabilize residue ion exchange resins. The objective of the resin stabilization program is: (1) to ensure their safety during interim storage at the site, and (2) to prepare them for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Included in the discussion is a description of the safety concerns associated with ion exchange resins, alternatives considered for their stabilization, the selection of the preferred treatment method, the means of implementing the preferred option, and the progress to date.

  6. Clinical evaluation of resin composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement in non-carious cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke; Oginni, Ao

    2012-10-01

    The clinical performance of various tooth-coloured materials used to restore Non-Carious Cervical Lesions (NCCLs) has been evaluated. However, most of these evaluations were in western societies where soft diets requiring little mastication were common. The present study sets out to evaluate resin composite and RMGIC in the restoration of NCCLs among a Nigerian subpopulation group with fibrous diet requiring more rigorous mastication. The study included all adult patients that presented at the Dental Hospital, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria with non-carious cervical lesions over a period of six months. The teeth with non-carious cervical lesions in each patient were allocated into treatment with either resin composite or resin-modified glass ionomer cement by simple random sampling using ballots. The depth of the NCCLs was measured using a graduated flat ash periodontal probe. All the treatment was done by the first author according to the manufacturer's instructions. Patients were recalled and evaluated at 48- hours, 3- months, 6- months and 12- months using the USPHS criteria. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 15. The level of significance was put at 0.05. At the end of 12 months, 143 resin composite and 144 RMGIC restorations were evaluated, out of which 37 resin composite and 13 RMGIC restorations were dislodged, giving a retention rate of 74.1% and 91.0% respectively. The difference was statistically significant (pcarious cervical lesions than resin composite over a period of 12 month.

  7. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (pbonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  8. Comparison the Effects of Different Root Canal Irrigants on the Retention of Quarts Fiber Posts Cemented by Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shirinzad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Root canal irrigants could change the structure of root dentin and affect the posts retention the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three different endodontic irrigants on the retention of quarts fiber posts cemented by different resin cements. Materials & Methods: In this in-vitro study, 10 mm long post spaces were prepared in root canals of 120 premolars after endodontic therapy and cutting the crowns at the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were randomly divided into four equal groups based on the irrigants as follows: distilled water, 2% chlorhexidine, 0.25% iodine and 1% NaOCl. Quarts fiber posts were cemented by Panavia F2. Samples were stored at 370c and humidity of 100% for one week. After thermocycling, the retention of fiber posts were measured by tensile test and modes of failure were reported. Data were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA, Tukey and Fisher's exact tests.Results: The mean and standard deviation of the posts retention were 367.08±63.07, 377.59±72.02, 363.11±68.53 and 342.89±74.94 for distilled water, chlorhexidine 2%, iodine 0.25% and sodium hypochlorite, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed that there was a significant difference among the groups (P<0.001. The results of Tukey test showed that posts retention was significantly higher after rinsing by chlorhexidine (P<0.01Conclusion: According to the results of this study, chlorhexidine rinse had a favorable effect on retention of posts cemented by resin cement.

  9. Effect of ceramic surface treatment on tensile bond strength to a resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Hood, James A A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the following hypotheses: (1) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-treated ceramic surfaces produce the highest tensile bond strength to resin cements, independent of the ceramic microstructure and composition; and (2) the tensile bond strength test is appropriate for analysis of interfacial adhesion for ceramic-bonded-to-resin systems. Ceramic specimens were polished with 1-micron alumina abrasive and divided into four groups of 10 specimens for each of seven ceramic types. One of the following surface treatments was applied: (1) 10% ammonium bifluoride (ABF) for 1 minute; (2) 9.6% HF for 2 minutes; (3) 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 minutes; and (4) a silane coupling agent. The surface-treated areas were coated with an adhesive resin and bonded to a resin cement. Specimens were loaded to failure in tension using a testing machine. Tensile bond strength data were statistically analyzed, and fracture surfaces were examined to determine the mode of failure. Silane-treated surfaces showed statistically higher mean tensile bond strength values than surfaces treated with any etchant (HF, ABF, APF). HF produced statistically higher mean tensile bond strengths than ABF and APF. All failures occurred in the adhesion zone. The tensile bond strength test is adequate for analysis of the adhesive zone of resin-ceramic systems. The chemical adhesion produced by silane promoted higher mean bond strength values than the micromechanical retention produced by any etchant for the resin-ceramic systems used in this study.

  10. Degree of Conversion of a Resin Cement Light-Cured Through Ceramic Veneers of Different Thicknesses and Types

    OpenAIRE

    Runnacles,Patrício; Correr, Gisele Maria; Flares BARATTO FILHO; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    During the cementation of ceramic veneers the polymerization of resin cements may be jeopardized if the ceramics attenuate the irradiance of the light-curing device. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different types and thicknesses of ceramic veneers on the degree of conversion of a light-cured resin-based cement (RelyX Veneer). The cement was light-cured after interposing ceramic veneers [IPS InLine, IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS e.max LT (low translucency) and IPS e.max HT (hi...

  11. Bone-like apatite layer formation on the new resin-modified glass-ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourmohammadi, Jhamak; Sadrnezhaad, S K; Ghader, A Behnam

    2008-12-01

    In this study, the apatite-forming ability of the new resin-modified glass-ionomer cement was evaluated by soaking the cement in the simulated body fluid. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns of the soaked cement pointed to the creation of poorly crystalline carbonated apatite. It was found that the releasing of calcium ions from the soaked cement will dominate the undesirable effect of polyacrylic acid on apatite formation. Consequently, the ionic activity products (IAPs) of the apatite in the surrounding medium increased which accelerated apatite nucleation induced by the presence of the Si-OH and COOH groups. Accordingly, the apatite nuclei started to form via primary heterogeneous nucleation and continued by secondary nucleation. Therefore, nucleation and growth occurs as in the layer-by-layer mode so that finite numbers of monolayers are produced. Subsequent formation of film occurs by formation of discrete nuclei (layer-plus-island or SK growth).

  12. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.T. Tauböck; A.J. Feilzer; W. Buchalla; C.J. Kleverlaan; I. Krejci; T. Attin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Re

  13. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  14. EFFECT OF FLUORIDE-CONTAINING DESENSITIZING AGENTS ON THE BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN-BASED CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Külünk, Safak; Saraç, Y. Sinasi; Karakas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Material and Methods: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO) was used. The shear bond strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05). The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001). PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05). PMID:19936532

  15. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Valle, Accácio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; Só, Marcus-Vinícius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond™ FL, Kerr); G3 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE); G4 - a 2-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE); G5 - a single-step self-etching system (Bond Force, Tokuyama); and G6 - universal bonding system (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then, cylinders made of self-adhesive resin cement with polypropylene matrix was cemented in all groups (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Bond strength was assessed by submitting the specimens to micro-shear test and was characterized according to the fracture pattern observed through optical microscopy. Results The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test, which indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.04), and Tukey’s multiple comparisons, which indicated a statistically significant difference between G1 and G3 (p<0.05). The microscopic analysis revealed a high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed fractures, and cohesive failures in the dentin. Conclusions The use of a previous dentin hybridization protocol is able to increase adhesive bonding resistance of self-adhesive resin cement, especially when used Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose system. Key words:Bonding, self-adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:27703609

  16. Influence of chlorhexidine on dentin adhesive interface micromorphology and nanoleakage expression of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Menezes, Murilo De Sousa; Barreto, Bruno De Castro Ferreira; Naves, Lucas Zago; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2013-08-01

    This study focused on adhesive interface morphologic characterization and nanoleakage expression of resin cements bonded to human dentin pretreated with 1% chlorhexidine (CHX). Thirty-two non-carious human third molars were ground flat to expose superficial dentin. Resin composite blocks were luted to the exposed dentin using one conventional (RelyX ARC) and one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100), with/without CHX pretreatment. Four groups (n = 8) were obtained: control groups (ARC and U100); experimental groups (ARC/CHX and U100/CHX) were pretreated with 1% CHX prior to the luting process. After storage in water for 24 h, the bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 × 0.9 mm(2) sticks producing a minimum of 12 sticks per tooth. Four sticks from each tooth were prepared for hybrid layer evaluation by scanning electron microscope analysis. The remaining sticks were immersed in silver nitrate for 24 h for either nanoleakage evaluation along the bonded interfaces or after rupture. Nanoleakage samples were carbon coated and examined using backscattered electron mode. Well-established hybrid layers were observed in the groups luted with RelyX ARC. Nanoleakage evaluation revealed increase nanoleakage in groups treated with CHX for both resin cements. Group U100/CHX exhibited the most pronouncing nanoleakage expression along with porous zones adjacent to the CHX pretreated dentin. The results suggest a possible incompatibility between CHX and RelyX U100 that raises the concern that the use of CHX with self-adhesive cements may adversely affect resin-dentin bond.

  17. Film Thickness and Flow Properties of Resin-Based Cements at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagheri R.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: For a luting agent to allow complete seating of prosthetic restorations, it must obtain an appropriate flow rate maintaining a minimum film thickness. The performance of recently introduced luting agents in this regard has not been evaluated. Purpose: To measure and compare the film thickness and flow properties of seven resin-containing luting cements at different temperatures (37°C, 25°C and10°C. Material and Methods: Specimens were prepared from five resin luting cements; seT (SDI, Panavia F (Kuraray, Varioloink II (Ivoclar, Maxcem (Kerr, Nexus2 (Kerr and two resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements (RM-GICs; GC Fuji Plus (GC Corporation, and RelyX Luting 2 (3 M/ESPE. The film thickness and flow rate of each cement (n=15 was determined using the test described in ISO at three different temperatures. Results: There was a linear correlation between film thickness and flow rate for most of the materials. Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials while the effect of temperature on film thickness was material dependent. At 37°C, all products revealed a film thickness of less than 25µm except for GC Fuji Plus. At 25°C, all cements pro-duced a film thickness of less than 27 µm except for seT. At 10°C, apart from seT and Rely X Luting 2, the remaining cements showed a film thickness smaller than 20 µm.Conclusion: Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials, however. the film thickness did not exceed 35 µm in either condition, in spite of the lowest film thickness being demonstrated at the lowest temperature.

  18. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+. Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  19. Evaluation of Surface Treatment Methods on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics Systems, Resin Cements and Tooth Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Akkuş Emek; Turker Sebnem Begum

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of airborne-particle abrasion (APA) and tribochemical silica coating (TSC) surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramics systems, resin cements and tooth surface

  20. Evaluation of Surface Treatment Methods on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics Systems, Resin Cements and Tooth Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkuş Emek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of airborne-particle abrasion (APA and tribochemical silica coating (TSC surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramics systems, resin cements and tooth surface

  1. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  2. Effect of axial groove and resin luting cements on the retention of complete cast metal crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The design of the tooth preparation and the cementing medium are important consid-erations in the retention of crowns and fixed partial dentures. The purpose of this invitro study was to determine the effect of axial groove on the retention of complete cast metal crowns using two resin luting cements. Methods: Forty freshly extracted intact human molar teeth were prepared in their long axis to receive complete cast metal crowns. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (one control and one study group. An axial groove of uniform size and shape was made on the prepared teeth under the study group. Axial surface area of prepared teeth specimens was measured. Complete cast metal crowns were fabricated for each specimen. Specimens of each group were divided into subgroups of 10 samples and were cemented with two resin luting cements, RelyX Unicem® and Calibra®, re-spectively. The cemented crowns were loaded in tension using a Universal Instron testing machine. The maximal tensile strength was recorded. Data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05. Results: No significant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 5.76±0.392 MPa and study (mean: 5.93±0.751 MPa groups cemented with RelyX Unicem. No sig-nificant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 4.92±0.641 MPa and study (mean: 5.15 ±0.478 MPa groups cemented with Calibra. However, significant dif-ference in the tensile stress values was found between the two resin cements in the control and study groups. Conclusion: Axial groove placed in tooth preparations for resin bonded complete cast metal crowns had no statistically significant effect on retention. The use of (RelyX Unicem® yielded greater reten-tion values when compared to Calibra®.

  3. Correlation between the degree of conversion and the elution of leachable components from dental resin-based cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOSOVKA OBRADOVIĆ-DJURIČIĆ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the possible correlation between the degree of conversion (DC and the amount of substances eluted from three commercial cured resin-based cements. The DC of the various resin-based cements was measured by Raman spectroscopy, while the quantity of unreacted monomers released from the cement matrix (triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, TEGDMA, urethane dimethacrylate, UDMA, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, HEMA and bisphenol A was determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. The obtained results, after multiple statistical evaluation (one way ANOVA, LSD post hoc test, showed no significant differences in the DC values between the resin cements. On the contrary, the results of the HPLC analysis depicted statistically significant differences between the three materials with respect to the amount of leached monomers. In addition, no correlation between the DC and the amount of eluted substances from the tested cured composite cements was found.

  4. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Carolina; Buono Vicente; Mota Joao Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm) of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B) to composite resin (InTen-S) blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok). Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydroflu...

  5. Effect of silane activation on shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite post to resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyun-Dong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Hee-Sun; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Among the surface treatment methods suggested to enhance the adhesion of resin cement to fiber-reinforced composite posts, conflicting results have been obtained with silanization. In this study, the effects of silanization, heat activation after silanization, on the bond strength between fiber-reinforced composite post and resin cement were determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS Six groups (n=7) were established to evaluate two types of fiber post (FRC Postec Plus, D.T. Light Post) and th...

  6. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik;

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After embedding, planar surface...

  7. Transient and residual stresses in a pressable glass-ceramic before and after resin-cement coating determined using profilometry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The effect of heat-pressing and subsequent pre-cementation (acid-etching) and resin-cementation operative techniques on the development of transient and residual stresses in different thicknesses of a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were characterised using profilometry prior to biaxial flexure strength (BFS) determination.

  8. Effect of femtosecond laser beam angle on bond strength of zirconia-resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Yusuf Z; Kepceoglu, Abdullah; Yavuz, Tevfik; Aslan, Muhammed A; Demirtag, Zulfikar; Kılıc, Hamdi S; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-11-01

    Yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic is widely used as an all-ceramic core material because of its enhanced mechanical and aesthetic properties. The bond strength of Y-TZP restorations affects long-term success; hence, surface treatment is required on ceramic boundaries. This study evaluated the effect of different laser beam angles on Y-TZP-resin cement shear bond strength (SBS). Forty plates of Y-TZP ceramics were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10). A femtosecond amplifier laser pulse was applied on Y-TZP surface with different incidence angles (90°, 75°, 60°, 45°). The resin cement was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces. The SBS of each sample was measured using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The SBS was analyzed through one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA)/Tukey tests. The results showed that the degree of laser beam angle affects the SBS of resin cement to Y-TZP. The laser beam was applied to a surface with a 45° angle which resulted in significantly higher SBS (18.2 ± 1.43 MPa) than other groups (at 90° angulation (10.79 ± 1.8 MPa), at 75° (13.48 ± 1.2 MPa) and at 60° (15.85 ± 0.81 MPa); p surface and the laser beam increased the SBS between the resin cement and the ceramic material, as well as the orifice.

  9. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    Full Text Available The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilylethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future.

  10. The effect of ultrafast fiber laser application on the bond strength of resin cement to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Caglar, Ipek Satıroglu; Duymus, Zeynep Yeşil; Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Elif Arslan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrafast fiber laser treatment on the bond strength between titanium and resin cement. A total of 60 pure titanium discs (15 mm × 2 mm) were divided into six test groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment used: group (1) control, machining; group (2) grinding with a diamond bur; group (3) ultrafast fiber laser application; group (4) resorbable blast media (RBM) application; group (5) electro-erosion with copper; and group (6) sandblasting. After surface treatments, resin cements were applied to the treated titanium surfaces. Shear bond strength testing of the samples was performed with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test were used to analyse the data (P < 0.05). The highest bond strength values were observed in the laser application group, while the lowest values were observed in the grinding group. Sandblasting and laser application resulted in significantly higher bond strengths than control treatment (P < 0.05). Ultrafast fiber laser treatment and sandblasting may improve the bond strength between resin cement and titanium.

  11. Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijen Pamir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2 or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1 no etching, (2 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3 30 s of etching, and (4 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250, the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05. Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p0.05. However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. CONCLUSIONS: The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal.

  12. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  13. MICROLEAKAGE OF CLASS V RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT AND COMPOMER RESTORATIONS IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Ling; LU Yi; LU Qun; XU Qi-hua

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the microleakage of Class Ⅴ restorations made with two resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs) and two polyacid-modified composite resins (PMCRs). Methods Restorations of the four materials ( GC Fuji H LC, VitremerTM, Dyract AP and F2000TM ) were placed in facial Class Ⅴ cavity preparations in forty noncarious human molar teeth. Teeth were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups of 10 teeth each. After thermal cycling( × 20, 5 -55℃ ), the interface between dentin and restorations was spattercoated with gold and observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Then the square and average width of margin gaps of central 1/3 interface were recorded with image analysis software. Results The data indicated no significant differences between all the restorative materials for both occlusal and gingival margins. Further analysis revealed there were statistically significant differences between occlusal margins and gingival margins for VitremerTM and Dyract AP, respectively. Conclusion None of the tested materials guaranteed margins free of microleakage. Resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed similar margin gaps to the polyacid-modified composite resins tested.

  14. Cytotoxicity Comparison of Harvard Zinc Phosphate Cement Versus Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus Resin Cements on Rat L929-fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasti, Sahabi; Sattari, Mandana; Romoozi, Elham; Akbar-Zadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Resin cements, regardless of their biocompatibility, have been widely used in restorative dentistry during the recent years. These cements contain hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) molecules which are claimed to penetrate into dentinal tubules and may affect dental pulp. Since tooth preparation for metal ceramic restorations involves a large surface of the tooth, cytotoxicity of these cements would be more important in fixed prosthodontic treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus) versus zinc phosphate cement (Harvard) using rat L929-fibroblasts in vitro. In this experimental study, ninety hollow glass cylinders (internal diameter 5-mm, height 2-mm) were made and divided into three groups. Each group was filled with one of three experimental cements; Harvard Zinc Phosphate cement, Panavia F2 resin cement and Rely X Plus resin cement. L929- Fibroblast were passaged and subsequently cultured in 6-well plates of 5×10(5) cells each. The culture medium was RPMI_ 1640. All samples were incubated in CO2. Using enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay, the cytotoxicity of the cements was investigated at 1 hour, 24 hours and one week post exposure. Statistical analyses were performed via two-way ANOVA and honestly significant difference (HSD) Tukey tests. This study revealed significant differences between the three cements at the different time intervals. Harvard cement displayed the greatest cytotoxicity at all three intervals. After 1 hour Panavia F2 showed the next greatest cytotoxicity, but after 24-hours and oneweek intervals Rely X Plus showed the next greatest cytotoxicity. The results further showed that cytotoxicity decreased significantly in the Panavia F2 group with time (pcytotoxicity increased significantly in the Rely X Plus group with time (pcytotoxicity with time. Although this study has limitations

  15. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p strengths after thermocycling were not remarkable as compared with the corresponding prethermal cycling groups (p > 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p strength, whereas the specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.6 +/- 0.4 MPa) showed the lowest. After thermocycling, the bond strength values of specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.1 +/- 0.1 MPa) and Super-Bond C&B (1.7 +/- 0.4 MPa) decreased; however, this was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling was also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Variolink II and Panavia F systems showed higher shear bond strength values than Chemiace II and

  16. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Menezes de MENDONÇA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives: To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein, used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin, after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods: Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10 according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal and R (resin- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5 were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results: Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231. Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001 and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007. Conclusion: The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the

  17. The effect of repeated bonding on the shear bond strength of different resin cements to enamel and dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsü, Saadet Sağlam

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Cementation failures of restorations are frequently observed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of initial and repeated bonding on the bond strengths of different resin cements to enamel and dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety human maxillary central incisors were bisected longitudinally. The 180 tooth halves were divided into 2 groups (n = 90) for enamel and dentin bonding. The enamel and dentin groups were further divided into 3 groups (n = 30) for different resin cement types. Composite resin (Filtek Ultimate) cylinders (3 × 3 mm) were prepared and luted to enamel and dentin using Variolink II (Group V), RelyX ARC (Group R), or Panavia F 2.0 (Group P) resin cement. After 24 hours, initial shear bond strengths of the resin cements to enamel and dentin were measured. Using new cylinders, the specimens were de-bonded and re-bonded twice to measure the first and the second bond strengths to enamel and dentin. Failure modes and bonding interfaces were examined. Data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel were similar for all the groups. The first (15.3 ± 2.2 MPa) and second (10.4 ± 2.2 MPa) bond strengths to dentin were significantly higher in Group V (P<.0001). Second bond strengths of dentin groups were significantly lower than initial and first bond strengths to dentin (P<.0001). CONCLUSION All resin cements have similar initial and repeated bond strengths to enamel. Variolink II has the highest first and second bond strength to dentin. Bond strength to dentin decreases after the first re-bonding for all resin cements. PMID:28243393

  18. Effect of adding ethylene glycol dimethacrylate to resin cements: durability against thermal stress of adhesion to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Y; Ikeda, Y

    1997-06-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the effect of the addition of a dimethacrylate to resin cements on bond strength between titanium and resin after thermocycling. Titanium disks, polished and treated with a phosphate monomer, were bonded to acrylic rods using two types of experimental resin cements. The cements were composed of methyl methacrylate (MMA) containing a tributylborane initiator and 0-10 wt% of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and two types of polymer component of hard poly (MMA) or soft fluoropolymer (2-6F). The bonded specimens were subjected to a thermocycling test in water and then to tensile strength testing. The addition of 5% or more dimethacrylate monomer to the two MMA-based resin cements caused a drastic decrease in bond strength to the metal after the thermocycling test. The resin prepared with soft 2-6F as a polymer component was significantly more durable than the rigid type resin based on PMMA. However, even a 1% addition of ECDMA to the 2-6F resin resulted in a significant decrease in durability.

  19. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

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    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  20. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  1. Degree of conversion of a resin cement light-cured through ceramic veneers of different thicknesses and types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnacles, Patrício; Correr, Gisele Maria; Baratto Filho, Flares; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    During the cementation of ceramic veneers the polymerization of resin cements may be jeopardized if the ceramics attenuate the irradiance of the light-curing device. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different types and thicknesses of ceramic veneers on the degree of conversion of a light-cured resin-based cement (RelyX Veneer). The cement was light-cured after interposing ceramic veneers [IPS InLine, IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS e.max LT (low translucency) and IPS e.max HT (high translucency) - Ivoclar Vivadent] of four thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm and 2.0 mm). As control, the cement was light-cured without interposition of ceramics. The degree of conversion was evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy (n=5). Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Significant differences were observed among groups (p0.05). Among 1.5-mm-thick veneers, IPS e.max LT was the only one that showed different results from the control (pveneers were able to produce cements with degrees of conversion similar to the control (p>0.05). The degree of conversion of the evaluated light-cured resin cement depends on the thickness and type of ceramics employed when veneers thicker than 1.5 mm are cemented.

  2. Effect of different laser surface treatment on microshear bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan Zanjani, Vagharaldin; Ahmadi, Hadi; Nateghifard, Afshin; Ghasemi, Amir; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Abdoh Tabrizi, Maryam; Alikhani, Farnaz; Razi, Reza; Nateghifard, Ardalan

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sandblasting, carbon dioxide (CO₂), and erbium,chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) lasers on the microshear bond strength of zirconia to resin cement. Sixty-one sintered yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia blocks (10 × 5 × 2 mm) were prepared and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15); one sample was retained as a control. The samples were treated by aluminium oxide air abrasion, CO₂4W, Er,Cr:YSGG 3W, and Er,Cr:YSGG 2W, respectively. One sample from each group and the control sample were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Panavia F2.0 resin microcylinders were prepared and placed on treated surfaces, light cured, and incubated for 48 h. Microshear bond strength testing was done by a microtensile tester machine, and the type of bond failures were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey's test at a significance level of P laser showed significantly higher bond strength than Er,Cr:YSGG 2W (P laser-treated surfaces, the roughness was much less than the air abrasion-treated surfaces, and the mode of failure was almost pure adhesive. Air abrasion has a greater effect than CO₂and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers in the treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces to enhance the bonding strength of resin cement to zirconia. CO₂laser at 4W and Er,Cr:YSGG laser at only 3-W output power can be regarded as surface treatment options for roughening the zirconia surface to establish better bond strength with resin cements. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 1: Effects of sandblasting and silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Mami; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of sandblasting and silanization on resin cement bond strengths to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Twenty four blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK) were divided into two resin cement groups (PANAVIA V5 [PV5] and PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX [PSA]), and further divided into four subgroups representing different surface treatment methods: no treatment (Ctl), silanization (Si), sandblasting (Sb), and Sb+Si. After resin application, microtensile bond strengths (μTBSs) were measured immediately, 1, 3 and 6 months after water storage. In addition, surfaces resulting from each of the treatment methods were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=370), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=103, PSA

  4. Effect of Fluoride-containing Mouthrinses on the Translucence of Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

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    Patrícia Petromilli Nordi Sasso Garcia

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of different fluoride-containing mouthrinses on the translucence of resin-modified glass ionomer cements, as a function of the restorative material used, the fluoride-containing solution employed and the time of immersion. Disks were prepared (10 mm × 2 mm with the modified glass ionomer cements Vitremer (3M and Fuji II LC (GC Co., and immersed in three fluoride-containing solutions: Fluordent Reach (Johnson & Johnson, Fluorgard (Colgate-Palmolive and Oral B (Gillette do Brasil Ltda. Translucence was measured with electrophoresis equipment (JOUAN after different immersion times. The results obtained were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test, and a statistically significant decrease was observed in the translucence of the materials after immersion in the fluoride-containing solutions. Fuji II LC demonstrated the lowest alteration in translucence, independently of the solution employed. Fluorgard was the fluoride-containing mouthrinse that promoted the highest alteration. It can be concluded that the fluoride-containing mouthrinses influenced the translucence of the resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

  5. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

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    Marta Invernizzi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Glass (GFR and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethylphenol as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  6. The influence of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements on bonding to metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzijden, C W; Feilzer, A J; Creugers, N H; Davidson, C L

    1992-02-01

    During the setting of a resin composite cement (RCC) used as an adhesive between a resin-bonded bridge and tooth structure, the adhesion may be disrupted by the development of shrinkage stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the shrinkage stress of three different RCCs on their adhesive and cohesive qualities when bonded to metal surfaces in a rigid set-up. Two opposing parallel NiCr discs (Wiron 77) were mounted in a tensilometer at a mutual distance of 200 microns and cemented with Panavia Ex, Clearfil F2, or Microfill Pontic C. The alloy surfaces were treated by either electrolytic etching, sand-blasting, silane-coating, or tin-plating. During setting, the discs were kept at their original mutual distance to simulate the extreme clinical situation of "complete" rigidity, where the casting and the tooth cannot move toward each other. The developing shrinkage stress was recorded continuously. During setting, the adhesive strength of the RCCs to silane-coated surfaces was always higher than their early cohesive strength. Electrolytically-etched surfaces as well as sand-blasted surfaces showed, in almost all cases, adhesive failure. The tin-plated samples showed mainly adhesive failure at the metal/resin interface. The highest bond strength values were found for silane-coated surfaces in combination with Clearfil F2.

  7. Bond Strength of Resin Cement and Glass Ionomer to Nd:YAG Laser-Treated Zirconia Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Ghorbanian, Foojan; Ahrary, Farzaneh; Rajati Haghi, Hamidreza; Karamad, Reza; Yari, Amir; Javan, Abdollah

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation on the surface properties and bond strength of zirconia ceramics. Forty-eight zirconia ceramic pieces (4 × 4 × 1 mm(3) ) were divided into four groups according to surface treatment as follows: two control groups (no treatment) for resin bonding (CRC) and glass ionomer (GI) bonding (CGC); two laser treatment groups (Nd:YAG irradiation, 3 W, 200 MJ, 10 Hz, 180 μs) for resin bonding (LRC) and GI bonding (LGC). The ceramics in the control groups and the laser groups were distinguished by the application of different cements (resin cement and GI). Following surface treatments, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement and GI. After bonding, the shear bond strength (SBS) of the ceramic to dentin was measured, and the failure mode of each specimen was analyzed using a stereomicroscope. A one-way ANOVA compared the average bond strength of the four groups. Pairwise comparisons among the groups were performed using the Games-Howell test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The means (± standard deviation) of SBS values in the CRC, CGC, LRC, and LGC groups were 3.98 ± 1.10, 1.66 ± 0.59, 10.24 ± 2.46, and 2.21 ± 0.38 MPa, respectively. Data showed that the application of the Nd:YAG laser resulted in a significantly greater SBS of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramics (p nd 83.3% in the LRC and LGC groups, respectively. In the CGC group, all failures were adhesive. Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via Nd:YAG laser improves the bond strength of the resin cement to the zirconia ceramic. GI cement does not provide sufficient bond strength of zirconia ceramics to dentin. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Influence of inorganic filler content on the radiopacity of dental resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Laura; Moldovan, Marioara; Prejmerean, Cristina; Nica, Luminita

    2012-01-01

    Digital radiography was used to measure the radiopacity of 18 resin cements to determine the influence of inorganic filler content on radiopacity. Four disk specimens (n=4) of each light-curing cement were digitally radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge using an intraoral sensor (XIOS Plus, Sirona, Germany), and their mean gray value measured. Percentage of filler by weight was determined using an analytical combustion furnace. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). All materials were more radiopaque than dentin and 12 materials were more radiopaque than enamel. Filler percentage ranged between 17.36 to 53.56 vol% and radiopacity between 1.02 to 3.40 mm Al. There were no statistically significant differences in inorganic filler percentage and radiopacity among the different shades of the same material (p>0.05), but the highest radiopacity was measured for the material which contained a higher percentage of filler.

  9. Tensile bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement to microabraded and silica-coated or tin-plated high noble ceramic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, J M; Davis, R D; Overton, J D

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of alloy surface microabrasion, silica coating, or microabrasion plus tin plating on the tensile bond strengths between a resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cement and a high-noble alloy. Bond strength between the microabraded alloy specimens and conventional glass-ionomer cement or resin cement were included for comparison. One hundred twenty uniform size, disk-shaped specimens were cast in a noble metal alloy and divided into 6 groups (n = 10 pairs/group). The metal surfaces of the specimens in each group were treated and cemented as follows. Group 1: No surface treatment (as cast, control), cemented with a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 2: Microabrasion with 50-microm aluminum oxide particles, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 3: A laboratory microabrasion and silica coating system, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 4: Microabrasion and tin-plating, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Group 5: Microabrasion only, conventional glass-ionomer cement. Group 6: Microabrasion and tin-plating, conventional resin cement. The uniaxial tensile bond strength for each specimen pair was determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine (Instron Corp, Canton, MA). Results were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (alpha = 0.05) and a Tukey post-hoc analysis. Mean bond strength: Group 1: 3.6 (+/- 1.5) MPa. Group 2: 4.2 (+/-0.5) MPa. Group 3: 6.7 (+/- 0.9) MPa. Group 4: 10.6 (+/- 1.8) MPa. Group 5: 1.1 (+/- 0.4) MPa. Group 6: 14.6 (+/- 2.3) MPa. Group 6 was significantly stronger than Group 4. The bond strength of specimens cemented with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 4) was significantly stronger than all other groups except the resin cement with microabrasion and tin-plating (Group 6). Microabraded and tin-plated alloy specimens luted with the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement resulted in the greatest mean tensile strengths

  10. 18-year survival of posterior composite resin restorations with and without glass ionomer cement as base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Françoise H; Rodolpho, Paulo A Da Rosa; Basso, Gabriela R; Patias, Rômulo; da Rosa, Quéren F; Demarco, Flávio F; Opdam, Niek J; Cenci, Maximiliano S

    2015-06-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of using intermediate layers underneath resin-composite restorations have been presented under different perspectives. Yet, few long-term clinical studies evaluated the effect of glass-ionomer bases on restoration survival. The present study investigated the influence of glass-ionomer-cement base in survival of posterior composite restorations, compared to restorations without base. Original datasets of one dental practice were used to retrieve data retrospectively. The presence or absence of an intermediate layer of glass-ionomer-cement was the main factor under analysis, considering survival, annual failure rate and types of failure as outcomes. Other investigated factors were: patient gender, jaw, tooth, number of restored surfaces and composite. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test, Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox-regression. In total 632 restorations in 97 patients were investigated. Annual failure rates percentages up to 18-years were 1.9% and 2.1% for restorations with and without base, respectively. In restorations with glass-ionomer-cement base, fracture was the predominant reason for failure, corresponding to 57.8% of total failures. Failure type distribution was different (p=0.007) comparing restorations with and without base, but no effect in the overall survival of restorations was found (p=0.313). The presence of a glass-ionomer-cement base did not affect the survival of resin-composite restorations in the investigated sample. Acceptable annual failure rates after 18-years can be achieved with both techniques, leading to the perspective that an intermediate layer, placed during an interim treatment, may be maintained without clinical detriment, but no improvement in survival should be expected based on such measure. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajong, K. H.; Damiyanti, M.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) is a restoration material composed of powder and liquid whose stability is affected by its shelf life. This is an issue that has not been taken into consideration by customers or sellers. To observe the effects of shelf life on the compressive strength of RMGIC, 30 cylindrical (d = 4mm and t = 6mm) specimens of RMGIC (Fuji II LC, GC, Tokyo, Japan) were divided into three groups with different storage times and their compressive strength was tested with a universal testing machine. Results were statistically analyzed with the one-way ANOVA test. There were significant differences (pvalue along with the duration of storage time.

  12. Effect of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of two resin cements to aged simulated composite core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Behnaz; Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Shakerian, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Roughening of the aged composite resin core (CRC) surface seems essential for durable adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments and different resin cements on microtensile bond strength (µ TBS) between two aged core build-up composites (CBCs) and feldspathic ceramic. A total of 16 composite blocks made of two CBCs, Core.it and Build-it were randomly assigned to four surface treatment groups after water storage and thermocycling (2 weeks and 500 cycles). Experimental groups included surface roughening with air abrasion (AA), hydrofluoric acid, pumice, and laser and then were bonded to computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic blocks using two resin cements, Panavia F2 (PF), and Duo-link (DL). The µ TBS was tested, and the fracture mode was assessed. The data were analyzed with multiple analysis of variance to estimate the contribution of different surface treatments, resin cements, and two aged CRCs on µ TBS. Statistical significance level was set at α strength (P strength was in AA group cemented with PF (31.83 MPa). The most common failure mode was cohesive fracture in the cement. Different surface treatments had different effects on µ TBS of aged CRCs to feldspathic ceramics. PF was significantly better than DL.

  13. Immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements and retention of glass-fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and post holes of 9 mm in depth were prepared. Fiber posts were luted using one of two SARCs, BisCem(r (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, USA or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE, Saint Paul, USA, or a regular (etch-and-rinse resin cement (AllCem; FGM, Joinvile, Brazil. Photoactivation was performed immediately, or at 5 or 10 min after cementation. Root/post specimens were transversely sectioned 7 days after luting into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' method (α = 0.05. Immediate photoactivation resulted in the highest bond strength for Unicem. BisCem(r demonstrated higher bond strength values when photoactivated after a 10-min delay. Immediate photoactivation yielded the lowest bond strengths for AllCem, although no differences in bond strength were observed between photoactivation delayed by 5 and 10 min. In conclusion, the moment of resin cement photoactivation may affect the intraradicular retention of fiber posts, depending upon the resin cement used for luting.

  14. Adhesion of 10-MDP containing resin cements to dentin with and without the etch-and-rinse technique

    OpenAIRE

    Turp, Volkan; Sen, Deniz; Tuncelli, Betul; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion of 10-MDP containing self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin with and without the use of etch-and-rinse technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Human third molars (N=180) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=30 per group). Conventional (Panavia F2.0, Kuraray-PAN) and self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA, Kuraray-CSA) were bonded to dentin surfaces either after application of 3-step etch-and-rinse (35% H3PO4 + ED Primer) or two-step self-etc...

  15. Comparative study of the radiopacity of resin cements used in aesthetic dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterde-Hernández, Manuel; Cabanillas-Casabella, Cristina; Pallares-Sabater, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the radiopacity of 6 modern resin cements with that of human enamel and dentine using the Digora digital radiography system, to verify whether they meet the requirements of ANSI/ADA specification no. 27/1993 and the ISO 4049/2000 standard and assess whether their radiopacity is influenced by the thickness of the cement employed. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three 3-thickness samples (0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm) were fabricated for each material. The individual cement samples were radiographed on the CCD sensor next to the aluminium wedge and the tooth samples. Five radiographs were made of each sample and therefore five readings of radiographic density were taken for each thickness of the materials. The radiopacity was measured in pixels using Digora 2.6 software. The calibration curve obtained from the mean values of each step of the wedge made it possible to obtain the equivalent in mm of aluminium for each mm of the luting material. RESULTS With the exception of Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0, all the cements studied were more radiopaque than enamel and dentin (P<.05) and complied with the ISO and ANSI/ADA requirements (P<.001). The radiopacity of all the cements examined depended on their thickness: the thicker the material, the greater its radiopacity. CONCLUSION All materials except Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0 yielded radiopacity values that complied with the recommendations of the ISO and ANSI/ADA. Variolink Veneer Medium Value 0 showed less radiopacity than enamel and dentin. PMID:27350854

  16. Effect of artificial saliva and pH on shear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramipanah, F; Majidpour, M; Sadighpour, L; Fard, M J Kharazi

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of media with different pH on shear and strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramics. Sixty rectangularly shaped specimens made of a zirconia based ceramic (Cercon, Dentsply) were prepared, air-blasted with 110 microm aluminum oxide particles (Al203) and randomly assigned into three groups (n = 30). A universal resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M/ESPE) was bonded to each specimen using one of the following three cements: Calibra (Dentsply), Panavia F2 (kurary) and Unicem (3M/ESPE). Specimens were thermal cycled and stored in one of the following three media for two weeks: water at pH = 7, saliva at pH = 7 and saliva at pH = 3.5. The mean shear bond strength of each group was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (alpha = 0.05). The modes of failure were recorded using a streomicroscope. All specimens in the Calibra groups showed premature debonding. No significant difference was found between the two other cements or different media. The failure modes in the two latter cements were predominantly adhesive. Despite the adverse effect of acidic media on the properties of restorative materials, the media did not significantly influence the bond strength of MDP-containing resin cement and a self-adhesive cement to a zirconia- based ceramic.

  17. Effects of curing protocols on fluid kinetics and hardness of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizero, Nádia da Rocha; Silva, Marília Santos; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Rodrigues, Flávia Pires; Hipólito, Vinícius Di; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti

    2013-01-01

    The effects of polymerization protocols on water sorption/solubility, the diffusion coefficient (D), the flux (J), and the hardness (KH) of two resin cements were evaluated. The materials were manipulated and divided into three groups (n=6) according to the curing protocol: PA=photoactivation (40 s); DP=delayed photoactivation (10 min self-curing plus 40 s photoactivated); CA=chemical activation. After desiccation, the specimens were weighed, stored in water (37ºC), evaluated over 28-days, and hardness recorded. Chemical activation resulted in lower net water uptake, D, and J for RelyX ARC (RX). For Variolink II (VL), CA yielded equivalent D and lower J; however, photoactivation resulted in lower net water uptake. Hardness of VL was less affected by the water storage, irrespective of the polymerization protocol. Considering the water diffusion parameters, VL demonstrated immediate photoactivation dependence; for RX, a chemical activation. Different polymerization protocols affect the fluid kinetics and the hardness of the resin cements tested.

  18. Evaluation of sealing ability of two temporary resin-based cements used in Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Mariana Ramos Bitencourt

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The outcome of endodontic treatment is related to the sealing ability of temporary dental restoration, which aims to prevent bacterial infiltration and recontamination of the root canal system.Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of two temporary resin-based cements: Fill Magic Tempo and Bioplic.Material and methods: Twenty-four third molars were used, and twenty-two of them were opened to the pulp chamber (resulting in a class I cavity and randomly divided: group 1 was restored using Fill Magic Tempo (n = 10 and group 2 was restored using Bioplic (n = 10.The negative control group was not opened (n = 2, and the positive control group was opened but not restored (n = 2. Then the root and apex of the teeth were varnished to become impermeable. All samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue and kept at 37°C for 72h.After longitudinal sectioning, the linear leakage was measured in mm.In sequence, the statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney test with a level of significance of 5%. Results: Most part of the samples showed leakage of 1 mm, and only the negative control group showed total leakage. There was no significant difference between the tested materials. Conclusion: It is possible to conclude that both resin-based cements showed satisfactory results on sealing ability during endodontic treatment.

  19. Color changes in resin cement polymerized with different curing lights under indirect restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Bayindir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of different interface materials and curing units on color changes in a resin cement material. Materials and Methods: Three interface materials and different curing systems, quartz-tungsten-halogen and polywave and monowave light-emitting diode (LED light curing units, were studied at two-time intervals. Polystyrene strip was used as a control group. All measurements were made on a white background for standard color measurement. According to the CIE LFNx01aFNx01bFNx01 color space, the baseline color values of each specimen were measured. Differences between the measurements were calculated as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA and Duncan′s tests (α = 0.05 with SPSS 20.0 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. ANOVA revealed significance for interface materials and curing units and time for ΔE (P 0.05. Monowave LED exhibited significantly higher color changes than the other units ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 2.94 ± 0.44]. QTH promoted composite specimens significantly less color change ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 0.87 ± 0.41]. Conclusion: This study concluded that color of resin cement used in the adhesion of indirect restorations was affected by curing device light and indirect restoration material type.

  20. Preparation of Anti-Scratch Optical Light Diffusing Film Via Thermal/UV Dual Curing Method%热/UV双重固化制备耐划伤光学扩散膜

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柱; 夏萍; 邓康清; 龚露露; 常征; 施文芳

    2013-01-01

    采用热/UV双重固化方式制备高透光率、高雾度光学扩散膜扩散涂层.分别研究了不同树脂/粒子比例(以热固化树脂为参考)、双重固化树脂比例(UV固化树脂/热固化树脂),以及相同树脂/粒子比例条件下不同粒子粒径等参数对光学扩散膜扩散涂层力学性能、光学性能的影响.对制备的光学扩散膜扩散涂层力学、光学性能及表观形貌进行表征.测试结果表明:使用合适比例的热/UV混合固化树脂,能够制备出具有耐划伤性能且翘曲度较低的光学扩散膜扩散涂层.%A kind of high light transmittance and high haze diffusion optical light diffusion film was prepared using thermal/UV dual curing methods.The influence of the different resin/ particle ratio(base on the thermosetting resin),the ratio of dual curing resin(UV Curing resin/thermosetting resin) and different size particles with the same resin/particle ratio on the mechanical properties and optical performance of optical diffusion film diffusion coating were studied,respectively.The particle size and its distribution was tested,optical properties and surface morphology of the optical light diffusion coating were characterized.The test results showed that,a kind of anti-scratch diffusion coating of optical light diffusion film which possesses low curl value could be produced when using proper ratio of dual curing resin.

  1. Assessment of Tensile Bond Strength of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin to Enamel Using Two Types of Resin Cements and Three Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-bonded bridgework with a metal framework is one of the most conservative ways to replace a tooth with intact abutments. Visibility of metal substructure and debonding are the complications of these bridgeworks. Today, with the introduction of fiber-reinforced composite resins, it is possible to overcome these complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite resin materials (FRC to enamel. Methods: Seventy-two labial cross-sections were prepared from intact extracted teeth. Seventy-two rectangular samples of cured Vectris were prepared and their thickness was increased by adding Targis. The samples were divided into 3 groups for three different surface treatments: sandblasting, etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid, and roughening with a round tapered diamond bur. Each group was then divided into two subgroups for bonding to etched enamel by Enforce and Variolink II resin cements. Instron universal testing machine was used to apply a tensile force. The fracture force was recorded and the mode of failure was identified under a reflective microscope. Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the three surface treatment groups (P=0.53. The mean bond strength of Variolink II cement was greater than that of Enforce (P=0.04. There was no relationship between the failure modes (cohesive and adhesive and the two cement types. There was some association between surface treatment and failure mode. There were adhesive failures in sandblasted and diamond-roughened groups and the cohesive failure was dominant in the etched group. Conclusion: It is recommended that restorations made of fiber-reinforced composite resin be cemented with VariolinkII and surface-treated by hydrofluoric acid. Keywords: Tensile bond strength; surface treatment methods; fiber-reinforced composite resin

  2. Shear bond strength of a self-etched resin cement to an indirect composite: effect of different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harorli, O T; Barutcugil, C; Kirmali, O; Kapdan, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of resin cement (Rely X-U200) bonded to differently conditioned indirect composite samples. Sixty-six composite resin specimens (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were prepared with an indirect composite resin (Grandia) and randomly divided into six groups. Surfaces of the samples were treated with one of the following treatments; %37 phosphoric acid etching, sandblasting, 1,5 W, 2 W and 3 W erbium, chromium: Yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser application. An untreated group was used as a control. In each group surface of the sample was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. The remaining samples (n = 60) were built up with a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X-U200) 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm height. After 24 h water storage at 37°C, the prepared specimens were submitted to shear bond strength test. One-way analysis of variance was used to analyze the bond strength values of different groups. Highest shear bond strength values were observed in sandblasting group however there were not statistical difference among the tested surface treatment methods. In Shear bond strength of resin, cement was independent of the surface conditioning methods applied on tested indirect resin composite.

  3. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Velagala L; Bhargavi Dhamaraju; Indira Priyadharsini Bollu; Tandri S Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into th...

  4. The effects of different shades of resin luting cement on the color of ceramic veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Mohammed Q; Aljurais, Rana M; Alshaafi, Maan M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the effects of different shades of light-polymerized resin cement on the color of two different thicknesses (0.5 mm and 0.7 mm) of three different ceramic materials (Esthetic, e.max, and ZirPress). A spectrophotometer (Color Eye 7000A - CIE (L*a*b*) was used to measure the color of specimens on the control substrate without cement, and then on (Translucent, White Opaque, B0.5, A1, and A3 of RelyX™ Veneer cement). The mean values of color difference (ΔE) were higher for Esthetic, followed by ZirPress, with the lowest values for e.max. The mean values of ΔE decreased when the thickness of ceramic increased from 0.5 mm to 0.7 mm. It was observed that the White Opaque had significantly increased ΔE values when compared with (TR, B0.5, A1, and A3), whereas no significant difference between B0.5 and TR, and between B0.5 and A3.

  5. Optical fiber sensors and their application in monitoring stress build-up in dental resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Fernandez Fernandez, A.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.

    2005-09-01

    The field of optical fiber sensing is highly diverse and this diversity is perceived as a great advantage over more conventional sensors in that an optical sensor can be tailored to measure any of a myriad of physical parameters. In this paper we present a niche application for optical fiber sensors in the domain of biophotonics, namely the monitoring of stress build-up during the curing process of dental resin cements. We discuss the origin of this stress build-up and the problems it can cause when treating patients. Optical fiber sensors aim at excelling in two kind of applications: firstly to perform quality control on batch produced dental cements and measure their total material shrinkage, secondly to monitor the hardening of the cement during in-vivo measurements resulting in the dynamic measurement of the shrinkage and to control the stress in a facing based restoration. We therefore investigated two types of optical fiber sensors as alternatives to conventional measurement techniques; namely polarimetric optical fiber sensors and fiber Bragg gratings written in polarization maintaining fibers. After discussing the results obtained with both optical fiber sensors, we will conclude with a critical assessment of the suitability of the two proposed sensing configurations for multi-parameter stress monitoring.

  6. Influence of fluoride- or triclosan-based desensitizing agents on adhesion of resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mine; Cal, Ebru; Gökçe, Bülent; Türkün, Murat; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2010-10-01

    Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of resin cements to dentin was evaluated. Intact premolars (N = 90) were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate; dentin surfaces were exposed, and they were randomly divided into two main groups of cements (Duolink (D), Variolink II (V); n = 45 per group) and then into three desensitizer subgroups (n = 15 per subgroup). Teeth in controls (C) were treated according to cements' adhesion protocols; the other two groups received either fluoride- [Aqua-Prep F (F)] or triclosan-based [Seal&Protect (T)] desensitizers. Ceramic disks (Empress 2) were adhered; specimens were thermocycled (×5,000 cycles, 5-55 ± 1°C, dwell time 30 s) and subjected to shear bond strength test (MPa ± SD) in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Failure types were classified using scanning electron microscope. For V, application of both desensitizers (29.6 ± 7.8 and 22.8 ± 2.8 for F and T, respectively) did not present significantly different results than that of the VC (21.2 ± 2.3; p > 0.05, one-way ANOVA). In D, F (20.6 ± 2.4) showed significantly higher results (p types.

  7. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Häner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for μTBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H₃PO₄) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and μTBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg⁻¹ of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H₃PO₄ or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the μTBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the μTBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher μTBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials.

  8. Histological assessment of pulpal responses to resin modified glass ionomer cements in human teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eskandarizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biocompatibility of resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs as a lining material is still under question. The present study evaluated the response of the pulp-dentin complex following application of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, calcium hydroxide and conventional glass-ionomer in deep cavities prepared in human teeth. Materials and Methods: In this controlled clinical trial, 30 deep class V buccal cavities (3 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm were prepared in human premolars treatment planned to be extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into 3 groups. Groups were lined by a RMGI (Vivaglass, conventional glass Ionomer (Ionocid and calcium hydroxide respectively. The cavities were subsequently filled with amalgam. Each group was then divided into two sub-groups according to time intervals 5 and 30 days. The patients were referred to Kerman Dental School and in accordance with orthodontic treatment plan; premolars were extracted and then prepared for histological assessment. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid Schiff techniques. All of the samples were examined using a number of criteria including odontoblastic changes, inflammatory cells response, reactionary dentin formation and presence of microorganisms. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. P 0.05. Conclusion: Ionocid and Vivaglass resin-modified glass ionomers can be used as lining materials in human teeth.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the Long-term bond strength of two resin cements to enamel and dentin

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    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : In this in vitro study, the long-term bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement and conventional resin cements to human enamel and dentin was compared .   Materials and Methods: 80 sections of intact human third molars were randomly assigned into eight groups according to the cement type [Rely X Unicem (RXU, Rely X ARC (RXA], bond substrate (enamel, dentin and the duration of water storage (24 h or 1 year. Rods of cements (0.75×1 mm were prepared on the top surface of specimens using Tygon tubes. The micro-shear bond strengths of specimens were measured by a micro-tensile tester. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed ranks and Mann Whitney tests ( α =0.05.   Results: The bond strengths of RXA and RXU cements to enamel after 24h were 18.56±4.08 MPa and 14.99±4.17 MPa, and after 1 year were 19.41±6.24 MPa and 15.51±6.17 MPa, respectively. The bond strengths of RXA and RXU cements to dentin were 13.36±4.02 MPa and 14.16±4.69 MPa after 24h , and 14.63±5.96 MPa and 14.08±6.72 MPa after 1 year, respectively. Tooth substrate had significant effect only on the shear bond strength of RXA cement after 24h (P=0.01, while no other significant differences were found in this study (P>0.05.   Conclusion: According to the results of this study, one-step self-adhesive and multi-step conventional resin cements were similarly effective in bonding to enamel and dentin after 1 year water storage.

  10. Immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of different luting resin cements to different regional dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdelraheem Mohamed; Hamouda, Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazy, Mohamed Hamed; Abo-Madina, Manal Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    We sought to evaluate immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of Panavia F2.0 and Multilink Sprint resin cement to superficial, deep and cervical dentin. Thirty-six freshly extracted non-carious human molars were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction to expose three different dentin regions including superficial dentin (1 mm below the dentine-enamel junction), deep dentin (1 mm above the highest pulp horn) and cervical dentin (0.5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction and 0.5 mm below the dentine-enamel junction). Resin cements were applied on dentin surfaces and composite blocks were luted under constant seating pressure. Each group was divided into three subgroups according to time intervals. Specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of 1 mm(2) in diameter and subjected to microtensile bond strength testing at a cross head speed of 1 mm/min. Both resin cements showed higher micro-tensile bond strength to superficial dentin than that to deep or cervical dentin (P Micro-tensile bond strengths of Panavia F2.0 were higher than those of Multilink Sprint at different dentin regions (P micro-tensile bond strengths were higher than those of delayed micro-tensile bond strengths for both resin cements (P micro-tensile bond strengths to different dentin regions.

  11. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR, VI

  12. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR, VI

  13. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felipe Valandro, Luiz; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Cicero; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Scotti, Roberto; Della Bona, Alvaro

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia) ce

  14. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, L.F.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.C.; Bottino, M.A.; Scotti, R.; Della Bona, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia) ce

  15. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  16. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.A.; Valandro, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR,

  17. Bond strength of a resin cement to high-alumina and zirconia-reinforced ceramics: The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valandro, L.F.; Ozcan, M.; Bottino, M.C.; Bottino, M.A.; Scotti, R.; Della Bona, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to three high-strength core ceramics: high alumina-based (In-Ceram Alumina, Procera AllCeram) and zirconia-reinforced alumina-based (in-Ceram Zirconia)

  18. Effect of the cross-linking silane concentration in a novel silane system on bonding resin-composite cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo; Kalk, Warner; Vallittu, Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Four experimental blends of an organo-functional silane monomer with a non-functional cross-linking silane monomer (a novel silane system) were evaluated as adhesion promoters in an experiment in which a resin-composite cement was bonded to silica-coated titanium. Material and Methods. 3-

  19. Comparison of Microleakage and Thickness of Resin Cement in Ceramic Inlays with Various Temperatures

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    Homayoun Alaghemand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Microleakage is still one of the major problems of composite-based restorations. This study compared the microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures. Materials and methods. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of thirty human molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in dentin (3 mm wide, 5 mm long and 2 mm deep. Laboratory-made inlays (LMI were used for buccal cavities, and CAD/CAM inlays (CMI were used for lingual cavities. All the cavities were divided into six groups (n=10: 1 LMI at -5°C; 2 LMI at 50°C; 3 LMI at room temperature (25°C; 4 CMI at -5°C; 5 CMI at 50°C; 6 CMI at room temperature (25°C. Inlays were bonded to cavities in a pulp pressure- and temperaturesimulating device. After thermocycling and dye penetration, the teeth were divided into two mesiodistal halves. Amount of dye penetration and film thickness were measured under a stereomicroscope and analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon and Spearman's correlation tests ( = 0.05. Results. There were no statistically significant differences in leakage between different inlay temperatures (P > 0.05. The mean cement thickness in laboratory-made inlays (gingival margin, 83.7 ± 11 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 19 was greater than that in CAD/CAM inlays (gingival margin, 69 ± 16 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 16. No correlation was found between cement thickness and microleakage either in enamel or dentin for any of the ceramic systems. Conclusion. Differences in inlay temperature had no effect on microleakage. CAD/CAM inlays had lower cement thickness than laboratory-made inlays, but this was not related to their microleakage.

  20. Comparison of microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghemand, Homayoun; Abolghasemzadeh, Faezeh; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Judi Chelan, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Microleakage is still one of the major problems of composite-based restorations.This study compared the microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures. Materials and methods. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of thirty human molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in dentin (3 mm wide, 5 mm long and 2 mm deep). Laboratory-made inlays (LMI) were used for buccal cavities, and CAD/CAM inlays (CMI) were used for lingual cavities. All the cavities were divided into six groups (n=10): 1) LMI at -5°C; 2) LMI at 50°C; 3) LMI at room temperature (25°C); 4) CMI at -5°C; 5) CMI at 50°C; 6) CMI at room temperature (25°C). Inlays were bonded to cavities in a pulp pressure- and temperature-simulating device. After thermocycling and dye penetration, the teeth were divided into two mesiodistal halves. Amount of dye penetration and film thickness were measured under a stereomicroscope and analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon and Spearman's correlation tests ( = 0.05). Results. There were no statistically significant differences in leakage between different inlay temperatures (P > 0.05). The mean cement thickness in laboratory-made inlays (gingival margin, 83.7 ± 11 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 19) was greater than that in CAD/CAM inlays (gingival margin, 69 ± 16 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 16). No correlation was found be-tween cement thickness and microleakage either in enamel or dentin for any of the ceramic systems. Conclusion. Differences in inlay temperature had no effect on microleakage. CAD/CAM inlays had lower cement thickness than laboratory-made inlays, but this was not related to their microleakage.

  1. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti, E-mail: joserenatocq@hotmail.com [Potiguar University, Department of Biotechnology, Natal (Brazil); Nogueira Junior, Lafayette [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Massi, Marcos [Federal University of São Paulo, Institute of Science and Technology, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio [São Paulo State University, Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Materials, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva [Technological Institute of Aeronautics, Department of Physics, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Özcan, Mutlu [University of Zurich, Dental Materials Unit, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Dental Materials Science, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0–14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  2. Effects of radiant exposure and wavelength spectrum of light-curing units on chemical and physical properties of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Fonseca Lima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives In this study, we evaluated the influence of different radiant exposures provided by single-peak and polywave light-curing units (LCUs on the degree of conversion (DC and the mechanical properties of resin cements. Materials and Methods Six experimental groups were established for each cement (RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE; LuxaCore Dual, Ivoclar Vivadent; Variolink, DMG, according to the different radiant exposures (5, 10, and 20 J/cm2 and two LCUs (single-peak and polywave. The specimens were made (7 mm in length × 2 mm in width × 1 mm in height using silicone molds. After 24 hours of preparation, DC measurement was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The same specimens were used for the evaluation of mechanical properties (flexural strength, FS; elastic modulus, E by a three-point bending test. Data were assessed for normality, after which two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test were performed. Results No properties of the Variolink cement were influenced by any of the considered experimental conditions. In the case of the RelyX ARC cement, DC was higher when polywave LCU was used; FS and E were not influenced by the conditions evaluated. The LuxaCore cement showed greater sensitivity to the different protocols. Conclusions On the basis of these results, both the spectrum of light emitted and the radiant exposure used could affect the properties of resin cements. However, the influence was material-dependent.

  3. The Evaluation of a Resin-modified Glass Ionome Cement for Bonding Orthodontic Brackets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fujun; PENG Youjian; PENG Bin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strength(SBS)and bond failure interface after the debonding of orthodontic brackets with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement(RMGIC)under six bonding conditions,140 premolar teeth were randomly divided into seven groups.The brackets of all groups,except for control group,were bonded using a RMGIC.The teeth were debonded using a universal testing machine.The shear bond strength,adhesive remnant index(ARI)and enamel fracture were examined for each debonding.A significant difference existed in SBS under wet and dry condi-tions in two groups of Fuji Ortho LC.Different degree of enamel fracture was seen in groups of Fuji Ortho LC(dry/37%phosphoric acid treated)after debonding.Bond failed predominantly at the enamel-adhesive interface,except for phosphoric acid treated groups.The RMGIC achieve a clinically effective adhesion in orthodontics under different bonding conditions.

  4. Effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezzizadeh, Maryam; Nojedehian, Hanieh; Valizadeh Haghi, Haleh

    2017-01-31

    This study aimed to assess the effect of bioglass and silica coating of zirconia substrate on its bond strength to resin cement. A total of 120 specimens were used in this in-vitro, experimental study. Zirconia discs measuring 10×7×2 mm were cut from Y-TZP zirconia blocks, sintered, cleaned and received different surface treatments of sandblasting, bioglass powder coating+etching, bioglass powder coating+etching+silanization, bioglass slurry coating+etching, bioglass slurry coating+etching+silanization, silica coating+silanization, silica coating+etching+silanization and no treatment group (control). Then the microshear bond strength testing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were done. Data were analyzed using the Mann Whitney U and the Kruskal Wallis tests. Significant differences existed in bond strength of different groups (p<0.001). The sandblasted and bioglass coated groups showed higher and the colloidal silica-coated groups showed lower bond strength compared to the control group.

  5. Microleakage evaluation of class V restorations with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcacio; Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the marginal microleakage of conventional Glass Ionomer Cements (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGIC). The tested materials were grouped as follows: GIC category - G1 (Vidrion R - SSWhite); G2 (Vitro Fill - DFL); G3 (Vitro Molar - DFL); G4 (Bioglass R - Biodinâmica); and G5 (Ketac Fill - 3M/ESPE); and RMGIC category - G6 (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE); G7 (Vitro Fill LC - DFL); and G8 (Resiglass - Biodinâmica). Therefore, 80 class V cavities (2.0X2.0 mm) were prepared in bovine incisors, either in the buccal face. The samples were randomly divided into 8 groups and restored using each material tested according to the manufacturer. The root apices were then sealed with acrylic resin. The teeth were stored for 24 h in 100% humidity at 37°C. After storage, the specimens were polished with extra-slim burs and silicon disc (Soft-lex - 3M/ESPE), then were isolated with cosmetic nail polish up to 1 mm around the restoration. Then, the samples were immersed in 50% AgNO3 solution for 12 h and in a developing solution for 30 min. They were rinsed and buccal-lingual sectioned. The evaluation of the microleakage followed scores from 0 to 3. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn method test were applied (a=0.05). The results showed that there was no difference between the enamel and dentin margins. However, GIC materials presented more microleakage than RMGIC.

  6. Fluoride release and uptake from glass ionomer cements and composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, P; Miranda, L A; Maltz, M; Samuel, S M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate fluoride release and uptake from 4 glass ionomer cements (GICs)--Vitremer (VIT), Fuji II LC (FII LC), Fuji IX (FIX), Chelon Fill (CHE)--and 2 composite resins (CRs)--Heliomolar (H) and Zeta-100 (Z-100). Eight discs (8 mm x 2 mm) were made of each material and were stored in plastic vials containing artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. In group 1 (N = 3), the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva which was changed daily for 25 days. In group 2 (N = 5), besides receiving the same treatment as group 1, the specimens were immersed, after 24 hours, in a fluoride solution (1% NaF) for 1 min before daily saliva change. An ion-specific electrode (9609 BN-Orion) connected to an ion analyzer (SA-720 Procyon) was used to determine the amount of fluoride released at days 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25. Data were analyzed using two way ANOVA and Friedman's test. GICs released more fluoride during the first day and after this period the mean fluoride released decreased. Composite resin H released fluoride during the first day only and Z-100 did not release fluoride. In terms of NaF treatment, CRs did not show fluoride uptake, whereas the GICs showed fluoride uptake (VIT = FII LC = CHE > FIX).

  7. Influence of Pre-Sintered Zirconia Surface Conditioning on Shear Bond Strength to Resin Cement

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    Tomofumi Sawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite on zirconia surface to which a specific conditioner was applied before sintering. After sintering of either conditioner-coated or uncoated specimens, both groups were divided into three subgroups by their respective surface modifications (n = 10 per group: no further treatment; etched with hydrofluoric acid; and sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 particles. Surfaces were characterized by measuring different surface roughness parameters (e.g., Ra and Rmax and water contact angles. Half of the specimens underwent thermocycling (10,000 cycles, 5–55 °C after self-adhesive resin cement build-up. The SBSs were measured using a universal testing machine, and the failure modes were analyzed by microscopy. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and parametric tests followed by post-hoc comparisons (α = 0.05. Conditioner-coated specimens increased both surface roughness and hydrophilicity (p < 0.01. In the non-thermocycled condition, sandblasted surfaces showed higher SBSs than other modifications, irrespective of conditioner application (p < 0.05. Adhesive fractures were commonly observed in the specimens. Thermocycling favored debonding and decreased SBSs. However, conditioner-coated specimens upon sandblasting showed the highest SBS (p < 0.05 and mixed fractures were partially observed. The combination of conditioner application before sintering and sandblasting after sintering showed the highest shear bond strength and indicated improvements concerning the failure mode.

  8. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Coatings Through Dual-Cure Processes: State of the Art and Perspectives

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    Giulio Malucelli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current state of the art related to the synthesis and characterization of hybrid organic-inorganic (O/I coatings obtained through the exploitation of dual-cure processes, which involve a photo-induced polymerization followed by a thermal treatment: this latter allows the occurrence of sol-gel reactions of suitable alkoxy precursors already embedded in the UV-curable system. After a brief introduction on hybrid organic-inorganic coatings, the first part of the review is focused on the design and feasibility issues provided by the dual-cure method, emphasizing the possibility of tuning the structure of the final hybrid network on the basis of the composition of the starting liquid mixture. Then, some recent examples of hybrid organic-inorganic networks are thoroughly described, showing their potential advances and the application fields to which they can be addressed.

  9. Influence of Photoinitiator and Light-Curing Source on Bond Strength of Experimental Resin Cements to Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segreto, Dario Raimundo; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo; Brandt, William Cunha; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength (BS) of experimental resin cements formulated with different photoinitiators when activated by two kinds of light-curing units (LCUs) through a ceramic material. Seven resin blends with different camphorquinone (CQ) and/or phenylpropanedione (PPD) concentrations (weight) were prepared: C5: 0.5% CQ; C8: 0.8% CQ; P5: 0.5% PPD; P8: 0.8% PPD; C1P4: 0.1% CQ and 0.4% PPD; C4P1: 0.4% CQ and 0.1% PPD; C4P4: 0.4% CQ and 0.4% PPD. Two LCUs were used: one quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH - 850 mW/cm²) and one light-emitting diode (LED - 1300 mW/cm²). The microtensile bond strength of each blend was assessed. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The BS values did not exhibit significant differences for LCUs, regardless of the photoinitiator type. Three cements showed significant differences: P5 and C5 had higher BS with QTH, and C4P1 with LED. For QTH, P5 showed the highest and C1P4 the lowest BS. For the LED, C4P1 showed the highest BS of all the cements. The results indicated that PPD was a viable alternative in the formulation of photocured resin cements, reducing or eliminating CQ that is yellowish without impairing the bond strength. Furthermore, both LED and QTH were effective in curing resin cements that contain PPD or CQ.

  10. Effect of APF gel on micromorphology of resin modified glass-ionomer cements and flowable compomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benderli, Y; Gökçe, K; Kazak, M

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface micromorphology of resin modified glass-ionomer cements and flowable compomers. In the study two resin modified glass-ionomers and two flowable compomers were used to prepare standardized 20 cylinderic samples. Samples were divided into four groups. Surface treatments with APF gel for experimental groups (group B,C,D) or distilled water as a control (group A) were performed four times. In group B, only APF gel was applied. In group C, after the APF gel application, the samples were immersed into the demineralizing and remineralizing solutions. In group D, before the APF gel application, the buffer solution was applied. The examinations of the surface micromorphology of the materials were made by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results showed that in group B all of the materials except Compoglass Flow, and in group C all of the materials showed erratic behaviours. In group D, severe erratic effect (score 2) was obtained on the surfaces of Vivaglassliner and Dyract Flow, and for the others score 1 signals were found. The moderate degradation was obtained by applying of only APF gel on the surfaces of both material groups. The addition of pH circulation caused increasing of micromorphologic changes on the surfaces of all materials. The effect of application of buffer solution on the surfaces before APF gel changed according to the materials. If acidulated fluoride gel is preferred for prophylactic therapy in patients' mouth, for the success, either buffer or neutral fluoride have to be applied on the restored teeth by resin based materials before acidulated fluoride application.

  11. Comparison of the resin cement bond strength to an indirect composites treated by Er;YAG laser and sandblast

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    Mansure Mirzaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Indirect composites are designed to overcome the shortcomings of direct composites such as polymerization shrinkage and low degree of conversion. But, good adhesion of resin cements to indirect composites is still difficult. This research was designed to assess the effect of different powers of Er;YAG laser compared with sandblasting. On the micro tensil bond strength of resin cement to indirect composites.   Materials and Methods: Specimens were prepred using dental resin composite (Gradia GC and metallic mold (15×5×5 mm and were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 24 blocks were prepared and randomly divided into 12 groups. G1:no treatment (as control, G 2-6: Er; YAG laser irradiation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watt, G7: sandblast. Two composite blocks were bonded to each other with Panavia F.2. resin cement. The cylindrical sections with dimensions of 1 mm were tested in a microtensile bond strength tester device using 0.5 mm/min speed until fracture points. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Interaction between lasers irradiation and sandblast treatments were significant (P0.05 whether samples were sandblasted or not. Samples which received 300 mJ of laser showed lower bond strength compared with no laser treatment. Other groups showed no significant difference (P>0.05.   Conclusion: It seems that application of sandblast with proper variables, is a good way to improve bond strength.Laser application had no influence in improving the bond strength between the indirect composite and resin cement.

  12. Comparison of Endodontic Medicaments on Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Dentin Using Resin Cement

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    Maryam Zare Jahromi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Endodontic irrigants and medicaments may affect the bond strength of intracanal posts to root dentin. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH2 and 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX on bond strength of fiber post cemented with resin cement to root dentin. Materials and Method: This in vitro experimental study was conducted on 36 mandibular premolars. Canals were prepared using the step back technique. After root canal irrigation, the teeth were divided into three groups of 12. Ca(OH2 paste and CHX gel were used as intracanal medicaments in the first and second groups respectively. No intracanal medicament was used in the third group (control group. Access cavities were then sealed and the teeth were incubated for one week. The root canals were then filled using gutta percha and AH26 sealer and the teeth were incubated for 72 hours. Tooth crowns were then cut at the level of the cementoenamel junction and intracanal posts were placed. The teeth were mounted in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin, and incubated for one week .They were then sectioned into 1.5mm thick slices from their coronal surface using a fully automated cutting machine, and subjected to push-out test until failure. The load at debonding was recorded and data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, post-hoc test and t-test. The coronal margin of the root was at the level of the surface of acrylic resin in the mold. Results: The mean bond strength was 4.45 MPa in the Ca(OH2, 2.45 MPa in the CHX and 2.48 MPa in the control group. The difference in this regard was statistically significant among groups (p= 0.04. The Ca(OH2 group had significant differences with the CHX and control groups (p= 0.03 and p= 0.02, respectively. The difference between the CHX and control groups was not significant (p= 0.974. Conclusion: Based on the results, Ca(OH2 increased the bond strength of fiber post to root dentin but 2% CHX had no effect on

  13. Comparison of Endodontic Medicaments on Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Dentin Using Resin Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Ravanbod, Shirin; Ranjbarian, Parisa; Kousehlar, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Endodontic irrigants and medicaments may affect the bond strength of intracanal posts to root dentin. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX) on bond strength of fiber post cemented with resin cement to root dentin. Materials and Method: This in vitro experimental study was conducted on 36 mandibular premolars. Canals were prepared using the step back technique. After root canal irrigation, the teeth were divided into three groups of 12. Ca(OH)2 paste and CHX gel were used as intracanal medicaments in the first and second groups respectively. No intracanal medicament was used in the third group (control group). Access cavities were then sealed and the teeth were incubated for one week. The root canals were then filled using gutta percha and AH26 sealer and the teeth were incubated for 72 hours. Tooth crowns were then cut at the level of the cementoenamel junction and intracanal posts were placed. The teeth were mounted in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin, and incubated for one week .They were then sectioned into 1.5mm thick slices from their coronal surface using a fully automated cutting machine, and subjected to push-out test until failure. The load at debonding was recorded and data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, post-hoc test and t-test. The coronal margin of the root was at the level of the surface of acrylic resin in the mold. Results: The mean bond strength was 4.45 MPa in the Ca(OH)2, 2.45 MPa in the CHX and 2.48 MPa in the control group. The difference in this regard was statistically significant among groups (p= 0.04). The Ca(OH)2 group had significant differences with the CHX and control groups (p= 0.03 and p= 0.02, respectively). The difference between the CHX and control groups was not significant (p= 0.974). Conclusion: Based on the results, Ca(OH)2 increased the bond strength of fiber post to root dentin but 2% CHX had no effect on bond

  14. Effects of a novel optical conductive fiber post on the microhardness of two resin cement with different curing modes%新型导光性纤维桩对两种固化方式的树脂水门汀显微硬度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵希; 熊宇; 王辉; 张从纪

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of an optical conductive fiber post on the mechanical property of two resin cement with different curing modes. Methods Sixteen human premolars with single root were randomly divided into two groups, in which an optical conductive fiber post was luted with light-curing (i-TFC) and dual-curing resin cement (Panavia F 2.0), respectively. Dentin slabs with fiber posts located at cervical, middle and apical root were prepared, Knoop microhardness (KHN) were evaluated using microindentation and the relative curing rate was calculated, data was submitted to two-way ANOVA. Results A trend of decreased microhardness and relative curing rate was observed in both groups as the depth in the root increased. For the light-curing group, microhardness and the relative curing rate at the apical area was significantly lower than that at the cervical and middle area in the root (P<0.05). Conclusion Dual-curing resin cements were recommended to achieve higher degree of polymerization within deep root canal when a optical conductive fiber post was used to restore the root.%目的:探讨导光性纤维桩应用于残根修复时,对两种不同固化方式的树脂水门汀机械性能的影响。方法:16颗单根人前磨牙根分为光固化组和双固化组,分别以光固化(i-TFC)和双固化树脂水门汀(Panavia F 2.0)粘结导光性纤维桩并固化。制备纤维桩修复后的根颈段、根中段、根尖段的牙本质片,压痕法测试两组树脂水门汀在根管不同深度的Knoop显微硬度值(KHN)并计算其相对固化率,进行双因素方差分析。结果:随根管深度的增加,两组树脂水门汀的显微硬度和相对固化率均呈下降趋势。光固化树脂水门汀在根尖段的显微硬度值和相对固化率显著低于根颈段和根中段(P<0.05)。结论:导光性纤维桩修复残根时,双固化树脂水门汀有利于在根尖段获得较高的聚合度。

  15. The effect of ceramic thickness and resin cement shades on the color matching of ceramic veneers in discolored teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wenzhong; Chen, Xiaodong; Ren, Dafei; Zhan, Kangru; Wang, Yining

    2017-01-10

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of ceramic material thickness and resin cement shade on the color matching of ceramic veneers at the gray tooth structures. Seventy-two artificial maxillary right central incisor teeth (C2 shade) were prepared according to veneer tooth preparation in practice. Ceramic materials (LT, A2 shade, IPS e.max Press) were selected to fabricate the 0.50- and 0.75-mm thick veneers at the body region. The ceramic veneer specimens were bonded to the artificial teeth by the 6 shades of resin cements (Variolink Veneer: shades of HV+3, LV-2, LV-3; and RelyX(TM) Veneer: shades of WO, TR, A3). A clinical spectrophotometer (Crystaleye, Olympus) was used to measure the color parameters. The color differences (ΔE values) of ceramic veneers and A2 shade tab (Vitapan Classical, Vita) and C* ab values were calculated. The results of three-way ANOVA indicated that the ΔE values of ceramic veneer and A2 shade tab were significantly different in the thickness of ceramic materials, shades of resin cements, and measuring regions (p veneers that exhibited higher ΔE values compared with veneers that were 0.75-mm thick. Tukey's HSD test showed that the average ΔE values in body region were significantly smaller than that in cervical and incisal regions. The color matching of ceramic veneers was significantly influenced not only by the ceramic thickness and the resin cement shades but also the tooth regions.

  16. Effect of different adhesives combined with two resin composite cements on shear bond strength to polymeric CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähr, Nora; Keul, Christine; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different adhesives and resin composite cements on shear bond strength (SBS) to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based CAD/CAM materials. SBS specimens were fabricated and divided into five main groups (n=30/group) subject to conditioning: 1. Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), 2. Visio.link (VL), 3. Ambarino P60 (AM), 4. exp. VP connect (VP), and 5. no conditioning-control group (CG). All cemented specimens using a. Clearfil SA Cement and b. Variolink II were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, one half of the specimens were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles (5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 20 s). SBS was measured; data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA, unpaired two-sample t-test and Chi(2)-test. CAD/CAM materials without additional adhesives showed no bond to resin composite cements. Highest SBS showed VL with Variolink II on composite-based material, before and after thermocycling.

  17. Microleakage of conventional, resin-modified, and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement as primary teeth filling material

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    Dita Madyarani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glass ionomer cements are one of many dental materials that widely used in pediatric dentistry due to their advantage of fluoride release and chemical bond to tooth structure. Adherence of the filling material to the cavity walls is one of the most important characteristic that need to be examined its effect on microleakage. Purpose: This study was conducted to examine the microleakage of nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement compared with the conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Methods: Standard class V cavities sized 3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm were made on a total of 21 extracted maxillary primary canine teeth and restored with the conventional, resin-modified, dan nano-ionomer glass ionomer cements. All the teeth were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 4 hours. The depth of dye penetration was assessed using digital microscope after sectioning the teeth labio-palatally. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: All type of glass ionomer material showed microleakage. Conventional glass ionomer cement demonstrated the least microleakage with mean score 1.29. the resin-modified glass ionomer cements (mean score 1.57 and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement (mean score 2.57. Conclusion: The conventional glassionomer, resin modified glassionomer, and nano-ionomer glassionomer showed micro leakage as filling material in primary teeth cavity. The micro leakage among three types was not significant difference. All three material were comparable in performance and can be used for filling material but still needs a coating material to fill the microleakage.Latar belakang: Semen ionomer kaca adalah salah satu dari banyak bahan gigi yang banyak digunakan dalam praktek kedokteran gigi anak karena bahan tersebut merilis fluoride dan berikatan kimia dengan struktur gigi. Perlekatan bahan tumpatan pada dinding kavitas adalah salah satu karakteristik paling penting yang perlu diteliti efeknya terhadap

  18. Comparison of Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Ariadent and Harvard Polycarboxylate Cement and Vitremer Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

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    Ahmadian Khoshemehr Leila

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Luting agents are used to attach indirect restoration into or on the tooth. Poor mechanical properties of cement may be a cause of fracture of this layer and lead to caries and restoration removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the elastic modulus and compressive strength of Ariadent (A Poly and Harvard polycarboxylate (H Poly cements and Vitremer resin modified glass ionomer (RGl.Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 15 specimens were prepared form each experimental cement in Laboratory of Tehran Oil Refining Company. The cylindrical specimens were compressed in Instron machine after 24 hours. Elastic modulus and compressive strength were calculated from stress/strain curve of each specimen. One way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis and P values<0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Results: The mean elastic modulus and mean compressive strength were 2.2 GPa and 87.8MPa in H poly, 2.4 GPa and 56.5 MPa in A Poly, and 0.8GPa and 105.6 MPa in RGI, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that compressive strength and elastic modulus of both polycarboxylate cements were significantly different from hybrid ionomer (P<0.05, but the difference between elastic modulus of two types of polycarboxilate cements was not statistically significant. Compressive strength of two polycarboxilate cements were significantly different (P<0.05. Conclusion: An ideal lutting agent must have the best mechanical properties. Between the tested luttins RGl cement had the lowest elastic modulus and the highest compressive strength, but the A poly cement had the highest elastic modulus and the lowest compressive strength. Therefore none of them was the best.

  19. Modelling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behaviour of ion exchange resins incorporated into a cement-based matrix

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    Le Bescop P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a predictive model, based on experimental data, to determine the macroscopic mechanical behavior of a material made up of ion exchange resins solidified into a CEM III cement paste. Some observations have shown that in some cases, a significant macroscopic expansion of this composite material may be expected, due to internal pressures generated in the resin. To build the model, we made the choice to break down the problem in two scale’s studies. The first deals with the mechanical behavior of the different heterogeneities of the composite, i.e. the resin and the cement paste. The second upscales the information from the heterogeneities to the Representative Elementary Volume (REV of the composite. The heterogeneities effects are taken into account in the REV by applying a homogenization method derived from the Eshelby theory combined with an interaction coefficient drawn from the poroelasticity theory. At the first scale, from the second thermodynamic law, a formulation is developed to estimate the resin microscopic swelling. The model response is illustrated on a simple example showing the impact of the calculated internal pressure, on the macroscopic strain.

  20. Influence of atmospheric pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Okawa, Takahisa; Fukumoto, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Akiko; Tatsuta, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Takamasa; Tanaka, Junko; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Zirconia exhibits excellent strength and high biocompatibility in technological applications and it is has therefore been investigated for clinical applications and research. Before setting prostheses, a crown prosthesis inner surface is sandblasted with alumina to remove contaminants and form small cavities. This alumina sandblasting causes stress-induced phase transition of zirconia. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma has been applied in the dental industry, particularly for adhesives, as a surface treatment to activate the surface energy and remove contaminants. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment on the shear bond strength between zirconia and adhesive resin cement. The surface treatment method was classified into three groups: untreated (Cont group), alumina sandblast treatment (Sb group), and atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment (Ps group). Adhesive resin cement was applied to stainless steel and bonded to zirconia. Shear adhesion tests were performed after complete hardening of the cement. Multiple comparisons were performed using a one-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni method. X-ray diffractometry was used to examine the change in zirconia crystal structure. Statistically significant differences were noted between the control and Sb groups and between the control and Ps groups. In contrast, no statistically significant differences were noted for the Ps and Sb bond strength. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment did not affect the zirconia crystal structure. Atmospheric-pressure low-temperature plasma treatment improves the bonding strength of adhesive resin cement as effectively as alumina sandblasting, and does not alter the zirconia crystal structure. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (α=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement.

  2. Amino acid derivative-mediated detoxification and functionalization of dual cure dental restorative material for dental pulp cell mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Masahiro; Iwasa, Fuminori; Ueno, Takeshi; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    Current dental restorative materials are only used to fill the defect of hard tissues, such as dentin and enamel, because of their cytotoxicity. Therefore, exposed dental pulp tissues in deep cavities must be first covered by a pulp capping material like calcium hydroxide to form a layer of mineralized tissue. However, this tissue mineralization is based on pathological reaction and triggers long-lasting inflammation, often causing clinical problems. This study tested the ability of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), amino acid derivative, to reduce cytotoxicity and induce mineralized tissue conductivity in resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), a widely used dental restorative material having dual cure mechanism. Rat dental pulp cells were cultured on untreated or NAC-supplemented RMGI. NAC supplementation substantially increased the percentage of viable cells from 46.7 to 73.3% after 24-h incubation. Cell attachment, spreading, proliferative activity, and odontoblast-related gene and protein expressions increased significantly on NAC-supplemented RMGI. The mineralization capability of cells, which was nearly suppressed on untreated RMGI, was induced on NAC-supplemented RMGI. These improved behaviors and functions of dental pulp cells on NAC-supplemented RMGI were associated with a considerable reduction in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and with the increased level of intracellular glutathione reserves. These results demonstrated that NAC could detoxify and functionalize RMGIs via two different mechanisms involving in situ material detoxification and antioxidant cell protection. We believe that this study provides a new approach for developing dental restorative materials that enables mineralized tissue regeneration.

  3. Early bond strength of two resin cements to Y-TZP ceramic using MPS or MPS/4-META silanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Cura, Cenk; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    For cementation of yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconium polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramic frameworks, protocols of surface-conditioning methods and available cements vary, resulting in confusion among clinicians regarding selection and effects of different conditioning methods on cement adhesion. This study evaluated the effect of two silanes (3-trimethoxysilylpropylmethacrylate (MPS) and 3-trimethoxysilylpropylmethacrylate/4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride methyl methacrylate (MPS/4-META) on the adhesion of two resin-based cements (SuperBond and Panavia F 2.0) to Y-TZP ceramic and compared several protocols with those indicated by the manufacturer of each of these cements. Disks of Y-TZP ceramic (LAVA, 3M ESPE) (n = 60) were divided into six experimental groups (n = 10 per group) and treated as follows: (1) silica coating (SC) + MPS silane + SuperBond; (2) SC + MPS/4-META + silane + SuperBond); (3) SC + MPS silane + Panavia F 2.0); (4) SC + MPS/4-META silane + Panavia F 2.0); (5) no conditioning + MPS/4-META silane + Super-Bond (SuperBond instructions); and (6) 50-μm Al(2)O(3) conditioning + Panavia F 2.0 (Panavia F 2.0 instructions). The specimens were subjected to shear-bond testing after water storage at 37 °C for 3 months in the dark. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's HSD (α = 0.05). After silica coating, the mean bond strength of SuperBond cement was not significantly different between MPS and MPS/4-META silanes (20.2 ± 3.7 and 20.9 ± 1.6 MPa, respectively), but the mean bond strength of Panavia F 2.0 was significantly higher with MPS silane (24.4 ± 5.3 MPa) than with MPS/4-META (12.3 ± 1.4 MPa) (P MPS or MPS/4-META silane resulted in no significant difference when the ceramic surface was silica coated, but with Panavia F 2.0, use of MPS silane resulted in a significantly higher bond strength than use of MPS/4-META. Use of chairside silica coating and silanization to condition the zirconia surface improved adhesion

  4. Three dimensional color measurement of porcelain laminate restorations using resin cements with shade modifiers: a laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalali H.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: With the introduction of porcelain veneers to fulfill patients’ esthetic needs, question raises about the ability of the veneers to cover the substructure discoloration. It seems that using shade modifiers under the porcelain veneers can neutralize the discoloration. The goal of this study was to determine the efficacy of shade modifiers in correcting tooth discoloration, when used with resin cements under porcelain veneers. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 60 porcelain discs with two thicknesses of 0.7 mm and 2 mm (30 porcelain of each thickness were made from ceramco porcelain powder. 40 of them were in A2 shade and 20 were made by the mixture of A2 shade porcelain powder and porcelain stain to represent tooth discoloration. Then all the laminate discs (0.7 mm were cemented over the 2 mm thick discs to make groups of 10 samples as followed: 1- The first group: laminate discs + resin cement + 2mm thick discs with A2 shade. 2- The second group: laminate discs + resin cement + 2mm thick discolored discs. 3- The third group: laminate discs+ resin cement+ shade modifier+ 2mm thick discolored discs. The color of 30 specimens was measured by spectrophotometer in 2 conditions. 1- To include the specular reflection (SCI. 2- To exclude specular reflection (SCE. In each condition the specimens were measured on both a white background (W and a black one (B. The mean color differences (E of each specimen in the second and third group with the specimens of the first group were calculated. Data were analyzed using Paired sample t-test and P<0.05 of significance. Results: Color measurements showed that in SCIW condition L was significantly different among the three groups except the first and the third. In SCEW condition all the parameters showed significant differences. In SCIB condition, E was not significantly different between the second and the third groups. Hue (h parameter wasn’t different between groups

  5. Influence of Nd:YAG or Er:YAG laser surface treatment on microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composites to resin cement. Lasers surface treatment of indirect resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneppele, T M F; de Souza, A C Oliveira; Batista, G R; Borges, A B; Torres, C R G

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the surface pretreatment of indirect resin composite (Signum, Admira Lab and Sinfony) on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement. Sixty samples made of each brand were divided into 6 groups, according to surface treatment: (1) control; (2) controlled-air abrasion with Al2O3; (3) Er:YAG Laser 200 mJ, 10 Hz, for 10s; (4) Er: YAG Laser 300 mJ, 10 Hz, for 10 s; (5) Nd:YAG 80 mJ, S15Hz for 1 min; (6) Nd:YAG 120mJ, 15 Hz for 1 min. After treatments, all the groups received an application of 37% phosphoric acid and adhesive. The pair of blocks of the same brand were cemented to each other with dual resin cement. The blocks were sectioned to obtain resin-resin sticks (1 x1 mm) and analyzed by microtensile bond testing. The bond strength values were statistically different, irrespective of the surface treatment performed, with highest values for Sinfony (43.81 MPa) and lowest values for Signum (32.33 MPA). The groups treated with the Nd:YAG laser showed the lowest bond strength values and power did not interfere in the results, both for Nd:YAG laser and Er:YAG. Controlled-air abrasion with Al203 is an efficient surface treatment method and the use of the Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers reduced bond strength, irrespective of the intensity of energy used.

  6. Polimerización de un cemento de composite a través de restauraciones de cerómero utilizando lámparas halógenas y LEDs Polymerization of dual-cure resin luting cements through laboratory-processed-resins: LED versus halogen lights

    OpenAIRE

    P. Grau Grullón; P.P. Portero; J. Laufer-Neto; O.M.M. Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Este estudio evaluó la influencia del grosor de una restauración indirecta de cerómero, el tipo de lámpara fotoactivadora y el tiempo de almacenamiento en la dureza Vickers de un cemento de composite. Dos lámparas de diodos (Optilight CL [CL] y Ultra-Lume 5 [UL]) fueron comparadas con la lámpara halógena (Optilux 401 [OH]). Fueron confeccionados especímenes en cerómero con un diámetro de 5 mm y una espesura de 1 y 2 mm, los cuales fueron interpuestos entre la luz y la matriz metálica de 5 mm ...

  7. Polimerización de un cemento de composite a través de restauraciones de cerómero utilizando lámparas halógenas y LEDs Polymerization of dual-cure resin luting cements through laboratory-processed-resins: LED versus halogen lights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P. Grau Grullón; P.P. Portero; J. Laufer-Neto; O.M.M. Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Este estudio evaluó la influencia del grosor de una restauración indirecta de cerómero, el tipo de lámpara fotoactivadora y el tiempo de almacenamiento en la dureza Vickers de un cemento de composite...

  8. Polimerización de un cemento de composite a través de restauraciones de cerómero utilizando lámparas halógenas y LEDs Polymerization of dual-cure resin luting cements through laboratory-processed-resins: LED versus halogen lights

    OpenAIRE

    P. Grau Grullón; P.P. Portero; J. Laufer-Neto; O.M.M. Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Este estudio evaluó la influencia del grosor de una restauración indirecta de cerómero, el tipo de lámpara fotoactivadora y el tiempo de almacenamiento en la dureza Vickers de un cemento de composite. Dos lámparas de diodos (Optilight CL [CL] y Ultra-Lume 5 [UL]) fueron comparadas con la lámpara halógena (Optilux 401 [OH]). Fueron confeccionados especímenes en cerómero con un diámetro de 5 mm y una espesura de 1 y 2 mm, los cuales fueron interpuestos entre la luz y la matriz metálica de 5 mm ...

  9. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized.

  10. Effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation on the mechanical properties of resin modified glass-ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roza Haghgoo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Metallic nano-particles show exclusive biological, chemical and physical characteristic. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effect of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation (0 (as control, 20, 40, 80, 120, 200 ppm on the mechanical Properties ( compressive and flexural strength of resin modified Glass ionomer Cement.   Materials and Methods: Based on ISO 4049 and ISO 9971 for polyalkenoid cements, 90 cases in each group were prepared for the flexural and compressive strength. Specimens in 6 groups with different amounts of nanosilver (20, 40, 80, 120 and 200 ppm and control (Fuji II LC improved, stored in distilled water at 37 ° C for 1 day and 30 days. Flexural strength, using a three-point bending method, Modulus of elasticity and the compressive strength were measured by universal testing machine (Zwick with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey post HOC test.   Results: The flexural strength and modulus of various amounts of nanosilver incorporation of resin modified glass-ionomer cement were not significantly different (P>0.05. The compressive strength of incorporating of20 ppm compared with control (P=0.01, 40 ppm (P=0.02 and 80 ppm compared with control (P<0.001 were increased. The flexural strength and compressive strength of Fuji II LC, containing nanosilver particles were increased after 1 day and 1 month significantly (P<0.001.   Conclusion: Incorporation of 20 to 80 ppm nanosilver into Fuji II LC had increased mechanical properties compared to the original cement.

  11. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect.

  12. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  13. Immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of different luting resin cements to different regional dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Abdelraheem Mohamed; Hamouda, Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazy, Mohamed Hamed; Abo-Madina, Manal Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    We sought to evaluate immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of Panavia F2.0 and Multilink Sprint resin cement to superficial, deep and cervical dentin. Thirty-six freshly extracted non-carious human molars were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction to expose three different dentin regions including superficial dentin (1 mm below the dentine-enamel junction), deep dentin (1 mm above the highest pulp horn) and cervical dentin (0.5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction and 0.5 mm bel...

  14. Effect of surface treatments of laboratory-fabricated composites on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos José; Giannini, Marcelo; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares de; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments on composite resin on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement. Two laboratory composites for indirect restorations, Solidex and Targis, and a conventional composite, Filtek Z250, were tested. Forty-eight composite resin blocks (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm) were incrementally manufactured, which were randomly divided into six groups, according to the surface treatments: 1- control, 600-grit SiC paper (C); 2- silane priming (SI); 3- sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 for 10s (SA); 4- etching with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s (HF); 5- HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Composite blocks submitted to similar surface treatments were bonded together with the resin adhesive Single Bond and Rely X luting composite. A 500-g load was applied for 5 minutes and the samples were light-cured for 40s. The bonded blocks were serially sectioned into 3 slabs with 0.9mm of thickness perpendicularly to the bonded interface (n = 12). Slabs were trimmed to a dumbbell shape and tested in tension at 0.5mm/min. For all composites tested, the application of a silane primer after sandblasting provided the highest bond strength means.

  15. Impact of different adhesives on work of adhesion between CAD/CAM polymers and resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, Christine; Müller-Hahl, Manuel; Eichberger, Marlis; Liebermann, Anja; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-09-01

    To determine the impact of pre-treatment of adhesive systems on the work of adhesion (WA) between CAD/CAM polymers and resin composite cements and compare with conventional tests of previous studies. Surface parameters were measured by contact angle measurement (2700 measurements) and WA was calculated. Five CAD/CAM polymers were used for fabrication of specimens (n=75/subgroup): artBloc Temp (A), Telio CAD (B), Nano Composite CFI-C (C), exp. CAD/CAM nanohybrid composite (D), and LAVA Ultimate (E). Then, air-abraded specimens were pre-treated (n=15 per group): Ambarino P60 (I), Monobond Plus/Heliobond (II), visio.link (III), VP connect (IV), and no pre-treatment (V). Resin composite cement specimens (n=75) were smoothed out homogeneously on a glass plate (n=15/group): RelyX ARC (RXA), Variolink II (VAR), Panavia F2.0 (PAN), RelyX Unicem (RXU), and Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Contact angles were determined with 3 drops of distilled water and diiodomethane each. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis-H test and Spearman-Rho correlation (pCAD/CAM materials (B), (A), and (C) showed higher WA compared to (D) and (E). (II) and (IV) resulted in higher WA than (I), (III) and (V). VAR had the significantly lowest WA, followed by RXU, RXA, CSA and PAN. No correlation occurred between WA and TBS/SBS whereas polar component of surface free energy of CAD/CAM resin and spreading coefficient showed significant positive correlation with TBS/SBS. Determination of WA is not a proper method to draw conclusions about the bond between resin materials. Destructive test methods are not dispensable. The successful outcome of fixed dental restorations depends, among others, on the quality of bonding between the tooth and the restoration. Additional pre-treatment of the dental CAD/CAM resin restoration by bonding systems can be recommended for clinical use. Pre-treatment showed a significant impact on the surface properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of resin cement adhesion to Y-TZP ceramic following manufacturers' instructions of the cements only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Kerkdijk, Sandra; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the bond strength of four resin materials with various chemical compositions following the manufacturers' instructions only and (2) to test their durability in dry and thermal aged conditions when they were bonded to zirconia ceramic. Four types of r

  17. Effect of an Indirect Composite Resin Surface Treatment with Two Types of Lasers: Nd: YAG, Er:YAG and Acid Etching on the Microshear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In order to increase the bonding strength of the composite resin cements to the indirect composites, experiments such as the creation of surface roughness with sandblasting, acid-etching, silane application, laser, etc. have been carried out. However, there is no consensus about the results. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Er: YAG and Nd: YAG lasers and acid etching on microshear bond strength of an indirect composite resin. Methods: Aft...

  18. The impact of endodontic irrigating solutions on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Pelegrine, Rina Andrea; Silveira, Cláudia Fernandes de Magalhães; Bueno, Vanessa Castro Pestana da Silveira; Alves, Vanessa de Oliveira; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Pereira, Gisele Damiana da Silveira; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2016-01-01

    Resin-based restorative materials, widely used to cement posts, may be influenced by irrigants used during endodontic chemical-mechanical preparation. This study evaluated the impact of endodontic irrigating solutions and adhesive cement systems on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin. Ninety-six bovine incisors were divided into 12 groups (4 irrigants × 3 resin cements; n = 8). Prepared canals were irrigated with saline solution, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine gel, and posts were cemented with RelyX ARC, Panavia F, or RelyX U100. The bond strength was evaluated by means of the push-out test, and results were subjected to analysis of variance. The mean bond strength observed for the combination of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and RelyX U100 cement was significantly lower (8.82 MPa) than the values found for the other groups (P < 0.05). The other combinations of irrigating solution and resin cement had no adverse effect on the bond strength of the glass fiber posts to dentin.

  19. Shear Bond Strength of a Resin Cement to Different Alloys Subjected to Various Surface Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Ezoji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Micromechanical retention of resin cements to alloys is an important factor affecting the longevity of metal base restorations. This study aimed to compare the bond strength and etching pattern of a newly introduced experimental etchant gel namely Nano Met Etch with those of conventional surface treatment techniques for nickel-chrome (Ni-Cr and high noble alloys. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 discs (8×10×15 mm were cast with Ni-Cr (n=20, high noble BegoStar (n=50 and gold coin alloys (n=50. Their Surfaces were ground with abrasive papers. Ni-Cr specimens received sandblasting and etching. High noble alloy specimens (begoStar and gold coin received sandblasting, sandblasting-alloy primer, etching, etch-alloy primer and alloy primer alone. Cylindrical specimens of Panavia were bonded to surfaces using Tygon tubes. Specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength testing after storing at 37°C for 24 hours.Results: In gold coin group, the highest bond strength was achieved after sandblasting (25.82±1.37MPa, P<0.001 and etching+alloy primer (26.60 ± 5.47 MPa, P<0.01. The lowest bond strength belonged to sandblasting+alloy primer (17.79±2.96MPa, P<0.01. In BegoStar group, the highest bond strength was obtained in the sandblasted group (38.40±3.29MPa, P<0.001 while the lowest bond strength was detected in the sandblast+ alloy primer group (15.38±2.92MPa, P<0.001. For the Ni-Cr alloy, bond strength in the etched group (20.79±2.01MPa was higher than that in the sandblasted group (18.25±1.82MPa (P<0.01.Conclusions: For the Ni-Cr alloy, etching was more efficient than sandblasting but for the high noble alloys, higher Au content increased the efficacy of etching.

  20. Chemical characterization and bioactivity of epoxy resin and Portland cement-based sealers with niobium and zirconium oxide radiopacifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viapiana, Raqueli; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Hungaro-Duarte, Marco Antonio; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Camilleri, Josette

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize and to evaluate the bioactivity potential of experimental root canal sealers (ES) based on Portland cement, epoxy resin with nano- and micro-particles of niobium or zirconium oxide used as radiopacifiers in comparison to AH Plus and MTA Fillapex. Specimens of the sealers (10 mm in diameter×1 mm thick) were prepared and the radiopacity was evaluated according to ISO 6876 (2012) specifications. Characterization of the sealers was performed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) immediately after setting and after immersion for 28 days in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). In addition X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were also performed. The pH and calcium ion release were measured after 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after completion of seating using a digital pH meter and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, respectively. The experimental sealers exhibited an average radiopacity of 2.5 mm thickness of aluminum, which was similar to MTA Fillapex (P>0.05) and inferior to AH Plus (Pepoxy resin and radiopacifier exhibited a degree of bioactivity although no evidence of cement hydration was demonstrated on material characterization. The radiopacifier particle size had limited effect on the sealer microstructure and chemical properties. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to feldpathic ceramic after different etching and silanization regimens in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brentel, Aline Scalone; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Alarca, Lilian Guimaraes; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the durability of bond strength between resin cement and a feldspathic ceramic submitted to different etching regimens with and without silane coupling agent application. Methods. Thirty-two blocks (6.4 mm x 6.4 mm x 4.8 mm) were fabricated using a microparticulate f

  2. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to feldpathic ceramic after different etching and silanization regimens in dry and aged conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brentel, Aline Scalone; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Alarca, Lilian Guimaraes; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the durability of bond strength between resin cement and a feldspathic ceramic submitted to different etching regimens with and without silane coupling agent application. Methods. Thirty-two blocks (6.4 mm x 6.4 mm x 4.8 mm) were fabricated using a microparticulate

  3. The effect of short polyethylene fiber with different weight percentages on diametral tensile strength of conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Ghaboos, Seyed-Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polyethylene fiber on diametral tensile strength of conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements. Material and Methods 60 specimens in 6 groups (n=10) were prepared. In group 1 conventional glass ionomer (Fuji GC) and in group 2 resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji LC) were as control groups. In group 3 and 4 conventional glass ionomers mixed with short polyethylene fibers in proportion of 1 wt% and 3 wt%, respectively. In fifth and sixth groups, resin modified glass ionomer and short polyethylene fibers were mixed in 1 and 3% wt, respectively. Samples were prepared in a round brass mold (6.5×2.5 mm). After thermo-cycling, the diametral tensile strength of the specimens were tested and data were analyzed with ANOVA and post-hoc tests (p<0.05). Results Diametral tensile strength of both conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements increased after mixing with polyethylene fiber (p<0.001). Also, reinforcement occurred as the mixing percentage increased from 1% wt to 3% wt in either conventional and resin modified glass ionomer (p<0.001). Conclusions The polyethylene fiber was shown to have a significant positive influence on diametral tensile strength of two types of glass ionomers. Key words:Conventional glass ionomer, diametral tensile strength, polyethylene fiber, resin modified glass ionomer. PMID:28298993

  4. In vitro comparative bond strength of contemporary self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatz, Markus B; Phark, Jin-Ho; Ozer, Fusun; Mante, Francis K; Saleh, Najeed; Bergler, Michael; Sadan, Avishai

    2010-04-01

    This study compared shear bond strengths of six self-adhesive resin cements to zirconium oxide ceramic with and without air-particle abrasion. One hundred twenty zirconia samples were air-abraded (group SB; n = 60) or left untreated (group NO). Composite cylinders were bonded to the zirconia samples with either BisCem (BC), Maxcem (MC), G-Cem (GC), RelyX Unicem Clicker (RUC), RelyX Unicem Applicator (RUA), or Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Shear bond strength was tested after thermocycling, and data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Holm-Sidak pairwise comparisons. Without abrasion, RUA (8.0 MPa), GC (7.9 MPa), and CSA (7.6 MPa) revealed significantly higher bond strengths than the other cements. Air-particle abrasion increased bond strengths for all test cements (p MDP/4-META) were superior to other compositions.

  5. Effect of adhesive resin cements and post surface silanization on the bond strengths of adhesively inserted fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Altenburger, Markus Jörg; Schirrmeister, Jörg Fabian; Bitter, Kerstin; Kielbassa, Andrej Michael

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strengths and the effect of silanization of fiber posts inserted with different adhesive systems. Sixty DT Light Posts (size 1) were used. Thirty posts were pretreated with silane. The posts were cemented into form-congruent artificial root canals (12 mm) of bovine dentine. Six groups were formed: G1, Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G2, Monobond-S+Prime&Bond NT/Calibra; G3, ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G4, Monobond-S+ED Primer/Panavia 21ex; G5, RelyX Unicem; and G6, Monobond-S+RelyX Unicem. The mean (standard deviation) tensile bond strengths (megapascals) were 7.69 (0.85) for G1, 7.15 (1.01) for G2, 6.73 (0.85) for G3, 6.78 (0.97) for G4, 4.79 (0.58) for G5, and 4.74 (0.88) for G6. G1 achieved significantly higher bond strengths than G3 and G5; G3 had significantly higher values than G5 (P Silanization had no significant effect (P > .05, one-way analysis of variance). Tensile bond strengths were significantly influenced by the type of resin cement. Silanization of fiber post surfaces seems to have no clinical relevance.

  6. The effect of polishing systems on microleakage of tooth coloured restoratives: Part 1. Conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, A U; Tan, S; Teh, T Y

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of polishing systems on the microleakage of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements. Class V cavities were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction of 80 freshly extracted posterior teeth. The prepared teeth were randomly divided into two groups and restored with conventional or resin-modified glass-ionomer cements. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week after removal of excess restorative with diamond finishing burs. The restored teeth were then divided into four groups of 10 and finished and polished using the following systems: Two Striper MFS; Sof-Lex XT; Enhance Composite Finishing and Polishing System; Shofu Composite Finishing Kit. The finished restorations were subjected to dye penetration testing. Results showed that the microleakage at dentin margins of conventional glass-ionomer cements and enamel margins of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements are significantly affected by the different polishing systems.

  7. Cytotoxicity evaluation of luting resin cements on bovine dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs) by real-time cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan Malkoç, Meral; Demir, Necla; Şengün, Abdulkadir; Bozkurt, Şerife Buket; Hakki, Sema Sezen

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of resin cements on dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs), Bifix QM (BQM), Choice 2(C2), RelyX U200(RU200), Maxcem Elite(ME), and Multilink Automix(MA) were tested. The materials were incubated in DMEM for 72 h. A real-time cell analyzer was used to evaluate cell survival. The statistical analyses used were one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests. BQM, RU200, and ME demonstrated a significant decrease in the bDPCs' index at 24 and 72 h (p≤0.001). These materials were found to be the most toxic resin cements, as compared to the control and other tested materials (C2 and MA). However, C2 and MA showed a better survival rate, compared to BQM, RU200, and ME, and had lower cell index than the control group. The cytotoxic effects of resin cements on pulpa should be evaluated during the selection of proper cements.

  8. Shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA, glass ionomer cement and composite resin on human dentine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, Markus; Dammann, Christoph Heinrich; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2015-04-19

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA (MTA), glass ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin (CR) on dentine. 120 extracted human third molars were embedded in cold-cured-resin and grinned down to the dentine. For each material 30 specimens were produced in standardised height and width and the materials were applied according to manufacturers´ instructions on the dentine samples. Only in the CR group a self-etching dentine-adhesive was used. In all other groups the dentine was not pre-treated. All specimens were stored at 37.5 °C and 100% humidity for 2d, 7d and 14d. With a testing device the shear bond strength was determined (separation of the specimens from the dentine surface). The statistical evaluation was performed using ANOVA and Tukey-test (p MTA the lowest values (p MTA and Biodentine increased significantly compared to the 2d investigation period (p MTA (p  0.05). After 7d Biodentine showed comparable shear bond values than GIC, whereas the shear bond values for MTA were significantly lower even after 14d. The adhesion of Biodentine to dentine surface seams to be superior compared to that of MTA.

  9. Shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cements to Er:YAG laser-treated tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation of enamel and dentin on the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGIC). Twenty molars were selected and the roots removed. The crowns were bisected, embedded in polyester resin and ground to plane the enamel or expose the dentin. The bonding site was delimited, and samples were randomly assigned according to the cavity preparation device: I--Er.YAG laser (350mJ/2Hz); II--Carbide bur (control group). They were subdivided according to the restorative material employed: A) Fuji II LC (GC); B) Vitremer (3M). Samples were then fixed to a metallic device where ionomer cylinders were prepared. Sequentially, the molars were stored for 24 hours and subjected to a shear bond strength test (50Kgf at 0.5 mm/minute). Means in MPa were: Enamel--IA) 4.77 (+/- 1.12); IB) 4.36 (+/- 1.50); IIA) 7.70 (+/- 1.53); IIB) 7.34 (+/- 1.52) and Dentin--IA) 3.13 (+/- 1.15); IB) 2.67 (+/- 0.74); IIA) 6.38 (+/- 1.44); IIB) 5.58 (+/-2.09). Data were submitted to statistical analysis by ANOVA. Adhesion for enamel was more efficient than for dentin (p bond strength values than those recorded for Er:YAG laser (p shear bond strength of RMGIC for both enamel and dentin.

  10. Streptococcus mutans-induced secondary caries adjacent to glass ionomer cement, composite resin and amalgam restorations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Teixeira, Adriana; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzeti; Elian, Silvia Nagib; Sobral, Maria Angela Pita; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define, in vitro, the potential to inhibit secondary caries of restorative materials currently used in dental practice. Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of fifty extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups, each one restored with one of the following materials: glass ionomer cement (GIC); amalgam; light-cured composite resin; ion-releasing composite; and light-cured, fluoride-containing composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled, sterilized with gamma irradiation, exposed to a cariogenic challenge using a bacterial system using Streptococcus mutans, and then prepared for microscopic observation. The following parameters were measured in each lesion formed: extension, depth, and caries inhibition area. The outer lesions developed showed an intact surface layer and had a rectangular shape. Wall lesions were not observed inside the cavities. After Analysis of Variance and Component of Variance Models Analysis, it was observed that the GIC group had the smallest lesions and the greatest number of caries inhibition areas. The lesions developed around Amalgam and Ariston pHc restorations had an intermediate size and the largest lesions were observed around Z-100 and Heliomolar restorations. It may be concluded that the restorative materials GIC, amalgam and ion-releasing composites may reduce secondary caries formation.

  11. Dry adhesive bonding of nanoporous inorganic membranes to microfluidic devices using the OSTE(+) dual-cure polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharil, Farizah; Forsberg, Fredrik; Liu, Yitong; Bettotti, Paolo; Kumar, Neeraj; Niklaus, Frank; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Gylfason, Kristinn B.

    2013-02-01

    We present two transfer bonding schemes for incorporating fragile nanoporous inorganic membranes into microdevices. Such membranes are finding increasing use in microfluidics, due to their precisely controllable nanostructure. Both schemes rely on a novel dual-cure dry adhesive bonding method, enabled by a new polymer formulation: OSTE(+), which can form bonds at room temperature. OSTE(+) is a novel dual-cure ternary monomer system containing epoxy. After the first cure, the OSTE(+) is soft and suitable for bonding, while during the second cure it stiffens and obtains a Young’s modulus of 1.2 GPa. The ability of the epoxy to react with almost any dry surface provides a very versatile fabrication method. We demonstrate the transfer bonding of porous silicon and porous alumina membranes to polymeric microfluidic chips molded into OSTE(+), and of porous alumina membranes to microstructured silicon wafers, by using the OSTE(+) as a thin bonding layer. We discuss the OSTE(+) dual-cure mechanism, describe the device fabrication and evaluate the bond strength and membrane flow properties after bonding. The membranes bonded to OSTE(+) chips delaminate at 520 kPa, and the membranes bonded to silicon delaminate at 750 kPa, well above typical maximum pressures applied to microfluidic circuits. Furthermore, no change in the membrane flow resistance was observed after bonding.

  12. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musani, Smita; Musani, Iqbal; Dugal, Ramandeep; Habbu, Nitin; Madanshetty, Pallavi; Virani, Danish

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the micro tensile bond strength of two metal bonding resin cements to sandblasted cobalt chromium alloy. Materials & Methods: Eight, Cobalt chromium alloy blocks of dimensions 10x5x5 mm were cast, finished and polished. One of the faces of each alloy block measuring 5x5mm was sandblasted with 50 μm grit alumina particles. The alloy blocks were then cleaned in an ultrasonic cleaner for 1 min and then air dried with an air stream. The Sandblasted surfaces of the two alloy blocks were bonded together with 2 different metal bonding resin systems (Panavia F Kuraray and DTK Kleber – Bredent). The samples were divided into 2 groups (n=4). Group 1- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with Panavia cement. Group 2- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with DTK Kleber-Bredent cement. The bonded samples were cut with a diamond saw to prepare Microtensile bars of approximately 1mm x 1mm x 6mm. Thirty bars from each group were randomly separated into 2 subgroups (n=15) and left for 3hrs (baseline) as per manufacturer's instructions while the other group was aged for 24hrs in 370C water, prior to loading to failure under tension at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Failure modes were determined by means of stereomicroscopy (sm). Statistical analysis was performed through one way – ANOVA. Results: Significant variation in micro-tensile bond strength was observed between the two metal bonding resin systems. Conclusion: DTK showed higher mean bond strength values than Panavia F cement both at baseline and after aging. How to cite this article: Musani S, Musani I, Dugal R, Habbu N, Madanshetty P, Virani D. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):73-8. PMID:24324308

  13. Sensitivity of catalyst/base ratio on curing of resin luting agents: polymerization exotherm analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, J A; Shen, C; Anusavice, K J

    1994-09-01

    Currently, the proposed test of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) for measuring working and setting times of resin luting agents is based on measurement of times to reach specified stages on the polymerization exotherm. The objective of this study was to use this test to investigate the influence of variations in the mass ratios of catalyst paste to base paste on the working and setting times of three dual-cured dental resin luting agents. The materials used were Dicor Light Activated Cement (Dentsply International Inc.), Palfique Inlay Resin Cement (Tokuyama Soda Co.), and Vivadent Dual Cement (Vivadent). Fifteen specimens of each material were tested for working time by spatulating mass ratios from 0.7 to 1.3 for 30s at 23 degrees C and recording the time from beginning of spatulation to the time at which a temperature increase occurs. Ten specimens of each material were tested for setting time by spatulating in a similar manner at 37 degrees C and recording the time at which the temperature reaches a maximum value. The data were fitted to the relation, In t = In A + Bm, where t is the time in seconds, m is the mass ratio, and A and B are regression coefficients. The results suggest that working and setting times of the specimens were independent of variations in mass ratio. A comparison among the materials was made by using a multiple linear regression with the relation, In t = In C + Dm + E gamma + Fm gamma, where gamma is a dummy variable to help distinguish between materials, and C, D, E, and F are regression coefficients. The results suggest that differences in materials influence the working time but not the setting time. These results infer that variations in mass ratio (+/- 20%) often observed in the clinical setting should not have a significant influence on the working and setting times of resin luting agents.

  14. Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfem Ergun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED light-curing units (LCUs have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time and 40 s (100% exposure time. After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x10(4 per well and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. RESULTS: Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively. For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical

  15. 18-year survival of posterior composite resin restorations with and without glass ionomer cement as base.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sande, F.H. van de; Rosa Rodolpho, P.A. Da; Basso, G.R.; Patias, R.; Rosa, Q.F. da; Demarco, F.F.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Cenci, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Advantages and disadvantages of using intermediate layers underneath resin-composite restorations have been presented under different perspectives. Yet, few long-term clinical studies evaluated the effect of glass-ionomer bases on restoration survival. The present study investigated the i

  16. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  17. Effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Abed-Kahnamoui, Mehdi; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Gharouni, Mahya

    2017-01-01

    Background Considering the probability of chemical and enzymatic reactions between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the dentin structure and their specific inhibitors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of MMPs (galardin) on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. Material and Methods Forty-eight sound human premolars were mounted in self-cured acrylic resin after removal of the enamel on the buccal and lingual surfaces. The dentin surfaces achieved were polished and prepared with 600-grit silicon carbide paper. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=16) based on the concentration of galardin used (with no galardin, galardin at a high concentration and galardin at a low concentration). In addition, 96 composite resin blocks, measuring 3 mm in height and diameter, were prepared. The composite resin blocks were bonded to the buccal and lingual surface dentin with Rely-X Unicem (RXC) and Speed CEM (SPC) self-adhesive resin cements, respectively, according to manufacturers’ instructions. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the shear bond strength values were determined in MPa and fracture modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni test (α=0.05). Results The shear bond strength of galardin at high concentration was significantly higher than that in the control group and galardin at a low concentrations (PDental Bonding.

  18. Transmission of composite polymerization contraction force through a flowable composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; Cavalcanti, Ana Paula; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250), a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB), and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB) adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm(2) for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N + 0.2N; G2: 9.8 + 0.2N; G3: 1.8 + 0.2N; G4: 6.8N + 0.2N; G5: 6.9N + 0.3N; G6: 4.0N + 0.4N and G7: 2.8N + 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses.

  19. Transmission of composite polymerization contraction force through a flowable composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Castañeda-Espinosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250, a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB, and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm² for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N + 0.2N; G2: 9.8 + 0.2N; G3: 1.8 + 0.2N; G4: 6.8N + 0.2N; G5: 6.9N + 0.3N; G6: 4.0N + 0.4N and G7: 2.8N + 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses.

  20. Bonding strength of resin cement to silicate glass ceramics for dental CAD/CAM systems is enhanced by combination treatment of the bonding surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakura, Yusuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Fujishima, Akihiro; Kunii, Jun; Miyazaki, Takashi; Kawawa, Tadaharu

    2007-09-01

    To increase the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated, leucite-reinforced glass ceramics with a resin cement, the effects of the following were investigated: surface modification by tribochemical (TBC) treatment, followed by combined application of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer. Bond strength was evaluated by a shear bond test. It was found that a silane coupling agent was useful for all the surfaces, particularly for the TBC-treated surface. This was because of the presence of a silica layer on the modified surface. The combination of a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer on the TBC surface allowed marked improvement in bonding, whereby the bonding endured 20,000 cycles of thermal cycling. Therefore, TBC treatment in combination with a silane coupling agent and a functional monomer as a primer substantially increased the bond strength of CAD/CAM-fabricated glass ceramics with resin cement, if the treatment conditions were appropriate.

  1. Fluoride rechargability of a non-resin auto-cured glass ionomer cement from a fluoridated dentifrice: An in vitro study

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    A Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In addition to their fluoride-releasing properties, glass ionomer cement (GICs have the ability to reuptake and release fluorides from commonly used sources like fluoridated dentifrices. This property has the potential to provide a continuous low concentration of fluoride in the saliva aiding in caries prevention. The superior fluoride-recharging abilities of resin-modified GICs over conventional GICs have been documented. The manufacturer of a non-resin, auto-cured GIC (GC Fuji VII claims fluoride release from the product to be about six times that of conventional GIC. It was hypothesized that perhaps this high fluoride release could translate into a high reuptake and release, when exposed to a 1 000 ppm fluoridated dentifrice every day, thus providing increased fluoride levels in saliva. Aims: This study therefore examined fluoride-recharging abilities of the non-resin, auto-cured glass ionomer cement from a 1 000 ppm fluoridated dentifrice and compared it with resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Materials and Methods: Twelve glass ionomer discs each of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji II L C, Group 1 and the non-resin, auto-cured glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji VII, Group 2 were prepared with precise dimensions of 9 x 2 mm. The 12 specimens in each group were further subdivided into two subgroups of six each. Subgroup A involved no fluoride treatment (Control. Subgroup B involved application of a 1 000 ppm dentifrice for 2 minutes twice daily with a soft toothbrush. The disc-specimens were then suspended in airtight plastic bottles containing exactly 20 ml double distilled water. The fluoride concentration of the water in which the specimen discs were immersed was measured by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode connected to an ion selective electrode meter/digital ion analyzer at 1, 2, 7, 15, and 30 days. Statistical Analysis: It was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis Test. Results and Conclusion: Fuji VII

  2. Thio-urethane oligomers improve the properties of light-cured resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Consani, Rafael L; Martim, Gedalias C; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2015-05-01

    Thio-urethanes were synthesized by combining 1,6-hexanediol-diissocyante (aliphatic) with pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (aromatic) with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. Oligomers were added at 10-30 phr to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, BUT). 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Commercial cement (Relyx Veneer, 3M-ESPE) was also evaluated with 10-20 phr of aromatic oligomer. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion (DC) and rate of polymerization (Rpmax). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM, and toughness), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (KIC). Polymerization stress (PS) was measured on the Bioman. Volumetric shrinkage (VS, %) was measured with the bonded disk technique. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). In general terms, for BUT cements, conversion and mechanical properties in flexure increased for selected groups with the addition of thio-urethane oligomers. The aromatic versions resulted in greater FS/FM than aliphatic. Fracture toughness increased by two-fold in the experimental groups (from 1.17 ± 0.36 MPam(1/2) to around 3.23 ± 0.22 MPam(1/2)). Rpmax decreased with the addition of thio-urethanes, though the vitrification point was not statistically different from the control. VS and PS decreased with both oligomers. For the commercial cement, 20 phr of oligomer increased DC, vitrification, reduced Rpmax and also significantly increased KIC, and reduced PS and FM. Thio-urethane oligomers were shown to favorably modify conventional dimethacrylate networks. Significant reductions in polymerization stress were achieved at the same time conversion and fracture toughness increased.

  3. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Soo Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n=10. They were treated as follows: untreated (control, Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P<0.05. Results. The Z-PRIME Plus treatment combined with air abrasion produced the highest bond strength, followed by Z-PRIME Plus application, Metal/Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P<0.05. Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements.

  4. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuaki, Arao; Keiichi, Yoshida; Takashi, Sawase

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS) and Block HC (BHC)] were pretreated as follows: (a) no treatment (None), (b) application of a ceramic primer (CP), (c) alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB), (d) AB followed by CP (AB+CP), and (e) glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB) followed by CP (GBB+CP). The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS) and ResiCem (RC)]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0) and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4-60°C) were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05). For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p0.05). The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (presin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP.

  5. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesaraki, S., E-mail: S-hesaraki@merc.ac.ir

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95 MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20 MPa after immersing for 30 days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~ 32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37 °C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption. - Highlights: • Light cure cement based on SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass and polymer-like matrix was formed. • The matrix includes poly(acrylic/maleic acid) and poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate). • The cement is as strong as polymethylmethacrylate bone cement. • The cement exhibits apatite formation ability in simulated body fluid. • The cement is biodegradable and supports proliferation of osteoblastic cells.

  6. Materiali Polimerici Reticolati e Interpenetrati ottenuti per polimerizzazione sequenziale (Dual Curing) di oligomeri epossiacrilati modificati

    OpenAIRE

    Busatto, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The materials and methods used for the preparation of interpenetrated polymer network (IPN) by UV curing processes are reported. In particular, recent developments on the formation and characterization of some sequential IPN based on mixtures of commercially available diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy resins and UV curable epoxy-dimethacrylate resins are discussed. Finally, the photopolymerization kinetic behavior and thermal properties of some UV curable mixture...

  7. Compressive strength and the effect of duration after photo-activation among dual-cure bulk fill composite core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad; Vohra, Fahim

    2016-01-01

    To assess compressive strength and effect of duration after photoactivation on the compressive strength of different dual cure bulk fill composites. Seventy-two disc shaped (4x10mm) specimens were prepared from three dual cure bulk fill materials, ZirconCore (ZC) (n=24), MulticCore Flow (MC) (n=24) and Luxacore Dual (LC) (n=24). Half of the specimens in each material were tested for failure loads after one hour [MC1 (n=12), LC1 (n=12) & ZC1 (n=12)] and the other half in 7 days [MC7 (n=12), LC7 (n=12), ZC7 (n=12)] from photo-polymerization using the universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 cm/minutes. Compressive strength was calculated using the formula UCS=4f/πd(2). Compressive strengths among different groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's multiple comparisons test. Maximum and minimum compressive strengths were observed in ZC7 (344.14±19.22) and LC1 (202.80±15.52) groups. Specimens in LC1 [202.80 (15.52)] showed significantly lower compressive strength as compared to MC1 [287.06 (15.03)] (pstrengths compared to LC7 [324.56 (19.47)] and MC7 [315.26 (12.36)]. Compressive strengths among all three materials were significantly higher (pstrength compared to MC and LC. Increasing the post photo-activation duration (from one hour to 7 days) significantly improves the compressive strengths of dual cure bulk fill material.

  8. Effect of chemomechanical caries removal on bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer cement adhesives to caries-affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Hhh; Yiu, Cky; Burrow, M F

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of: (1) chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR); (2) dentine surface treatments and (3) dentine substrates on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesives. One hundred and twenty permanent molars exhibiting moderate cavitation on the occlusal surface into dentine were used. Seventy-five carious molars were used for bond strength testing; the remaining 45 for micromorphological evaluation of the bonded interface. Caries was excavated with NaOCl-based CMCR (Carisolv), enzyme-based CMCR (Papacarie), or conventional rotary caries removal methods. Dentine surface treatment was performed using 37% phosphoric acid, 25-30% PAA or 20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 . Three-way ANOVA revealed that all three factors 'caries removal methods', 'dentine surface treatments' and 'dentine substrates' did not significantly affect bond strength (p > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the acid-base resistant layer was thicker in caries-affected dentine compared to sound dentine. NaOCl- and enzyme-based CMCR methods have no adverse effect on adhesion of RMGIC adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentine. Dentine surface treatment with 37% phosphoric acid for 5 s has no negative effect on bonding of RMGIC adhesives to dentine compared with using polyacrylic acid for 10 s. RMGIC adhesives bonded well to both sound and caries-affected dentine. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Effect of novel chitosan-fluoroaluminosilicate resin modified glass ionomer cement supplemented with translationally controlled tumor protein on pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanachottrakul, Nattaporn; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2014-04-01

    Dental materials that can promote cell proliferation and function is required for regenerative pulp therapy. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), a broadly used liner or restorative material, can cause apoptosis to pulp cells mainly due to HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), the released residual monomer. Recent studies found that chitosan and albumin could promote release of protein in GIC while translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) has an anti-apoptotic activity against HEMA. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chitosan and albumin modified RMGIC (Exp-RMGIC) supplemented with TCTP on pulp cell viability and mineralization. Exp-RMGIC+TCTP was composed of RMGIC powder incorporated with 15 % of chitosan, 5 % albumin and supplemented with TCTP mixed with the same liquid components of RMGIC. The effect of each specimen on pulp cells was examined using the Transwell plate. From the MTT assay, Exp-RMGIC+TCTP had the highest percentages of viable cells (P supplemented with TCTP had less cytotoxicity than RMGIC and can protect cells from apoptosis better than RMGIC supplemented with TCTP.

  10. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  11. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARAO Nobuaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS and Block HC (BHC] were pretreated as follows: (a no treatment (None, (b application of a ceramic primer (CP, (c alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB, (d AB followed by CP (AB+CP, and (e glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB followed by CP (GBB+CP. The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS and ResiCem (RC]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0 and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05. Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p0.05. The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05, but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05. Conclusions Air abrasion with glass beads was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP.

  12. Quantitative comparison of the water permeable zone among four types of dental adhesives used with a dual-cured composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juhea; Platt, Jeffrey A; Yi, Keewook; Cochran, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    This study compared silver penetration in the adhesive interface among four versions of adhesives from the same manufacturer: OptiBond FL, OptiBond Solo Plus, OptiBond Solo Plus Dual Cure, and OptiBond Solo Plus Self-Etch, when coupled with dual-cured composite, CoreRestore 2 (Kerr). Twenty flat dentin surfaces were prepared using one of the adhesives and bonded with the composite, following the manufacturer's instructions. The surfaces were sectioned into 2-mm slabs and immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate for 24 hours. Each specimen was exposed to a photodeveloping solution for eight hours and examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The water permeable area occupied by the silver nitrate tracer was determined, and the relative weight of silver was analyzed by wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS). The OptiBond FL group had a significantly lower silver content than the other groups (p < 0.0001). Each group demonstrated different patterns of silver deposition within the adhesive layer and within various features of artifactual fracture from dehydration stress of the SEM. This may be indicative of weak links in the bonded interfaces. Simplified-step adhesives showed increased permeability, which can lead to disruption of coupling with composites.

  13. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS of self-adhesive resin (SA cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n=16: (1 negative control (NC without treatment; (2 Single Bond Universal (SBU; (3 RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC. RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40, followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81 and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01 (P0.05. PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling.

  14. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Woo, Jung-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of self-adhesive resin (SA) cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n = 16): (1) negative control (NC) without treatment; (2) Single Bond Universal (SBU); (3) RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC). RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40), followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81) and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01) (P 0.05). PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling. PMID:26557660

  15. The Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Concentration on the Bond Strength and Morphology of the Surface and Interface of Glass Ceramics to a Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld Neto, D; Naves, L Z; Costa, A R; Correr, A B; Consani, S; Borges, G A; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) on the surface/interface morphology and μ-shear bond strength (μSBS) between IPS Empress Esthetic (EST) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and IPS e.max Press (EMX) (Ivoclar Vivadent) ceramics and resin cement. Ceramic blocks were divided into 12 groups for each kind of ceramic. Six different HF concentrations were evaluated: 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15%. All groups were silanated after etching, and half of the specimens within each group received a thin layer of unfilled resin (UR). Three resin cement cylinders were prepared on each ceramic block for μSBS testing. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The μSBS test was carried out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The data were submitted to three-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were performed using the Tukey post hoc test (p0.05). When evaluating UR, μSBS mean was significantly higher and better infiltration was observed on the etched surfaces. No statistical difference was found between the ceramics. The HF concentration and UR influenced the bond strength and surface/interface morphology.

  16. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

  17. Synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement fillers increased the fluoride recharge and lactic acid neutralizing ability of a resin-based pit and fissure sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surintanasarn, Atikom; Siralertmukul, Krisana; Thamrongananskul, Niyom

    2017-07-12

    This study evaluated the effect of different types of filler in a resin-based pit and fissure sealant on fluoride release, recharge, and lactic acid neutralization. Resin-based sealant was incorporated with 5% w/w of the following fillers: calcium aluminate cement (CAC), synthesized mesoporous silica (SI), a CAC and SI mixture (CAC+SI), glass-ionomer powder (GIC), and acetic acid-treated GIC (GICA). Sealant without filler served as control. The samples were immersed in deionized water or a lactic acid solution and the concentration of fluoride in the water, before and after fluoride recharge, and the lactic acid pH change, respectively, were determined. The CAC+SI group demonstrated the highest fluoride release after being recharged with fluoride gel. The CAC+SI group also demonstrated increased lactic acid pH. These findings suggest that a resin-based sealant containing synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement may enhance remineralization due to fluoride release and higher pH.

  18. Bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to primary dentin after cutting with different bur types and dentin conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12. In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5% and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence.

  19. Microleakage after Thermocycling of Three Self-Etch Adhesives under Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine O. Geerts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate microleakage that appeared on Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement (RMGIC restorations. Sixty class V cavities (h×w×l=2mm×2mm×3mm were cut on thirty extracted third molars, which were randomly allocated to three experimental groups. All the buccal cavities were pretreated with polyacrylic acid, whereas the lingual cavities were treated with three one-step Self-Etch adhesives, respectively, Xeno III (Dentsply Detrey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany, iBond exp (Heraeus Kulzer gmbH & Co. KG, Hanau, Germany, and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (3M ESPE AG, Dental products Seefeld, Germany. All cavities were completely filled with RMGIC, teeth were thermocycled for 800 cycles, and leakage was evaluated. Results were expressed as means ± standard deviations (SDs. Microleakage scores were analysed by means of generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs assuming an ordinal logistic link function. All results were considered to be significant at the 5% critical level (<.05. The results showed that bonding RMGIC to dentin with a Self-Etch adhesive rather than using polyacrylic acid did not influence microleakage scores (=.091, except for one tested Self-Etch adhesive, namely, Xeno III (<.0001. Nevertheless, our results did not show any significant difference between the three tested Self-Etch adhesive systems. In conclusion, the pretreatment of dentin with Self-Etch adhesive system, before RMGIC filling, seems to be an alternative to the conventional Dentin Conditioner for the clinicians as suggested by our results (thermocycling and others (microtensile tests.

  20. Influence of eugenol on the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts cemented with different types of resin luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Erhan; Çetin, Ali Riza; Capar, İsmail Davut; Tunçdemir, Ali Riza; Aydinbelge, Hale Ari

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of eugenol on the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts cemented with different types of resin luting agents. Seventy-two extracted maxillary single-rooted canine teeth were randomly divided into two groups of 36 teeth. Group 1, the control group, was filled with gutta-percha only (i.e., did not receive eugenol), whereas group 2 was filled with a eugenol-containing sealer. All root canals were filled and each group was divided into three subgroups. The posts in each subgroup were cemented with the following materials: subgroup 1 with a 2-step self-etching adhesive system (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V + Panavia F); subgroup 2 with a 1-step self-etching adhesive (Panavia F); and subgroup 3 with a self-adhesive (Clearfil SA Cement). Dislodgement resistance was measured using a universal testing machine. All data were subjected to ANOVA using a factorial design and Tukey test (α = 0.05). The use of the eugenol-containing sealer significantly reduced the push-out bond strength of the fiber post (P eugenol-containing sealer (P eugenol than were the other evaluated groups when the fiber post was cemented in the canals filled with the eugenol-containing sealer.

  1. A new self-curing resin-modified glass-ionomer cement for the direct bonding of orthodontic brackets in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, J P

    1998-04-01

    A new self-curing (chemically cured) resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, Fuji Ortho (GC International), is based on the technology of hybrid glass-ionomer restorative materials and features chemical adhesion to tooth structure and long-term fluoride release. This article describes a 12-month clinical evaluation of Fuji Ortho for the direct bonding of orthodontic (metal) brackets with System 1+ (Ormco Corp.) as a control. Three failures of Fuji Ortho occurred from a sample of 60 (5%), with five failures of the composite resin from a sample of 60 (8.3%). No statistical significance was seen between these results. Fuji Ortho is a satisfactory adhesive for the direct bonding of orthodontic brackets where there are no occlusal interferences.

  2. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velagala L Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC, a novel resin-modified (RM calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC, Group B (BD, and Group C (RMGIC. Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573 while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000. The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive.

  3. Fast curing ethylene vinyl acetate films with dual curing agent towards application as encapsulation materials for photovoltaic modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W-H. Ruan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To speed up curing of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA films as encapsulation materials for photovoltaic modules, a dual curing agent of benzoyl peroxide (BPO and butylperoxy 2-ethylhexyl carbonate (TBEC was introduced in this work. The experimental results indicated that for the weight ratio of BPO/TBEC of 0.6/2.4, over 80% gel content of EVA was yielded after curing at 130°C for 12 min. Compared with the case of single curing agent, the present one obviously operated at much lower temperature with faster rate. By carefully studying the influence of curing agent proportion and curing conditions on gel content of EVA films, as well as rheology and curing kinetics, the mechanism involved was analyzed and verified. The results are believed to be useful for developing new curing system of EVA encapsulation films with improved processability.

  4. 双重固化体系柔韧性研究%Research on Dual-curing System Flexibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆凯; 魏先福; 黄蓓青

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain UV-heat curing coatings which has great flexibility, UV-heat curing coatings were made through the principle of formulating of recipe. The effect of different prepolymer and monomer on UV-heat curing coatings has been studied. The sample is prepared by the most optimal formula. The experiment shows that Flexibility is best when using monomer EOEOA preparing dual curing coating. Moreover, 3 kinds of prepolymer and monomer with preferably flexibility are selected to conduct experiments, dual curing coatings with high flexibility is prepare using the experimental formula, in which hybrid prepolymer LR9000︰UA VP 2396︰ SE-400=0. 378︰0. 287︰0. 334.%为了获得柔韧性能良好的热-UV双重固化涂料,利用配方设计原理制备了热-UV双重固化涂料样品,分别探讨了预聚物和单体含量对双重固化涂层柔韧性的影响,使用最优配方制备柔韧性最佳涂料样品。实验表明,单体中采用EOEOEA制备双重固化涂料柔韧性最好,选用混合预聚物LR9000︰UA VP 2396︰SE-400=0.378︰0.287︰0.334制备了具有较高柔韧性双重固化涂料。

  5. 不同树脂核材料对纤维桩核修复后整体抗折强度的影响%Comparison of influence of resin core on overall bending strength of fiber post-core restoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞忠伟; 马燕

    2015-01-01

    目的 比较不同树脂核材料对纤维桩核修复后整体抗折强度的影响.方法 选择离体下颌第一前磨牙60颗,分别用3M光固化复合树脂P60、Medental双重固化树脂、Pulpdent双重固化树脂联合Viva碳纤维加强玻璃纤维桩行桩核修复,缓慢加载力同时观察离体牙受力的变化情况.结果 3M光固化复合树脂的抗折强度为(80.182±9.512)N,Medental双重固化树脂的抗折强度为(87.805±11.649)N,Pulpdent双重固化树脂的抗折强度为(85.458±10.845)N.组间比较,3M光固化复合树脂的抗折强度低于Medental双重固化树脂和Pulpdent双重固化树脂的抗折强度(t=5.758、3.084,均P<0.05),Medental双重固化树脂和Pulpdent双重固化树脂的抗折强度差异无统计学意义(t=0.718,P>0.05).3M光固化复合树脂组桩核断裂后伴有大面积的堆核树脂碎裂脱落.结论 采用双重固化树脂行纤维桩-树脂核修复大面积牙体硬组织缺损抗折强度优于高填料光固化复合树脂,且不易出现核碎裂脱落,是更理想的桩核修复核材料.%Objective To compare the influence of resin core on overall bending strength of fiber post-core restoration.Methods 60 mandibular first premolar extracted because of orthodontic treatment was selected.3M light -cured composite resin P60,medental dual-cured resin,pulpdent dual-cured resin combined with viva carbon fiber reinforced glass fiber post were applied.The changes of teeth in vitro were observed when strength was given on.Results The flexural strength of 3M light-cured composite resin was (80.182 ±9.512)N,Medental dual-cured resin was (87.805 ± 11.649) N,Pulpdent dual-cured resin was (85.458 ± 10.845) N.The flexural strength of 3 M light-cured composite resin was lower than that of medental dual-cured resin and pulpdent dual-cured resin (t =5.758,3.084,both P < 0.05).There was no statistical differences of flexural strength between medental dual-cured resin and pulpdent dual-cured

  6. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis; Sintese e caracterizacao de pastas de cimento aditivadas com resinas epoxi - analises cineticas, termodinamicas e calorimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, A.M.G.; Andrade Junior, M.A.S.; Cestari, A.R.; Vieira, E.F.S., E-mail: macleybiane@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  7. Resistance to fracture of endodontically treated premolars restored with glass ionomer cement or acid etch composite resin: An in vitro study

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    B Ranga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Due to the weakness of endodontically treated posterior teeth requires more strengthened restoration to withstand occlusal forces. The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars restored with different materials in mesio-occluso-distal (MOD cavity preparations. Materials and Methods: MOD cavity preparations in 80 endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars were restored using four different methods. Fiber rings were filled with stone plaster and the teeth were placed into the plaster up to the level of cemento-enamel junction. The teeth were grouped according to restorative method, mounted in an Instrom T.T. machine, and the buccal walls subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. Result: The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups compared. All teeth fractured in a similar manner irrespective of the restorative method used. Conclusion: The resistance to the fracture of the teeth was the same when they were stored with glass ionomer cement as a base over which composite resin was placed. When the entire cavities were filled with glass ionomer cement, the resistance to fracture of the teeth decreased significantly compared with the acid etch resin technique.

  8. Shear bond strengths of self-adhesive luting resins fixing dentine to different restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congxiao; Degrange, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the bond strengths of three self-adhesive resin cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem and Multilink Sprint) fixing dentine to four different restorative substrates (Ni-Cr alloy, E-Max glass-ceramic, Y-TZP Zirconia and Adoro micro-filled composite) and to compare their performances with those of two conventional dual-cured luting cements (Variolink II + Total-etch Excite DSC and Multilink Automix + Self-etching Primer A + B). Cylindric specimens (5 x 5 mm) were prepared with the four restorative materials for bonding to human dentine. Three surface treatments were performed depending on the restorative material: (i) Al2O3 50 microm sandblasting (Ni-Cr, Adoro), (ii) #800 SiC polishing (Zirconia, E-Max), (iii) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching (E-Max). Twenty-five groups (n = 10) were designed according to luting cements, restorative materials and surface pre-treatments. In some experimental groups, Variolink II and Multilink Automix were coupled with, respectively, a silane primer (Monobond S) and an alloy/zirconia primer (Multilink A/Z primer). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then loaded in shear until failure. Variolink II and Multilink Automix showed the highest bond strengths, regardless of the restorative substrate, when used with dentine bonding systems and primers, while the weakest bonds were with Maxcem. The bond strength recorded with the two other self-adhesive cements depended on the nature of the restorative substrate. Increasing retention at the interfaces (i.e., HF ceramic etching) and using specific primers significantly improves the bond strength of luted restorative materials to dentine.

  9. Salivary contamination and post-cured resin/resin lute bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, A N; Pereira, B P

    1994-01-01

    A previous study has shown that sandblasting and silane priming a post-cured inlay resin gave a secure bond to dual-cure luting resin. To determine the influence of salivary contamination 4 additional groups of 15 post-cured resin discs were mounted in acrylic cylinders, their faces sandblasted with 50 microns alumina and silane primed. Surface treatments with saliva (sa), air/water spray (a/w), phosphoric acid gel (pa), and silane (si) followed in the order listed: A) control, no further treatment; B) sa, a/w; C) sa, a/w, si; D) sa, a/w, pa a/w; E) sa, a/w, pa, a/w, si. A 3.9 mm diameter column of dual-cure resin lute was then bonded to the dry stored in water surfaces. Specimens were stored in water for 2 weeks after which the dual-cure resin columns were sheared off the post-cured resin discs. Shear bond strengths were A) 19.2 +/- 3.7, B) 17.4 +/- 3.9, C) 16.7 +/- 3.1, D) 15.6 +/- 3.5, E) 15.4 +/- 2.3 MPa. One-way ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple Range Procedure showed groups D and E to be significantly lower than the uncontaminated control group A (p < 0.05). There were 2 adhesive failures in group B and all others were cohesive within the post-cured resin discs. This implies that air/water alone after salivary contamination is an unreliable cleansing method. The low shear bond values for Groups D and E may have been related to inadequate clearance of the phosphoric acid gel. It was concluded that salivary contamination adversely affected the quality of the bonds studied and decontamination using phosphoric acid gel resulted in significantly reduced shear bond strengths.

  10. Physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of an experimental resin-based pulp capping material containing the quaternary ammonium salt and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y W; Yu, F; Zhang, H C; Dong, Y; Qiu, Y N; Jiao, Y; Xing, X D; Tian, M; Huang, L; Chen, J H

    2017-04-04

    To evaluate in vitro the physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity and calcium phosphate nucleation of an experimental light-curable pulp capping material composed of a resin with antibacterial monomer (MAE-DB) and Portland cement (PC). The experimental material was prepared by mixing PC with a resin containing MAE-DB at a 2 : 1 ratio. Cured pure resin containing MAE-DB served as control resin. ProRoot MTA and Dycal served as commercial controls. The depth of cure, degree of monomer conversion, water absorption and solubility of dry samples, calcium release, alkalinizing activity, calcium phosphate nucleation and the cytotoxicity of materials were evaluated. Statistical analysis was carried out using anova followed by Tukey's HSD test (equal variance assumed) or Tamhane test (equal variance not assumed) and independent-samples t-tests. The experimental material had a cure depth of 1.19 mm, and the mean degree of monomer conversion was 70.93% immediately post-cure and 88.75% at 24 h post-cure. The water absorption of the experimental material was between those of MTA and Dycal, and its solubility was significantly less (P material exhibited continuous calcium release and an alkalinizing power between those of MTA and Dycal throughout the test period. Freshly set experimental material, control resin and all 24-h set materials had acceptable cytotoxicity. The experimental material, MTA and Dycal all exhibited the formation of apatite precipitates after immersion in phosphate-buffered saline. The experimental material possessed adequate physicochemical properties, low cytotoxicity and good calcium phosphate nucleation. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo PEREIRA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05. The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148. The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. CONCLUSIONS: Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

  12. Effect of loading weight on bond durability of composite-type resin cement under cyclic impact test (part 2). Loading with light weight of 100-120 g.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2009-03-01

    The bond durability of composite-type resin cement was evaluated by means of cyclic impact tests using three different loads. In terms of experimental setup, a casting alloy, 12% Au-Pd-Ag, was used as the adherend and bonded to a cast block using a composite-type cement (Bistite II). A shear load--using plungers of three different weights at 100, 110, and 120 g--was dropped from a 3-mm height onto a small piece of the casting alloy until debonding. The cycle numbers that caused debonding were 1756 +/- 680 x 10(4) times for 100 g, 1403 +/- 515 x 10(4) times for 110 g, and 420 +/- 200 x 10(4) times for 120 g, respectively. Therefore, the group loaded with 120 g showed a significantly lower value as compared to the other two groups. On the fracture mode of the cement, it was a bulk fracture regardless of the loading weight employed in this study--the same result obtained in a previous study where heavier weights were employed.

  13. Clinical comparison between a resin-reinforced self-cured glass ionomer cement and a composite resin for direct bonding of orthodontic brackets. Part 2: Bonding on dry enamel and on enamel soaked with saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciafesta, V; Bosch, C; Melsen, B

    1999-11-01

    The purposes of this investigation were to compare the clinical performance of a resin-reinforced self-cured glass ionomer cement to a standard composite resin in the direct bonding of orthodontic brackets when bonded onto: a) dry teeth and b) teeth soaked with saliva. The two bonding agents were compared using a split-mouth design. In that, both systems were used for direct bonding of stainless steel brackets in every patient. Thirty-eight consecutive patients with fixed appliances were followed for a period of 12 months. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: group A (11 patients) and group B (27 patients). In group A, the performance of 220 stainless steel brackets was evaluated: 110 brackets were bonded with GC Fuji Ortho glass ionomer cement (GC Industrial Co., Tokyo, Japan) onto dry teeth, and 110 bonded with System 1+ composite resin (Ormco Corp., Glendora, CA). In group B, the performance of 540 stainless steel brackets was evaluated: 270 brackets were bonded with GC Fuji Ortho onto teeth soaked with saliva, and 270 bonded with System 1+. In group A, GC Fuji Ortho recorded an overall failure rate (34.5%) significantly higher (p 0.05) between the failure rates of the two bonding agents were found when GC Fuji Ortho was used on teeth soaked with saliva. It was concluded, therefore, that GC Fuji Ortho shows clinically acceptable bond strengths when bonded onto moist teeth, but not when used on dry enamel. Both bonding agents failed mostly at the enamel/adhesive interface, without causing any enamel damage.

  14. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Marinho AZEVEDO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher's test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05. CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations.

  15. In vitro antibacterial activity of a novel resin-based pulp capping material containing the quaternary ammonium salt MAE-DB and Portland cement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries is challenging due to bacterial infection. The objectives of this study were to synthesize a novel, light-cured composite material containing bioactive calcium-silicate (Portland cement, PC and the antimicrobial quaternary ammonium salt monomer 2-methacryloxylethyl dodecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB and to evaluate its effects on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro. METHODS: The experimental material was prepared from a 2 : 1 ratio of PC mixed with a resin of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, bisphenol glycerolate dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (4 : 3 : 1 containing 5 wt% MAE-DB. Cured resin containing 5% MAE-DB without PC served as the positive control material, and resin without MAE-DB or PC served as the negative control material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and calcium hydroxide (Dycal served as commercial controls. S. mutans biofilm formation on material surfaces and growth in the culture medium were tested according to colony-forming units (CFUs and metabolic activity after 24 h incubation over freshly prepared samples or samples aged in water for 6 months. Biofilm formation was also assessed by Live/Dead staining and scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: S. mutans biofilm formation on the experimental material was significantly inhibited, with CFU counts, metabolic activity, viability staining, and morphology similar to those of biofilms on the positive control material. None of the materials affected bacterial growth in solution. Contact-inhibition of biofilm formation was retained by the aged experimental material. Significant biofilm formation was observed on MTA and Dycal. CONCLUSION: The synthesized material containing HEMA-BisGMA-TEGDMA resin with MAE-DB as the antimicrobial agent and PC to support mineralized tissue formation inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation even after aging in water for 6 months, but had no inhibitory effect on

  16. In vitro fluoride release from a different kind of conventional and resin modified glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimović-Dragaš, Mediha; Hasić-Branković, Lajla; Korać, Fehim; Đapo, Nermin; Huseinbegović, Amina; Kobašlija, Sedin; Lekić, Meliha; Hatibović-Kofman, Šahza

    2013-08-01

    Fluoride release is important characteristic of glass-ionomer cements. Quantity of fluoride ions released from the glass-ionomer cements has major importance in definition of their biological activity. The objectives of this study were to define the quantity of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements and to define the effect of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements on their cytotoxicity. Concentrations of the fluoride ions released in the evaluated glass-ionomer cements were measured indirectly, by the fluoride-selective WTW, F500 electrode potential, combined with reference R503/D electrode. Statistical analyses of F-ion concentrations released by all glass-ionomers evaluated at two time points, after 8 and after 24 hours, show statistically higher fluoride releases from RMGICs: Vitrebond, Fuji II LC and Fuji Plus, when compared to conventional glass-ionomer cements: Fuji Triage, Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac Silver, both after 8 and after 24 hours. Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released by evaluated glass-ionomer cements and cytotoxic response of UMR-106 osteoblast cell-line are relatively high, but do not reach levels of biological significance. Correlation between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line after 8 hours is high, positive and statistically significant for conventional GICs, Fuji Triage and Fuji IX GP Fast, and RMGIC, Fuji II LC. Statistically significant Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 cell line after 24 hours is defined for RMGIC Fuji II LC only.

  17. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  18. Deposition of crystalline hydroxyapatite nano-particle on zirconia ceramic: a potential solution for the poor bonding characteristic of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Abbas; Nikzad, Sakineh; Yazdani, Arash; Atri, Faezeh; Fazel Anvari-Yazdi, Abbas

    2017-07-01

    The poor bonding strength of zirconia to different dental substrates is one of the challenging issues in restorative dentistry. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent biocompatible material with fine bonding properties. In this study, it was hypothesized that hydroxyapatite coating on zirconia would improve its bond strength. Forty-five zirconia blocks were prepared and randomly divided into three groups: hydroxyapatite coating, sandblasting, and no preparation (control). The blocks were bonded to cement and the micro-shear bond strength was measured following load application. The bond strength values were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test in 3 groups and paired comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test. The failure patterns of the specimens were studied by a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope and then analyzed by the chi-square test (significance level = 0.05). Deposition of hydroxyapatite on the zirconia surface significantly improved its bond strength to the resin cement in comparison with the control specimens (p control group only showed adhesive failure, but the hydroxyapatite coated group had mixed failures, indicating the better quality of bonding (p quality and values.

  19. Cerâmicas ácido resistentes: a busca por cimentação resinosa adesiva Acid resistant ceramics: the search for resinous adhesive cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Malheiros

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A eliminação da fase vítrea das cerâmicas odontológicas tornou-as resistentes à fratura, mas também ácido resistentes, o que neste último caso dificulta a cimentação resinosa adesiva. A busca por métodos para condicionar estas cerâmicas tem estimulado inúmeros trabalhos científicos. O tratamento da superfície cerâmica, a descontaminação da superfície e a escolha dos agentes de união e cimentação estão entre os itens considerados importantes. As pesquisas dos últimos cinco anos mostram que ainda não há um protocolo definido de cimentação, contudo os resultados apontam para uma associação de métodos para que a união adesiva seja obtida.The elimination of the glassy phase of dental ceramics made them resistant to fracture but also acid resistant, which makes it difficult in the latter case the adhesive resin cement. The search for methods to condition these ceramics has stimulated many scientific papers. The ceramic surface treatment, decontamination of the surface and the choice of coupling agents and cement are among the items considered important. Researches in the last five years show that there is still no established protocol for cement, but the results point to a combination of methods for the adhesive bond is obtained.

  20. In vitro quantitative evaluation of marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with a glass ionomer cement and two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIJELLA Maria Fernanda Borro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with the glass ionomer cement Vitremer and with the composite resins Ariston pHc and P-60. The aims of the study were to assess the effect of thermocycling on those materials and to evaluate two methods utilized in the analysis of dye penetration. Sixty premolars divided in three groups were utilized; the teeth had proximal cavities whose cervical walls were located 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Half of the test specimens from each group underwent thermocycling; the other half remained in deionized water, at 37ºC. The specimens were immersed, for 24 hours, in a basic 0.5% fuchsin solution at 37ºC. For the analysis of microleakage, the specimens were sectioned in a mesio-distal direction, and the observation was carried out with the software Imagetools. The results were evaluated through the 2-way ANOVA and through the Tukey?s test. All groups presented marginal microleakage. The smallest values were obtained with Vitremer, followed by those obtained with the composite resins P-60 and Ariston pHc. There was no statistically significant difference caused by thermocycling, and the method of maximum infiltration was the best for detecting the extension of microleakage.

  1. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO2-CaO-P2O5 glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95 MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20 MPa after immersing for 30 days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37 °C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption.

  2. Influence of drying time of adhesive systems on the bond strength between resin cement and feldspathic ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Feitosa, Sabrina Alves; Institute of Science and Technology – UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista – School of Dentistry – Graduate Program in Restorative Dentistry (Prosthetic Dentistry Unit) – São José dos Campos – SP – Brazil.; Moura, Isabela Gomes; Institute of Science and Technology – UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista – School of Dentistry – Graduate Program in Restorative Dentistry (Operative Dentistry Unit) – São José dos Campos – SP – Brazil.; Corazza, Pedro Henrique; Post-graduation Program in Dentistry – Dental School – University of Passo Fundo – Passo Fundo – RS – Brazil.; Bergolli, Cesar Dalmolin; Faculty of Dentistry – Prosthetic Dentistry Unit – Federal University of Pelotas (UFPEL) – RS – Brazil.; Pagani, Clóvis; Institute of Science and Technology – UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista – School of Dentistry – Department of Restorative Dentistry – São José dos Campos – SP – Brazil.; Souza, Rodrigo Othavio A; Department of Restorative Dentistry – Division of Prosthodontics – Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN) – Natal – RN – Brazil.; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Rio Grande do Sul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of drying times of two total-etch & rinse adhesives on the resin bond strength to a feldsphatic ceramic, before and after aging. Material and Methods: Feldsphatic-ceramic CAD-CAM bars were cut into blocks (12×10×4 mm) with a cutting machine (N = 32). Impressions were made of each ceramic block with silicone putty material and the negative space was filled with a composite resin. The bonding ceramic surface was etched with hydrofluoric acid, silan...

  3. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, Kenan; Avci, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. The highest (17.7 ± 6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8 ± 3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7 ± 6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9 ± 5.7) (p Biodentine® = 8.0 ± 3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA = 5.8 ± 3.2; GIC and Biodentine = 6.7 ± 2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p = 0.73 and p = 0.38, respectively). The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  4. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan CANTEK?N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB composites, silorane-based (SB composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Material and Methods: Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results: The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2 than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7 (p<0.001, the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6 and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6 showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively. Conclusions: The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  5. Effect of different adhesion strategies on fiber post cementation: Push-out test and scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Letícia Oliveria; Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Costa, Leonardo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Muniz, Leonardo; Mathias, Paula

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of phosphoric acid etching and the dentin pre-treatment with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on the push-out bond strength between fiber post and root canal dentin. Root canals of 48 human incisors were selected, post spaces were prepared and assigned to four groups: G1-37% phosphoric acid (15 s); G2-5.25% NaOCl (2 min) +37% phosphoric acid (15 s); G3-37% phosphoric acid (60 s); and G4-5.25% NaOCl (2 min) +37% phosphoric acid (60 s). Fiber post cementation was performed with two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system/dual-cured resin cement according to the manufacturer's recommendation. After 24 h, each root was sectioned transversally into three slices (cervical, middle and apical) and the bond strength of each section was determined using a push-out bond strength test. Morphology analysis of the bonded interface was evaluated using a scanning electron microscopy. Push-out strength data (MPa) were analyzed by Analysis of Variance and Tukey-Kramer (α = 0.05). Considering the NaOCl pre-treatment, no statistically significant differences were observed among groups; however, when the phosphoric acid was applied during 60 s in the apical portion without NaOCl pre-treatment, the bond strength was statistically significant increased. The NaOCl pre-treatment did not improve the bond strength of adhesive luting cement to root canal dentin. The findings suggest that the use of 37% phosphoric acid for 60 s may have a beneficial effect on bond strength in the apical root third.

  6. Effect of different adhesion strategies on fiber post cementation: Push-out test and scanning electron microscopy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Oliveria Saraiva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of phosphoric acid etching and the dentin pre-treatment with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl on the push-out bond strength between fiber post and root canal dentin. Materials and Methods: Root canals of 48 human incisors were selected, post spaces were prepared and assigned to four groups: G1-37% phosphoric acid (15 s; G2-5.25% NaOCl (2 min +37% phosphoric acid (15 s; G3-37% phosphoric acid (60 s; and G4-5.25% NaOCl (2 min +37% phosphoric acid (60 s. Fiber post cementation was performed with two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system/dual-cured resin cement according to the manufacturer′s recommendation. After 24 h, each root was sectioned transversally into three slices (cervical, middle and apical and the bond strength of each section was determined using a push-out bond strength test. Morphology analysis of the bonded interface was evaluated using a scanning electron microscopy. Push-out strength data (MPa were analyzed by Analysis of Variance and Tukey-Kramer (α = 0.05. Results: Considering the NaOCl pre-treatment, no statistically significant differences were observed among groups; however, when the phosphoric acid was applied during 60 s in the apical portion without NaOCl pre-treatment, the bond strength was statistically significant increased. Conclusion: The NaOCl pre-treatment did not improve the bond strength of adhesive luting cement to root canal dentin. The findings suggest that the use of 37% phosphoric acid for 60 s may have a beneficial effect on bond strength in the apical root third.

  7. Thin and thick layers of resin-based sealer cement bonded to root dentine compared: Adhesive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Epita S; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate tensile and shear bond strengths of one epoxy (AH) and two methacrylate resin-based sealers (EZ and RS) in thin and thick layers bonded to root dentine. An alignment device was prepared for accurate positioning of 20 root dentine cylinders in a predefined gap of 0.1 or 1 mm. Sealer was placed in the interface. Bond strength tests were conducted. Mode of failures and representative surfaces were evaluated. Data were analysed using anova and post-hoc tests, with P layer of sealer produced higher bond strength, except for the shear bond strength of EZ. Significant differences between thin and thick layers were found only in tensile bond strengths of AH and RS. Mixed type of failure was constantly found with all sealers. Bond strengths of thick layers of resin-based sealers to root dentine tended to be higher than with thin layers.

  8. Influence of different kinds of rosins and hydrogenated resins on the setting time of Grossman cements Influência de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas sobre o tempo de endurecimento dos cimentos do tipo Grossman

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    Manoel Damião SOUSA NETO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on the setting time by the addition of different kinds of rosin and hydrogenated resin on the Grossman cement powder was evaluated. The experiments were carried out following the American Dental Association’s specification number 57 for root canal sealers. For this analysis, different Grossman cement powders were prepared using different rosins (X, WW and WG and hydrogenated resins (Staybelite and Staybelite ester 10. The study of the physicochemical properties of the Grossman cements obtained the different kinds of rosins and hydrogenated resins interference on the cement’s setting time. The hydrogenated resin, having a higher pH, increased the setting time of the cement when compared to the X, WW and WG rosins.No presente estudo, analisou-se o efeito da adição de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas ao pó do cimento de GROSSMAN sobre o tempo de endurecimento. Os experimentos foram realizados de acordo com a Especificação 57 para materiais obturadores de canais radiculares da American Dental Association (ADA. Para análise, foram aviados pós do cimento de GROSSMAN com diferentes tipos de breu (X, WW e WG e resinas hidrogenadas (Stabylite e Stabylite éster 10. Os estudos das propriedades físico-químicas dos cimentos tipo GROSSMAN obtidos de diferentes tipos de breus e resinas hidrogenadas interferem no tempo de endurecimento do cimento. A resina hidrogenada, obtida do processo de hidrogenação tem o pH mais alto, provocando um aumento do tempo de endurecimento do cimento em relação aos breus tipo X, WW e WG, que têm pH mais ácido.

  9. Antibacterial potential of contemporary dental luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugela, Povilas; Oziunas, Rimantas; Zekonis, Gediminas

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were to evaluate the antibacterial activities of different types of dental luting cements and to compare antibacterial action during and after setting. Agar diffusion testing was used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of seven types of dental luting cements (glass ionomer cements (GICs), resin modified GICs, resin composite, zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide non-eugenol, zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate cements) on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. Instantly mixed zinc phosphate cements showed the strongest antibacterial activity in contrast to the non-eugenol, eugenol and resin cements that did not show any antibacterial effects. Non-hardened glass ionomer, resin modified and zinc polycarboxylate cements exhibited moderate antibacterial action. Hardened cements showed weaker antibacterial activities, than those ones applied right after mixing.

  10. Radiographic appearance of commonly used cements in implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pette, Gregory A; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Norkin, Frederic J

    2013-01-01

    Cement-retained restorations allow for a conventional fixed partial denture approach to restoring dental implants. However, inadequate removal of excess cement at the time of cementation may introduce a severe complication: cement-induced peri-implantitis. Radiopaque cements are more easily detected on radiographs and should improve the recognition of extravasated cement at the time of insertion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of commercially available cements in vitro. Eighteen different cements commonly used for luting restorations to implants were tested at both 0.5- and 1.0-mm thicknesses. The cements examined were zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide, zinc polycarboxylate, zinc phosphate, resin-reinforced glass ionomer, urethane resin, resin, and composite resin. Two samples of each cement thickness underwent standardized radiography next to an aluminum step wedge as a reference. The mean grayscale value of each of the nine 1-mm steps in the step wedge were used as reference values and compared to each of the cement samples. Temp Bond Clear (resin), IMProv (urethane resin), Premier Implant Cement (resin), and Temrex NE (resin) were not radiographically detectable at either sample thickness. Cements containing zinc were the most detectable upon radiographic analysis. There are significant differences in the radiopacity of many commonly used cements. Since cementinduced peri-implantitis can lead to late implant failure, cements that can be visualized radiographically may reduce the incidence of this problem.

  11. Influence of method and period of storage on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations to dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ribeiro Santana

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the method and period of storage on the adhesive bond strength of indirect composite resin to bovine dentin. Ninety bovine incisors were stored in three different solutions: 0.2% thymol, 10% formalin, and 0.2% sodium azide, during 3 periods of storage: 7 days, 30 days and 6 months, resulting in 9 groups (n = 10. The roots were cut off and the buccal surface was ground with #600-grit silicon carbide paper. The surface was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and a composite resin restoration (TPH Spectrum was fixed using a one-bottle adhesive system (Adper Single Bond and a dual-cured resinous cement (Rely X ARC under a load of 500 g for 5 minutes. The samples were serially cut perpendicular to the bonded interface to obtain slices of 1.2 mm in thickness. Each slab was trimmed with a cylindrical diamond bur resulting in an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm². The microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing was performed in a testing machine (EMIC 2000 DL at a 0.5 mm/minute crosshead-speed until failure. After fracture, the specimens were examined under SEM to analyze the mode of fracture. μTBS Means were expressed in MPa and the data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (3X3 and the Tukey test (α = 0.05. The storage times of 7 and 30 days produced no significant difference irrespective of the solution type. The formalin and thymol solutions, however, did have a negative influence on bond strength when the teeth were stored for 6 months.

  12. Influence of air-abrasion executed with polyacrylic acid-Bioglass 45S5 on the bonding performance of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Timothy F; Thompson, Ian; Toledano, Manuel; Nucci, Cesare; Banerjee, Avijit

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the microtensile bond strength (μTBS), after 6 months of storage in PBS, of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) bonded to dentine pretreated with Bioglass 45S5 (BAG) using various etching and air-abrasion techniques. The RMGIC (GC Fuji II LC) was applied onto differently treated dentine surfaces followed by light curing for 30 s. The specimens were cut into matchsticks with cross-sectional areas of 0.9 mm(2). The μTBS of the specimens was measured after 24 h or 6 months of storage in PBS and the results were statistically analysed using two-way anova and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). Further RMCGIC-bonded dentine specimens were used for interfacial characterization, micropermeability, and nanoleakage analyses by confocal microscopy. The RMGIC-dentine interface layer showed no water absorption after 6 months of storage in PBS except for the interdiffusion layer of the silicon carbide (SiC)-abraded/polyacrylic acid (PAA)-etched bonded dentine. The RMGIC applied onto dentine air-abraded with BAG/H(2)O only or with BAG/PAA-fluid followed by etching procedures (10% PAA gel) showed no statistically significant reduction in μTBS after 6 months of storage in PBS. The abrasion procedures performed using BAG in combination with PAA might be a suitable strategy to enhance the bonding durability and the healing ability of RMGIC bonded to dentine.

  13. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

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    L. C. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC or composite resin (CR restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control: cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF. The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations.

  14. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro

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    S Prathibha Rani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I, 30 days (phase II, 90 days (phase III, and 180 days (Phase IV. At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC (Group II, Flowable Compomer (Group III, and Flowable Composite (Group IV, respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  15. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathibha, Rani S

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I), 30 days (phase II), 90 days (phase III), and 180 days (Phase IV). At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC) (Group II), Flowable Compomer (Group III), and Flowable Composite (Group IV), respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  16. Pit and Fissure Sealants with Different Materials: Resin Based x Glass Ionomer Cement – Results after Six Months

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    Priscilla Santana Pinto Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the retention and superficial characteristics between a new resin-modified glass ionomer sealant and resin sealant. In addition, the teeth sealed were compared to partially erupted first molars (control group without sealing in relation to the incidence of dental caries. Material and Methods: Initially, 31 children aged 6-8 years participated in this study. The study children showed caries history, but had at least two healthy first molars. A total of 114 teeth were randomly divided into three groups: Clinpro (n=36, Fluroshield (n=38, and control (n=40. The two sealants were applied under relative isolation after previous prophylaxis and enamel etching with phosphoric acid 35% (15s. Clinical evaluation was performed by two calibrated examiners. They evaluated the retention and surface characteristics of the occlusal surface. Results: Fluroshield® showed significantly greater retention than ClinproTM Varnish® XT (p=0.002. However, the performance analysis of the success and failure of retention presented no significant difference between the materials (p=0.141. Concerning to the surface characteristics, Fluroshield performed better than Clinpro after analyzing the marginal deterioration, marginal discoloration, and superficial discoloration (p<0.05. The surface texture of the materials under study was similar (p=0.071. Sealed groups (Clinpro=Fluroshield showed similar performance in the prevention of dental caries, which was significantly lower than that of control group (p=0.001. Conclusion: Both sealants, Fluroshield® and Clinpro TM Varnish® XT were effective in preventing caries lesion within 6 months, although Fluroshield sealant showed better clinical retention.

  17. Effect of different intensities of light source on fiber post cementation%固化光源强度对双固化树脂粘结纤维桩强度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈健; 吴凤鸣; 张晓燕; 马骞; 乔萍丽

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究不同光源强度对双固化树脂粘结纤维桩固位力的影响。方法30颗离体前磨牙,截冠,预备根管,根管充填, BISCO Duo - link 双固化粘结剂将BISCO DT light post 纤维桩粘固。按纤维桩粘结时使用的固化光源强度不同分成3组:空白组不使用固化光源;低强度组使用600 MW / cm2 LED 强度固化光源;高强度组使用1200 MW / cm2 LED 强度固化光源。沿垂直纤维桩长轴方向将牙根切成1 mm 薄片,行薄片推出实验,记录推出力量,计算粘结强度。结果粘结强度:空白组<低强度组<高强度组。空白组、高强度组各自不同深度粘结强度无差别;低强度组粘结强度:根尖<根中<根颈。结论使用双固化树脂粘结剂粘结纤维桩时,固化光源强度增加,有利于增强不同深度粘结剂与桩的粘结强度,增加树脂粘结纤维桩的固位力。%Objective To verify the influence of different light intensities on the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with dual-cured resin cement. Methods 30 crownless human premolars were prepared. Fiber posts were inserted using dual-cured cement and were randomly divided into 3 groups(n = 10):control group:no use of curing light source;low intensity group:the use of 600 MW / cm2 LED curing light intensity;high strength group:the use of 1 200 MW / cm2 LED curing light intensity. After one week,each root was sectioned transversally into three slices (cervical,middle and apical)and the bond strength of each section was determined using a push-out bond strength test. Results The bond strength:blank group middle > apical. Conclusions When using a dual-cured cement,the bond strength of fiber post was influ-enced by the strength of curing light intensity. With the increase of curing light source intensity,the bond strength of fiber post also in-creased.

  18. Micromechanical properties of veneer luting resins after curing through ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Elif; Hickel, Reinhard; Bolay, Sükran; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of light-cured luting resin after curing under the ceramic restoration in comparison to dual-cured luting resin, by evaluating the micromechanical properties. Two hundred seventy thin luting composite films of ca. 170 μm in thickness were prepared by using two light-cured luting resins (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent; RelyX Veneer, 3M ESPE) and a dual-cured luting resin (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent). The composites were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10, 20, and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent; IPS Empress® CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0, 0.75, and 2 mm). Forty-five groups were included, each containing six thin films. The samples were stored after curing for 24 h at 37°C by maintaining moisture conditions with distilled water. Micromechanical properties of the composites were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). For each sample, ten indentations were made, thus totalizing 60 measurements per group. Micromechanical properties of the luting resins were statistically analyzed (SPSS 17.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the luting resins (p mechanical properties compared to the light-cured luting resins. The effect of luting resin type on the micromechanical properties of the luting resins was higher than the effect of curing time, ceramic type and ceramic thickness respectively (*The values of reference without ceramics for 30 s curing time).

  19. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

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    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  20. 自粘接型树脂粘接剂对玻璃陶瓷粘接耐久性的研究%Bond durability of self-adhesive resin cement to glass ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟翔峰; 刘清; 骆小平

    2010-01-01

    目的 评价自粘接型和普通型树脂粘接剂与玻璃陶瓷粘接的耐久性,以期为树脂粘接剂的临床应用提供参考.方法 按照ISO 4049 国际标准,对粘接剂A(自粘接型,G-CEM)和粘接剂B(普通型,Linkmax HV)各5个试件在6周内的最大吸水值和溶解值以及其光照射后0.5、24 h和6周的表面显微硬度进行测量.对64个陶瓷试件分别使用硅烷偶联剂A(Monobond S)、B(Clearfil Ceramic Primer)和C(GC Ceramic Primer)进行表面处理或不进行表面处理,再分别使用粘接剂A和B粘接,并于冷热循环前和冷热循环30 000次后测量试件粘接强度.结果 粘接剂A的吸水值和溶解值分别为(79.62±5.63)和(4.78±3.33)μg/mm~3,明显高于粘接剂B[分别为(35.03±3.33)和(0.00±0.00)μg/mm~3].两种粘接剂的表面显微硬度在光照射后24 h达到最大值.冷热循环30 000次后未行表面处理和硅烷偶联剂A、B、C处理后的陶瓷试件与粘接剂A的粘接强度分别为(0.00±0.00)、(2.86±3.25)、(12.75±1.55)和(11.98±2.35)MPa,与粘接剂B对应试件粘接强度[分别为(0.00±0.00)、(5.15±5.20)、(10.94±3.30)和(14.18±3.13)MPa]的差异无统计学意义.结论 在使用硅烷偶联剂的前提下,自粘接型树脂粘接剂可以代替普通型树脂粘接剂进行玻璃陶瓷粘接.%Objective To evaluate the bond durability of glass ceramic to self-adhesive and conventional resin cements.Methods Maximum water sorption and solubility of two resin cements(A:self-adhesive type,G-CEM;B:conventional type,Linkmax HV)were measured during 6 week water storage.And their surface Knoop hardness number was measured at 0.5,24 h and 6 week after irradiation.Sixty-four glass ceramic samples were or were not silanized with one of the three silane coupling agents(A:Monobond S;B:Clearfil Ceramic Primet;C:GC Ceramic Primer),and then cemented with two resin cements.The micro-bond strength between the two cements and glass ceramic were measured at baseline and

  1. The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S D; Kim, J S; Han, S H; Ha, Y K; Song, K S; Jee, K Y

    2009-09-01

    In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of (129)I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The (129)I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67+/-3% and 5.43+/-0.53 g, 70+/-7% and 10.40+/-1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of (129)I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, (129)I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher (129)I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g.

  2. 树脂水门汀添加生物玻璃后在人工唾液中的生物活性研究%Investigation of the bioactivity of resin cement added with bioactive glass in artificial saliva

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪洁; 章非敏

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the bioactivity of resin cement added with bioactive glass in artificial saliva. Methods Surface silanized bioactive glass was proportionally mixed with the resin cement,and the mixture was immersed in artifical saliva for 3,7,14, and 28 d to test the bioactivity. Results The microstructure of the material was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy( SEM/EDS) .finding that after immersed in artificial saliva for 3 d,the surfaces of the material had been deposited with mineralized apatite, which became thicker with soaking time increasing. Conclusions The resin cement added with bioactive glass in artificial saliva has strong bioactivity, and its biological properties are improved.%目的 研究加入生物活性玻璃的树脂水门汀在人工唾液中的生物活性.方法 将生物活性玻璃表面硅烷化,按比例与树脂水门汀混合均匀,放人配置好的人工唾液中分别浸泡3,7,14和28 d来检测其生物活性.结果 扫描电镜/能谱仪(SEM/EDS)对材料的微观形貌进行分析后发现,在人工唾液中浸泡3d材料的表面已经有矿化的磷灰石沉积,并且随着浸泡时间的增加而增厚.结论 将生物活性玻璃添加入树脂水门汀后在人工唾液中具有较强的生物活性,可以提高树脂水门汀的生物性能.

  3. Resin-modified and conventional glass ionomer restorations in primary teeth: 8-year results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.; Manscher, E.; Teglers, P.T.

    2004-01-01

    clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer......clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer...

  4. Evaluation of the esthetic effect of resin cements on the final color of ceramic veneer restorations%树脂粘接剂色调对牙体瓷贴面美学效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小冬; 张绍朴; 邢文忠; 展康茹; 王贻宁

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of various shades of resin cements on the final color of an improved lithium-disilicate pressed glass ceramic veneers and analyze the agreement of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes.Methods Forty-eight artificial maxillary central incisor teeth were sequenced according to the measured color parameters and divided at random into 8 groups(n=6).These artificial teeth were prepared following veneer preparation protocol.An improved lithium-disilicate pressed glass ceramic materials(IPS e.max Press,Ivoclar Vivadent) were selected as the veneer material.The shape and curvature of each veneer wax pattern were duplicated with the same impression to guarantee the similarity.The ceramic veneer specimens were delivered on the artificial teeth using the corresponding try-in pastes of 8 shades(Variolink Veneer,shades of LV-3,LV-2,MV,HV+2,HV+3; and 3M RelyXTM Veneer,shades of WO,TR,A3) and bonded with the resin cements.A clinical spectrophotometer was used to measure the color parameters of the ceramic veneers before the try-in,during the try-in procedure,and after cementation.△E values and C*ab values were calculated.Results The result of one-way ANOVA indicated that the color changes of ceramic veneer cementation with resin cements were statistically significantly different in the shades of resin cements(P<0.001).The △E values of ceramic veneer after cementation ranged from 0.93 to 6.79.The color changes of ceramic veneer specimens using the shades of LV-3,HV+3,WO were 3.31,4.90 and 6.79,respectively(△E>3.3).The △E values of the ceramic veneer specimens between the resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes were from 0.72 to 1.79(except the shade of HV + 3).Conclusions The LV-3,HV+3,WO shades were able to change the final color of a ceramic veneer.The color of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes achieved high agreement(except the shade of HV+3).%目的 比较树脂粘接剂与同色调试色糊剂颜色效

  5. Retention of oral microorganisms on conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements Retenção de microrganismos bucais em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais e modificados por resina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise PEDRINI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary caries are a worldwide public and socioeconomic problem. The placement of restorations can lead to the development of environmental conditions favorable to microbial colonization, especially on the tooth/restoration interface, which is a predisposing factor for secondary caries. The aim of this study was to evaluate microbial retention on conventional (Chelon-Fil and Vidrion R and resin-modified (Vitremer and Fuji II LC glass-ionomer cements, in situ, using a hybrid composite resin (Z100 as a control. Twelve volunteers wore Hawley appliances with specimens made of all tested filling materials for 7 days. The specimens were then removed from the appliances and transferred to tubes containing 2.0 ml of Ringer-PRAS. Microorganisms from the samples were inoculated onto blood agar and Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar and incubated under anaerobiosis (90% N2, 10% CO2, at 37°C, for 10 and 2 days, respectively. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cements and the composite resin retained the same levels of microorganisms on their surfaces. The resin-modified glass-ionomers retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin and conventional glass-ionomer cements. The conventional glass-ionomer cements retained less mutans streptococci than the composite resin, but that difference was not statistically significant.A cárie secundária representa problema de saúde pública e socioeconômico no mundo. A restauração de dentes acometidos por cárie pode criar condições favoráveis à proliferação microbiana na superfície do material restaurador ou na interface dente/restauração, criando ambiente propício para o estabelecimento de cárie secundária. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a capacidade de retenção de placa bacteriana em cimentos de ionômero de vidro convencionais (Chelon-Fil e Vidrion R e modificados por resina (Vitremer e Fuji II LC e de resina composta híbrida (Z100, utilizada como controle. Nos testes de reten

  6. Effects of different surface-treatment methods on the bond strengths of resin cements to full-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kansu

    2011-09-01

    Conclusions: The in vitro findings from this study indicate that surface-treatment procedures applied to the IPS Empress and the IPS Empress 2 full-ceramic systems are important when cement types are considered. In contrast, cement types and surface-treatment methods had no effect on changing the bond strength of the In-Ceram ceramic system.

  7. Block containing contaminated ion exchange resins and preparation process. Bloc contenant des resines echangeuses d'ions contaminees et son procede de preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, C.; Da Silva, P.

    1993-01-08

    The invention concerns a block containing contaminated ion exchange resins for storage in a repository. Ion exchange resins are incorporated, after water saturation, in a composite matrix made of hardened epoxide resin and cement chosen among Clinker slag cements and slag-ashes cements. The presence of cement in composite matrix allows to limit the temperature in such block below 63 degree C, during their preparation.

  8. Epoxy-Based Shape-Memory Actuators Obtained via Dual-Curing of Off-Stoichiometric “Thiol–Epoxy” Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Belmonte

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, epoxy-based shape-memory actuators have been developed by taking advantage of the sequential dual-curing of off-stoichiometric “thiol–epoxy” systems. Bent-shaped designs for flexural actuation were obtained thanks to the easy processing of these materials in the intermediate stage (after the first curing process, and successfully fixed through the second curing process. The samples were programmed into a flat temporary-shape and the recovery-process was analyzed in unconstrained, partially-constrained and fully-constrained conditions using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA. Different “thiol–epoxy” systems and off-stoichiometric ratios were used to analyze the effect of the network structure on the actuation performance. The results evidenced the possibility to take advantage of the flexural recovery as a potential actuator, the operation of which can be modulated by changing the network structure and properties of the material. Under unconstrained-recovery conditions, faster and narrower recovery-processes (an average speed up to 80%/min are attained by using materials with homogeneous network structure, while in partially- or fully-constrained conditions, a higher crosslinking density and the presence of crosslinks of higher functionality lead to a higher amount of energy released during the recovery-process, thus, increasing the work or the force released. Finally, an easy approach for the prediction of the work released by the shape-memory actuator has been proposed.

  9. 一种新型树脂粘结剂安全性及有效性的临床评价%Clinical Assessment on the Safety and Efficiency of One Neo-type Resin Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩宁宁; 孙方方; 费健; 孟翔峰; 聂蓉蓉; 骆小平

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察一种新型树脂粘结材料应用于活髓牙粘结时是否具有良好的安全性及粘结强度.方法:80名受试者随机分为2组,每组各40例,实验组采用NISSIN公司生产的新型牙科树脂基粘结剂,对照组采用3MESPE AG公司生产的通用自粘结树脂型粘结材料(Rely×100),每组病例在粘结完成后1周、3月、6月复查.评价指标包括:牙髓情况、口腔软组织有无过敏反应、修复体粘结情况.结果:80例受试者均未出现严重不良牙髓反应及口腔软组织过敏反应,74例临床反应等级属于无刺激.结论:该新型树脂基粘结剂应用于活髓牙的粘结修复是安全的、有效的.%Objective: To assess the safety and adhesive efficiency of one neo-type resin cement used as a vital teeth bonding agent. Methods: 80 volunteers were divided into two groups randomly. The test group was applied with the neo-type resin cement made by NISSIN and the other one was applied with Rely× 100 made by 3M ESPE AG. Every case was visited after one week, three months and six months. The evaluation index included postoperative tooth sensitivity, oral mucosal allergy and adhesive efficiency. Results: 74 cases were not found tooth pulp sensitive, oral mucosal allergy and no crown dropping. Conclusion: The neo-type resin cement used as vital teeth adhesive was safe and efficient.

  10. Interfases adhesivas al utilizar cementos de resina en el interior de los conductos radiculares: Comparación al MEB Adhesive interfaces when using resin cement at the interior of the radicular duct: A SEM comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Valenzuela Aránguiz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una comparación micro morfológica de la interfase dentina radicular - resina de cementación de postes de fibra de vidrio con dos sistemas de resinas compuestas, Relyx UnicemTM y ParaCemTM. Veinte premolares unirradiculares, extraídos por indicación ortodóncica fueron divididos al azar en dos grupos de 10 y se les realizó terapia endodóntica convencional. Las muestras fueron desobturadas parcialmente y se cementaron los postes de fibra (Tenax Fiber White, Coltene-Whaledent con los materiales en estudio siguiendo las indicaciones del fabricante. Posteriormente se realizaron cortes en los tercios apical, medio y cervical y se prepararon para la observación al microscopio electrónico de barrido (MEB. Las raíces cuyos postes fueron cementados con Relyx UnicemTM no evidenciaron formación de capa hibrida en ninguno de los tercios. La interfase cemento-dentina se encontró irregular y discontinua, en cambio se encontró una intima unión poste-cemento. Las raíces en las que se utilizó el ParaCem formaron una capa híbrida uniforme y homogénea de un espesor promedio de 2 μm sólo en el tercio cervical, no encontrándose esta estructura en los tercios medio y apical. También se evidenció una intima unión poste-cemento. Conclusiones: El cemento Relyx UnicemTM, no ha formado capa híbrida a lo largo del conducto. En cambio con el ParaCemTM es posible encontrarla aunque solo a nivel cervical. No se observó formación de tags con los cementos probados en este estudio. Ambos cementos han generado unión íntima entre el poste de fibra y la resina cementante.A micro morphological study was performed; this study compared the interface between radicular dentin and resin cement, when fixing fiberglass posts with Relyx UnicemTM and ParaCemTM systems. Twenty single-rooted premolars, extracted by orthodontic indication, were divided randomly into two groups of 10 teeth each. Endodontic treatment using gutta-percha points and Grossman

  11. Application of light-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cement in orthodontic practice%光固化树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀在正牙学实践中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单丽华; 崔占琴; 沈庆华; 高琪; 邱志香

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cements have higher bond strength, especially can release fluoride. But there are fewer reports of the clinical application for the prevention of decalcification.OBJECTIVE: To test the benefit from using RMGI cement instead of a conventional composite resin in bracket bonding for patients with malocclusion, and observe bracket-failure rates and decalcification on enamel surfaces at pretreatment and at debonding.DESIGN: Observational and comparative trial.SETTING: The Second Hospital Affiliated to Hebei Medical University.PARTICIPANTS: Forty successive patients (358 teeth) with malocclusion admitted to the Department of Orthodontics in the Second Hospital Affiliated to Hebei Medical University, were selected for the study from July to August in 2002. All the patients (21 females and 19 males, mean age 16 years) had normal and complete anterior teeth, good oral hygiene. There were no obvious differences in bilateral teeth. Informed consents were obtained from all the subjects. The experiment was also approved by the ethical committee of the hospital. Experimental materials were RMGI adhesive (Fuji, GC, Japan, Lot 0005111) and composite resin cement (enamel adhesive of Beijing and Tianjin, Tianjin product, Lot 020402). Brackets produced from Hangzhou 3B and 37% phosphoric acid were used.METHODS: ①Bonding brackets: Subjects selected according to random procedure were divided into two groups, each with 20. GroupⅠ: The left buccal surfaces bonded with light-cure RMGI were etching for 30 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water; the right buccal surfaces bonded with composite resin cement were etching for 60 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water and dried; Group Ⅱ: After etching for 30 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid, the right buccal surfaces were rinsed with water and bonded brackets with light-cure RMGI. The left buccal surfaces were bonded brackets with composite resin cement after etching

  12. Estudio in vitro de la resistencia a la tracción de postes de fibra de vidrio cementados con cuatro agentes cementantes In vitro study of push-out resistance of glass-fiber posts cemented with four luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jara Vidal

    2010-10-01

    significant differences between groups (p<0.0001, and a multiple comparisons test revealed that statistically significant difference among the 4 cementing agents (p<0.05. Conclusions. This in vitro study demonstrated that dual-cured resin cement Panavia F 2.0 resulted in the highest dislodgement force thus would be within the clinically acceptable standard.

  13. The Experiment of Creep with Glass Ionomer Cement and Light-cured Composite Resin%玻璃离子水门汀与光固化复合树脂的蠕变实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁杰; 李新颖; 李鹏; 罗民

    2014-01-01

    通过蠕变实验得出了光固化型玻璃离子水门汀试样、银粉玻璃离子水门汀试样、光固化复合树脂试样的蠕变数据、蠕变曲线,建立了各组试样的蠕变函数方程,对比分析三种材料的蠕变特性,为临床提供蠕变力学参数。取光固化型玻璃离子水门汀试样、银粉玻璃离子水门汀试样、光固化复合树脂试样各10个,在电子万能试验机上进行蠕变实验,模拟人体温在36.5±1℃的温度下,以0.1 Mpa/s 的应力增加速度对试样施加应力,每个试样采集100个实验数据,以归一化分析的方法处理蠕变数据,拟合蠕变曲线。光固化型玻璃离子水门汀试样7200 s蠕变量为0.301%,银粉玻璃离子水门汀试样7200 s蠕变量为0.262%,光固化复合树脂试样7200 s蠕变量为0.230%,光固化型玻璃离子水门汀试样7200 s蠕变量大于银粉玻璃离子水门汀试样7200 s蠕变量,光固化复合树脂试样7200 s蠕变量差异显著(P<0.05)。各组试样蠕变曲线是以指数关系变化的。光固化型玻璃离子水门汀由于采用了光化处理,改善了其蠕变特性。%To get the creep data and the creep curves by creep test with the light cured glass ionomer cement specimen,the glass ionomer cement specimen and the light cured composite resin sample,we established the creep equation of different sample,and we analyzed the creep characteristics of three kinds of materials,which provide a clinical creep parameters were analyed.10 glass ionomer cement specimen of the light cared,10 glass ionomer cement specimen,and the 10 specimen of light cured composite resin sample were taken,and we conducted creep experiments in electronic universal testing machine.We simulated human body temperature at a tem-perature of 36.5 ±0.5 ℃ and applied to the specimen stress with stress increasing speed of 0.1Mpa/s,then 100 experimental data in each of samples were collected,then the

  14. Cement Conundrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    China aims to streamline the crowded cement industry Policymakers are looking to build a concrete wall around the cement-making industry as they seek to solidify the fluid cement market and cut excessive production.

  15. Radioactive ion exchange resin pretreatment and treatment system and corresponding process. Systemes de pre-traitement et de traitement de resines echangeuses d'ions radioactives et procede de traitement correspondant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, G.; Ranc, R.

    1989-05-12

    Spent organic ion exchange resins contain Li (cationic resins) and B (amionic resins) which interfere with cement after encapsulation. Radioactive anionic and cationic resins or their mixture are treated by a soluble aluminum salt for precipitation of insoluble lithium aluminate, then neutralized and mixed with the cement containing calcium oxide for precipitation of boron.

  16. 不同树脂黏结剂对纤维桩冠向微渗漏及黏结强度的影响%Effects of different resin cements on the coronal microleakage and bonding strength of fiber posts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高士军; 宗婉翘; 王冬霞; 侯玉泽; 肖媛媛; 薛钢; 黄艳军; 姜家真

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:At present, there are stil differences in the studies of total-etch, self-etch and self-bonding resin cement effect on the coronal microleakage and bonding strength of fiber posts. OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the coronal microleakage and the bonding strength of fiber posts treated with three kinds of resin cements. METHODS:Total y 32 upper incisors were randomly divided into five groups, including three experimental groups and two control groups. After the root canal preparation, three kinds of resin cements (EMBRACE WetBond, LuxaCore, Medental Multi-cure) were used to fiber posts with the bond diameter of 1.4 mm. Stereomicroscope was used to observe the microleakage. Then, the specimens were cut into 2 mm wafer along the axis of tooth, and universal testing machine for push-out test was used to observe the failure mode. In the positive control group, no root canal preparation was done, the root was coated with nail polish, and the crown was directly exposed to the dye. In the negative control group, no root canal preparation was done, the root canal orifice was covered with the resin, the tooth was overal coated with nail polish and then embedded 1 mm below the section. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The microleakage was observed in al the three resin cements, Medental Multi-cure showed the least microleakage and LuxaCore showed the largest microleakage, and there was significantly different among the three kinds of resin cements (P  目的:评价全酸蚀、自酸蚀及自黏结3种树脂黏结剂对纤维桩黏固后冠向微渗漏及黏结强度影响。  方法:将32颗人离体上前牙随机分成5组,其中3组为实验组,2组为对照组。实验组离体牙经根管预备后,选用全酸蚀、自酸蚀及自黏结3种树脂黏结剂分别黏结直径为1.4 mm的玻璃纤维桩。体视显微镜下观察试件各剖面的微渗漏情况,再将实验组试件沿垂直牙长轴方向切成厚度为2 mm的薄片,万能材料测试机进

  17. 不同树脂粘接剂对纤维桩粘接强度及断裂界面的作用%Effects of different resin cements on bonding strength and failure modes of fiber posts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莉; 陈小冬

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The good performance of resin cements used to cement fiber-posts has been confirmed, but the adhesive properties of different kinds of resin cements remain different. OBJECTIVE:To compare the shear bond strength of three resin cements (Bisco One-step, Clearfil DC, 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem) used to cement fiber posts and to observe their adhesive properties. METHODS:Fifteen extracted teeth were selected and the crowns were removed with a diamond bur 1-mm coronal to the cemento-enamel junction fol owed by endodontic treatment. Then the teeth were randomly divided into three groups (n=5). Glass fiber posts were cemented respectively with three resin cements, and after embedding, the roots were cut into 2-mm-thick sections for push-out tests. The mean shear bonding strengths were compared, and the failure modes were recorded and analyzed under a high-power microscope. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Mean bonding strengths were (4.69±1.85) MPa for Bisco One-step group, Clearfil DC, (6.10±0.36) MPa for Clearfil DC group, and (7.04±0.92) MPa for 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem group. The bonding strengths of RelyX Unicem and Clearfil DC groups were significantly greater than that of Bisco One-step group (P  目的:比较Bisco One-step、Clearfil DC及3M RelyX Unicem三种树脂粘接系统对纤维桩的剪切粘接强度,研究纤维桩与根管壁牙本质间的粘接性能。  方法:将15颗人离体牙在釉牙骨质界冠方1 mm处与牙体长轴方向垂直去除牙冠,磨平,常规热牙胶技术根管治疗后,随机分为3组,分别采用Bisco One-step、Clearfil DC及3M RelyX Unicem树脂粘接剂将玻璃纤维桩黏固于根管内,包埋后分别切片制备2 mm厚的样本,采用微推出法测试各组样本的粘接剪切强度;在高倍显微镜下观察所有被测样本的破坏类型。  结果与结论:Bisco One-step粘接剂组、Clearfil DC粘接剂组及3M RelyX Unicem粘接剂组的粘接强度分别为(4.69±1.85),(6.10

  18. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  19. Comparison of shear bond strength of resin reinforced chemical cure glass ionomer, conventional chemical cure glass ionomer and chemical cure composite resin in direct bonding systems: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kolasani Srinivasa; Reddy, T Praveen Kumar; Yugandhar, Garlapati; Kumar, B Sunil; Reddy, S N Chandrasekhar; Babu, Devatha Ashok

    2013-01-01

    The acid pretreatment and use of composite resins as the bonding medium has disadvantages like scratching and loss of surface enamel, decalcification, etc. To overcome disadvantages of composite resins, glass ionomers and its modifications are being used for bonding. The study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of resin reinforced glass ionomer as a direct bonding system with conventional glass ionomer cement and composite resin. The study showed that shear bond strength of composite resin has the higher value than both resin reinforced glass ionomer and conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration and it increased from 1 to 24 hours in all groups. The shear bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement was higher than the conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration. Conditioning with polyacrylic acid improved the bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement significantly but not statistically significant in the case of conventional glass ionomer cement.

  20. Propriedades mecânicas de materiais compósitos à base de cimento Portland e resina epoxi Mechanical properties of composite materials based on portland cement and epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Panzera

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de materiais de alto desempenho e multifuncionais, como os compósitos poliméricos cimentícios, tem sido o foco de inúmeras pesquisas na indústria da construção civil. Este trabalho investiga o efeito da combinação de uma fase polimérica termorrígida, uma resina epóxi, com cimento Portland branco estrutural, seguido da avaliação da resistência à compressão e módulo de elasticidade. Este compósito, quando comparado individualmente com as suas matérias-prima originais, promove um aumento da resistência mecânica à compressão, redução da massa específica e, também uma mudança significativa do comportamento mecânico. As mudanças nas propriedades mecânicas estão associadas à hidratação da fase cimentícia na presença da resina, fato comprovado através da análise espectroscópica na região do infravermelho.The study of multi-functional materials of high performance, as the polymeric-cementitious composites, has been the focus of several researches in the industry of the civil engineering. This work investigates the effect of the combination of a thermorigid epoxy phase and the white Portland cement, followed by the evaluation of its compressive strength and modulus of elasticity. This composite, when the phases are individually compared, provides an increase of the compressive strength, a reduction of the density, and a significant change of the mechanical behaviour. The changes in mechanical behaviour are associated with the hydration of cement in the presence of resin, which was evident after infrared spectroscopy analysis.

  1. Microleakage of Resin- Modified Glass Ionomer Cement and Compomer Restorations in vitro%改良型玻璃离子水门汀及复合体的边缘微漏研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆忆; 丁玲; 陆群

    2001-01-01

    目的比较两种树脂改良型玻璃离子水门汀及两种树脂复合体边缘封闭性。方法选用40颗成人离体恒磨牙,制备V类洞型,分别用两种树脂改良型光固化玻璃离子水门汀(GCFujiⅡLC和Vitremer TM)及两种多元酸修饰的树脂复合体(Dyract复合体和F2000复合体)充填,经冷热交替试验(5~55℃,循环20次),采用1%碱性品红染料渗入法观察充填体与牙体洞壁间边缘微漏。结果在V类洞壁及龈壁4种不同材料的边缘封闭性存在显著差异(P=0.026,P=0.000),壁侧GC FGCiⅡLC组显著优于其它各组,龈壁侧Dyract复合体组显著比其它各组差。结论牙面的不同处理及充填材料的聚合收缩、吸水率以及热膨胀系数的差异等都是影响微漏的因素。树脂改良型光固化玻璃离子水门汀边缘封闭性优于树脂复合体。%Objective To evaluate the marginal integrity of restoration in two types of mate- rials, or resin- modified glass ionomer cement and polyacid- modified composite resin (compomer). Methods Restorations of four kinds of material (GC Fuji Ⅱ LC, VitremerTM, Dyract compomer and F2000 compomer) were placed in the facial Class V cavity preparations in forty noncarious human molar teeth. The teeth were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups of 10 teeth each. After thermal cy- cling( × 20,5 ~55℃ ), the teeth were immersed in 1% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours at room tempera- ture. Staining along the teeth restoration interface was recorded. Results The data indicated signifi- cant differences between all the restorative materials for both occlusal and gingival scores ( P=0.026, P = 0. 000)respectively. Further analysis revealed there were statistically significant differences between GC Fuji Ⅱ LC and others on occlusal margins versus Dyract compomer and others on gingival margins. Conclusion Factors such as dental conditioning, rates of water absorption and thermal coefficient were related to

  2. Does Addition of Propolis to Glass Ionomer Cement Alter its Physicomechanical Properties? An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, P; Girish Babu, K L; Neeraja, G; Pillai, S

    Propolis is a natural resinous substance produced by honey bees. The antimicrobial effects of glass ionomer cement have been shown to improve with the addition of propolis; however its effect on the physicomechanical properties of the cement is not known.

  3. Effect of cyclic loading on fracture strength and microleakage of a quartz fiber dowel with different adhesive, cement and resin core material combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissara, P; Ozcan, M; Melilli, D; Valandro, L F

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of different adhesive-cement-core combinations coupled with quartz fiber dowels after cyclic loading and fracture strength tests and assessed the microleakage using dye penetration method. Forty maxillary canines (N=10 per group) were restored with fiber dowels (Quartz fiber DT Light Post) and four adhesive-cement-core material combinations (Group 1: All-Bond 2+C&B [root]/All-Bond 2+Biscore [core]; Group 2: All-Bond 2+Bisfil 2B [root]/All-Bond 2+Bisfil 2B [core]; Group 3: Scotchbond 1+RelyX ARC [root]/Scotchbond 1+Supreme [core]; Group 4: RelyX Unicem [root]/Scotchbond 1+Filtek Supreme [core]). The specimens were initially cyclic loaded (x2,000,000, 8 Hz, 3 to 100 N at 45 °C under 37±3 °C water irrigation) and then immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine at 37 °C for 24 hours for dye penetration and interface failure detection. The failure surfaces were observed under the stereomicroscope (x100 magnification). Circumferential and centripetal dye penetration was scored at the buccal and lingual sites. Only three specimens failed macroscopically during cyclic loading. No significant difference was found among the groups for the number of resisted cycles (P=0.9). Mean fracture strength between the groups were also not statistically significant (213±63-245±71 N) (P=0.740) (ANOVA). All four groups showed high values of dye penetration along the restoration interfaces being not significant from each other (P=0.224) (Kruskal-Wallis). The lingual sides of the teeth where the load applied, showed significantly higher incidence of detachment between the core and the dentin (100%, 90%, 100%, 90% for groups 1, 2, 3, 4, respectively) compared to the buccal side (30%, 30%, 60%, 40%) (P=0.032, c2 test). In 13 specimens (32.5%) crack lines at the coronal area were observed. Fracture strength was not significantly correlated with dye penetration (P=0.1803, r=-0.2162, Linear Regression and Correlation test). Different combinations of adhesive-cement

  4. Cements and adhesives for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana P; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A; Pegoraro, Thiago A; Dias, Renata A; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2011-04-01

    Dental cements are designed to retain restorations, prefabricated or cast posts and cores, and appliances in a stable, and long-lasting position in the oral environment. Resin-based cements were developed to overcome drawbacks of nonresinous materials, including low strength, high solubility, and opacity. Successful cementation of esthetic restorations depends on appropriate treatment to the tooth substrate and intaglio surface of the restoration, which in turn, depends on the ceramic characteristics. A reliable resin cementation procedure can only be achieved if the operator is aware of the mechanisms involved to perform the cementation and material properties. This article addresses current knowledge of resin cementation concepts, exploring the bonding mechanisms that influence long-term clinical success of all-ceramic systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  6. Multi-step adhesive cementation versus one-step adhesive cementation: push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin before and after mechanical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Marina; Rippe, Marilia Pivetta; Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Monaco, Carlo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical cycling on resin push-out bond strength to root dentin, using two strategies for fiber post cementation. Forty bovine roots were embedded in acrylic resin after root canal preparation using a custom drill of the fiber post system. The fiber posts were cemented into root canals using two different strategies (N = 20): a conventional adhesive approach using a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system combined with a conventional resin cement (ScotchBond Multi Purpose Plus + RelyX ARC ), or a simplified adhesive approach using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100). The core was built up with composite resin and half of the specimens from each cementation strategy were submitted to mechanical cycling (45 degree angle; 37 degrees C; 88 N; 4 Hz; 700,000 cycles). Each specimen was cross-sectioned and the disk specimens were pushed-out. The means from every group (n = 10) were statistically analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and a Tukey test (P = 0.05). The cementation strategy affected the push-out results (P < 0.001), while mechanical cycling did not (P = 0.3716). The simplified approach (a self-adhesive resin cement) had better bond performance despite the conditioning. The self-adhesive resin cement appears to be a good option for post cementation. Further trials are needed to confirm these results.

  7. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dalby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS, with dentin bonding agents (DBAs applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go! that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent using RXU following the manufacturer’s instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (0.05 in the SBS between the test groups (A–D or the control (group E. Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (>0.05 affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  8. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to glass-ionomer cement using self-etching bonding agents with different pH: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivanayagam Kandaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the bonding ability of composite to unset glass-ionomer cement (GIC using different self-etching bonding systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred samples of composite bonded to unset GIC were prepared and were divided into four groups. In Group A, composite was bonded to unset GIC employing a strong (pH 1 self-etch primer was used. In Group B, intermediary strong (pH 1.4 self-etch primer was employed. In Group C and D, mild (pH 2 and (pH 2.2 self-etch primer was employed. Shear bond strength analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: Statistical analysis performed with one way analysis of variance and Tukey′s test showed that the bond strength of composite to unset GIC was significantly higher for the mild self-etch primer group. In addition, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX analysis was used to determine the composition of various structural phases identified by FE-SEM along the GIC-bonding agent interfaces. Conclusion: Hence this present study concludes that clinically the use of mild self-etching bonding agent over unset GIC has improved bond strength compared to the use of strong and intermediate self-etching bonding agent.

  9. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Feilzer, Albert J; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Krejci, Ivo; Attin, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Rebilda DC) were subjected to different irradiation protocols with identical energy density (27 J cm(-2) ): high-intensity continuous light (HIC), low-intensity continuous light (LIC), soft-start (SS), and pulse-delay curing (PD). Axial shrinkage and shrinkage force of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real time for 15 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences among the curing protocols for both Knoop hardness and axial shrinkage, irrespective of the composite material. Pulse-delay curing generated the significantly lowest shrinkage forces within the three light-curing materials SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD. High-intensity continuous light created the significantly highest shrinkage forces within Esthet X HD and Rebilda DC, and caused significantly higher forces than LIC within Esthet X flow. In conclusion, both the composite material and the applied curing protocol control shrinkage force formation. Pulse-delay curing decreases shrinkage forces compared with high-intensity continuous irradiation without affecting hardening and axial polymerization shrinkage. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Influence of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of pressed ceramic luted to dentin with self-etch resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Robert; Ellakwa, Ayman; Millar, Brian; Martin, F Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS), with dentin bonding agents (DBAs) applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU) cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E) of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go!) that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic) luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control) had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent) using RXU following the manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (P Optibond FL (Group A) and Go! (Group D). There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the SBS between the test groups (A-D) or the control (group E). Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (P > 0.05) affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  11. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajkovic, Denis [Clinic for Dentistry, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Svetozara Markovica 69, 34000 Kragujevac (Serbia); Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kisic, Danilo [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakocevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  12. EP-toxicity test of saturated GT-73 resin and resin in grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibler, J.P.

    1985-04-24

    The results of EP-toxicity tests on mercury saturated Duolite{reg_sign} GT-73 cation exchange resin clarify options for the ultimate disposal of spent resin. Samples of GT-73 saturated with mercury passed the EP-toxicity test, indicating that fully spent resin may be classifed as ``solid``-not``hazardous``-waste and stored or disposed-of as such. Samples of GT-73 resin saturated with mercury and then incorporated into Portland Type 1 cement did not pass the EP-toxicity test and fall into the ``hazardous waste`` category. Samples of GT-73 resin less-than-saturated with mercury which were in corporated in Portland Type 1 cement passed the EP-toxicity test and may be classified as ``solid waste.`` Other commercially available materials are being investigated for incorporating fully spent GT-73 resin in a solid waste form.

  13. 铸瓷固位钉对牙本质-树脂界面粘结强度的影响%Influence of all ceramic pin on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to dentin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    景双林; 黄丽娟; 唐哲; 李琥; 张光东; 于金华

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨自行研制的铸瓷固位钉对牙本质-复合树脂界面粘结强度的影响,为铸瓷固位钉进一步的临床应用提供实验依据.方法:将40颗离体牙随机分为4组:A组,铸瓷固位钉组;B组,金属自攻螺纹钉组;C组,复合树脂钉组;D组,树脂直接充填组.采用IPS e.max Press热压铸瓷系统制作铸瓷牙本质固位钉,制备标准化牙本质-固位钉-复合树脂块试件,微拉伸实验测试各组试件粘结强度,体视显微镜下观察试件断裂面形态.结果:A、B两组试件粘结强度显著高于C、D两组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);A组与B组、C组与D组组间粘结强度差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).A、C、D三组试件断裂模式以牙本质-树脂界面断裂为主,B组以牙本质内聚断裂为主.结论:作为一种新型牙本质固位钉,IPS e.max Press铸瓷固位钉可显著提升牙本质-复合树脂界面的粘结强度.%Objective:To evaluate the effects of self-made all ceramic pin on the micro tensile bond strength of a rensin cement to dentin.Methods:Forty extracted molars were selected and randomly divided into four groups,group A,B and C were prepared with an internal pin channel,then the all ceramic pins,self-threading retentive pins and resin composite pins were inserted into dentin respectively,group D was prepared with no internal retentive features.All subjuects were filled with composite resin.For the microtensile nontrimming technique,10 beam-shaped specimens per group were obtained.Each specimen was loaded in tension until failure and the fracture mode present were observed under stero-microscope.All the results were analyzed statistically.Results:The micro tensile bond strength of group A and B was statistically higher than that of group C and D (P < 0.05),while there were no significant difference between group A and B,or between group C and D (P > 0.05).The breakage modes were observed mainly between the dentin and adhesive interface in

  14. Observation of Effect onFilling of 50 CasesWedge Shaped DefectTeeth by Light Cured Composite Resin and Glass Ionomer Cement%光固化复合树脂、玻璃离子水门汀填充牙楔状缺损50例的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马勇

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical efficacyonfilling of 50 caseswedge shaped defectteeth by light cured composite resin and glass ionomer cement.Methods50 cases (186 teeth) with wedge shaped defect in our hospital were selected.They were randomly divided into light cured composite resin and glass ionomer cement joint repair group (observation group),62 teeth, light cured composite resin repair group (control group 1),58 teeth, glass ionomer cement group (control group 2),66 teeth, therapeutic effect of three groups of patients were compared.ResultsAfter 2 years of observation, the success rate of observation group was significantly higher than that of control group 1 and control group 2, the difference was statistically significant (P0.05).ConclusionIt canobtain good therapeutic effect thatwedge shaped defectteeth was repaired by light cured composite resin and glass ionomer cement. This method is worthy to be popularized and applied in clinical practice.%目的:探讨光固化复合树脂联合玻璃离子水门汀填充牙楔状缺损的临床疗效。方法选取本院门诊收治的50例(共186颗)牙楔状缺损患者,随机将其分为光固化复合树脂与玻璃离子水门汀联合修复组(观察组),共62颗,光固化复合树脂修复组(对照1组),共58颗,玻璃离子水门汀修复组(对照2组),共66颗,对三组患者的治疗效果进行比较。结果经2年的修复观察,观察组的修复成功率明显高于对照1组和对照2组,差异具有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论光固化复合树脂联合玻璃离子水门汀填充牙楔状缺损能取得良好的治疗效果,值得在临床推广与应用。

  15. Retentive strength of luting cements for stainless steel crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Priya; Kondae, Sapna; Gupta, Kamal Kishore

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the retentive strength of three luting cements. A total of forty five freshly extracted human primary molars were used in this study. The teeth were prepared to receive stainless steel crowns. They were then randomly divided into three groups, of fifteen teeth each, so as to receive the three different luting cements: conventional glass ionomer resin modified glass ionomer and adhesive resin. The teeth were then stored in artificial saliva for twenty four hours. The retentive strength of the crowns was determined by using a specially designed Instron Universal Testing Machine (Model 1011). The data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA to evaluate retentive strength for each cement and Tukey test for pair wise comparison. It was concluded that retentive strength of adhesive resin cement and resin modified glass ionomer cement was significantly higher than that of the conventional glass ionomer cement.

  16. Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cement for orthopedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cements were synthesized, formulated, and evaluated for orthopedic application. The formulation of different amino acid containing glass-ionomer bone cements was optimized, and conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements were compared. Properties of interest included handling characteristics, physical and chemical properties, and mechanical strength of the bone cement. The study was based on the synthesis of different vinyl containing amino acids, different polyelectrolytes containing these amino acid residues, and different resin-modified polyelectrolytes, as well as formulation and evaluation of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements using these polyelectrolytes. Systematic preparation of polyelectrolytes and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cements were essential features of this work, since we anticipated that the mechanical properties of the glass-ionomer bone cements could be strongly affected by the nature of the polyelectrolytes and formulation. Mechanical properties were evaluated in a screw driven mechanical testing machine, and structure-property relationships were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation of the fracture surface of the specimens. How the structure of polyelectrolytes, such as different amino acid residues, molecular weight, different modifying resin, and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cement, affected the mechanical properties was also studied.

  17. Cement compositions for cementing wells, allowing pressure gas-channeling in the cemented annulus to be controlled

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parcevaux, P.A.; Piot, B.M.; Vercaemer, C.J.

    1987-01-27

    The invention relates to cement compositions for cementing oil and geothermal wells. These compositions allow pressure gas-channeling to be effectively controlled up to more than about 485/sup 0/F. The compositions according to the invention comprise four essential constituents: a cement, a styrene-butadiene latex, a latex stabilizer, and water. The cement is a hydraulic cement belonging to any class among those currently used for cementing oil wells. The useful stabilizers according to the invention are anionic polyelectrolytes such as lignosulfanates and their desulfonated and/or resulfonated derivatives; sulfonated lignin-Kraft products; melamine-formaldehyde resins modified by a sulfonic acid or sulfite; formaldehyde/sulfonated naphthalene resins; or the condensation products of bi-nuclear sulfonated phenols and of formaldehyde. Preferred are the sodium salts of the condensation product of mononaphthalenesulfonic acid and of formaldehyde. The patent also includes a description of tests of various cement compositions of the invention, plus scanning electron microscope observations. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. 玻璃离子水门汀、光固化复合树脂、流动树脂修复牙体浅型楔状缺损的疗效性%Curative Effect of Glass Sonomer Cement, Light-Cured Composite Resin and Flowable Resin in the Dental Repair of Wedge-Shaped Defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文进

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To compare the clinical efficacy of glass sonomer cement, light-cured composite resin and flowable resin in the dental repair of wedge-shaped defect.Method:90 patients with wedge-shaped defect in our dental clinic were selected from January 2010 to May 2014 and they were randomly divided into three groups, 30 cases in each group. Group A was given glass sonomer cement, group B adopted light-cured composite resin and group C was given the flowable resin. After 1 year of follow-up visits, the success rate of dental repair, loss rate of materials, incidence rate of irritation symptom of dental pulp and incidence rate of secondary caries of three groups were compared.Result: In 1 year, group A had 6 cases with loss of materials,group B had 4 cases and group C had 1 case,the loss rate of materials of group A was significantly higher than that of group C, the difference was statistically significant(P0.05).The incidence rate of irritation symptom of dental pulp of three groups was respectively 10.0%,40.0% and 3.3%,compared group A and C, the difference was not statistically significant(P>0.05)The rate of Group B was significantly higher than that of Group A and Group B, the difference was statistically significant(P0.05).Compared 3 months and 1 weeks after repair, the periodontal index of group B and group C were significantly reduced, the differences were statistically significant (P0.05).Conclusion:The flowable resin is featured as great adhesion, less irritation, ability of filling in the tooth edge, reduction of permeability and fewer damages for periodontal tissues. It has a high success rate of dental repair. It can be promoted and applied in clinical treatment.%目的:对玻璃离子水门汀、光固化复合树脂、流动树脂三种材料修复牙体浅型楔状缺损的临床疗效进行对比,并做出评价。方法:选取2010年1月-2014年5月本院口腔科门诊收治的牙体浅型楔状缺损患者90例为研究对象,将患者

  19. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (pcementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar.

  20. Comparison of shear bond strength between zirconia ceramics and three resin luting cements%氧化锆陶瓷与三种树脂粘接剂粘接剪切强度比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金明; 陈利民; 高平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the bondig strength of zirconia ceramics with three kinds of luting cement materials.Methods Blocks of sintered zirconia ceranucs were cut and randomly divided into three groups with 32 slices in each.After being treated with sandbLasting, they were bonded with three kinds of luting cements respectively.After preserved in 37℃ distilled water for 24 hours and 30 days, the shear bonding strength of these specimens was tesred and the data were analyzed with SAS9.12 software package and the bond sections were observed under scanning electron microscope.Results Two - way ANOVA revealed that the group of PanaviaTMF could attain the best shear bonding strength: (31.36 ±3.49) MPa (after 24 hours) and (29.52 ± 3.44) MPa ( after 1 month).Superbond C & B had the high initial shear bond strength ( 31.85 ± 3.61) MPa ( after 24 hours) but low long - term bond strength (21.32±2.58)MPa (after 1month).The one - step self erosion adhesive RelyX Unicem was proved to have the lowest initial bond strength ( 13.29 ± 3.05) MPa ( after 24 hours) , but the strength could last longer.Conclusion Resin luting cement containing phosphate monomer ( MDP) can provide zirconia ceramics a strong and long - lasting bonding.The cement without inorganic filler can get good bonding strength too, but cant last long.%目的 探讨适合牙科氧化锆陶瓷的粘接材料.方法 将烧结后的氧化锆陶瓷片分为3组,每组32片,分别采用三种自酸蚀粘接剂RelyX Unicem、PanaviaTM F、Superbond C & B与喷砂后的氧化锆陶瓷片粘接,水浴24h和水浴30d后,测试其粘接剪切强度.数据用SAS9.12软件进行统计学分析,粘接断面用扫描电镜观察.结果 PanaviaTM F树脂粘接材料粘接强度最好,分别为(31.36±3.49)MPa(水浴24h)、(29.52±3.44)MPa(水浴30d).Superbond C & B能够取得较好的初期粘接强度(31.85 ±3.61)MPa(水浴24h),但水浴30d后明显下降至(21.32 ±2.58)MPa,P<0.05.RelyX Unicem的初期(水浴24h

  1. 偶联剂和不同粘接剂对纤维桩粘接强度的影响%Effects of silane and different resin cements on shear bond strength between fiber post and root dentine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆支越; 林南雁; 朱姗姗

    2012-01-01

    目的:利用薄片推出实验比较硅烷偶联剂和三种树脂粘接剂对纤维桩剪切粘接强度的影响.方法:60颗因牙周病等原因拔除的上颌单根前牙,根管治疗后行纤维桩修复的桩道预备.随机分为5组,每组12颗牙.分别采用下列粘接剂粘接Matchpost纤维桩:A组:Paracore粘接剂+偶联剂;B组:Paracore粘接剂;C组:Panavia F粘接剂+偶联剂;D组:Panavia F粘接剂;E组:Multilink N粘接剂+偶联剂.纤维桩粘接后,在牙根中部横向切割1.0mm层厚切片2个,在Zwick Z100材料试验机上行薄片推出试验(Push-Out Bond Test),记录失败载荷,计算剪切粘接强度,体视显微镜观察粘接失败类型.结果采用SPSS 11.5进行方差分析和χ2检验.结果:五组样本的剪切粘接强度(MPa)分别为A组:14.69±2.76;B组:9.46±3.11;C组:13.12±3.10;D组:10.40±3.30;E组:13.86±3.81,方差分析提示五组间差异有统计学意义(P 0.05).五组粘接失败类型间差异有统计学意义(P 0.05). There were significant differences in failure mode among the five groups (P<0.05). Conclusions: After HF etching, treating the glass fiber post surface with silane before resin cementation might significantly improve the push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentine.

  2. Avaliação in vitro da atividade antibacteriana de um cimento odontológico à base de óleo-resina de Copaifera multijuga Hayne In vitro assessment of antibacterial activity of a dental cement constituted of a Copaifera multijuga Hayne oil-resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Regina Felizardo Vasconcelos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Um dos materiais utilizados para a adequação do meio bucal no serviço público é o cimento produzido a partir de óxido de zinco e eugenol. Entretanto, o eugenol é uma substância citotóxica que pode desencadear alguns efeitos adversos. Por essa razão, procura-se substituir o eugenol por uma substância que apresente baixa toxicidade, mantendo ou mesmo melhorando as propriedades do cimento. O óleo-resina de copaíba é um produto natural, utilizado pelas populações amazônicas e reconhecido por suas propriedades medicinais. Baseando-se nas propriedades desse óleo-resina, na ação antimicrobiana comprovada do hidróxido de cálcio e na ação anti-séptica do óxido de zinco, propôs-se formular um cimento odontológico obtido da associação do ZnO, Ca(OH2 e óleo-resina de Copaifera multijuga Hayne e avaliar sua atividade antibacteriana através do teste de diluição em meio líquido frente às cepas padrão de Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175 e S. sanguinis (ATCC 15300. Nesse ensaio, utilizaram-se os seguintes grupos experimentais: o cimento contendo ZnO, Ca(OH2 e óleo-resina de copaíba (G1 e cada um dos constituintes isoladamente, ZnO (G2, Ca(OH2 (G3 e óleo-resina de copaíba (G4. Todos os grupos analisados demonstraram atividade antibacteriana, o G4 apresentou os melhores resultados e o G1 mostrou-se um cimento promissor a ser utilizado em odontologia.One of the materials utilized for suitability of the oral means in the public service is the cement produced from zinc oxide and eugenol. However, eugenol is a cytotoxic substance that can trigger some adverse effects. For this reason, it is desired to replace eugenol for another substance that presents low toxicity, keeping or even improving the cement properties. The copaiba oil-resin is a natural product, utilized by the Amazonian population and recognized for its medicinal properties. Based on the properties of this oil-resin, on the proven antimicrobial activity of calcium

  3. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  4. Advances in glass-ionomer cements

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Carel Leon

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the properties, advances and shortcomings of glass-ionomer cement as a restorative material. The adhesion of glass-ionomer to tooth structure is less technique sensitive than composite resins and its quality increases with time. Therefore glass-ionomer might turn out to the more reliable restorative material in minimal invasive dentistry based on adhesive techniques.

  5. Advances in glass-ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Carel Leon

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the properties, advances and shortcomings of glass-ionomer cement as a restorative material. The adhesion of glass-ionomer to tooth structure is less technique sensitive than composite resins and its quality increases with time. Therefore glass-ionomer might turn out to the more reliable restorative material in minimal invasive dentistry based on adhesive techniques.

  6. Marginal adaptation of ceramic inserts after cementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Pfeiffer, P; Nergiz, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    The advantage of using ceramic inserts is to prevent major drawbacks of composite resins such as polymerization shrinkage, wear and microleakage. This in vitro study evaluated the marginal adaptation of two approximal ceramic insert systems after cementation to the cavities opened with ultrasonic ti

  7. Clinical applications of preheated hybrid resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, L J; Padipatvuthikul, P; Chee, B

    2011-07-22

    This clinical article describes and discusses the use of preheated nanohybrid resin composite for the placement of direct restorations and luting of porcelain laminate veneers. Two clinical cases are presented. Preheating hybrid composite decreases its viscosity and film thickness offering the clinician improved handling. Preheating also facilitates the use of nanohybrid composite as a veneer luting material with relatively low polymerisation shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion compared to currently available resin luting cements.

  8. Evaluation of resin adhesion to zirconia ceramic using some organosilanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Heikkinen, Mo; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated and compared the effect of three trialkoxysilane coupling agents on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA-based unfilled resin and a dimethacrylate-based resin composite luting cement to a zirconia ceramics (Procera(R) AllZircon, Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden). Methods. S

  9. Laboratory evaluation of several nanofilled dental resin composites: mechanical and chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focused on nanofilled dental resins. The first year activity focused on depth of cure analysis of nanofilled composites. The second year activity focused on hardness, depth of cure and shrinkage stress analysis of bulk fill resin composites. The third year focused on degree of conversion and hardness of nanofilled resin cements. 2013/2014

  10. Laboratory evaluation of several nanofilled dental resin composites: mechanical and chemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focused on nanofilled dental resins. The first year activity focused on depth of cure analysis of nanofilled composites. The second year activity focused on hardness, depth of cure and shrinkage stress analysis of bulk fill resin composites. The third year focused on degree of conversion and hardness of nanofilled resin cements. 2013/2014

  11. Effect of delayed light curing of a resin composite on marginal integrity in cylindrical dentine cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, A; Debari, K; Itoh, K; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S

    1993-12-01

    The effect of delayed light curing of resin composite on marginal adaptation has been examined by measuring the wall-to-wall polymerization contraction gap when using a commercial resin composite together with experimental dentine bonding systems to restore cylindrical preparations in dentine. Morphological changes in dentine during dentine bonding procedures were observed using a scanning electron microscope. In a previous report, the contraction gap width for a resin composite increased when irradiation of the resin system was delayed, despite the use of a dentine bonding system considered to be 'contraction' gap free. Such deterioration in marginal adaptation was minimized by use of an experimental dentine primer, 40% erythritol methacrylate aqueous solution (EM), followed by the use of a commercial dual- or autocured dentine bonding agent. Under scanning electron microscopy, the dentine surface microstructure became unclear after EM priming, and a polymer film was detected after polymerization of the dual-cured dentine bonding agent. The hydrogelled primer and the formation of a polymer network on the dentine surface may prevent the flow of fluid from the pulp through the dentine tubules, and maintain marginal integrity if there is delay in light curing of light-activated resin composite systems.

  12. Different application ways of binders influence the bonding performance of total-etch resin cements with the dentin%黏结剂不同使用方式对全酸蚀树脂水门汀与牙本质间黏结性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马国兰

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:In the clinical course, dental prostheses often fal off together with adhesive materials or produce smal bleeding holes; therefore, it is of clinical significance to explore the effect of binders appliedvia different ways on the bonding performance of total-etch resin cements with the dentin. OBJECTIVE:To compare the effects of binders usedvia different ways on the bonding performance of total-etch resin cements with the dentin. METHODS:Ninety second molars which were freshly extracted from caries-free people were enroled and randomized into three groups. Enamel crowns were polished and rinsed with water at room temperature to expose the dentin that was used to prepare the bonding surface. Then, these specimens were treated with no binder (control), total-etch resin cements with ilumination, and total-etch resin cement with no ilumination, respectively. Micro-tensile bond strength was detected immediately after treatment and after ageing treatment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Immediately after treatment, the micro-tensile bond strength was (8.089±3.431) MPa for the control group, (11.671±2.561) MPa for the group of total-etch resin cements with no ilumination, and (8.821±2.513) MPa for the group of total-etch resin cements with ilumination, and there were significant differences between groups (P < 0.05). After ageing treatment, the micro-tensile bond strength was changed to (1.069±0.421), (7.621±2.061), (4.821±1.513) MPa in these three groups, respectively, and there were also significant differences between groups (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that the binder treatment with no ilumination is an optimal method for the binding between total-etch resin cements and the dentin.%背景:在临床治疗过程中,修复体连同黏结材料一同脱落及产生微小渗孔等情况常有发生,因此,探究黏结剂不同使用方式对全酸蚀树脂水门汀与牙本质间黏结性能的影响具有重要的临床意义。目的:对比黏

  13. Development and clinical trial of a novel bioactive bone cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Strontium(Sr)and related compounds have become more attractive in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.Previously,we developed a novel bioactive bone cement which is mainly composed of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite(Sr-HA)filler and bisphenol A diglycidylether dimethacrylate(Bis-GMA)resin.This bone cement is superior to conventional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)bone cement in bioactivity,biocompatibility,and osseointegration.It also has shown sufficient mechanical strength properties for its use in percutaneous vertebroplasty(PVP)and total hip replacement(THR).In this paper,we review the in vitro,in vivo and clinical evidence for the effectiveness of this bioactive bone cement.

  14. The effects of dentin bonding agents on micro-tensile dentin bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements and RMGIC%粘接处理剂对自粘接树脂水门汀和RMGIC的牙本质粘接强度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣桂红; 傅柏平

    2012-01-01

    目的:实验评价牙本质粘接处理剂对自粘接树脂水门汀和树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀(RMGIC)的牙本质微拉伸粘接强度的影响.方法:选用离体人无龋第三恒磨牙24颗,用低速切片机垂直于牙体长轴方向将磨牙冠(牙合)中1/3交界线处切开待用.实验组牙本质表面涂布牙本质粘接处理剂,对照组不涂粘接处理剂.后将试样分别用自粘接树脂水门汀(Unicem,3M ESPE;seT PP,SDI)或树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀(Fuji CEM,GC)原位对位粘接.水浴中储存24h后,用低速切片机把样本切割成约1mm×1mm×8mm条状,随后进行微拉伸测试.用扫描电镜观察粘接界面形貌.结果:无论是否使用粘接处理剂,Unicem的牙本质粘接强度显著高于seT PP 和Fuji CEM(P <0.01).与对照组相比,实验组的粘接强度显著提高(P <0.05).结论:粘接处理剂表面处理增强自粘接树脂水门汀及树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀的牙本质粘接强度.%Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dentin bonding agents on the micro-tensile dentin bond strengths (mTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). Methods: Twenty-four non-carious humane third molars were used for the study. The crowns were cut into two with a low-speed saw (Isomet) along the line between occlusal one third and middle one third of crowns, perpendicularly to tooth long axis in order to expose the dentin surfaces of both sectioned sides. The sectioned dentin surfaces were treated with or without dentin primer (control). Subsequently, the sectioned dentin surfaces were glued together in situ either with one of two resin cements (Unicem, 3M ESPE; seT PP, SDI) or with RMGIC (Fuji CEM; GC). After 24h water storage, all specimens were sectioned into beams about 1 × 1 × 8mm consistently with the axis of the teeth, followed by μTBS tests with micro-tensile tester. The micro-morphologies of the debonded cement

  15. Assessment of the tensile strength of hexagonal abutments using different cementing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Wahl

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the uniaxial tensile strength after thermal cycling in replicas of CeraOne®abutments (abutment and coping sets, using four types of cements (n = 10. A zinc phosphate cement (Fosfato de Zinco®/ SSW, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX®luting / 3M-ESPE, a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE®/ SSW and a zinc oxide cement without eugenol (TempBond NE®/ KERR were used. After cementation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycles (1,000 cycles, 5ºC ± 2º to 55ºC ± 2º for thirty seconds in each bath. Next, the samples were submitted to the tensile test in a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min. The data were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test (p < 0.05, and statistically significant difference was found among the cements. The highest tensile strength mean value found was for zinc phosphate cement (33.6 kgf followed by the resin-modified glass ionomer cement (20.5 kgf, zinc oxide-eugenol cement (8.4 kgf and the temporary cement (3.1 kgf. Therefore, it was found that the permanent cements presented higher tensile strength, and the temporary cement could be used in situations requiring reversibility and the removal of cemented dental implant-supported prostheses.

  16. Uso de incrustaciones de resina compuesta tipo onlay en molares estructuralmente comprometidos Use of onlay-type composite resin inlays in structurally involved molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Carlos Cruz González

    2012-03-01

    contraction at large sections of material polymerized outside the dental cavity. The objective of this article was to show the use of the composite with indirect technique how an alternative to easy handle and significant clinical results with the structural involvement of molars. The article reports two cases of composite resin inlay onlay in two permanent molars structurally affected, one endodontically treated. The collection of models is performed by the arch alginate impression of the teeth selected, making silicone light casting the prepared tooth and the rest in type III dental stone to obtain a die of work on drawing up the inlay in incremental technique. The cementation process oral cavity is carried out with dual cure resin cement. To control at six months for signs of a leak or marginal jet we used air-dried syringe, explorer and periapical X-Ray. The clinical examination and radiographic analysis revealed a good performance of the restorations in the absence of mismatch or marginal pigmentation. In conclusions the use of the composite inlays in molars with structural involvement with indirect technique is an alternative to easy handle and significant clinical results.

  17. Processing of Spent Ion Exchange Resins in a Rotary Calciner - 12212

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kascheev, Vladimir; Musatov, Nikolay [Joint Stock Company ' A.A. Bochvar High-Technology Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials' (VNIINM), Rogova st., 5A (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Processing Russian nuclear ion exchange resin KU-2 using a 'Rotary' calciner was conducted. The resulting product is a dry free flowing powder (moisture content 3 wt.%, Angle of repose of ≅ 20 deg.). Compared with the original exchange resin the volume of the final product is about 3 times less.. Rotary calciner product can be stored in metal drums or in special reinforced concrete cubicles. After thermal treatment in a rotary calciner, the spent resin product can be solidified in cement yielding the following attributes: - The cemented waste is only a 35% increase over the volume of powder product; - The volume of cement calciner product is almost 9 times less (8.7) than the volume of cement solidified resin; - The mechanical strength of cemented calciner product meets the radioactive waste regulations in Russia. (authors)

  18. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  19. Assessment of the tensile strength of hexagonal abutments using different cementing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Carlos; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Brito, Rui Barbosa; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Smanio, Henrique

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the uniaxial tensile strength after thermal cycling in replicas of CeraOne abutments (abutment and coping sets), using four types of cements (n = 10). A zinc phosphate cement (Fosfato de Zinco/ SSW), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX luting / 3M-ESPE), a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE/ SSW) and a zinc oxide cement without eugenol (TempBond NE/ KERR) were used. After cementation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycles (1,000 cycles, 5 degrees C +/- 2 degrees to 55 degrees C +/- 2 degrees) for thirty seconds in each bath. Next, the samples were submitted to the tensile test in a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min). The data were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test (p zinc phosphate cement (33.6 kgf) followed by the resin-modified glass ionomer cement (20.5 kgf), zinc oxide-eugenol cement (8.4 kgf) and the temporary cement (3.1 kgf). Therefore, it was found that the permanent cements presented higher tensile strength, and the temporary cement could be used in situations requiring reversibility and the removal of cemented dental implant-supported prostheses.

  20. Effects of composite resin and glass-ionomer cements on proliferation and functional activity of human macrophages%复合树脂、玻璃离子对人巨噬细胞的增殖活性和功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚瑜; 杨荣强; 杨红丽

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究常用复合树脂、玻璃离子对体外培养的人单核-巨噬细胞增殖活性和功能的影响.方法:体外诱导培养人的单核血细胞株THP-1,获得巨噬细胞,MTT法测定2种常用复合树脂材料Filtek Z350(3M)、Filtek P60(3M)和玻璃离子材料的24h浸渍液对体外培养的人单核-巨噬细胞增殖活性的影响,ELISA试验检测各组材料浸渍液对细胞分泌IL-1细胞因子活性的影响.采用SPSS 17.0软件包对数据进行统计学分析.结果:与对照组相比,2种复合树脂材料浸渍培养液对体外培养的人单核-巨噬细胞的增殖活性有促进作用,与对照组相比差异有显著性(P<0.05);检测各材料对巨噬细胞分泌IL-1的影响,2种复合树脂材料与对照组相比,差异没有显著性(P>0.05);玻璃离子与对照组相比,差异有显著性(P<0.05).结论:复合树脂对人巨噬细胞的增殖和功能活性有显著影响,可能与复合树脂充填产生牙本质敏感症状有关.玻璃离子对人巨噬细胞的增殖活性无明显影响,但可能会促进炎症发展.%PURPOSE:To study the effects of composite resin and glass-ionomer cements on cell proliferation and function of human macrophages in vitro.METHODS:Macrophages were differentiated from THP-1 cells after treatment with phorbol ester and used as the model of inflammatory cells,which were treated by specimens from glass-ionomer cements(GC),composite resin Filtek Z350(3M)and Filtek P60(3M) on culture medium for 24 hours.The cell proliferation of the tooth-colored restorative materials on human macrophages in vitro was evaluated by MTT color imetric assay,and determined for IL-1 content in these material specimens by ELISA.All statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 17.0 software package.RESULTS:Compared with control group,composite resin Filtek Z350 (3M) and Filtek P60(3M) significantly enhanced the proliferation of human macrophages (P<0.05),while Glass-ionomer had little

  1. Lunar cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  2. 磺化木质素蜜胺甲醛超塑化剂对水泥颗粒的分散稳定机理%Action Mechanism of Lignosulfonate Modified Sulfonated Melamine Formaldehyde Resin on the Dispersion and Stabilization of Cement Particles in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小萍; 易聪华; 魏民; 邱学青

    2011-01-01

    Air entraining property, the adsorption property and effect to the Zeta potential of lignosulfonate modified sulfonated melamine formaldehyde resin (SLMF) on the surface of cement particles in water were studied. The results show that the combined action of the electrostatic repulsion force derives from the charged - SO3- and -COO- , the space steric hindrance force derives from the adsorbed superplasticizer layer, and the air entraining action (so-called "ball bearing action") of SLMF results in the dispersion of cement particles in water; the combined action of the strong retention ability of electrostatic repulsion force, set retarding action and bubble floating action of SLMF result in the stabilization of cement-water dispersion system.%系统研究了磺化木质素蜜胺甲醛超塑化剂(SLMF)的引气性能、在水泥颗粒表面的吸附性能、对水泥颗粒表面Zeta电位的影响.结果表明,SLMF0对水泥-水体系的分散机理是其含有的-SO-3和-COO-带电产生的静电斥力、在水泥颗粒表面吸附层产生的空间位阻力以及引气产生"滚珠"效应的共同作用;SLMF对水泥-水分散体系的稳定机理是其较强的ζ电位保持能力、对水泥水化的延缓作用和引气对水泥颗粒产生的托浮效应的共同作用.

  3. Color stability of different composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkensammer, Frank; Arnetzl, Gerwin Vincent; Wildburger, Angelika; Freudenthaler, Josef

    2013-06-01

    Data are needed to better predict the color stability of current composite resin materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of different storage solutions on the color stability of different composite resin materials. Different restorative and adhesive composite resin specimens (dual-polymerizing self-adhesive resin cement, autopolymerizing resin-based composite resin, dual-polymerizing resin-based composite resin, nanohybrid composite resin, and microhybrid composite resin) were fabricated and stored in red wine, black tea, chlorhexidine, sodium fluoride, tea tree oil, or distilled water for 4 weeks at 37°C. Color parameters were measured with a colorimeter before and after storage. Total color differences and specific coordinate differences were expressed as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. A 2-way and 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons were applied for statistical calculations (α=.05). Red wine caused the most severe discoloration (ΔE >10), followed by black tea with perceptible (ΔE >2.6) to clinically unacceptable discoloration (ΔE >5.5). Colored mouth rinses discolored the materials to a lesser extent with clinically acceptable values. Dual-polymerizing resin adhesives showed a higher amount of discoloration. Current restorative and adhesive composite resin materials discolor over time under the influence of different storage solutions. The composition related to the polymerizing mode seemed to be a causative factor. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, P G

    1999-01-01

    Epoxy resins have an extraordinarily broad range of commercial applications, especially as protective surface coatings and adhesives. Epoxy resin systems include combinations of epoxy monomers, hardeners, reactive diluents, and/or a vast array of other additives. As a result, an epoxy resin system may have a number of chemical ingredients with the potential for attendant health hazards. Most, but not all, of these health hazards arise in the occupational setting. The most frequent adverse effects are irritation or allergic mechanisms involving the dermal and respiratory systems. Sensitization usually is caused by low molecular weight or short-chain compounds. This review discusses the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of epoxy resin-related adverse health effects.

  5. Cytotoxicity of commonly used luting cements -An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpaite-Vanagiene, Rita; Bukelskiene, Virginija; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta; Puriene, Alina; Baltriukiene, Daiva; Rutkunas, Vygandas

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to 1) evaluate the cytotoxicity of luting cements: Hoffmann's Zinc Phosphate (Hoffmann's ZP), GC Fuji Plus Resin Modified Glass Ionomer (Fuji Plus RMGI) and 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem Resin Cement (RelyX Unicem RC) and 2) test if pre-washing reduces the cements' cytotoxicity. In vitro human gingival fibroblast (HGF) culture model was chosen. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT test, the cell viability -by staining the cells with AO/EB dye mixture. The means±SD of Cell Survival Ratio (CSR%) were compared among different cement types under two testing conditions, with or without cement pre-washing. The CSR%s were compared by ANOVA and linear multiple regression (LMR). Hoffmann's ZPC was less cytotoxic, while Fuji Plus RMGIC and RelyX Unicem RC were more cytotoxic (ANOVA, ptype of cement and cement pre-washing jointly explained 90% of cell survival (LMR, p<0.001, adjusted squared R=0.889). The commonly used luting cements such as Hoffmann's ZP, Fuji Plus RMGI and RelyX Unicem RC may have a cytotoxic potential.

  6. Antibacterial Effects and Physical Properties of Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cements Containing Minocycline%米诺环素对树脂改良型玻璃离子水门汀抗菌性能和机械性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈春桂

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究添加不同浓度米诺环素对树脂改良型玻璃离子水门汀(resin-modified glass ionomer cement,RMGIC)抗菌性能和机械性能的影响.方法:将米诺环素以不同浓度加入RMGIC中,通过生物膜实验观察材料的抗菌性能;测量材料抗压缩强度及表面微硬度,评价添加抗菌剂对材料机械性能的影响.结果:生物膜形成实验结果显示添加米诺环素后能够有效提高RMGIC的抗菌性能,且抗菌性能的强弱与添加米诺环素的浓度成正比.加入较高浓度的米诺环素后,材料的抗压缩强度和表面微硬度降低.结论:米诺环素能有效增强RMGIC抑制变形链球菌的作用,但高浓度的米诺环素可使材料的机械性能受到影响.在对牙科充填材料进行抗菌改性的同时应当考虑材料本身的机械性能,选择合适的方法和浓度,以使材料发挥更好的作用.%Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial effects and physical properties of resin-modified glass - iono mer cements (RMGICs) containing minocycline. Methods: RMGIC (Fuji Ⅱ LC) was used as control. Minocycline was added to powdered RMGIC to obtain concentration ratios of 1. 5, 3. 0 and 4. 5% w/w. The antibacterial activity of each RMGIC was evaluated against Streptococcus mutans using biofilm assay. The compressive strength and mi-crohardness were measured and compared with those of control samples. Results: All experimental groups showed a significantly greater inhibition with growth of the selected bacteria in comparison to the control groups (P<0. 05). However, RMGIC with high concentration minocycline had significantly lower compressive strength and microhard-ness than the control group (P<0. 05). Conclusion: The minocycline-containing RMGIC were effective in inhibiting S. Mutans. However, high concentration minocycline compromised the mechanical properties of the cement.

  7. Does Adhesive Resin Application Contribute to Resin Bond Durability on Etched and Silanized Feldspathic Ceramic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Kimpara, Estevao Tomomitsu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of adhesive application and aging on the bond durability of resin cement to etched and silanized feldspathic ceramic. Materials and Methods: Twenty blocks (6.4 x 6.4 x 4.8 mm) of feldspathic ceramic (Vita VM7) were produced. The ceramic surfaces were conditioned with 10

  8. Network morphology of straight and polymer modified asphalt cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozeveld, S J; Shin, E E; Bhurke, A; France, L; Drzal, L T

    1997-09-01

    Asphalt cements are often regarded as a colloidal system containing several hydrocarbon constituents: asphaltenes, resins, and oils. The high molecular weight asphaltene particles are considered to be covered in a sheath of resins and dispersed in the lower molecular weight oily medium [Whiteoak (1990) The Shell Bitumen Handbook (Shell Bitumen UK, Riversdell House, Surrey, UK)]. However, the exact arrangement of the asphaltene particles within the oily phase will vary depending on the relative amounts of resin, asphaltene, and oils. It is this arrangement and the degree of association between asphaltene particles that govern the rheological properties of the cement [Simpson et al. (1961) J. Chem. Eng. Data 6:426-429; Whiteoak (1990)]. Here we report for the first time the observation of a three-dimensional network of asphaltene strands within straight, polymer-modified, and aged asphalt cements. While the existence of a asphaltene/resin micelle network has been proposed in previous studies [Whiteoak (1990)], direct observation has not been reported. The network is expected to greatly influence the rheological properties of the asphalt binder and ultimately the properties of asphalt concretes. In situ fracture studies of asphalt cement/aggregate composites indicate a possible correlation between the network structure and adhesion between the cement binder and aggregate.

  9. Effect of resin shades on opacity of ceramic veneers and polymerization efficiency through ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Elif; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Coşgun, Erdal; Bolay, Şükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different resin cement shades on the opacity and color difference of ceramics and to determine the polymerization efficiency of the resin cement at different shades after curing through ceramics. Two different ceramics (IPS e.max Press and IPS Empress(®)CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) were used for this study. A light-cured veneer luting resin (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent) in four different shades of HV+1, HV+3, LV-1, and LV-3 was used for the colorimetric measurements. The color and spectral reflectance of the ceramics were measured according to the CIELab color scale relative to the standard illuminant D65 on a reflection spectrophotometer (ColorEye7000A, USA). Color differences (ΔE values) and the contrast ratios (CR) of the different groups of samples were calculated. In order to analyse the polymerization efficiency of the resin cements, the micromechanical properties of the resins were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). The results were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc tests (SPSS 18.0). The one-way ANOVA test showed that the values of ΔE and CR of the different specimen groups were significantly different (p<0.05). Group 1 (20.7 ± 0.5) (IPS-CAD without resin cement) exhibited the highest and group 10 (14.8 ± 0.5) (e.max:HV+3) exhibited the lowest ΔE value. Significant differences in the micromechanical properties were identified among the tested resin cements in different shades (p<0.05). Resin cement shade is an important factor for the opacity of a restoration. Furthermore, the resin shade affects the micromechanical properties of the underlying resin cement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Metodología de utilización de los cementos de vidrio ionomero en combinación con resina compuesta // Methodology of the use of glass-ionomer cements in combination the composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Macorra García, José Carlos de la

    1988-01-01

    Se describe secuencialmente la técnica de utilización de los CVI. Las características de estos materiales obligan a introducir algunos pasos intermedios no descritos previamente, como es el doble grabado, a fin de utilizar eficazmente todas sus posibilidades terapéuticas. // Clinical methodology of a rational use of glass ionomer cements is described. Their characteristics make neccesary to introduce some intermediary steps, such as double etch, in order to improve their terapeutical advan...

  11. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  12. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  13. Effect of primers containing copper salts on bonding of TBB resin to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Y; Imai, Y

    1994-12-01

    The effect of primers containing copper salts on adhesion between enamel and stainless steel was studied in a trial to improve durability of TBB type resin cements. Bovine enamel surfaces were treated with 10% phosphoric acid, then with acetone primers containing copper salts, and finally bonded with TBB resins. Tensile strengths of the bonded specimens were measured after thermocycling testing in water and compared with those obtained for commercial composite type resin cements. A combination of a primer containing copper (II) methacryloyloxyethyl succinate and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin was most effective in improving the durability, and superior to the commercial resin cements. The mean and lowest bond strength values of 21 MPa and about 12 MPa, respectively, were retained after 2,000 thermocycles.

  14. Silanated Surface Treatment: Effects on the Bond Strength to Lithium Disilicate Glass-Ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Baratto,Samantha Schaffer Pugsley; Spina,Denis Roberto Falcão; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cunha,Leonardo Fernandes da; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Flares BARATTO FILHO; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization protocols on the bond strength of two resin cements to a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Thirty-two ceramic discs were assigned to 2 groups (n=16): G1 - dual-cured resin cement and G2 - light-cured resin cement. Four subgroups were evaluated according to the used silanization protocol. The glass-ceramic was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and silane was applied for 1 min, as follows: CTL - according to the...

  15. Brushing abrasion of luting cements under neutral and acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    2000-01-01

    Four resin based materials (Compolute Aplicap, ESPE; Variolink Ultra, Vivadent; C&B Metabond, Parkell and Panavia 21, Kuraray), two carboxylate cements (Poly-F Plus, Dentsply DeTrey and Durelon Maxicap, ESPE), two glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, GC and Ketac-Cem Aplicap, ESPE), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, 3M) one polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Cem, Dentsply DeTrey) and one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard, Richter & Hoffmann) were investigated according to their brushing resistance after storage in neutral and acidic buffer solutions. For this purpose 24 cylindrical acrylic molds were each filled with the materials. After hardening, the samples were stored for seven days in 100% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C. Subsequently, they were ground flat and polished. Then each specimen was covered with an adhesive tape leaving a 4 mm wide window on the cement surface. Twelve samples of each material were stored for 24 hours in a buffer solution with a pH of 6.8. The remaining 12 samples were placed in a buffer with a pH of 3.0. All specimens were then subjected to a three media brushing abrasion (2,000 strokes) in an automatic brushing machine. Storage and brushing were performed three times. After 6,000 brushing strokes per specimen, the tape was removed. Brushing abrasion was measured with a computerized laser profilometer and statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's Standardized Range Test (p < or = 0.05). The highest brushing abrasion was found for the two carboxylate cements. The lowest brushing abrasion was found for one resin based material, Compolute Aplicap. With the exception of three resin-based materials, a lower pH led to a higher brushing abrasion.

  16. Influence of light intensity on surface free energy and dentin bond strength of core build-up resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Tsujimoto, A; Furuichi, T; Suzuki, T; Tsubota, K; Miyazaki, M; Platt, J A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influence of light intensity on surface free energy characteristics and dentin bond strength of dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems. Two commercially available dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems, Clearfil DC Core Automix with Clearfil Bond SE One and UniFil Core EM with Self-Etching Bond, were studied. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in acrylic resin and the facial dentin surfaces were wet ground on 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Adhesives were applied to dentin surfaces and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). The surface free energy of the adhesives (five samples per group) was determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. To determine the strength of the dentin bond, the core build-up resin pastes were condensed into the mold on the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces according to the methods described for the surface free energy measurement. The resin pastes were cured with the same light intensities as those used for the adhesives. Ten specimens per group were stored in water maintained at 37°C for 24 hours, after which they were shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute in a universal testing machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a Tukey-Kramer test were performed, with the significance level set at 0.05. The surface free energies of the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces decreased with an increase in the light intensity of the curing unit. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the type of core build-up system and the light intensity significantly influence the bond strength, although there was no significant interaction between the two factors. The highest bond strengths were achieved when the resin pastes were cured with the strongest light intensity for all the core build-up systems. When polymerized with a light intensity of 200 mW/cm(2) or less, significantly lower bond strengths were observed. CONClUSIONS: The

  17. Process for ion exchange resins from radioactive materials reprocessing plants. Procede d'immobilisation de resines echangeuses d'ions provenant des centres de retraitement des produits radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnin, G.; Magnin, M.F.; Aubert, V.; Jaouen, C.

    1989-06-23

    Prior to encapsulation in cement spent ion exchange resins are treated with an aqueous solution containing NO{sub 3}{sup -} and Na{sup +} ions. Nitrate ion amount is determined for saturation of all resin sites as if all the resins were anionic and sodium ion amount for on the one hand a basic pH of the medium and on the other hand the saturation of all cationic resin sites.

  18. Filtek Z350流动纳米树脂与Fuji Ⅸ玻璃离子应用于磨牙窝沟浅龋的效果比较%The effect comparison between Filtek Z350 flowable nano-composite resin and FUji Ⅸ glass-ionomer cement in the application of early pit and fissure caries in molars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申玲; 黄碧杰; 朱燕梅; 安立民; 刘玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects between Filtek Z350 flowable nano-composite resin and FUji IX glass-ionomer cement in the application of early pit and fissure caries in molars in order to explore a more suitable method for prevention and treatment in early pit and fissure caries in molars.Methods Three hundred and fifty-six molars with early pit and fissures caries in 201 patients were selected as the research object and randomly divided into 2 groups,178 molars of 101 patients as the experimental group and 178 molars of 100 patients as the control group.After caries removal,the experimental group with the Filtek Z350 flowable nano-composite resin was restored in caries damage position and preventive resin restoration was sealed in undamaged fissured area.The control group was restored and sealed with FUji IX glass-ionomer cement.The two groups were observed the retention rate and the secondary caries incidence in 4 years.Results The coating retention rate of the experimental group was higher than that of the control group in the second,third and fourth year (P < 0.05).The secondary caries incidences of the two groups were zero in the first 2 years and the differences between the two groups in the third and fourth year were not significant (P > 0.05).Conclusions Filtek Z350 flowable nano-composite resin is a new method for the prevention and treatment of molar pit and fissure caries effectively and is recommended for clinical use.%目的 比较3M ESPE Fihek Z350 Flowable纳米流动树脂(Filtek Z350流动纳米树脂)与而至富士Ⅸ GP玻璃离子水门汀(Fuji Ⅸ玻璃离子)应用于磨牙窝沟浅龋的临床效果,探讨更适合于预防和治疗磨牙窝沟浅龋的方法.方法 选择201例患者的356颗窝沟浅龋的患牙作为研究对象,随机分为两组,实验组101例患者178颗患牙,对照组100例患者178颗患牙,在彻底去除龋坏组织后,实验组用Fihek Z350流动纳米树脂充填龋坏部位并对未龋损的窝沟区域

  19. Comparison of retention of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cements containing stannous fluoride and sodium fluoride-an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachin, Bhuvana

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the addition of stannous fluoride (SnF2) and sodium fluoride (NaF) to luting cements on the retention of provisional crowns. Provisional crowns were fabricated using methyl methacrylate and bis-acryl composite resin for 32 chamfer prepared molars. For control group A, crowns were cemented with Freegenol and RelyX Temp NE non-eugenol cements. For test group B, crowns were cemented using the above cements with the addition of SnF2. For test group C, crowns were cemented using the above cements with the addition of NaF. The specimens were thermocycled and retention test was conducted after 7 days. The addition of SnF2 significantly increased the retentive strength of both the cements in the range of 27-48 %, whereas addition of NaF decreased the retentive strength of both the cements in the range of 14-23 %. SnF2 can be mixed with non-eugenol luting cements to improve the retention of both methyl methacrylate and bis-acryl composite crowns. The different effects of NaF and SnF2 on retention indicate that it may be useful to have two different types of provisional luting cements for short-term and long-term cementation, as appropriate.

  20. In vitro evaluation of microleakage of various types of dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Vesna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Microleakage is defined as the clinically undetectable seepage of oral fluids containing bacteria and debris between cement layer and tooth restoration. Objective. This in vitro study investigated the effect of different dental cements (zinc-phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass-ionomer and resin cement on microleakage in different ceramic crown systems (metal ceramic crown, metal ceramic crown with a porcelain margin, Empress 2 and In Ceram all-ceramic crowns fixed on extracted human teeth. Methods. One hundred and sixty intact human premolars were randomized to four groups of forty teeth each, according to the different ceramic crown systems. They were prepared in a standardized manner for metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns. Crowns were made following a standard laboratory technique, and each group of crowns were divided into four groups according to the different cement agents and cemented on their respective abutments. The specimens were subjected to thermocycling, placed in methylene blue solutions, embedded in resin blocks and vertically cut in the bucco-oral and meso-distal direction. The microleakage in the area of tooth-cement interface was defined as linear penetration of methylene blue and was determined with a microscope to assign microleakage scores using a five-point scale. Results. A significant association was found between a cement type and degree of microleakage (p=0.001. No statistically significant differences were found among the different ceramic crown systems luted with the same dental cement. The smallest degree of microleakage was observed in specimens luted with resin cement (X=1.73, followed by glass-ionomer cement (X=2.45 and polycarboxylate cement (X=3.20. The greatest degree of microleakage was detected in the crowns fixed with zincphosphate cement (X=3.33. Conclusion. The investigated dental cements revealed different sealing abilities. The use of resin cement resulted in the percentage of 0

  1. SUSTENTAÇÃO DE ESMALTE COM IONÔMEROS DE VIDRO E RESINA COMPOSTA: EFEITO NA RESISTÊNCIA À FRATURA DAS CÚSPIDES DE DENTES RESTAURADOS SUPPORTING ENAMEL WITH GLASS IONOMER CEMENT AND COMPOSITE RESIN: EFFECT ON FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF CUSPS OF RESTORED TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Stefano SECCO

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo determinou a resistência e o tipo de fratura do esmalte suportado pelos materiais restauradores ionômeros de vidro convencional e modificado por resina e resina composta, bem como a influência dessa técnica restauradora na resistência das cúspides dos dentes. A remoção da estrutura dental para o preparo de cavidades tipo classe II e a presença de esmalte socavado diminuiram significativamente a resistência das cúspides dos dentes em relação ao dente hígido (p This study determined the resistance to fracture and its pattern for enamel supported with conventional and modified glass ionomer cements, and composite resin restorative materials, as well as the influence of these restorative techniques on cuspal strength of teeth. Removal of dental structure by class II cavity preparations and unsupported enamel had decreased significantly the cuspal strength in relation to healthy teeth (p < 0.01. Restorative materials used to support enamel reduced the fracture rate of restored cusps, but did not increase the fracture resistance values statistically. All tested groups presented alterations in the fracture pattern

  2. Fluoride Release From Three Different Types of Giass- lonomer Cements After Exposure to Acidic and Neutral NaF Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Kousari A; Mahmoodian J.; Rashidian A

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the fluoride release of three fluoride- containing materials exposed to fluoride solutions. This study compared the initial fluoride release and release following re-fluoridation (neutral or acidic 2% NaF) of three different filling materials, conventional glass ionomer cement (CG1C), resin- modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), polyacid- modified composite resin (PAMCR). Twenty discs of each material, measuring 2mm height and 6mm diameter, were suspen...

  3. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  4. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Pooran; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Shirban, Farinaz; Davoodi, Amin; Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs) should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Prompt L-Pop (PLP) adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1) Immediate light-curing, (2) delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3) self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05). PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  5. The biocompatibility of porous vs non-porous bone cements: a new methodological approach

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    C. Dall'Oca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Composite cements have been shown to be biocompatible, bioactive, with good mechanical properties and capability to bind to the bone. Despite these interesting characteristic, in vivo studies on animal models are still incomplete and ultrastructural data are lacking. The acquisition of new ultrastructural data is hampered by uncertainties in the methods of preparation of histological samples due to the use of resins that melt methacrylate present in bone cement composition. A new porous acrylic cement composed of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA and β-tricalciumphosphate (β-TCP was developed and tested on an animal model. The cement was implanted in femurs of 8 New Zealand White rabbits, which were observed for 8 weeks before their sacrifice. Histological samples were prepared with an infiltration process of LR white resin and then the specimens were studied by X-rays, histology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. As a control, an acrylic standard cement, commonly used in clinical procedures, was chosen. Radiographic ultrastructural and histological exams have allowed finding an excellent biocompatibility of the new porous cement. The high degree of osteointegration was demonstrated by growth of neo-created bone tissue inside the cement sample. Local or systemic toxicity signs were not detected. The present work shows that the proposed procedure for the evaluation of biocompatibility, based on the use of LR white resin allows to make a thorough and objective assessment of the biocompatibility of porous and non-porous bone cements.

  6. Surface roughness of orthodontic band cements with different compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Hélène van de Sande