WorldWideScience

Sample records for dual-band infrared thermal

  1. Dual-band infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H.; Schlemmer, H.

    2005-10-01

    Every year, numerous accidents happen on European roads due to bad visibility (fog, night, heavy rain). Similarly, the dramatic aviation accidents of year 2001 in Milan and Zurich have reminded us that aviation safety is equally affected by reduced visibility. A dual-band thermal imager was developed in order to raise human situation awareness under conditions of reduced visibility especially in the automotive and aeronautical context but also for all transportation or surveillance tasks. The chosen wavelength bands are the Short Wave Infrared SWIR and the Long Wave Infrared LWIR band which are less obscured by reduced visibility conditions than the visible band. Furthermore, our field tests clearly show that the two different spectral bands very often contain complementary information. Pyramidal fusion is used to integrate complementary and redundant features of the multi-spectral images into a fused image which can be displayed on a monitor to provide more and better information for the driver or pilot.

  2. Dual-band infrared capabilities for imaging buried object sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Perkins, D.E.; Clark, G.A.; Hernandez, J.E.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1993-04-02

    We discuss dual-band infrared (DBIR) capabilities for imaging buried object sizes. We identify physical features affecting thermal contrast needed to distinguish buried object sites from undisturbed sites or surface clutter. Apart from atmospheric transmission and system performance, these features include: object size, shape, and burial depth; ambient soil, disturbed soil and object site thermal diffusivity differences; surface temperature, emissivity, plant-cover, slope, albedo and roughness variations; weather conditions and measurement times. We use good instrumentation to measure the time-varying temperature differences between buried object sites and undisturbed soil sites. We compare near surface soil temperature differences with radiometric infrared (IR) surface temperature differences recorded at 4.7 {plus_minus} 0.4 {mu}m and at 10.6 {plus_minus} 1.0 {mu}m. By producing selective DBIR image ratio maps, we distinguish temperature-difference patterns from surface emissivity effects. We discuss temperature differences between buried object sites, filled hole site (without buried objects), cleared (undisturbed) soil sites, and grass-covered sites (with and without different types of surface clutter). We compare temperature, emissivity-ratio, visible and near-IR reflectance signatures of surface objects, leafy plants and sod. We discuss the physical aspects of environmental, surface and buried target features affecting interpretation of buried targets, surface objects and natural backgrounds.

  3. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  4. Design of visible and IR infrared dual-band common-path telescope system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, YuLin; Yu, Xun; Tao, Yu; Jiang, Xu

    2018-01-01

    The use of visible and IR infrared dual-band combination can effectively improve the performance of photoelectric detection system,TV and IR system were designed with the common path by the common reflection optical system.A TV/IR infrared common-caliber and common-path system is designed,which can realize the Remote and all-day information.For the 640×512 cooled focal plane array,an infrared middle wave system was presented with a focal length of 600mm F number of 4 field of view(FOV) of 0.38°×0.43°, the system uses optical passive thermal design, has o compact structure and can meet 100% cold shield efficiency,meanwhile it meets the design requirements of lightweight and athermalization. For the 1920×1080 pixels CCD,a visible (TV) system ,which had 500mm focal length, 4F number,was completed.The final optical design along with their modulation transfer function is presented,showing excellent imaging performance in dual-band at the temperature range between -40° and 60°.

  5. Monolithic dual-band HgCdTe infrared detector structure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Parish, G

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A monolithic HgCdTe photoconductive device structure is presented that is suitable for dual-band optically registered infrared photodetection in the two atmospheric transmission windows of 3-5 mu m and 8-12 mu m, which correspond to the mid...

  6. Design of an ultra-thin dual band infrared system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ke; Cheng, Xuemin; Lv, Qichao; Hu, YiFei

    2014-11-01

    The ultra-thin imaging system using reflective multiple-fold structure has smaller volume and less weight while maintaining high resolution compared with conventional optical systems. The multi-folded approach can significantly extend focal distance within wide spectral range without incurring chromatic aberrations. In this paper, we present a dual infrared imaging system of four-folded reflection with two air-spaced concentric reflective surfaces. The dual brand IR system has 107mm effective focal length, 0.7NA, +/-4° FOV, and 50mm effective aperture with 80mm outer diameter into a 25mm total thickness, which spectral response is 3~12μm.

  7. Dual-band absorber for multispectral plasmon-enhanced infrared photodetection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Peng; Ashalley, Eric; Wang, Zhiming; Wu, Jiang; Govorov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    For most of the reported metamaterial absorbers, the peak absorption only occurs at one single wavelength. Here, we investigated a dual-band absorber which is based on simple gold nano-rings. Two absorption peaks can be readily achieved in 3–5 µ m and 8–14 µ m via tuning the width and radius of gold nano-rings and dielectric constant. The average maximum absorption of two bands can be as high as 95.1% (−0.22 dB). Based on the simulation results, the perfect absorber with nano-rings demonstrates great flexibility to create dual-band or triple-band absorption, and thus holds potential for further applications in thermophotovoltaics, multicolor infrared focal plane arrays, optical filters, and biological sensing applications. (paper)

  8. Dual-Band Modulation of Visible and Near-Infrared Light Transmittance in an All-Solution-Processed Hybrid Micro-Nano Composite Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Chen, Mei; Guo, Shumeng; Zhang, Lanying; Li, Fasheng; Yang, Huai

    2017-11-22

    Smart windows with controllable visible and near-infrared light transmittance can significantly improve the building's energy efficiency and inhabitant comfort. However, most of the current smart window technology cannot achieve the target of ideal solar control. Herein, we present a novel all-solution-processed hybrid micronano composite smart material that have four optical states to separately modulate the visible and NIR light transmittance through voltage and temperature, respectively. This dual-band optical modulation was achieved by constructing a phase-separated polymer framework, which contains the microsized liquid crystals domains with a negative dielectric constant and tungsten-doped vanadium dioxide (W-VO 2 ) nanocrystals (NCs). The film with 2.5 wt % W-VO 2 NCs exhibits transparency at normal condition, and the passage of visible light can be reversibly and actively regulated between 60.8% and 1.3% by external applied voltage. Also, the transmittance of NIR light can be reversibly and passively modulated between 59.4% and 41.2% by temperature. Besides, the film also features easy all-solution processability, fast electro-optical (E-O) response time, high mechanical strength, and long-term stability. The as-prepared film provides new opportunities for next-generation smart window technology, and the proposed strategy is conductive to engineering novel hybrid inorganic-organic functional matters.

  9. A Retina-Like Dual Band Organic Photosensor Array for Filter-Free Near-Infrared-to-Memory Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanlin; Liu, Hongtao; Zhao, Qiang; Ni, Zhenjie; Zou, Ye; Yang, Jie; Wang, Lifeng; Sun, Yanqiu; Guo, Yunlong; Hu, Wenping; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-08-01

    Human eyes use retina photoreceptor cells to absorb and distinguish photons from different wavelengths to construct an image. Mimicry of such a process and extension of its spectral response into the near-infrared (NIR) is indispensable for night surveillance, retinal prosthetics, and medical imaging applications. Currently, NIR organic photosensors demand optical filters to reduce visible interference, thus making filter-free and anti-visible NIR imaging a challenging task. To solve this limitation, a filter-free and conformal, retina-inspired NIR organic photosensor is presented. Featuring an integration of photosensing and floating-gate memory modules, the device possesses an acute color distinguishing capability. In general, the retina-like photosensor transduces NIR (850 nm) into nonvolatile memory and acts as a dynamic photoswitch under green light (550 nm). In doing this, a filter-free but color-distinguishing photosensor is demonstrated that selectively converts NIR optical signals into nonvolatile memory. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Design and Fabrication of Large Diameter Gradient-Index Lenses for Dual-Band Visible to Short-Wave Infrared Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Anthony Joseph

    The fabrication of gradient-index (GRIN) optical elements is quite challenging, which has traditionally restricted their use in many imaging systems; consequently, commercial-level GRIN components usually exist in one particular market or niche application space. One such fabrication technique, ion exchange, is a well-known process used in the chemical strengthening of glass, the fabrication of waveguide devices, and the production of small diameter GRIN optical relay systems. However, the manufacturing of large diameter ion-exchanged GRIN elements has historically been limited by long diffusion times. For example, the diffusion time for a 20 mm diameter radial GRIN lens in commercially available ion exchange glass for small diameter relays, is on the order of a year. The diffusion time can be dramatically reduced by addressing three key ion exchange process parameters; the composition of the glass, the diffusion temperature, and the composition of the salt bath. Experimental work throughout this thesis aims to (1) scale up the ion exchange diffusion process to 20 mm diameters for a fast-diffusing titania silicate glass family in both (2) sodium ion for lithium ion (Na+ for Li+) and lithium ion for sodium ion (Li+ for Na+) exchange directions, while (3) utilizing manufacturing friendly salt bath compositions. In addition, optical design studies have demonstrated that an important benefit of gradient-index elements in imaging systems is the added degree of freedom introduced with a gradient's optical power. However, these studies have not investigated the potential usefulness of GRIN materials in dual-band visible to short-wave infrared (vis-SWIR) imaging systems. The unique chromatic properties of the titania silicate ion exchange glass become a significant degree of freedom in the design process for these color-limited, broadband imaging applications. A single GRIN element can replace a cemented doublet or even a cemented triplet, without loss in overall system

  11. Evaluation of a color fused dual-band NVG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Toet, A.

    2009-01-01

    We designed and evaluated a dual-band Night Vision Goggles sensor system. The sensor system consists of two optically aligned NVGs fitted with filters splitting the sensitive range into a visual and a near-infrared band. The Color-the-night technique (Hogervorst & Toet, FUSION2008) was used to fuse

  12. Infrared thermal annealing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladys, M.J.; Clarke, I.; O'Connor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    A device for annealing samples within an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscopy system was designed, constructed, and tested. The device is based on illuminating the sample with infrared radiation from outside the UHV chamber with a tungsten projector bulb. The apparatus uses an elliptical mirror to focus the beam through a sapphire viewport for low absorption. Experiments were conducted on clean Pd(100) and annealing temperatures in excess of 1000 K were easily reached

  13. Human ear detection in the thermal infrared spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Ayman; Bourlai, Thirimachos

    2012-06-01

    In this paper the problem of human ear detection in the thermal infrared (IR) spectrum is studied in order to illustrate the advantages and limitations of the most important steps of ear-based biometrics that can operate in day and night time environments. The main contributions of this work are two-fold: First, a dual-band database is assembled that consists of visible and thermal profile face images. The thermal data was collected using a high definition middle-wave infrared (3-5 microns) camera that is capable of acquiring thermal imprints of human skin. Second, a fully automated, thermal imaging based ear detection method is developed for real-time segmentation of human ears in either day or night time environments. The proposed method is based on Haar features forming a cascaded AdaBoost classifier (our modified version of the original Viola-Jones approach1 that was designed to be applied mainly in visible band images). The main advantage of the proposed method, applied on our profile face image data set collected in the thermal-band, is that it is designed to reduce the learning time required by the original Viola-Jones method from several weeks to several hours. Unlike other approaches reported in the literature, which have been tested but not designed to operate in the thermal band, our method yields a high detection accuracy that reaches ~ 91.5%. Further analysis on our data set yielded that: (a) photometric normalization techniques do not directly improve ear detection performance. However, when using a certain photometric normalization technique (CLAHE) on falsely detected images, the detection rate improved by ~ 4%; (b) the high detection accuracy of our method did not degrade when we lowered down the original spatial resolution of thermal ear images. For example, even after using one third of the original spatial resolution (i.e. ~ 20% of the original computational time) of the thermal profile face images, the high ear detection accuracy of our method

  14. Unmanned Ground Vehicle Perception Using Thermal Infrared Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry; Bajracharya, Max; Assad, Christopher; Brennan, Shane; Bellutta, Paolo; Sherwin, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform off-road autonomous navigation at any time of day or night is a requirement for some unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) programs. Because there are times when it is desirable for military UGVs to operate without emitting strong, detectable electromagnetic signals, a passive only terrain perception mode of operation is also often a requirement. Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras can be used to provide day and night passive terrain perception. TIR cameras have a detector sensitive to either mid-wave infrared (MWIR) radiation (3-5?m) or long-wave infrared (LWIR) radiation (8-12?m). With the recent emergence of high-quality uncooled LWIR cameras, TIR cameras have become viable passive perception options for some UGV programs. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has used a stereo pair of TIR cameras under several UGV programs to perform stereo ranging, terrain mapping, tree-trunk detection, pedestrian detection, negative obstacle detection, and water detection based on object reflections. In addition, we have evaluated stereo range data at a variety of UGV speeds, evaluated dual-band TIR classification of soil, vegetation, and rock terrain types, analyzed 24 hour water and 12 hour mud TIR imagery, and analyzed TIR imagery for hazard detection through smoke. Since TIR cameras do not currently provide the resolution available from megapixel color cameras, a UGV's daytime safe speed is often reduced when using TIR instead of color cameras. In this paper, we summarize the UGV terrain perception work JPL has performed with TIR cameras over the last decade and describe a calibration target developed by General Dynamics Robotic Systems (GDRS) for TIR cameras and other sensors.

  15. Reconfigurable dual-band metamaterial antenna based on liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Bang-Jun; Meng, Fan-Yi; Lyu, Yue-Long; Wu, Qun

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a novel reconfigurable dual-band metamaterial antenna with a continuous beam that is electrically steered in backward to forward directions is first proposed by employing a liquid crystal (LC)-loaded tunable extended composite right-/left-handed (E-CRLH) transmission line (TL). The frequency-dependent property of the E-CRLH TL is analyzed and a compact unit cell based on the nematic LC is proposed to realize the tunable dual band characteristics. The phase constant of the proposed unit cell can be dynamically continuously tuned from negative to positive values in two operating bands by changing the bias voltage of the loaded LC material. A resulting dual band fixed-frequency beam steering property has been predicted by numerical simulations and experimentally verified. The measured results show that the fabricated reconfigurable antenna features an electrically controlled continuous beam steering from backward  ‑16° to forward  +13° at 7.2 GHz and backward  ‑9° to forward  +17° at 9.4 GHz, respectively. This electrically controlled beam steering range turns out to be competitive with the previously reported single band reconfigurable antennas. Besides, the measured and simulated results of the proposed reconfigurable dual-band metamaterial antenna are in good agreement.

  16. Evaluation of a color fused dual-band NVG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Toet, A.

    2009-01-01

    We have tested a prototype dual-band NVG system consisting of two NVGs fitted with filters that split the NVG sensitive range into a short (visual) and a long wavelength (NIR) band. The Color-the-night technique (see Hogervorst & Toet, SPIE D&S ‘08) was used to fuse the images of the two sensors. We

  17. Face recognition in the thermal infrared domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, M.; Grudzień, A.; Palka, N.; Szustakowski, M.

    2017-10-01

    Biometrics refers to unique human characteristics. Each unique characteristic may be used to label and describe individuals and for automatic recognition of a person based on physiological or behavioural properties. One of the most natural and the most popular biometric trait is a face. The most common research methods on face recognition are based on visible light. State-of-the-art face recognition systems operating in the visible light spectrum achieve very high level of recognition accuracy under controlled environmental conditions. Thermal infrared imagery seems to be a promising alternative or complement to visible range imaging due to its relatively high resistance to illumination changes. A thermal infrared image of the human face presents its unique heat-signature and can be used for recognition. The characteristics of thermal images maintain advantages over visible light images, and can be used to improve algorithms of human face recognition in several aspects. Mid-wavelength or far-wavelength infrared also referred to as thermal infrared seems to be promising alternatives. We present the study on 1:1 recognition in thermal infrared domain. The two approaches we are considering are stand-off face verification of non-moving person as well as stop-less face verification on-the-move. The paper presents methodology of our studies and challenges for face recognition systems in the thermal infrared domain.

  18. Thermal infrared anomalies of several strong earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting.

  19. Dual-band dual-polarized array for WLAN applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, JM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available dual-band dual-polarized (DBDP) antenna design for WLAN applications. The antenna is in the form of an array consisting of four double-dipole radiators. The basic radiating element consists of a rhombus shaped dipole above a planar ground plane... the ground planes and the respective feedlines. Substrate cuts and difierent heights for the horizontal feedlines were necessary to achieve the latter. The 2nd conflguration (for vertical polarization) has a slightly difierent feeding network layout...

  20. Thermal infrared panoramic imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Tsui, Eddy K.; Gutin, Olga; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Alexey

    2006-05-01

    Panoramic cameras offer true real-time, 360-degree coverage of the surrounding area, valuable for a variety of defense and security applications, including force protection, asset protection, asset control, security including port security, perimeter security, video surveillance, border control, airport security, coastguard operations, search and rescue, intrusion detection, and many others. Automatic detection, location, and tracking of targets outside protected area ensures maximum protection and at the same time reduces the workload on personnel, increases reliability and confidence of target detection, and enables both man-in-the-loop and fully automated system operation. Thermal imaging provides the benefits of all-weather, 24-hour day/night operation with no downtime. In addition, thermal signatures of different target types facilitate better classification, beyond the limits set by camera's spatial resolution. The useful range of catadioptric panoramic cameras is affected by their limited resolution. In many existing systems the resolution is optics-limited. Reflectors customarily used in catadioptric imagers introduce aberrations that may become significant at large camera apertures, such as required in low-light and thermal imaging. Advantages of panoramic imagers with high image resolution include increased area coverage with fewer cameras, instantaneous full horizon detection, location and tracking of multiple targets simultaneously, extended range, and others. The Automatic Panoramic Thermal Integrated Sensor (APTIS), being jointly developed by Applied Science Innovative, Inc. (ASI) and the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) combines the strengths of improved, high-resolution panoramic optics with thermal imaging in the 8 - 14 micron spectral range, leveraged by intelligent video processing for automated detection, location, and tracking of moving targets. The work in progress supports the Future Combat Systems (FCS) and the

  1. Thermal infrared remote sensing sensors, methods, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kuenzer, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in the field of thermal infrared remote sensing. Temperature is one of the most important physical environmental variables monitored by earth observing remote sensing systems. Temperature ranges define the boundaries of habitats on our planet. Thermal hazards endanger our resources and well-being. In this book renowned international experts have contributed chapters on currently available thermal sensors as well as innovative plans for future missions. Further chapters discuss the underlying physics and image processing techni

  2. Dual band metamaterial perfect absorber based on Mie resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji, E-mail: zhouji@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bi, Ke [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Zhao, Qian [State Key Lab of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-08

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrated a polarization insensitive dual-band metamaterial perfect absorber working in wide incident angles based on the two magnetic Mie resonances of a single dielectric “atom” with simple structure. Two absorption bands with simulated absorptivity of 99% and 96%, experimental absorptivity of 97% and 94% at 8.45 and 11.97 GHz were achieved due to the simultaneous magnetic and electric resonances in dielectric “atom” and copper plate. Mie resonances of dielectric “atom” provide a simple way to design metamaterial perfect absorbers with high symmetry.

  3. Joint Resource Allocation for Dual - Band Heterogeneous Wireless Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeogun, Ramoni

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate downlink resource allocation in two-tier OFDMA heterogeneous networks comprising a macrocell transmitting at a microwave frequency and dual band small cells utilizing both microwave and millimeter wave frequencies. A non - cooperative game theoretic approach...... is proposed for adaptively switching the SC transmission frequency based on the location of small cell users and interference to macrocell users. We propose a resource allocation approach which maximizes the sum rate of small cell users while minimizing interference to macrocell users and the total power...

  4. Teaching physics and understanding infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2017-08-01

    Infrared thermal imaging is a very rapidly evolving field. The latest trends are small smartphone IR camera accessories, making infrared imaging a widespread and well-known consumer product. Applications range from medical diagnosis methods via building inspections and industrial predictive maintenance etc. also to visualization in the natural sciences. Infrared cameras do allow qualitative imaging and visualization but also quantitative measurements of the surface temperatures of objects. On the one hand, they are a particularly suitable tool to teach optics and radiation physics and many selected topics in different fields of physics, on the other hand there is an increasing need of engineers and physicists who understand these complex state of the art photonics systems. Therefore students must also learn and understand the physics underlying these systems.

  5. A Novel Dual-Band Circularly Polarized Rectangular Slot Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A coplanar waveguide fed dual-band circularly polarized rectangular slot antenna is presented. The proposed antenna consists of a rectangular metal frame acting as a ground and an S-shaped monopole as a radiator. The spatial distribution of the surface current density is employed to demonstrate that the circular polarization is generated by the S-shaped monopole which controls the path of the surface currents. An antenna prototype, having overall dimension 37 × 37 × 1 mm3, has been fabricated on FR4 substrate with dielectric constant 4.4. The proposed antenna achieves 10 dB return loss bandwidths and 3 dB axial ratio (AR in the frequency bands 2.39–2.81 GHz and 5.42–5.92 GHz, respectively. Both these characteristics are suitable for WLAN and WiMAX applications.

  6. Design of two-DMD based zoom MW and LW dual-band IRSP using pixel fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yue; Xu, Xiping; Qiao, Yang

    2018-06-01

    In order to test the anti-jamming ability of mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) dual-band imaging system, a zoom mid-wave (MW) and long-wave (LW) dual-band infrared scene projector (IRSP) based on two-digital micro-mirror device (DMD) was designed by using a projection method of pixel fusion. Two illumination systems, which illuminate the two DMDs directly with Kohler telecentric beam respectively, were combined with projection system by a spatial layout way. The distances of projection entrance pupil and illumination exit pupil were also analyzed separately. MWIR and LWIR virtual scenes were generated respectively by two DMDs and fused by a dichroic beam combiner (DBC), resulting in two radiation distributions in projected image. The optical performance of each component was evaluated by ray tracing simulations. Apparent temperature and image contrast were demonstrated by imaging experiments. On the basis of test and simulation results, the aberrations of optical system were well corrected, and the quality of projected image meets test requirements.

  7. Dual-band linearly and circularly polarized microstrip patch antennas with meandering slot and metallic vias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jin; Lin, Xianqi; Yu, Jiawei

    2018-01-01

    performances. The characteristics are analyzed in detail where we find that the existence of the vias also improves the impedance matching. Four samples are designed, where dual-band with both linear polarization, dual-band with circular- and linear-polarization, and single band with linear polarization...

  8. Thermal Infrared and Visible to Near-Infrared Spectral Analysis of Chert and Amorphous Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, M. L.; Hamilton, V. E.; Cady, S. L.; Knauth, P.

    2009-03-01

    We look in detail at the thermal infrared and visible to near-infrared spectra of various forms of chert and amorphous silica and compare the spectral variations between samples with variations in physical and chemical characteristics.

  9. A Dual Band Slotted Patch Antenna on Dielectric Material Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Habib Ullah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A low profile, compact dual band slotted patch antenna has been designed using finite element method-based high frequency full-wave electromagnetic simulator. The proposed antenna fabricated using LPKF printed circuit board (PCB fabrication machine on fiberglass reinforced epoxy polymer resin material substrate and the performance of the prototype has been measured in a standard far-field anechoic measurement chamber. The measured impedance bandwidths of (reflection coefficient <-10 dB 12.26% (14.3–16.2 GHZ, 8.24% (17.4–18.9 GHz, and 3.08% (19.2–19.8 have been achieved through the proposed antenna prototype. 5.9 dBi, 3.37 dBi, and 3.32 dBi peak gains have been measured and simulated radiation efficiencies of 80.3%, 81.9%, and 82.5% have been achieved at three resonant frequencies of 15.15 GHz, 18.2 GHz, and 19.5 GHz, respectively. Minimum gain variation, symmetric, and almost steady measured radiation pattern shows that the proposed antenna is suitable for Ku and K band satellite applications.

  10. A compact dual band MIMO PIFA for 5G applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachakonda, A.; Bang, P.; Mudiganti, J.

    2017-11-01

    5G applications support operations in 28, 37, 60 and 73GHz bands and is expected to support 1GHz bandwidth. In the present paper, planar inverted F antenna for 28GHz operation has been proposed for 5G applications for which a return loss of -17.46dB and a gain of 9.30dB have been observed. In addition, the design has been extended for dual band operation at 28 and 37GHz by implementing an L slot in the patch. An excellent return loss of -32.54dB and -18.57dB with a gain of 8.62dB has been observed. Moreover, a feasible bandwidth of 1.02GHz has been obtained in former design, while an enhanced bandwidth of 1.3GHz has been obtained at both bands in case of latter design. However, for better gain & data rate considerations, the previous design has been extended as a MIMO configuration with 2 antenna elements (2x1) and corresponding performance parameters have been evaluated.

  11. Design of Two Novel Dual Band-Notched UWB Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two novel dual band-notched ultra-wideband (UWB printed monopole antennas with simple structure and small size are presented. The size of both antennas is 25×25×0.8 mm3. The bandwidth of one of the proposed antenna can be from 2.7 GHz to 36.8 GHz, except the bandwidth of 3.2–3.9 GHz for WiMAX applications and 5.14–5.94 GHz for WLAN applications. The bandwidth of the other is ranging for 2.7 to 41.1 GHz, except the bandwidth of 3.2–3.9 GHz for WiMAX applications and 4.8–5.9 GHz for WLAN applications. Bandwidths of the antennas are about 512% and 455% wider than those of conventional band-notched UWB antennas, respectively. In addition, the time-domain characteristics of the two antennas are investigated to show the difference between both antennas.

  12. The Visualization of Infrared Radiation Using Thermal Sensitive Foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a set of demonstration school experiments where infrared radiation is detected using thermal sensitive foils. The possibility of using standard glass lenses for infrared imaging is discussed in detail. It is shown that with optic components made from glass, infrared radiation up to 2.5 µm of wavelength can be detected. The…

  13. Infrared frequency-tunable coherent thermal sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we numerically demonstrate an infrared (IR) frequency-tunable selective thermal emitter made of graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) gratings. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis shows temporally-coherent emission peaks associated with magnetic polariton (MP), whose resonance frequency can be dynamically tuned within the phonon absorption band of SiC by varying graphene chemical potential. An analytical inductor–capacitor circuit model is introduced to quantitatively predict the resonance frequency and further elucidate the mechanism for the tunable emission peak. The effects of grating geometric parameters, such as grating height, groove width and grating period, on the selective emission peak are explored. The direction-independent behavior of MP and associated coherent emission are also demonstrated. Moreover, by depositing four layers of graphene sheets onto the SiC gratings, a large tunability of 8.5% in peak frequency can be obtained to yield the coherent emission covering a broad frequency range from 820 to 890 cm −1 . The novel tunable metamaterial could pave the way to a new class of tunable thermal sources in the IR region. (paper)

  14. A Dual Band Additively Manufactured 3D Antenna on Package with Near-Isotropic Radiation Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Zhen; Klionovski, Kirill; Bilal, Rana Muhammad; Shamim, Atif

    2018-01-01

    presents a novel 3D dual band near-isotropic wideband GSM antenna to fulfill these requirements. The antenna has been realized on the package of electronics through additive manufacturing to ensure efficient utilization of available space and lower cost

  15. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1991-12-03

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a material (16, 42) by applying a cooling medium (20, 54) to cool a thin surface layer portion of the material and to transiently generate a temperature differential between the thin surface layer portion and the lower portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material. The altered thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material is detected by a spectrometer/detector (28, 50) while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of the emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation, so that the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of the characteristics relating to the molecular composition of the material.

  16. OBSERVED ASTEROID SURFACE AREA IN THE THERMAL INFRARED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, C. R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wright, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The rapid accumulation of thermal infrared observations and shape models of asteroids has led to increased interest in thermophysical modeling. Most of these infrared observations are unresolved. We consider what fraction of an asteroid’s surface area contributes the bulk of the emitted thermal flux for two model asteroids of different shapes over a range of thermal parameters. The resulting observed surface in the infrared is generally more fragmented than the area observed in visible wavelengths, indicating high sensitivity to shape. For objects with low values of the thermal parameter, small fractions of the surface contribute the majority of thermally emitted flux. Calculating observed areas could enable the production of spatially resolved thermal inertia maps from non-resolved observations of asteroids.

  17. Validating an infrared thermal switch as a novel access technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memarian Negar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a novel single-switch access technology based on infrared thermography was proposed. The technology exploits the temperature differences between the inside and surrounding areas of the mouth as a switch trigger, thereby allowing voluntary switch activation upon mouth opening. However, for this technology to be clinically viable, it must be validated against a gold standard switch, such as a chin switch, that taps into the same voluntary motion. Methods In this study, we report an experiment designed to gauge the concurrent validity of the infrared thermal switch. Ten able-bodied adults participated in a series of 3 test sessions where they simultaneously used both an infrared thermal and conventional chin switch to perform multiple trials of a number identification task with visual, auditory and audiovisual stimuli. Participants also provided qualitative feedback about switch use. User performance with the two switches was quantified using an efficiency measure based on mutual information. Results User performance (p = 0.16 and response time (p = 0.25 with the infrared thermal switch were comparable to those of the gold standard. Users reported preference for the infrared thermal switch given its non-contact nature and robustness to changes in user posture. Conclusions Thermal infrared access technology appears to be a valid single switch alternative for individuals with disabilities who retain voluntary mouth opening and closing.

  18. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1991-12-24

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a solid material (16, 42) by applying energy from an energy source (20, 70) top a surface region of the solid material sufficient to cause transient heating in a thin surface layer portion of the solid material (16, 42) so as to enable transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion, and by detecting with a spectrometer/detector (28, 58) substantially only the transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion of the solid material. The detected transient thermal emission of infrared radiation is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the solid material of emitted infrared radiation, so as to be indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the solid material.

  19. Design of Dual-Band Two-Branch-Line Couplers with Arbitrary Coupling Coefficients in Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Prudyus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to design dual-band two-branch couplers with arbitrary coupling coefficients at two operating frequency bands is proposed in this article. The method is based on the usage of equivalent subcircuits input reactances of the even-mode and odd-mode excitations. The exact design formulas for three options of the dual-band coupler with different location and number of stubs are received. These formulas permit to obtain the different variants for each structure in order to select the physically realizable solution and can be used in broad range of frequency ratio and power division ratio. For verification, three different dual-band couplers, which are operating at 2.4/3.9 GHz with different coupling coefficients (one with 3/6 dB, and 10/3 dB two others are designed, simulated, fabricated and tested. The measured results are in good agreement with the simulated ones.

  20. Compact Dual-Band Bandpass Filter Using Stubs Loaded Ring Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel second-order dual-band bandpass filter (BPF) by using proposed stubs loaded ring resonator. The resonant behavior of proposed stubs loaded ring resonator is analyzed by even-/odd-mode method, which shows its multiple-mode resonant characteristic. Parameters sweep is done so as to give the design guidelines. As an example, a second-order dual-band BPF operating at 1.8/5.2 GHz for GSM and WLAN applications is designed, fabricated and measured. The fabricated filter has a very compact size of 0.05λg×0.15λg. Measured results also show that the proposed dual-band BPF has a better than 20 dB rejection upper stopband from 5.47 GHz to 12.56 GHz. Good agreement is shown between the simulated and measured results.

  1. Factors affecting thermal infrared images at selected field sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisson, J.B.; Ferguson, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    A thermal infrared (TIR) survey was conducted to locate surface ordnance in and around the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, and a thermal anomaly was found. This report documents studies conducted to identify the position of cause of the thermal anomaly. Also included are results of a long path Fourier transform infrared survey, soil sampling activities, soil gas surveys, and buried heater studies. The results of these studies indicated that the thermal anomaly was caused by a gravel pad, which had thermal properties different than those of the surrounding soil. Results from this investigation suggest that TIR is useful for locating surface objects having a high thermal inertia compared to the surrounding terrain, but TIR is of very limited use for characterizing buried waste or other similar buried objects at the INEL

  2. Thermal Infrared Imaging-Based Computational Psychophysiology for Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Daniela; Pinti, Paola; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-01-01

    Thermal infrared imaging has been proposed as a potential system for the computational assessment of human autonomic nervous activity and psychophysiological states in a contactless and noninvasive way. Through bioheat modeling of facial thermal imagery, several vital signs can be extracted, including localized blood perfusion, cardiac pulse, breath rate, and sudomotor response, since all these parameters impact the cutaneous temperature. The obtained physiological information could then be used to draw inferences about a variety of psychophysiological or affective states, as proved by the increasing number of psychophysiological studies using thermal infrared imaging. This paper presents therefore a review of the principal achievements of thermal infrared imaging in computational physiology with regard to its capability of monitoring psychophysiological activity.

  3. Dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation and stable performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hang; Qu, Shao-Bo; Peng, Wei-Dong; Lin, Bao-Qin; Wang, Jia-Fu; Ma, Hua; Zhang, Jie-Qiu; Bai, Peng; Wang, Xu-Hua; Xu, Zhuo

    2012-05-01

    A new technique of designing a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is presented. This technique is based on a delicately designed topology of L- and Ku-band microwave filters. The two band-pass responses are generated by a capacitively-loaded square-loop frequency selective surface and an aperture-coupled frequency selective surface, respectively. A Faraday cage is located between the two frequency selective surface structures to eliminate undesired couplings. Based on this technique, a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is designed, which possesses large band separation, high selectivity, and stable performance under various incident angles and different polarizations.

  4. Conceptual thermal design and analysis of a far-infrared/mid-infrared remote sensing instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettker, William A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents the conceptual thermal design and analysis results for the Spectroscopy of the Atmosphere using Far-Infrared Emission (SAFIRE) instrument. SAFIRE has been proposed for Mission to Planet Earth to study ozone chemistry in the middle atmosphere using remote sensing of the atmosphere in the far-infrared (21-87 microns) and mid-infrared (9-16 microns) spectra. SAFIRE requires that far-IR detectors be cooled to 3-4 K and mid-IR detectors to 80 K for the expected mission lifetime of five years. A superfluid helium dewar and Stirling-cycle cryocoolers provide the cryogenic temperatures required by the infrared detectors. The proposed instrument thermal design uses passive thermal control techniques to reject 465 watts of waste heat from the instrument.

  5. Far-infrared spectroscopy of thermally annealed tungsten silicide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiotti, M.; Borghesi, A.; Guizzetti, G.; Nava, F.; Santoro, G.

    1991-01-01

    The far-infrared transmittance spectrum of tungsten silicide has been observed for the first time. WSi 2 polycrystalline films were prepared by coevaporation and chemical-vapour deposition on silicon wafers, and subsequently thermally annealed at different temperatures. The observed structures are interpreted, on the basis of the symmetry properties of the crystal, such as infrared-active vibrational modes. Moreover, the marked lineshape dependence on annealing temperature enables this technique to analyse the formation of the solid silicide phases

  6. Wide frequency independently controlled dual-band inkjet-printed antenna

    KAUST Repository

    AbuTarboush, Hattan F.; Shamim, Atif

    2014-01-01

    .2 and 23.7%, respectively. These dual-bands have the ability to be controlled independently between 1.1 and 7.5 GHz without affecting the other band. In addition, the proposed antenna can be assigned for different mobile and wireless applications

  7. A dual-band planar array of connected dipoles: Experimental validation based on bistatic RCS measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavallo, D.; Neto, A.; Gerini, G.; Morello, D.

    2010-01-01

    Rigorous equivalent networks representing connected arrays in transmission and reception are derived in this paper. These equivalent networks are not based on reciprocity but on Green's functions. Thus, all components have well identified and physically meaningful roles. A dual-band connected array

  8. A photo-excited broadband to dual-band tunable terahertz prefect metamaterial polarization converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianfeng; Yang, Yang; Li, Shufang

    2018-04-01

    A new and simple design of photo-excited broadband to dual-band tunable terahertz (THz) metamaterial cross polarization converter is proposed in this paper. The tunable converter is a sandwich structure with the center-cut cross-shaped metallic patterned structure as a resonator, the middle dielectric layer as a spacer and the bottom metallic film as the ground. The conductivity of the photoconductive semiconductor (Silicon) filled in the gap of the cross-shaped metallic resonator can be tuned by the incident pump power, leading to an easy modulation of the electromagnetic response of the proposed converter. The results show that the proposed cross-polarization converter can be tuned from a broadband with polarization conversion ratio (PCR) beyond 95% (1.86-2.94 THz) to dual frequency bands (fl = 1 . 46 THz &fh = 2 . 9 THz). The conversion peaks can reach 99.9% for the broadband and, 99.5% (fl) and 99.7% (fh) for the dual-band, respectively. Most importantly, numerical simulations demonstrate that the broadband/dual-band polarization conversion mechanism of the converter originates from the localized surface plasmon modes, which make the design simple and different from previous designs. With these good features, the proposed broadband to dual-band tunable polarization converter is expected to be used in widespread applications.

  9. A dual-band reconfigurable Yagi-Uda antenna with diverse radiation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurav, Kushmanda; Sarkar, Debdeep; Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a dual-band pattern reconfigurable antenna is proposed. The antenna comprises of a dual-band complementary split ring resonators (CSRRs) loaded dipole as the driven element and two copper strips with varying lengths as parasitic segments on both sides of the driven dipole. PIN diodes are used with the parasitic elements to control their electrical length. The CSRRs loading provide a lower order mode in addition to the reference dipole mode, while the parasitic elements along with the PIN diodes are capable of switching the omni-directional radiation of the dual-band driven element to nine different configurations of radiation patterns which include bi-directional end-fire, broadside, and uni-directional end-fire in both the operating bands. A prototype of the designed antenna together with the PIN diodes and DC bias lines is fabricated to validate the concept of dual-band radiation pattern diversity. The simulation and measurement results are in good agreement. The proposed antenna can be used in wireless access points for PCS and WLAN applications.

  10. Infrared difficulties with thermal quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandou, T.

    1997-01-01

    Reviewing briefly the two main difficulties encountered in thermal quantum field theories at finite temperature when dealing with the Braaten-Pisarski (BP) resummation program, the motivation is introduced of an analysis relying on the bare perturbation theory, right from the onset. (author)

  11. Sea surface temperature mapping using a thermal infrared scanner

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R; Pandya, R; Mathur, K.M.; Charyulu, R; Rao, L.V.G.

    1 metre water column below the sea surface. A thermal infrared scanner developed by the Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad was operated on board R.V. Gaveshani in April/May 1984 for mapping SST over the eastern Arabian Sea. SST values...

  12. Thermal infrared sensors for postharvest deficit irrigation of peach

    Science.gov (United States)

    California has been in a historic drought and the lack of water has been a major problem for agriculture especially for crops that depend on irrigation. A multi-year field study was carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of applying thermal infrared sensors for managing deficit irrigation in an ...

  13. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, C.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Bus, Sicco A.

    Background: Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the

  14. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the applicability

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinsic, Gorazd

    2011-09-01

    Ten years ago, a book with a title like this would be interesting only to a narrow circle of specialists. Thanks to rapid advances in technology, the price of thermal imaging devices has dropped sharply, so they have, almost overnight, become accessible to a wide range of users. As the authors point out in the preface, the growth of this area has led to a paradoxical situation: now there are probably more infrared (IR) cameras sold worldwide than there are people who understand the basic physics behind them and know how to correctly interpret the colourful images that are obtained with these devices. My experience confirms this. When I started using the IR camera during lectures on the didactics of physics, I soon realized that I needed more knowledge, which I later found in this book. A wide range of potential readers and topical areas provides a good motive for writing a book such as this one, but it also represents a major challenge for authors, as compromises in the style of writing and choice of topics are required. The authors of this book have successfully achieved this, and indeed done an excellent job. This book addresses a wide range of readers, from engineers, technicians, and physics and science teachers in schools and universities, to researchers and specialists who are professionally active in the field. As technology in this area has made great progress in recent times, this book is also a valuable guide for those who opt to purchase an infrared camera. Chapters in this book could be divided into three areas: the fundamentals of IR thermal imaging and related physics (two chapters); IR imaging systems and methods (two chapters) and applications, including six chapters on pedagogical applications; IR imaging of buildings and infrastructure, industrial applications, microsystems, selected topics in research and industry, and selected applications from other fields. All chapters contain numerous colour pictures and diagrams, and a rich list of relevant

  16. Pattern Synthesis of Dual-band Shared Aperture Interleaved Linear Antenna Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Guo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to improve the efficiency of an array aperture by interleaving two different arrays in the same aperture area. Two sub-arrays working at different frequencies are interleaved in the same linear aperture area. The available aperture area is efficiently used. The element positions of antenna array are optimized by using Invasive Weed Optimization (IWO to reduce the peak side lobe level (PSLL of the radiation pattern. To overcome the shortness of traditional methods which can only fulfill the design of shared aperture antenna array working at the same frequency, this method can achieve the design of dual-band antenna array with wide working frequency range. Simulation results show that the proposed method is feasible and efficient in the synthesis of dual-band shared aperture antenna array.

  17. Based on graphene tunable dual-band terahertz metamaterial absorber with wide-angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mulin; Cheng, Yongzhi; Cheng, Zhengze; Chen, Haoran; Mao, Xuesong; Gong, Rongzhou

    2018-05-01

    We present a wide-angle tunable dual-band terahertz (THz) metamaterial absorber (MMA) based on square graphene patch (SGP). This MMA is a simple periodic array, consisting of a dielectric substrate sandwiched with the SGP and a continuous metallic film. The designed MMA can achieve dual-band absorption by exciting fundamental and second higher-order resonance modes on SGP. The numerical simulations indicate that the absorption spectrum of the designed MMA is tuned from 0.85 THz to 1.01 THz, and from 2.84 THz to 3.37 THz when the chemical potential of the SGP is increasing from 0.4eV to 0.8eV. Moreover, it operates well in a wide-angle of the incident waves. The presented THz MMA based on the SGP could find some potential applications in optoelectronic related devices, such as sensor, emitter and wavelength selective radiators.

  18. Dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation and stable performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hang; Qu Shao-Bo; Lin Bao-Qin; Wang Jia-Fu; Ma Hua; Zhang Jie-Qiu; Peng Wei-Dong; Bai Peng; Wang Xu-Hua; Xu Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    A new technique of designing a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is presented. This technique is based on a delicately designed topology of L- and Ku-band microwave filters. The two band-pass responses are generated by a capacitively-loaded square-loop frequency selective surface and an aperture-coupled frequency selective surface, respectively. A Faraday cage is located between the two frequency selective surface structures to eliminate undesired couplings. Based on this technique, a dual-band frequency selective surface with large band separation is designed, which possesses large band separation, high selectivity, and stable performance under various incident angles and different polarizations. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  19. Miniaturized dual-band antenna array with double-negative (DNG) metamaterial for wireless applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadami, Abdulrahman Shueai Mohsen; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Soh, Ping Jack; Rahim, Sharul Kamal Abdul; Vandenbosch, Guy A. E.; Narbudowicz, Adam

    2017-01-01

    A miniaturized dual-band antenna array using a negative index metamaterial is presented for WiMAX, LTE, and WLAN applications. This left-handed metamaterial plane is located behind the antenna array, and its unit cell is a combination of split-ring resonator, square electric ring resonator, and rectangular electrical coupled resonator. This enables the achievement of a metamaterial structure exhibiting both negative permittivity and permeability, which results in antenna size miniaturization, efficiency, and gain enhancement. Moreover, the proposed metamaterial antenna has realized dual-band operating frequencies compared to a single frequency for normal antenna. The measured reflection coefficient (S11) shows a 50.25% bandwidth in the lower band (from 2.119 to 3.058 GHz) and 4.27% in the upper band (from 5.058 to 5.276 GHz). Radiation efficiency obtained in the lower and upper band are >95 and 80%, respectively.

  20. Dual band multi frequency rectangular patch microstrip antenna with flyswatter shaped slot for wireless systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, Dheeraj; Saraswat, Shriti; Gulati, Gitansh; Shekhar, Snehanshu; Joshi, Kanika; Sharma, Komal

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a dual band planar antenna has been proposed for IEEE 802.16 Wi-MAX /IEEE 802.11 WLAN/4.9 GHz public safety applications. The antenna comprises a frequency bandwidth of 560MHz (3.37GHz-3.93GHz) for WLAN and WiMAX and 372MHz (4.82GHz-5.192GHz) for 4.9 GHz public safety applications and Radio astronomy services (4.8-4.94 GHz). The proposed antenna constitutes of a single microstrip patch reactively loaded with three identical steps positioned in a zig-zag manner towards the radiating edges of the patch. The coaxially fed patch antenna characteristics (radiation pattern, antenna gain, antenna directivity, current distribution, S_1_1) have been investigated. The antenna design is primarily focused on achieving a dual band operation.

  1. Dual band multi frequency rectangular patch microstrip antenna with flyswatter shaped slot for wireless systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, Dheeraj, E-mail: dbhardwaj.bit@gmail.com [Department of Physics, BIT-Mesra-Jaipur Campus, Jaipur 302017 (India); Saraswat, Shriti, E-mail: saraswat.srishti@gmail.com; Gulati, Gitansh, E-mail: gitanshgulati@gmail.com; Shekhar, Snehanshu, E-mail: snehanshushekhar.bit@gmail.com; Joshi, Kanika, E-mail: kanika.karesh@gmail.com [Department of Electronics & Communication, BIT-Mesra-Jaipur Campus, Jaipur 302017 (India); Sharma, Komal, E-mail: kbhardwaj18@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Swami Keshvanand Institute of Technology, Jaipur 302017 (India)

    2016-03-09

    In this paper a dual band planar antenna has been proposed for IEEE 802.16 Wi-MAX /IEEE 802.11 WLAN/4.9 GHz public safety applications. The antenna comprises a frequency bandwidth of 560MHz (3.37GHz-3.93GHz) for WLAN and WiMAX and 372MHz (4.82GHz-5.192GHz) for 4.9 GHz public safety applications and Radio astronomy services (4.8-4.94 GHz). The proposed antenna constitutes of a single microstrip patch reactively loaded with three identical steps positioned in a zig-zag manner towards the radiating edges of the patch. The coaxially fed patch antenna characteristics (radiation pattern, antenna gain, antenna directivity, current distribution, S{sub 11}) have been investigated. The antenna design is primarily focused on achieving a dual band operation.

  2. Dual band multi frequency rectangular patch microstrip antenna with flyswatter shaped slot for wireless systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Dheeraj; Saraswat, Shriti; Gulati, Gitansh; Shekhar, Snehanshu; Joshi, Kanika; Sharma, Komal

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a dual band planar antenna has been proposed for IEEE 802.16 Wi-MAX /IEEE 802.11 WLAN/4.9 GHz public safety applications. The antenna comprises a frequency bandwidth of 560MHz (3.37GHz-3.93GHz) for WLAN and WiMAX and 372MHz (4.82GHz-5.192GHz) for 4.9 GHz public safety applications and Radio astronomy services (4.8-4.94 GHz). The proposed antenna constitutes of a single microstrip patch reactively loaded with three identical steps positioned in a zig-zag manner towards the radiating edges of the patch. The coaxially fed patch antenna characteristics (radiation pattern, antenna gain, antenna directivity, current distribution, S11) have been investigated. The antenna design is primarily focused on achieving a dual band operation.

  3. Dual-band reflective polarization converter based on slotted wire resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengxia; Zhang, Linbo; Zhou, Peiheng; Chen, Haiyan; Zhao, Rui; Zhou, Yang; Liang, Difei; Lu, Haipeng; Deng, Longjiang

    2018-02-01

    A dual-band and high-efficiency reflective linear polarization converter composed of a layer of slotted metal wires has been proposed. Both the simulated and experimental results indicate that the structure can convert a linearly polarized wave to its cross-polarized state for two distinct frequency bands under normal incidence: 9.8-15.1 and 19.2-25.7 GHz. This phenomenon is attributed to a resonance that corresponds to the "trapped mode" at 15.8 GHz. This mode is stable with structural parameters and incident angle at a relatively wide range, and thus becomes promising for dual-band (also multiband) devices design. By surface current distribution and electric field analysis, the operation mechanism has been illuminated, especially for the "trapped mode", identified by the equally but also oppositely directed currents in each unit cell.

  4. Studies of planetary boundary layer by infrared thermal imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albina, Bogdan; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe, E-mail: dimitriu@uaic.ro; Gurlui, Silviu Octavian, E-mail: dimitriu@uaic.ro [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Atmosphere Optics, Spectroscopy and Lasers Laboratory, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi (Romania); Cazacu, Marius Mihai [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Atmosphere Optics, Spectroscopy and Lasers Laboratory, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi, Romania and Department of Physics, Gheorghe Asachi Technical University of Iasi, 59A Mangeron Blvd., 700 (Romania); Timofte, Adrian [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Atmosphere Optics, Spectroscopy and Lasers Laboratory, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi, Romania and National Meteorological Administration, Regional Forecast Center Bacau, 1 Cuza Voda Str., 60 (Romania)

    2014-11-24

    The IR camera is a relatively novel device for remote sensing of atmospheric thermal processes from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) based on measurements of the infrared radiation. Infrared radiation is energy radiated by the motion of atoms and molecules on the surface of aerosols, when their temperature is more than absolute zero. The IR camera measures directly the intensity of radiation emitted by aerosols which is converted by an imaging sensor into an electric signal, resulting a thermal image. Every image pixel that corresponds to a specific radiance is pre-processed to identify the brightness temperature. The thermal infrared imaging radiometer used in this study, NicAir, is a precision radiometer developed by Prata et al. The device was calibrated for the temperature range of 270–320 K and using a calibration table along with image processing software, important information about variations in temperature can be extracted from acquired IR images. The PBL is the lowest layer of the troposphere where the atmosphere interacts with the ground surfaces. The importance of PBL lies in the fact that it provides a finite but varying volume in which pollutants can disperse. The aim of this paper is to analyze the PBL altitude and thickness variations over Iasi region using the IR imaging camera as well as its behavior from day to night and thermal processes occurring in PBL.

  5. A novel technique to monitor thermal discharges using thermal infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthulakshmi, A L; Natesan, Usha; Ferrer, Vincent A; Deepthi, K; Venugopalan, V P; Narasimhan, S V

    2013-09-01

    Coastal temperature is an important indicator of water quality, particularly in regions where delicate ecosystems sensitive to water temperature are present. Remote sensing methods are highly reliable for assessing the thermal dispersion. The plume dispersion from the thermal outfall of the nuclear power plant at Kalpakkam, on the southeast coast of India, was investigated from March to December 2011 using thermal infrared images along with field measurements. The absolute temperature as provided by the thermal infrared (TIR) images is used in the Arc GIS environment for generating a spatial pattern of the plume movement. Good correlation of the temperature measured by the TIR camera with the field data (r(2) = 0.89) make it a reliable method for the thermal monitoring of the power plant effluents. The study portrays that the remote sensing technique provides an effective means of monitoring the thermal distribution pattern in coastal waters.

  6. Discussion on the application potential of thermal infrared remote sensing technology in uranium deposits exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junhu; Zhang Jielin; Liu Dechang

    2011-01-01

    With the continual development of new thermal infrared sensors and thermal radiation theory, the technology of thermal infrared remote sensing has shown great potential for applications in resources exploration, especially in the field of uranium exploration. The paper makes a systemic summary of the theoretical basis and research status of the thermal infrared remote sensing applications in resources exploration from the surface temperature, thermal inertia and thermal infrared spectrum. What's more, the research objective and the research content of thermal infrared remote sensing in the uranium deposits exploration applications are discussed in detail. Besides, based on the thermal infrared ASTER data, the paper applies this technology to the granite-type uranium deposits in South China and achieves good result. Above all, the practice proves that the thermal infrared remote sensing technology has a good application prospects and particular value in the field of uranium prospecting and will play an important role in the prospecting target of the uranium deposits. (authors)

  7. Dual-Band Split-Ring Antenna Design for WLAN Applications

    OpenAIRE

    BAŞARAN, S. Cumhur; ERDEMLİ, Yunus E.

    2014-01-01

    A dual-band microstrip antenna based on split-ring elements is introduced for WLAN (2.4/5.2 GHz) applications. The proposed split-ring antenna (SRA) has a compact novel design which provides about 2% impedance-bandwidth without a need for additional matching network. Analysis and design of the proposed microstrip antenna is carried out by means of full-wave simulators based on the finite-element method.

  8. Image registration for a UV-Visible dual-band imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Yuan, Shuang; Li, Jianping; Xing, Sheng; Zhang, Honglong; Dong, Yuming; Chen, Liangpei; Liu, Peng; Jiao, Guohua

    2018-06-01

    The detection of corona discharge is an effective way for early fault diagnosis of power equipment. UV-Visible dual-band imaging can detect and locate corona discharge spot at all-weather condition. In this study, we introduce an image registration protocol for this dual-band imaging system. The protocol consists of UV image denoising and affine transformation model establishment. We report the algorithm details of UV image preprocessing, affine transformation model establishment and relevant experiments for verification of their feasibility. The denoising algorithm was based on a correlation operation between raw UV images, a continuous mask and the transformation model was established by using corner feature and a statistical method. Finally, an image fusion test was carried out to verify the accuracy of affine transformation model. It has proved the average position displacement error between corona discharge and equipment fault at different distances in a 2.5m-20 m range are 1.34 mm and 1.92 mm in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, which are precise enough for most industrial applications. The resultant protocol is not only expected to improve the efficiency and accuracy of such imaging system for locating corona discharge spot, but also supposed to provide a more generalized reference for the calibration of various dual-band imaging systems in practice.

  9. Wide field-of-view dual-band multispectral muzzle flash detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, J.; Melchor, J.; Spiliotis, P.; Taplin, L.

    2013-06-01

    Sensor technologies are undergoing revolutionary advances, as seen in the rapid growth of multispectral methodologies. Increases in spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution, and in breadth of spectral coverage, render feasible sensors that function with unprecedented performance. A system was developed that addresses many of the key hardware requirements for a practical dual-band multispectral acquisition system, including wide field of view and spectral/temporal shift between dual bands. The system was designed using a novel dichroic beam splitter and dual band-pass filter configuration that creates two side-by-side images of a scene on a single sensor. A high-speed CMOS sensor was used to simultaneously capture data from the entire scene in both spectral bands using a short focal-length lens that provided a wide field-of-view. The beam-splitter components were arranged such that the two images were maintained in optical alignment and real-time intra-band processing could be carried out using only simple arithmetic on the image halves. An experiment related to limitations of the system to address multispectral detection requirements was performed. This characterized the system's low spectral variation across its wide field of view. This paper provides lessons learned on the general limitation of key hardware components required for multispectral muzzle flash detection, using the system as a hardware example combined with simulated multispectral muzzle flash and background signatures.

  10. Real-time dual-band haptic music player for mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Inwook; Lee, Hyeseon; Choi, Seungmoon

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel dual-band haptic music player for real-time simultaneous vibrotactile playback with music in mobile devices. Our haptic music player features a new miniature dual-mode actuator that can produce vibrations consisting of two principal frequencies and a real-time vibration generation algorithm that can extract vibration commands from a music file for dual-band playback (bass and treble). The algorithm uses a "haptic equalizer" and provides plausible sound-to-touch modality conversion based on human perceptual data. In addition, we present a user study carried out to evaluate the subjective performance (precision, harmony, fun, and preference) of the haptic music player, in comparison with the current practice of bass-band-only vibrotactile playback via a single-frequency voice-coil actuator. The evaluation results indicated that the new dual-band playback outperforms the bass-only rendering, also providing several insights for further improvements. The developed system and experimental findings have implications for improving the multimedia experience with mobile devices.

  11. Dual-band and high-efficiency polarization converter based on metasurfaces at microwave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yajun; Xia, Song; Shi, Hongyu; Zhang, Anxue; Xu, Zhuo

    2016-06-01

    We present a dual-band and high-efficiency polarization converter in microwave regime. The proposed converter can convert a linearly polarized wave to its cross-polarized wave for two distinct bands: Ku (11.5-20.0 GHz) and Ka (28.8-34.0 GHz). It can also convert the linearly polarized wave to a circularly polarized wave at four other frequencies. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulation results for both frequency bands. The polarization conversion ratio is above 0.94 for the Ku-band and 0.90 for the Ka-band. Furthermore, the converter can achieve dual-band and high-efficiency polarization conversion over angles of incidence up to 45°. The converter is also polarization-selective in that only the x- and y-polarized waves can be converted. The physical mechanism of the dual-band polarization conversion effect is interpreted via decomposed electric field components that couple with different plasmon resonance modes of the structure.

  12. Unmanned Ground Vehicle Perception Using Thermal Infrared Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry; Bajracharya, Max; Assad, Christopher; Brennan, Shane; Bellut, Paolo; Sherwin, Gary

    2011-01-01

    TIR cameras can be used for day/night Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) autonomous navigation when stealth is required. The quality of uncooled TIR cameras has significantly improved over the last decade, making them a viable option at low speed Limiting factors for stereo ranging with uncooled LWIR cameras are image blur and low texture scenes TIR perception capabilities JPL has explored includes: (1) single and dual band TIR terrain classification (2) obstacle detection (pedestrian, vehicle, tree trunks, ditches, and water) (3) perception thru obscurants

  13. Uranyl soaps - thermal, electronic and infrared spectral study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanki, A.K.; Bhandari, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The electronic and infrared spectra and TGA thermogram of uranyl soaps (laurate, mystrate, palmitate and stearate) have been studied. The environment about the UO 2+ 2 ion would comprise two 'short bite' bidentate carboxylate groups and oxygen atoms bridging from adjacent carboxylic molecules. The uranyl soaps have UO 2+ 2 vibronic absorption (approx. equal to 22730 cm -1 ) in the range found for eight coordinate uranyl complexes. The greater resistance to thermal degradation (approx. equal to 300 0 C) of these soaps and their stepwise thermal degradation infer strong metal-ligand interaction. (orig.) [de

  14. Thermal Design of a Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Suk Yang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A Protomodel Space Infrared Cryogenic System (PSICS cooled by a stirling cryocooler has been designed. The PSICS has an IR sensor inside the cold box which is cooled by a stirling cryocooler with refrigeration capacity of 500mW at 80K in a vacuum vessel. It is important to minimize the heat load so that the background thermal noise can be reduced. In order to design the cryogenic system with low heat load and to reduce the remained heat load, we have performed numerical analyses. In this paper, we present the design factors and the results obtained by the thermal analysis of the PSICS.

  15. Waveguide resonances with selectable polarization in an infrared thermal emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lun Huang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A multi-band infrared thermal emitter with polarized waveguide resonances was investigated. The device is constructed by embedding the metallic grating strips within the resonant cavity of a metal/dielectric/metal (MDM structure. The proposed arrangement makes it possible to generate waveguide resonances with mutually orthogonal polarization, thereby providing an additional degree of freedom to vary the resonant wavelengths and polarizations in the medium infrared region. The measured reflection spectra and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD simulation indicated that the electric fields of the waveguide modes with two orthogonal polarizations are distributed in different regions of the cavity. Resonant wavelengths in different polarizations can be adjusted by altering the period, the metallic line width, or the position of the embedded gold strips. The ratio of the full width at half maximum (FWHM to the peak wavelength was achieved to be smaller than 0.035. This study demonstrated a multi-band infrared thermal emission featuring a narrow bandwidth and polarization characteristics, which is quite suitable to be applied to the non-dispersive infrared (NDIR detection system.

  16. Thermal infrared remote sensing of crude oil slicks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salisbury, J.W.; D'Aria, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    It is important to develop a remote sensing technique for reliable detection of oil slicks for reasons of both oil exploration and environmental protection. Yet, unambiguous detection has proven an elusive goal. This article presents new thermal infrared spectra of oil slicks made from five different crude oil samples with a wide range of API gravities and compositions. After a brief outgassing phase, all oil slick spectra are quite similar and little affected by thickness, extended exposure to air or sunlight, and even by emulsification with seawater (mousse formation). Thus, oil slicks provide a remarkably unvarying spectral signature as remote sensing targets in the thermal infrared compared to other regions of the spectrum. This spectral signature in the 8-14 μm atmospheric window is flat, with an average reflectance of 4%. Seawater, on the other hand, has a spectrum that varies in reflectance with wavelength in the 8-14 μm window from 0.90 to 3.65%. In addition, the authors show that sea foam displays a reflectance spectrum quite similar to that of seawater in the 8-14 μm region, because the very high absorption coefficient of water in this wavelength region prevents volume scattering in foam bubbles. This results in a relatively uniform spectral background, against which oil slicks can be detected, based on their different spectral signature. Thus, thermal infrared multispectral remote sensing appears to offer a simple and reliable technique for aircraft or satellite detection of oil slicks

  17. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  18. Aeolian system dynamics derived from thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, Stephen Paul

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote-sensing and field-based observations were used to study aeolian systems, specifically sand transport pathways, dust emission sources and Saharan atmospheric dust. A method was developed for generating seamless and radiometrically accurate mosaics of thermal infrared data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. Using a combination of high resolution thermal emission spectroscopy results of sand samples and mosaic satellite data, surface emissivity was derived to map surface composition, which led to improvement in the understanding of sand accumulation in the Gran Desierto of northern Sonora, Mexico. These methods were also used to map sand transport pathways in the Sahara Desert, where the interaction between sand saltation and dust emission sources was explored. The characteristics and dynamics of dust sources were studied at White Sands, NM and in the Sahara Desert. At White Sands, an application was developed for studying the response of dust sources to surface soil moisture based on the relationship between soil moisture, apparent thermal inertia and the erosion potential of dust sources. The dynamics of dust sources and the interaction with sand transport pathways were also studied, focusing on the Bodele Depression of Chad and large dust sources in Mali and Mauritania. A dust detection algorithm was developed using ASTER data, and the spectral emissivity of observed atmospheric dust was related to the dust source area in the Sahara. At the Atmospheric Observatory (IZO) in Tenerife, Spain where direct measurement of the Saharan Air Layer could be made, the cycle of dust events occurring in July 2009 were examined. From the observation tower at the IZO, measurements of emitted longwave atmospheric radiance in the TIR wavelength region were made using a Forward Looking Infrared Radiometer (FLIR) handheld camera. The use of the FLIR to study atmospheric dust from the Saharan is a

  19. The Thermal Infrared Sensor onboard NASA's Mars 2020 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G.; Perez-Izquierdo, J.; Sebastian, E.; Ramos, M.; Bravo, A.; Mazo, M.; Rodriguez-Manfredi, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Mars 2020 rover mission is scheduled for launch in July/August 2020 and will address key questions about the potential for life on Mars. The Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA) is one of the seven instruments onboard the rover [1] and has been designed to assess the environmental conditions across the rover traverse. MEDA will extend the current record of in-situ meteorological measurements at the surface [2] to other locations on Mars. The Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) [3] is one of the six sensors comprising MEDA. TIRS will use three downward-looking channels to measure (1) the surface skin temperature (with high heritage from the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station onboard the Mars Science Laboratory mission [4]), (2) the upwelling thermal infrared radiation from the surface and (3) the reflected solar radiation at the surface, and two upward-looking channels to measure the (4) downwelling thermal infrared radiation at the surface and (5) the atmospheric temperature. In combination with other MEDA's sensors, TIRS will allow the quantification of the surface energy budget [5] and the determination of key geophysical properties of the terrain such as the albedo and thermal inertia with an unprecedented spatial resolution. Here we present a general description of the TIRS, with focus on its scientific requirements and results from field campaigns showing the performance of the different channels. References:[1] Rodríguez-Manfredi, J. A. et al. (2014), MEDA: An environmental and meteorological package for Mars 2020, LPSC, 45, 2837. [2] Martínez, G.M. et al. (2017), The Modern Near-Surface Martian Climate: A Review of In-situ Meteorological Data from Viking to Curiosity, Space Science Reviews, 1-44. [3] Pérez-Izquierdo, J. et al. (2017), The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) of the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA) Instrument onboard Mars 2020, IEEE. [4] Sebastián, E. et al. (2010), The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground

  20. Design of dual band FSS by using quadruple L-slot technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, Noor Azamiah Md; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abd.; Said, Maizatul Alice Meor; Othman, Mohd Azlishah; Ahmad, Badrul Hisham; Malek, Mohd Fareq Abd

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a new design of dual band frequency selective surface (FSS) for band pass microwave transmission application. FSS can be used on energy saving glass to improve the transmission of wireless communication signals through the glass. The microwave signal will be attenuate when propagate throughout the different structure such as building. Therefore, some of the wireless communication system cannot be used in the optimum performance. The aim of this paper is designed, simulated and analyzed the new dual band FSS structure for microwave transmission. This design is based on a quadruple L slot combined with cross slot to produce pass band at 900 MHz and 2.4 GHz. The vertical of pair inverse L slot is used as the band pass for the frequency of 2.4GHz. While, the horizontal of pair inverse L slot is used as the band pass at frequency 900MHz. This design is simulated and analyzed by using Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio (MWS) software. The characteristics of the transmission (S21) and reflection (S11) of the dual band FSS were simulater and analyzed. The bandwidth of the first band is 118.91MHz which covered the frequency range from 833.4MHz until 952.31MHz. Meanwhile, the bandwidth for the second band is 358.84MHz which covered the frequency range from 2.1475GHz until 2.5063GHz. The resonance/center frequency of this design is obtained at 900MHz with a 26.902dB return loss and 2.37GHz with 28.506dB a return loss. This FSS is suitable as microwave filter for GSM900 and WLAN 2.4GHz application.

  1. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, Jaap J; van Baal, Jeff G; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A

    2013-09-01

    Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the applicability of high-resolution infrared thermal imaging for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease. The plantar foot surfaces of 15 diabetes patients were imaged with an infrared camera (resolution, 1.2 mm/pixel): 5 patients had no visible signs of foot complications, 5 patients had local complications (e.g., abundant callus or neuropathic ulcer), and 5 patients had diffuse complications (e.g., Charcot foot, infected ulcer, or critical ischemia). Foot temperature was calculated as mean temperature across pixels for the whole foot and for specified regions of interest (ROIs). No differences in mean temperature >1.5 °C between the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were found in patients without complications. In patients with local complications, mean temperatures of the ipsilateral and the contralateral foot were similar, but temperature at the ROI was >2 °C higher compared with the corresponding region in the contralateral foot and to the mean of the whole ipsilateral foot. In patients with diffuse complications, mean temperature differences of >3 °C between ipsilateral and contralateral foot were found. With an algorithm based on parameters that can be captured and analyzed with a high-resolution infrared camera and a computer, it is possible to detect signs of diabetic foot disease and to discriminate between no, local, or diffuse diabetic foot complications. As such, an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for noninvasive automated detection of signs of diabetic foot disease is one step closer. Future studies are essential to confirm and extend these promising early findings. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  2. High Selectivity Dual-Band Bandpass Filter with Tunable Lower Passband

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Qiang Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method to design dual-band bandpass filters with tunable lower passband and fixed upper passband. It utilizes a trimode resonator with three controllable resonant modes. Discriminating coupling is used to suppress the unwanted mode to avoid the interference. Varactors are utilized to realize tunable responses. The bandwidth of the two bands can be controlled individually. Transmission zeros are generated near the passband edges, resulting in high selectivity. For demonstration, a tunable bandpass filter is implemented. Good agreement between the prediction and measurement validates the proposed method.

  3. Dual Y-Shaped Monopole Antenna for Dual-Band WLAN/WiMAX Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqing Zhai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual-band design of monopole antenna with two coupled Y-shaped strips for WLAN/WiMAX applications is presented. By the introduction of dual Y-shaped strips, two separated impedance bandwidths of 22.4% (3.28~4.10 GHz and 19.2% (4.90~5.94 GHz can be obtained to meet the specifications of the WLAN/WiMAX communication band applications. The proposed antenna is successfully simulated, designed, and measured, demonstrating the matched impedance and good radiation characteristics with an overall dimension of 17.7×26×1 mm3.

  4. Thermal noise in mid-infrared broadband upconversion detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Ajanta; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Low noise detection with state-of-the-art mid-infrared (MIR) detectors (e.g., PbS, PbSe, InSb, HgCdTe) is a primary challenge owing to the intrinsic thermal background radiation of the low bandgap detector material itself. However, researchers have employed frequency upconversion based detectors...... of the noise-equivalent power of an UCD system. In this article, we rigorously analyze the optical power generated by frequency upconversion of the intrinsic black-body radiation in the nonlinear material itself due to the crystals residual emissivity, i.e. absorption. The thermal radiation is particularly...... prominent at the optical absorption edge of the nonlinear material even at room temperature. We consider a conventional periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) based MIR-UCD for the investigation. The UCD is designed to cover a broad spectral range, overlapping with the entire absorption edge of the PPLN...

  5. Dual Band Planar Inverted F Antenna (PIFA with L-Shape Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khlouf Munzer Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most used antennas in mobile devices is planar inverted F antenna (PIFA. PIFA can be design in dual band frequencies due to the coverage of the wireless service in a mobile device that requires a multiple frequencies. However, the consideration of technical operation has to be combined with an evaluation of the antenna radiation impact on the users. A procedure of PIFA work in GSM (867-960MHz and GSM (1710-1899MHz is done using CST Software. The dual band frequency response is obtained by means of an insertion of an L-shaped slot, which is use to tune the operation frequencies. The prototype of the antenna is fabricated as model by CST Software and evaluated. It is found out that the PIFA antenna has a good efficiency, bandwidth as well as produce a maximum gain for the antenna. A key and innovative research is still underway to broaden performance parameters of the antenna.

  6. Reduced size dual band pass filters for RFID applications with excellent bandpass/bandstop characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, M. A.; Choudhary, D. Kumar; Chaudhary, R. Kumar

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the design of two reduced size dual-band metamaterial bandpass filters and its simulation followed by measurements of proposed filters. These filters are supporting different frequency bands and primarily could be utilize in radio frequency identification (RFID) application. The filter includes three cells in which two are symmetrical and both inductively coupled with the third cell which is present in between them. In the proposed designs, three different metamaterial composite right/left handed (CRLH) cell resonators have been analysed for compactness. The CRLH cell consists of an interdigital capacitor, a stub/meander line/spiral inductor and a via to connect the top of the structure and ground plane. Finally, the proposed dual band bandpass filters (using meander line and spiral inductor) are showing size reduction by 65% and 50% (with 25% operating frequency reduction), respectively, in comparison with reference filter using stub inductor. More than 30 dB attenuation has been achieved between the two passbands.

  7. Dual Band Metamaterial Antenna For LTE/Bluetooth/WiMAX System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Mehedi; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2018-01-19

    A compact metamaterial inspired antenna operate at LTE, Bluetooth and WiMAX frequency band is introduced in this paper. For the lower band, the design utilizes an outer square metallic strip forcing the patch to radiate as an equivalent magnetic-current loop. For the upper band, another magnetic current loop is created by adding metamaterial structure near the feed line on the patch. The metamaterial inspired antenna dimension of 42 × 32 mm 2 compatible to wireless devices. Finite integration technique based CST Microwave Studio simulator has been used to design and numerical investigation as well as lumped circuit model of the metamaterial antenna is explained with proper mathematical derivation. The achieved measured dual band operation of the conventional antenna are sequentially, 0.561~0.578 GHz, 2.346~2.906 GHz, and 2.91~3.49 GHz, whereas the metamaterial inspired antenna shows dual-band operation from 0.60~0.64 GHz, 2.67~3.40 GHz and 3.61~3.67 GHz, respectively. Therefore, the metamaterial antenna is applicable for LTE and WiMAX applications. Besides, the measured metamaterial antenna gains of 0.15~3.81 dBi and 3.47~3.75 dBi, respectively for the frequency band of 2.67~3.40 GHz and 3.61~3.67 GHz.

  8. A New Fractal-Based Miniaturized Dual Band Patch Antenna for RF Energy Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sika Shrestha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of wireless communications in recent years has made it necessary to develop compact, lightweight multiband antennas. Compact antennas can achieve the same performance as large antennas do with low price and with greater system integration. Dual-frequency microstrip antennas for transmission and reception represent promising approach for doubling the system capacity. In this work, a miniaturized dual band antenna operable at 2.45 and 5.8 GHz is constructed by modifying the standard microstrip patch antenna geometry into a fractal structure. In addition to miniaturization and dual band nature, the proposed antenna also removes unwanted harmonics without the use of additional filter component. Using a finite-element-method-based high frequency structure simulator (HFSS, the antenna is designed and its performance in terms of return loss, impedance matching, radiation pattern, and voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR is demonstrated. Simulation results are shown to be in close agreement with performance measurements from an actual antenna fabricated on an FR4 substrate. The proposed antenna can be integrated with a rectifier circuit to develop a compact rectenna that can harvest RF energy in both of these frequency bands at a reduction in size of 25.98% relative to a conventional rectangular patch antenna.

  9. Implementation and investigation of circular slot UWB antenna with dual-band-notched characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DadashZadeh Gholamreza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The design and analysis of an ultra wideband aperture antenna with dual-band-notched characteristics are presented. The proposed antenna consists of a circular ring exciting stub on the front side and a circular slot on the back ground plane. By utilizing a parasitic strip and a T-shaped stub on the antenna structure, two notched bands of 850 MHz (3.5-4.35 GHz and 900 MHz (5.05-5.95 GHz are achieved. The proposed antenna is fabricated and measured. Measured results show that this antenna operates from 2.3 GHz to upper 11 GHz for voltage standing wave ratio less than 2, except two frequency notched bands of 3.5-4.35 and 5.05-5.95 GHz. Moreover, the experimental results show that proposed antenna has stable radiation patterns and constant gain. A conceptual circuit model, which is based on the measured impedance of the proposed antenna, is also shown to investigate the dual-band-notched characteristics.

  10. A Compact CPW-Fed UWB Antenna with Dual Band-Notched Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiting Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact CPW-fed planar UWB antenna with dual band-notched property is presented. The dual band rejection is achieved by etching a C-shaped slot on the radiation patch and two L-shaped parasitic strips in the ground plane. The experimental and measured results show that the proposed antenna exhibits an impedance bandwidth over an ultrawideband frequency range from 2.4 to 12.5 GHz with VSWR less than 2, except for two stopbands at 3.3 to 3.75 GHz and 5.07 to 5.83 GHz for filtering the WiMAX and WLAN signals, respectively. It also demonstrates a nearly omnidirectional radiation pattern. The fabricated antenna has a tiny size, only 32 mm × 32 mm × 0.508 mm. The simulated results are compared with the measured performance and show good agreement. The simple structure, compact size, and good characteristics make the proposed antenna an excellent candidate for UWB applications.

  11. Hybrid method to predict the resonant frequencies and to characterise dual band proximity coupled microstrip antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Ruchi; Ghosh, Jayanta

    2018-06-01

    A new hybrid technique, which is a combination of neural network (NN) and support vector machine, is proposed for designing of different slotted dual band proximity coupled microstrip antennas. Slots on the patch are employed to produce the second resonance along with size reduction. The proposed hybrid model provides flexibility to design the dual band antennas in the frequency range from 1 to 6 GHz. This includes DCS (1.71-1.88 GHz), PCS (1.88-1.99 GHz), UMTS (1.92-2.17 GHz), LTE2300 (2.3-2.4 GHz), Bluetooth (2.4-2.485 GHz), WiMAX (3.3-3.7 GHz), and WLAN (5.15-5.35 GHz, 5.725-5.825 GHz) bands applications. Also, the comparative study of this proposed technique is done with the existing methods like knowledge based NN and support vector machine. The proposed method is found to be more accurate in terms of % error and root mean square % error and the results are in good accord with the measured values.

  12. A Codesigned Compact Dual-Band Filtering Antenna with PIN Loaded for WLAN Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanxiong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A codesigned compact dual-band filtering antenna incorporating a PIN diode for 2.45/5.2 GHz wireless local area network (WLAN applications is proposed in this paper. The integrated filtering antenna system consists of a simple monopole radiator, a microstrip dual-band band-pass filter, and a PIN diode. The performance of the filtering antenna is notably promoted by optimizing the impedance between the antenna and the band-pass filter, with good selectivity and out-of-band rejection. The design process follows the approach of the synthesis of band-pass filter. In addition, the PIN diode is incorporated in the filtering antenna for further size reduction, which also widens the coverage of the bandwidth by about 230% for 2.4 GHz WLAN. With the presence of small size and good filtering performances, the proposed filtering antenna is a good candidate for the wireless communication systems. Prototypes of the proposed filtering antenna incorporating a PIN diode are fabricated and measured. The measured results including return losses and radiation patterns are presented.

  13. Wide frequency independently controlled dual-band inkjet-printed antenna

    KAUST Repository

    AbuTarboush, Hattan F.

    2014-01-08

    A low-cost inkjet-printed multiband monopole antenna is presented. The unique advantage of the proposed antenna is the freedom to adjust and set the dual-band of the antenna independently over a wide range (148.83%). To demonstrate the independent control feature, the 2.4 and 3.4 GHz bands for the wireless local area network (WLAN) and worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) applications are selected as an example. The measured impedance bandwidths for the 2.4 and 3.4 GHz are 15.2 and 23.7%, respectively. These dual-bands have the ability to be controlled independently between 1.1 and 7.5 GHz without affecting the other band. In addition, the proposed antenna can be assigned for different mobile and wireless applications such as GPS, PCS, GSM 1800, 1900, UMTS, and up to 5-GHz WLAN and WiMAX applications. The mechanism of independent control of each radiator through dimensional variation is discussed in detail. The antenna has a compact size of 10 × 37.3 × 0.44 mm3, leaving enough space for the driving electronics on the paper substrate. The measured results from the prototype are in good agreement with the simulated results. Owing to inkjet printing on an ordinary paper, the design is extremely light weight and highly suitable for low cost and large volume manufacturing. © The Institution of Engineering and Technology 2013.

  14. Monitoring Thermal Pollution in Rivers Downstream of Dams with Landsat ETM+ Thermal Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ling

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dams play a significant role in altering the spatial pattern of temperature in rivers and contribute to thermal pollution, which greatly affects the river aquatic ecosystems. Understanding the temporal and spatial variation of thermal pollution caused by dams is important to prevent or mitigate its harmful effect. Assessments based on in-situ measurements are often limited in practice because of the inaccessibility of water temperature records and the scarcity of gauges along rivers. By contrast, thermal infrared remote sensing provides an alternative approach to monitor thermal pollution downstream of dams in large rivers, because it can cover a large area and observe the same zone repeatedly. In this study, Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ thermal infrared imagery were applied to assess the thermal pollution caused by two dams, the Geheyan Dam and the Gaobazhou Dam, located on the Qingjiang River, a tributary of the Yangtze River downstream of the Three Gorges Reservoir in Central China. The spatial and temporal characteristics of thermal pollution were analyzed with water temperatures estimated from 54 cloud-free Landsat ETM+ scenes acquired in the period from 2000 to 2014. The results show that water temperatures downstream of both dams are much cooler than those upstream of both dams in summer, and the water temperature remains stable along the river in winter, showing evident characteristic of the thermal pollution caused by dams. The area affected by the Geheyan Dam reaches beyond 20 km along the downstream river, and that affected by the Gaobazhou Dam extends beyond the point where the Qingjiang River enters the Yangtze River. Considering the long time series and global coverage of Landsat ETM+ imagery, the proposed technique in the current study provides a promising method for globally monitoring the thermal pollution caused by dams in large rivers.

  15. A Novel Dual-Band Rectenna for Ambient RF Energy Harvesting at GSM 900 MHz and 1800 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh Khanh Ho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel dual-band rectenna for RF energy harvesting system. This rectenna is created from a dual-band antenna and a dual-band rectifier which operates at GSM bands (900 MHz and 1800 MHz. The printed monopole antenna is miniaturized by two meander-lines. The received signal from the receiving antenna is rectified by a voltage double using Schottky diode SMS-7630. The rectifier is optimized for low input power level of -20dBm using harmonic balance. Prototype is designed and fabricated. The simulation is validated by measurement with power conversion efficiency of 20% and 40.8% (in measurement at the input power level of -20dBm. The proposed rectenna has output voltage from 183-415 mV. From the measured results, this rectenna provides the possibility to harvest the ambient electromagnetic energy for powering low-power electronic devices.

  16. Detecting Plastic PFM-1 Butterfly Mines Using Thermal Infrared Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, J.; de Smet, T.; Nikulin, A.

    2017-12-01

    Remnant plastic-composite landmines, such as the mass-produced PFM-1, represent an ongoing humanitarian threat aggravated by high costs associated with traditional demining efforts. These particular unexploded ordnance (UXO) devices pose a challenge to conventional geophysical detection methods, due their plastic-body design and small size. Additionally, the PFM-1s represent a particularly heinous UXO, due to their low mass ( 25 lb) trigger limit and "butterfly" wing design, earning them the reputation of a "toy mine" - disproportionally impacting children across post-conflict areas. We developed a detection algorithm based on data acquired by a thermal infrared camera mounted to a commercial UAV to detect time-variable temperature difference between the PFM-1 and the surrounding environment. We present results of a field study focused on thermal detection and identification of the PFM-1 anti-personnel landmines from a remotely operated unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). We conducted a series of field detection experiments meant to simulate the mountainous terrains where PFM-1 mines were historically deployed and remain in place. In our tests, 18 inert PFM-1 mines along with the aluminum KSF-1 casing were randomly dispersed to mimic an ellipsoidal minefield of 8-10 x 18-20 m dimensions in a de-vegetated rubble yard at Chenango Valley State Park (New York State). We collected multiple thermal infrared imagery datasets focused on these model minefields with the FLIR Vue Pro R attached to the 3DR Solo UAV flying at approximately at 2 m. We identified different environmental variables to constrain the optimal time of day and daily temperature variations to reveal presence of these plastic UXOs. We show that in the early-morning hours when thermal inertia is greatest, the PFM-1 mines can be detected based on their differential thermal inertia. Because the mines have statistically different temperatures than background and a characteristic shape, we were able to train a

  17. PHyTIR - A Prototype Thermal Infrared Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Hook, Simon J.; Johnson, William R.; Foote, Marc C.; Paine, Christopher G.; Pannell, Zack W.; Smythe, Robert F.; Kuan, Gary M.; Jakoboski, Julie K.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the PHyTIR (Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer) instrument, which is the engineering model for the proposed HyspIRI (Hyperspectral Infrared Imager) earth observing instrument. The HyspIRI mission would be comprised of the HyspIRI TIR (Thermal Infrared Imager), and a VSWIR (Visible Short-Wave Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer). Both instruments would be used to address key science questions related to the earth's carbon cycle, ecosystems, climate, and solid earth properties. Data gathering of volcanic activities, earthquakes, wildfires, water use and availability, urbanization, and land surface compositions and changes, would aid the predictions and evaluations of such events and the impact they create. Even though the proposed technology for the HyspIRI imager is mature, the PHyTIR prototype is needed to advance the technology levels for several of the instrument's key components, and to reduce risks, in particular to validate 1) the higher sensitivity, spatial resolution, and higher throughput required for this focal plane array, 2) the pointing accuracy, 2) the characteristics of several spectral channels, and 4) the use of ambient temperature optics. The PHyTIR telescope consists of the focal plane assembly that is housed within a cold housing located inside a vacuum enclosure; all mounted to a bulkhead, and an optical train that consists of 3 powered mirrors; extending to both sides of the bulkhead. A yoke connects the telescope to a scan mirror. The rotating mirror enables to scan- a large track on the ground. This structure is supported by kinematic mounts, linking the telescope assembly to a base plate that would also become the spacecraft interface for HyspIRI. The focal plane's cooling units are also mounted to the base plate, as is an overall enclosure that has two viewing ports with large exterior baffles, shielding the focal plane from incoming stray light. PHyTIR's electronics is distributed inside and near the vacuum

  18. Looking Forward - A Next Generation of Thermal Infrared Planetary Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P. R.; Hamilton, V. E.; Edwards, C. S.; Spencer, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal infrared measurements have provided important information about the physical properties of planetary surfaces beginning with the initial Mariner spacecraft in the early 1960's. These infrared measurements will continue into the future with a series of instruments that are now on their way or in development that will explore a suite of asteroids, Europa, and Mars. These instruments are being developed at Arizona State University, and are next-generation versions of the TES, Mini-TES, and THEMIS infrared spectrometers and imagers. The OTES instrument on OSIRIS-REx, which was launched in Sept. 2016, will map the surface of the asteroid Bennu down to a resolution of 40 m/pixel at seven times of day. This multiple time of day coverage will be used to produce global thermal inertia maps that will be used to determine the particle size distribution, which will in turn help select a safe and appropriate sample site. The EMIRS instrument, which is being built in partnership with the UAE's MBRSC for the Emirates Mars Mission, will measure martian surface temperatures at 200-300 km/pixel scales at over the full diurnal cycle - the first time the full diurnal temperature cycle has been observed since the Viking mission. The E-THEMIS instrument on the Europa Clipper mission will provide global mapping at 5-10 km/pixel scale at multiple times of day, and local observations down to resolutions of 50 m/pixel. These measurements will have a precision of 0.2 K for a 90 K scene, and will be used to map the thermal inertia and block abundances across Europa and to identify areas of localized endogenic heat. These observations will be used to investigate the physical processes of surface formation and evolution and to help select the landing site of a future Europa lander. Finally, the LTES instrument on the Lucy mission will measure temperatures on the day and night sides of the target Trojan asteroids, again providing insights into their surface properties and evolution

  19. Laboratory Thermal Infrared and Visible to Near-Infrared Spectral Analysis of Chert

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, M. L.; Hamilton, V. E.

    2007-12-01

    Though basaltic materials dominate the composition of the Martian surface, a material with a relatively high silica component in an area of Eos Chasma was reported by [1] from thermal infrared (TIR) data. The spectrum of the silica phase resembles quartz or chert, but with the existing information it is difficult to tell which phase best fits the observations. Though quartz, chert, and amorphous silica are chemically identical (SiO2), their physical differences (e.g., microstructures) result in different TIR spectral characteristics. Previous studies have analyzed a limited number of chert samples using emission infrared spectroscopy [2] and transmission infrared spectroscopy [3]. We continue these preliminary studies with an investigation aiming to more completely understand and document the variation in spectral character of cherts. This knowledge may help to identify the silica phase in Eos Chasma and any future discoveries. Our study includes a more extensive sampling of geologic chert in hand sample (>15 samples) with various sources, methods of formation, surface textures, and crystallinities. We analyzed their visible to near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectra, as well as spectral features in TIR emission spectra. We measured multiple locations on each sample to determine spectral homogeneity across the sample and between various orientations. Where possible, natural, cut, and recently fractured surfaces were measured. We compared the collected TIR spectra for similarities and differences in shape and spectral contrast within each sample and between samples that may relate to variations in the samples' structure (e.g. crystallinity, and surface texture). VNIR measurements show features indicative of non-silica phases and water that may be present in the cherts. [1] Hamilton, V.E. (2005) Eos Trans. AGU, Fall Meeting Suppl., Abstract P24A-08. [2] Michalski, J.R. (2005) PhD Diss., ASU, Tempe. [3] Long, D. G. et al. (2001) Canadian Archaeological Assoc., 33rd

  20. Groundwater discharge mapping at Altnabreac by thermal infrared linescan surveying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brereton, N.R.; Hall, D.H.

    1983-07-01

    A thermal infra-red linescan survey has been carried out of the area around Altnabreac, Caithness. The objectives of the survey were: to assess the applicability of the technique to the location of springs discharging from peat covered crystalline rocks; to provide the locations of springs for a subsequent geochemical sampling programme; and to gain clearer understanding of the ground water circulation patterns in the area. The number and distribution of springs located by the survey has proved to be far greater than had been previously anticipated and the capabilities of the technique have been clearly demonstrated. The results, together with other geochemical and hydrogeological data, indicate that the majority of the springs represent near surface recent groundwaters circulating within the moraine deposits and weathered granite. (author)

  1. Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balick, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillespie, Alan [UN. WASHINGTON; French, Andrew [USDA-ARS; Danilina, Iryna [UN. WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

  2. Reflective all-sky thermal infrared cloud imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Brian J; Shaw, Joseph A; Nugent, Paul W; Clark, R Trevor; Piazzolla, Sabino

    2018-04-30

    A reflective all-sky imaging system has been built using a long-wave infrared microbolometer camera and a reflective metal sphere. This compact system was developed for measuring spatial and temporal patterns of clouds and their optical depth in support of applications including Earth-space optical communications. The camera is mounted to the side of the reflective sphere to leave the zenith sky unobstructed. The resulting geometric distortion is removed through an angular map derived from a combination of checkerboard-target imaging, geometric ray tracing, and sun-location-based alignment. A tape of high-emissivity material on the side of the reflector acts as a reference that is used to estimate and remove thermal emission from the metal sphere. Once a bias that is under continuing study was removed, sky radiance measurements from the all-sky imager in the 8-14 μm wavelength range agreed to within 0.91 W/(m 2 sr) of measurements from a previously calibrated, lens-based infrared cloud imager over its 110° field of view.

  3. Dual-Band Compact Planar Antenna for a Low-Cost WLAN USB Dongle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Henrique Costa Dias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the present technologies for WLAN devices, USB dongles still play a noticeable role. One major design challenge regards the antenna, which unavoidably has to comply with a very small volume available and sometimes should also allow multiband operation. In this scope, the present work discusses a dual-band WiFi compact planar IFA-based antenna design for a low-cost USB dongle application. Like most of the related published solutions, the methodology for deriving the present proposition was assisted by the use of an antenna analysis software. A prototype was assembled and tested in order to qualify the radiator design. Practical operation conditions were considered in the tests, such as the influence of the dongle case and the effect of the notebook itself. The results complied with the design constraints, presenting an impedance match quite stable regardless of the stick position alongside a laptop base.

  4. A Multibeam Dual-Band Orthogonal Linearly Polarized Antenna Array for Satellite Communication on the Move

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and simulation of a 10 × 8 multibeam dual-band orthogonal linearly polarized antenna array operating at Ku-band are presented for transmit-receive applications. By using patches with different coupling methods as elements, both perpendicular polarization in 12.25–12.75 GHz band and horizontal polarization in 14.0–14.5 GHz band are realized in a shared antenna aperture. A microstrip Rotman lens is employed as the beamforming network with 7 input ports, which can generate a corresponding number of beams to cover −30°–30° with 5 dB beamwidth along one dimension. This type of multibeam orthogonal linearly polarized planar antenna is a good candidate for satellite communication (SatCom.

  5. A Double Inverted F-Shape Patch Antenna for Dual-Band Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Islam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A double inverted F-shape patch antenna is presented for dual-band operation. The proposed antenna is comprised of circular and rectangular slots on a printed circuit board of 40 mm × 40 mm × 1.6 mm with a 50 Ω microstrip transmission line. Commercially available high frequency structural simulator (HFSS based on the finite element method (FEM has been adopted in this investigation. It has a measured impedance bandwidths (2 : 1 VSWR of 18.53% on the lower band and 7.8% on the upper band, respectively. It has achieved stable radiation efficiencies of 79.76% and 80.36% with average gains of 7.82 dBi and 5.66 dBi in the operating frequency bands. Moreover, numerical simulations have been indicated as an important uniformity with measured results.

  6. Dual Band Parasitic Element Patch Antenna for LTE/WLAN Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAG Biplab

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a single layer coaxial fed dual band slotted microstrip antenna is proposed. The proposed antenna consists of two direct couple parasitic elements and L-shape slots on the main resonating element. Two resonant modes are excited and it covers 4G LTE and WLAN middle band. The -10dB impedance bandwidth for resonant frequency of 2.35GHz and 5.28GHz are 140MHz (2.25-2.39GHz and 570MHz (5.18-5.75GHz, respectively. The measured VSWR at 2.35GHz is 1.27 and at 5.28GHz is 1.41. The proposed antenna is simple in design and compact in size. The simulated and measured results are in good agreement.

  7. Dual Band Magnonic Crystals: Model System and Basic Spin Wave Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Montoncello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a special design of two-dimensional magnonic crystal, consisting of two superimposed lattices with different lattice constants, such that spin waves (SWs can propagate either in one or the other sublattice, depending on which of the two frequency bands they belong to. The SW bands are separated by a very large bandgap (in our model system, 6 GHz, easily tunable by changing the direction of an applied magnetic field, and the overlap of their spatial distribution, for any frequency of their bands, is always negligible. These properties make the designed system an ideal test system for a magnonic dual band waveguide, where the simultaneous excitation and subsequent propagation of two independent SW signals are allowed, with no mutual interference.

  8. Compact Dual-Band Dipole Antenna with Asymmetric Arms for WLAN Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiu Chiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual-band dipole antenna that consists of a horn- and a C-shaped metallic arm is presented. Depending on the asymmetric arms, the antenna provides two −10 dB impedance bandwidths of 225 MHz (about 9.2% at 2.45 GHz and 1190 MHz (about 21.6% at 5.5 GHz, respectively. This feature enables it to cover the required bandwidths for wireless local area network (WLAN operation at the 2.4 GHz band and 5.2/5.8 GHz bands for IEEE 802.11 a/b/g standards. More importantly, the compact size (7 mm × 24 mm and good radiating performance of the antenna are profitable to be integrated with wireless communication devices on restricted RF-elements spaces.

  9. Design and experimental verification of a dual-band metamaterial filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Yang; Yao, Ai-Qin; Zhong, Min

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present the design, simulation, and experimental verification of a dual-band free-standing metamaterial filter operating in a frequency range of 1 THz-30 THz. The proposed structure consists of periodically arranged composite air holes, and exhibits two broad and flat transmission bands. To clarify the effects of the structural parameters on both resonant transmission bands, three sets of experiments are performed. The first resonant transmission band shows a shift towards higher frequency when the side width w 1 of the main air hole is increased. In contrast, the second resonant transmission band displays a shift towards lower frequency when the side width w 2 of the sub-holes is increased, while the first resonant transmission band is unchanged. The measured results indicate that these resonant bands can be modulated individually by simply optimizing the relevant structural parameters (w 1 or w 2) for the required band. In addition, these resonant bands merge into a single resonant band with a bandwidth of 7.7 THz when w 1 and w 2 are optimized simultaneously. The structure proposed in this paper adopts different resonant mechanisms for transmission at different frequencies and thus offers a method to achieve a dual-band and low-loss filter. Project supported by the Doctorate Scientific Research Foundation of Hezhou University, China (Grant No. HZUBS201503), the Promotion of the Basic Ability of Young and Middle-aged Teachers in Universities Project of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. KY2016YB453), the Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory Symbolic Computation, China, Engineering Data Processing and Mathematical Support Autonomous Discipline Project of Hezhou University, China (Grant No. 2016HZXYSX01).

  10. Differential contrast of gold nanorods in dual-band OCT using spectral multiplexing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Rawashdeh, Wa’el [RWTH Aachen University, Experimental Molecular Imaging (Germany); Weyand, Thomas [DWI - Leibniz-Institute for Interactive Materials e.V. at RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Kray, Stefan; Lenz, Markus [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Semiconductor Electronics (Germany); Buchkremer, Anne [RWTH Aachen University, Institut für Anorganische Chemie (Germany); Spöler, Felix [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Semiconductor Electronics (Germany); Simon, Ulrich [RWTH Aachen University, Institut für Anorganische Chemie (Germany); Möller, Martin [DWI - Leibniz-Institute for Interactive Materials e.V. at RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Kiessling, Fabian; Lederle, Wiltrud, E-mail: wlederle@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Experimental Molecular Imaging (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    In optical coherence tomography (OCT), differential contrast can be generated by resonant nanoparticles using spectral multiplexing. Differential contrast can be of interest for medical applications for improving detection specificity of structures with low endogenous contrast. Differential contrast has been shown using OCT systems with one bandwidth; however, this requires post-processing that is time consuming and reduces image resolution. In this study, we used a dual-band OCT prototype system with two far separated bandwidths in the clinically relevant optical window, and in search for the optimal differential contrast-generating particles for this prototype system, three different gold nanorods (AuNR) samples were investigated. The samples with different particle volume, aspect ratio, and absorption-maximum were imaged in a highly scattering phantom and on chicken muscle. In vitro, differential contrast was observed for the nanorods large (NRL) sample having the absorption-maximum within one bandwidth of the OCT and an average length of 75 nm. For the smaller AuNR (48 nm length) with comparable absorption-maximum, the obtained signal intensities were too low for being visible, although differences in signal intensities between both bandwidths could be measured. NRL optimal concentration for differential contrast using this prototype system is between 100 and 500 µg Au/mL (0.51–2.54 mM). These results demonstrate the potential of real-time imaging of differential contrast in dual-band OCT and motivate in vivo application of plasmon resonant AuNR in order to improve the detection sensitivity for structures that are difficult to identify by OCT such as small blood vessels.

  11. A DUAL-BAND MILLIMETER-WAVE KINETIC INDUCTANCE CAMERA FOR THE IRAM 30 m TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Bideaud, A.; Swenson, L.; Cruciani, A.; Camus, P.; Hoffmann, C.; Desert, F. X.; Doyle, S.; Ade, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Tucker, C.; Roesch, M.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F.; Endo, A.; Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C

    2011-01-01

    The Neel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) is a fully integrated measurement system based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) currently being developed for millimeter wave astronomy. The instrument includes dual-band optics allowing simultaneous imaging at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The imaging sensors consist of two spatially separated arrays of KIDs. The first array, mounted on the 150 GHz branch, is composed of 144 lumped-element KIDs. The second array (220 GHz) consists of 256 antenna-coupled KIDs. Each of the arrays is sensitive to a single polarization; the band splitting is achieved by using a grid polarizer. The optics and sensors are mounted in a custom dilution cryostat, with an operating temperature of ∼70 mK. Electronic readout is realized using frequency multiplexing and a transmission line geometry consisting of a coaxial cable connected in series with the sensor array and a low-noise 4 K amplifier. The dual-band NIKA was successfully tested in 2010 October at the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy (IRAM) 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, Spain, performing in-line with laboratory predictions. An optical NEP was then calculated to be around 2 x 10 -16 W Hz -1/2 (at 1 Hz) while under a background loading of approximately 4 pW pixel -1 . This improvement in comparison with a preliminary run (2009) verifies that NIKA is approaching the target sensitivity for photon-noise limited ground-based detectors. Taking advantage of the larger arrays and increased sensitivity, a number of scientifically relevant faint and extended objects were then imaged including the Galactic Center SgrB2 (FIR1), the radio galaxy Cygnus A, and the NGC1068 Seyfert galaxy. These targets were all observed simultaneously in the 150 GHz and 220 GHz atmospheric windows.

  12. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  13. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry of flowable enclosed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1993-03-02

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a flowable material enclosed in a transport system having an infrared transparent wall portion. A temperature differential is transiently generated between a thin surface layer portion of the material and a lower or deeper portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material, and the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is detected through the infrared transparent portion of the transport system while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower or deeper portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. By such detection, the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the material.

  14. Thermal interpretation of infrared dynamics in de Sitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigopoulos, Gerasimos, E-mail: gerasimos.rigopoulos@ncl.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, Herschel Building, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU U.K. (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    The infrared dynamics of a light, minimally coupled scalar field in de Sitter spacetime with Ricci curvature R = 12 H {sup 2}, averaged over horizon sized regions of physical volume V {sub H} = (4π/3)(1/ H ){sup 3}, can be interpreted as Brownian motion in a medium with de Sitter temperature T {sub DS} = h-bar H /2π. We demonstrate this by directly deriving the effective action of scalar field fluctuations with wavelengths larger than the de Sitter curvature radius and generalizing Starobinsky's seminal results on stochastic inflation. The effective action describes stochastic dynamics and the fluctuating force drives the field to an equilibrium characterized by a thermal Gibbs distribution at temperature T {sub DS} which corresponds to a de Sitter invariant state. Hence, approach towards this state can be interpreted as thermalization. We show that the stochastic kinetic energy of the coarse-grained description corresponds to the norm of ∂{sub μ}φ and takes a well defined value per horizon volume ½((∇φ){sup 2}) = − ½ T {sub DS}/ V {sub H} . This approach allows for the non-perturbative computation of the de Sitter invariant stress energy tensor ( T {sub μν}) for an arbitrary scalar potential.

  15. Thermal comfort of seats as visualized by infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Rosemary Bom Conselho; Pereira, Romeu Rodrigues; Aguilar, Maria Teresa Paulino; Cardoso, Antônio Valadão

    2017-07-01

    Published studies that deal with the question of how the temperature of chair seats influences human activities are few, but the studies considering such a factor, a function of the type of material, could contribute to improvements in the design of chairs. This study evaluates seat temperatures of 8 types of chairs made of different materials. The parts of the furniture that people come into contact with, and the thermal response of the material to heating and cooling have been evaluated. Infrared thermography was used for this, as it is a non-contact technique that does not present any type of risk in the measurement of temperatures. Seats made of synthetic leather (leatherette), wood and polyester fabric were found to have the highest temperatures, and the plywood seat showed the lowest. The study has also revealed that thermography can contribute to studies of thermal comfort of chair seats in addition to determining the most suitable material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural parameter based modification of energy conscious ESPAR antenna system through optimization for WLAN’s dual-band operability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bembe, MJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available single device. In this study the focus is on the modification of the antenna designs for dual-band functionality which is limited on the ESPAR antenna’s structural parameter. This modification should result in an antenna system which operates in both 2...

  17. Thermal Intertias of Main-Belt Asteroids from Wise Thermal Infrared Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Josef; Delbo', Marco; Durech, Josef; Alí-Lagoa, Victor

    2014-11-01

    By means of a modified thermophysical model (TPM) that takes into account asteroid shape and pole uncertainties, we analyze the thermal infrared data acquired by the NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) of about 300 asteroids with derived convex shape models. We adopt convex shape models from the DAMIT database (Durech et al., 2010, A&A 513, A46) and present new determinations based on optical disk-integrated photometry and the lightcurve inversion method (Kaasalainen & Torppa, 2001, Icarus 153, 37). This work more than double the number of asteroids with determined thermophysical properties. We also discuss cases in which shape uncertainties prevent the determination of reliable thermophysical properties. This is per-se a novel result, as the effect of shape has been often neglected in thermophysical modeling of asteroids.We also present the main results of the statistical study of derived thermophysical parameters within the whole population of MBAs and within few asteroid families. The thermal inertia increases with decreasing size, but a large range of thermal inertia values is observed within the similar size ranges between 10-100 km. Surprisingly, we derive low (10 km, indicating a very fine and mature regolith on these small bodies. The work of JH and MD was carried under the contract 11-BS56-008 (SHOCKS) of the French Agence National de la Recherche (ANR), and JD has been supported by the grant GACR P209/10/0537 of the Czech Science Foundation.

  18. Provisional maps of thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park, based on satellite thermal infrared imaging and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Heasler, Henry; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Maps that define the current distribution of geothermally heated ground are useful toward setting a baseline for thermal activity to better detect and understand future anomalous hydrothermal and (or) volcanic activity. Monitoring changes in the dynamic thermal areas also supports decisions regarding the development of Yellowstone National Park infrastructure, preservation and protection of park resources, and ensuring visitor safety. Because of the challenges associated with field-based monitoring of a large, complex geothermal system that is spread out over a large and remote area, satellite-based thermal infrared images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) were used to map the location and spatial extent of active thermal areas, to generate thermal anomaly maps, and to quantify the radiative component of the total geothermal heat flux. ASTER thermal infrared data acquired during winter nights were used to minimize the contribution of solar heating of the surface. The ASTER thermal infrared mapping results were compared to maps of thermal areas based on field investigations and high-resolution aerial photos. Field validation of the ASTER thermal mapping is an ongoing task. The purpose of this report is to make available ASTER-based maps of Yellowstone’s thermal areas. We include an appendix containing the names and characteristics of Yellowstone’s thermal areas, georeferenced TIFF files containing ASTER thermal imagery, and several spatial data sets in Esri shapefile format.

  19. Formation and Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Halite Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, A. M.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    Efflorescent salt crusts form as groundwater evaporates from capillary updraw of brine through sediment. Salts precipitate at the surface, coating and cementing the upper few layers of sediment. If enough brine is present to completely saturate and pond on top of the surface, halite will precipitate at the surface of the brine and settle out as layers of crystalline salt on top of the sediment. In playa environments, salts such as sulfates, carbonates and halides, and forms such crusts. In remote sensing studies of such surfaces, it is important to understand how the presence of salt crusts affects the spectral features of the surrounding sediment. This is especially true when the crusts form from a non-absorbing salt such as halite. Halite has been observed to exhibit unusual spectral properties in the thermal infrared. Specifically, granular mixtures of minerals with halite produced spectra in which the spectral features inverted form reflectivity, shifted to shorter wavelengths and the spectral contrast increased near absorption bands. However, in crusted surfaces, in which the halite cements, coats or overlays the mineral grains, the presence of halite has a different affect on the spectra. This work will examine the precipitation of halite and the formation of salt crusts for several sediment and brine mixtures. Laboratory measurements of thermal emission spectra for the crusts will be compared to previous studies for particulate mixtures of halite with minerals and well as to natural surface crusts. Detailed knowledge of such surfaces will allow for their discrimination and identification in terrestrial playa settings as well as in paleo-environments on Mars.

  20. Thermal consequences of colour and near-infrared reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart-Fox, Devi; Newton, Elizabeth; Clusella-Trullas, Susana

    2017-07-05

    The importance of colour for temperature regulation in animals remains controversial. Colour can affect an animal's temperature because all else being equal, dark surfaces absorb more solar energy than do light surfaces, and that energy is converted into heat. However, in reality, the relationship between colour and thermoregulation is complex and varied because it depends on environmental conditions and the physical properties, behaviour and physiology of the animal. Furthermore, the thermal effects of colour depend as much on absorptance of near-infrared ((NIR), 700-2500 nm) as visible (300-700 nm) wavelengths of direct sunlight; yet the NIR is very rarely considered or measured. The few available data on NIR reflectance in animals indicate that the visible reflectance is often a poor predictor of NIR reflectance. Adaptive variation in animal coloration (visible reflectance) reflects a compromise between multiple competing functions such as camouflage, signalling and thermoregulation. By contrast, adaptive variation in NIR reflectance should primarily reflect thermoregulatory requirements because animal visual systems are generally insensitive to NIR wavelengths. Here, we assess evidence and identify key research questions regarding the thermoregulatory function of animal coloration, and specifically consider evidence for adaptive variation in NIR reflectance.This article is part of the themed issue 'Animal coloration: production, perception, function and application'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. A Thermal Infrared Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Yan, Michael M.-H.; Cote, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This technical memorandum documents the longwave radiation parameterization developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for a wide variety of weather and climate applications. Based on the 1996-version of the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory HITRAN data, the parameterization includes the absorption due to major gaseous absorption (water vapor, CO2, O3) and most of the minor trace gases (N2O, CH4, CFCs), as well as clouds and aerosols. The thermal infrared spectrum is divided into nine bands. To achieve a high degree of accuracy and speed, various approaches of computing the transmission function are applied to different spectral bands and gases. The gaseous transmission function is computed either using the k-distribution method or the table look-up method. To include the effect of scattering due to clouds and aerosols, the optical thickness is scaled by the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor. The parameterization can accurately compute fluxes to within 1% of the high spectral-resolution line-by-line calculations. The cooling rate can be accurately computed in the region extending from the surface to the 0.01-hPa level.

  2. Spectral characterization of surface emissivities in the thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclòs, Raquel; Mira, Maria; Valor, Enric; Caselles, Diego; García-Santos, Vicente; Caselles, Vicente; Sánchez, Juan M.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing trends to hyperspectral sensors on board satellites in the last decades, e.g., the current EOS-MODIS and EOS-ASTER and future missions like HyspIRI, ECOSTRESS, THIRSTY and MISTIGRI. This study aims to characterize spectrally the emissive properties of several surfaces, mostly soils. A spectrometer ranging from 2 to 16 μm, D&P Model 102, has been used to measure samples with singular spectral features, e.g. a sandy soil rich in gypsum sampled in White Sands (New Mexico, USA), salt samples, powdered quartz, and powdered calcite. These samples were chosen for their role in the assessment of thermal emissivity of soils, e.g., the calcite and quartz contents are key variables for modeling TIR emissivities of bare soils, along with soil moisture and organic matter. Additionally, the existence of large areas in the world with abundance of these materials, some of them used for calibration/validation activities of satellite sensors and products, makes the chosen samples interesting. White Sands is the world's largest gypsum dune field encompassing 400 km^2; the salt samples characterize the Salar of Uyuni (Bolivia), the largest salt flat in the world (up to 10,000 km^2), as well as the Jordanian and Israeli salt evaporation ponds at the south end of the Dead Sea, or the evaporation lagoons in Aigües-Mortes (France); and quartz is omnipresent in most of the arid regions of the world such as the Algodones Dunes or Kelso Dunes (California, USA), with areas around 700 km2 and 120 km^2, respectively. Measurements of target leaving radiance, hemispherical radiance reflected by a diffuse reflectance panel, and the radiance from a black body at different temperatures were taken to obtain thermal spectra with the D&P spectrometer. The good consistency observed between our measurements and laboratory spectra of similar samples (ASTER and MODIS spectral libraries) indicated the validity of the measurement protocol. Further, our study showed the

  3. Highly miniaturised semi-loop meandered dual-band MIMO antenna system

    KAUST Repository

    Jehangir, Syed S.; Sharawi, Mohammad S.; Shamim, Atif

    2017-01-01

    A novel dual-band two-element directional multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) antenna system is presented with 68% miniaturisation, which is achieved using a semi-loop meandered driven element and a small ground plane. The centre frequency of operation is 2 GHz. The antenna system covers two bands: the telemetry L-band 1.27-1.43 GHz and the global system for mobile communications/long-term evolution band 1.8-2.133 GHz. The simulation and measurement results are in good agreement. The proposed antenna system mimics the quasi-Yagi antenna configuration with a measured front-to-back ratio of around 15 dB at 1.35 GHz and 17 dB at 2 GHz, which is achieved without using a large ground plane, extra metallic structures, multiple reflector elements, or any complex technique. A gain of more than 5 dBi is measured for the single element with a total radiation efficiency of around 85% in both bands. The measured isolation of the proposed MIMO antenna is more than 15 dB with < 0.0785 measured envelope correlation coefficient values in both bands.

  4. A Dual Band Frequency Reconfigurable Origami Magic Cube Antenna for Wireless Sensor Network Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Imran Hussain; Lim, Sungjoon

    2017-11-20

    In this paper, a novel dual band frequency reconfigurable antenna using an origami magic cube is proposed for wireless sensor network (WSN) applications. The proposed origami antenna consists of a meandered monopole folded onto three sides of the magic cube. A microstrip open-ended stub is loaded on the meandered monopole. The proposed origami magic cube can be mechanically folded and unfolded. The proposed antenna operates at 1.57 GHZ and 2.4 GHz in the folded state. In the unfolded state, the proposed antenna operates at 900 MHz and 2.3 GHz. The resonant frequency of the second band can be tunable by varying the length and position of the open stub. The origami magic cube is built on paper. Its performance is numerically and experimentally demonstrated from S-parameters and radiation patterns. The measured 10 dB impedance bandwidth of the proposed origami antenna is 18% (900-1120 MHz) and 15% (2.1-2.45 GHz) for the unfolded state and 20% (1.3-1.6 GHz) and 14% (2.3-2.5 GHz) for the folded state. The measured peak gain at 900 MHz and 2.3 GHz are 1.1 dBi and 2.32 dBi, respectively, in the unfolded state. The measured peak gain at 1.5 GHz and 2.4 GHz are 3.28 dBi and 1.98 dBi, respectively, in the folded state.

  5. Highly miniaturised semi-loop meandered dual-band MIMO antenna system

    KAUST Repository

    Jehangir, Syed S.

    2017-12-05

    A novel dual-band two-element directional multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) antenna system is presented with 68% miniaturisation, which is achieved using a semi-loop meandered driven element and a small ground plane. The centre frequency of operation is 2 GHz. The antenna system covers two bands: the telemetry L-band 1.27-1.43 GHz and the global system for mobile communications/long-term evolution band 1.8-2.133 GHz. The simulation and measurement results are in good agreement. The proposed antenna system mimics the quasi-Yagi antenna configuration with a measured front-to-back ratio of around 15 dB at 1.35 GHz and 17 dB at 2 GHz, which is achieved without using a large ground plane, extra metallic structures, multiple reflector elements, or any complex technique. A gain of more than 5 dBi is measured for the single element with a total radiation efficiency of around 85% in both bands. The measured isolation of the proposed MIMO antenna is more than 15 dB with < 0.0785 measured envelope correlation coefficient values in both bands.

  6. A Dual Band Additively Manufactured 3D Antenna on Package with Near-Isotropic Radiation Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Zhen

    2018-04-06

    Internet of things (IoT) applications need wireless connectivity on devices with very small footprints, and in RF obscure environments. The antenna for such applications must work on multiple GSM bands (preferred choice for network connectivity), provide near isotropic radiation pattern to maintain orientation insensitive communication, be small in size so that it can be integrated with futuristic miniaturized IoT devices, and be low in cost to be implemented on billions of devices. This paper presents a novel 3D dual band near-isotropic wideband GSM antenna to fulfill these requirements. The antenna has been realized on the package of electronics through additive manufacturing to ensure efficient utilization of available space and lower cost. The proposed antenna consists of a meander line antenna that is folded on the faces of a 3D package with two variations, 0.375λ length for narrowband version and 0.67λ length for the wideband version. Theoretical conditions to achieve near isotropic radiation pattern with bent wire antennas on a 3D surface have been derived. The antenna has been optimized to operate with embedded electronics and a large metallic battery. The antenna provides 8.9% and 34.4% bandwidths, at 900 and 1800 MHz respectively with decent near isotropic radiation behavior.

  7. Throughput Measurement of a Dual-Band MIMO Rectangular Dielectric Resonator Antenna for LTE Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Jamal; Jamaluddin, Mohd Haizal; Ahmad Khan, Aftab; Kamarudin, Muhammad Ramlee; Yen, Bruce Leow Chee; Owais, Owais

    2017-01-13

    An L-shaped dual-band multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) rectangular dielectric resonator antenna (RDRA) for long term evolution (LTE) applications is proposed. The presented antenna can transmit and receive information independently using fundamental TE 111 and higher order TE 121 modes of the DRA. TE 111 degenerate mode covers LTE band 2 (1.85-1.99 GHz), 3 (1.71-1.88 GHz), and 9 (1.7499-1.7849 GHz) at f r = 1.8 GHz whereas TE 121 covers LTE band 7 (2.5-2.69 GHz) at f r = 2.6 GHz, respectively. An efficient design method has been used to reduce mutual coupling between ports by changing the effective permittivity values of DRA by introducing a cylindrical air-gap at an optimal position in the dielectric resonator. This air-gap along with matching strips at the corners of the dielectric resonator keeps the isolation at a value more than 17 dB at both the bands. The diversity performance has also been evaluated by calculating the envelope correlation coefficient, diversity gain, and mean effective gain of the proposed design. MIMO performance has been evaluated by measuring the throughput of the proposed MIMO antenna. Experimental results successfully validate the presented design methodology in this work.

  8. Unidirectional Dual-Band CPW-Fed Antenna Loaded with an AMC Reflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A unidirectional dual-band coplanar waveguide fed antenna (DB-CPWFA loaded with a reflector is presented in this paper. The reflector is made of an electric ground plane, a dielectric substrate, and artificial magnetic conductor (AMC which shows an effective dual operational bandwidth. Then, the closely spaced AMC reflector is employed under the DB-DPWFA for performance improvement including unidirectional radiation, low profile, gain enhancement, and higher front-to-back (F/B ratio. The final antenna design exhibits an 8% and 13% impedance bandwidths for 2.45 GHz and 5.8 GHz frequency regions, respectively. The overall gain enhancement of about 4 dB is achieved. The F/B ratio is approximate to 20 dB with a 16 dB improvement. The measured results are inconsistent with the numerical values. The presented design is a suitable candidate for radio frequency identification (RFID reader application.

  9. Dual-band left-handed metamaterials fabricated by using tree-shaped fractal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu He-Xiu; Wang Guang-Ming; Yang Zi-Mu; Wang Jia-Fu

    2012-01-01

    A method of fabricating dual-band left-handed metematerials (LHMs) is investigated numerically and experimentally by single-sided tree-like fractals. The resulting structure features multiband magnetic resonances and two electric resonances. By appropriately adjusting the dimensions, two left-handed (LH) bands with simultaneous negative permittivity and permeability are engineered and are validated by full-wave eigenmode analysis and measurement as well in the microwave frequency range. To study the multi-resonant mechanism in depth, the LHM is analysed from three different perspectives of field distribution analysis, circuit model analysis, and geometrical parameters evaluation. The derived formulae are consistent with all simulated results and resulting electromagnetic phenomena, indicating the effectiveness of the established theory. The method provides an alternative to the design of multi-band LHM and has the advantage of not requiring two individual resonant particles and electrically continuous wires, which in turn facilitates planar design and considerably simplifies the fabrication. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. Tunable dual-band subwavelength imaging with a wire medium slab loaded with nanostructured graphene metasurfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Forouzmand

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate that a wire medium slab loaded with graphene-nanopatch metasurfaces (GNMs enables the enhancement of evanescent waves for the subwavelength imaging at terahertz (THz frequencies. The analysis is based on the nonlocal homogenization model for wire medium with the additional boundary condition at the connection of wires to graphene. The physical mechanism behind this lens can be described as the surface plasmons excitement at the lower and upper GNMs which are coupled by an array of metallic wires. The dual nature (capacitive/inductive of the GNM is utilized in order to design a dual-band lens in which the unique controllable properties of graphene and the structural parameters of wire medium (WM slab provide more degrees of freedom in controlling two operating frequency bands. The lens can support the subwavelength imaging simultaneously at two tunable distinct frequencies with the resolution better than λ/6 even if the distance between GNMs is a significant fraction of wavelength (>λ/5.5. The major future challenges in the fabrication of the lens have been demonstrated and a promising approach for the practical configuration of the lens has been proposed.

  11. Ultrasmall Dual-Band Metamaterial Antennas Based on Asymmetrical Hybrid Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Xu Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new type of hybrid resonant circuit model is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The resonant model consists of a right hand (RH patch part and a composite right and left handed (CRLH part (RH + CRLH, which determines a compact size and also a convenient frequency modulation characteristic for the proposed antennas. For experimental demonstration, two antennas are fabricated. The former dual-band antenna operating at f-1=3.5 GHz (Wimax and f+1=5.25 GHz (WLAN occupies an area of 0.21λ0×0.08λ0, and two dipolar radiation patterns are obtained with comparable gains of about 6.1 and 6.2 dB, respectively. The latter antenna advances in many aspects such as an ultrasmall size of only 0.16λ0×0.08λ0, versatile radiation patterns with a monopolar pattern at f0=2.4 GHz (Bluetooth, and a dipole one at f+1=3.5 GHz (Wimax and also comparable antenna gains. Circuit parameters are extracted and researched. Excellent performances of the antennas based on hybrid resonators predict promising applications in multifunction wireless communication systems.

  12. COMPACT DUAL-BAND INVERTED L SHAPED MONOPOLE ANTENNA FOR WLAN APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sumathi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A highly compact and an optimized design of an Inverted L shaped printed monopole antenna with a simple compact ground plane is proposed. To make the designed antenna suitable for implantation it is embedded in FR-4 substrate and is presented. The antenna is designed for dual-band operation at 2.4GHz and 5.2GHz. It is suitable for Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN applications with return loss (S11 < -10dB. The antenna has two different resonant current paths that support two resonances at 2.44GHz and 5.18GHz (forming an F-shaped structure. The size of the antenna is 32.5mm × 19.6mm × 1.6mm. The antenna design is simulated using the tool Advanced Design System (ADS 2014. This antenna design has good return loss and radiation characteristics in both the required frequency bands. The radiation pattern obtained from the proposed antenna is an Omni directional radiation pattern in the E and H plane over the frequency ranges 2.4GHz and 5.2GHz.

  13. Dual band monopole antenna for WLAN 2.4/5.2/5.8 with truncated ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandan, Bharti, Gagandeep; Srivastava, Toolika; Rai, B. S.

    2018-04-01

    A dual-band mono-pole antenna is proposed for Wireless LAN applications. The WLAN band is obtained by cutting a rectangular ring and a circular slot in the radiating patch. The overall dimension of antenna is 17×16.5×0.8 mmł. The frequency bands obtained are 2.38-2.9 GHz and 4.7-6.1 GHz with ≤ - 10 dB return loss which covers WLAN 2.4/5.2/5.8 GHz bands. The behavior of the antenna is analyzed in terms of radiation pattern, peak realized gain, radiation efficiency and surface current density. It has dipole like radiation pattern with gain of 2.33 - 4.31 dBi for lower frequency band and 4.29 - 5.16 dBi for upper frequency band with radiation efficiency of 95-98% and 93-96% respectively. The parametric analysis is carried out to understand the consequence of the various shape parameters and to get an optimum design. The simulation and measurement gave the results having close agreement.

  14. Dual-band high-efficiency polarization converter using an anisotropic metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Baoqin; Wang, Buhong; Meng, Wen; Da, Xinyu; Li, Wei; Fang, Yingwu; Zhu, Zihang

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a dual-band and high-efficiency reflective cross-polarization converter based on an anisotropic metasurface for linearly polarized electromagnetic waves is proposed. Its unit cell is composed of an elliptical disk-ring mounted on grounded dielectric substrate, which is an anisotropic structure with a pair of mutually perpendicular symmetric axes u and v along ± 45 ° directions with respect to y-axis direction. Both the simulation and measured results show that the polarization converter can convert x- or y-polarized incident wave to its cross polarized wave in the two frequency bands (6.99-9.18 GHz, 11.66-20.40 GHz) with the conversion efficiency higher than 90%; moreover, the higher frequency band is an ultra-wide one with a relative bandwidth of 54.5% for multiple plasmon resonances. In addition, we present a detailed analysis for the polarization conversion of the polarization converter, and derive a formula to calculate the cross- and co-polarization reflections at y-polarized incidence according to the phase differences between the two reflected coefficients at u-polarized and v-polarized incidences. The simulated, calculated, and measured results are all in agreement with the entire frequency regions.

  15. Surface Composition of Trojan Asteroids from Thermal-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A.; Emery, J. P.; Lindsay, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Asteroid origins provide an effective means of constraining the events that dynamically shaped the solar system. Jupiter Trojan asteroids (hereafter Trojans) may help in determining the extent of radial mixing that occurred during giant planet migration. Previous studies aimed at characterizing surface composition show that Trojans have low albedo surfaces and fall into two distinct spectral groups the near infrared (NIR). Though, featureless in this spectral region, NIR spectra of Trojans either exhibit a red or less-red slope. Typically, red-sloped spectra are associated with organics, but it has been shown that Trojans are not host to much, if any, organic material. Instead, the red slope is likely due to anhydrous silicates. The thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength range has advantages for detecting silicates on low albedo asteroids such as Trojans. The 10 µm region exhibits strong features due to the Si-O fundamental molecular vibrations. We hypothesize that the two Trojan spectral groups have different compositions (silicate mineralogy). With TIR spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we identify mineralogical features from the surface of 11 Trojan asteroids, five red and six less-red. Preliminary results from analysis of the 10 µm region indicate red-sloped Trojans have a higher spectral contrast compared to less-red-sloped Trojans. Fine-grain mixtures of crystalline pyroxene and olivine exhibit a 10 µm feature with sharp cutoffs between about 9 µm and 12 µm, which create a broad flat plateau. Amorphous phases, when present, smooth the sharp emission features, resulting in a dome-like shape. Further spectral analysis in the 10 µm, 18 µm, and 30 µm band region will be performed for a more robust analysis. If all Trojans come from the same region, it is expected that they share spectral and compositional characteristics. Therefore, if spectral analysis in the TIR reinforce the NIR spectral slope dichotomy, it is likely that Trojans were sourced from

  16. Quantitative assessment of pain-related thermal dysfunction through clinical digital infrared thermal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frize Monique

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The skin temperature distribution of a healthy human body exhibits a contralateral symmetry. Some nociceptive and most neuropathic pain pathologies are associated with an alteration of the thermal distribution of the human body. Since the dissipation of heat through the skin occurs for the most part in the form of infrared radiation, infrared thermography is the method of choice to study the physiology of thermoregulation and the thermal dysfunction associated with pain. Assessing thermograms is a complex and subjective task that can be greatly facilitated by computerised techniques. Methods This paper presents techniques for automated computerised assessment of thermal images of pain, in order to facilitate the physician's decision making. First, the thermal images are pre-processed to reduce the noise introduced during the initial acquisition and to extract the irrelevant background. Then, potential regions of interest are identified using fixed dermatomal subdivisions of the body, isothermal analysis and segmentation techniques. Finally, we assess the degree of asymmetry between contralateral regions of interest using statistical computations and distance measures between comparable regions. Results The wavelet domain-based Poisson noise removal techniques compared favourably against Wiener and other wavelet-based denoising methods, when qualitative criteria were used. It was shown to improve slightly the subsequent analysis. The automated background removal technique based on thresholding and morphological operations was successful for both noisy and denoised images with a correct removal rate of 85% of the images in the database. The automation of the regions of interest (ROIs delimitation process was achieved successfully for images with a good contralateral symmetry. Isothermal division complemented well the fixed ROIs division based on dermatomes, giving a more accurate map of potentially abnormal regions. The measure

  17. Groundwater discharge mapping by thermal infra-red imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brereton, N.R.

    1984-02-01

    An area around Altnabreac in northern Scotland has been studied as part of the UK programme of research into the feasibility of disposal of radioactive waste into geological formations. An essential prerequisite to being able to predict the behaviour, migratory pathways and travel times of radionuclides emanating from a waste repository is an understanding of the regional and near surface groundwater flow systems and groundwater geochemical evolution. The groundwater system at depth has been studied by means of boreholes but an understanding of the shallow groundwater flow, and its interaction with groundwater upwelling from depth, can be gained from studies of the spatial distribution and geochemistry of surface springs and discharges. A survey was carried out using the thermal infra-red linescan technique with the objective of locating all significant spring discharges over the study area. The terrain around Altnabreac is largely covered by superficial deposits which overlie weathered granite. The survey was carried out from a height of 275m at a spatial resolution of about 0.5m. About 280 line Km were covered but allowing for overlap between adjacent flight lines and some repeat coverage, the actual area surveyed was 68 sq Km. The most striking aspect of the results is the wide distribution of groundwater discharges in the Altnabreac area. An analysis of the data identified three general categories of spring and many of these springs were subsequently visited for verification and to allow samples to be collected for chemical analysis. The results from this survey indicates that the groundwater table is strongly influenced by local topography and that the majority of the spring discharges represent near surface recent groundwaters circulating within the superficial deposits and weathered granite

  18. Multiphoton dissociation and thermal unimolecular reactions induced by infrared lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, H.L.

    1981-04-01

    Multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of ethyl chloride was studied using a tunable 3.3 μm laser to excite CH stretches. The absorbed energy increases almost linearly with fluence, while for 10 μm excitation there is substantial saturation. Much higher dissociation yields were observed for 3.3 μm excitation than for 10 μm excitation, reflecting bottlenecking in the discrete region of 10 μm excitation. The resonant nature of the excitation allows the rate equations description for transitions in the quasicontinuum and continuum to be extended to the discrete levels. Absorption cross sections are estimated from ordinary ir spectra. A set of cross sections which is constant or slowly decreasing with increasing vibrational excitation gives good fits to both absorption and dissociation yield data. The rate equations model was also used to quantitatively calculate the pressure dependence of the MPD yield of SF 6 caused by vibrational self-quenching. Between 1000-3000 cm -1 of energy is removed from SF 6 excited to approx. > 60 kcal/mole by collision with a cold SF 6 molecule at gas kinetic rate. Calculation showed the fluence dependence of dissociation varies strongly with the gas pressure. Infrared multiphoton excitation was applied to study thermal unimolecular reactions. With SiF 4 as absorbing gas for the CO 2 laser pulse, transient high temperature pulses were generated in a gas mixture. IR fluorescence from the medium reflected the decay of the temperature. The activation energy and the preexponential factor of the reactant dissociation were obtained from a phenomenological model calculation. Results are presented in detail

  19. Is the aerosol emission detectable in the thermal infrared?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, H.-D.; Bakan, S.; Taylor, J. P.

    2006-08-01

    The impact of aerosols on the thermal infrared radiation can be assessed by combining observations and radiative transfer calculations. Both have uncertainties, which are discussed in this paper. Observational uncertainties are obtained for two FTIR instruments operated side by side on the ground during the LACE 1998 field campaign. Radiative transfer uncertainties are assessed using a line-by-line model taking into account the uncertainties of the HITRAN 2004 spectroscopic database, uncertainties in the determination of the atmospheric profiles of water vapor and ozone, and differences in the treatment of the water vapor continuum absorption by the CKD 2.4.1 and MT_CKD 1.0 algorithms. The software package OPAC was used to describe the optical properties of aerosols for climate modeling. The corresponding radiative signature is a guideline to the assessment of the uncertainty ranges of observations and models. We found that the detection of aerosols depends strongly on the measurement accuracy of atmospheric profiles of water vapor and ozone and is easier for drier conditions. Within the atmospheric window, only the forcing of downward radiation at the surface by desert aerosol emerges clearly from the uncertainties of modeling and FTIR measurement. Urban and polluted continental aerosols are only partially detectable depending on the wave number and on the atmospheric water vapor amount. Simulations for the space-borne interferometer IASI show that only upward radiation above transported mineral dust aloft emerges out of the uncertainties. The detection of aerosols with weak radiative impact by FTIR instruments like ARIES and OASIS is made difficult by noise as demonstrated by the signal to noise ratio for clean continental aerosols. Altogether, the uncertainties found suggest that it is difficult to detect the optical depths of nonmineral and unpolluted aerosols.

  20. Impact of Soil Water Content on Landmine Detection Using Radar and Thermal Infrared Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Sung-ho

    2001-01-01

    .... The most important of these is water content since it directly influences the three other properties in this study, the ground penetrating radar and thermal infrared sensors were used to identify non...

  1. Airborne Thematic Thermal InfraRed and Electro-Optical Imaging System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is an advanced Airborne Thematic Thermal InfraRed and Electro-Optical Imaging System (ATTIREOIS). ATTIREOIS sensor payload consists of two sets of...

  2. TIRCIS: A Thermal Infrared, Compact Imaging Spectrometer for Small Satellite Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will demonstrate how hyperspectral thermal infrared (TIR; 8-14 microns) image data, with a spectral resolution of up to 8 wavenumbers, can be acquired...

  3. Thermal Infrared Spectra of Microcrystalline Sedimentary Phases: Effects of Natural Surface Roughness on Spectral Feature Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardgrove, C.; Rogers, A. D.

    2012-03-01

    Thermal infrared spectral features of common microcrystalline phases (chert, alabaster, micrite) are presented. Spectra are sensitive to mineralogy and micron-scale (~1-25 µm) surface roughness. Roughness is on the scale of the average crystal size.

  4. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Wang, Jia; Liu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  5. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia (42-46°C, treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  6. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jia [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  7. Development of models for thermal infrared radiation above and within plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paw u, Kyaw T.

    1992-01-01

    Any significant angular dependence of the emitted longwave radiation could result in errors in remotely estimated energy budgets or evapotranspiration. Empirical data and thermal infrared radiation models are reviewed in reference to anisotropic emissions from the plant canopy. The biometeorological aspects of linking longwave models with plant canopy energy budgets and micrometeorology are discussed. A new soil plant atmosphere model applied to anisotropic longwave emissions from a canopy is presented. Time variation of thermal infrared emission measurements is discussed.

  8. HTS dual-band bandpass filters using stub-loaded hair-pin resonators for mobile communication systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiya, N., E-mail: nsekiya@yamanashi.ac.jp; Sugiyama, S.

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We have developed a HTS five-pole dual-band bandpass filter using stub-loaded hair-pin resonators. • The proposed dual-band BPF can independently control of the center frequency. • Flexibly adjustment of the bandwidth can be achieved by the H-shaped waveguide. • The proposed BPF is evaluated by simulation and measurement with good agreement. - Abstract: A HTS dual-band bandpass filter is developed to obtain sharp-cut off characteristics for mobile communication systems. The filter is composed of five stub-loaded hair-pin resonators with H-shaped waveguides between them. The main advantage of the proposed filter is to allow independent control of the center frequency of the first and second bands. The bandwidths can be flexibly adjusted using the H-shaped waveguide. An electromagnetic simulator was used to design and analyze the filter, which have a 3.5-GHz center frequency and a 70-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the first band and a 5.0-GHz center frequency and a 100-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the second band. The filter was fabricated using YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} thin film on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. Ground plane was fabricated using Au thin film. The measured frequency responses of the filter tally well with the simulated ones.

  9. A Dual Band Frequency Reconfigurable Origami Magic Cube Antenna for Wireless Sensor Network Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Imran Hussain Shah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel dual band frequency reconfigurable antenna using an origami magic cube is proposed for wireless sensor network (WSN applications. The proposed origami antenna consists of a meandered monopole folded onto three sides of the magic cube. A microstrip open-ended stub is loaded on the meandered monopole. The proposed origami magic cube can be mechanically folded and unfolded. The proposed antenna operates at 1.57 GHZ and 2.4 GHz in the folded state. In the unfolded state, the proposed antenna operates at 900 MHz and 2.3 GHz. The resonant frequency of the second band can be tunable by varying the length and position of the open stub. The origami magic cube is built on paper. Its performance is numerically and experimentally demonstrated from S-parameters and radiation patterns. The measured 10 dB impedance bandwidth of the proposed origami antenna is 18% (900–1120 MHz and 15% (2.1–2.45 GHz for the unfolded state and 20% (1.3–1.6 GHz and 14% (2.3–2.5 GHz for the folded state. The measured peak gain at 900 MHz and 2.3 GHz are 1.1 dBi and 2.32 dBi, respectively, in the unfolded state. The measured peak gain at 1.5 GHz and 2.4 GHz are 3.28 dBi and 1.98 dBi, respectively, in the folded state.

  10. Tree Canopy Characterization for EO-1 Reflective and Thermal Infrared Validation Studies: Rochester, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Jerrell R., Jr.; Smith, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The tree canopy characterization presented herein provided ground and tree canopy data for different types of tree canopies in support of EO-1 reflective and thermal infrared validation studies. These characterization efforts during August and September of 2001 included stem and trunk location surveys, tree structure geometry measurements, meteorology, and leaf area index (LAI) measurements. Measurements were also collected on thermal and reflective spectral properties of leaves, tree bark, leaf litter, soil, and grass. The data presented in this report were used to generate synthetic reflective and thermal infrared scenes and images that were used for the EO-1 Validation Program. The data also were used to evaluate whether the EO-1 ALI reflective channels can be combined with the Landsat-7 ETM+ thermal infrared channel to estimate canopy temperature, and also test the effects of separating the thermal and reflective measurements in time resulting from satellite formation flying.

  11. Analysis and research on thermal infrared properties and adaptability of the camouflage net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guangzhen; Hu, Jianghua; Jian, Chaochao; Yang, Juntang

    2016-10-01

    As camouflage equipment, camouflage net which covers or obstruct the enemy reconnaissance and attack, have the compatibility such as optics, infrared, radar wave band performance. To improve the adaptive between the camouflage net with background in infrared wavelengths, the heat shield and heat integration requirements on the surface of the camouflage net was analyzed. The condition that satisfied the heat shield was when the average thermal infrared transmittance was less than 25.38% on camouflage screen surface. Studies have shown that camouflage nets and the background field fused together when infrared radiation temperature difference control is within the scope of ± 4K . Experiment on temperature contrast was tested in situ background, thermal camouflage spots and camouflage net with sponge material, the infrared heat maps was recorded in the period of experiment through the thermal imager. Results showed that the thermal inertia of camouflage net was markedly lower than the background and the exposed signs were obvious. It was difficult to reach camouflage thermal infrared fusion requirements by relying on camouflage spot emissivity, but sponge which mix with polymer resin can reduce target significance in the context of mottled and realize the fusion effect.

  12. A dual-band LO generation system using a 40GHz VCO with a phase noise of -106.8dBc/Hz at 1-MHz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Pei, Y.; Leenaerts, D.M.W.; Hanock, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a dual-band LO generation system using a low phase noise single-band 40GHz VCO as the signal source. The LO generation system has two outputs: single-band LO1 at 20GHz and dual-band LO2 switchable between 10GHz and 15GHz. Implemented in 0.25-µm SiGe:C BiCMOS, the VCO achieves

  13. RESEARCH OF REGISTRATION APPROACHES OF THERMAL INFRARED IMAGES AND INTENSITY IMAGES OF POINT CLOUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the analysis of thermal energy of the objects in 3D vision, the registration approach of thermal infrared images and TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner point cloud was studied. The original data was pre-processed. For the sake of making the scale and brightness contrast of the two kinds of data meet the needs of basic matching, the intensity image of point cloud was produced and projected to spherical coordinate system, histogram equalization processing was done for thermal infrared image.This paper focused on the research of registration approaches of thermal infrared images and intensity images of point cloud based on SIFT,EOH-SIFT and PIIFD operators. The latter of which is usually used for medical image matching with different spectral character. The comparison results of the experiments showed that PIIFD operator got much more accurate feature point correspondences compared to SIFT and EOH-SIFT operators. The thermal infrared image and intensity image also have ideal overlap results by quadratic polynomial transformation. Therefore, PIIFD can be used as the basic operator for the registration of thermal infrared images and intensity images, and the operator can also be further improved by incorporating the iteration method.

  14. Thermal comfort index and infrared temperatures for lambs subjected to different environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago do Prado Paim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an abundance of thermal indices with different input parameters and applicabilities. Infrared thermography is a promising technique for evaluating the response of animals to the environment and differentiating between genetic groups. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate superficial body temperatures of lambs from three genetic groups under different environmental conditions, correlating these with thermal comfort indices. Forty lambs (18 males and 22 females from three genetic groups (Santa Inês, Ile de France × Santa Inês and Dorper × Santa Inês were exposed to three climatic conditions: open air, housed and artificial heating. Infrared thermal images were taken weekly at 6h, 12h and 21h at the neck, front flank, rear flank, rump, nose, skull, trunk and eye. Four thermal comfort indices were calculated using environmental measurements including black globe temperature, air humidity and wind speed. Artificial warming, provided by infrared lamps and wind protection, conserved and increased the superficial body temperature of the lambs, thus providing lower daily thermal ranges. Artificial warming did not influence daily weight gain or mortality. Skin temperatures increased along with increases in climatic indices. Again, infrared thermography is a promising technique for evaluating thermal stress conditions and differentiating environments. However, the use of thermal imaging for understanding animal responses to environmental conditions requires further study.

  15. Experimental Evaluation of Camouflage Effectiveness in the Thermal Infrared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The detectability of a target ln the infrared spectral region ls determined by differences between the radiative stignatures of the target and the local background. This implies that both, the difference in surface temperature and emissivity ^T resp. ^€ and the distribution of these differences over

  16. MINERAL INFORMATION EXTRACTION BASED ON GAOFEN-5’S THERMAL INFRARED DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gaofen-5 carries six instruments aimed at various land and atmosphere applications, and it’s an important unit of China High-resolution Earth Observation System. As Gaofen-5’s thermal infrared payload is similar to that of ASTER, which is widely used in mineral exploration, application of Gaofen-5’s thermal infrared data is discussed regarding its capability in mineral classification and silica content estimation. First, spectra of silicate, carbonate, sulfate minerals from a spectral library are used to conduct spectral feature analysis on Gaofen-5’s thermal infrared emissivities. Spectral indices of band emissivities are proposed, and by setting thresholds of these spectral indices, it can classify three types of minerals mentioned above. This classification method is tested on a simulated Gaofen-5 emissivity image. With samples acquired from the study area, this method is proven to be feasible. Second, with band emissivities of silicate and their silica content from the same spectral library, correlation models have been tried to be built for silica content inversion. However, the highest correlation coefficient is merely 0.592, which is much lower than that of correlation model built on ASTER thermal infrared emissivity. It can be concluded that GF-5’s thermal infrared data can be utilized in mineral classification but not in silica content inversion.

  17. Conformational changes in matrix-isolated 6-methoxyindole: Effects of the thermal and infrared light excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes Jesus, A. J. [CQC, Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); CQC, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3004-295 Coimbra (Portugal); Reva, I., E-mail: reva@qui.uc.pt; Fausto, R. [CQC, Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Araujo-Andrade, C. [CQC, Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Unidad Académica de Física de la Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas (Mexico); ICFO–The Institute of Photonic Sciences, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2016-03-28

    Conformational changes induced thermally or upon infrared excitation of matrix-isolated 6-methoxyindole were investigated. Narrowband near-infrared excitation of the first overtone of the N–H stretching vibration of each one of the two identified conformers is found to induce a selective large-scale conversion of the pumped conformer into the other one. This easily controllable bidirectional process consists in the intramolecular reorientation of the methoxy group and allowed a full assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers. Matrices with different conformational compositions prepared by narrow-band irradiations were subsequently used to investigate the effects of both thermal and broadband infrared excitations on the conformational mixtures. Particular attention is given to the influence of the matrix medium (Ar vs. Xe) and conformational effects of exposition of the sample to the spectrometer light source during the measurements.

  18. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  19. Design, Manufacturing, and Testing of a 20/30-GHz Dual-Band Circularly Polarized Reflectarray Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Thomas Gunst; Gothelf, Ulrich; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2013-01-01

    This letter documents the design, manufacturing, and testing of a single-layer dual-band circularly polarized reflectarray antenna for 19.7–20.2 and 29.5–30.0 GHz. The reflectarray is designed using the concentric dual split-loop element and the variable rotation technique that enables full 360......$^{\\circ}$ phase adjustment simultaneously in two separate frequency bands. The elements have been optimized to suppress cross-polar reflection. Thereafter, the element data is included in a design tool that computes the reflectarray layout and the associated radiation patterns. The reflectarray...

  20. A 5.2/5.8 GHz Dual Band On-Off Keying Transmitter Design for Bio-Signal Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hsi; You, Hong-Cheng; Huang, Shun-Zhao

    2018-02-01

    An architecture of 5.2/5.8-GHz dual-band on-off keying (DBOOK) modulated transmitter is designed in a 0.18-μm CMOS technology. The proposed DBOOK transmitter is used in the biosignal transmission system with high power efficiency and small area. To reduce power consumption and enhance output swing, two pairs of center-tapped transformers are used as both LC tank and source grounding choke for the designed voltage controlled oscillator (VCO). Switching capacitances are used to achieve dual band operations, and a complemented power combiner is used to merge the differential output power of VCO to a single-ended output. Besides, the linearizer circuits are used in the proposed power amplifier with wideband output matching to improve the linearity both at 5.2/5.8-GHz bands. The designed DBOOK transmitter is implemented by dividing it into two chips. One chip implements the dual-band switching VCO and power combiner, and the other chip implements a linear power amplifier including dual-band operation. The first chip drives an output power of 2.2mW with consuming power of 5.13 mW from 1.1 V supply voltage. With the chip size including pad of 0.61 × 0.91 m2, the measured data rate and transmission efficiency attained are 100 Mb/s and 51 pJ/bit, respectively. The second chip, for power enhanced mode, exhibits P1 dB of -9 dBm, IIP3 of 1 dBm, the output power 1 dB compression point of 12.42 dBm, OIP3 of about 21 dBm, maximum output power of 17.02/16.18 dBm, and power added efficiency of 17.13/16.95% for 5.2/ 5.8 GHz. The chip size including pads is 0:693 × 1:084mm2.

  1. Quantitative remote sensing in thermal infrared theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Huajun

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive technical overview of the core theory of thermal remote sensing and its applications in hydrology, agriculture, and forestry includes a host of illuminating examples and covers everything from the basics to likely future trends in the field.

  2. Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  3. USING OF THE MULTITEMPORAL THERMAL INFRARED SATELLITE IMAGERY FOR NATURAL AREAS MAPPING (CASE OF MENDELEEV VOLCANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Grishchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper authors examine the mountain group of Mendeleev volcano situated on the Kunashir island, Kuril archipelago, Russia. Ground observations were led to examine the vegetation cover of the area as well as its typical landscapes. The other type of used data is Landsat imagery. Images were combined into multitemporal thermal infrared and multispectral pictures, which were classified to reveal the heterogeneity of the study area. Ground observations and comparison of the classification results with landscape map derive that the multitemporal thermal infrared image classification result describes better the vegetation cover structure of the area and particularity of its typical landscapes distribution. It leads to the proposition that miltitemporal thermal infrared imagery can be used to refine landscape and vegetation cover contours. 

  4. Biodegradable starch-based films containing saturated fatty acids: thermal, infrared and raman spectroscopic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo M. Nobrega

    Full Text Available Biodegradable films of thermoplastic starch and poly (butylene adipate co-terephthalate (PBAT containing fatty acids were characterized thermally and with infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The symmetrical character of the benzene ring in PBAT provided a means to illustrate the difference between these spectroscopic techniques, because a band appeared in the Raman spectrum but not in the infrared. The thermal analysis showed three degradation stages related to fatty acids, starch and PBAT. The incorporation of saturated fatty acids with different molecular mass (caproic, lauric and stearic did not change the nature of the chemical bonds among the components in the blends of starch, PBAT and glycerol, according to the thermal analysis, infrared and Raman spectroscopies.

  5. Key issues in the thermal design of spaceborne cryogenic infrared instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schember, Helene R.; Rapp, Donald

    1992-12-01

    Thermal design and analysis play an integral role in the development of spaceborne cryogenic infrared (IR) instruments. From conceptual sketches to final testing, both direct and derived thermal requirements place significant constraints on the instrument design. Although in practice these thermal requirements are interdependent, the sources of most thermal constraints may be grouped into six distinct categories. These are: (1) Detector temperatures, (2) Optics temperatures, (3) Pointing or alignment stability, (4) Mission lifetime, (5) Orbit, and (6) Test and Integration. In this paper, we discuss these six sources of thermal requirements with particular regard to development of instrument packages for low background infrared astronomical observatories. In the end, the thermal performance of these instruments must meet a set of thermal requirements. The development of these requirements is typically an ongoing and interactive process, however, and the thermal design must maintain flexibility and robustness throughout the process. The thermal (or cryogenic) engineer must understand the constraints imposed by the science requirements, the specific hardware, the observing environment, the mission design, and the testing program. By balancing these often competing factors, the system-oriented thermal engineer can work together with the experiment team to produce an effective overall design of the instrument.

  6. Detection of leaks in buried rural water pipelines using thermal infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.

    1985-01-01

    Leakage is a major problem in many pipelines. Minor leaks called 'seeper leaks', which generally range from 2 to 10 m3 per day, are common and are difficult to detect using conventional ground surveys. The objective of this research was to determine whether airborne thermal-infrared remote sensing could be used in detecting leaks and monitoring rural water pipelines. This study indicates that such leaks can be detected using low-altitude 8.7- to 11.5. micrometer wavelength, thermal infrared images collected under proper conditions.

  7. [Using infrared thermal asymmetry analysis for objective assessment of the lesion of facial nerve function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu-long; Hong, Wen-xue; Song, Jia-lin; Wu, Zhen-ying

    2012-03-01

    The skin temperature distribution of a healthy human body exhibits a contralateral symmetry. Some lesions of facial nerve function are associated with an alteration of the thermal distribution of the human body. Since the dissipation of heat through the skin occurs for the most part in the form of infrared radiation, infrared thermography is the method of choice to capture the alteration of the infrared thermal distribution. This paper presents a new method of analysis of the thermal asymmetry named effective thermal area ratio, which is a product of two variables. The first variable is mean temperature difference between the specific facial region and its contralateral region. The second variable is a ratio, which is equal to the area of the abnormal region divided by the total area. Using this new method, we performed a controlled trial to assess the facial nerve function of the healthy subjects and the patients with Bell's palsy respectively. The results show: that the mean specificity and sensitivity of this method are 0.90 and 0.87 respectively, improved by 7% and 26% compared with conventional methods. Spearman correlation coefficient between effective thermal area ratio and the degree of facial nerve function is an average of 0.664. Hence, concerning the diagnosis and assessment of facial nerve function, infrared thermography is a powerful tool; while the effective ther mal area ratio is an efficient clinical indicator.

  8. Infrared, X-ray and thermal analysis of praseodym soaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrotra, K.N.; Sharma, M.; Gahlaut, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared spectra tests have shown that fatty acids exist with a dimeric structure through hydrogen bonding between two molecules of fatty acids whereas metal-to-oxygen bonds in metal soaps have an ionic character but the bonds are not purely ionic. X-ray diffraction tests confirm that praseodymium soaps have a double layer structure with molecular axes slightly inclined to the basal plane. It is concluded that the decomposition reaction of praseodymium soaps is kinetically of zero order and the activation energy for the process lies in the range of 1 to 10 kcal mole -1 . (orig.) [de

  9. Wideband or Dual-Band Low-Profile Circular Patch Antenna with High Gain and Sidelobe Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Squadrito, Paolo; Zhang, Shuai; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a wideband or dual-band circular disk antenna with high gain and sidelobe suppression (SLS). The antenna has a single layer and single-fed configuration. The antenna can operate with the radiation field superposition of TM12 and TM14 modes at one frequency, which provides high...... gain and SLS. A circle of 10 shorting vias with non-identical diameters are loaded inside the antenna cavity in order to excite the field superposition of TM11 and TM13 modes at another frequency. By modifying the radius of the vias, the resonant frequency with the TM11 and TM13 superposition can...... be tuned closer to or further away from the one with the TM12 and TM14 superposition. In this way, a wideband or dual-band behavior can be obtained with high gain and SLS. The proposed antenna achieves the impedance bandwidth of 6.46% for the wideband case, which is over 6 times wider than the previous...

  10. Design and Implementation of Dual-Band MIMO Antenna with Low Mutual Coupling Using EBG for Handheld Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong Thanh Tu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual-band Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO antenna system with enhanced isolation for LTE and WLAN applications is proposed. Using a double-rectangular Defected Ground Structure (DGS, the MIMO antenna gets two resonant frequencies of 2.6 GHz and 5.7 GHz with bandwidth of 5.7% and 4.3% respectively. To reduce much more mutual coupling between dual-band MIMO antenna ports, a novel double-side Electromagnetic Band Gap (EBG structure with equivalent circuit model is proposed. Size of t gain of the antenna is getting better, especially at the low band. he EBG unit cell is 8.6x8.6 mm2 that is built on FR4 substrate with height of 1.6 mm, so it is achieved more compact size than conventional EBG structures. With 1x7 EBG structures, the mutual coupling gets -40dB in the low frequency band and -30 dB in the high one with narrow distance of 0.11 from feeding point to feeding point. Furthermore, radiation efficiency as well as gain of the antenna is getting better, especially at the low band.

  11. Infrared photon-echo spectroscopy of water : The thermalization effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Yeremenko, Sergey; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A.; Okada, Tadashi; Silvestri, Sandro De

    2005-01-01

    The larger part of the nonlinear response in IR photon-echo and transient-grating spectroscopy on HDO-D2O mixtures at > 1-ps delays is found to originate from the D2O refractive index modulation due to local volume thermalization.

  12. A Multi-Wavelength Thermal Infrared and Reflectance Scene Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, J. R., Jr.; Smith, J. A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several theoretical calculations are presented and our approach discussed for simulating overall composite scene thermal infrared exitance and canopy bidirectional reflectance of a forest canopy. Calculations are performed for selected wavelength bands of the DOE Multispectral Thermal Imagery and comparisons with atmospherically corrected MTI imagery are underway. NASA EO-1 Hyperion observations also are available and the favorable comparison of our reflective model results with these data are reported elsewhere.

  13. Stream temperature estimated in situ from thermal-infrared images: best estimate and uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iezzi, F; Todisco, M T

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to show a technique to estimate in situ the stream temperature from thermal-infrared images deepening its best estimate and uncertainty. Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality and nowadays its assessment is important particularly for thermal pollution monitoring in water bodies. Stream temperature changes are especially due to the anthropogenic heat input from urban wastewater and from water used as a coolant by power plants and industrial manufacturers. The stream temperatures assessment using ordinary techniques (e.g. appropriate thermometers) is limited by sparse sampling in space due to a spatial discretization necessarily punctual. Latest and most advanced techniques assess the stream temperature using thermal-infrared remote sensing based on thermal imagers placed usually on aircrafts or using satellite images. These techniques assess only the surface water temperature and they are suitable to detect the temperature of vast water bodies but do not allow a detailed and precise surface water temperature assessment in limited areas of the water body. The technique shown in this research is based on the assessment of thermal-infrared images obtained in situ via portable thermal imager. As in all thermographic techniques, also in this technique, it is possible to estimate only the surface water temperature. A stream with the presence of a discharge of urban wastewater is proposed as case study to validate the technique and to show its application limits. Since the technique analyzes limited areas in extension of the water body, it allows a detailed and precise assessment of the water temperature. In general, the punctual and average stream temperatures are respectively uncorrected and corrected. An appropriate statistical method that minimizes the errors in the average stream temperature is proposed. The correct measurement of this temperature through the assessment of thermal- infrared images obtained in situ via portable

  14. Infrared electro-thermal NDE of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.R.; Hassberger, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Electro-thermal examination, a branch of thermal testing, is a promising method being developed for nondestructive examination of stainless steel welds. This paper describes the first phase of development; i.e., preliminary demonstration and laboratory evaluation of the method's sensitivity to notches in Type 304 stainless steel plate specimens. It also includes a description of the basic principles, together with a description of the hardware and experimental results showing that electrical discharge machined notches down to 0.16 cm long x 0.08 cm deep were detected. A qualitative technique for interpreting the test results to determine whether defects are at the surface or deeper within the material is demonstrated

  15. Infrared X-ray and thermal analysis of terbium soaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrotra, K.N.; Sharma, N.

    1996-01-01

    Terbium sops (laureate, myristate and palmitate) were synthesized by direct metathesis of corresponding potassium soap with an aqueous solution of terbium nitrate. The physico-chemical characteristics of soaps in solid state were investigated by IR spectra, X-ray diffraction patterns and TGA measurements. The IR results revealed that the fatty acids exist in dimeric state through hydrogen bonding while the soaps possess partial ionic character. The X-ray analysis showed that the soaps have double layer structure with molecular axes slightly inclined to the basal plane. The thermal analysis suggested that the decomposition of soaps occur in two steps. The energy of activation, order of reaction and various kinetic parameters (i.e. frequency factor, entropy of activation and free energy) for the thermal decomposition of soaps were evaluated. (author). 26 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  16. Thermal infrared imaging of the temporal variability in stomatal conductance for fruit trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struthers, Raymond; Ivanova, Anna; Tits, Laurent; Swennen, Rony; Coppin, Pol

    2015-07-01

    Repeated measurements using thermal infrared remote sensing were used to characterize the change in canopy temperature over time and factors that influenced this change on 'Conference' pear trees (Pyrus communis L.). Three different types of sensors were used, a leaf porometer to measure leaf stomatal conductance, a thermal infrared camera to measure the canopy temperature and a meteorological sensor to measure weather variables. Stomatal conductance of water stressed pear was significantly lower than in the control group 9 days after stress began. This decrease in stomatal conductance reduced transpiration, reducing evaporative cooling that increased canopy temperature. Using thermal infrared imaging with wavelengths between 7.5 and13 μm, the first significant difference was measured 18 days after stress began. A second order derivative described the average rate of change of the difference between the stress treatment and control group. The average rate of change for stomatal conductance was 0.06 (mmol m-2 s-1) and for canopy temperature was -0.04 (°C) with respect to days. Thermal infrared remote sensing and data analysis presented in this study demonstrated that the differences in canopy temperatures between the water stress and control treatment due to stomata regulation can be validated.

  17. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and partial least squares regression to determine mineral modes of granitoid rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hecker, Christoph; Dilles, John H.; van der Meijde, Mark; van der Meer, Freek D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach to extracting mineralogic information from thermal infrared (TIR) spectra that is not based on an input library of pure mineral spectra nor tries to extract spectral end‐members from the data. Instead, existing modal mineralogy for a number of samples are used

  18. Cancellation of infrared and mass singularities in the thermal di-lepton rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.; Becherrawy, T.

    1989-03-01

    We give a rigorous proof that, at first order in α s , the thermal di-lepton rate is free of infrared and mass singularities. The calculation is performed for massive quarks in the real-time formalism with the n-dimensional regularization scheme. The cancellation is shown to occur within each topology

  19. University Physics Students' Ideas of Thermal Radiation Expressed in Open Laboratory Activities Using Infrared Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Jesper; Melander, Emil; Weiszflog, Matthias; Andersson, Staffan

    2017-01-01

    Background: University physics students were engaged in open-ended thermodynamics laboratory activities with a focus on understanding a chosen phenomenon or the principle of laboratory apparatus, such as thermal radiation and a heat pump. Students had access to handheld infrared (IR) cameras for their investigations. Purpose: The purpose of the…

  20. Exploring the use of thermal infrared imaging in human stress research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Engert

    Full Text Available High resolution thermal infrared imaging is a pioneering method giving indices of sympathetic activity via the contact-free recording of facial tissues (thermal imprints. Compared to established stress markers, the great advantage of this method is its non-invasiveness. The goal of our study was to pilot the use of thermal infrared imaging in the classical setting of human stress research. Thermal imprints were compared to established stress markers (heart rate, heart rate variability, finger temperature, alpha-amylase and cortisol in 15 participants undergoing anticipation, stress and recovery phases of two laboratory stress tests, the Cold Pressor Test and the Trier Social Stress Test. The majority of the thermal imprints proved to be change-sensitive in both tests. While correlations between the thermal imprints and established stress markers were mostly non-significant, the thermal imprints (but not the established stress makers did correlate with stress-induced mood changes. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that in contrast to the established stress markers the thermal imprints could not disambiguate anticipation, stress and recovery phases of both tests. Overall, these results suggest that thermal infrared imaging is a valuable method for the estimation of sympathetic activity in the stress laboratory setting. The use of this non-invasive method may be particularly beneficial for covert recordings, in the study of special populations showing difficulties in complying with the standard instruments of data collection and in the domain of psychophysiological covariance research. Meanwhile, the established stress markers seem to be superior when it comes to the characterization of complex physiological states during the different phases of the stress cycle.

  1. Physiology-based face recognition in the thermal infrared spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddharaju, Pradeep; Pavlidis, Ioannis T; Tsiamyrtzis, Panagiotis; Bazakos, Mike

    2007-04-01

    The current dominant approaches to face recognition rely on facial characteristics that are on or over the skin. Some of these characteristics have low permanency can be altered, and their phenomenology varies significantly with environmental factors (e.g., lighting). Many methodologies have been developed to address these problems to various degrees. However, the current framework of face recognition research has a potential weakness due to its very nature. We present a novel framework for face recognition based on physiological information. The motivation behind this effort is to capitalize on the permanency of innate characteristics that are under the skin. To establish feasibility, we propose a specific methodology to capture facial physiological patterns using the bioheat information contained in thermal imagery. First, the algorithm delineates the human face from the background using the Bayesian framework. Then, it localizes the superficial blood vessel network using image morphology. The extracted vascular network produces contour shapes that are characteristic to each individual. The branching points of the skeletonized vascular network are referred to as Thermal Minutia Points (TMPs) and constitute the feature database. To render the method robust to facial pose variations, we collect for each subject to be stored in the database five different pose images (center, midleft profile, left profile, midright profile, and right profile). During the classification stage, the algorithm first estimates the pose of the test image. Then, it matches the local and global TMP structures extracted from the test image with those of the corresponding pose images in the database. We have conducted experiments on a multipose database of thermal facial images collected in our laboratory, as well as on the time-gap database of the University of Notre Dame. The good experimental results show that the proposed methodology has merit, especially with respect to the problem of

  2. Characteristics of Turbulent Airflow Deduced from Rapid Surface Thermal Fluctuations: An Infrared Surface Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2017-12-01

    The intermittent nature of turbulent airflow interacting with the surface is readily observable in fluctuations of the surface temperature resulting from the thermal imprints of eddies sweeping the surface. Rapid infrared thermography has recently been used to quantify characteristics of the near-surface turbulent airflow interacting with the evaporating surfaces. We aim to extend this technique by using single-point rapid infrared measurements to quantify properties of a turbulent flow, including surface exchange processes, with a view towards the development of an infrared surface anemometer. The parameters for the surface-eddy renewal (α and β ) are inferred from infrared measurements of a single-point on the surface of a heat plate placed in a wind tunnel with prescribed wind speeds and constant mean temperatures of the surface. Thermally-deduced parameters are in agreement with values obtained from standard three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer measurements close to the plate surface (e.g., α = 3 and β = 1/26 (ms)^{-1} for the infrared, and α = 3 and β = 1/19 (ms)^{-1} for the sonic-anemometer measurements). The infrared-based turbulence parameters provide new insights into the role of surface temperature and buoyancy on the inherent characteristics of interacting eddies. The link between the eddy-spectrum shape parameter α and the infrared window size representing the infrared field of view is investigated. The results resemble the effect of the sampling height above the ground in sonic anemometer measurements, which enables the detection of larger eddies with higher values of α . The physical basis and tests of the proposed method support the potential for remote quantification of the near-surface momentum field, as well as scalar-flux measurements in the immediate vicinity of the surface.

  3. Analytical tools for thermal infrared engineerig: a thermal sensor simulation package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, Sandeep

    1992-09-01

    The Advanced Sensor Development Laboratory (ASDL) at the Stennis Space Center develops, maintains and calibrates remote sensing instruments for the National Aeronautics & Space Administration. To perform system design trade-offs, analysis, and establish system parameters, ASDL has developed a software package for analytical simulation of sensor systems. This package called 'Analytical Tools for Thermal InfraRed Engineering'--ATTIRE, simulates the various components of a sensor system. The software allows each subsystem of the sensor to be analyzed independently for its performance. These performance parameters are then integrated to obtain system level information such as SNR, NER, NETD etc. This paper describes the uses of the package and the physics that were used to derive the performance parameters. In addition, ATTIRE can be used as a tutorial for understanding the distribution of thermal flux or solar irradiance over selected bandwidths of the spectrum. This spectrally distributed incident flux can then be analyzed as it propagates through the subsystems that constitute the entire sensor. ATTIRE provides a variety of functions ranging from plotting black-body curves for varying bandwidths and computing the integral flux, to performing transfer function analysis of the sensor system. The package runs from a menu- driven interface in a PC-DOS environment. Each sub-system of the sensor is represented by windows and icons. A user-friendly mouse-controlled point-and-click interface allows the user to simulate various aspects of a sensor. The package can simulate a theoretical sensor system. Trade-off studies can be easily done by changing the appropriate parameters and monitoring the effect of the system performance. The package can provide plots of system performance versus any system parameter. A parameter (such as the entrance aperture of the optics) could be varied and its effect on another parameter (e.g., NETD) can be plotted. A third parameter (e.g., the

  4. Use of visible, near-infrared, and thermal infrared remote sensing to study soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Greeley, R.; Goettelman, R.

    1974-01-01

    Two methods are described which are used to estimate soil moisture remotely using the 0.4- to 14.0 micron wavelength region: (1) measurement of spectral reflectance, and (2) measurement of soil temperature. The reflectance method is based on observations which show that directional reflectance decreases as soil moisture increases for a given material. The soil temperature method is based on observations which show that differences between daytime and nighttime soil temperatures decrease as moisture content increases for a given material. In some circumstances, separate reflectance or temperature measurements yield ambiguous data, in which case these two methods may be combined to obtain a valid soil moisture determination. In this combined approach, reflectance is used to estimate low moisture levels; and thermal inertia (or thermal diffusivity) is used to estimate higher levels. The reflectance method appears promising for surface estimates of soil moisture, whereas the temperature method appears promising for estimates of near-subsurface (0 to 10 cm).

  5. Dual Band a-Si:H Solar-Slot Antenna for 2.4/5.2GHz WLAN Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shynu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple and compact design of solar-slot antenna for dual band 2.4/5.2GHz wireless local area networks (WLAN applications is proposed. The design employs amorphous silicon (a-Si:H solar cells in polyimide substrate with an embedded twin strip slot structure to generate dual resonant frequencies. A T-shaped microstripline feed is used to excite the twin slot in the a-Si:H solar cell. The measured impedance bandwidths for the proposed solar antenna are 25.9% (642 MHz centered at 2.482 GHz and 8.2% (420 MHz centered at 5.098 GHz. The measured gain at 2.4 and 5.2 GHz are 3.1 dBi and 2.1 dBi respectively.

  6. Delamination detection in reinforced concrete using thermal inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Grande, N K; Durbin, P F.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of thermal inertia mapping for bridge deck inspections. Using pulsed thermal imaging, we heat-stimulated surrogate delaminations in reinforced concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Using a dual-band infrared camera system, we measured thermal inertia responses of Styrofoam implants under 5 cm of asphalt, 5 cm of concrete, and 10 cm of asphalt and concrete. We compared thermal maps from solar-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs with thermal inertia maps from flash-heated concrete and asphalt-concrete slabs. Thermal inertia mapping is a tool for visualizing and quantifying subsurface defects. Physically, thermal inertia is a measure of the resistance of the bridge deck to temperature change. Experimentally, it is determined from the inverse slope of the surface temperature versus the inverse square root of time. Mathematically, thermal inertia is the square root of the product of thermal conductivity, density, and heat capacity. Thermal inertia mapping distinguishes delaminated decks which have below-average thermal inertias from normal or shaded decks. Key Words: Pulsed Thermal Imaging, Thermal Inertia, Detection Of Concrete Bridgedeck Delaminations

  7. A debugging method of the Quadrotor UAV based on infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guangjie; Hao, Qian; Yang, Jianguo; Chen, Lizhi; Hu, Hongkang; Zhang, Lijun

    2018-01-01

    High-performance UAV has been popular and in great need in recent years. The paper introduces a new method in debugging Quadrotor UAVs. Based on the infrared thermal technology and heat transfer theory, a UAV is under debugging above a hot-wire grid which is composed of 14 heated nichrome wires. And the air flow propelled by the rotating rotors has an influence on the temperature distribution of the hot-wire grid. An infrared thermal imager below observes the distribution and gets thermal images of the hot-wire grid. With the assistance of mathematic model and some experiments, the paper discusses the relationship between thermal images and the speed of rotors. By means of getting debugged UAVs into test, the standard information and thermal images can be acquired. The paper demonstrates that comparing to the standard thermal images, a UAV being debugging in the same test can draw some critical data directly or after interpolation. The results are shown in the paper and the advantages are discussed.

  8. Remote detection of physiological depression in crop plants with infrared thermal imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The infrared thermal imagery was measured concurrently with physiological status in stressed and non-stressed corn and wheat canopies. Thermal images were obtained with an infrared thermography system from a distance of 5 to 20 m. Each thermal image, composed of 512 (H) × 240 (V) pixels with a sensitivity of 0.05°C, was recorded in a video tape every 8 seconds in the field, and analyzed in a laboratory later. A root-reducing treatment was used for simulating environmental stresses, which treatment was carried out by cutting a root system with a thin metal plate at the depth of 20 cm, but brought little apparent change in plant stands. Photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance in the stressed canopy were depressed, which were accompanied with an inverse change in the canopy surface temperature. The maximum difference in mean surface temperatures of the stressed and non-stressed parts of the canopy was no less than 4.2°C in corn and 3.1°C in wheat. Gaussian distribution of spatial temperature frequency in the stressed part shifted toward higher temperature from that of non-stressed part of the canopy, which was visualized clearly on the pseudo-color thermal image while no visible changes were observed directly from the distance. The infrared imagery was effective, especially, for detecting phisiological depression or for comparing various canopies in their physiological status on a remote and real-time basis

  9. Remote detection of physiological depression in crop plants with infrared thermal imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Y. [Agricultural Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1990-12-15

    The infrared thermal imagery was measured concurrently with physiological status in stressed and non-stressed corn and wheat canopies. Thermal images were obtained with an infrared thermography system from a distance of 5 to 20 m. Each thermal image, composed of 512 (H) × 240 (V) pixels with a sensitivity of 0.05°C, was recorded in a video tape every 8 seconds in the field, and analyzed in a laboratory later. A root-reducing treatment was used for simulating environmental stresses, which treatment was carried out by cutting a root system with a thin metal plate at the depth of 20 cm, but brought little apparent change in plant stands. Photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance in the stressed canopy were depressed, which were accompanied with an inverse change in the canopy surface temperature. The maximum difference in mean surface temperatures of the stressed and non-stressed parts of the canopy was no less than 4.2°C in corn and 3.1°C in wheat. Gaussian distribution of spatial temperature frequency in the stressed part shifted toward higher temperature from that of non-stressed part of the canopy, which was visualized clearly on the pseudo-color thermal image while no visible changes were observed directly from the distance. The infrared imagery was effective, especially, for detecting phisiological depression or for comparing various canopies in their physiological status on a remote and real-time basis.

  10. Estimating top-of-atmosphere thermal infrared radiance using MERRA-2 atmospheric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleynhans, Tania; Montanaro, Matthew; Gerace, Aaron; Kanan, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    Thermal infrared satellite images have been widely used in environmental studies. However, satellites have limited temporal resolution, e.g., 16 day Landsat or 1 to 2 day Terra MODIS. This paper investigates the use of the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) reanalysis data product, produced by NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) to predict global topof-atmosphere (TOA) thermal infrared radiance. The high temporal resolution of the MERRA-2 data product presents opportunities for novel research and applications. Various methods were applied to estimate TOA radiance from MERRA-2 variables namely (1) a parameterized physics based method, (2) Linear regression models and (3) non-linear Support Vector Regression. Model prediction accuracy was evaluated using temporally and spatially coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) thermal infrared data as reference data. This research found that Support Vector Regression with a radial basis function kernel produced the lowest error rates. Sources of errors are discussed and defined. Further research is currently being conducted to train deep learning models to predict TOA thermal radiance

  11. Thermal infrared remote sensing of water temperature in riverine landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handcock, Rebecca N.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Gillespie, Alan R.; Klement, Tockner; Faux, Russell N.; Tan, Jing; Carbonneau, Patrice E.; Piégay, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    Water temperature in riverine landscapes is an important regional indicator of water quality that is influenced by both ground- and surface-water inputs, and indirectly by land use in the surrounding watershed (Brown and Krygier, 1970; Beschta et al., 1987; Chen et al., 1998; Poole and Berman, 2001).Coldwater fishes such as salmon and trout are sensitive to elevated water temperature; therefore, water temperature must meet management guidelines and quality standards, which aim to create a healthy environment for endangered populations (McCullough et al., 2009). For example, in the USA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established water quality standards to identify specific temperature criteria to protect coldwater fishes (Environmental Protection Agency, 2003). Trout and salmon can survive in cool-water refugia even when temperatures at other measurement locations are at or above the recommended maximums (Ebersole et al., 2001; Baird and Krueger, 2003; High et al., 2006). Spatially extensive measurements of water temperature are necessary to locate these refugia, to identify the location of ground- and surface-water inputs to the river channel, and to identify thermal pollution sources. Regional assessment of water temperature in streams and rivers has been limited by sparse sampling in both space and time. Water temperature has typically been measured using a network of widely distributed instream gages, which record the temporal change of the bulk, or kinetic, temperature of the water (Tk) at specific locations. For example, the State of Washington (USA) recorded water quality conditions at 76 stations within the Puget Lowlands eco region, which contains 12,721 km of streams and rivers (Washington Department of Ecology, 1998). Such gages are sparsely distributed, are typically located only in larger streams and rivers, and give limited information about the spatial distribution of water temperature.

  12. Infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis of prepared cation exchangers from cellulosic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nada, A.M.A.; EI-Sherief, S.; Nasr, A.; Kamel, M.

    2005-01-01

    Different cation exchangers were prepared by incorporation of phosphate and sulfate groups into acid or alkali treated wood pulp. The molecular structure of these cation exchangers were followed by infrared spectroscopy and thermal degradation analysis technique. From infrared spectra, a new bands are seen at 1200 and 980 cm-1 in phosphorylated wood pulp due to the formation of C-O-P bond. Another bands were seen at 1400, 1200 and 980 cm-1 in phospho sulfonated wood pulp due to the formation of CO- P and C-O-S bonds. Also, it is seen from infrared spectra that the crystallinity index for acid treated wood pulp has a higher value than untreated and alkali treated wood pulp. On the other hand, the acid treated and phosphorylated acid treated wood pulp have a higher activation energy than untreated and phosphorylated alkali treated wood pulp

  13. MIS photodetectors on intrinsic semiconductors for thermal infrared imagery - A design aid for focal plane matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farre, J.

    1980-12-01

    The physical mechanisms determining the operational behavior of an MIS photodetector for thermal infrared imagery based on a two-dimensional matrix of intrinsic semiconductors constituting a charge injection device are examined. The general principles of a thermal infrared imagery system composed of radiation source, atmosphere, sensor system with entrance optics, detector and environment, and data processing means are introduced, and the parameters of the system as a whole influencing detector characteristics are indicated. The properties of an ideal and a real MIS photodetector are discussed, with attention given to the physical properties of narrow bandgap materials such as InSb, operational properties in the dynamic regime, the carrier tunneling component and experimentally observed instability phenomena. The matrix organization of MIS photodetectors is then considered, with particular attention given to a simple model of charge transfer between two electrodes and the two principal reading mechanisms: charge injection and the floating potential method.

  14. Prospective for graphene based thermal mid-infrared light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, L. M.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R.

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from large area Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) graphene, transferred onto SiO2/Si, and show that the emission is broadly that of a grey-body emitter, with emissivity values of approximately 2% and 6% for mono- and multilayer graphene. For the currents used, which could be sustained for over one hundred hours, the emission peaked at a wavelength of around 4 μm and covered the characteristic absorption of many important gases. A measurable modulation of thermal emission was obtained even when the drive current was modulated at frequencies up to 100 kHz.

  15. An assessment of radiance in Landsat TM middle and thermal infrared wavebands for the detection of tropical forest regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.S.; Foody, G.M.; Curran, P.J.; Lucas, R.M.; Honzak, M.

    1996-01-01

    It has been postulated that tropical forests regenerating after deforestation constitute an unmeasured terrestrial sink of atmospheric carbon, and that the strength of this sink is a function of regeneration stage. Such regeneration stages can be characterized by biophysical properties, such as leaf and wood biomass, which influence the radiance emitted and/or reflected from the forest canopy. Remotely sensed data can therefore be used to estimate these biophysical properties and thereby determine the forest regenerative stage. Studies conducted on temperate forests have related biophysical properties successfully with red and near-infrared radiance, particularly within the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). However, only weak correlations have generally been observed for tropical forests and it is suggested here that the relationship between forest biophysical properties and middle and thermal infrared radiance may be stronger than that between those properties and visible and near-infrared radiance.An assessment of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data revealed that radiance acquired in middle and thermal infrared wavebands contained significant information for the detection of regeneration stages in Amazonian tropical forests. It was demonstrated that tropical forest regeneration stages were most separable using middle infrared and thermal infrared wavebands and that the correlation with regeneration stage was stronger with middle infrared, thermal infrared or combinations of these wavebands than they were with visible, near infrared or combinations of these wavebands. For example, correlation coefficients increased from — 0·26 (insignificant at 95 per cent confidence level) when using the NDVI, to up to 0·93 (significant at 99 per cent confidence level) for a vegetation index containing data acquired in the middle and thermal infrared wavebands. These results point to the value of using data acquired in middle and thermal infrared wavebands for the

  16. Planck 2015 results: XXIII. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect-cosmic infrared background correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    We use Planck data to detect the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the infrared emission from the galaxies that make up the the cosmic infrared background (CIB). We first perform a stacking analysis towards Planck-confirmed galaxy clusters. We detect infrared...... that infrared galaxies in the outskirts of clusters have higher infrared flux than cluster-core galaxies. We also study the cross-correlation between tSZ and CIB anisotropies, following three alternative approaches based on power spectrum analyses: (i) using a catalogue of confirmed clusters detected in Planck...... data; (ii) using an all-sky tSZ map built from Planck frequency maps; and (iii) using cross-spectra between Planck frequency maps. With the three different methods, we detect the tSZ-CIB cross-power spectrum at significance levels of (i) 6σ; (ii) 3σ; and (iii) 4σ. We model the tSZ-CIB cross-correlation...

  17. A protocol for analysing thermal stress in insects using infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Belén; Verdú, José R; Carrascal, Luis M; Lobo, Jorge M

    2016-02-01

    The study of insect responses to thermal stress has involved a variety of protocols and methodologies that hamper the ability to compare results between studies. For that reason, the development of a protocol to standardize thermal assays is necessary. In this sense, infrared thermography solves some of the problems allowing us to take continuous temperature measurements without handling the individuals, an important fact in cold-blooded organisms like insects. Here, we present a working protocol based on infrared thermography to estimate both cold and heat thermal stress in insects. We analyse both the change in the body temperature of individuals and their behavioural response. In addition, we used partial least squares regression for the statistical analysis of our data, a technique that solves the problem of having a large number of variables and few individuals, allowing us to work with rare or endemic species. To test our protocol, we chose two species of congeneric, narrowly distributed dung beetles that are endemic to the southeastern part of the Iberian Peninsula. With our protocol we have obtained five variables in the response to cold and twelve in the response to heat. With this methodology we discriminate between the two flightless species of Jekelius through their thermal response. In response to cold, Jekelius hernandezi showed a higher rate of cooling and reached higher temperatures of stupor and haemolymph freezing than Jekelius punctatolineatus. Both species displayed similar thermoregulation ranges before reaching lethal body temperature with heat stress. Overall, we have demonstrated that infrared thermography is a suitable method to assess insect thermal responses with a high degree of sensitivity, allowing for the discrimination between closely related species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of an Infrared Lamp Array for the Smap Spacecraft Thermal Balance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer R.; Emis, Nickolas; Forgette, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    NASA launched the SMAP observatory in January 2015 aboard a Delta II into a sun-synchronous orbit around Earth. The science payload of a radar and a radiometer utilizes a shared rotating six-meter antenna to provide a global map of the Earth's soil moisture content and its freeze/thaw state on a global, high-resolution scale in this three-year mission. An observatory-level thermal balance test conducted in May/June 2014 validated the thermal design and demonstrated launch readiness as part of the planned environmental test campaign. An infrared lamp array was designed and used in the thermal balance test to replicate solar heating on the solar array and sunlit side of the spacecraft that would normally be seen in orbit. The design, implementation, and operation of an infrared lamp array used for this nineteen-day system thermal test are described in this paper. Instrumental to the smooth operation of this lamp array was a characterization test performed in the same chamber two months prior to the observatory test to provide insight into its array operation and flux uniformity. This knowledge was used to identify the lamp array power settings that would provide the worst case predicted on-orbit fluxes during eclipse, cold, and hot cases. It also showed the lamp array variation when adjustments in flux were needed. Calorimeters calibrated prior to testing determined a relationship between calorimeter temperature and lamp array flux. This allowed the team to adjust the lamp output for the desired absorbed flux on the solar array. Flux levels were within 10% of the desired value at the center of the solar array with an ability to maintain these levels within 5% during steady state cases. All tests demonstrated the infrared lamp array functionality and furthered lamp array understanding for modeling purposes. This method contributed to a high-fidelity environmental simulation, which was required to replicate the extreme on-orbit thermal environments.

  19. Synegies Between Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrometry and the Thermal Infrared in an Urban Environment: An Evaluation of the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HYSPIRI) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Hulley, Glynn C.; Hook, Simon J.; Green, Robert O.

    2012-01-01

    A majority of the human population lives in urban areas and as such, the quality of urban environments is becoming increasingly important to the human population. Furthermore, these areas are major sources of environmental contaminants and sinks of energy and materials. Remote sensing provides an improved understanding of urban areas and their impacts by mapping urban extent, urban composition (vegetation and impervious cover fractions), and urban radiation balance through measures of albedo, emissivity and land surface temperature (LST). Recently, the National Research Council (NRC) completed an assessment of remote sensing needs for the next decade (NRC, 2007), proposing several missions suitable for urban studies, including a visible, near-infrared and shortwave infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectrometer and a multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) instrument called the Hyperspectral Infrared Imagery (HyspIRI). In this talk, we introduce the HyspIRI mission, focusing on potential synergies between VSWIR and TIR data in an urban area. We evaluate potential synergies using an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and MODIS-ASTER (MASTER) image pair acquired over Santa Barbara, United States. AVIRIS data were analyzed at their native spatial resolutions (7.5m VSWIR and 15m TIR), and aggregated 60 m spatial resolution similar to HyspIRI. Surface reflectance was calculated using ACORN and a ground reflectance target to remove atmospheric and sensor artifacts. MASTER data were processed to generate estimates of spectral emissivity and LST using Modtran radiative transfer code and the ASTER Temperature Emissivity Separation algorithm. A spectral library of common urban materials, including urban vegetation, roofs and roads was assembled from combined AVIRIS and field-measured reflectance spectra. LST and emissivity were also retrieved from MASTER and reflectance/emissivity spectra for a subset of urban materials were retrieved from co-located MASTER and

  20. An Efficient Algorithm for Server Thermal Fault Diagnosis Based on Infrared Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang; Xie, Ting; Ran, Jian; Gao, Shan

    2017-10-01

    It is essential for a data center to maintain server security and stability. Long-time overload operation or high room temperature may cause service disruption even a server crash, which would result in great economic loss for business. Currently, the methods to avoid server outages are monitoring and forecasting. Thermal camera can provide fine texture information for monitoring and intelligent thermal management in large data center. This paper presents an efficient method for server thermal fault monitoring and diagnosis based on infrared image. Initially thermal distribution of server is standardized and the interest regions of the image are segmented manually. Then the texture feature, Hu moments feature as well as modified entropy feature are extracted from the segmented regions. These characteristics are applied to analyze and classify thermal faults, and then make efficient energy-saving thermal management decisions such as job migration. For the larger feature space, the principal component analysis is employed to reduce the feature dimensions, and guarantee high processing speed without losing the fault feature information. Finally, different feature vectors are taken as input for SVM training, and do the thermal fault diagnosis after getting the optimized SVM classifier. This method supports suggestions for optimizing data center management, it can improve air conditioning efficiency and reduce the energy consumption of the data center. The experimental results show that the maximum detection accuracy is 81.5%.

  1. A Tunable Mid-Infrared Solid-State Laser with a Compact Thermal Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyang Yu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tunable mid-infrared lasers are widely used in laser spectroscopy, gas sensing and many other related areas. In order to solve heat dissipation problems and improve the environmental temperature adaptability of solid-state laser sources, a tunable all-fiber laser pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO was established, and a compact thermal control system based on thermoelectric coolers, an automatic temperature control circuit, cooling fins, fans and heat pipes was integrated and designed for the laser. This system is compact, light and air-cooling which satisfies the demand for miniaturization of lasers. A mathematical model and method was established to estimate the cooling capacity of this thermal control system under different ambient environments. A finite-element model was built and simulated to analyze the thermal transfer process. Experiments in room and high temperature environments were carried out and showed that the substrate temperature of a pump module could be maintained at a stable value with controlled precision to 0.2 degrees, while the output power stability of the laser was within ±1%. The experimental results indicate that this compact air-cooling thermal control system could effectively solve the heat dissipation problem of mid-infrared solid-state lasers with a one hundred watts level pump module in room and high temperature environments.

  2. Experimental and numerical investigations of heat transfer and thermal efficiency of an infrared gas stove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenlerdchanya, A.; Rattanadecho, P.; Keangin, P.

    2018-01-01

    An infrared gas stove is a low-pressure gas stove type and it has higher thermal efficiency than the other domestic cooking stoves. This study considers the computationally determine water and air temperature distributions, water and air velocity distributions and thermal efficiency of the infrared gas stove. The goal of this work is to investigate the effect of various pot diameters i.e. 220 mm, 240 mm and 260 mm on the water and air temperature distributions, water and air velocity distributions and thermal efficiency of the infrared gas stove. The time-dependent heat transfer equation involving diffusion and convection coupled with the time-dependent fluid dynamic equation is implemented and is solved by using the finite element method (FEM). The computer simulation study is validated with an experimental study, which is use standard experiment by LPG test for low-pressure gas stove in households (TIS No. 2312-2549). The findings revealed that the water and air temperature distributions increase with greater heating time, which varies with the three different pot diameters (220 mm, 240 mm and 260 mm). Similarly, the greater heating time, the water and air velocity distributions increase that vary by pot diameters (220, 240 and 260 mm). The maximum water temperature in the case of pot diameter of 220 mm is higher than the maximum water velocity in the case of pot diameters of 240 mm and 260 mm, respectively. However, the maximum air temperature in the case of pot diameter of 260 mm is higher than the maximum water velocity in the case of pot diameters of 240 mm and 220 mm, respectively. The obtained results may provide a basis for improving the energy efficiency of infrared gas stoves and other equipment, including helping to reduce energy consumption.

  3. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Asteroid 2100 Ra-Shalom: Visible, Infrared, and Thermal Spectroscopy Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Beth Ellen; Shepard, M.; Bus, S. J.; Vilas, F.; Rivkin, A. S.; Lim, L.; Lederer, S.; Jarvis, K.; Shah, S.; McConnochie, T.

    2004-01-01

    The August 2003 apparition of asteroid 2100 Ra-Shalom brought together a collaboration of observers with the goal of obtaining rotationally resolved multiwavelength spectra at each of 5 facilities: infrared spectra at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (Clark and Shepard), radar images at Arecibo (Shepard and Clark), thermal infrared spectra at Palomar (Lim, McConnochie and Bell), visible spectra at McDonald Observatory (Vilas, Lederer and Jarvis), and visible lightcurves at Ondrojev Observatory (Pravec). The radar data was to be used to develop a high spatial resolution physical model to be used in conjunction with spectral data to investigate compositional and textural properties on the near surface of Ra Shalom as a function of rotation phase. This was the first coordinated multi-wavelength investigation of any Aten asteroid. There are many reasons to study near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 2100 Ra-Shalom: 1) It has a controversial classification (is it a C- or K-type object)? 2) There would be interesting dynamical ramifications if Ra-Shalom is a K-type because most K-types come from the Eos family and there are no known dynamical pathways from Eos to the Aten population. 3) The best available spectra obtained previously may indicate a heterogeneous surface (most asteroids appear to be fairly homogeneous). 4) Ra-Shalom thermal observations obtained previously indicated a lack of regolith, minimizing the worry of space weathering effects in the spectra. 5) Radar observations obtained previously hinted at interesting surface structures. 6) Ra-Shalom is one of the largest Aten objects. And 7) Ra-Shalom is on a short list of proposed NEAs for spacecraft encounters and possible sample returns. Preliminary results from the visible, infrared, and thermal spectroscopy measurements will be presented here.

  4. Measurement of thermal properties of magnetic nanoparticles using infrared thermal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jae Young; Chang, Ki Soo; Kook, Myung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are considered promising for biomedical applications such as hyperthermia treatment and disease diagnosis owing to their distinctive thermal properties. For these applications, it is essential to screen the temperature distribution in the targeted disease site....... This study aimed to investigate and observe the thermal properties of a small amount of MNPs used as highly sensitive biomarkers for disease diagnosis by microthermography. Toward this end, we used polyacrylamide and agarose phantoms containing a small amount of MNPs (30 mg Fe-1). In phantoms, the increasing...

  5. Near-near-infrared thermal lens spectroscopy to assess overtones and combination bands of sulfentrazone pesticide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, M.; Silva, J. R.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Scorza Júnior, R. P.; Lima, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    Thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS) in the near-near-infrared region was used to explore the absorptions of overtones and combination bands of sulfentrazone (SFZ) herbicide diluted in methanol. This spectroscopic region was chosen in order to guarantee that only thermal lens effect is noted during the experimental procedure. The results showed that it was possible to detect very low concentrations ( 2 ng/μL) of SFZ in methanol by determining its thermal diffusivity or the absorption coefficient due to the 3ν(NH) + 1δ(CH) combination band. This minimum SFZ concentration is the limit observed by chromatography method. The findings demonstrated that the TLS can be used for precise and accurate assessment of pesticides in ecosystems. Besides, the 3ν(NH) + 1δ(CH) combination band at 960 nm can be used as a marker for SFZ in methanol.

  6. Extraction of Curcumin Pigment from Indonesian Local Turmeric with Its Infrared Spectra and Thermal Decomposition Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Wiryani, A. S.; Rusli, A.; Purnamasari, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Ana; Widiaty, I.; Hurriyati, R.

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is one of the pigments which is used as a spice in Asian cuisine, traditional cosmetic, and medicine. Therefore, process for getting curcumin has been widely studied. Here, the purpose of this study was to demonstrate the simple method for extracting curcumin from Indonesian local turmeric and investigate the infrared spectra and thermal decomposition properties. In the experimental procedure, the washed turmeric was dissolved into an ethanol solution, and then put into a rotary evaporator to enrich curcumin concentration. The result showed that the present method is effective to isolate curcumin compound from Indonesian local turmeric. Since the process is very simple, this method can be used for home industrial application. Further, understanding the thermal decomposition properties of curcumin give information, specifically relating to the selection of treatment when curcumin must face the thermal-related process.

  7. Thermal radiators with embedded pulsating heat pipes: Infra-red thermography and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemadri, Vadiraj A.; Gupta, Ashish; Khandekar, Sameer

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of exploring potential applications of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP), for space/terrestrial sectors, experimental study of embedded PHP thermal radiators, having two different effective Biot numbers respectively, and subjected to conjugate heat transfer conditions on their surface, i.e., natural convection and radiation, has been carried out under different thermo-mechanical boundary conditions. High resolution infrared camera is used to obtain spatial temperature profiles of the radiators. To complement the experimental study, detailed 3D computational heat transfer simulation has also been undertaken. By embedding PHP structures, it was possible to make the net thermal resistance of the mild steel radiator plate equivalent to the aluminum radiator plate, in spite of the large difference in their respective thermal conductivities (k Al ∼ 4k MS ). The study reveals that embedded PHP structures can be beneficial only under certain boundary conditions. The degree of isothermalization achieved in these structures strongly depends on its effective Biot number. The relative advantage of embedded PHP is appreciably higher if the thermal conductivity of the radiator plate material itself is low. The study indicates that the effective thermal conductivity of embedded PHP structure is of the order of 400 W/mK to 2300 W/mK, depending on the operating conditions. - Research highlights: → Study of radiator plates with embedded Pulsating Heat Pipe by infrared thermography. → Radiator is subjected to natural convection and radiation boundary conditions. → Experimental study is supported by 3D simulation. → Effective thermal conductivity of PHPs of the order of 2000 W/mK is obtained. → Efficacy of embedded PHPs depends on the effective Biot number of the system.

  8. [Study on Hollow Brick Wall's Surface Temperature with Infrared Thermal Imaging Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-fang; Yin, Yi-hua

    2015-05-01

    To address the characteristic of uneven surface temperature of hollow brick wall, the present research adopts soft wares of both ThermaCAM P20 and ThermaCAM Reporter to test the application of infrared thermal image technique in measuring surface temperature of hollow brick wall, and further analyzes the thermal characteristics of hollow brick wall, and building material's impact on surface temperature distribution including hollow brick, masonry mortar, and so on. The research selects the construction site of a three-story-high residential, carries out the heat transfer experiment, and further examines the exterior wall constructed by 3 different hollow bricks including sintering shale hollow brick, masonry mortar and brick masonry. Infrared thermal image maps are collected, including 3 kinds of sintering shale hollow brick walls under indoor heating in winter; and temperature data of wall surface, and uniformity and frequency distribution are also collected for comparative analysis between 2 hollow bricks and 2 kinds of mortar masonry. The results show that improving heat preservation of hollow brick aid masonry mortar can effectively improve inner wall surface temperature and indoor thermal environment; non-uniformity of surface temperature decreases from 0. 6 to 0. 4 °C , and surface temperature frequency distribution changes from the asymmetric distribution into a normal distribution under the condition that energy-saving sintering shale hollow brick wall is constructed by thermal mortar replacing cement mortar masonry; frequency of average temperature increases as uniformity of surface temperature increases. This research provides a certain basis for promotion and optimization of hollow brick wall's thermal function.

  9. Reconstructing Face Image from the Thermal Infrared Spectrum to the Visible Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmastro Kresnaraman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During the night or in poorly lit areas, thermal cameras are a better choice instead of normal cameras for security surveillance because they do not rely on illumination. A thermal camera is able to detect a person within its view, but identification from only thermal information is not an easy task. The purpose of this paper is to reconstruct the face image of a person from the thermal spectrum to the visible spectrum. After the reconstruction, further image processing can be employed, including identification/recognition. Concretely, we propose a two-step thermal-to-visible-spectrum reconstruction method based on Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA. The reconstruction is done by utilizing the relationship between images in both thermal infrared and visible spectra obtained by CCA. The whole image is processed in the first step while the second step processes patches in an image. Results show that the proposed method gives satisfying results with the two-step approach and outperforms comparative methods in both quality and recognition evaluations.

  10. A Study on infrared tracing and monitoring of thermal discharge from the power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Sun; Hong, Wuk Hee; Kim, Yung Bae; Park, Jang Rae; Choi, Yung An; Park, Yung San [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center

    1996-08-01

    Massive discharge of cooling water from the nuclear power plants as well as many thermal power plants would cause serious environmental problems. Hence, the task of predicting cooling water dispersion areas has enormous importance for better environmental management related with the power plant operation. For the last two decades, extensive field survey and dispersion modeling have been mainly applied to predict thermal discharge dispersion areas. In this study, the method of infrared thermal sensing was tested as a possible means of measuring the affected areas of thermal discharge at the thermal power plant sites. Many IR images obtained by using the terrestrial camera, or by using the airborne scanner, or from the Landsat iv satellite were analyzed from the pc with the IDRISI and resource software and further enhanced with other image analysis technologies. The result of study proved this IR imaging technology to be an potentially cost-effective tool for assessment of water-temperature increase caused by the thermal discharge from the power plants, however, further elaboration of procedure was highly requested. (author). 9 refs., 24 figs.

  11. Real-Time Monitoring of Occupants’ Thermal Comfort through Infrared Imaging: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Pavlin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermally comfortable indoor environments are of great importance, as modern lifestyles often require people to spend more than 20 h per day indoors. Since most of the thermal comfort models use a variety of different environmental and personal factors that need to be measured or estimated, real-time and continuous assessment of thermal comfort is often not practically feasible. This work presents a cheap and non-invasive approach based on infrared imaging for monitoring the occupants’ thermal sensation and comfort in real time. Thanks to a mechatronic device developed by the authors, the imaging is performed on the forehead skin, selected because it is always exposed to the environment and, thus, facilitating the monitoring activity in a non-invasive manner. Tests have been performed in controlled conditions on ten subjects to assess the hypothesis that the forehead temperature is correlated with subjects’ thermal sensation. This allows the exploitation of this quantity as a base for a simple monitoring of thermal comfort, which could later be tuned with an extensive experimental campaign.

  12. Time series analysis of infrared satellite data for detecting thermal anomalies: a hybrid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppen, W. C.; Pilger, E.; Wright, R.

    2011-07-01

    We developed and tested an automated algorithm that analyzes thermal infrared satellite time series data to detect and quantify the excess energy radiated from thermal anomalies such as active volcanoes. Our algorithm enhances the previously developed MODVOLC approach, a simple point operation, by adding a more complex time series component based on the methods of the Robust Satellite Techniques (RST) algorithm. Using test sites at Anatahan and Kīlauea volcanoes, the hybrid time series approach detected ~15% more thermal anomalies than MODVOLC with very few, if any, known false detections. We also tested gas flares in the Cantarell oil field in the Gulf of Mexico as an end-member scenario representing very persistent thermal anomalies. At Cantarell, the hybrid algorithm showed only a slight improvement, but it did identify flares that were undetected by MODVOLC. We estimate that at least 80 MODIS images for each calendar month are required to create good reference images necessary for the time series analysis of the hybrid algorithm. The improved performance of the new algorithm over MODVOLC will result in the detection of low temperature thermal anomalies that will be useful in improving our ability to document Earth's volcanic eruptions, as well as detecting low temperature thermal precursors to larger eruptions.

  13. Accurate Energy Consumption Modeling of IEEE 802.15.4e TSCH Using Dual-BandOpenMote Hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneels, Glenn; Municio, Esteban; Van de Velde, Bruno; Ergeerts, Glenn; Weyn, Maarten; Latré, Steven; Famaey, Jeroen

    2018-02-02

    The Time-Slotted Channel Hopping (TSCH) mode of the IEEE 802.15.4e amendment aims to improve reliability and energy efficiency in industrial and other challenging Internet-of-Things (IoT) environments. This paper presents an accurate and up-to-date energy consumption model for devices using this IEEE 802.15.4e TSCH mode. The model identifies all network-related CPU and radio state changes, thus providing a precise representation of the device behavior and an accurate prediction of its energy consumption. Moreover, energy measurements were performed with a dual-band OpenMote device, running the OpenWSN firmware. This allows the model to be used for devices using 2.4 GHz, as well as 868 MHz. Using these measurements, several network simulations were conducted to observe the TSCH energy consumption effects in end-to-end communication for both frequency bands. Experimental verification of the model shows that it accurately models the consumption for all possible packet sizes and that the calculated consumption on average differs less than 3% from the measured consumption. This deviation includes measurement inaccuracies and the variations of the guard time. As such, the proposed model is very suitable for accurate energy consumption modeling of TSCH networks.

  14. Two orthogonal carriers assisted 101-Gb/s dual-band DDO-OFDM transmission over 320-km SSMF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiqin; Hu, Rong; Yang, Qi; Luo, Ming; Yu, Shaohua; Li, Wei

    2015-05-04

    We propose a novel fading-free direct-detection optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DDO-OFDM) scheme for 100-Gb/s medium-reach transmission. In the proposed scheme, we adopts two bands spaced at 100-GHz to accommodate the same complex-valued OFDM signal. However, the signals are coupled with a pair of orthogonal optical carriers. By doing so, real and imaginary parts of the complex-valued OFDM signal can be recovered from the two bands, respectively. We also propose a cost-effective scheme to generate such DDO-OFDM signal using an optical 90-degree hybrid and an optical I/Q modulator. The advantage of the proposed method is that it is fading-free, and the electrical spectral efficiency (SE) is doubled compared to traditional direct-detection method. Finally, we experimentally demonstrated a 101-Gb/s dual-band transmission over 320-km SSMF within only 30-GHz electrical bandwidth, which is highly competitive in both capacity and cost.

  15. Non-invasive imaging and monitoring of rodent retina using simultaneous dual-band optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimalla, Peter; Burkhardt, Anke; Walther, Julia; Hoefer, Aline; Wittig, Dierk; Funk, Richard; Koch, Edmund

    2011-03-01

    Spectral domain dual-band optical coherence tomography for simultaneous imaging of rodent retina in the 0.8 μm and 1.3 μm wavelength region and non-invasive monitoring of the posterior eye microstructure in the field of retinal degeneration research is demonstrated. The system is illuminated by a supercontinuum laser source and allows three-dimensional imaging with high axial resolution better than 3.8 μm and 5.3 μm in tissue at 800 nm and 1250 nm, respectively, for precise retinal thickness measurements. A fan-shaped scanning pattern with the pivot point close to the eye's pupil and a contact lens are applied to obtain optical access to the eye's fundus. First in vivo experiments in a RCS (royal college of surgeons) rat model with gene-related degeneration of the photoreceptor cells show good visibility of the retinal microstructure with sufficient contrast for thickness measurement of individual retinal layers. An enhanced penetration depth at 1250 nm is clearly identifiable revealing sub-choroidal structures that are not visible at 800 nm. Furthermore, additional simultaneous imaging at 1250 nm improves image quality by frequency compounding speckle noise reduction. These results are encouraging for time course studies of the rodent retina concerning its development related to disease progression and treatment response.

  16. Infrared survey of 50 buildings constructed during 100 years: thermal performances and damage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1995-03-01

    Different building constructions and craftsmanship give rise to different thermal performance and damage conditions. The building stock of most industrial countries consists of buildings of various age, and constructions, from old historic buildings with heavy stone or wooden construction, to new buildings with heavy or light concrete construction, or modern steel or wooden construction. In this paper the result from a detailed infrared survey of 50 buildings from six Swedish military camps is presented. The presentation is limited to a comparison of thermal performance and damage conditions of buildings of various ages, functions, and constructions, of a building period of more than 100 years. The result is expected to be relevant even to civilian buildings. Infrared surveys were performed during 1992-1993, with airborne, and mobile short- and longwave infrared systems, out- and indoor thermography. Interpretation and analysis of infrared data was performed with interactive image and analyzing systems. Field inspections were carried out with fiber optics system, and by ocular inspections. Air-exchange rate was measured in order to quantify air leakages through the building envelope, indicated in thermograms. The objects studied were single-family houses, barracks, office-, service-, school- and exercise buildings, military hotels and restaurants, aircraft hangars, and ship factory buildings. The main conclusions from this study are that most buildings from 1880 - 1940 have a solid construction with a high quality of craftsmanship, relatively good thermal performance, due to extremely thick walls, and adding insulation at the attic floor. From about 1940 - 1960 the quality of construction, thermal performance and craftsmanship seem to vary a lot. Buildings constructed during the period of 1960 - 1990 have in general the best thermal performance due to a better insulation capacity, however, also one finds here the greatest variety of problems. The result from this

  17. Application of Infrared Thermal Imaging in a Violinist with Temporomandibular Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, M; Coimbra, D; Silva, A; Aguiar Branco, C; Pinho, J C

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) consist of a group of pathologies that affect the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints (TMJ), and/or related structures. String instrumentalists, like many orchestra musicians, can spend hours with head postures that may influence the biomechanical behavior of the TMJ and the muscles of the craniocervicomandibular complex (CCMC). The adoption of abnormal postures acquired during performance by musicians can lead to muscular hyperactivity of the head and cervical muscles, with the possible appearance of TMD. Medical infrared thermography is a non-invasive procedure that can monitor the changes in the superficial tissue related to blood circulation and may serve as a complement to the clinical examination. The objective of this study was to use infrared thermography to evaluate, in one subject, the cutaneous thermal changes adjacent to the CCMC that occur before, during, and after playing a string instrument.

  18. The infrared spectroscopy in the study of the bone crystallinity thermally affected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, C.; Tiesler, V.; Azamar, J.A.; Alvarado G, J.J.; Quintana, P.

    2006-01-01

    Bone is made up by both organic and inorganic components. Among the latter stands out hydroxyapatite (HAP), composed by hexagonal crystallites arranged in a laminar form. The size of the hydroxyapatite crystals may be altered by different conditions, among those figures thermal exhibition, since during burning the bone eliminates organic matrix and thus promotes the crystallization process of the material. An experimental series was designed to measure crystallinity, in which pig bone remains were burnt at different temperatures and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). By means of analogy a comparison was made between the infrared spectra in order to compare with the ones obtained from the archaeological samples, coming from the Classic period Maya sites of Calakmul and Becan, Campeche. (Author)

  19. Definitions in use by the visible and near-infrared, and thermal working groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; Miller, ED; Martin, Bob; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Palmer, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The Calibration Advisory Panel (CAP) is composed of calibration experts from each of the Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments, science investigation, and cross-calibration teams. These members come from a variety of institutions and backgrounds. In order to facilitate an exchange of ideas, and assure a common basis for communication, it was desirable to assemble this list of definitions. These definitions were developed for use by the visible and near-infrared working group, and the thermal infrared working group. Where necessary or appropriate, deviations from these for specific instruments or other sensor types are given in the individual calibration plans. The definitions contained in this document are derived, wherever possible, from definitions accepted by international and national metrological commissions including the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and the International Organization of Legal Metrology (OIML).

  20. Flaw evaluation of Nd:YAG laser welding based plume shape by infrared thermal camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Yeol; Yoo, Young Tae; Yang, Dong Jo; Song, Kyung Seol; Ro, Kyoung Bo

    2003-01-01

    In Nd:YAG laser welding evaluation methods of welding flaw are various. But, the method due to plume shape is difficult to classification od welding flaw. The Nd:YAG laser process is known to have high speed and deep penetration capability to become one of the most advanced welding technologies. At the present time, some methods are studied for measurement of plume shape by using high-speed camera and photo diode. This paper describes the machining characteristics of SM45C carbon steel welding by use of an Nd:YAG laser. In spite of its good mechanical characteristics, SM45C carbon steel has a high carbon contents and suffers a limitation in the industrial application due to the poor welding properties. In this study, plume shape was measured by infrared thermal camera that is non-contact/non-destructive thermal measurement equipment through change of laser generating power, speed, focus. Weld was performed on bead-on method. Measurement results are compared as two equipment. Here, two results are composed of measurement results of plume quantities due to plume shape by infrared thermal camera and inspection results of weld bead include weld flaws by ultrasonic inspector.

  1. Apple detection using infrared thermal image, 3: Real-time temperature measurement of apple tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.H.; Takahashi, T.; Fukuchi, H.; Sun, M.; Terao, H.

    1998-01-01

    In Part 1, we reported the thermal distribution characteristics and the identification methods of apples, leaves and branches by using the infrared thermal image at the specific time. This paper reports the temperature changing characteristics and the relationships among apples, leaves and air temperature based on the information measured by the infrared thermal image equipment in the real-time for 24 hours. As a result, it was confirmed that the average temperature of apples was 1 degree C or more higher than the one of the leaves, and the average temperature of the leaves was almost same as the air temperature within daytime and about 3 hours period after sunset. It was also clarified for a remarkable temperature difference not to exist for midnight and the early morning between the apples and the leaves, and both became almost as well as the air temperature. Moreover, a binary image was easily obtained and the apples could be detected by using this temperature difference informat

  2. Comparative Analysis of Infrared Thermography and CFD Modelling for Assessing the Thermal Performance of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Morón

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption in the building sector has increased significantly in the developed countries over the last decades. For this reason, the new European standards have become stricter in terms of energy saving. This paper establishes a comparison between using infrared thermography for technical building inspection and modelling with Computational Flow Dynamics (CFD tools for the study of thermal performance of the building. The results show that the use of this type of tools gives a reliable response with the difference in thermal changes lower than 0.5 °C with respect to the data taken in situ. Moreover, these simulators of flow dynamics allow to evaluate the efficiency of proposed measures for energy savings and to obtain a reliable approximation to thermal comfort applying the improvement, deepening in the surface analysis of infrared thermography before performing rehabilitation project. In this research, Predicted Mean Vote Index (PMV comfort index of 0.7 for a living room and 0.6 for a bedroom were obtained, that corresponds to C class that includes values in the range of −0.7 < PMV < 0.7 according to the standard UNE-EN 7730.

  3. Thermal infrared remote sensing for riverscape analysis of water temperature heterogeneity: current research and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, S.; Hannah, D. M.; Malcolm, I.; Bergeron, N.; St-Hilaire, A.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change will increase summer water temperatures in northern latitude rivers. It is likely that this will have a negative impact on fish species such as salmonids, which are sensitive to elevated temperatures. Salmonids currently avoid heat stress by opportunistically using cool water zones that arise from the spatio-temporal mosaic of thermal habitats present within rivers. However, there is a general lack of information about the processes driving this thermal habitat heterogeneity or how these spatio-temporal patterns might vary under climate change. In this paper, we document how thermal infrared imaging has previously been used to better understand the processes driving river temperature patterns. We then identify key knowledge gaps that this technology can help to address in the future. First, we demonstrate how repeat thermal imagery has revealed the role of short-term hydrometeorological variability in influencing longitudinal river temperature patterns, showing that precipitation depth is strongly correlated with the degree of longitudinal temperature heterogeneity. Second, we document how thermal infrared imagery of a large watershed in Eastern Canada has shed new light on the landscape processes driving the spatial distribution of cool water patches, revealing that the distribution of cool patches is strongly linked to channel confinement, channel curvature and the proximity of dry tributary valleys. Finally, we detail gaps in current understanding of spatio-temporal patterns of river temperature heterogeneity. We explain how advances in unmanned aerial vehicle technology and deterministic temperature modelling will be combined to address these current limitations, shedding new light on the landscape processes driving geographical variability in patterns of river temperature heterogeneity. We then detail how such advances will help to identify rivers that will be resilient to future climatic warming, improving current and future strategies for

  4. A Study of Coal Fire Propagation with Remotely Sensed Thermal Infrared Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyuan Huo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Coal fires are a common and serious problem in most coal-bearing countries. Thus, it is very important to monitor changes in coal fires. Remote sensing provides a useful technique for investigating coal fields at a large scale and for detecting coal fires. In this study, the spreading direction of a coal fire in the Wuda Coal Field (WCF, northwest China, was analyzed using multi-temporal Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+ thermal infrared (TIR data. Using an automated method and based on the land surface temperatures (LST that were retrieved from these thermal data, coal fires related to thermal anomalies were identified; the locations of these fires were validated using a coal fire map (CFM that was developed via field surveys; and the cross-validation of the results was also carried out using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER thermal infrared images. Based on the results from longtime series of satellite TIR data set, the spreading directions of the coal fires were determined and the coal fire development on the scale of the entire coal field was predicted. The study delineated the spreading direction using the results of the coal fire dynamics analysis, and a coal fire spreading direction map was generated. The results showed that the coal fires primarily spread north or northeast in the central part of the WCF and south or southwest in the southern part of the WCF. In the northern part of the WCF, some coal fires were spreading north, perhaps coinciding with the orientation of the coal belt. Certain coal fires scattered in the northern and southern parts of the WCF were extending in bilateral directions. A quantitative analysis of the coal fires was also performed; the results indicate that the area of the coal fires increased an average of approximately 0.101 km2 per year.

  5. Thermal and Chemical Characterization of Non-Metallic Materials Using Coupled Thermogravimetric Analysis and Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is widely employed in the thermal characterization of non-metallic materials, yielding valuable information on decomposition characteristics of a sample over a wide temperature range. However, a potential wealth of chemical information is lost during the process, with the evolving gases generated during thermal decomposition escaping through the exhaust line. Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a powerful analytical technique for determining many chemical constituents while in any material state, in this application, the gas phase. By linking these two techniques, evolving gases generated during the TGA process are directed into an appropriately equipped infrared spectrometer for chemical speciation. Consequently, both thermal decomposition and chemical characterization of a material may be obtained in a single sample run. In practice, a heated transfer line is employed to connect the two instruments while a purge gas stream directs the evolving gases into the FT-IR. The purge gas can be either high purity air or an inert gas such as nitrogen to allow oxidative and pyrolytic processes to be examined, respectively. The FT-IR data is collected realtime, allowing continuous monitoring of chemical compositional changes over the course of thermal decomposition. Using this coupled technique, an array of diverse materials has been examined, including composites, plastics, rubber, fiberglass epoxy resins, polycarbonates, silicones, lubricants and fluorocarbon materials. The benefit of combining these two methodologies is of particular importance in the aerospace community, where newly developing materials have little available data with which to refer. By providing both thermal and chemical data simultaneously, a more definitive and comprehensive characterization of the material is possible. Additionally, this procedure has been found to be a viable screening technique for certain materials, with the generated data useful in

  6. MODVOLC2: A Hybrid Time Series Analysis for Detecting Thermal Anomalies Applied to Thermal Infrared Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppen, W. C.; Wright, R.; Pilger, E.

    2009-12-01

    We developed and tested a new, automated algorithm, MODVOLC2, which analyzes thermal infrared satellite time series data to detect and quantify the excess energy radiated from thermal anomalies such as active volcanoes, fires, and gas flares. MODVOLC2 combines two previously developed algorithms, a simple point operation algorithm (MODVOLC) and a more complex time series analysis (Robust AVHRR Techniques, or RAT) to overcome the limitations of using each approach alone. MODVOLC2 has four main steps: (1) it uses the original MODVOLC algorithm to process the satellite data on a pixel-by-pixel basis and remove thermal outliers, (2) it uses the remaining data to calculate reference and variability images for each calendar month, (3) it compares the original satellite data and any newly acquired data to the reference images normalized by their variability, and it detects pixels that fall outside the envelope of normal thermal behavior, (4) it adds any pixels detected by MODVOLC to those detected in the time series analysis. Using test sites at Anatahan and Kilauea volcanoes, we show that MODVOLC2 was able to detect ~15% more thermal anomalies than using MODVOLC alone, with very few, if any, known false detections. Using gas flares from the Cantarell oil field in the Gulf of Mexico, we show that MODVOLC2 provided results that were unattainable using a time series-only approach. Some thermal anomalies (e.g., Cantarell oil field flares) are so persistent that an additional, semi-automated 12-µm correction must be applied in order to correctly estimate both the number of anomalies and the total excess radiance being emitted by them. Although all available data should be included to make the best possible reference and variability images necessary for the MODVOLC2, we estimate that at least 80 images per calendar month are required to generate relatively good statistics from which to run MODVOLC2, a condition now globally met by a decade of MODIS observations. We also found

  7. Thermal Field Analysis and Simulation of an Infrared Belt Furnace Used for Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During solar cell firing, volatile organic compounds (VOC and a small number of metal particles were removed using the gas flow. When the gas flow was disturbed by the thermal field of infrared belt furnace and structure, the metal particles in the discharging gas flow randomly adhered to the surface of solar cell, possibly causing contamination. Meanwhile, the gas flow also affected the thermal uniformity of the solar cell. In this paper, the heating mechanism of the solar cell caused by radiation, convection, and conduction during firing was analyzed. Afterward, four 2-dimensional (2D models of the furnace were proposed. The transient thermal fields with different gas inlets, outlets, and internal structures were simulated. The thermal fields and the temperature of the solar cell could remain stable and uniform when the gas outlets were installed at the ends and in the middle of the furnace, with the gas inlets being distributed evenly. To verify the results, we produced four types of furnaces according to the four simulated results. The experimental results indicated that the thermal distribution of the furnace and the characteristics of the solar cells were consistent with the simulation. These experiments improved the efficiency of the solar cells while optimizing the solar cell manufacturing equipment.

  8. Proximity and Gaze Influences Facial Temperature: A Thermal Infrared Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanos eIoannou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Direct gaze and interpersonal proximity are known to lead to changes in psycho-physiology, behaviour and brain function. We know little, however, about subtler facial reactions such as rise and fall in temperature, which may be sensitive to contextual effects and functional in social interactions. Using thermal infrared imaging cameras 18 female adult participants were filmed at two interpersonal distances (intimate and social and two gaze conditions (averted and direct. The order of variation in distance was counterbalanced: half the participants experienced a female experimenter’s gaze at the social distance first before the intimate distance (a socially ‘normal’ order and half experienced the intimate distance first and then the social distance (an odd social order. At both distances averted gaze always preceded direct gaze. We found strong correlations in thermal changes between six areas of the face (forehead, chin, cheeks, nose, maxilliary and periorbital regions for all experimental conditions and developed a composite measure of thermal shifts for all analyses. Interpersonal proximity led to a thermal rise, but only in the ‘normal’ social order. Direct gaze, compared to averted gaze, led to a thermal increase at both distances with a stronger effect at intimate distance, in both orders of distance variation. Participants reported direct gaze as more intrusive than averted gaze, especially at the intimate distance. These results demonstrate the powerful effects of another person’s gaze on psycho-physiological responses, even at a distance and independent of context.

  9. Soil moisture estimation using reflected solar and emitted thermal infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. D.; Cihlar, J.; Estes, J. E.; Heilman, J. L.; Kahle, A.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Millard, J.; Price, J. C.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Classical methods of measuring soil moisture such as gravimetric sampling and the use of neutron moisture probes are useful for cases where a point measurement is sufficient to approximate the water content of a small surrounding area. However, there is an increasing need for rapid and repetitive estimations of soil moisture over large areas. Remote sensing techniques potentially have the capability of meeting this need. The use of reflected-solar and emitted thermal-infrared radiation, measured remotely, to estimate soil moisture is examined.

  10. Simulated transient thermal infrared emissions of forest canopies during rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Jerrell R.; Hawkins, William R.; Howington, Stacy E.; Kala, Raju V.

    2017-05-01

    We describe the development of a centimeter-scale resolution simulation framework for a theoretical tree canopy that includes rainfall deposition, evaporation, and thermal infrared emittance. Rainfall is simulated as discrete raindrops with specified rate. The individual droplets will either fall through the canopy and intersect the ground; adhere to a leaf; bounce or shatter on impact with a leaf resulting in smaller droplets that are propagated through the canopy. Surface physical temperatures are individually determined by surface water evaporation, spatially varying within canopy wind velocities, solar radiation, and water vapor pressure. Results are validated by theoretical canopy gap and gross rainfall interception models.

  11. Satellite infrared imagery for thermal plume contamination monitoring in coastal ecosystem of Cernavoda NPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, M. A.; Zoran, Liviu Florin V.; Dida, Adrian I.

    2017-10-01

    Satellite remote sensing is an important tool for spatio-temporal analysis and surveillance of NPP environment, thermal heat waste of waters being a major concern in many coastal ecosystems involving nuclear power plants. As a test case the adopted methodology was applied for 700x2 MW Cernavoda nuclear power plant (NPP) located in the South-Eastern part of Romania, which discharges warm water affecting coastal ecology. The thermal plume signatures in the NPP hydrological system have been investigated based on TIR (Thermal Infrared) spectral bands of NOAA AVHRR, Landsat TM/ETM+/OLI, and MODIS Terra/Aqua time series satellite data during 1990-2016 period. If NOAA AVHRR data proved the general pattern and extension of the thermal plume signature in Danube river and Black Sea coastal areas, Landsat TM/ETM and MODIS data used for WST (Water Surface Temperature) change detection, mapping and monitoring provided enhanced information about the plume shape, dimension and direction of dispersion in these waters. Thermal discharge from two nuclear reactors cooling is dissipated as waste heat in Danube-Black -Sea Channel and Danube River. From time-series analysis of satellite data during period 1990-2016 was found that during the winter season thermal plume was localized to an area of a few km of NPP, and the mean temperature difference between the plume and non-plume areas was about 1.7 oC. During summer and fall, derived mean temperature difference between the plume and non-plume areas was of about 1.3°C and thermal plume area was extended up to 5- 10 km far along Danube Black Sea Channel.

  12. Contribution of thermal infrared images on the understanding of the subsurface/atmosphere exchanges on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Teodolina; Antoine, Raphaël; Baratoux, David; Rabinowicz, Michel

    2017-04-01

    High temporal resolution of space-based thermal infrared images (METEOSAT, MODIS) and the development of field thermal cameras have permitted the development of thermal remote sensing in Earth Sciences. Thermal images are influenced by many factors such as atmosphere, solar radiation, topography and physico-chemical properties of the surface. However, considering these limitations, we have discovered that thermal images can be used in order to better understand subsurface hydrology. In order to reduce as much as possible the impact of these perturbing factors, our approach combine 1) field observations and 2) numerical modelling of surface/subsurface thermal processes. Thermal images of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Réunion Island), acquired by hand, show that the Formica Leo inactive scoria cone and some fractures close to the Bory-Dolomieu caldera are always warmer, inducing a thermal difference with the surrounding of at least 5°C and a Self-Potential anomaly [1, 2]. Topography cannot explain this thermal behaviour, but Piton de la Fournaise is known as highly permeable. This fact allows the development of an air convection within the whole permeable structure volcanic edifice [2]. Cold air enters the base of the volcano, and exits warmer upslope, as the air is warmed by the geothermal flow [1,2]. Then, we have decided to understand the interaction between subsurface hydrogeological flows and the humidity in the atmosphere. In the Lake Chad basin, regions on both sides of Lake Chad present a different thermal behaviour during the diurnal cycle and between seasons [3]. We propose that this thermal behaviour can only be explained by lateral variations of the surface permeability that directly impact the process of evaporation/condensation cycle. These studies bring new highlights on the understanding of the exchanges between subsurface and the atmosphere, as the presence of a very permeable media and/or variations of the surface permeability may enhance or

  13. Micromachined single-level nonplanar polycrystalline SiGe thermal microemitters for infrared dynamic scene projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyutenko, V. K.; Malyutenko, O. Yu.; Leonov, V.; Van Hoof, C.

    2009-05-01

    The technology for self-supported membraneless polycrystalline SiGe thermal microemitters, their design, and performance are presented. The 128-element arrays with a fill factor of 88% and a 2.5-μm-thick resonant cavity have been grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition and fabricated using surface micromachining technology. The 200-nm-thick 60×60 μm2 emitting pixels enforced with a U-shape profile pattern demonstrate a thermal time constant of 2-7 ms and an apparent temperature of 700 K in the 3-5 and 8-12 μm atmospheric transparency windows. The application of the devices to the infrared dynamic scene simulation and their benefit over conventional planar membrane-supported emitters are discussed.

  14. Prospective for graphene based thermal mid-infrared light emitting devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Lawton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from large area Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD graphene, transferred onto SiO2/Si, and show that the emission is broadly that of a grey-body emitter, with emissivity values of approximately 2% and 6% for mono- and multilayer graphene. For the currents used, which could be sustained for over one hundred hours, the emission peaked at a wavelength of around 4 μm and covered the characteristic absorption of many important gases. A measurable modulation of thermal emission was obtained even when the drive current was modulated at frequencies up to 100 kHz.

  15. Thermal infrared properties of the Martian atmosphere 2. The 15-μm band measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.Z.; Kieffer, H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Viking infrared thermal mapper observations of Mars in the 15-μm CO 2 band reveal global atmospheric thermal behavior at the 0.3- to 0.6-mbar level. Dust entrained by storms produces major modification of diurnal and latitudinal structure in the brightness temperature T 15 . In the dust-laden atmosphere of southern spring and summer 1977, T 15 was a maximum in late afternoon at a latitude well south of the subsolar latitude. Diurnal amplitude was as great as 30 K, while diurnal mean temperatures exceeded 220 K. Over the northern winter polar cap, T 15 increased dramatically following the second global dust storm of 1977; even in regions of polar night the change was up to 80 K. Inversions of similar magnitude resulted, and the change in downward radiance was sufficient to modify substantially the rate of CO 2 condensation at the surface

  16. Thermal deposition analysis during disruptions on DIII-D using infrared scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.L.; Hyatt, A.W.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; Lasnier, C.J.

    1995-12-01

    The DIII-D tokamak generates plasma discharges with currents up to 3 MA and auxiliary input power up to 20 MW from neutral beams and 4 MW from radio frequency systems. In a disruption, a rapid loss of the plasma current and internal thermal energy occurs and the energy is deposited onto the torus graphite wall. Quantifying the spatial and temporal characteristics of the heat deposition is important for engineering and physics-related issues, particularly for designing future machines such as ITER. Using infrared scanners with a time resolution of 120 micros, measurements of the heat deposition onto the all-graphite walls of DIII-D during two types of disruptions have been made. Each scanner contains a single point detector sensitive to 8--12 microm radiation, allowing surface temperatures from 20 C to 2,000 C to be measured. A zinc selenide window that transmits in the infrared is used as the vacuum window. Views of the upper and lower divertor regions and the centerpost provide good coverage of the first wall for single and double null divertor discharges. During disruptions, the thermal energy is not deposited evenly onto the inner surface of the tokamak, but is deposited primarily in the divertor region when operating diverted discharges. Analysis of the heat deposition during a radiative collapse disruption of a 1.5 MA discharge revealed power densities of 300--350 MW/m 2 in the divertor region. During the thermal quench of the disruption, the energy deposited onto the divertor region was more than 70% of the stored thermal energy in the discharge prior to the disruption. The spatial distribution and temporal behavior of power deposition during high β disruptions will also be presented

  17. Dual-Mode Dual-Band Microstrip Bandpass Filter Based on Fourth Iteration T-Square Fractal and Shorting Pin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A new class of dual mode microstrip fractal resonator is proposed and developed for miniaturization of the dual band bandpass filter. The perimeter of the proposed resonator is increased by employing fourth iteration T-square fractal shape. Consequently the lower resonant frequency of the filter is decreased without increasing the usable space. The self similarity of the usable structure enables it to produce the two degenerate modes which are coupled using the proper perturbation technique. The shorting pin is placed at the null in the surface current distribution at the center of the resonator. This shorting pin is coactively coupled to the resonant circuit of the resonator, effectively coupled to the lower degenerate mode and reduces the lower edge band resonant frequency. By adjusting the resonator dimensions and the size of the shorting pin, the resonant frequency and the out-of-band rejection around the transmission bands can be controlled to meet the design requirements. The simulated response of the designed filter has two transmission bands, the first band is from 2.34-3.65 GHz with resonant frequencies at 2.47GHz and 3.55GHz, the second band is from 4.37-5.324GHz with resonant frequencies at 4.5GHz and 5.13GHz. In the pass bands, the group delay is less than 0.65 ns. The proposed filter can be applied to WLAN (2.4 GHz and 5.2 GHz and WiMAX (3.5 GHz and Bluetooth and ZigBee (4.9 GHz.

  18. Bulk mineralogy of the NE Syrtis and Jezero crater regions of Mars derived through thermal infrared spectral analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, M. R.; Goudge, T. A.; Bramble, M. S.; Edwards, C. S.; Bandfield, J. L.; Amador, E. S.; Mustard, J. F.; Christensen, P. R.

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the area to the northwest of the Isidis impact basin (hereby referred to as "NW Isidis") using thermal infrared emission datasets to characterize and quantify bulk surface mineralogy throughout this region. This area is home to Jezero crater and the watershed associated with its two deltaic deposits in addition to NE Syrtis and the strong and diverse visible/near-infrared spectral signatures observed in well-exposed stratigraphic sections. The spectral signatures throughout this region show a diversity of primary and secondary surface mineralogies, including olivine, pyroxene, smectite clays, sulfates, and carbonates. While previous thermal infrared investigations have sought to characterize individual mineral groups within this region, none have systematically assessed bulk surface mineralogy and related these observations to visible/near-infrared studies. We utilize an iterative spectral unmixing method to statistically evaluate our linear thermal infrared spectral unmixing models to derive surface mineralogy. All relevant primary and secondary phases identified in visible/near-infrared studies are included in the unmixing models and their modeled spectral contributions are discussed in detail. While the stratigraphy and compositional diversity observed in visible/near-infrared spectra are much better exposed and more diverse than most other regions of Mars, our thermal infrared analyses suggest the dominance of basaltic compositions with less observed variability in the amount and diversity of alteration phases. These results help to constrain the mineralogical context of these previously reported visible/near-infrared spectral identifications. The results are also discussed in the context of future in situ investigations, as the NW Isidis region has long been promoted as a region of paleoenvironmental interest on Mars.

  19. Ground-based infrared surveys: imaging the thermal fields at volcanoes and revealing the controlling parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Michele; Walter, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Temperature monitoring is a widespread procedure in the frame of volcano hazard monitoring. Indeed temperature changes are expected to reflect changes in volcanic activity. We propose a new approach, within the thermal monitoring, which is meant to shed light on the parameters controlling the fluid pathways and the fumarole sites by using infrared measurements. Ground-based infrared cameras allow one to remotely image the spatial distribution, geometric pattern and amplitude of fumarole fields on volcanoes at metre to centimetre resolution. Infrared mosaics and time series are generated and interpreted, by integrating geological field observations and modeling, to define the setting of the volcanic degassing system at shallow level. We present results for different volcano morphologies and show that lithology, structures and topography control the appearance of fumarole field by the creation of permeability contrasts. We also show that the relative importance of those parameters is site-dependent. Deciphering the setting of the degassing system is essential for hazard assessment studies because it would improve our understanding on how the system responds to endogenous or exogenous modification.

  20. Infrared and laser-Raman spectroscopic studies of thermally-induced globular protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A H; Saunderson, D H; Suggett, A

    1981-03-01

    Infrared and laser-Raman spectroscopy have been used to follow secondary structure changes during the heat-set gelation of a number of aqueous (D2O) globular protein solutions. Measurements of the infrared Amide I' absorption band around 1650 cm-1, for BSA gels of varying clarity and texture, have shown that the very considerable variations in network structure underlying these materials are not reflected in obvious differences in secondary structure. In all cases aggregation is accompanied by development of beta-sheet of a kind common in fibrous protein systems, but for BSA at least this does not appear to vary significantly in amount from one gel type to another. Infrared studies of gels formed from other protein systems have confirmed this tendency for beta-sheet to develop during aggregation, and the tendency is further substantiated by laser-Raman evidence which provides the extra information that in most of the examples studied alpha-helix content simultaneously falls. From these, and other observations, some generalisations are made about the thermally-induced sol-to-gel transformations of globular proteins.

  1. Passive thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging for quantitative imaging of shale gas leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Guyot, Éric; Lagueux, Philippe; Morton, Vince; Giroux, Jean; Chamberland, Martin

    2017-10-01

    There are many types of natural gas fields including shale formations that are common especially in the St-Lawrence Valley (Canada). Since methane (CH4), the major component of shale gas, is odorless, colorless and highly flammable, in addition to being a greenhouse gas, methane emanations and/or leaks are important to consider for both safety and environmental reasons. Telops recently launched on the market the Hyper-Cam Methane, a field-deployable thermal infrared hyperspectral camera specially tuned for detecting methane infrared spectral features under ambient conditions and over large distances. In order to illustrate the benefits of this novel research instrument for natural gas imaging, the instrument was brought on a site where shale gas leaks unexpectedly happened during a geological survey near the Enfant-Jesus hospital in Quebec City, Canada, during December 2014. Quantitative methane imaging was carried out based on methane's unique infrared spectral signature. Optical flow analysis was also carried out on the data to estimate the methane mass flow rate. The results show how this novel technique could be used for advanced research on shale gases.

  2. XRD- and infrared-probed anisotropic thermal expansion properties of an organic semiconducting single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, J; Capria, E; Benevoli, L; Perucchi, A; Demitri, N; Fraleoni-Morgera, A

    2018-01-17

    The anisotropic thermal expansion properties of an organic semiconducting single crystal constituted by 4-hydroxycyanobenzene (4HCB) have been probed by XRD in the range 120-300 K. The anisotropic thermal expansion coefficients for the three crystallographic axes and for the crystal volume have been determined. A careful analysis of the crystal structure revealed that the two different H-bonds stemming from the two independent, differently oriented 4HCB molecules composing the unit cell have different rearrangement patterns upon temperature variations, in terms of both bond length and bond angle. Linearly Polarized Mid InfraRed (LP-MIR) measurements carried out in the same temperature range, focused on the O-H bond spectral region, confirm this finding. The same LP-MIR measurements, on the basis of a semi-empirical relation and of geometrical considerations and assumptions, allowed calculation of the -CNH-O- hydrogen bond length along the a and b axes of the crystal. In turn, the so-calculated -CNH-O- bond lengths were used to derive the thermal expansion coefficients along the corresponding crystal axes, as well as the volumetric one, using just the LP-MIR data. Reasonable to good agreement with the same values obtained from XRD measurements was obtained. This proof-of-principle opens interesting perspectives about the possible development of a rapid, low cost and industry-friendly assessment of the thermal expansion properties of organic semiconducting single crystals (OSSCs) involving hydrogen bonds.

  3. Power Generation from a Radiative Thermal Source Using a Large-Area Infrared Rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Joshua; Kadlec, Emil A.; Jarecki, Robert L.; Starbuck, Andrew; Howell, Stephen; Peters, David W.; Davids, Paul S.

    2018-05-01

    Electrical power generation from a moderate-temperature thermal source by means of direct conversion of infrared radiation is important and highly desirable for energy harvesting from waste heat and micropower applications. Here, we demonstrate direct rectified power generation from an unbiased large-area nanoantenna-coupled tunnel diode rectifier called a rectenna. Using a vacuum radiometric measurement technique with irradiation from a temperature-stabilized thermal source, a generated power density of 8 nW /cm2 is observed at a source temperature of 450 °C for the unbiased rectenna across an optimized load resistance. The optimized load resistance for the peak power generation for each temperature coincides with the tunnel diode resistance at zero bias and corresponds to the impedance matching condition for a rectifying antenna. Current-voltage measurements of a thermally illuminated large-area rectenna show current zero crossing shifts into the second quadrant indicating rectification. Photon-assisted tunneling in the unbiased rectenna is modeled as the mechanism for the large short-circuit photocurrents observed where the photon energy serves as an effective bias across the tunnel junction. The measured current and voltage across the load resistor as a function of the thermal source temperature represents direct current electrical power generation.

  4. A review on the application of medical infrared thermal imaging in hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Elsa; Vardasca, Ricardo; Teixeira, Sérgio; Seixas, Adérito; Mendes, Joaquim; Costa-Ferreira, António

    2017-09-01

    Infrared Thermal (IRT) imaging is a medical imaging modality to study skin temperature in real time, providing physiological information about the underlining structures. One of the most accessible body sites to be investigated using such imaging method is the hands, which can reflect valuable information about conditions affecting the upper limbs. The aim of this review is to acquaint the successful applications of IRT in the hands with a medical scope, opening horizons for future applications based in the achieved results. A systematic literature review was performed in order to assess in which applications medical IRT imaging was applied to the hands. The literature search was conducted in the reference databases: PubMed, Scopus and ISI Web of Science, making use of keywords (hand, thermography, infrared imaging, thermal imaging) combination that were present at the title and abstract. No temporal restriction was made. As a result, 4260 articles were identified, after removal of duplicates, 3224 articles remained and from first title and abstract filtering, a total of 388 articles were considered. After application of exclusion criteria (non-availability, non-clinical applications, reviews, case studies, written in other languages than English and using liquid crystal thermography), 146 articles were considered for this review. It can be verified that thermography provides useful diagnostic and monitoring information of conditions that directly or indirectly related to hands, as well as aiding in the treatment assessment. Trends and future challenges for IRT applications on hands are provided to stimulate researchers and clinicians to explore and address them.

  5. Integrated optics for nulling interferometry in the thermal infrared: progress and recent achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillot, M.; Barthelemy, E.; Bastard, L.; Broquin, J.-E.; Hawkins, G.; Kirschner, V.; Ménard, S.; Parent, G.; Poinsot, C.; Pradel, A.; Vigreux, C.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X.

    2017-11-01

    The search for Earth-like exoplanets, orbiting in the habitable zone of stars other than our Sun and showing biological activity, is one of the most exciting and challenging quests of the present time. Nulling interferometry from space, in the thermal infrared, appears as a promising candidate technique for the task of directly observing extra-solar planets. It has been studied for about 10 years by ESA and NASA in the framework of the Darwin and TPF-I missions respectively [1]. Nevertheless, nulling interferometry in the thermal infrared remains a technological challenge at several levels. Among them, the development of the "modal filter" function is mandatory for the filtering of the wavefronts in adequacy with the objective of rejecting the central star flux to an efficiency of about 105. Modal filtering [2] takes benefit of the capability of single-mode waveguides to transmit a single amplitude function, to eliminate virtually any perturbation of the interfering wavefronts, thus making very high rejection ratios possible. The modal filter may either be based on single-mode Integrated Optics (IO) and/or Fiber Optics. In this paper, we focus on IO, and more specifically on the progress of the on-going "Integrated Optics" activity of the European Space Agency.

  6. Delineation of thermal effluents discharged into tropical waters around Puerto Rico by aerial infrared scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, E.D.

    1975-01-01

    Aerial infrared scanning offers a versatile tool with which to monitor thermal discharges and a rapid method of detecting extraneous discharges, whose temperatures differ from the ambient waters. Knowledge of the extent and distribution of thermal effluents is necessary to assist in determining the effects of the added heat upon biota of the region. An AGA Model 680 Thermovision infrared scanner with a 45 0 lens was mounted in a Cessna 182, and flown at altitudes of 600 to 2000 m during night and twilight hours. The detector was InSb, cooled with liquid nitrogen and sensitive to the range 2 to 5.6 μm. The picture was originally displayed on a color monitor which assigned ten arbitrary colors to shades of gray on the control unit. Isotherms have been assigned using coincidental surface measurements made with a thermometer, read to the nearest 0.1 0 C. The data were then recorded on film. Ranges were set at 2 0 C and 5 0 C, common sensitivities were 0.2 0 C and 0.5 0 C, respectively. More recently, the data have been recorded on magnetic tapes with a Sabre III instrumentation tape recorder. Observed data have been compared to predictions made using the Pritchard Plume Model. Anomalies can be explained by boundary, wind, and tidal effects. (U.S.)

  7. An intelligent approach for cooling radiator fault diagnosis based on infrared thermal image processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri-Garavand, Amin; Ahmadi, Hojjat; Omid, Mahmoud; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Mollazade, Kaveh; Russell Smith, Alan John; Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria

    2015-01-01

    This research presents a new intelligent fault diagnosis and condition monitoring system for classification of different conditions of cooling radiator using infrared thermal images. The system was adopted to classify six types of cooling radiator faults; radiator tubes blockage, radiator fins blockage, loose connection between fins and tubes, radiator door failure, coolant leakage, and normal conditions. The proposed system consists of several distinct procedures including thermal image acquisition, image pre-processing, image processing, two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform (2D-DWT), feature extraction, feature selection using a genetic algorithm (GA), and finally classification by artificial neural networks (ANNs). The 2D-DWT is implemented to decompose the thermal images. Subsequently, statistical texture features are extracted from the original images and are decomposed into thermal images. The significant selected features are used to enhance the performance of the designed ANN classifier for the 6 types of cooling radiator conditions (output layer) in the next stage. For the tested system, the input layer consisted of 16 neurons based on the feature selection operation. The best performance of ANN was obtained with a 16-6-6 topology. The classification results demonstrated that this system can be employed satisfactorily as an intelligent condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for a class of cooling radiator. - Highlights: • Intelligent fault diagnosis of cooling radiator using thermal image processing. • Thermal image processing in a multiscale representation structure by 2D-DWT. • Selection features based on a hybrid system that uses both GA and ANN. • Application of ANN as classifier. • Classification accuracy of fault detection up to 93.83%

  8. Thin film coatings for new generation infrared thermal picture synthesising devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, J.V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of infrared imaging devices has been proved by the continuous marketing of such products for more than 10 years. The need to produce thermal images with high apparent temperature values (600-800 deg. C) in the 3-5 micron waveband, mean that the operating temperature of the device pixels must be high. Such high temperature operation compromises the lifetime and switching speed of the pixels. It is hence desired that the real temperature of the pixels is kept as low as possible to achieve the desired apparent temperature. This requires coating the pixels with a high emissivity coating in the infrared. Current devices have multi-layer double resonating cavity interference structures built on their top surface. These structures enhance the emissivity of the pixels to a value around 50%. However, the manufacturing of such structures on top of the delicate pixels is time intensive and involves many delicate processes, which increase the probability of device failure during manufacture. The work presented in this thesis aims at achieving a simple and quick process that will provide the pixels with a single high emissivity coating. The process is carried out using standard cleanroom equipment with the coating aimed at being than one micron thick, and being able to withstand the operating temperatures of the pixel under ambient atmospheres. The work concludes with an optimised sputter-deposition process of two coatings with a combined thickness of 7000A, followed by annealing at 700 deg. C. This process achieves a coating with an emissivity of 84%. The work also describes the deposition of a thermally stable SiC coating which is highly transparent in the infrared. (author)

  9. Shape memory nanocomposite of poly(L-lactic acid/graphene nanoplatelets triggered by infrared light and thermal heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lashgari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs on the shape memory properties of poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA was studied. In addition to thermal activation, the possibility of infrared actuating of thermo-responsive shape memory PLLA/GNPs nanocomposite was investigated. The incorporated GNPs were expected to absorb infrared wave’s energy and activate shape memory PLLA/GNPs. Different techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD, field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA were used to characterize samples. DSC and WAXD results indicated that GNPs augmented crystallinity due to nucleating effect of graphene particles. GNPs improved both thermal and infrared activating shape memory properties along with faster response. Pure shape memory PLLA was slightly responsive to infrared light and its infrared actuated shape recovery ratio was 86% which increased to more than 95% with loading of GNPs. Drastic improvement in the crystallinity was obtained in nanocomposites with lower GNPs contents (0.5 and 1 wt% due to finer dispersion of graphene which resulted in more prominent mechanical and shape memory properties enhancement. Infrared activated shape memory PLLA/GNPs nanocomposites can be developed for wireless remote shape control of smart medical and bio-systems.

  10. An On-Line Method for Thermal Diffusivity Detection of Thin Films Using Infrared Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Huilong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for thermal diffusivity evolution of thin-film materials with pulsed Gaussian beam and infrared video is reported. Compared with common pulse methods performed in specialized labs, the proposed method implements a rapid on-line measurement without producing the off-centre detection error. Through mathematical deduction of the original heat conduction model, it is discovered that the area s, which is encircled by the maximum temperature curve rTMAX(θ, increases linearly over elapsed time. The thermal diffusivity is acquired from the growth rate of the area s. In this study, the off-centre detection error is avoided by performing the distance regularized level set evolution formulation. The area s was extracted from the binary images of temperature variation rate, without inducing errors from determination of the heat source centre. Thermal diffusivities of three materials, 304 stainless steel, titanium, and zirconium have been measured with the established on-line detection system, and the measurement errors are: −2.26%, −1.07%, and 1.61% respectively.

  11. Infrared Thermal Signature Evaluation of a Pure and Saline Ice for Marine Operations in Cold Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taimur Rashid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine operations in cold climates are subjected to abundant ice accretion, which can lead to heavy ice loads over larger surface area. For safe and adequate operations on marine vessels over a larger area, remote ice detection and ice mitigation system can be useful. To study this remote ice detection option, lab experimentation was performed to detect the thermal gradient of ice with the infrared camera. Two different samples of ice blocks were prepared from tap water and saline water collected from the North Atlantic Ocean stream. The surfaces of ice samples were observed at room temperature. A complete thermal signature over the surface area was detected and recorded until the meltdown process was completed. Different temperature profiles for saline and pure ice samples were observed, which were kept under similar conditions. This article is focused to understand the experimentation methodology and thermal signatures of samples. However, challenges remains in terms of the validation of the detection signature and elimination of false detection.

  12. Relationship between dynamic infrared thermal images and blood perfusion rate of the tongue in anaemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiwei; Zhang, Yan

    2018-03-01

    The relationship between dynamic infrared (IR) thermal images and blood perfusion rate of the tongues of anaemia patients was investigated. Blood perfusion rates at multiple locations on the tongues of 62 anaemia patients and 70 control subjects were measured. For both groups of subjects, dynamic IR thermal images were also recorded within 16 s after the mouth opened. The results showed that the blood perfusion rates at different sites (apex, middle, left side and right side) on the tongues in anaemia patients (3.49, 3.71, 3.85 and 3.77 kg/s m-3) were significantly lower than those at the corresponding sites in control subjects (4.45, 4.66, 4.81 and 4.70 kg/s m-3). After the mouth opened, the tongue temperature decreased more rapidly in anaemia patients than in control subjects. To analyse the heat transfer mechanism, a transient heat transfer model of the tongue was developed. The tongue temperatures in anaemia patients and control subjects were calculated using this model and compared to the tongue temperatures measured by the IR thermal imager. The relationship between the tongue surface temperature and the tongue blood perfusion rate was analysed. The simulation results indicated that the low blood perfusion rate and the correlated changes in anaemia patients can cause faster temperature decreases of the tongue surface.

  13. Localization of thermal anomalies in electrical equipment using Infrared Thermography and support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laib dit Leksir, Y.; Mansour, M.; Moussaoui, A.

    2018-03-01

    Analysis and processing of databases obtained from infrared thermal inspections made on electrical installations require the development of new tools to obtain more information to visual inspections. Consequently, methods based on the capture of thermal images show a great potential and are increasingly employed in this field. However, there is a need for the development of effective techniques to analyse these databases in order to extract significant information relating to the state of the infrastructures. This paper presents a technique explaining how this approach can be implemented and proposes a system that can help to detect faults in thermal images of electrical installations. The proposed method classifies and identifies the region of interest (ROI). The identification is conducted using support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. The aim here is to capture the faults that exist in electrical equipments during an inspection of some machines using A40 FLIR camera. After that, binarization techniques are employed to select the region of interest. Later the comparative analysis of the obtained misclassification errors using the proposed method with Fuzzy c means and Ostu, has also be addressed.

  14. Thermal investigation of an infrared reflow oven with a convection fan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Ro; Choi, Young Ki; Lee, Jung Hee; Lee, Gyu Bong; Chung, Il Yong; Kim, Jung Duck

    1998-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model for an infrared reflow soldering with a convection fan is used by modifying the Eftychiou's numerical modeling. The two-dimensional tunnel model which predicts convective conditions within the reflow oven are solved using the finite volume method with the SIMPLER algorithm. The card model solves the transient two-dimensional heat conduction equation in conjunction with a radiative heat transfer analysis. We also performed an experiment to validate the numerical modeling. The numerical result shows excellent agreement with experimental data. Based on the capability of this model, parametric simulations are performed to determine the thermal response of the solder to variations in the oven operating conditions and heat transfer conditions. This study shows that radiation and conveyor velocity are important factors in the preheat region

  15. Cryogenic and thermal design for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Brooks, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    The 1-meter class cryogenically cooled Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) planned by NASA, is scheduled for a 1992 launch. SIRTF would be deployed from the Shuttle, and placed into a sun synchronous polar orbit of 700 km. The facility has been defined for a mission with a minimum initial lifetime of one year in orbit with mission extension that could be made possible through in-orbit servicing of the superfluid helium cryogenic system, and use of a thermal control system. The superfluid dewar would use an orbital disconnect system for the tank supports, and vapor cooling of the barrel baffle. The transient analysis of the design shows that the superfluid helium tank with no active feedback comes within temperature requirements for the nominal orbital aperture heat load, quiescent instrument, and chopper conditions.

  16. ATTIRE (analytical tools for thermal infrared engineering): A sensor simulation and modeling package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Sensor Development Laboratory (ASDL) at the Stennis Space Center develops, maintains and calibrates remote sensing instruments for the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA). To perform system design trade-offs, analysis, and establish system parameters, ASDL has developed a software package for analytical simulation of sensor systems. This package called 'Analytical Tools for Thermal InfraRed Engineering' - ATTIRE, simulates the various components of a sensor system. The software allows each subsystem of the sensor to be analyzed independently for its performance. These performance parameters are then integrated to obtain system level information such as Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Noise Equivalent Radiance (NER), Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) etc. This paper describes the uses of the package and the physics that were used to derive the performance parameters.

  17. Analysis of rocks involving the x-ray diffraction, infrared and thermal gravimetric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, M.; Rauf, M.A.; Munir, N.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical analysis of rocks and minerals are usually obtained by a number of analytical techniques. The purpose of present work is to investigate the chemical composition of the rock samples and also to find that how far the results obtained by different instrumental methods are closely related. Chemical tests wee performed before using the instrumental techniques in order to determined the nature of these rocks. The chemical analysis indicated mainly the presence of carbonate and hence the carbonate nature of these rocks. The x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis techniques were used for the determination of chemical composition of these samples. The results obtained by using these techniques have shown a great deal of similarities. (author)

  18. Infrared reflecting glazing for automotive application. New developments to improve fuel efficiency and thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielsch, R.; Wahl, A.; Kleinhempel, R. [Southwall Europe GmbH, Grossroehrsdorf (Germany); Coda, M.; Boman, L. [Southwall Technologies Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Solar control coatings in automotive glazing improve the thermal comfort for passengers, degrease solar irradiation into the cabin and reduce fading of materials. In IRR glazing solar radiation reduction is performed by silver based low-e-stacks with high visual transmittance and high near infrared reflectance. The proposed ARB regulation for Califormia published 2009 demanded for reduced total solartransmittance Tts of <50% of automotive glazing in new cars from 2012 on and of <40% starting 2016. Unfortunately, the regulation was ceased last minute and of March 2010 due to some technical concerns related to proper operation of electronic communication devices. Nevertheless, the technical goals regarding the total solar energy transmittance became a widely accepted performance target for solar heat protection glazing in upcoming new car models for the next years. In order to achieve the challenging new Tts target <40% major steps forward in coating design and optimization of layer properties are required. (orig.)

  19. These images show thermal infrared radiation from Jupiter at different wavelengths which are diagnos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    These images show thermal infrared radiation from Jupiter at different wavelengths which are diagnostic of physical phenomena The 7.85-micron image in the upper left shows stratospheric temperatures which are elevated in the region of the A fragment impact (to the left of bottom). Temperatures deeper in the atmosphere near 150-mbar are shown by the 17.2-micron image in the upper right. There is a small elevation of temperatures at this depth, indicated by the arrow, and confirmed by other measurements near this wavelength. This indicates that the influence of the impact of fragment A on the troposphere has been minimal. The two images in the bottom row show no readily apparent perturbation of the ammmonia condensate cloud field near 600 mbar, as diagnosed by 8.57-micron radiation, and deeper cloud layers which are diagnosed by 5-micron radiation.

  20. Volcanic Eruption Observations from an Elevated Point of the Stromboli Using Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, V.; Gagnon, M. A.; Marcotte, F.; Gouhier, M.; Smekens, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Many urban areas are located near active volcanoes around the world. Therefore, scientific research on different indicators of imminent eruptions is carried out on an ongoing basis. Due to the hazardous and unpredictable behavior of volcanoes, remote sensing technologies are normally preferred for investigations. Over the years, the Telops Hyper-Cam, a high-performance infrared hyperspectral camera, has established itself as a reference tool for investigating gas clouds over large distances. In order to illustrate the benefits of standoff infrared hyperspectral imaging for characterizing volcanic processes, many different measurements were carried out from an elevated point ( 800 m) of the Stromboli volcano (Italy) by researchers from the Université Blaise-Pascal (Clermont-Ferrand, France). The Stromboli volcano is well known for its periodic eruptions of small magnitude containing various proportions of ash, lava and gases. Imaging was carried out at a relatively high spectral and spatial resolution before and during eruptions from the North-East (NE) craters. Both sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur tetrafluoride (SiF4) could be successfully identified within the volcano's plume from their distinct spectral features. During the passive degassing phase, a total amount of 3.3 kg of SO2 and 0.8 g of SiF4 were estimated. A violent eruption from NE1 crater was then observed and a total of 45 g and and 7 g of SO2 and SiF4 were estimated respectively. These results are in good agreement with previous work using a UV-SO2 camera. Finally, a smaller eruption from NE2 crater was observed. Total amounts of 3 kg and 17 g of SO2 and SiF4 were estimated respectively. Quantitative chemical maps for both gases will be presented. The results show that standoff thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging provides unique insights for a better understanding of volcanic eruptions.

  1. Thermal effects of an ICL-based mid-infrared CH4 sensor within a wide atmospheric temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Weilin; Zheng, Chuantao; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Girija, Aswathy V.; He, Qixin; Zheng, Huadan; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2018-03-01

    The thermal effects of an interband cascade laser (ICL) based mid-infrared methane (CH4) sensor that uses long-path absorption spectroscopy were studied. The sensor performance in the laboratory at a constant temperature of ∼25 °C was measured for 5 h and its Allan deviation was ∼2 ppbv with a 1 s averaging time. A LabVIEW-based simulation program was developed to study thermal effects on infrared absorption and a temperature compensation technique was developed to minimize these effects. An environmental test chamber was employed to investigate the thermal effects that occur in the sensor system with variation of the test chamber temperature between 10 and 30 °C. The thermal response of the sensor in a laboratory setting was observed using a 2.1 ppm CH4 standard gas sample. Indoor/outdoor CH4 measurements were conducted to evaluate the sensor performance within a wide atmospheric temperature range.

  2. Thermal analysis and infrared emission spectroscopic study of halloysite-potassium acetate intercalation compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hongfei [School of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 China (China); School of Mining Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Liu, Qinfu [School of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 China (China); Yang, Jing [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Zhang, Jinshan [School of Mining Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Frost, Ray L., E-mail: r.frost@qut.edu.au [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2010-11-20

    The thermal decomposition of halloysite-potassium acetate intercalation compound was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and infrared emission spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that intercalation of potassium acetate into halloysite caused an increase of the basal spacing from 1.00 to 1.41 nm. The thermogravimetry results show that the mass losses of intercalation the compound occur in main three main steps, which correspond to (a) the loss of adsorbed water, (b) the loss of coordination water and (c) the loss of potassium acetate and dehydroxylation. The temperature of dehydroxylation and dehydration of halloysite is decreased about 100 {sup o}C. The infrared emission spectra clearly show the decomposition and dehydroxylation of the halloysite intercalation compound when the temperature is raised. The dehydration of the intercalation compound is followed by the loss of intensity of the stretching vibration bands at region 3600-3200 cm{sup -1}. Dehydroxylation is followed by the decrease in intensity in the bands between 3695 and 3620 cm{sup -1}. Dehydration was completed by 300 {sup o}C and partial dehydroxylation by 350 {sup o}C. The inner hydroxyl group remained until around 500 {sup o}C.

  3. Near Infrared Fluorescence Imaging in Nano-Therapeutics and Photo-Thermal Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Mukti; Mishra, Sumit Kumar; Baghini, Mahdieh Shojaei; Chauhan, Deepak S.; Srivastava, Rohit; De, Abhijit

    2017-01-01

    The unresolved and paramount challenge in bio-imaging and targeted therapy is to clearly define and demarcate the physical margins of tumor tissue. The ability to outline the healthy vital tissues to be carefully navigated with transection while an intraoperative surgery procedure is performed sets up a necessary and under-researched goal. To achieve the aforementioned objectives, there is a need to optimize design considerations in order to not only obtain an effective imaging agent but to also achieve attributes like favorable water solubility, biocompatibility, high molecular brightness, and a tissue specific targeting approach. The emergence of near infra-red fluorescence (NIRF) light for tissue scale imaging owes to the provision of highly specific images of the target organ. The special characteristics of near infra-red window such as minimal auto-fluorescence, low light scattering, and absorption of biomolecules in tissue converge to form an attractive modality for cancer imaging. Imparting molecular fluorescence as an exogenous contrast agent is the most beneficial attribute of NIRF light as a clinical imaging technology. Additionally, many such agents also display therapeutic potentials as photo-thermal agents, thus meeting the dual purpose of imaging and therapy. Here, we primarily discuss molecular imaging and therapeutic potentials of two such classes of materials, i.e., inorganic NIR dyes and metallic gold nanoparticle based materials. PMID:28452928

  4. Dust coatings on basaltic rocks and implications for thermal infrared spectroscopy of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Christensen, P.R.; Lucey, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Thin coatings of atmospherically deposited dust can mask the spectral characteristics of underlying surfaces on Mars from the visible to thermal infrared wavelengths, making identification of substrate and coating mineralogy difficult from lander and orbiter spectrometer data. To study the spectral effects of dust coatings, we acquired thermal emission and hemispherical reflectance spectra (5-25 μm; 2000-400 cm-1) of basaltic andesite coated with different thicknesses of air fall-deposited palagonitic soils, fine-grained ceramic clay powders, and terrestrial loess. The results show that thin coatings (10-20 μm) reduce the spectral contrast of the rock substrate substantially, consistent with previous work. This contrast reduction continues linearly with increasing coating thickness until a "saturation thickness" is reached, after which little further change is observed. The saturation thickness of the spectrally flat palagonite coatings is ~100-120 μm, whereas that for coatings with higher spectral contrast is only ~50-75 μm. Spectral differences among coated and uncoated samples correlate with measured coating thicknesses in a quadratic manner, whereas correlations with estimated surface area coverage are better fit by linear functions. Linear mixture modeling of coated samples using the rock substrate and coating materials as end-members is also consistent with their measured coating thicknesses and areal coverage. A comparison of ratios of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra of dark and bright intracrater and windstreak deposits associated with Radau crater suggests that the dark windstreak material may be coated with as much as 90% areal coverage of palagonitic dust. The data presented here also will help improve interpretations of upcoming mini-TES and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) observations of coated Mars surface materials.

  5. Thermal and Infrared Studies of Garnierite from the Soroako Nickeliferous Laterite Deposit, Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufriadin Sufriadin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v7i2.137Mineralogical characterization of some garnierite samples from Soroako have been conducted using X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, and infrared spectroscopy methods. XRD patterns reveal the samples mainly containing the mixture of kerolite (talc-like phase and serpentine with minor smectite, sepiolite, and silica. Thermal analyses of garnierite samples indicated by DTA curves are in good agreement with patterns that have been reported in literature. Three endothermic peaks normally occur in the ranges between 58º C and <800º C illustrating three steps of weight losses: adsorbed, bound, and hydroxyl/crystal water. One additional weight loss in low temperature region of sepiolite is corresponding to the lost of zeolitic water. Infrared spectra appeared in 3800 - 3200 cm-1 region generally exhibit broad absorption bands, indicating low crystallinities of studied samples and can be assigned to the presence of hydroxyl group bonded to octahedral coordination mainly Mg atom. The bands observed at 1660 cm-1, 1639 cm-1, 1637 cm-1, and 1633 cm-1 in all samples indicate water molecules. FTIR spectra displaying the strong bands at 1045 cm-1, 1038 cm-1, and 1036 cm-1 could be related to the presence of Si-O-Si bonds linking to tetrahedral coordination. The strong absorption bands appeared at 511 cm-1, 505 cm-1, 499 cm-1, and 496 cm-1 in respective samples are attributed to divalent cation bonds (e.g. Mg, Ni-O. Both TG/DTA and FTIR seem to be the powerful tool in diagnosing the crystal chemistry of garnierite which is mainly composed of phyllosilicate minerals.

  6. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion (SICWC): Arc Lamp, InfraRed (IR) Thermal Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Sebright, J. [Caterpillar Corp.

    2007-12-15

    The primary goal of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) betwe1311 UT-Battelle (Contractor) and Caterpillar Inc. (Participant) was to develop the plasma arc lamp (PAL), infrared (IR) thermal processing technology 1.) to enhance surface coating performance by improving the interfacial bond strength between selected coatings and substrates; and 2.) to extend this technology base for transitioning of the arc lamp processing to the industrial Participant. Completion of the following three key technical tasks (described below) was necessary in order to accomplish this goal. First, thermophysical property data sets were successfully determined for composite coatings applied to 1010 steel substrates, with a more limited data set successfully measured for free-standing coatings. These data are necessary for the computer modeling simulations and parametric studies to; A.) simulate PAL IR processing, facilitating the development of the initial processing parameters; and B.) help develop a better understanding of the basic PAL IR fusing process fundamentals, including predicting the influence of melt pool stirring and heat tnmsfar characteristics introduced during plasma arc lamp infrared (IR) processing; Second, a methodology and a set of procedures were successfully developed and the plasma arc lamp (PAL) power profiles were successfully mapped as a function of PAL power level for the ORNL PAL. The latter data also are necessary input for the computer model to accurately simulate PAL processing during process modeling simulations, and to facilitate a better understand of the fusing process fundamentals. Third, several computer modeling codes have been evaluated as to their capabilities and accuracy in being able to capture and simulate convective mixing that may occur during PAL thermal processing. The results from these evaluation efforts are summarized in this report. The intention of this project was to extend the technology base and provide for

  7. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  8. A low-power current-reuse dual-band analog front-end for multi-channel neural signal recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrian, H; Gosselin, B

    2014-01-01

    Thoroughly studying the brain activity of freely moving subjects requires miniature data acquisition systems to measure and wirelessly transmit neural signals in real time. In this application, it is mandatory to simultaneously record the bioelectrical activity of a large number of neurons to gain a better knowledge of brain functions. However, due to limitations in transferring the entire raw data to a remote base station, employing dedicated data reduction techniques to extract the relevant part of neural signals is critical to decrease the amount of data to transfer. In this work, we present a new dual-band neural amplifier to separate the neuronal spike signals (SPK) and the local field potential (LFP) simultaneously in the analog domain, immediately after the pre-amplification stage. By separating these two bands right after the pre-amplification stage, it is possible to process LFP and SPK separately. As a result, the required dynamic range of the entire channel, which is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio of the SPK signal of larger bandwidth, can be relaxed. In this design, a new current-reuse low-power low-noise amplifier and a new dual-band filter that separates SPK and LFP while saving capacitors and pseudo resistors. A four-channel dual-band (SPK, LFP) analog front-end capable of simultaneously separating SPK and LFP is implemented in a TSMC 0.18 μm technology. Simulation results present a total power consumption per channel of 3.1 μw for an input referred noise of 3.28 μV and a NEF for 2.07. The cutoff frequency of the LFP band is fc=280 Hz, and fL=725 Hz and fL=11.2 KHz for SPK, with 36 dB gain for LFP band 46 dB gain for SPK band.

  9. Assessment and Correction of on-Orbit Radiometric Calibration for FY-3 VIRR Thermal Infrared Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available FengYun-3 (FY-3 Visible Infrared Radiometer (VIRR, along with its predecessor, Multispectral Visible Infrared Scanning Radiometer (MVISR, onboard FY-1C&D have had continuous global observation more than 14 years. This data record is valuable for weather prediction, climate monitoring, and environment research. Data quality is vital for satellite data assimilations in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP and quantitative remote sensing applications. In this paper, the accuracies of radiometric calibration for VIRR onboard FY-3A and FY-3B, in thermal infrared (TIR channels, are evaluated using the Low Earth Orbit (LEO-LEO simultaneous nadir overpass intercalibration method. Hyperspectral and high-quality observations from Infrared Atmosphere Sounding Instrument (IASI onboard METOP-A are used as reference. The biases of VIRR measurements with respect to IASI over one-and-a-half years indicate that the TIR calibration accuracy of FY-3B VIRR is better than that of FY-3A VIRR. The brightness temperature (BT measured by FY-3A/VIRR is cooler than that measured by IASI with monthly mean biases ranging from −2 K to −1 K for channel 4 and −1 K to 0.2 K for channel 5. Measurements from FY-3B/VIRR are more consistent with that from IASI, and the annual mean biases are 0.84 ± 0.16 K and −0.66 ± 0.18 K for channels 4 and 5, respectively. The BT biases of FY-3A/VIRR show scene temperature-dependence and seasonal variation, which are not found from FY-3B/VIRR BT biases. The temperature-dependent biases are shown to be attributed to the nonlinearity of detectors. New nonlinear correction coefficients of FY-3A/VIRR TIR channels are reevaluated using various collocation samples. Verification results indicate that the use of the new nonlinear correction can greatly correct the scene temperature-dependent and systematic biases.

  10. A dual-band near-field focused reflectarray antenna for RFID applications at 0.9 and 2.4 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hsi-Tseng; Hsueh, Pai-Han; Hung, Tso-Ming; Kuo, Li-Ruei; Chou, Hsi-Hsir

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a dual-band reflectarray antenna which operates at 0.915 and 2.4 GHz to radiate electromagnetic fields focused in the near-zone of array aperture. The design uses two stacked feed antennas operated at 0.915 and 2.4 GHz, respectively, so that the currently available RFID systems in the market can be simultaneously used in an independent fashion. Numerical investigations on the radiation characteristics of this reflectarray, as well as an experimental validation, are presented to demonstrate its feasibility.

  11. Numerical investigation of steady-state thermal behavior of an infrared detector cryo chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhal Mayank

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An infrared (IR detector is simply a transducer of radiant energy, converting radiant energy into a measurable form. Since radiation does not rely on visible light, it offers the possibility of seeing in the dark or through obscured conditions, by detecting the IR energy emitted by objects. One of the prime applications of IR detector systems for military use is in target acquisition and tracking of projectile systems. The IR detectors also have great potential in commercial market. Typically, IR detectors perform best when cooled to cryogenic temperatures in the range of nearly 120 K. However, the necessity to operate in such cryogenic regimes makes the application of IR detectors extremely complex. Further, prior to proceeding on to a full blown transient thermal analysis it is worthwhile to perform a steady-state numerical analysis for ascertaining the effect of variation in viz., material, gas conduction coefficient, h, emissivity, ε, on the temperature profile along the cryo chamber length. This would enable understanding the interaction between the cryo chamber and its environment. Hence, the present work focuses on the development of steady-state numerical models for thermal analysis of IR cryo chamber using MATLAB. The numerical results show that gas conduction coefficient has marked influence on the temperature profile of the cryo chamber whereas the emissivity has a weak effect. The experimental validation of numerical results has also been presented.

  12. Airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over disseminated gold deposits, Osgood Mountains, Humboldt County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over several disseminated gold deposits in northern Nevada in 1983. The aerial surveys were flown to determine whether TIMS data could depict jasperoids (siliceous replacement bodies) associated with the gold deposits. The TIMS data were collected over the Pinson and Getchell Mines in the Osgood Mountains, the Carlin, Maggie Creek, Bootstrap, and other mines in the Tuscarora Mountains, and the Jerritt Canyon Mine in the Independence Mountains. The TIMS data seem to be a useful supplement to conventional geochemical exploration for disseminated gold deposits in the western United States. Siliceous outcrops are readily separable in the TIMS image from other types of host rocks. Different forms of silicification are not readily separable, yet, due to limitations of spatial resolution and spectral dynamic range. Features associated with the disseminated gold deposits, such as the large intrusive bodies and fault structures, are also resolvable on TIMS data. Inclusion of high-resolution thermal inertia data would be a useful supplement to the TIMS data.

  13. MERTIS: the thermal infrared imaging spectrometer onboard of the Mercury Planetary Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeh, T.; Peter, G.; Walter, I.; Kopp, E.; Knollenberg, J.; Helbert, J.; Gebhardt, A.; Weber, I.; Hiesinger, Harry

    2017-11-01

    The MERTIS instrument is a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer onboard of ESA's cornerstone mission BepiColombo to Mercury. MERTIS has four goals: the study of Mercury's surface composition, identification of rock-forming minerals, mapping of the surface mineralogy, and the study of the surface temperature variations and thermal inertia. MERTIS will provide detailed information about the mineralogical composition of Mercury's surface layer by measuring the spectral emittance in the spectral range from 7-14 μm at high spatial and spectral resolution. Furthermore MERTIS will obtain radiometric measurements in the spectral range from 7-40 μm to study the thermo-physical properties of the surface material. The MERTIS detector is based on an uncooled micro-bolometer array providing spectral separation and spatial resolution according to its 2-dimensional shape. The operation principle is characterized by intermediate scanning of the planet surface and three different calibration targets - free space view and two on-board black body sources. In the current project phase, the MERTIS Qualification Model (QM) is under a rigorous testing program. Besides a general overview of the instrument principles, the papers addresses major aspects of the instrument design, manufacturing and verification.

  14. Experimental investigation of thermal loading of a horizontal thin plate using infrared camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. Abdollahzadeh Jamalabadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the results of experimental investigations of the characteristics of thermal loading of a thin plate by discrete radiative heat sources. The carbon–steel thin plate is horizontally located above the heat sources. Temperature distribution of the plate is measured using an infrared camera. The effects of various parameters, such as the Rayleigh number, from 107 to 1011, the aspect ratio, from 0.05 to 0.2, the distance ratio, from 0.05 to 0.2, the number of heaters, from 1 to 24, the thickness ratio, from 0.003 to 0.005, and the thermal radiative emissivity, from 0.567 to 0.889 on the maximum temperature and the length of uniform temperature region on a thin plate are explored. The results indicate that the most effective parameters on the order of impact on the maximum temperature is Rayleigh number, the number of heat sources, the distance ratio, the aspect ratio, the surface emissivity, and the plate thickness ratio. Finally, the results demonstrated that there is an optimal distance ratio to maximize the region of uniform temperature on the plate.

  15. Near-infrared Thermal Emission Detections of a Number of Hot Jupiters and the Systematics of Ground-based Near-infrared Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Bryce; Albert, Loic; Jayawardhana, Ray; Cushing, Michael; Moutou, Claire; Lafreniere, David; Johnson, John Asher; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Deleuil, Magali; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    We present detections of the near-infrared thermal emission of three hot Jupiters and one brown dwarf using the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). These include Ks-band secondary eclipse detections of the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and Qatar-1b and the brown dwarf KELT-1b. We also report Y-band, K CONT-band, and two new and one reanalyzed Ks-band detections of the thermal emission of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b. We present a new reduction pipeline for CFHT/WIRCam data, which is optimized for high precision photometry. We also describe novel techniques for constraining systematic errors in ground-based near-infrared photometry, so as to return reliable secondary eclipse depths and uncertainties. We discuss the noise properties of our ground-based photometry for wavelengths spanning the near-infrared (the YJHK bands), for faint and bright stars, and for the same object on several occasions. For the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and WASP-12b we demonstrate the repeatability of our eclipse depth measurements in the Ks band; we therefore place stringent limits on the systematics of ground-based, near-infrared photometry, and also rule out violent weather changes in the deep, high pressure atmospheres of these two hot Jupiters at the epochs of our observations. Based on observations obtained with WIRCam, a joint project of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), Taiwan, Korea, Canada, France, at the CFHT, which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  16. Retrieval of Saharan desert dust optical depth from thermal infrared measurements by IASI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbussche, S.; Kochenova, S.; Vandaele, A.-C.; Kumps, N.; De Mazière, M.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosols are a major actor in the climate system. They are responsible for climate forcing by both direct (by emission, absorption and scattering) and indirect effects (for example, by altering cloud microphysics). A better knowledge of aerosol optical properties, of the atmospheric aerosol load and of aerosol sources and sinks may therefore significantly improve the modeling of climate changes. Aerosol optical depth and other properties are retrieved on an operational basis from daytime measurements in the visible and near infrared spectral range by a number of instruments, like the satellite instruments MODIS, CALIOP, POLDER, MISR and ground-based sunphotometers. Aerosol retrievals from day and night measurements at thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths (for example, from SEVIRI, AIRS and IASI satellite instruments) are less common, but they receive growing interest in more recent years. Among those TIR measuring instruments, IASI on METOP has one major advantage for aerosol retrievals: its large continuous spectral coverage, allowing to better capture the broadband signature of aerosols. Furthermore, IASI has a high spectral resolution (0.5cm-1 after apodization) which allows retrieving a large number of trace gases at the same time, it will nominally be in orbit for 15 years and offers a quasi global Earth coverage twice a day. Here we will show recently obtained results of desert aerosol properties (concentration, altitude, optical depth) retrieved from IASI TIR measurements, using the ASIMUT software (BIRA-IASB, Belgium) linked to (V)LIDORT (R. Spurr, RTsolutions Inc, US) and to SPHER (M. Mishchenko, NASA GISS, USA). In particular, we will address the case of Saharan desert dust storms, which are a major source of desert dust particles in the atmosphere. Those storms frequently transport sand to Europe, Western Asia or even South America. We will show some test-case comparisons between our retrievals and measurements from other instruments like those listed

  17. Observation of SO2 degassing at Stromboli volcano using a hyperspectral thermal infrared imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekens, Jean-François; Gouhier, Mathieu

    2018-05-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) imaging is a common tool for the monitoring of volcanic activity. Broadband cameras with increasing sampling frequency give great insight into the physical processes taking place during effusive and explosive event, while Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) methods provide high resolution spectral information used to assess the composition of volcanic gases but are often limited to a single point of interest. Continuing developments in detector technology have given rise to a new class of hyperspectral imagers combining the advantages of both approaches. In this work, we present the results of our observations of volcanic activity at Stromboli volcano with a ground-based imager, the Telops Hyper-Cam LW, when used to detect emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) produced at the vent, with data acquired at Stromboli volcano (Italy) in early October of 2015. We have developed an innovative technique based on a curve-fitting algorithm to quickly extract spectral information from high-resolution datasets, allowing fast and reliable identification of SO2. We show in particular that weak SO2 emissions, such as inter-eruptive gas puffing, can be easily detected using this technology, even with poor weather conditions during acquisition (e.g., high relative humidity, presence of fog and/or ash). Then, artificially reducing the spectral resolution of the instrument, we recreated a variety of commonly used multispectral configurations to examine the efficiency of four qualitative SO2 indicators based on simple Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD). Our results show that quickly changing conditions at the vent - including but not limited to the presence of summit fog - render the establishment of meaningful thresholds for BTD indicators difficult. Building on those results, we propose recommendations on the use of multispectral imaging for SO2 monitoring and routine measurements from ground-based instruments.

  18. Ring-patterned plasmonic photonic crystal thermal light source for miniaturized near-infrared spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Shady R.; Elsayed, Ahmed A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2018-02-01

    There is a growing number of spectroscopy applications in the near-infrared (NIR) range including gas sensing, food analysis, pharmaceutical and industrial applications that requires highly efficient, more compact and low-cost miniaturized spectrometers. One of the key components for such systems is the wideband light source that can be fabricated using Silicon technology and hence integrated with other components on the same chip. In this work, we report a ring-patterned plasmonic photonic crystal (PC) thermal light source for miniaturized near-infrared spectrometers. The design is based on silicon and tuned to achieve wavelength selectivity in the emitted spectrum. The design is optimized by using Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) simulation, which is used to compute the power reflectance and transmittance that are used to predict the emissivity of the structure. The design consists of a PC of silicon rings coated with platinum. The period of the structure is about 2 μm and the silicon is highly-doped with n-type doping level in the order of 1019-1020 cm-3 to enhance the free-carrier absorption. The ring etching depth, diameter and shell thickness are optimized to increase its emissivity within a specific wavelength range of interest. The simulation results show an emissivity exceeding 0.9 in the NIR range up to 2.5 μm, while the emissivity is decreased significantly for longer wavelengths suppressing the emission out of the range of interest, and hence increasing the efficiency for the source. The reported results open the door for black body radiation engineering in integrated silicon sources for spectrometer miniaturization.

  19. A new paradigm of oral cancer detection using digital infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, M.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Dasgupta, A.; Banerjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Patsa, S.; Ray, J. G.; Chaudhuri, K.

    2016-03-01

    Histopathology is considered the gold standard for oral cancer detection. But a major fraction of patient pop- ulation is incapable of accessing such healthcare facilities due to poverty. Moreover, such analysis may report false negatives when test tissue is not collected from exact cancerous location. The proposed work introduces a pioneering computer aided paradigm of fast, non-invasive and non-ionizing modality for oral cancer detection us- ing Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging (DITI). Due to aberrant metabolic activities in carcinogenic facial regions, heat signatures of patients are different from that of normal subjects. The proposed work utilizes asymmetry of temperature distribution of facial regions as principle cue for cancer detection. Three views of a subject, viz. front, left and right are acquired using long infrared (7:5 - 13μm) camera for analysing distribution of temperature. We study asymmetry of facial temperature distribution between: a) left and right profile faces and b) left and right half of frontal face. Comparison of temperature distribution suggests that patients manifest greater asymmetry compared to normal subjects. For classification, we initially use k-means and fuzzy k-means for unsupervised clustering followed by cluster class prototype assignment based on majority voting. Average classification accuracy of 91:5% and 92:8% are achieved by k-mean and fuzzy k-mean framework for frontal face. The corresponding metrics for profile face are 93:4% and 95%. Combining features of frontal and profile faces, average accuracies are increased to 96:2% and 97:6% respectively for k-means and fuzzy k-means framework.

  20. Single-Layer, Dual-Port, Dual-Band, and Orthogonal-Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna Array with Low Frequency Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A single-layer, dual-port, dual-band, and dual circularly polarized (CP microstrip array is designed for satellite communication in this paper. The operating frequencies are 8.2 and 8.6 GHz with a very low ratio of 1.05. First, a rectangular patch element is fed through microstrip lines at two orthogonal edges to excite two orthogonal dominant modes of TM01 and TM10. The very low frequency ratio can be realized with high polarization isolations. Then, a 2-by-2 dual-band dual-CP subarray is constructed by two independent sets of sequentially rotated (SR feed structures. An 8-by-8 array is designed on the single-layer thin substrate. Finally, by utilizing one-to-four power dividers and semirigid coaxial cables, a 16-by-16 array is developed to achieve higher gain. Measured results show that the 16-by-16 array has 15 dB return loss (RL bandwidths of 4.81% and 6.75% and 3 dB axial ratio (AR bandwidths of 2.84% and 1.57% in the lower and the upper bands, respectively. Isolations of 18.6 dB and 19.4 dB and peak gains of 25.1 dBic and 25.6 dBic are obtained at 8.2 and 8.6 GHz, respectively.

  1. Automated processing of thermal infrared images of Osservatorio Vesuviano permanent surveillance network by using Matlab code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansivero, Fabio; Vilardo, Giuseppe; Caputo, Teresa

    2017-04-01

    The permanent thermal infrared surveillance network of Osservatorio Vesuviano (INGV) is composed of 6 stations which acquire IR frames of fumarole fields in the Campi Flegrei caldera and inside the Vesuvius crater (Italy). The IR frames are uploaded to a dedicated server in the Surveillance Center of Osservatorio Vesuviano in order to process the infrared data and to excerpt all the information contained. In a first phase the infrared data are processed by an automated system (A.S.I.R.A. Acq- Automated System of IR Analysis and Acquisition) developed in Matlab environment and with a user-friendly graphic user interface (GUI). ASIRA daily generates time-series of residual temperature values of the maximum temperatures observed in the IR scenes after the removal of seasonal effects. These time-series are displayed in the Surveillance Room of Osservatorio Vesuviano and provide information about the evolution of shallow temperatures field of the observed areas. In particular the features of ASIRA Acq include: a) efficient quality selection of IR scenes, b) IR images co-registration in respect of a reference frame, c) seasonal correction by using a background-removal methodology, a) filing of IR matrices and of the processed data in shared archives accessible to interrogation. The daily archived records can be also processed by ASIRA Plot (Matlab code with GUI) to visualize IR data time-series and to help in evaluating inputs parameters for further data processing and analysis. Additional processing features are accomplished in a second phase by ASIRA Tools which is Matlab code with GUI developed to extract further information from the dataset in automated way. The main functions of ASIRA Tools are: a) the analysis of temperature variations of each pixel of the IR frame in a given time interval, b) the removal of seasonal effects from temperature of every pixel in the IR frames by using an analytic approach (removal of sinusoidal long term seasonal component by using a

  2. Thermal and infrared-diode laser effects on indocyanine-green-treated corneal collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, George T.; Patmore, Ann; Shallal, Assaad; McHugh, Dominic; Marshall, John

    1993-07-01

    It has been suggested that laser welds of collagenous tissues form by interdigitation and chemical bonding of thermally 'unraveled' collagen fibrils. We investigated this proposal by attempting to weld highly collagenous, avascular corneal tissue with an infrared (IR) diode laser as follows. First, the temperature at which corneal collagen shrinks and collagen fibrils 'split' into subfibrillary components was determined. Second, since use of a near-IR laser wavelength necessitated addition of an absorbing dye (indocyanine green (ICG) to the cornea, we measured absorption spectra of ICG-treated tissue to ensure that peak ICG absorbance did not change markedly when ICG was present in the cornea. Third, using gel electrophoresis of thermally altered corneal collagen, we searched for covalently crosslinked compounds predicted by the proposed welding mechanism. Finally, we attempted to weld partial thickness corneal incisions infused with ICG. Principal experimental findings were as follows: (1) Human corneal (type I) collagen splits into subfibrillary components at approximately 63 degree(s)C, the same temperature that produces collagen shrinkage. (2) Peak ICG absorption does not change significantly in corneal stroma or with laser heating. (3) No evidence was found for the formation of novel compounds or the loss of proteins as a result of tissue heating. All tissue treated with ICG, however, exhibited a novel 244 kD protein band indicating chemical activity between collagen and corneal stromal components. (4) Laser welding corneal incisions was unsuccessful possibly due to shrinkage of the sides of the incision, lack of incision compression during heating, or a less than optimal combination of ICG concentration and radiant exposure. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the biochemical and morphological complexity of ICG-enhanced IR laser-tissue welding and the need for further investigation of laser welding mechanisms.

  3. Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing for Analysis of Landscape Ecological Processes: Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal Infrared (TIR) remote sensing data can provide important measurements of surface energy fluxes and temperatures, which are integral to understanding landscape processes and responses. One example of this is the successful application of TIR remote sensing data to estimate evapotranspiration and soil moisture, where results from a number of studies suggest that satellite-based measurements from TIR remote sensing data can lead to more accurate regional-scale estimates of daily evapotranspiration. With further refinement in analytical techniques and models, the use of TIR data from airborne and satellite sensors could be very useful for parameterizing surface moisture conditions and developing better simulations of landscape energy exchange over a variety of conditions and space and time scales. Thus, TIR remote sensing data can significantly contribute to the observation, measurement, and analysis of energy balance characteristics (i.e., the fluxes and redistribution of thermal energy within and across the land surface) as an implicit and important aspect of landscape dynamics and landscape functioning. The application of TIR remote sensing data in landscape ecological studies has been limited, however, for several fundamental reasons that relate primarily to the perceived difficulty in use and availability of these data by the landscape ecology community, and from the fragmentation of references on TIR remote sensing throughout the scientific literature. It is our purpose here to provide evidence from work that has employed TIR remote sensing for analysis of landscape characteristics to illustrate how these data can provide important data for the improved measurement of landscape energy response and energy flux relationships. We examine the direct or indirect use of TIR remote sensing data to analyze landscape biophysical characteristics, thereby offering some insight on how these data can be used more robustly to further the understanding and modeling of

  4. Thermal Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Synthetic Allophane and its Potential Formation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    Allophane is a poorly-crystalline, hydrous aluminosilicate with variable Si/Al ratios approx.0.5-1 and a metastable precursor of clay minerals. On Earth, it forms rapidly by aqueous alteration of volcanic glass under neutral to slightly acidic conditions [1]. Based on in situ chemical measurements and the identification of alteration phases [2-4], the Martian surface is interpreted to have been chemically weathered on local to regional scales. Chemical models of altered surfaces detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in Gusev crater suggest the presence of an allophane-like alteration product [3]. Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution models are primary tools for determining the mineralogy of the Martian surface [5]. Spectral models of data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate a global compositional dichotomy, where high latitudes tend to be enriched in a high-silica material [6,7], interpreted as high-silica, K-rich volcanic glass [6,8]. However, later interpretations proposed that the high-silica material may be an alteration product (such as amorphous silica, clay minerals, or allophane) and that high latitude surfaces are chemically weathered [9-11]. A TIR spectral library of pure minerals is available for the public [12], but it does not contain allophane spectra. The identification of allophane on the Martian surface would indicate high water activity at the time of its formation and would help constrain the aqueous alteration environment [13,14]. The addition of allophane to the spectral library is necessary to address the global compositional dichotomy. In this study, we characterize a synthetic allophane by IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to create an IR emission spectrum of pure allophane for the Mars science community to use in Martian spectral models.

  5. Determination of thermal diffusivity of dental enamel and dentin as a function of temperature, using infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Thiago Martini

    2009-01-01

    In this work it was developed a software that calculates automatically, the thermal diffusivity value as a function of temperature in materials. The infrared thermography technique was used for data acquisition of temperature distribution as a function of time. These data were used to adjust a temperature function obtained from the homogeneous heat equation with specific boundary conditions. For that, an infrared camera (detecting from 8 μm to 9 μm) was calibrated to detect temperature ranging from 185 degree C up to 1300 degree C at an acquisition rate of 300 Hz. It was used, 10 samples of dental enamel and 10 samples of dentin, with 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm, which were obtained from bovine lower incisor teeth. These samples were irradiated with an Er:Cr:YSGG pulsed laser (λ = 2,78 μm). The resulting temperature was recorded 2 s prior, 10 s during irradiation and continuing for 2 more seconds after it. After each irradiation, all obtained thermal images were processed in the software, creating a file with the data of thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature. Another file with the thermal diffusivity values was also calculated after each laser pulse. The mean result of thermal diffusivity obtained for dental enamel was 0,0084 ± 0,001 cm2/s for the temperature interval of 220-550 degree C. The mean value for thermal diffusivity obtained for dentin was 0,0015 0,0004 cm2/s in temperatures up to 360 degree C; however, this value increases for higher temperatures. According to these results, it was possible to conclude that the use of infrared thermography, associated with the software developed in this work, is an efficient method to determine the thermal diffusivity values as a function of temperature in different materials. (author)

  6. Identification of thermal properties distribution in building wall using infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouns, Jordan; Dumoulin, Jean

    2016-04-01

    [1] L. Ibos, J-P. Monchau, V. Feuillet, Y. Candau, A comparative study of in-situ measurement methods of a building wall thermal resistance using infrared thermography, in Proc. SPIE 9534, Twelfth International Conference on Quality Control by Artificial Vision 2015, 95341I (April 30, 2015); doi:10.1117/12.2185126 [2] Nassiopoulos, A., Bourquin, F., On-site building walls characterization, Numerical Heat Transfer, Part A : Applications, 63(3) :179 :200, 2013 [3] J. Brouns, Développement d'outils numériques pour l'audit énergétique des bâtiments, PhD thesis, Université Paris-Est, SIE, 2014 [4] J.-L. Lions, Contrôle optimal de systèmes gouvernés par des équations aux dérivées partielles. Book, Dunod editor, 1968.

  7. Thermal infrared spectrometer MERTIS for the BepiColumbo Mission to Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeh, T.; Kaiser, S.; Lenfert, K.; Peter, G.; Walter, I.; Hirsch, H.; Knollenberg, J.; Helbert, J.; Multhaup, K.; Hiesinger, H.; Gebhardt, A.; Risse, S.; Damm, C.; Eberhardt, R.; Baier, V.; Kessler, E.

    2017-11-01

    The MERTIS instrument is a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer onboard of ESA's cornerstone mission BepiColombo to Mercury. MERTIS will provide detailed information about the mineralogical composition of Mercury's surface layer by measuring the spectral emittance in the spectral range from 7-14 μm with a high spatial and spectral resolution. Furthermore MERTIS will obtain radiometric measurements in the spectral range from 7-40 μm to study the thermo-physical properties of the surface material. Under the lead of the German Aerospace Center DLR (Dep. Optical Information Systems, Berlin) a development model (DM) is in development which integrates all MERTIS sub-units of later flight models. With the DM the general design and performance goals of the system shall be investigated and verified. Besides a general overview about the instrument principles the following topics are addressed: Optics setup with a Three Mirror Anastigmatic (TMA) telescope and Offner Spectrometer, Manufacturing techniques for the robust and high precision optics and Radiometer Concept and Design

  8. Hot spots in energetic materials generated by infrared and ultrasound, detected by thermal imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Wei; You, Sizhu; Suslick, Kenneth S; Dlott, Dana D

    2014-02-01

    We have observed and characterized hot spot formation and hot-spot ignition of energetic materials (EM), where hot spots were created by ultrasonic or long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) exposure, and were detected by high-speed thermal microscopy. The microscope had 15-20 μm spatial resolution and 8.3 ms temporal resolution. LWIR was generated by a CO2 laser (tunable near 10.6 μm or 28.3 THz) and ultrasound by a 20 kHz acoustic horn. Both methods of energy input created spatially homogeneous energy fields, allowing hot spots to develop spontaneously due to the microstructure of the sample materials. We observed formation of hot spots which grew and caused the EM to ignite. The EM studied here consisted of composite solids with 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine crystals and polymer binders. EM simulants based on sucrose crystals in binders were also examined. The mechanisms of hot spot generation were different with LWIR and ultrasound. With LWIR, hot spots were most efficiently generated within the EM crystals at LWIR wavelengths having longer absorption depths of ∼25 μm, suggesting that hot spot generation mechanisms involved localized absorbing defects within the crystals, LWIR focusing in the crystals or LWIR interference in the crystals. With ultrasound, hot spots were primarily generated in regions of the polymer binder immediately adjacent to crystal surfaces, rather than inside the EM crystals.

  9. The Response of the Ocean Thermal Skin Layer to Variations in Incident Infrared Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Elizabeth W.; Minnett, Peter J.

    2018-04-01

    Ocean warming trends are observed and coincide with the increase in concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere resulting from human activities. At the ocean surface, most of the incoming infrared (IR) radiation is absorbed within the top micrometers of the ocean's surface where the thermal skin layer (TSL) exists. Thus, the incident IR radiation does not directly heat the upper few meters of the ocean. This paper investigates the physical mechanism between the absorption of IR radiation and its effect on heat transfer at the air-sea boundary. The hypothesis is that given the heat lost through the air-sea interface is controlled by the TSL, the TSL adjusts in response to variations in incident IR radiation to maintain the surface heat loss. This modulates the flow of heat from below and hence controls upper ocean heat content. This hypothesis is tested using the increase in incoming longwave radiation from clouds and analyzing vertical temperature profiles in the TSL retrieved from sea-surface emission spectra. The additional energy from the absorption of increasing IR radiation adjusts the curvature of the TSL such that the upward conduction of heat from the bulk of the ocean into the TSL is reduced. The additional energy absorbed within the TSL supports more of the surface heat loss. Thus, more heat beneath the TSL is retained leading to the observed increase in upper ocean heat content.

  10. Application methods of infrared thermal images in the health care field of traditional Chinese medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Zhang, Xusheng

    2008-12-01

    Infrared thermal imaging (ITI) is the potential imaging technique for the health care field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Successful application demands obeying the characteristics and regularity of the ITI of human body and designing rigorous trials. First, the influence of time must be taken into account as the ITI of human body varies with time markedly. Second, relative magnitude is preferred to be the index of the image features. Third, scatter diagrams and the method of least square could present important information for evaluating the health care effect. A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial was undertaken to study the influences of Shengsheng capsule, one of the TCM health food with immunity adjustment function, on the ITI of human body. The results showed that the effect of Shengsheng capsule to people with weak constitution or in the period of being weak could be reflected objectively by ITI. The relative efficacy rate was 81.3% for the trial group and 30.0% for the control group, there was significant difference between the two groups (P=0.003). So the sensitivity and objectivity of ITI are of great importance to the health care field of TCM.

  11. Thermal analysis of fused deposition modeling process using infrared thermography imaging and finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xunfei; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen

    2017-05-01

    After years of development, Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) has become the most popular technique in commercial 3D printing due to its cost effectiveness and easy-to-operate fabrication process. Mechanical strength and dimensional accuracy are two of the most important factors for reliability of FDM products. However, the solid-liquid-solid state changes of material in the FDM process make it difficult to monitor and model. In this paper, an experimental model was developed to apply cost-effective infrared thermography imaging method to acquire temperature history of filaments at the interface and their corresponding cooling mechanism. A three-dimensional finite element model was constructed to simulate the same process using element "birth and death" feature and validated with the thermal response from the experimental model. In 6 of 9 experimental conditions, a maximum of 13% difference existed between the experimental and numerical models. This work suggests that numerical modeling of FDM process is reliable and can facilitate better understanding of bead spreading and road-to-road bonding mechanics during fabrication.

  12. SENSOR++: Simulation of Remote Sensing Systems from Visible to Thermal Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproth, C.; Schlüßler, E.; Scherbaum, P.; Börner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During the development process of a remote sensing system, the optimization and the verification of the sensor system are important tasks. To support these tasks, the simulation of the sensor and its output is valuable. This enables the developers to test algorithms, estimate errors, and evaluate the capabilities of the whole sensor system before the final remote sensing system is available and produces real data. The presented simulation concept, SENSOR++, consists of three parts. The first part is the geometric simulation which calculates where the sensor looks at by using a ray tracing algorithm. This also determines whether the observed part of the scene is shadowed or not. The second part describes the radiometry and results in the spectral at-sensor radiance from the visible spectrum to the thermal infrared according to the simulated sensor type. In the case of earth remote sensing, it also includes a model of the radiative transfer through the atmosphere. The final part uses the at-sensor radiance to generate digital images by using an optical and an electronic sensor model. Using SENSOR++ for an optimization requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR++ are discussed, and first examples of its use are given, for example a camera simulation for a moon lander. Finally, the verification of SENSOR++ is demonstrated.

  13. Sympathy Crying: Insights from Infrared Thermal Imaging on a Female Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul; Terry, Samantha; Baker, Marc; Gallese, Vittorio; Reddy, Vasudevi

    2016-01-01

    Sympathy crying is an odd and complex mixture of physiological and emotional phenomena. Standard psychophysiological theories of emotion cannot attribute crying to a single subdivision of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and disagreement exists regarding the emotional origin of sympathy crying. The current experiment examines sympathy crying using functional thermal infrared imaging (FTII), a novel contactless measure of ANS activity. To induce crying female participants were given the choice to decide which film they wanted to cry to. Compared to baseline, temperature started increasing on the forehead, the peri-orbital region, the cheeks and the chin before crying and reached even higher temperatures during crying. The maxillary area showed the opposite pattern and a gradual temperature decrease was observed compared to baseline as a result of emotional sweating. The results suggest that tears of sympathy are part of a complex autonomic interaction between the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous systems, with the latter preceding the former. The emotional origin of the phenomenon seems to derive from subjective internal factors that relate to one’s personal experiences and attributes with tears arising in the form of catharses or as part of shared sadness. PMID:27716801

  14. The Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer (PHyTIR): A High Speed, Multispectral, Thermal Instrument Development in Support of HyspIRI-TIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer (PHyTIR) is being developed as part of the risk reduction activities associated with the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI). The HyspIRI mission was recommended by the National Research Council Decadal Survey and includes a visible shortwave infrared (SWIR) pushboom spectrometer and a multispectral whiskbroom thermal infrared (TIR) imager. Data from the HyspIRI mission will be used to address key science questions related to the Solid Earth and Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems focus areas of the NASA Science Mission Directorate. The HyspIRI TIR system will have 60m ground resolution, better than 200mK noise equivalent delta temperature (NEDT), 0.5C absolute temperature resolution with a 5-day repeat from LEO orbit. PHyTIR addresses the technology readiness level (TRL) of certain key subsystems of the TIR imager, primarily the detector assembly and scanning mechanism. PHyTIR will use Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) technology at the focal plane and operate in time delay integration mode. A custom read out integrated circuit (ROIC) will provide the high speed readout hence allowing the high data rates needed for the 5 day repeat. PHyTIR will also demonstrate a newly developed interferometeric metrology system. This system will provide an absolute measurement of the scanning mirror to an order of magnitude better than conventional optical encoders. This will minimize the reliance on ground control points hence minimizing post-processing (e.g. geo-rectification computations).

  15. Structure and composition of enamel and dentin after thermal treatment or infrared laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, Luciano

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to identify the crystallographic structure, optical properties, chemical composition and electron paramagnetic signals that laser irradiation or oven heating produces on the tissue. The thermal treatment was conducted in oven with temperature range below 1000 deg C and the laser irradiation with holmium (Ho:YLF - 2,065 μm) and erbium (Er:YAG - 2,94 μm) laser. The tissue characterization was carried out with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet and visible transmission spectroscopy, light microscopy, infrared transmission/reflection spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance. The holmium irradiated enamel (600-800 J/cm 2 ) shows the presence of tetracalcium phosphate that coexists with the natural phase (hydroxyapatite). The irradiated dentin shows only the sharper diffraction peaks of the natural phase. The narrows peaks, observed after irradiation, could be assigned to the dentin crystal growth and impurities elimination. Tissue discoloration is observed after thermal treatment with temperatures above 100 deg C. Heated enamel become white-opaque and the origin is assigned to the water elimination, which promotes higher light scattering by the prismatic structure. On the other hand, heated dentin, with similar temperatures becomes brown. The dentin browning changes with the temperature and shown two peaks, at 375 deg C and 700 deg C. The peak at 375 deg C is assigned to the collagen structure degradation and at 700 deg C to the cyanate formation. The dentin discoloration produced with temperatures below 200 deg C is reversible after the tissue hydration. Both enamel and dentin discoloration are also observed in erbium irradiated tissues. Thermal treatments, heating in oven or laser irradiation, change mainly the organic matrix composition and water present in the tissues. The inorganic matrix is more stable and its radicals are changed, with more predominance, only at temperatures higher than 500 deg

  16. Facile and high spatial resolution ratio-metric luminescence thermal mapping in microfluidics by near infrared excited upconversion nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Shunbo; Wen, Weijia; Cao, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    A local area temperature monitor is important for precise control of chemical and biological processes in microfluidics. In this work, we developed a facile method to realize micron spatial resolution of temperature mapping in a microfluidic channel quickly and cost effectively. Based on the temperature dependent fluorescence emission of NaYF 4 :Yb 3+ , Er 3+ upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) under near-infrared irradiation, ratio-metric imaging of UCNPs doped polydimethylsiloxane can map detailed temperature distribution in the channel. Unlike some reported strategies that utilize temperature sensitive organic dye (such as Rhodamine) to achieve thermal sensing, our method is highly chemically inert and physically stable without any performance degradation in long term operation. Moreover, this method can be easily scaled up or down, since the spatial and temperature resolution is determined by an optical imaging system. Our method supplied a simple and efficient solution for temperature mapping on a heterogeneous surface where usage of an infrared thermal camera was limited

  17. Analysis on nondestructive temperature distribution of tire tread part in a running using infrared thermal vision camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Yeol; Yang, Dong Jo; Ma, Sang Dong; Park, Byoung Gu; Lee, Ju Wan

    2001-01-01

    The experimental method which investigates validity of numerical simulation for wheeling tires has not developed until now. Separation of belt caused by sudden temperature increase is the most serious problem with wheeling tires. Actually, separation of belt is closely related with the life cycle and design of tires. It is important to investigate the temperature history of tires because sudden temperature increase on belt accelerates the thermal fatigue and then causes the destruction of bending area in the radial direction. Therefore, in the present study, finite element method (FEM) was used to obtain the accurate temperature distribution of tire. Its results were compared with experimental data acquired by infrared thermal camera.

  18. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Yu; Meng, Xiang-Bing; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method. PMID:24696649

  19. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method.

  20. Synergistic Use of Thermal Infrared Field and Satellite Data: Eruption Detection, Monitoring and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The ASTER-based observational success of active volcanic processes early in the Terra mission later gave rise to a funded NASA program designed to both increase the number of ASTER scenes following an eruption and perform the ground-based science needed to validate that data. The urgent request protocol (URP) system for ASTER grew out of this initial study and has now operated in conjunction with and the support of the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Hawaii, the USGS Land Processes DAAC, and the ASTER science team. The University of Pittsburgh oversees this rapid response/sensor-web system, which until 2011 had focused solely on the active volcanoes in the North Pacific region. Since that time, it has been expanded to operate globally with AVHRR and MODIS and now ASTER visible and thermal infrared (TIR) data are being acquired at numerous active volcanoes around the world. This program relies on the increased temporal resolution of AVHRR/MODIS midwave infrared data to trigger the next available ASTER observation, which results in ASTER data as frequently as every 2-5 days. For many new targets such as Mt. Etna, the URP has increased the observational frequency by as much 50%. Examples of these datasets will be presented, which have been used for operational response to new eruptions as well as longer-term scientific studies. These studies include emplacement of new lava flows, detection of endogenous dome growth, and interpretation of hazardous dome collapse events. As a means to validate the ASTER TIR data and capture higher-resolution images, a new ground-based sensor has recently been developed that consists of standard FLIR camera modified with wavelength filters similar to the ASTER bands. Data from this instrument have been acquired of the lava lake at Kilauea and reveal differences in emissivity between molten and cooled surfaces confirming prior laboratory results and providing important constraints on lava

  1. High-efficiency electroluminescence and amplified spontaneous emission from a thermally activated delayed fluorescent near-infrared emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hyeon; D'Aléo, Anthony; Chen, Xian-Kai; Sandanayaka, Atula D. S.; Yao, Dandan; Zhao, Li; Komino, Takeshi; Zaborova, Elena; Canard, Gabriel; Tsuchiya, Youichi; Choi, Eunyoung; Wu, Jeong Weon; Fages, Frédéric; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Ribierre, Jean-Charles; Adachi, Chihaya

    2018-02-01

    Near-infrared organic light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers could benefit a variety of applications including night-vision displays, sensors and information-secured displays. Organic dyes can generate electroluminescence efficiently at visible wavelengths, but organic light-emitting diodes are still underperforming in the near-infrared region. Here, we report thermally activated delayed fluorescent organic light-emitting diodes that operate at near-infrared wavelengths with a maximum external quantum efficiency of nearly 10% using a boron difluoride curcuminoid derivative. As well as an effective upconversion from triplet to singlet excited states due to the non-adiabatic coupling effect, this donor-acceptor-donor compound also exhibits efficient amplified spontaneous emission. By controlling the polarity of the active medium, the maximum emission wavelength of the electroluminescence spectrum can be tuned from 700 to 780 nm. This study represents an important advance in near-infrared organic light-emitting diodes and the design of alternative molecular architectures for photonic applications based on thermally activated delayed fluorescence.

  2. A method to quickly test the emissivity with an infrared thermal imaging system within a small distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan-yu; Hu, Rui; Wang, Rui-xin

    2015-10-01

    A simple method has been set up to quickly test the emissivity with an infrared thermal imaging system within a small distance according to the theory of measuring temperature by infrared system, which is based on the Planck radiation law and Lambert-beer law. The object's temperature is promoted and held on by a heater while a temperature difference has been formed between the target and environment. The emissivity of human skin, galvanized iron plate, black rubber and liquid water has been tested under the condition that the emissivity is set in 1.0 and the testing distance is 1m. According to the invariance of human's body temperature, a testing curve is established to describe that the thermal imaging temperatures various with the emissivity which is set in from 0.9 to 1.0. As a result, the method has been verified. The testing results show that the emissivity of human skin is 0.95. The emissivity of galvanized iron plate, black rubber and liquid water decreases with the increase of object's temperature. The emissivity of galvanized iron plate is far smaller than the one of human skin, black rubber or water. The emissivity of water slowly linearly decreases with the increase of its temperature. By the study, within a small distance and clean atmosphere, the infrared emissivity of objects may be expediently tested with an infrared thermal imaging system according to the method, which is promoting the object's temperature to make it different from the environment temperature, then simultaneously measures the environmental temperature, the real temperature and thermal imaging temperature of the object when the emissivity is set in 1.0 and the testing distance is 1.0m.

  3. Mapping temperature and radiant geothermal heat flux anomalies in the Yellowstone geothermal system using ASTER thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Heasler, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to use satellite-based thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data to measure, map, and monitor geothermal activity within the Yellowstone geothermal area to help meet the missions of both the U.S. Geological Survey Yellowstone Volcano Observatory and the Yellowstone National Park Geology Program. Specifically, the goals were to: 1) address the challenges of remotely characterizing the spatially and temporally dynamic thermal features in Yellowstone by using nighttime TIR data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and 2) estimate the temperature, geothermal radiant emittance, and radiant geothermal heat flux (GHF) for Yellowstone’s thermal areas (both Park wide and for individual thermal areas). ASTER TIR data (90-m pixels) acquired at night during January and February, 2010, were used to estimate surface temperature, radiant emittance, and radiant GHF from all of Yellowstone’s thermal features, produce thermal anomaly maps, and update field-based maps of thermal areas. A background subtraction technique was used to isolate the geothermal component of TIR radiance from thermal radiance due to insolation. A lower limit for the Yellowstone’s total radiant GHF was established at ~2.0 GW, which is ~30-45% of the heat flux estimated through geochemical (Cl-flux) methods. Additionally, about 5 km2 was added to the geodatabase of mapped thermal areas. This work provides a framework for future satellite-based thermal monitoring at Yellowstone as well as exploration of other volcanic / geothermal systems on a global scale.

  4. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, the organic carbon concentration is measured using thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) from quartz fiber filters. Here, methods are presented whereby Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters are used to accurately predict TOR OC. Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filters. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites sampled during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to artifact-corrected TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date which leads to precise and accurate OC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, all μg m-3 values based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; this division also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass indicating that the

  5. A Useful Tool for Atmospheric Correction and Surface Temperature Estimation of Landsat Infrared Thermal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivalland, Vincent; Tardy, Benjamin; Huc, Mireille; Hagolle, Olivier; Marcq, Sébastien; Boulet, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Land Surface temperature (LST) is a critical variable for studying the energy and water budgets at the Earth surface, and is a key component of many aspects of climate research and services. The Landsat program jointly carried out by NASA and USGS has been providing thermal infrared data for 40 years, but no associated LST product has been yet routinely proposed to community. To derive LST values, radiances measured at sensor-level need to be corrected for the atmospheric absorption, the atmospheric emission and the surface emissivity effect. Until now, existing LST products have been generated with multi channel methods such as the Temperature/Emissivity Separation (TES) adapted to ASTER data or the generalized split-window algorithm adapted to MODIS multispectral data. Those approaches are ill-adapted to the Landsat mono-window data specificity. The atmospheric correction methodology usually used for Landsat data requires detailed information about the state of the atmosphere. This information may be obtained from radio-sounding or model atmospheric reanalysis and is supplied to a radiative transfer model in order to estimate atmospheric parameters for a given coordinate. In this work, we present a new automatic tool dedicated to Landsat thermal data correction which improves the common atmospheric correction methodology by introducing the spatial dimension in the process. The python tool developed during this study, named LANDARTs for LANDsat Automatic Retrieval of surface Temperature, is fully automatic and provides atmospheric corrections for a whole Landsat tile. Vertical atmospheric conditions are downloaded from the ERA Interim dataset from ECMWF meteorological organization which provides them at 0.125 degrees resolution, at a global scale and with a 6-hour-time step. The atmospheric correction parameters are estimated on the atmospheric grid using the commercial software MODTRAN, then interpolated to 30m resolution. We detail the processing steps

  6. Application of Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing for Quantitative Evaluation of Crop Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J.; Luvall, J.; Rickman, D.; Mask, P.; Wersinger, J.; Sullivan, D.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Evidence suggests that thermal infrared emittance (TIR) at the field-scale is largely a function of the integrated crop/soil moisture continuum. Because soil moisture dynamics largely determine crop yields in non-irrigated farming (85 % of Alabama farms are non-irrigated), TIR may be an effective method of mapping within field crop yield variability, and possibly, absolute yields. The ability to map yield variability at juvenile growth stages can lead to improved soil fertility and pest management, as well as facilitating the development of economic forecasting. Researchers at GHCC/MSFC/NASA and Auburn University are currently investigating the role of TIR in site-specific agriculture. Site-specific agriculture (SSA), or precision farming, is a method of crop production in which zones and soils within a field are delineated and managed according to their unique properties. The goal of SSA is to improve farm profits and reduce environmental impacts through targeted agrochemical applications. The foundation of SSA depends upon the spatial and temporal characterization of soil and crop properties through the creation of management zones. Management zones can be delineated using: 1) remote sensing (RS) data, 2) conventional soil testing and soil mapping, and 3) yield mapping. Portions of this research have concentrated on using remote sensing data to map yield variability in corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) crops. Remote sensing data have been collected for several fields in the Tennessee Valley region at various crop growth stages during the last four growing seasons. Preliminary results of this study will be presented.

  7. Airborne thermal infrared imaging of the 2004-2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. J.; Vallance, J. W.; Logan, M.; Wessels, R.; Ramsey, M.

    2005-12-01

    A helicopter-mounted forward-looking infrared imaging radiometer (FLIR) documented the explosive and effusive activity at Mount St. Helens during the 2004-2005 eruption. A gyrostabilzed gimbal controlled by a crew member houses the FLIR radiometer and an optical video camera attached at the lower front of the helicopter. Since October 1, 2004 the system has provided an unprecedented data set of thermal and video dome-growth observations. Flights were conducted as frequently as twice daily during the initial month of the eruption (when changes in the crater and dome occurred rapidly), and have been continued on a tri-weekly basis during the period of sustained dome growth. As with any new technology, the routine use of FLIR images to aid in volcano monitoring has been a learning experience in terms of observation strategy and data interpretation. Some of the unique information that has been derived from these data to date include: 1) Rapid identification of the phreatic nature of the early explosive phase; 2) Observation of faulting and associated heat flow during times of large scale deformation; 3) Venting of hot gas through a short lived crater lake, indicative of a shallow magma source; 4) Increased heat flow of the crater floor prior to the initial dome extrusion; 5) Confirmation of new magma reaching the surface; 6) Identification of the source of active lava extrusion, dome collapse, and block and ash flows. Temperatures vary from ambient, in areas insulated by fault gouge and talus produced during extrusion, to as high as 500-740 degrees C in regions of active extrusion, collapse, and fracturing. This temperature variation needs to be accounted for in the retrieval of eruption parameters using satellite-based techniques as such features are sub-pixel size in satellite images.

  8. Use of the Vis-SWIR to Aid Atmospheric Correction of Multispectral and Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared (TIR) Imagery: The TIR Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gruninger, John; Fox, Marsha; Lee, Jamine; Ratkowski, Anthony J; Hoke, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    The atmospheric correction of thermal infrared (TIR) imagery involves the combined tasks of separation of atmospheric transmittance, downwelling flux and upwelling radiance from the surface material spectral emissivity and temperature...

  9. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Wei, Chaochen [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate.

  10. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd; Wei, Chaochen; Shao, Lin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate

  11. Analysis of peripheral thermal damage after laser irradiation of dentin using polarized light microscopy and synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Rosa, Alfredo; Sarma, Anupama V.; Le, Charles Q.; Jones, Robert S.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    It is necessary to minimize peripheral thermal damage during laser irradiation, since thermal damage to collagen and mineral compromises the bond strength to restorative materials in dentin and inhibits healing and osteointegration in bone. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that lasers resonant to the specific absorption of water, collagen, and hydroxyapatite with pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation times at each respective laser wavelength will efficiently remove dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Precise incisions were produced in 3 x 3 mm2 blocks of human dentin using CO2 (9.6 μm), Er:YSGG (2.79 μm), and Nd:YAG (355 nm) lasers with and without a computer controlled water spray. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography was used to obtain optical cross-sections of each incision to determine the rate and efficiency of ablation. The peripheral thermal damage zone around each incision was analyzed using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Synchrotron-Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared Spectro-microscopy (SR-FTIR). Thermally induced chemical changes to both mineral and the collagen matrix was observed with SR-FTIR with a 10-μm spatial resolution and those changes were correlated with optical changes observed with PLM. Minimal (alveolar bone.

  12. Elucidation of the thermal deterioration mechanism of bio-oil pyrolyzed from rice husk using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Xu, Yu; Lu, Rui; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-09-14

    In this study, the rationale for exploring the thermal deterioration mechanism of the bio-oil pyrolyzed from rice husk is established. This is based on identification of the unstable intermediates in the thermal deterioration process. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to monitor such a thermal deterioration process of bio-oil samples in thermal treatment and/or during long-term storage at ambient temperatures of 20-30 °C. Terminal olefins, as a key intermediate, so-called "signature", were identified qualitatively by using FTIR spectroscopy. A band shift observed at 880 cm(-1), which was assigned to the C-H out-of-plane deformation vibration of terminal olefins, indicates the start-up of the bio-oil thermal deterioration. A two-step pathway was proposed to describe the thermal deterioration process of bio-oil. This study suggests that the status of bio-oil could be rapidly monitored by the FTIR method.

  13. Thermal signatures of urban land cover types: High-resolution thermal infrared remote sensing of urban heat island in Huntsville, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chor Pang

    1996-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to apply airborne high-resolution thermal infrared imagery for urban heat island studies, using Huntsville, AL, a medium-sized American city, as the study area. The occurrence of urban heat islands represents human-induced urban/rural contrast, which is caused by deforestation and the replacement of the land surface by non-evaporating and non-porous materials such as asphalt and concrete. The result is reduced evapotranspiration and more rapid runoff of rain water. The urban landscape forms a canopy acting as a transitional zone between the atmosphere and the land surface. The composition and structure of this canopy have a significant impact on the thermal behavior of the urban environment. Research on the trends of surface temperature at rapidly growing urban sites in the United States during the last 30 to 50 years suggests that significant urban heat island effects have caused the temperatures at these sites to rise by 1 to 2 C. Urban heat islands have caused changes in urban precipitation and temperature that are at least similar to, if not greater than, those predicted to develop over the next 100 years by global change models. Satellite remote sensing, particularly NOAA AVHRR thermal data, has been used in the study of urban heat islands. Because of the low spatial resolution (1.1 km at nadir) of the AVHRR data, these studies can only examine and map the phenomenon at the macro-level. The present research provides the rare opportunity to utilize 5-meter thermal infrared data acquired from an airplane to characterize more accurately the thermal responses of different land cover types in the urban landscape as input to urban heat island studies.

  14. Thermal infrared and microwave absorbing properties of SrTiO3/SrFe12O19/polyaniline nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Hossein; Zamani, Parisa; Mousavi, S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We have developed a new perspective of applications and properties of conducting polymers. The combination of absorption ability prepared nanocomposites in the present of PANI display a great potential in organization of shielding structures into thermal IR and microwave. Further investigations using other conducting polymers to demonstrate their capability for advance thermal IR and microwave shielding devices is under way. The application of these samples may improve the IR thermographic detection, catalysis, sensors, magnetic data storage, electromagnetic resonance wave absorption, photonic crystals, and microelectronic devices and military aspects. - Highlights: • The SrTiO 3 /SrFe 12 O 19 /PANI exhibited electric and electromagnetic properties. • The SrTiO 3 /SrFe 12 O 19 /PANI has shielding structures into thermal IR and microwave. • Increasing weight ratios and thicknesses will increase thermal IR ability. • Increasing weight ratios and thicknesses will increase microwave absorption ability. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) as a unique polymer that also has electromagnetic absorption used as the substrate. In this research, SrTiO 3 was synthesized as IR absorbent and core and then SrFe 12 O 19 as microwave absorbent was prepared on SrTiO 3 via co-precipitation method as the first shell. As the next step, PANI was coated on SrTiO 3 /SrFe 12 O 19 nanoparticles via in situ polymerization by multi core–shell structures (SrTiO 3 /SrFe 12 O 19 /PANI). Nanometer size and structures of samples were measured by TEM, XRD and FTIR. Morphology of nanocomposite was showed by SEM images. The magnetic and electric properties were also performed by VSM and four probe techniques. Thermal infrared (IR) absorption and microwave reflection loss of nanocomposites were investigated at 10–40 μm and 8–12 GHz, IR and microwave frequencies, respectively. The results showed that the SrTiO 3 /SrFe 12 O 19 /PANI nanocomposites have good compatible

  15. Estimation of Surface Soil Moisture from Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Using an Improved Trapezoid Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface soil moisture (SM plays a fundamental role in energy and water partitioning in the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum. A reliable and operational algorithm is much needed to retrieve regional surface SM at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Here, we provide an operational framework of estimating surface SM at fine spatial resolutions (using visible/thermal infrared images and concurrent meteorological data based on a trapezoidal space defined by remotely sensed vegetation cover (Fc and land surface temperature (LST. Theoretical solutions of the wet and dry edges were derived to achieve a more accurate and effective determination of the Fc/LST space. Subjectivity and uncertainty arising from visual examination of extreme boundaries can consequently be largely reduced. In addition, theoretical derivation of the extreme boundaries allows a per-pixel determination of the VI/LST space such that the assumption of uniform atmospheric forcing over the entire domain is no longer required. The developed approach was tested at the Tibetan Plateau Soil Moisture/Temperature Monitoring Network (SMTMN site in central Tibet, China, from August 2010 to August 2011 using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Terra images. Results indicate that the developed trapezoid model reproduced the spatial and temporal patterns of observed surface SM reasonably well, with showing a root-mean-square error of 0.06 m3·m−3 at the site level and 0.03 m3·m−3 at the regional scale. In addition, a case study on 2 September 2010 highlighted the importance of the theoretically calculated wet and dry edges, as they can effectively obviate subjectivity and uncertainties in determining the Fc/LST space arising from visual interpretation of satellite images. Compared with Land Surface Models (LSMs in Global Land Data Assimilation System-1, the remote sensing-based trapezoid approach gave generally better surface SM estimates, whereas the LSMs showed

  16. Use of ASTER and MODIS thermal infrared data to quantify heat flow and hydrothermal change at Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Heasler, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The overarching aim of this study was to use satellite thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing to monitor geothermal activity within the Yellowstone geothermal area to meet the missions of both the U.S. Geological Survey and the Yellowstone National Park Geology Program. Specific goals were to: 1) address the challenges of monitoring the surface thermal characteristics of the > 10,000 spatially and temporally dynamic thermal features in the Park (including hot springs, pools, geysers, fumaroles, and mud pots) that are spread out over ~ 5000 km2, by using satellite TIR remote sensing tools (e.g., ASTER and MODIS), 2) to estimate the radiant geothermal heat flux (GHF) for Yellowstone's thermal areas, and 3) to identify normal, background thermal changes so that significant, abnormal changes can be recognized, should they ever occur (e.g., changes related to tectonic, hydrothermal, impending volcanic processes, or human activities, such as nearby geothermal development). ASTER TIR data (90-m pixels) were used to estimate the radiant GHF from all of Yellowstone's thermal features and update maps of thermal areas. MODIS TIR data (1-km pixels) were used to record background thermal radiance variations from March 2000 through December 2010 and establish thermal change detection limits. A lower limit for the radiant GHF estimated from ASTER TIR temperature data was established at ~ 2.0 GW, which is ~ 30–45% of the heat flux estimated through geochemical thermometry. Also, about 5 km2 of thermal areas was added to the geodatabase of mapped thermal areas. A decade-long time-series of MODIS TIR radiance data was dominated by seasonal cycles. A background subtraction technique was used in an attempt to isolate variations due to geothermal changes. Several statistically significant perturbations were noted in the time-series from Norris Geyser Basin, however many of these did not correspond to documented thermal disturbances. This study provides concrete examples of the

  17. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FT-IR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed: one developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a uniform distribution of Low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the Low EC calibration to Low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produce predictions for Low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, a

  18. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  19. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC < 2.4 μg, Low Uniform EC). A hybrid approach which applies the low EC calibration to low EC samples and the Uniform EC calibration to all other samples is used to produces predictions for low EC samples that have mean error on par with parallel TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no

  20. An investigation into the applicability of thermal infrared scanning for exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broicher, H.

    1981-07-01

    PRATT's theory of thermal inertia stripping leads to thermal inertia calculations for the subsurface zones subjected to the diurnal and the annual temperature variations, as well as to temperatures at the zone limits. Thermal inertia mapping after separating these zones gains in importance for exploration. It should be investigated, if orebodies would cause detectable subsurface temperature anomalies. Technical infrastructure problems caused the termination of the project. The realization of thermal inertia stripping should be pursued. (orig.) [de

  1. Surface Temperature Mapping of the University of Northern Iowa Campus Using High Resolution Thermal Infrared Aerial Imageries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Sugumaran

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this project was to map the surface temperature of the University of Northern Iowa campus using high-resolution thermal infrared aerial imageries. A thermal camera with a spectral bandwidth of 3.0-5.0 μm was flown at the average altitude of 600 m, achieving ground resolution of 29 cm. Ground control data was used to construct the pixelto-temperature conversion model, which was later used to produce temperature maps of the entire campus and also for validation of the model. The temperature map then was used to assess the building rooftop conditions and steam line faults in the study area. Assessment of the temperature map revealed a number of building structures that may be subject to insulation improvement due to their high surface temperatures leaks. Several hot spots were also identified on the campus for steam pipelines faults. High-resolution thermal infrared imagery proved highly effective tool for precise heat anomaly detection on the campus, and it can be used by university facility services for effective future maintenance of buildings and grounds.

  2. Surface Temperature Mapping of the University of Northern Iowa Campus Using High Resolution Thermal Infrared Aerial Imageries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Alexander; Sugumaran, Ramanathan

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this project was to map the surface temperature of the University of Northern Iowa campus using high-resolution thermal infrared aerial imageries. A thermal camera with a spectral bandwidth of 3.0-5.0 μm was flown at the average altitude of 600 m, achieving ground resolution of 29 cm. Ground control data was used to construct the pixel- to-temperature conversion model, which was later used to produce temperature maps of the entire campus and also for validation of the model. The temperature map then was used to assess the building rooftop conditions and steam line faults in the study area. Assessment of the temperature map revealed a number of building structures that may be subject to insulation improvement due to their high surface temperatures leaks. Several hot spots were also identified on the campus for steam pipelines faults. High-resolution thermal infrared imagery proved highly effective tool for precise heat anomaly detection on the campus, and it can be used by university facility services for effective future maintenance of buildings and grounds. PMID:27873800

  3. Uncertainty Evaluations of the CRCS In-orbit Field Radiometric Calibration Methods for Thermal Infrared Channels of FENGYUN Meteorological Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Rong, Z.; Min, M.; Hao, X.; Yang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Meteorological satellites have become an irreplaceable weather and ocean-observing tool in China. These satellites are used to monitor natural disasters and improve the efficiency of many sectors of Chinese national economy. It is impossible to ignore the space-derived data in the fields of meteorology, hydrology, and agriculture, as well as disaster monitoring in China, a large agricultural country. For this reason, China is making a sustained effort to build and enhance its meteorological observing system and application system. The first Chinese polar-orbiting weather satellite was launched in 1988. Since then China has launched 14 meteorological satellites, 7 of which are sun synchronous and 7 of which are geostationary satellites; China will continue its two types of meteorological satellite programs. In order to achieve the in-orbit absolute radiometric calibration of the operational meteorological satellites' thermal infrared channels, China radiometric calibration sites (CRCS) established a set of in-orbit field absolute radiometric calibration methods (FCM) for thermal infrared channels (TIR) and the uncertainty of this method was evaluated and analyzed based on TERRA/AQUA MODIS observations. Comparisons between the MODIS at pupil brightness temperatures (BTs) and the simulated BTs at the top of atmosphere using radiative transfer model (RTM) based on field measurements showed that the accuracy of the current in-orbit field absolute radiometric calibration methods was better than 1.00K (@300K, K=1) in thermal infrared channels. Therefore, the current CRCS field calibration method for TIR channels applied to Chinese metrological satellites was with favorable calibration accuracy: for 10.5-11.5µm channel was better than 0.75K (@300K, K=1) and for 11.5-12.5µm channel was better than 0.85K (@300K, K=1).

  4. Non-thermal near-infrared exposure photobiomodulates cellular responses to ionizing radiation in human full thickness skin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Anke; Zöller, Nadja; Kippenberger, Stefan; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Layer, Paul G; Heselich, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Ionizing and near-infrared radiation are both part of the therapeutic spectrum in cancer treatment. During cancer therapy ionizing radiation is typically used for non-invasive reduction of malignant tissue, while near-infrared photobiomodulation is utilized in palliative medical approaches, e.g. for pain reduction or impairment of wound healing. Furthermore, near-infrared is part of the solar wavelength spectrum. A combined exposure of these two irradiation qualities - either intentionally during medical treatment or unintentionally due to solar exposure - is therefore presumable for cancer patients. Several studies in different model organisms and cell cultures show a strong impact of near-infrared pretreatment on ionizing radiation-induced stress response. To investigate the risks of non-thermal near-infrared (NIR) pretreatment in patients, a human in vitro full thickness skin models (FTSM) was evaluated for radiation research. FTSM were pretreated with therapy-relevant doses of NIR followed by X-radiation, and then examined for DNA-double-strand break (DSB) repair, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Double-treated FTSM revealed a clear influence of NIR on X-radiation-induced stress responses in cells in their typical tissue environment. Furthermore, over a 24h time period, double-treated FTSM presented a significant persistence of DSBs, as compared to samples exclusively irradiated by X-rays. In addition, NIR pretreatment inhibited apoptosis induction of integrated fibroblasts, and counteracted the radiation-induced proliferation inhibition of basal keratinocytes. Our work suggests that cancer patients treated with X-rays should be prevented from uncontrolled NIR irradiation. On the other hand, controlled double-treatment could provide an alternative therapy approach, exposing the patient to less radiation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Thermal and ghost reflection modeling for a 180-deg. field-of-view long-wave infrared lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weimin; Couture, Michael E.

    2001-03-01

    Optics 1, Inc. has successfully designed and developed a 180 degree(s) field of view long wave infrared lens for USAF/AFRL under SBIR phase I and II funded projects in support of the multi-national Programmable Integrated Ordinance Suite (PIOS) program. In this paper, a procedure is presented on how to evaluate image degradation caused by asymmetric aerodynamic dome heating. In addition, a thermal gradient model is proposed to evaluate degradation caused by axial temperature gradient throughout the entire PIOS lens. Finally, a ghost reflection analysis is demonstrated with non-sequential model.

  6. Effect of metal stress on the thermal infrared emission of soybeans: A greenhouse experiment - Possible utility in remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, R.; Schwaller, M. R.; Foy, C. D.; Weidner, J. R.; Schnetzler, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Manganese-sensitive forest and manganese-tolerant lee soybean cultivars were subjected to differential manganese stress in loring soil in a greenhouse experiment. Leaf temperature measurements were made using thermistors for forest and lee. Manganese-stressed plants had higher leaf temperatures than control plants in both forest and lee. Results of this experiment have potential applications in metal stress detection using remote sensing thermal infrared data over large areas of vegetation. This technique can be useful in reconnaissance mineral exploration in densely-vegetated regions where conventional ground-based methods are of little help.

  7. New interpretations of the Fort Clark State Historic Site based on aerial color and thermal infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Andrew Roland

    The Fort Clark State Historic Site (32ME2) is a well known site on the upper Missouri River, North Dakota. The site was the location of two Euroamerican trading posts and a large Mandan-Arikara earthlodge village. In 2004, Dr. Kenneth L. Kvamme and Dr. Tommy Hailey surveyed the site using aerial color and thermal infrared imagery collected from a powered parachute. Individual images were stitched together into large image mosaics and registered to Wood's 1993 interpretive map of the site using Adobe Photoshop. The analysis of those image mosaics resulted in the identification of more than 1,500 archaeological features, including as many as 124 earthlodges.

  8. Application of gas-fired infra-red radiator to thermal disinfection of horticultural substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawer, M.; Osiński, A.

    1998-01-01

    The studies were carried out on heating horticultural substrate (moor peat - bark, 1:1 by volume) with a gas-fired infra-red radiator to destroy the pests and pathogens. Minimum distance between radiator and substrate surface was determined considering assumed time of heating. Dynamics of substrate heating was determined depending on its layer thickness and kind of surface under substrate layer; black rubber, ground steel sheet and aluminium foil were used as the surface. Considerable decreasing of infra-red radiation penetrability through the substrate layer above 7 mm thick was found as well as an significant effect of the radiation reflected from the surface under substrate layer on the intensity of its heating. It was also stated that heating horticultural substrates with the gas-fired infra-red radiator enables to rise the temperature of thin substrate layer up to 70 degree of C within relatively short time [pl

  9. Detection of coastal and submarine discharge on the Florida Gulf Coast with an airborne thermal-infrared mapping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raabe, Ellen; Stonehouse, David; Ebersol, Kristin; Holland, Kathryn; Robbins, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Along the Gulf Coast of Florida north of Tampa Bay lies a region characterized by an open marsh coast, low topographic gradient, water-bearing limestone, and scattered springs. The Floridan aquifer system is at or near land surface in this region, discharging water at a consistent 70-72°F. The thermal contrast between ambient water and aquifer discharge during winter months can be distinguished using airborne thermal-infrared imagery. An airborne thermal-infrared mapping system was used to collect imagery along 126 miles of the Gulf Coast from Jefferson to Levy County, FL, in March 2009. The imagery depicts a large number of discharge locations and associated warm-water plumes in ponds, creeks, rivers, and nearshore waters. A thermal contrast of 6°F or more was set as a conservative threshold for identifying sites, statistically significant at the 99% confidence interval. Almost 900 such coastal and submarine-discharge locations were detected, averaging seven to nine per mile along this section of coast. This represents approximately one hundred times the number of previously known discharge sites in the same area. Several known coastal springs in Taylor and Levy Counties were positively identified with the imagery and were used to estimate regional discharge equivalent to one 1st-order spring, discharging 100 cubic feet per second or more, for every two miles of coastline. The number of identified discharge sites is a conservative estimate and may represent two-thirds of existing features due to low groundwater levels at time of overflight. The role of aquifer discharge in coastal and estuarine health is indisputable; however, mapping and quantifying discharge in a complex karst environment can be an elusive goal. The results of this effort illustrate the effectiveness of the instrument and underscore the influence of coastal springs along this stretch of the Florida coast.

  10. Retrieval of leaf water content spanning the visible to thermal infrared spectra

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ullah, S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ; Hunt and Rock 1989; Sepulcre-Cantó et al. 2006). 45 Retrieving leaf water content using remote sensing data, has been widely investigated in the 46 visible near infrared (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) spectra (Thomas et al. 1971; 47 Danson et..., USA: NASA / GSFC 400 Savitzky, A., & Golay, M.J.E. (1964). Smoothing and differentiation of data by simplified Least 401 squares procedures. Analytical Chemistry, 36, 1627-1639 402 Sepulcre-Cantó, G., Zarco-Tejada, P.J., Jiménez-Muñoz, J.C., Sobrino...

  11. Influence of season, age and management on scrotal thermal profile in Murrah bulls using scrotal infrared digital thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahirwar, Maneesh Kumar; Kataktalware, Mukund Amritrao; Ramesha, Kerekoppa Puttaiah; Pushpadass, Heartwin Amaladhas; Jeyakumar, Sakthivel; Revanasiddu, Deginal; Kour, Reen Jagish; Nath, Sapna; Nagaleekar, Anand Kumar; Nazar, Sayyad

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of non-genetic factors on scrotal thermographic profile viz., proximal pole temperature (PPT °C), mid pole temperature (MPT °C), distal pole temperature (DPT °C) and ocular temperature (OcT) of Murrah ( Bubalus bubalis) breeding bulls. A total of 109 buffalo bulls, maintained at three semen stations (SS), were monitored for scrotal surface and ocular temperatures using infrared thermography twice daily during rainy, winter and summer seasons using an FLIR i5 infrared camera and temperatures were measured. Thermograms were analysed by FLIR QuickReport v.1.2 SP2 software. Statistical analysis revealed that semen station, season, temperature humidity index (THI), housing system and timing of observations had significant ( P 80.88; system and timing of observations had a significant influence on scrotal surface temperature. The monitoring of scrotal surface temperature by infrared thermography was found to be useful in evaluating the effects of thermal stress on physiology and health of buffalo bulls.

  12. Investigation of Thermal Properties of High-Density Polyethylene/Aluminum Nanocomposites by Photothermal Infrared Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, H. D.; Evgin, T.; Horny, N.; Chirtoc, M.; Turgut, A.; Tavman, I. H.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, thermal properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) filled with nanosized Al particles (80 nm) were investigated. Samples were prepared using melt mixing method up to filler volume fraction of 29 %, followed by compression molding. By using modulated photothermal radiometry (PTR) technique, thermal diffusivity and thermal effusivity were obtained. The effective thermal conductivity of nanocomposites was calculated directly from PTR measurements and from the measurements of density, specific heat capacity (by differential scanning calorimetry) and thermal diffusivity (obtained from PTR signal amplitude and phase). It is concluded that the thermal conductivity of HDPE composites increases with increasing Al fraction and the highest effective thermal conductivity enhancement of 205 % is achieved at a filler volume fraction of 29 %. The obtained results were compared with the theoretical models and experimental data given in the literature. The results demonstrate that Agari and Uno, and Cheng and Vachon models can predict well the thermal conductivity of HDPE/Al nanocomposites in the whole range of Al fractions.

  13. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T.

    2013-01-01

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm −1 to 68 cm −1 to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100° C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  14. Robust Vehicle Detection under Various Environmental Conditions Using an Infrared Thermal Camera and Its Application to Road Traffic Flow Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Nakamiya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We have already proposed a method for detecting vehicle positions and their movements (henceforth referred to as “our previous method” using thermal images taken with an infrared thermal camera. Our experiments have shown that our previous method detects vehicles robustly under four different environmental conditions which involve poor visibility conditions in snow and thick fog. Our previous method uses the windshield and its surroundings as the target of the Viola-Jones detector. Some experiments in winter show that the vehicle detection accuracy decreases because the temperatures of many windshields approximate those of the exterior of the windshields. In this paper, we propose a new vehicle detection method (henceforth referred to as “our new method”. Our new method detects vehicles based on tires’ thermal energy reflection. We have done experiments using three series of thermal images for which the vehicle detection accuracies of our previous method are low. Our new method detects 1,417 vehicles (92.8% out of 1,527 vehicles, and the number of false detection is 52 in total. Therefore, by combining our two methods, high vehicle detection accuracies are maintained under various environmental conditions. Finally, we apply the traffic information obtained by our two methods to traffic flow automatic monitoring, and show the effectiveness of our proposal.

  15. Robust vehicle detection under various environmental conditions using an infrared thermal camera and its application to road traffic flow monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yoichiro; Misumi, Masato; Nakamiya, Toshiyuki

    2013-06-17

    We have already proposed a method for detecting vehicle positions and their movements (henceforth referred to as "our previous method") using thermal images taken with an infrared thermal camera. Our experiments have shown that our previous method detects vehicles robustly under four different environmental conditions which involve poor visibility conditions in snow and thick fog. Our previous method uses the windshield and its surroundings as the target of the Viola-Jones detector. Some experiments in winter show that the vehicle detection accuracy decreases because the temperatures of many windshields approximate those of the exterior of the windshields. In this paper, we propose a new vehicle detection method (henceforth referred to as "our new method"). Our new method detects vehicles based on tires' thermal energy reflection. We have done experiments using three series of thermal images for which the vehicle detection accuracies of our previous method are low. Our new method detects 1,417 vehicles (92.8%) out of 1,527 vehicles, and the number of false detection is 52 in total. Therefore, by combining our two methods, high vehicle detection accuracies are maintained under various environmental conditions. Finally, we apply the traffic information obtained by our two methods to traffic flow automatic monitoring, and show the effectiveness of our proposal.

  16. Superimpose methods for uncooled infrared camera applied to the micro-scale thermal characterization of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Junko

    2015-05-01

    The mobile type apparatus for a quantitative micro-scale thermography using a micro-bolometer was developed based on our original techniques such as an achromatic lens design to capture a micro-scale image in long-wave infrared, a video signal superimposing for the real time emissivity correction, and a pseudo acceleration of a timeframe. The total size of the instrument was designed as it was put in the 17 cm x 28 cm x 26 cm size carrying box. The video signal synthesizer enabled to record a direct digital signal of monitoring temperature or positioning data. The encoded digital signal data embedded in each image was decoded to read out. The protocol to encode/decode the measured data was originally defined. The mixed signals of IR camera and the imposed data were applied to the pixel by pixel emissivity corrections and the pseudo-acceleration of the periodical thermal phenomena. Because the emissivity of industrial materials and biological tissues were usually inhomogeneous, it has the different temperature dependence on each pixel. The time-scale resolution for the periodic thermal event was improved with the algorithm for "pseudoacceleration". It contributes to reduce the noise by integrating the multiple image data, keeping a time resolution. The anisotropic thermal properties of some composite materials such as thermal insulating materials of cellular plastics and the biometric composite materials were analyzed using these techniques.

  17. A Dual-Band Multiple Input Multiple Output Frequency Agile Antenna for GPSL1/Wi-Fi/WLAN2400/LTE Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Aqeel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel dual-band, single element multiple input multiple output (MIMO dielectric resonator antenna (DRA with a modest frequency tuning ability is presented in this communication. The proposed antenna operates at GPS L1/Bluetooth/Wi-Fi/LTE2500/WLAN2400 frequency bands. A single dielectric resonator element is fed by two coaxial probes to excite the orthogonal modes. A couple of slots are introduced on the ground plane to improve the isolation between antenna ports. The slots also serve the purpose of reconfiguration in the lower band on placement of switches at optimized locations. The measured impedance bandwidth is 5.16% (1.41–1.49 GHz in the lower band and 26% (2.2–2.85 GHz in the higher band. The lower band reconfigures with an impedance bandwidth of 6.5% (1.55–1.65 GHz when PIN diodes are switched ON. The gain, efficiency, correlation coefficient, and diversity gain of the MIMO DRA are presented with a close agreement between simulated and measured results.

  18. High-temperature superconducting coplanar-waveguide quarter-wavelength resonator with odd- and even-mode resonant frequencies for dual-band bandpass filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Kei; Takagi, Yuta; Narahashi, Shoichi [Research Laboratories, NTT DOCOMO, INC., 3-6 Hikari-no-oka Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-8536 Japan (Japan); Nojima, Toshio, E-mail: satokei@nttdocomo.co.j [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita 14, Nishi 9, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0814 Japan (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a high-temperature superconducting coplanar-waveguide quarter-wavelength resonator that has two different resonant modes for use in a dual-band bandpass filter (DBPF). An RF filter with multiple passbands such as the DBPF is a basic element that is expected to achieve broadband transmission by using separated frequency bands aggregately and simultaneously in future mobile communication systems. The proposed resonator has a folded center conductor and two open stubs that are aligned close to it. The odd- and even-mode resonant frequencies are configured using the space between the folded center conductor and the open stubs. It is easy to configure the odd- and even-mode coupling coefficients independently because the two resonant modes have different current density distributions. Consequently, a DBPF with two different bandwidths can be easily designed. This paper presents three design examples for a four-pole Chebyshev DBPF with different combinations of fractional bandwidths in order to investigate the validity of the proposed resonator. This paper also presents measured results of the DBPF based on the design examples from the standpoint of experimental investigation. The designed and measured frequency responses confirm that the proposed resonator is effective in achieving DBPFs not only with two of the same bandwidths but also with two different bandwidths.

  19. Design of a Dual-Band Bidirectional Antenna Using Superellipse-Monopole-Fed Rectangular Ring for IEEE 802.11 a/b/g/n Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekajit Khoomwong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a dual-band bidirectional ring antenna fed by a superellipse surface probe for 2.4/5 GHz WLAN applications. The Method of Moments (MoM with RWG basis function was utilized in the study and design processes. A prototype antenna was fabricated successfully with the advantages of simple and low-cost structure. The measured impedance bandwidth of 810 MHz (2.10–2.91 GHz and 2.39 GHz (3.57–5.96 GHz is achieved for the first and second band, respectively. The peak gains are also feasible, 4.67 dBi at 2.45 GHz and 7.83 dBi at 5.5 GHz, with bidirectional radiation patterns for both bands. From the experimental field tests, the proposed antenna was suitable for most applications in long and narrow communication sites in 2.4/5 GHz bands as desired. Also, the measured and calculated results were in good agreement.

  20. Facile and high spatial resolution ratio-metric luminescence thermal mapping in microfluidics by near infrared excited upconversion nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Shunbo; Wen, Weijia, E-mail: phwen@ust.hk [Department of Physics, KAUST-HKUST Joint Micro/Nanofluidic Laboratory, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Cao, Wenbin [Nano Science and Technology Program, Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2016-02-01

    A local area temperature monitor is important for precise control of chemical and biological processes in microfluidics. In this work, we developed a facile method to realize micron spatial resolution of temperature mapping in a microfluidic channel quickly and cost effectively. Based on the temperature dependent fluorescence emission of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) under near-infrared irradiation, ratio-metric imaging of UCNPs doped polydimethylsiloxane can map detailed temperature distribution in the channel. Unlike some reported strategies that utilize temperature sensitive organic dye (such as Rhodamine) to achieve thermal sensing, our method is highly chemically inert and physically stable without any performance degradation in long term operation. Moreover, this method can be easily scaled up or down, since the spatial and temperature resolution is determined by an optical imaging system. Our method supplied a simple and efficient solution for temperature mapping on a heterogeneous surface where usage of an infrared thermal camera was limited.

  1. Synthetic hydroxyapatites doped with Zn(II) studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared, Raman and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-López, José R.; Echeverría, Gustavo A.; Güida, Jorge A.; Viña, Raúl; Punte, Graciela

    2015-06-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHap) formation when different amounts of Zn(II) are present in the mother solution has been investigated by atomic absorption, infrared and Raman spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis (DTA and TG). The studied samples have been synthesized at T=95 °C and pH 9 in air. The analysis of the results have shown that the pure CaHap sample crystallizes in the monoclinic form P21/b. Concentrations up to 20% of Zn(II) in the mother solution, equivalent to smaller concentrations in solid (up to 9.1% in wt), favor the formation of the hexagonal apatite, P63/m, while Zn(II) concentrations higher than 20% in solution help an amorphous phase development where vibrational spectra indicated coexistence of two phases: an apatite and ZnNH4PO4·H2O. Infrared data of thermal treated samples endorse that HPO42- ion had not been incorporated in Zn(II) doped samples during the synthesis process. Present results also allow to conclude that Zn(II) cation exhibits a preference to occupy the Ca2 site of the apatite structure and induces water adsorption and a small quantity of CO32- cation incorporation, leading to formation of a less crystalline Ca deficient apatite.

  2. Cancellation of infrared and collinear singularities in relativistic thermal field theories. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bellac, M.; Reynaud, P.

    1992-01-01

    We study the infrared and collinear divergences of a renormalizable scalar field theory at finite temperature. We give the final results of an investigation undertaken in a previous work by showing the complete cancellation of all divergences at two-loop order in a physical process. This result makes the validity of the Kinoshita-Lee-Nauenberg theorem at finite temperature extremely plausible. (orig.)

  3. Keck observations of near-Earth asteroids in the thermal infrared

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Delbó, M.; Harris, A. W.; Binzel, R. P.; Pravec, Petr; Davies, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 166, č. 1 (2003), s. 116-130 ISSN 0019-1035 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003204; GA ČR GA205/99/0255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : asteroids * infrared observtions * photometry Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.611, year: 2003

  4. Effects of varying environmental conditions on emissivity spectra of bulk lunar soils: Application to Diviner thermal infrared observations of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Patterson, W. R.; Pieters, C. M.; Mustard, J. F.; Bowles, N. E.; Paige, D. A.; Glotch, T. D.; Thompson, C.

    2017-02-01

    Currently, few thermal infrared measurements exist of fine particulate (samples (e.g. minerals, mineral mixtures, rocks, meteorites, and lunar soils) measured under simulated lunar conditions. Such measurements are fundamental for interpreting thermal infrared (TIR) observations by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (Diviner) onboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as well as future TIR observations of the Moon and other airless bodies. In this work, we present thermal infrared emissivity measurements of a suite of well-characterized Apollo lunar soils and a fine particulate (sample as we systematically vary parameters that control the near-surface environment in our vacuum chamber (atmospheric pressure, incident solar-like radiation, and sample cup temperature). The atmospheric pressure is varied between ambient (1000 mbar) and vacuum (radiation is varied between 52 and 146 mW/cm2, and the sample cup temperature is varied between 325 and 405 K. Spectral changes are characterized as each parameter is varied, which highlight the sensitivity of thermal infrared emissivity spectra to the atmospheric pressure and the incident solar-like radiation. Finally spectral measurements of Apollo 15 and 16 bulk lunar soils are compared with Diviner thermal infrared observations of the Apollo 15 and 16 sampling sites. This comparison allows us to constrain the temperature and pressure conditions that best simulate the near-surface environment of the Moon for future laboratory measurements and to better interpret lunar surface compositions as observed by Diviner.

  5. Comparison of human skin opto-thermal response to near-infrared and visible laser irradiations: a theoretical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Tianhong [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Pikkula, Brian M [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Wang, Lihong V [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Anvari, Bahman [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States)

    2004-11-07

    Near-infrared wavelengths are absorbed less by epidermal melanin, and penetrate deeper into human skin dermis and blood than visible wavelengths. Therefore, laser irradiation using near-infrared wavelengths may improve the therapeutic outcome of cutaneous hyper-vascular malformations in moderately to heavily pigmented skin patients and those with large-sized blood vessels or blood vessels extending deeply into the skin. A mathematical model composed of a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate the distribution of absorbed light, numerical solution of a bio-heat diffusion equation to calculate the transient temperature distribution, and a damage integral based on an empirical Arrhenius relationship to quantify the tissue damage was utilized to investigate the opto-thermal response of human skin to near-infrared and visible laser irradiations in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling. In addition, the thermal effects of a single continuous laser pulse and micropulse-composed laser pulse profiles were compared. Simulation results indicated that a 940 nm wavelength induces improved therapeutic outcome compared with a 585 and 595 nm wavelengths for the treatment of patients with large-sized blood vessels and moderately to heavily pigmented skin. On the other hand, a 585 nm wavelength shows the best efficacy in treating small-sized blood vessels, as characterized by the largest laser-induced blood vessel damage depth compared with 595 and 940 nm wavelengths. Dermal blood content has a considerable effect on the threshold incident dosage for epidermal damage, while the effect of blood vessel size is minimal. For the same macropulse duration and incident dosage, a micropulse-composed pulse profile results in higher peak temperature at the basal layer of skin epidermis than an ideal single continuous pulse profile.

  6. Investigation of adulteration of sunflower oil with thermally deteriorated oil using Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Vilela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy based on attenuated total reflectance sampling technique, combined with multivariate analysis methods was used to monitor the adulteration of pure sunflower oil (SO with thermally deteriorated oil (TDO. Contrary to published research, in this work, SO was thermally deteriorated in the absence of foodstuff. SO samples were exposed to temperatures between 125 and 225°C from 6 to 24 h. Quantification of adulteration of SO with TDO, based on principal components regression (PCR, partial least squares regression (PLS-R, and linear discriminant analysis (LDA applied to mid-infrared spectra and to their first and second derivatives is reported for the first time. Infrared frequencies associated with the biochemical differences between TDO samples deteriorated in different conditions were investigated by principal component analysis (PCA. LDA was effective in the twofold classification presence/absence of TDO in adulterated SO (with 5% V/V of less of TDO. It provided 93.7% correct classification for the calibration set and 91.3% correct classification when cross-validated. A detection limit of 1% V/V of TDO in SO was determined. Investigation of an external set of samples allowed the evaluation of the predictability of the models. The regression coefficient (R2 for prediction was 0.95 and 0.96 and the RMSE was 2.1 and 1.9% V/V when using the PCR or PLS-R models, respectively, and the first derivative of spectra. To the best of our knowledge, no investigation of adulteration of SO with TDO based on PCR, PLS-R, and LDA has been reported so far.

  7. Thermal infrared imagery as a tool for analysing the variability of surface saturated areas at various temporal and spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Barbara; Antonelli, Marta; Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian

    2017-04-01

    Surface saturated areas are important for the on- and offset of hydrological connectivity within the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum. This is reflected in concepts such as variable contributing areas or critical source areas. However, we still lack a standardized method for areal mapping of surface saturation and for observing its spatiotemporal variability. Proof-of-concept studies in recent years have shown the potential of thermal infrared (TIR) imagery to record surface saturation dynamics at various temporal and spatial scales. Thermal infrared imagery is thus a promising alternative to conventional approaches, such as the squishy boot method or the mapping of vegetation. In this study we use TIR images to investigate the variability of surface saturated areas at different temporal and spatial scales in the forested Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2) in western Luxembourg. We took TIR images of the riparian zone with a hand-held FLIR infrared camera at fortnightly intervals over 18 months at nine different locations distributed over the catchment. Not all of the acquired images were suitable for a derivation of the surface saturated areas, as various factors influence the usability of the TIR images (e.g. temperature contrasts, shadows, fog). Nonetheless, we obtained a large number of usable images that provided a good insight into the dynamic behaviour of surface saturated areas at different scales. The images revealed how diverse the evolution of surface saturated areas can be throughout the hydrologic year. For some locations with similar morphology or topography we identified diverging saturation dynamics, while other locations with different morphology / topography showed more similar behaviour. Moreover, we were able to assess the variability of the dynamics of expansion / contraction of saturated areas within the single locations, which can help to better understand the mechanisms behind surface saturation development.

  8. Comparison of Three Infrared Thermal Detection Systems and Self Report for Mass Fever Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Nicole Cohen describes research that examined the usefulness of thermal scanners for detecting fever in large groups of people in public settings, such as hospitals and airports.

  9. Next-Generation Thermal Infrared Multi-Body Radiometer Experiment (TIMBRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, M.; Mariani, G.; Johnson, B.; Brageot, E.; Hayne, P.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed an instrument concept called TIMBRE which belongs to the important class of instruments called thermal imaging radiometers (TIRs). TIMBRE is the next-generation TIR with unparalleled performance compared to the state-of-the-art.

  10. Constraints on Circumstellar Dust Grain Sizes from High Spatial Resolution Observations in the Thermal Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Danen, R. M.; Gwinn, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    We describe how high spatial resolution imaging of circumstellar dust at a wavelength of about 10 micron, combined with knowledge of the source spectral energy distribution, can yield useful information about the sizes of the individual dust grains responsible for the infrared emission. Much can be learned even when only upper limits to source size are available. In parallel with high-resolution single-telescope imaging that may resolve the more extended mid-infrared sources, we plan to apply these less direct techniques to interpretation of future observations from two-element optical interferometers, where quite general arguments may be made despite only crude imaging capability. Results to date indicate a tendency for circumstellar grain sizes to be rather large compared to the Mathis-Rumpl-Nordsieck size distribution traditionally thought to characterize dust in the general interstellar medium. This may mean that processing of grains after their initial formation and ejection from circumstellar atmospheres adjusts their size distribution to the ISM curve; further mid-infrared observations of grains in various environments would help to confirm this conjecture.

  11. Infrared and optical polarimetry of the radio elliptical IC 5063 (PKS2048-57): discovery of a highly polarized non-thermal nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, J H; Brindle, C; Axon, D J; Bailey, J; Sparks, W B

    1987-02-15

    Two-aperture optical and near-infrared polarization and flux measurements of the radio elliptical galaxy IC 5063 are presented. Analysis of the polarized flux shows that the large infrared excess in the nucleus most likely arises from a steep-spectrum non-thermal source with a polarization of 17 per cent and near-infrared luminosity 6x10/sup 41/ erg s/sup -1/. This result suggests that IC5063 is closely related to the more luminous blazars. The origin of the polarization in the optical is, however, not clear.

  12. Infrared and optical polarimetry of the radio elliptical IC 5063 (PKS2048-57): discovery of a highly polarized non-thermal nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hough, J.H.; Brindle, C.; Axon, D.J.; Bailey, J.; Sparks, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    Two-aperture optical and near-infrared polarization and flux measurements of the radio elliptical galaxy IC 5063 are presented. Analysis of the polarized flux shows that the large infrared excess in the nucleus most likely arises from a steep-spectrum non-thermal source with a polarization of 17 per cent and near-infrared luminosity 6x10 41 erg s -1 . This result suggests that IC5063 is closely related to the more luminous blazars. The origin of the polarization in the optical is, however, not clear. (author)

  13. Robust Vehicle Detection under Various Environments to Realize Road Traffic Flow Surveillance Using an Infrared Thermal Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yoichiro; Misumi, Masato; Nakamiya, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    To realize road traffic flow surveillance under various environments which contain poor visibility conditions, we have already proposed two vehicle detection methods using thermal images taken with an infrared thermal camera. The first method uses pattern recognition for the windshields and their surroundings to detect vehicles. However, the first method decreases the vehicle detection accuracy in winter season. To maintain high vehicle detection accuracy in all seasons, we developed the second method. The second method uses tires' thermal energy reflection areas on a road as the detection targets. The second method did not achieve high detection accuracy for vehicles on left-hand and right-hand lanes except for two center-lanes. Therefore, we have developed a new method based on the second method to increase the vehicle detection accuracy. This paper proposes the new method and shows that the detection accuracy for vehicles on all lanes is 92.1%. Therefore, by combining the first method and the new method, high vehicle detection accuracies are maintained under various environments, and road traffic flow surveillance can be realized. PMID:25763384

  14. Geothermal area detection using Landsat ETM+ thermal infrared data and its mechanistic analysis—A case study in Tengchong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiming; Zhang, Ning; Nan, Peng; Chai, Leilei

    2011-08-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing is an important technique in the exploration of geothermal resources. In this study, a geothermal survey is conducted in Tengchong area of Yunnan province in China using TIR data from Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensor. Based on radiometric calibration, atmospheric correction and emissivity calculation, a simple but efficient single channel algorithm with acceptable precision is applied to retrieve the land surface temperature (LST) of study area. The LST anomalous areas with temperature about 4-10 K higher than background area are discovered. Four geothermal areas are identified with the discussion of geothermal mechanism and the further analysis of regional geologic structure. The research reveals that the distribution of geothermal areas is consistent with the fault development in study area. Magmatism contributes abundant thermal source to study area and the faults provide thermal channels for heat transfer from interior earth to land surface and facilitate the present of geothermal anomalies. Finally, we conclude that TIR remote sensing is a cost-effective technique to detect LST anomalies. Combining TIR remote sensing with geological analysis and the understanding of geothermal mechanism is an accurate and efficient approach to geothermal area detection.

  15. Robust Vehicle Detection under Various Environments to Realize Road Traffic Flow Surveillance Using an Infrared Thermal Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Iwasaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To realize road traffic flow surveillance under various environments which contain poor visibility conditions, we have already proposed two vehicle detection methods using thermal images taken with an infrared thermal camera. The first method uses pattern recognition for the windshields and their surroundings to detect vehicles. However, the first method decreases the vehicle detection accuracy in winter season. To maintain high vehicle detection accuracy in all seasons, we developed the second method. The second method uses tires’ thermal energy reflection areas on a road as the detection targets. The second method did not achieve high detection accuracy for vehicles on left-hand and right-hand lanes except for two center-lanes. Therefore, we have developed a new method based on the second method to increase the vehicle detection accuracy. This paper proposes the new method and shows that the detection accuracy for vehicles on all lanes is 92.1%. Therefore, by combining the first method and the new method, high vehicle detection accuracies are maintained under various environments, and road traffic flow surveillance can be realized.

  16. Robust vehicle detection under various environments to realize road traffic flow surveillance using an infrared thermal camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yoichiro; Misumi, Masato; Nakamiya, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    To realize road traffic flow surveillance under various environments which contain poor visibility conditions, we have already proposed two vehicle detection methods using thermal images taken with an infrared thermal camera. The first method uses pattern recognition for the windshields and their surroundings to detect vehicles. However, the first method decreases the vehicle detection accuracy in winter season. To maintain high vehicle detection accuracy in all seasons, we developed the second method. The second method uses tires' thermal energy reflection areas on a road as the detection targets. The second method did not achieve high detection accuracy for vehicles on left-hand and right-hand lanes except for two center-lanes. Therefore, we have developed a new method based on the second method to increase the vehicle detection accuracy. This paper proposes the new method and shows that the detection accuracy for vehicles on all lanes is 92.1%. Therefore, by combining the first method and the new method, high vehicle detection accuracies are maintained under various environments, and road traffic flow surveillance can be realized.

  17. Evidence of a metal-rich surface for the Asteroid (16) Psyche from interferometric observations in the thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Alexis; Delbo, Marco; Carry, Benoit; Ligori, Sebastiano

    2013-09-01

    We describe the first determination of thermal properties and size of the M-type Asteroid (16) Psyche from interferometric observations obtained with the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument (MIDI) of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. We used a thermophysical model to interpret our interferometric data. Our analysis shows that Psyche has a low macroscopic surface roughness. Using a convex 3-D shape model obtained by Kaasalainen et al. (Kaasalainen, M., Torppa, J., Piironen, J. [2002]. Icarus 159, 369-395), we derived a volume-equivalent diameter for (16) Psyche of 247 ± 25 km or 238 ± 24 km, depending on the possible values of surface roughness. Our corresponding thermal inertia estimates are 133 or 114 J m-2 s-0.5 K-1, with a total uncertainty estimated at 40 J m-2 s-0.5 K-1. They are among the highest thermal inertia values ever measured for an asteroid of this size. We consider this as a new evidence of a metal-rich surface for the Asteroid (16) Psyche.

  18. Scale dependence of cirrus horizontal heterogeneity effects on TOA measurements – Part I: MODIS brightness temperatures in the thermal infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fauchez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneities on MODIS simulated thermal infrared (TIR brightness temperatures (BTs at the top of the atmosphere (TOA as a function of spatial resolution from 50 m to 10 km. A realistic 3-D cirrus field is generated by the 3DCLOUD model (average optical thickness of 1.4, cloud-top and base altitudes at 10 and 12 km, respectively, consisting of aggregate column crystals of Deff = 20 µm, and 3-D thermal infrared radiative transfer (RT is simulated with the 3DMCPOL code. According to previous studies, differences between 3-D BT computed from a heterogenous pixel and 1-D RT computed from a homogeneous pixel are considered dependent at nadir on two effects: (i the optical thickness horizontal heterogeneity leading to the plane-parallel homogeneous bias (PPHB and the (ii horizontal radiative transport (HRT leading to the independent pixel approximation error (IPAE. A single but realistic cirrus case is simulated and, as expected, the PPHB mainly impacts the low-spatial-resolution results (above ∼ 250 m with averaged values of up to 5–7 K, while the IPAE mainly impacts the high-spatial-resolution results (below ∼ 250 m with average values of up to 1–2 K. A sensitivity study has been performed in order to extend these results to various cirrus optical thicknesses and heterogeneities by sampling the cirrus in several ranges of parameters. For four optical thickness classes and four optical heterogeneity classes, we have found that, for nadir observations, the spatial resolution at which the combination of PPHB and HRT effects is the smallest, falls between 100 and 250 m. These spatial resolutions thus appear to be the best choice to retrieve cirrus optical properties with the smallest cloud heterogeneity-related total bias in the thermal infrared. For off-nadir observations, the average total effect is increased and the minimum is shifted to coarser spatial

  19. Thermal Infrared Radiometric Calibration of the Entire Landsat 4, 5, and 7 Archive (1982-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, John R.; Hook, Simon J.; Barsi, Julia A.; Markham, Brian L.; Miller, Jonathan; Padula, Francis P.; Raqueno, Nina G.

    2012-01-01

    Landsat's continuing record of the thermal state of the earth's surface represents the only long term (1982 to the present) global record with spatial scales appropriate for human scale studies (i.e., tens of meters). Temperature drives many of the physical and biological processes that impact the global and local environment. As our knowledge of, and interest in, the role of temperature on these processes have grown, the value of Landsat data to monitor trends and process has also grown. The value of the Landsat thermal data archive will continue to grow as we develop more effective ways to study the long term processes and trends affecting the planet. However, in order to take proper advantage of the thermal data, we need to be able to convert the data to surface temperatures. A critical step in this process is to have the entire archive completely and consistently calibrated into absolute radiance so that it can be atmospherically compensated to surface leaving radiance and then to surface radiometric temperature. This paper addresses the methods and procedures that have been used to perform the radiometric calibration of the earliest sizable thermal data set in the archive (Landsat 4 data). The completion of this effort along with the updated calibration of the earlier (1985 1999) Landsat 5 data, also reported here, concludes a comprehensive calibration of the Landsat thermal archive of data from 1982 to the present

  20. Thermal characterization of rods, tubes and spheres using pulsed infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apinaniz, E; Mendioroz, A; Madariaga, N; Oleaga, A; Celorrio, R; Salazar, A

    2008-01-01

    In this work we analyse the accuracy of an extension of the flash method to measure the thermal diffusivity of rods, tubes and spheres, which was recently proposed by the authors. We have performed measurements in a wide set of calibrated samples of different sizes and we have found that a lower limiting size of the radius can be established for the validity of the method. On the other hand, a procedure to retrieve the thermal conductivity of tubes, based on filling them with a contrast liquid (water), is proposed. Moreover, the thermal contact resistance between the two layers of coated cylinders is also obtained. Measurements on calibrated samples confirm the validity of the two latest methods

  1. Thermal emission before earthquakes by analyzing satellite infra-red data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, D.; Taylor, P.; Bryant, N.; Pulinets, S.; Freund, F.

    2004-05-01

    Satellite thermal imaging data indicate long-lived thermal anomaly fields associated with large linear structures and fault systems in the Earth's crust but also with short-lived anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Positive anomalous land surface temperature excursions of the order of 3-4oC have been observed from NOAA/AVHRR, GOES/METEOSAT and EOS Terra/Aqua satellites prior to some major earthquake around the world. The rapid time-dependent evolution of the "thermal anomaly" suggests that is changing mid-IR emissivity from the earth. These short-lived "thermal anomalies", however, are very transient therefore there origin has yet to be determined. Their areal extent and temporal evolution may be dependent on geology, tectonic, focal mechanism, meteorological conditions and other factors.This work addresses the relationship between tectonic stress, electro-chemical and thermodynamic processes in the atmosphere and increasing mid-IR flux as part of a larger family of electromagnetic (EM) phenomena related to seismic activity.We still need to understand better the link between seismo-mechanical processes in the crust, on the surface, and at the earth-atmospheric interface that trigger thermal anomalies. This work serves as an introduction to our effort to find an answer to this question. We will present examples from the strong earthquakes that have occurred in the Americas during 2003/2004 and the techniques used to record the thermal emission mid-IR anomalies, geomagnetic and ionospheric variations that appear to associated with impending earthquake activity.

  2. Silver-Nanoparticle-Based Screen-Printing and Film Characterization of a Disposable, Dual-Band, Bandstop Filter on a Flexible Polyethylene Terephthalate Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishor Kumar Adhikari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a silver-nanoparticle-based, screen-printed, high-performance, dual-band, bandstop filter (DBBSF on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET substrate. Using screen-printing techniques to process a highly viscous silver printing ink, high-conductivity printed lines were implemented at a web transfer speed of 5 m/min. Characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, the printed lines were shown to be characterized by smooth surfaces with a root mean square roughness of 7.986 nm; a significantly higher thickness (12.2 μm than the skin depth; and a high conductivity of 2×107 S/m. These excellent printed line characteristics enabled the implementation of a high-selectivity DBBSF using shunt-connected uniform impedance resonators (UIRs. Additionally, the inductive loading effect of T-shaped stubs on the UIRs, which were analyzed using S-parameters based on lumped parameter calculations, was used to improve the return losses of the geometrically optimized DBBSF. The measured minimum return loss and maximum insertion loss of 28.26 and 1.58 dB, respectively, at the central frequencies of 2.56 and 5.29 GHz of a protocol screen-printed DBBSF demonstrated the excellent performance of the material and its significant potential for use in future cost-effective, flexible WiMax and WLAN applications.

  3. Outdoor thermal monitoring of large scale structures by infrared thermography integrated in an ICT based architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Crinière, Antoine; Averty, Rodolphe

    2015-04-01

    An infrared system has been developed to monitor transport infrastructures in a standalone configuration. Results obtained on bridges open to traffic allows to retrieve the inner structure of the decks. To complete this study, experiments were carried out over several months to monitor two reinforced concrete beams of 16 m long and 21 T each. Detection of a damaged area over one of the two beams was made by Pulse Phase Thermography approach. Measurements carried out over several months. Finally, conclusion on the robustness of the system is proposed and perspectives are presented.

  4. Study of the gamma radiation effect on lincomycin by two techniques thermal analysis and fourier transform infrared (FTIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zier, A.; Al-Kassiri, H.; Al Aji, Z.

    1999-02-01

    Sample of Lincomycin were irradiated by means of gamma radiation ( 60 Co) at dose rate ca. (408 kGy/h) in the range (3, 5, 15, 20)kGy in presence of air. Samples were investigated using two techniques: Thermal analysis (Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TG)) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). DSC purity study, which depends on Vant Hof equation, showed that the purity of Lincomycin reduced by means of gamma radiation. The purity of theses samples decreased by increasing the dose, and the purity of lincomycin was still above (99%) at dose (10 kGy). To follow up this effects, (FTIR) spectrums of these sample were recorded before and after irradiation. The two peaks at (1500 - 1750 Cm -1 ) which belong to amide group, and the peak at (1050 - 1100 Cm -1 ) which belongs to the S-C groups have reduced. (author)

  5. Study of the gamma radiation effect on the lincomycin by two techniques thermal analysis and fourier transform infrared (FTIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zier, A.; Al-Kassiri, H.

    1999-01-01

    Sample of Lincomycin were irradiated by means of gamma radiation ( 60 Co) at dose rate ca. (408 kGy/h) in the range (3, 5, 15, 20)kGy in presence of air. Samples were investigated using two techniques: Thermal analysis (Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TG)) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). DSC purity study, which depends on Vant Hof equation, showed that the purity of Lincomycin reduced by means of gamma radiation. The purity of theses samples decreased by increasing the dose, and the purity of lincomycin was still above (99%) at dose (10 kGy). To follow up this effects, (FTIR) spectrums of these sample were recorded before and after irradiation. The two peaks at (1500 - 1750 Cm -1 ) which belong to amide group, and the peak at (1050 - 1100 Cm -1 ) which belongs to the S-C groups have reduced. (author)

  6. Dual-Telescope Multi-Channel Thermal-Infrared Radiometer for Outer Planet Fly-By Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Shahid; Amato, Michael; Bowles, Neil; Calcutt, Simon; Hewagama, Tilak; Howard, Joseph; Howett, Carly; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Hurford, Terry; Hurley, Jane; hide

    2016-01-01

    The design of a versatile dual-telescope thermal-infrared radiometer spanning the spectral wavelength range 8-200 microns, in five spectral pass bands, for outer planet fly-by missions is described. The dual- telescope design switches between a narrow-field-of-view and a wide-field-of-view to provide optimal spatial resolution images within a range of spacecraft encounters to the target. The switchable dual-field- of-view system uses an optical configuration based on the axial rotation of a source-select mirror along the optical axis. The optical design, spectral performance, radiometric accuracy, and retrieval estimates of the instrument are discussed. This is followed by an assessment of the surface coverage performance at various spatial resolutions by using the planned NASA Europa Mission 13-F7 fly-by trajectories as a case study.

  7. Infrared absorption study of ammonium uranates and uranium oxide powders formed during their thermal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rofail, N.H.; ELfekey, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Ammonium uranates (AU) were precipitated from a nuclear-pure uranyl nitrate solution using different precipitating agents. IR spectra of the obtained uranates and oxides formed during their thermal decomposition have been studied. The results indicated that the precipitating agent, mode of stirring, washing and calcining temperature are important factors for a specific oxide formation.4 FIG., 3 TAB

  8. Burn Depth Estimation Based on Infrared Imaging of Thermally Excited Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, F.M.; Hoswade, S.C.; Yee, M.L.

    1999-03-05

    Accurate estimation of the depth of partial-thickness burns and the early prediction of a need for surgical intervention are difficult. A non-invasive technique utilizing the difference in thermal relaxation time between burned and normal skin may be useful in this regard. In practice, a thermal camera would record the skin's response to heating or cooling by a small amount-roughly 5 C for a short duration. The thermal stimulus would be provided by a heat lamp, hot or cold air, or other means. Processing of the thermal transients would reveal areas that returned to equilibrium at different rates, which should correspond to different burn depths. In deeper thickness burns, the outside layer of skin is further removed from the constant-temperature region maintained through blood flow. Deeper thickness areas should thus return to equilibrium more slowly than other areas. Since the technique only records changes in the skin's temperature, it is not sensitive to room temperature, the burn's location, or the state of the patient. Preliminary results are presented for analysis of a simulated burn, formed by applying a patch of biosynthetic wound dressing on top of normal skin tissue.

  9. Comparison of Three Infrared Thermal Detection Systems and Self Report for Mass Fever Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-20

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Nicole Cohen describes research that examined the usefulness of thermal scanners for detecting fever in large groups of people in public settings, such as hospitals and airports.  Created: 10/20/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/20/2010.

  10. Structural Evolution of Kerogen and Bitumen during Thermal Maturation examined by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, P. R.; Le Doan, T. V.; Pomerantz, A.

    2014-12-01

    Kerogen—the organic matter that is solid and insoluble in organic solvents—is a key component of organic-rich mudstones. The composition of kerogen affects the storage and transport of hydrocarbons in these unconventional resources and is known to change with thermal maturity. We report here using FTIR spectroscopy, the compositional characteristics of kerogen as a function of thermal maturity, together with the compositional characteristics of the organic phase, bitumen—the organic matter that is solid, but soluble in organic solvents. Kerogen is consumed during thermal maturation, whereas bitumen is an intermediary formed at low maturity from kerogen and consumed at higher maturities in formation of oil and gas. Bitumen relative to kerogen has higher aliphatic content, lower aromatic content, and lower abundance of oxygenated functions. At low maturity (vitrinite reflectance equivalent VRe ~ 0.5-0.9 %), the average length of aliphatic chains in bitumen increases during bitumen formation. At higher thermal maturities (VRe > 1.0-1.3 %), average aliphatic chain length decreases as bitumen is consumed. This evolution contrasts to that in kerogen, where aliphatic chain lengths shorten during all stages of maturation. Breakdown of kerogen appears to be driven by cleavage of oxygen functions at low maturity and removal of aliphatic carbons at higher maturities. These aliphatic-rich fragments may comprise the bitumen, and may in part explain the solubility of bitumen in organic solvents. Bitumen shows evidence of oxidation at low thermal maturity, a phenonemom not documented for kerogen. Bitumen maturation and degradation at higher thermal maturity is driven by cleavage and loss of aliphatic carbons, and is coincident with the maximum generation of oil and gas. The aromatic content of bitumen and of kerogen both increase during maturation as a consequence of the loss of aliphatic carbon. The oil and gas generation potential of the residual organic matter thus

  11. Highly thermal conductivity and infrared emissivity of flexible transparent film heaters utilizing silver-decorated carbon nanomaterials as fillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yu-An; Chen, Yin-Ju; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    A flexible transparent film heater using functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanosheets decorated with silver nanoparticles as fillers and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)- poly(4-stryrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as a dispersant possesses excellent optoelectronic and electrothermal properties. The film possesses a low sheet resistance of 53.0 ± 4.2 ohm · sq −1 , a transmittance of 80.2 ± 0.8% at a wavelength of 550 nm, a high thermal conductivity of 142.0 ± 9.6 W · m −1  · K −1 , a quick response time of less than 60 s, stable heating performance, good reliability, low power consumption, flexibility, and uniform heat diffusion. Besides, the film shows an average infrared emissivity of 0.53 in the wavelength range of 4 to 14 μm, which shows an outstanding heat release performance by radiation. The flexible transparent film heaters adopting graphene and carbon nanotubes as fillers boast excellent electrothermal performance through heat conduction and infrared radiation, suggesting that they are good substitutes for traditional metallic and indium tin oxide film heaters. (papers)

  12. Infrared laser induced organic reactions. 2. Laser vs. thermal inducment of unimolecular and hydrogen bromide catalyzed bimolecular dehydration of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danen, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a mixture of reactant molecules can be induced by pulsed infrared laser radiation to react via a route which is totally different from the pathway resulting from heating the mixture at 300 0 C. The high-energy unimolecular elimination of H 2 O from ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol and HBr can be selectively induced with a pulsed CO 2 laser in preference to either a lower energy bimolecular HBr-catalyzed dehydration or the more facile dehydration of 2-propanol. Heating the mixture resulted in the almost exclusive reaction of 2-propanol to produce propylene. It was demonstrated that the bimolecular ethanol + HBr reaction cannot be effectively induced by the infrared laser radiation as evidenced by the detrimental effect on the yield of ethylene as the HBr pressure was increased. The selective, nonthermal inducement of H 2 O elimination from vibrationally excited ethanol in the presence of 2-propanol required relatively low reactant pressures. At higher pressures intermolecular V--V energy transfer allowed the thermally more facile dehydration from 2-propanol to become the predominant reaction channel

  13. Preliminary determination of geothermal working area based on Thermal Infrared and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoes Nugroho, Indra; Kurniawahidayati, Beta; Syahputra Mulyana, Reza; Saepuloh, Asep

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing is one of the methods for geothermal exploration. This method can be used to map the geological structures, manifestations, and predict the geothermal potential area. The results from remote sensing were used as guidance for the next step exploration. Analysis of target in remote sensing is an efficient method to delineate geothermal surface manifestation without direct contact to the object. The study took a place in District Merangin, Jambi Province, Indonesia. The area was selected due to existing of Merangin volcanic complex composed by Mounts Sumbing and Hulunilo with surface geothermal manifestations presented by hot springs and hot pools. The location of surface manifestations could be related with local and regional structures of Great Sumatra Fault. The methods used in this study were included identification of volcanic products, lineament extraction, and lineament density quantification. The objective of this study is to delineate the potential zones for sitting the geothermal working site based on Thermal Infrared and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors. The lineament-related to geological structures, was aimed for high lineament density, is using ALOS - PALSAR (Advanced Land Observing Satellite - The Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar) level 1.1. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) analysis was used to predict the vegetation condition using Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS (The Operational Land Imager - Thermal Infrared Sensor). The brightness temperature was extracted from TIR band to estimate the surface temperature. Geothermal working area identified based on index overlay method from extracted parameter of remote sensing data was located at the western part of study area (Graho Nyabu area). This location was identified because of the existence of high surface temperature about 30°C, high lineament density about 4 - 4.5 km/km2 and low NDVI values less than 0.3.

  14. Ten years of ASTER thermal infrared data from Terra: Discoveries, lessons learned, and insights into future missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, M. S.; Dehn, J.; Duda, K.; Hughes, C. G.; Lee, R.; Rose, S.; Scheidt, S. P.; Wessels, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Soon after its launch in December 1999, the ASTER sensor on the NASA Terra satellite began acquiring infrared data of dynamic surface processes around the world. For the first time in history, well calibrated, relatively high spatial resolution thermal infrared (TIR) data was being collected in more than two spectral bands. These data began a new era in Earth science from space allowing us to examine such diverse topics as the compositional mapping of eolian systems, the accurate detection of subpixel thermal heterogeneities, the relationship between emitted energy from glassy materials and the volcanic processes that formed them, and the thermophysical behavior of the land surface. The TIR subsystem of ASTER has maintained very good radiometric accuracy over the last decade, which is double the original design life. The diligence of the ASTER Science Team to maintain this quality and expand the data through programs such as the night time TIR global map will provide a scientific dataset utilized for many years in the future. For example, one such program started in 2003 was a new collaboration between the ASTER project and the U.S. Geological Survey to help better monitor the explosive volcanoes of the northern Pacific region. The rapid response mode of the instrument has now been automated and linked to a larger-scale and more rapid monitoring alert system operated by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. ASTER TIR data collected under this project are commonly the first detailed views of new activity at these remote volcanoes, with over 1400 TIR images having been acquired for the five most active Kamchatka volcanoes. This presentation will focus on an overview of the science and operational results over the last decade using data from the ASTER TIR sensor. ASTER has the capability to acquire high spatial resolution data from the visible to the TIR wavelength region. Those data, in conjunction with its ability to generate digital elevation models (DEM’s), makes the

  15. Feasibility study on infrared electro-thermal NDE of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.R.; Hassberger, J.A.

    1975-11-01

    Electro-thermal examination, a branch of thermal testing (TT), is a promising method being developed for NDE of stainless steel welds. This report describes the first phase of development; i.e., preliminary demonstration and laboratory evaluation of the method's sensitivity to notches in Type 304 stainless steel plate specimens. It also includes a description of the basic principles, together with a description of the hardware and experimental results showing that electrical discharge machined notches down to 0.16 cm (0.06 in.) long x 0.08 cm (0.03 in.) deep were detected. A qualitative technique for interpreting the test results to determine whether defects are at the surface or deeper within the material is demonstrated

  16. Human Wearable Attribute Recognition Using Probability-Map-Based Decomposition of Thermal Infrared Images

    OpenAIRE

    KRESNARAMAN, Brahmastro; KAWANISHI, Yasutomo; DEGUCHI, Daisuke; TAKAHASHI, Tomokazu; MEKADA, Yoshito; IDE, Ichiro; MURASE, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the attribute recognition problem, a field of research that is dominated by studies in the visible spectrum. Only a few works are available in the thermal spectrum, which is fundamentally different from the visible one. This research performs recognition specifically on wearable attributes, such as glasses and masks. Usually these attributes are relatively small in size when compared with the human body, on top of a large intra-class variation of the human body itself, th...

  17. Physical, thermal, infrared and optical properties of Nd3+ doped lithium–lead-germanate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veeranna Gowda, V.C.

    2015-01-01

    The structure–property relationships of neodymium doped lithium–lead-germanate glasses were investigated. The density was found to increase with the increase of Nd 2 O 3 concentration and its variation is explained in terms of its molecular mass, structural transformation and packing density. Addition of modifier oxide to lead-germanate glass suggests a decreased free space within the glass matrix, resulting in the formation of stiff network. The increase in glass transition temperature specifies strengthening of glass by forming bridging oxygens. The optical properties of glass were measured employing UV–visible spectroscopy. The refractive index values varied nonlinearly with Nd 2 O 3 concentration and were speculated to depend on the electronic polarizability of oxide glasses. The frequencies of the infrared absorption bands were affected marginally and the absorption peaks revealed that the glass matrix consists of [GeO 4/2 ], [GeO 6/2 ] and [PbO 4/2 ] structural units

  18. A Decision Support Information System for Urban Landscape Management Using Thermal Infrared Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Howell, Burgess F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we describe efforts to use remote sensing data within the purview of an information support system, to assess urban thermal landscape characteristics as a means for developing more robust models of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. We also present a rationale on how we have successfully translated the results from the study of urban thermal heating and cooling regimes as identified from remote sensing data, to decision-makers, planners, government officials, and the public at large in several US cities to facilitate better understanding of how the UHI affects air quality. Additionally, through the assessment of the spatial distribution of urban thermal landscape characteristics using remote sensing data, it is possible to develop strategies to mitigate the UHI that hopefully will in turn, drive down ozone levels and improve overall urban air quality. Four US cities have been the foci for intensive analysis as part of our studies: Atlanta, GA, Baton Rouge, LA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Sacramento, CA. The remote sensing data for each of these cities has been used to generate a number of products for use by "stakeholder" working groups to convey information on what the effects are of the UHI and what measures can be taken to mitigate it. In turn, these data products are used to both educate and inform policy-makers, planners, and the general public about what kinds of UHI mitigation strategies are available.

  19. Thermal screening of facial skin arterial hot spots using non-contact infrared radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E M; Heusch, A I; McCarthy, P W

    2008-01-01

    Non-contact infrared thermometry of facial skin offers advantages over less accessible internal body sites, especially when considering mass screening for febrile infectious disease. The forehead offers an obvious site, but does not present an isothermic surface, as various small arteries passing close to the surface create 'hot-spots'. The aim of this study is to use non-contact infrared (IR) thermometry to determine the link between the temperature at specific facial skin sites and clinical body temperature. A sample of 169 asymptomatic adults (age range 18–54 years) was screened with IR thermometers (Braun Thermoscan proLT for auditory meatus (AM) temperature representing clinical body temperature, and a Raytek, Raynger MX for skin surface temperature). Peak IR skin temperature was measured over the course of each posterior auricular artery (PAA) and each superficial temporal artery (STA). In a sub-group (n = 54) the peak skin temperature of the forehead's metopic region (MR) was also recorded. There were no differences (P > 0.05) between the PAA and STA at 34.2 ± 0.9 °C and 34.2 ± 0.7 °C, respectively, which were 2.5 °C cooler than the AM temperature (36.7 ± 0.5 °C, p 2 = 0.63, p < 0.001) between PAA and STA. There were no asymmetric temperature differences between the left and right sides and males had warmer skin over the MR (F, 33.6 ± 0.7 °C versus M, 34.4 ± 0.6 °C, p < 0.001). Although a lack of correlation between either PAA or STA and AM was apparent in asymptomatics, further research in symptomatics is required to determine the usefulness of these measurements in mass screening of conditions such as fever

  20. Thermal monitoring of hydrothermal activity by permanent infrared automatic stations: Results obtained at Solfatara di Pozzuoli, Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, G.; Vilardo, G.; Augusti, V.; Granieri, D.; Caliro, S.; Minopoli, C.; Terranova, C.

    2007-12-01

    A permanent automatic infrared (IR) station was installed at Solfatara crater, the most active zone of Campi Flegrei caldera. After a positive in situ calibration of the IR camera, we analyze 2175 thermal IR images of the same scene from 2004 to 2007. The scene includes a portion of the steam heated hot soils of Solfatara. The experiment was initiated to detect and quantify temperature changes of the shallow thermal structure of a quiescent volcano such as Solfatara over long periods. Ambient temperature is the main parameter affecting IR temperatures, while air humidity and rain control image quality. A geometric correction of the images was necessary to remove the effects of slow movement of the camera. After a suitable correction the images give a reliable and detailed picture of the temperature changes, over the period October 2004 to January 2007, which suggests that origin of the changes were linked to anthropogenic activity, vegetation growth, and the increase of the flux of hydrothermal fluids in the area of the hottest fumaroles. Two positive temperature anomalies were registered after the occurrence of two seismic swarms which affected the hydrothermal system of Solfatara in October 2005 and October 2006. It is worth noting that these signs were detected in a system characterized by a low level of activity with respect to systems affected by real volcanic crisis where more spectacular results will be expected. Results of the experiment show that this kind of monitoring system can be a suitable tool for volcanic surveillance.

  1. MgB2-Based Bolometer Array for Far Infra-Red Thermal Imaging and Fourier Transform Spectroscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakew, B.; Aslam, S.; Brasunas, J.

    2012-01-01

    The mid-superconducting critical temperature (T(sub c) approximately 39 K) of the simple binary, intermetallic MgB, [1] makes it a very good candidate for the development of the next generation of electrooptical devices (e.g. [2]). In particular, recent advances in thin film deposition teclmiques to attain higb quality polycrystalline thin film MgB, deposited on SiN-Si substrates, with T(sub c) approximately 38K [3] coupled with the low voltage noise performance of the film [4] makes it higbly desirable for the development of moderately cooled bolometer arrays for integration into future space-bourne far infra-red (FIR) spectrometers and thermal mappers for studying the outer planets, their icy moons and other moons of interest in the 17-250 micrometer spectral wavelength range. Presently, commercially available pyroelectric detectors operating at 300 K have specific detectivity, D(*), around 7 x 10(exp 8) to 2 x 10(exp 9) centimeters square root of Hz/W. However, a MgB2 thin film based bolometer using a low-stress (less than 140 MPa) SiN membrane isolated from the substrate by a small thermal conductive link, operating at 38 K, promises to have two orders of magnitude higher specific detectivity [5][6].

  2. Assessment of a landfill methane emission screening method using an unmanned aerial vehicle mounted thermal infrared camera – A field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelsted, Lotte; Christensen, A. G.; Larsen, J. E.

    2018-01-01

    An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-mounted thermal infrared (TIR) camera’s ability to delineate landfill gas (LFG) emission hotspots was evaluated in a field test at two Danish landfills (Hedeland landfill and Audebo landfill). At both sites, a test area of 100 m2 was established and divided into a...

  3. Simultaneous measurement of thermal diffusivity and effective infrared absorption coefficient in IR semitransparent and semiconducting n-CdMgSe crystals using photothermal radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlak, M., E-mail: mpawlak@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziądzka 5/7, Toruń (Poland); Maliński, M. [Department of Electronics and Computer Science, Koszalin University of Technology, 2 Śniadeckich St., Koszalin 75-453 (Poland)

    2015-01-10

    Highlights: • The new method of determination of the effective infrared absorption coefficient is presented. • The method can be used for transparent samples for the excitation radiation. • The effect of aluminum foil on the PTR signal in a transmission configuration is discussed. - Abstract: In this paper we propose a new procedure of simultaneous estimation of the effective infrared optical absorption coefficient and the thermal diffusivity of solid state samples using the photothermal infrared radiometry method in the transmission configuration. The proposed procedure relies on the analysis of the frequency dependent signal obtained from the samples covered with thin aluminum foil. This method can be applied for both optically opaque and transparent samples. The proposed method is illustrated with the results of the thermal diffusivity and the effective IR absorption coefficient obtained for several Cd{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}Se crystals.

  4. Thermal-Infrared Surveys of Near-Earth Object Diameters and Albedos with Spitzer and IRTF/MIRSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David; Hora, Joseph L.; Chesley, Steven; Emery, Josh; Fazio, Giovanni; Harris, Alan W.; Moskovitz, Nick; Mueller, Michael; Smith, Howard

    2015-08-01

    More than 12000 Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) have been discovered over the past few decades and current discovery surveys find on average 4 new NEOs every night. In comparison to asteroid discovery, the physical characterization of NEOs lags far behind: measured diameters and albedos exist only for roughly 10% of all known NEOs. We describe a current and a future observing program that provide diameter and albedo measurements of a large number of NEOs.In our Spitzer Space Telescope Exploration Science program 'NEOSurvey', we are performing a fast and efficient flux-limited survey in which we measure the diameters and albedos of ~600 NEOs in a total of 710 hrs of observing time. We measure the thermal emission of our targets at 4.5 micron and combine these measurements with optical data in a thermal model. Our diameters and albedos come with highly realistic uncertainties that account for a wide range of potential asteroid properties. Our primary goal is to create a large and uniform catalog of NEO properties, including diameters, albedos, and flux density data. This catalog is publicly accessible and provides the latest results usually within 2 weeks after the observation.Starting in 2016, we will also make use of the refurbished and recommissioned MIRSI mid-infrared imaging camera on NASA's InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) to derive the diameters and albedos of up to 750 NEOs over a period of 3 yrs. MIRSI will be equipped with an optical camera that will allow for simultaneous optical imaging, which will improve our thermal modeling results. With MIRSI, we will focus on newly discovered NEOs that are close to Earth and hence relatively bright.The results from both programs, together with already exisiting diameter and albedo results from the literature, will form the largest database of NEO physical properties available to date. With this data set, we will be able to refine the size distribution of small NEOs and the corresponding impact frequency, and compare the

  5. Camera pose refinement by matching uncertain 3D building models with thermal infrared image sequences for high quality texture extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaszczuk, Dorota; Stilla, Uwe

    2017-10-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) images are often used to picture damaged and weak spots in the insulation of the building hull, which is widely used in thermal inspections of buildings. Such inspection in large-scale areas can be carried out by combining TIR imagery and 3D building models. This combination can be achieved via texture mapping. Automation of texture mapping avoids time consuming imaging and manually analyzing each face independently. It also provides a spatial reference for façade structures extracted in the thermal textures. In order to capture all faces, including the roofs, façades, and façades in the inner courtyard, an oblique looking camera mounted on a flying platform is used. Direct geo-referencing is usually not sufficient for precise texture extraction. In addition, 3D building models have also uncertain geometry. In this paper, therefore, methodology for co-registration of uncertain 3D building models with airborne oblique view images is presented. For this purpose, a line-based model-to-image matching is developed, in which the uncertainties of the 3D building model, as well as of the image features are considered. Matched linear features are used for the refinement of the exterior orientation parameters of the camera in order to ensure optimal co-registration. Moreover, this study investigates whether line tracking through the image sequence supports the matching. The accuracy of the extraction and the quality of the textures are assessed. For this purpose, appropriate quality measures are developed. The tests showed good results on co-registration, particularly in cases where tracking between the neighboring frames had been applied.

  6. Infrared thermography--a non-invasive tool to evaluate thermal status of neonatal pigs based on surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammersgaard, T S; Malmkvist, J; Pedersen, L J

    2013-12-01

    Hypothermia is a major cause of mortality in neonatal pigs. Infrared (IR) thermography is a promising non-invasive method to assess thermal status, but has not been evaluated for use on neonatal pigs from birth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of IR thermography as a non-invasive tool to estimate body temperature and assess the thermal status in newborn pigs by (1) estimating the relationship between surface temperature and rectal temperature (RT) in neonatal pigs; and (2) estimating the influence of air temperature (AT), birth weight and the time from birth on the relationship between surface temperature and RT. The method was evaluated on the basis of 1695 thermograms and 915 RTs on 91 neonatal pigs born in loose farrowing pens with floor heating at 34°C, and three different ATs (15°C, 20°C and 25°C). Full-body thermograms of the back and the side of the pigs and RT were acquired at 11 sampling times between birth and 48 h after birth. The maximum (IRmax), minimum, average of the full body and ear minimum IR surface temperatures were derived from the thermograms. IRmax had the highest correlation with RT (0.82) and was therefore used in the statistical analysis. The relation of RT by IRmax depended on time at: 0 h (slope: 0.20°C, Pmethod has the potential to be used without the need for manual restraint of the pigs. On the basis of the results of this study, we propose that IRmax temperature from full-body thermograms has implication as a valid tool to assess the thermal status in neonatal piglets but not as an identical substitute for RT.

  7. Investigation of human frontal cortex under noxious thermal stimulation of temporo-mandibular joint using functional near infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennu, Amarnath; Rawat, Rohit; Manry, Michael T.; Gatchel, Robert; Liu, Hanli

    2013-03-01

    According to American Academy of Orofacial Pain, 75% of the U.S. population experiences painful symptoms of temporo-mandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD) during their lifetime. Thus, objective assessment of pain is crucial for efficient pain management. We used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool to explore hemodynamic responses in the frontal cortex to noxious thermal stimulation of temporomadibular joint (TMJ). NIRS experiments were performed on 9 healthy volunteers under both low pain stimulation (LPS) and high pain stimulation (HPS), using a temperature-controlled thermal stimulator. To induce thermal pain, a 16X16 mm2 thermode was strapped onto the right TMJ of each subject. Initially, subjects were asked to rate perceived pain on a scale of 0 to 10 for the temperatures from 41°C to 47°C. For the NIRS measurement, two magnitudes of temperatures, one rated as 3 and another rated as 7, were chosen as LPS and HPS, respectively. By analyzing the temporal profiles of changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration (HbO) using cluster-based statistical tests, we were able to identify several regions of interest (ROI), (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex and prefrontal cortex), where significant differences (ppain, a neural-network-based classification algorithm was used. With leave-one-out cross validation from 9 subjects, the two levels of pain were identified with 100% mean sensitivity, 98% mean specificity and 99% mean accuracy to high pain. From the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.99 mean area under curve was observed.

  8. Method of improving the performance of lenses for use in thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, M. W.; Klee, H. W.

    1980-10-01

    A method is described whereby the field performance of an all-germanium triplet, as used for imaging radiation in the 8 to 13 micron waveband, can be improved. The principle of the method, which could also be used to improve the performance of achromatic triplets or aspherized doublets, involves the use of a field flattener lens which replaces the germanium window of the detector. The curvature of this lens can be optimized to minimize field curvature, which together with chromatic aberration is one of the most serious residuals of thermal imaging systems with relative apertures of around f/0.7. It is also shown that for such relative apertures, and for typical fields of less than 15 degrees, at 100 mm focal length, the location of the aperture stop is not a significant design parameter. This arises as a result of the intrinsic optical properties of germanium.

  9. Thermal, infrared and X-ray studies on praseodymium and neodymium myristates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, S.K.; Sharma, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of praseodymium and neodymium myristates has been studied both as a function of temperature and of time. The thermogravimetric analysis has shown that order of decomposition reaction is kinetically of zero order and the energy of activation for the decomposition process lies in the range of 10-15 kcal mol -1 . The IR results showed that lanthanide myristates have an ionic character. The X-ray analysis indicated that the zigzag chains of the fatty acid radical constituent of the soap molecules extend straight forward on both sides of each basal plane and the molecular axes of the soap molecules are somewhat inclined to the basal plane. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Detection of environmental disturbance using color aerial photography and thermal infrared imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronoff, S.; Ross, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of a program for satellite remote sensing for long-period environmental monitoring are examined, noting that establishing early mapping surveys of areas of concern aids in detection of stressful environmental conditions. The process is described with an example from IR and color photography of a 30,000 sq km area in the Athabasca Oil Sands, with the photography carried out from aircraft and satellite. The IR data was gathered between 8-14 microns and the photographs were taken at a 1:11,000 scale. Water-related disturbances detected included turbidity which indicated the possible presence of oil, and higher thermal emission near a tailings pond which also suggested an oil source. The presence of surface aquatic vegetation is an indicator of nutrient imbalance in a pond near a sewage pond. Finally, dead trees were observed near improperly installed culverts along new roads

  11. High-sensitivity broadband infrared monitor of spatial structure of relativistic bunches and thermal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal'tsev, A.A.; Mal'tsev, M.A.; Maslova, M.V.

    2004-01-01

    The monitor is intended for registration of spatial distribution of density of energy of pulsing radiation of thermal fields and bunches of relativistic electrons and protons in a wide spectral range 0,4 - 4 μm. In a measuring system of a monitor effective means of active and passive increase of the relation of a useful signal to noise, in view of particular conditions and requirements are used. The measuring channel can confidently allocate a useful signal on a background of handicaps, the size of which can make about 20 kE in a pulse [1]. The accuracy of measurement of amplitude of a signal of radiation makes 0,2% of maximum significances of a registrar scale. (author)

  12. Diagnosis Of The Risk For Carotid Artery Stenos Based On Thermal Model In Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Valipoori Goodarzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and a common cause of hospitalization in the United States of America and is also an important factor for Inability of patients and carotid stenos is one of the most important factors in creating it. Now, Imaging studies include: Angiography, MRI, CT scan and Doppler ultrasonography , are used to detect carotid artery stenos that is one of the most important causes of ischemic stroke. However, each method has unique advantages and disadvantages, that many of them will have a compromise between performance and accuracy versus easy usage and cost considerations. In contrast, in this paper, thermography is used as a non-invasive and cost effective to detect carotid artery Stenos and thus the risk of stroke. Materials and methods: This study is done on a series of thermal images obtained from the Clinical Center in California. In this imaging, the automatic detection of carotid artery stenos and thus Risk for stroke was done, based on: (1 the difference of average temperature between the right and left carotid arteries in the neck (2 The presence or absence of internal and external carotid arteries. Results: In this study, with the survey conducted by a specialist brain of patients had been previously, the accuracy of this work is confirmed. the techniques and points that are Experimental and  scientifically based  and obtained in this study, can help to doctors for Early detection of Artery disease, based on analysis of thermal images . Conclusion: The method presented in this paper is considered as a non-invasive and cost-effective method that automatically operates to detect the carotid arteries and prevent the Risk for stroke.

  13. Characterization of optical and micro-physical properties of cirrus clouds using a wideband thermal infrared spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, Luca; Di Natale, Gianluca; Bianchini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    High-altitude ice clouds such as cirrus clouds play a key role in the Earth's radiation budget since they cover permanently about 20-30% of the surface of the planet, reaching even to 60-70% in the tropics. The modulation of the incoming solar radiation and the outgoing Earth's thermal emission due to cirrus can contribute to heat or to cool the atmosphere, according to their optical properties, which must be characterised with great accuracy and over the whole spectral range involved in the scattering and emission processes. Here we present the infrared measurements over the wide spectral range from 9 to 50 micron performed by the Fourier transform spectrometer REFIR-PAD (Radiation Explorer in Far InfraRed - Prototype for Application and Development) during many field campaigns that have taken place since 2007 from different high-altitude ground-based stations: Testa Grigia Station, Cervinia-Italy, (3480 m asl), Cerro Toco, Atacama-Chile, (5380 m asl), Concordia Base, Dome C-Antarctica (3230 m asl). These measurements show for the first time the spectral effect of cirrus clouds in the long-wave part of the emission spectrum above 15 micron of wavelength. To characterise these measurements over the wide spectral range as a function of the optical properties of ice particles, a model of the radiative transfer, that integrates the well known numerical code LBLRTM, which simulates the radiative transfer in the atmosphere, with a specific code which simulates the propagation of the radiation through the cloud, was developed. The optical properties of clouds have been modelled using the δ-scaled Eddington approximation for a single layer and the Ping Yang's database for the single-scattering properties of ice crystals. The preliminary results of the fit procedure used for the determination of the micro-physical parameters of ice crystals, such as the effective diameter, ice water path, effective temperature and optical thickness will be shown in the presentation. The

  14. An Improved Mono-Window Algorithm for Land Surface Temperature Retrieval from Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The successful launch of the Landsat 8 satellite with two thermal infrared bands on February 11, 2013, for continuous Earth observation provided another opportunity for remote sensing of land surface temperature (LST. However, calibration notices issued by the United States Geological Survey (USGS indicated that data from the Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS Band 11 have large uncertainty and suggested using TIRS Band 10 data as a single spectral band for LST estimation. In this study, we presented an improved mono-window (IMW algorithm for LST retrieval from the Landsat 8 TIRS Band 10 data. Three essential parameters (ground emissivity, atmospheric transmittance and effective mean atmospheric temperature were required for the IMW algorithm to retrieve LST. A new method was proposed to estimate the parameter of effective mean atmospheric temperature from local meteorological data. The other two essential parameters could be both estimated through the so-called land cover approach. Sensitivity analysis conducted for the IMW algorithm revealed that the possible error in estimating the required atmospheric water vapor content has the most significant impact on the probable LST estimation error. Under moderate errors in both water vapor content and ground emissivity, the algorithm had an accuracy of ~1.4 K for LST retrieval. Validation of the IMW algorithm using the simulated datasets for various situations indicated that the LST difference between the retrieved and the simulated ones was 0.67 K on average, with an RMSE of 0.43 K. Comparison of our IMW algorithm with the single-channel (SC algorithm for three main atmosphere profiles indicated that the average error and RMSE of the IMW algorithm were −0.05 K and 0.84 K, respectively, which were less than the −2.86 K and 1.05 K of the SC algorithm. Application of the IMW algorithm to Nanjing and its vicinity in east China resulted in a reasonable LST estimation for the region. Spatial

  15. Application of infrared thermal imaging in the study of preventing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases with Chinese medicine health food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Zhang, Xusheng

    2009-08-01

    To explore the assessing technique which could objectively reflect the characteristics of Chinese medicine in the prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, four balance features of infrared thermal images (ITI) corresponding to the up and down, left and right, proximal and distal balance of blood circulation of human body were studied. First, the ITI features of the middle-aged and elderly people with lipid abnormality history were compared with those of the healthy youth. It was found that the balance state of the youth was significantly better than that of the middle-aged and elderly, Pfood with the function of helping to decrease serum lipid, on the balance features. The subjects were middle-aged and elderly people with lipid abnormality history. Shengyi capsule was taken by the trial group while Xuezhikang capsule (with lovastatin as the main effective component) by the control group for 108 days. The balance features of ITI showed that Shengyi was significantly better than Xuezhikang in improving the whole body balance of blood circulation (including the up and down, left and right, proximal and distal balance). The relative efficacy rate was 81.0% for the trial group and 33.3% for the control group, there was significant difference between the two groups (P=0.002). Shengyi could effectively decrease the low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) but the effect of Xuezhikang in decreasing total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C was better than Shengyi. Though the lipid-lowering effect of Shengyi was not as good as Xuezhikang, ITI reflected the obvious advantage of Shengyi in improving the whole body balance of blood circulation which indicated that helping to decrease serum lipid is only part of the health function of Shengyi. The physiology and pathology basis of the influences of Shengyi on the four balance features and its relationship with the clinical outcome deserves further study. So the prospect of infrared thermal imaging is indicated as

  16. Evaluation of thermal infrared hyperspectral imagery for the detection of onshore methane plumes: Significance for hydrocarbon exploration and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafutto, Rebecca DeĺPapa Moreira; de Souza Filho, Carlos Roberto; Riley, Dean N.; de Oliveira, Wilson Jose

    2018-02-01

    Methane (CH4) is the main constituent of natural gas. Fugitive CH4 emissions partially stem from geological reservoirs (seepages) and leaks in pipelines and petroleum production plants. Airborne hyperspectral sensors with enough spectral and spatial resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio can potentially detect these emissions. Here, a field experiment performed with controlled release CH4 sources was conducted in the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC), Casper, WY (USA). These sources were configured to deliver diverse emission types (surface and subsurface) and rates (20-1450 scf/hr), simulating natural (seepages) and anthropogenic (pipeline) CH4 leaks. The Aerospace Corporation's SEBASS (Spatially-Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System) sensor acquired hyperspectral thermal infrared data over the experimental site with 128 bands spanning the 7.6 μm-13.5 μm range. The data was acquired with a spatial resolution of 0.5 m at 1500 ft and 0.84 m at 2500 ft above ground level. Radiance images were pre-processed with an adaptation of the In-Scene Atmospheric Compensation algorithm and converted to emissivity through the Emissivity Normalization algorithm. The data was processed with a Matched Filter. Results allowed the separation between endmembers related to the spectral signature of CH4 from the background. Pixels containing CH4 signatures (absorption bands at 7.69 μm and 7.88 μm) were highlighted and the gas plumes mapped with high definition in the imagery. The dispersion of the mapped plumes is consistent with the wind direction measured independently during the experiment. Variations in the dimension of mapped gas plumes were proportional to the emission rate of each CH4 source. Spectral analysis of the signatures within the plumes shows that CH4 spectral absorption features are sharper and deeper in pixels located near the emitting source, revealing regions with higher gas density and assisting in locating CH4 sources in the field

  17. Evaluate depth of field limits of fixed focus lens arrangements in thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    More and more modern thermal imaging systems use uncooled detectors. High volume applications work with detectors that have a reduced pixel count (typically between 200x150 and 640x480). This reduces the usefulness of modern image treatment procedures such as wave front coding. On the other hand, uncooled detectors demand lenses with fast fnumbers, near f/1.0, which reduces the expected Depth of Field (DoF). What are the limits on resolution if the target changes distance to the camera system? The desire to implement lens arrangements without a focusing mechanism demands a deeper quantification of the DoF problem. A new approach avoids the classic "accepted image blur circle" and quantifies the expected DoF by the Through Focus MTF of the lens. This function is defined for a certain spatial frequency that provides a straightforward relation to the pixel pitch of imaging device. A certain minimum MTF-level is necessary so that the complete thermal imaging system can realize its basic functions, such as recognition or detection of specified targets. Very often, this technical tradeoff is approved with a certain lens. But what is the impact of changing the lens for one with a different focal length? Narrow field lenses, which give more details of targets in longer distances, tighten the DoF problem. A first orientation is given by the hyperfocal distance. It depends in a square relation on the focal length and in a linear relation on the through focus MTF of the lens. The analysis of these relations shows the contradicting requirements between higher thermal and spatial resolution, faster f-number and desired DoF. Furthermore, the hyperfocal distance defines the DoF-borders. Their relation between is such as the first order imaging formulas. A calculation methodology will be presented to transfer DoF-results from an approved combination lens and camera to another lens in combination with the initial camera. Necessary input for this prediction is the accepted DoF of

  18. Real-time person detection in low-resolution thermal infrared imagery with MSER and CNNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Christian; Müller, Thomas; Willersinn, Dieter; Beyerer, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    In many camera-based systems, person detection and localization is an important step for safety and security applications such as search and rescue, reconnaissance, surveillance, or driver assistance. Long-wave infrared (LWIR) imagery promises to simplify this task because it is less affected by background clutter or illumination changes. In contrast to a lot of related work, we make no assumptions about any movement of persons or the camera, i.e. persons may stand still and the camera may move or any combination thereof. Furthermore, persons may appear arbitrarily in near or far distances to the camera leading to low-resolution persons in far distances. To address this task, we propose a two-stage system, including a proposal generation method and a classifier to verify, if the detected proposals really are persons. In contradiction to use all possible proposals as with sliding window approaches, we apply Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER) and classify the detected proposals afterwards with a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). The MSER algorithm acts as a hot spot detector when applied to LWIR imagery. Because the body temperature of persons is usually higher than the background, they appear as hot spots in the image. However, the MSER algorithm is unable to distinguish between different kinds of hot spots. Thus, all further LWIR sources such as windows, animals or vehicles will be detected, too. Still by applying MSER, the number of proposals is reduced significantly in comparison to a sliding window approach which allows employing the high discriminative capabilities of deep neural networks classifiers that were recently shown in several applications such as face recognition or image content classification. We suggest using a CNN as classifier for the detected hot spots and train it to discriminate between person hot spots and all further hot spots. We specifically design a CNN that is suitable for the low-resolution person hot spots that are common with

  19. THE 1.6 μm NEAR-INFRARED NUCLEI OF 3C RADIO GALAXIES: JETS, THERMAL EMISSION, OR SCATTERED LIGHT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Chiaberge, Marco; Sparks, William; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Capetti, Alessandro; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Axon, David J.; Baum, Stefi A.; Quillen, Alice C.

    2010-01-01

    Using HST NICMOS 2 observations we have measured 1.6 μm near-infrared nuclear luminosities of 100 3CR radio galaxies with z < 0.3, by modeling and subtracting the extended emission from the host galaxy. We performed a multiwavelength statistical analysis (including optical and radio data) of the properties of the nuclei following classification of the objects into FR I and FR II, and low-ionization galaxies (LIGs), high-ionization galaxies (HIGs), and broad-line objects (BLOs) using the radio morphology and optical spectra, respectively. The correlations among near-infrared, optical, and radio nuclear luminosity support the idea that the near-infrared nuclear emission of FR Is has a non-thermal origin. Despite the difference in radio morphology, the multiwavelength properties of FR II LIG nuclei are statistically indistinguishable from those of FR Is, an indication of a common structure of the central engine. All BLOs show an unresolved near-infrared nucleus and a large near-infrared excess with respect to FR II LIGs and FR Is of equal radio core luminosity. This requires the presence of an additional (and dominant) component other than the non-thermal light. Considering the shape of their spectral energy distribution, we ascribe the origin of their near-infrared light to hot circumnuclear dust. A near-infrared excess is also found in HIGs, but their nuclei are substantially fainter than those of BLO. This result indicates that substantial obscuration along the line of sight to the nuclei is still present at 1.6 μm. Nonetheless, HIG nuclei cannot simply be explained in terms of dust obscuration: a significant contribution from light reflected in a circumnuclear scattering region is needed to account for their multiwavelength properties.

  20. Far infrared thermal detectors for laser radiometry using a carbon nanotube array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, John H.; Lee, Bob; Grossman, Erich N.

    2011-07-20

    We present a description of a 1.5 mm long, vertically aligned carbon nanotube array (VANTA) on a thermopile and separately on a pyroelectric detector. Three VANTA samples, having average lengths of 40 {mu}m, 150 {mu}m, and 1.5 mm were evaluated with respect to reflectance at a laser wavelength of 394 {mu}m(760 GHz), and we found that the reflectance decreases substantially with increasing tube length, ranging from 0.38 to 0.23 to 0.01, respectively. The responsivity of the thermopile by electrical heating (98.4 mA/W) was equal to that by optical heating (98.0 mA/W) within the uncertainty of the measurement. We analyzed the frequency response and temporal response and found a thermal decay period of 500 ms, which is consistent with the specific heat of comparable VANTAs in the literature. The extremely low (0.01) reflectance of the 1.5 mm VANTAs and the fact that the array is readily transferable to the detector's surface is, to our knowledge, unprecedented.

  1. Analysis of the Tikhonov regularization to retrieve thermal conductivity depth-profiles from infrared thermography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiñaniz, Estibaliz; Mendioroz, Arantza; Salazar, Agustín; Celorrio, Ricardo

    2010-09-01

    We analyze the ability of the Tikhonov regularization to retrieve different shapes of in-depth thermal conductivity profiles, usually encountered in hardened materials, from surface temperature data. Exponential, oscillating, and sigmoidal profiles are studied. By performing theoretical experiments with added white noises, the influence of the order of the Tikhonov functional and of the parameters that need to be tuned to carry out the inversion are investigated. The analysis shows that the Tikhonov regularization is very well suited to reconstruct smooth profiles but fails when the conductivity exhibits steep slopes. We check a natural alternative regularization, the total variation functional, which gives much better results for sigmoidal profiles. Accordingly, a strategy to deal with real data is proposed in which we introduce this total variation regularization. This regularization is applied to the inversion of real data corresponding to a case hardened AISI1018 steel plate, giving much better anticorrelation of the retrieved conductivity with microindentation test data than the Tikhonov regularization. The results suggest that this is a promising way to improve the reliability of local inversion methods.

  2. Optical temperature sensor based on the Nd{sup 3+} infrared thermalized emissions in a fluorotellurite glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalla, E.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de la Laguna, San Cristóbal de la Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); León-Luis, S.F., E-mail: sleonlui@ull.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad de la Laguna, San Cristóbal de la Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Malta Consolider Team, Universidad de la Laguna, San Cristóbal de la Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Monteseguro, V. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de la Laguna, San Cristóbal de la Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Malta Consolider Team, Universidad de la Laguna, San Cristóbal de la Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Pérez-Rodríguez, C. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de la Laguna, San Cristóbal de la Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Cáceres, J.M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial, Universidad de la Laguna, San Cristóbal de la Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); and others

    2015-10-15

    The temperature dependence of the infrared luminescence of a fluorotellurite glass doped with 0.01 and 2.5 mol% of Nd{sup 3+} ions was studied in order to use it as a high temperature sensing probe. For this purpose, the emission intensities of the ({sup 4}S{sub 3/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 7/2}), ({sup 2}H{sub 9/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 5/2}),{sup 4}F{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 9/2} transitions were measured in a wide range of temperatures from 300 upto 650 K. The changes in the emission profiles were calibrated by means of the fluorescence intensity ratio technique. The calibrations showed a strong dependence on the Nd{sup 3+} ions concentration, having the low-doped concentrated sample the best response to changes of temperature. The maximum value obtained for the thermal sensibility is 17×10{sup −4} K{sup −1} at 640 K, being one of the highest values found in the literature for Nd{sup 3+} optical temperature sensors. Finally, the experimental calibrations were compared with the theoretical temperature luminescence response calculated from the Judd–Ofelt theory. - Highlights: • Nd{sup 3+}-doped fluorotellurite glasses were prepared. • The intensities of the ({sup 4}S{sub 3/2},{sup 4}F{sub 7/2}),({sup 2}H{sub 9/2},{sup 4}F{sub 5/2}), {sup 4}F{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 9/2} transitions. • The highest thermal sensitivity has been obtained for the glass with the lowest concentration of Nd{sup 3+} ions. • The Nd{sup 3+}-doped fluorotellurite glass fits the requirement for a good temperature sensor.

  3. Thermal infrared remote sensing of water temperature in riverine landscapes: Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonneau, Rebecca N.; Piégay, Hervé; Handcock, R.N; Torgersen, Christian E.; Cherkauer, K.A; Gillespie, A.R; Tockner, K; Faux, R. N.; Tan, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Water temperature in riverine landscapes is an important regional indicator of water quality that is influenced by both ground- and surface-water inputs, and indirectly by land use in the surrounding watershed (Brown and Krygier, 1970; Beschta et al., 1987; Chen et al., 1998; Poole and Berman, 2001). Coldwater fishes such as salmon and trout are sensitive to elevated water temperature; therefore, water temperature must meet management guidelines and quality standards, which aim to create a healthy environment for endangered populations (McCullough et al., 2009). For example, in the USA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established water quality standards to identify specific temperature criteria to protect coldwater fishes (Environmental Protection Agency, 2003). Trout and salmon can survive in cool-water refugia even when temperatures at other measurement locations are at or above the recommended maximums (Ebersole et al., 2001; Baird and Krueger, 2003; High et al., 2006). Spatially extensive measurements of water temperature are necessary to locate these refugia, to identify the location of ground- and surface-water inputs to the river channel, and to identify thermal pollution sources. Regional assessment of water temperature in streams and rivers has been limited by sparse sampling in both space and time. Water temperature has typically been measured using a network of widely distributed instream gages, which record the temporal change of the bulk, or kinetic, temperature of the water (Tk) at specific locations. For example, the State of Washington (USA) recorded water quality conditions at 76 stations within the Puget Lowlands eco region, which contains 12,721 km of streams and rivers (Washington Department of Ecology, 1998). Such gages are sparsely distributed, are typically located only in larger streams and rivers, and give limited information about the spatial distribution of water temperature (Cherkauer et al., 2005).

  4. Thermal infrared and optical photometry of Asteroidal Comet C/2002 CE10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Miyasaka, Seidai; Dermawan, Budi; Mueller, Thomas; Takato, Naruhisa; Watanabe, Junichi; Boehnhardt, Hermann

    2018-04-01

    C/2002 CE10 is an object in a retrograde elliptical orbit with Tisserand parameter - 0.853 indicating a likely origin in the Oort Cloud. It appears to be a rather inactive comet since no coma and only a very weak tail was detected during the past perihelion passage. We present multi-color optical photometry, lightcurve and thermal mid-IR observations of the asteroidal comet. With the photometric analysis in BVRI, the surface color is found to be redder than asteroids, corresponding to cometary nuclei and TNOs/Centaurs. The time-resolved differential photometry supports a rotation period of 8.19 ± 0.05 h. The effective diameter and the geometric albedo are 17.9 ± 0.9 km and 0.03 ± 0.01, respectively, indicating a very dark reflectance of the surface. The dark and redder surface color of C/2002 CE10 may be attribute to devolatilized material by surface aging suffered from the irradiation by cosmic rays or from impact by dust particles in the Oort Cloud. Alternatively, C/2002 CE10 was formed of very dark refractory material originally like a rocky planetesimal. In both cases, this object lacks ices (on the surface at least). The dynamical and known physical characteristics of C/2002 CE10 are best compatible with those of the Damocloids population in the Solar System, that appear to be exhaust cometary nucleus in Halley-type orbits. The study of physical properties of rocky Oort cloud objects may give us a key for the formation of the Oort cloud and the solar system.

  5. Reflectance and Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Mars: Relationship Between ISM and TES for Compositional Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor); Mustard, John

    2004-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy has demonstrated that high albedo surfaces on Mars contain heavily altered materials with some component of hematite, poorly crystalline ferric oxides, and an undefined silicate matrix. The spectral properties of many low albedo regions indicate crystalline basalts containing both low and high calcium pyroxene, a mineralogy consistent with the basaltic SNC meteorites. The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) experiment on the Mars Geochemical Surveyor has acquired critical new data relevant to surface composition and mineralogy, but in a wavelength region that is complementary to reflectance spectroscopy. The essence of the completed research was to analyze TES data in the context of reflectance data obtained by the French ISM imaging spectrometer experiment in 1989. This approach increased our understanding of the complementary nature of these wavelength regions for mineralogic determinations using actual observations of the martian surface. The research effort focused on three regions of scientific importance: Syrtis Major-Isidis Basin, Oxia Palus-Arabia, and Valles Marineris. In each region distinct spatial variations related to reflectance, and in derived mineralogic information and interpreted compositional units were analyzed. In addition, specific science questions related to the composition of volcanics and crustal evolution, soil compositions and pedogenic processes, and the relationship between pristine lithologies and weathering provided an overall science-driven framework for the work. The detailed work plan involved colocation of TES and ISM data, extraction of reflectance and emissivity spectra from areas of known reflectance variability, and quantitative analysis using factor analysis and statistical techniques to determine the degree of correspondence between these different wavelength regions. Identified coherent variations in TES spectroscopy were assessed against known atmospheric effects to validate that the variations

  6. Thermal unimolecular decomposition of bicyclopropyl and deuterated analogues: infrared photoactivation as a diagnostic tool in mechanistic organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farneth, W.E.; Thomsen, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    The infrared photochemistry of bicyclopropyl yields product mixtures that are not easily rationalized on the basis of the mechanistic scheme suggested by previous pyrolysis work. As a result of this inconsistency the thermal chemistry of bicyclopropyl and analogues deuterated specifically on one ring has been reexamined. A significant new reaction channel involving the chemically activated decomposition of cyclohexene to ethylene and butadiene has been demonstrated. Evidence for the involvement of chemically activated cyclohexene is as follows: (1) isotopic labeling studies implying a symmetric intermediate, (2) a pressure-dependent ratio of cyclohexene to butadiene and ethylene, (3) good agreement between experimental and calculated values for the unimolecular rate constant for retro-Diels-Alder decay of ''hot'' cyclohexene. A comprehensive mechanism for the unimolecular decay of bicyclopropyl is proposed. The important elements of this mechanism are a single first-formed 1,3 biradical common to all products and the intervention of chemical activation in the generation of several of the secondary products

  7. HOW MANY HIPPOS (HOMHIP: ALGORITHM FOR AUTOMATIC COUNTS OF ANIMALS WITH INFRA-RED THERMAL IMAGERY FROM UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lhoest

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius L. is part of the animal species endangered because of multiple human pressures. Monitoring of species for conservation is then essential, and the development of census protocols has to be chased. UAV technology is considering as one of the new perspectives for wildlife survey. Indeed, this technique has many advantages but its main drawback is the generation of a huge amount of data to handle. This study aims at developing an algorithm for automatic count of hippos, by exploiting thermal infrared aerial images acquired from UAV. This attempt is the first known for automatic detection of this species. Images taken at several flight heights can be used as inputs of the algorithm, ranging from 38 to 155 meters above ground level. A Graphical User Interface has been created in order to facilitate the use of the application. Three categories of animals have been defined following their position in water. The mean error of automatic counts compared with manual delineations is +2.3% and shows that the estimation is unbiased. Those results show great perspectives for the use of the algorithm in populations monitoring after some technical improvements and the elaboration of statistically robust inventories protocols.

  8. EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR COREGISTRATION AND FUSION OF RPAS-BASED 3D POINT CLOUDS AND THERMAL INFRARED IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hoegner

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the automatic coregistration and fusion of 3d point clouds generated from aerial image sequences and corresponding thermal infrared (TIR images. Both RGB and TIR images have been taken from a RPAS platform with a predefined flight path where every RGB image has a corresponding TIR image taken from the same position and with the same orientation with respect to the accuracy of the RPAS system and the inertial measurement unit. To remove remaining differences in the exterior orientation, different strategies for coregistering RGB and TIR images are discussed: (i coregistration based on 2D line segments for every single TIR image and the corresponding RGB image. This method implies a mainly planar scene to avoid mismatches; (ii coregistration of both the dense 3D point clouds from RGB images and from TIR images by coregistering 2D image projections of both point clouds; (iii coregistration based on 2D line segments in every single TIR image and 3D line segments extracted from intersections of planes fitted in the segmented dense 3D point cloud; (iv coregistration of both the dense 3D point clouds from RGB images and from TIR images using both ICP and an adapted version based on corresponding segmented planes; (v coregistration of both image sets based on point features. The quality is measured by comparing the differences of the back projection of homologous points in both corrected RGB and TIR images.

  9. Thermal infrared remote sensing in assessing groundwater and surface-water resources related to Hannukainen mining development site, northern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautio, Anne B.; Korkka-Niemi, Kirsti I.; Salonen, Veli-Pekka

    2018-02-01

    Mining development sites occasionally host complicated aquifer systems with notable connections to natural surface water (SW) bodies. A low-altitude thermal infrared (TIR) imaging survey was conducted to identify hydraulic connections between aquifers and rivers and to map spatial surface temperature patterns along the subarctic rivers in the proximity of the Hannukainen mining development area, northern Finland. In addition to TIR data, stable isotopic compositions ( δ 18O, δD) and dissolved silica concentrations were used as tracers to verify the observed groundwater (GW) discharge into the river system. Based on the TIR survey, notable GW discharge into the main river channel and its tributaries (61 km altogether) was observed and over 500 GW discharge sites were located. On the basis of the survey, the longitudinal temperature patterns of the studied rivers were found to be highly variable. Hydrological and hydrogeological information is crucial in planning and siting essential mining operations, such as tailing areas, in order to prevent any undesirable environmental impacts. The observed notable GW discharge was taken into consideration in the planning of the Hannukainen mining development area. The results of this study support the use of TIR imagery in GW-SW interaction and environmental studies in extensive and remote areas with special concerns for water-related issues but lacking the baseline research.

  10. Characterizing Temporal and Spatial Changes in Land Surface Temperature across the Amazon Basin using Thermal and Infrared Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cak, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Amazon Basin has faced innumerable pressures in recent years, including logging, mining and resource extraction, agricultural expansion, road building, and urbanization. These changes have drastically altered the landscape, transforming a predominantly forested environment into a mosaic of different types of land cover. The resulting fragmentation has caused dramatic and negative impacts on its structure and function, including on biodiversity and the transfer of water and energy to and from soil, vegetation, and the atmosphere (e.g., evapotranspiration). Because evapotranspiration from forested areas, which is affected by factors including temperature and water availability, plays a significant role in water dynamics in the Amazon Basin, measuring land surface temperature (LST) across the region can provide a dynamic assessment of hydrological, vegetation, and land use and land cover changes. It can also help to identify widespread urban development, which often has a higher LST signal relative to surrounding vegetation. Here, we discuss results from work to measure and identify drivers of change in LST across the entire Amazon Basin through analysis of past and current thermal and infrared satellite imagery. We leverage cloud computing resources in new ways to allow for more efficient analysis of imagery over the Amazon Basin across multiple years and multiple sensors. We also assess potential drivers of change in LST using spatial and multivariate statistical analyses with additional data sources of land cover, urban development, and demographics.

  11. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  12. UV-visible, infrared and Raman spectroscopic and thermal studies of tungsten doped lead borate glasses and the effect of ionizing gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kheshen, Amany A.; El-Batal, Fatma H.; Marzouk, Samir Y.

    2008-01-01

    Ultraviolet-visible, infrared and Raman spectroscopy together with thermal properties were measured for undoped and WO 3 - doped (up to 10%) lead borate glasses. Also, the effect of gamma irradiation was followed by UV-visible measurements. The UV visible spectrum of the undoped glass reveals before irradiation intense ultraviolet bands due to the combined effects of trace iron impurities (Fe 3+ ) and Pb 2+ ions which remain unchanged with the addition of WO 3 . Infrared and Raman measurements show characteristic bands due to borate group and the possible sharing of lead-oxygen and tungsten-oxygen groups. The studied glasses show obvious resistance to gamma irradiation. The thermal and density data are correlated with the introduction of highly polarizable and heavy (W 6+ ) ions and to the change in structural arrangement with varying glass composition. (author)

  13. The automated infrared thermal imaging system for the continuous long-term monitoring of the surface temperature of the Vesuvius crater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Sansivero

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrared remote sensing monitoring is a significant tool aimed to integrated surveillance system of active volcanic areas. In this paper we describe the realization and the technological evolution of the permanent image thermal infrared (TIR surveillance system of the Vesuvius volcano. The TIR monitoring station was installed on the Vesuvius crater rim on July 2004 in order to acquire scenes of the SW inner slope of Vesuvius crater that is characterized by a significant thermal emission. At that time, it represented the first achievement all over the world of a permanent surveillance thermal imaging system on a volcano. It has been working in its prototypal configuration till May 2007. The experience gained over years about the engineering, management and maintenance of TIR remote acquisition systems in extreme environmental conditions, allows us to design and realize a new release of the TIR monitoring station with improved functionalities and more flexibility for the IR image acquisition, management and storage, which became operational in June 2011. In order to characterize the thermal background of the Vesuvius crater at present state of volcanic quiescence, the time series of TIR images gathered between July 2004 and May 2012 were analyzed using a statistical approach. Results show no significant changes in the thermal radiation during the observation periods, so they can be assumed as representative of a background level to which refer for the interpretation of possible future anomalies related to a renewal of the volcanic dynamics of the Vesuvius volcano.

  14. Infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies on sodium borosilicate glass interacted with thermally oxidized aluminides formed on alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusufali, C.; Dutta, R.S.; Dey, G.K.; Kshirsagar, R.J.; Jagannath; Mishra, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Thermally oxidized aluminides formed on Ni-Cr-Fe based superalloy 690 substrates were subjected to interaction with sodium borosilicate melt (used as matrices for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste) at 1248 K for 192 hours. After the interaction, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis of glass samples indicated the incorporation of Al in the glass network. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of glass specimens revealed modified glass structure. (author)

  15. Ground and satellite-based remote sensing of mineral dust using AERI spectra and MODIS thermal infrared window brightness temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, Richard Allen, Jr.

    The radiative effects of dust aerosol on our climate system have yet to be fully understood and remain a topic of contemporary research. To investigate these effects, detection/retrieval methods for dust events over major dust outbreak and transport areas have been developed using satellite and ground-based approaches. To this end, both the shortwave and longwave surface radiative forcing of dust aerosol were investigated. The ground-based remote sensing approach uses the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer brightness temperature spectra to detect mineral dust events and to retrieve their properties. Taking advantage of the high spectral resolution of the AERI instrument, absorptive differences in prescribed thermal IR window sub-band channels were exploited to differentiate dust from cirrus clouds. AERI data collected during the UAE2 at Al-Ain UAE was employed for dust retrieval. Assuming a specified dust composition model a priori and using the light scattering programs of T-matrix and the finite difference time domain methods for oblate spheroids and hexagonal plates, respectively, dust optical depths have been retrieved and compared to those inferred from a collocated and coincident AERONET sun-photometer dataset. The retrieved optical depths were then used to determine the dust longwave surface forcing during the UAE2. Likewise, dust shortwave surface forcing is investigated employing a differential technique from previous field studies. The satellite-based approach uses MODIS thermal infrared brightness temperature window data for the simultaneous detection/separation of mineral dust and cirrus clouds. Based on the spectral variability of dust emissivity at the 3.75, 8.6, 11 and 12 mum wavelengths, the D*-parameter, BTD-slope and BTD3-11 tests are combined to identify dust and cirrus. MODIS data for the three dust-laden scenes have been analyzed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this detection/separation method. Detected daytime dust and cloud

  16. Preliminary study on the time-related changes of the infrared thermal images of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Zhang, Xusheng; Lin, Gang; Chen, Zhigang

    2009-08-01

    It is of great importance to study the manifestations and the influencing factors of the time-related changes of infrared thermal images (ITI) of human body since the variable body surface temperature distribution seriously affected the application of ITI in medicine. In this paper, manifestations of time-related changes of the ITI of human body from three double-blind randomized trials and their correlation with meteorological factors (e.g. temperature, pressure, humidity, cold front passage and tropical cyclone landing) were studied. The trials were placebo or drug controlled studying the influences of Chinese medicine health food (including Shengsheng capsule with immunity adjustment function, Shengan capsule with sleep improvement function and Shengyi capsule with the function of helping to decrease serum lipid) on the ITI of human body. In the first thirty-six days of the trials images were scanned every six days and image data in the seven observation time spots (including the 0, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36 day of the trial) were used for the time-related study. For every subject the scanned time was fixed in the day within two hours. The ITI features which could reflect the functions of the health foods were studied. The indexes of the features were relative magnitude (temperature difference between the viewing area and the reference area). Results showed that the variation tendencies of the trial group and control group were basically the same in placebo controlled trials and some of the long-term effects of Chinese medicine health food could be reflected significantly in certain time spots in the first thirty-six days. Time-related changes of the ITI of human body were closely related with meteorological factors but there were other influencing factors still need to be studied. As the ITI of human body could reflect the influences of Chinese medicine health foods and are closely related with meteorology, there are bright prospects for the application of ITI in

  17. Spectroscopic (far or terahertz, mid-infrared and Raman) investigation, thermal analysis and biological activity of piplartine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Karthick, T.; Joshi, B. D.; Mishra, Rashmi; Tandon, Poonam; Ayala, A. P.; Ellena, Javier

    2017-09-01

    Research in the field of medicinal plants including Piper species like long pepper (Piper longum L.- Piperaceae) is increasing all over the world due to its use in traditional and Ayurvedic medicine. Piplartine (piperlongumine, 5,6-dihydro-1-[(2E)-1-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-2-propenyl]-2(1H)-pyridinone), a biologically active alkaloid/amide was isolated from the phytochemical investigations of Piper species, as long pepper. This alkaloid has cytotoxic, anti-fungal, anti-diabetic, anti-platelet aggregation, anti-tumoral, anxiolytic, anti-depressant, anti-leishmanial, and genotoxic activities, but, its anticancer property is the most promising and has been widely explored. The main purpose of the work is to present a solid state characterization of PPTN using thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy. Quantum mechanical calculations based on the density functional theory was also applied to investigate the molecular conformation and vibrational spectrum, which was compared with experimental results obtained by Raman scattering, far (terahertz) and mid-infrared adsorption spectroscopy. NBO analysis has been performed which predict that most intensive interactions in PPTN are the hyperconjugative interactions between n(1) N6 and π*(O1sbnd C7) having delocalization energy of 50.53 kcal/mol, Topological parameters have been analyzed using 'AIM' analysis which governs the three bond critical points (BCPs), one di-hydrogen, and four ring critical points (RCPs). MEP surface has been plotted which forecast that the most negative region is associated with the electronegative oxygen atoms (sites for nucleophilic activity). Theoretically, to confirm that the title compound has anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and anti-platelet aggregation activities, it was analyzed by molecular docking interactions with the corresponding target receptors. The obtained values of H-bonding parameters and binding affinity prove that its anti-cancer activity is the more prominent than the

  18. Directional anisotropy in thermal infrared measurements over Toulouse city centre during the CAPITOUL measurement campaigns: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagouarde, J.-P.; Irvine, M.

    2008-12-01

    The measurements of surface temperature are prone to important directional anisotropy related to the structure of the canopy and the radiative and energy exchanges inside of it. Directional effects must be taken into account for a number of practical applications such as the correction of large swath satellite data, the assimilation of thermal infrared (TIR) measurements in surface models, the design of future spatial missions… For urban canopies, experimental measurements of TIR directional anisotropy previously performed during summer days over Marseille in the framework of the ESCOMPTE campaign (2001) revealed significant angular surface temperature variations with noticeable hot spot effects whose intensity was related to the canopy structure. The CAPITOUL project ( http://medias.cnrs.fr/capitoul/ ) provided the opportunity to extend these results to other seasons and to nighttime conditions. The experimental setup is based on the use of 2 airborne TIR cameras with different lenses, inclination and resolution, and installed aboard a small aircraft. The flight protocol allowed the retrieval of directional anisotropy in all azimutal directions and in a range of zenith viewing angles between nadir and 62°. Measurements were performed during several intensive operation periods (IOP) in summer (2004 july), autumn (2004 September and October) and winter (2005 February). Only the first results of the 2004 autumn and 2005 winter IOPs are presented in this paper. The results obtained in daytime conditions confirm the systematic hot spot effects observed in previous experiments over cities. The variations found seem to be particularly important in winter when sun elevation is low: for instance they range between -4 and 10 K between oblique and nadir viewing in February. During nighttime conditions, angular variations are much lower (always less than 2 K between nadir and 60° zenithal viewing angle), whichever the azimutal viewing direction.

  19. Detection of Nonvolatile Inorganic Oxidizer-Based Explosives from Wipe Collections by Infrared Thermal Desorption-Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Sisco, Edward; Staymates, Matthew

    2018-05-07

    Infrared thermal desorption (IRTD) was coupled with direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) for the detection of both inorganic and organic explosives from wipe collected samples. This platform generated discrete and rapid heating rates that allowed volatile and semivolatile organic explosives to thermally desorb at relatively lower temperatures, while still achieving elevated temperatures required to desorb nonvolatile inorganic oxidizer-based explosives. IRTD-DART-MS demonstrated the thermal desorption and detection of refractory potassium chlorate and potassium perchlorate oxidizers, compounds difficult to desorb with traditional moderate-temperature resistance-based thermal desorbers. Nanogram to sub-nanogram sensitivities were established for analysis of a range of organic and inorganic oxidizer-based explosive compounds, with further enhancement limited by the thermal properties of the most common commercial wipe materials. Detailed investigations and high-speed visualization revealed conduction from the heated glass-mica base plate as the dominant process for heating of the wipe and analyte materials, resulting in thermal desorption through boiling, aerosolization, and vaporization of samples. The thermal desorption and ionization characteristics of the IRTD-DART technique resulted in optimal sensitivity for the formation of nitrate adducts with both organic and inorganic species. The IRTD-DART-MS coupling and IRTD in general offer promising explosive detection capabilities to the defense, security, and law enforcement arenas.

  20. On the metal-rich surfaces of (16) Psyche and other M-type asteroids from interferometric observations in the thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbo, Marco; Matter, A.; Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2013-10-01

    Asteroids belonging to the spectroscopic M-type exhibit a quasi featureless and moderately red reflectance spectrum and a geometric visible albedo between 0.1 and 0.3. These asteroids were initially thought to be metallic cores of differentiated asteroids that were exposed to space by a catastrophic disruption by impacts. Later, this view has been challenged by the detection of silicates and hydration spectroscopic bands on these bodies. Unveiling the physical properties of the surfaces of these asteroids, and identifying their meteorite analogs is a challenge from remote-sensing observations. Nevertheless, these are crucial problems, important for estimating the number of asteroids that underwent differentiation in the early phases of the formation of our solar system. The thermal inertia is a sensitive indicator for the presence of metal in the regolith on the surfaces of asteroids. We developed a new thermophysical model that allow us to derive the value of the thermal inertia from interferometric observations in the thermal infrared. We report on our investigation of the thermal inertia of M-type asteroids, including the asteroids (16) Psyche, for which we obtained a thermal inertia value anomalously high compared to the thermal inertia values of other asteroids in the same size range. From the thermal inertia and model of heat conductivity that accounts for different values of the packing fraction (a measure of the degree of compaction of the regolith particles) the regolith grain size is derived.

  1. Evaluation of water-use efficiency in foxtail millet (Setaria italica) using visible-near infrared and thermal spectral sensing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Cousins, Asaph B; Sankaran, Sindhuja

    2016-05-15

    Water limitations decrease stomatal conductance (g(s)) and, in turn, photosynthetic rate (A(net)), resulting in decreased crop productivity. The current techniques for evaluating these physiological responses are limited to leaf-level measures acquired by measuring leaf-level gas exchange. In this regard, proximal sensing techniques can be a useful tool in studying plant biology as they can be used to acquire plant-level measures in a high-throughput manner. However, to confidently utilize the proximal sensing technique for high-throughput physiological monitoring, it is important to assess the relationship between plant physiological parameters and the sensor data. Therefore, in this study, the application of rapid sensing techniques based on thermal imaging and visual-near infrared spectroscopy for assessing water-use efficiency (WUE) in foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv) was evaluated. The visible-near infrared spectral reflectance (350-2500 nm) and thermal (7.5-14 µm) data were collected at regular intervals from well-watered and drought-stressed plants in combination with other leaf physiological parameters (transpiration rate-E, A(net), g(s), leaf carbon isotopic signature-δ(13)C(leaf), WUE). Partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis was used to predict leaf physiological measures based on the spectral data. The PLSR modeling on the hyperspectral data yielded accurate and precise estimates of leaf E, gs, δ(13)C(leaf), and WUE with coefficient of determination in a range of 0.85-0.91. Additionally, significant differences in average leaf temperatures (~1°C) measured with a thermal camera were observed between well-watered plants and drought-stressed plants. In summary, the visible-near infrared reflectance data, and thermal images can be used as a potential rapid technique for evaluating plant physiological responses such as WUE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ferrites based infrared radiation coatings with high emissivity and high thermal shock resistance and their application on energy-saving kettle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianyi; Fan, Xi’an; Lu, Lei; Hu, Xiaoming; Li, Guangqiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The ferrites based infrared radiation coating was prepared by HVOF for the first time. • The infrared radiation coatings were applied firstly on the household kettle. • The bonding strength between the coating and substrate could reach 30.7 MPa. • The coating kept intact when cycle reached 27 by quenching from 1000 °C using water. • The energy-saving efficiency of the kettle with coating could reach 30.5%. - Abstract: Starting from Fe 2 O 3 , MnO 2 , Co 2 O 3 and NiO powders, the ferrites based infrared radiation coatings with high emissivity and high thermal shock resistance were successfully prepared on the surface of carbon steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying (HVOF). The coating thickness was about 120–150 μm and presented a typical flat lamellar structure. The coating surface was rough and some submicron grade grains distributed on it. The infrared emissivity of the ferrites based coating by HVOF was over 0.74 in 3–20 μm waveband at 800 °C, which was obviously higher than that of the coating by brushing process in the short waveband. The bonding strength was 30.7 MPa between the coating and substrate, which was five times more than that of conventional coatings by brushing process. The combined effect of the superior bonding strength, typical lamellar structure, pre-existing microcracks and newly generated pores made the cycle times reach 27 when the coating samples were quenched from 1000 °C using water. Lastly, the infrared radiation coatings were applied on the underside of household kettle, and the energy-saving efficiency could reach 30.5%. The ferrites based infrared radiation coatings obtained in this work are good candidates for saving energy in the field of cookware and industrial high temperature furnace

  3. Design of a size-efficient tunable metamaterial absorber based on leaf-shaped cell at near-infrared regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hailong; Xia, Hui; Xie, Wenke; Guo, Zhibo; Li, Hongjian

    2018-06-01

    A size-efficient tunable metamaterial absorber (MA) composed of metallic leaf-shaped cell, graphene layer, silicon substrate, and bottom metal film is investigated theoretically and numerically at near-infrared (NIR) regions. Simulation results reveal that the single-band high absorption of 91.9% is obtained at 1268.7 nm. Further results show that the single-band can be simply changed into dual-band high absorption by varying the geometric parameters of top metallic layer at same wavelength regions, yielding two high absorption coefficients of 96.6% and 95.3% at the wavelengths of 1158.7 nm and 1323.6 nm, respectively. And the effect of related geometric parameter on dual-band absorption intensities is also investigated to obtain the optimized one. The peak wavelength can be tuned via modifying the Fermi energy of the graphene layer through controlling the external gate voltage. The work shows that the proposed strategy can be applied to other design of the dual-band structure at infrared regions.

  4. Thermal infrared spectral analysis of compacted fine-grained mineral mixtures: implications for spectral interpretation of lithified sedimentary materials on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, C.; Rogers, D.

    2012-12-01

    Characterizing the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral mixing behavior of compacted fine-grained mineral assemblages is necessary for facilitating quantitative mineralogy of sedimentary surfaces from spectral measurements. Previous researchers have demonstrated that TIR spectra from igneous and metamorphic rocks as well as coarse-grained (>63 micron) sand mixtures combine in proportion to their volume abundance. However, the spectral mixing behavior of compacted, fine-grained mineral mixtures that would be characteristic of sedimentary depositional environments has received little attention. Here we characterize the spectral properties of pressed pellet samples of pestle and centrifuged to obtain less than 10 micron size. Pure phases and mixtures of two, three and four components were made in varying proportions by volume. All of the samples were pressed into pellets at 15000PSI to minimize volume scattering. Thermal infrared spectra of pellets were measured in the Vibrational Spectroscopy Laboratory at Stony Brook University with a Thermo Fisher Nicolet 6700 Fourier transform infrared Michelson interferometer from ~225 to 2000 cm-1. Our preliminary results indicate that some pelletized samples have contributions from volume scattering, which leads to non-linear spectral combinations. It is not clear if the transparency features (which arise from multiple surface reflections of incident photons) are due to minor clinging fines on an otherwise specular pellet surface or to partially transmitted energy through optically thin grains in the compacted mixture. Inclusion of loose powder (analysis of TES and Mini-TES data of lithified sedimentary deposits.

  5. Thermal infrared and microwave absorbing properties of SrTiO{sub 3}/SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/polyaniline nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Seyed Hossein, E-mail: shhosseini@iiau.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Islamshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, Parisa [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Pharmaceutical Sciences Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mousavi, S.Y. [Faculty of Passive Defense, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-25

    Graphical abstract: We have developed a new perspective of applications and properties of conducting polymers. The combination of absorption ability prepared nanocomposites in the present of PANI display a great potential in organization of shielding structures into thermal IR and microwave. Further investigations using other conducting polymers to demonstrate their capability for advance thermal IR and microwave shielding devices is under way. The application of these samples may improve the IR thermographic detection, catalysis, sensors, magnetic data storage, electromagnetic resonance wave absorption, photonic crystals, and microelectronic devices and military aspects. - Highlights: • The SrTiO{sub 3}/SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI exhibited electric and electromagnetic properties. • The SrTiO{sub 3}/SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI has shielding structures into thermal IR and microwave. • Increasing weight ratios and thicknesses will increase thermal IR ability. • Increasing weight ratios and thicknesses will increase microwave absorption ability. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) as a unique polymer that also has electromagnetic absorption used as the substrate. In this research, SrTiO{sub 3} was synthesized as IR absorbent and core and then SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} as microwave absorbent was prepared on SrTiO{sub 3} via co-precipitation method as the first shell. As the next step, PANI was coated on SrTiO{sub 3}/SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles via in situ polymerization by multi core–shell structures (SrTiO{sub 3}/SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI). Nanometer size and structures of samples were measured by TEM, XRD and FTIR. Morphology of nanocomposite was showed by SEM images. The magnetic and electric properties were also performed by VSM and four probe techniques. Thermal infrared (IR) absorption and microwave reflection loss of nanocomposites were investigated at 10–40 μm and 8–12 GHz, IR and microwave frequencies, respectively. The results showed that the Sr

  6. Thermal inertia in thermal infrared: porosity and chemical components of rocks; Inercia termica no infravermelho termal: porosidade e componentes quimicos de rochas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, Admilson P.; Ehlers, Ricardo Sandes [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Vitorello, Icaro [Instituto de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    The effect of porosity, and the relation between thermal inertia values and chemical components were determined. The thermal inertia values and chemical components were determined. The thermal inertia determinations were performed using radiometric observations, in the range 8 to 14 {mu}, of the surface temperature variations of the sample, induced by an incident heat flux. The results show that the increase in porosity tends to reduce the thermal inertia values, when the rock is in a dry state. In the water saturation state, the inertia also tends to show small values, only for porous rocks with thermal inertia values larger than the water values. The acid rocks show thermal inertia values smaller than those of the basic rocks. The intermediate and basic rocks show strong positive correlation between thermal inertia and Si O{sub 2}. 7 refs., 3 figs

  7. Accounting for particle non-sphericity in modeling of mineral dust radiative properties in the thermal infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, M.; Dubovik, O.; Lapyonok, T.; Derimian, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral radiative parameters (extinction optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor) of spheroids of mineral dust composed of quartz and clays have been simulated at wavelengths between 7.0 and 10.2 µm using a T-matrix code. In spectral intervals with high values of complex index of refraction and for large particles, the parameters cannot be fully calculated with the code. Practically, the calculations are stopped at a truncation radius over which the particles contribution cannot thus be taken into account. To deal with this issue, we have developed and applied an accurate corrective technique of T-matrix Size Truncation Compensation (TSTC). For a mineral dust described by its AERONET standard aspect ratio (AR) distribution, the full error margin when applying the TSTC is within 0.3% (or ±0.15%), whatever the radiative parameter and the wavelength considered, for quartz (the most difficult case). Large AR values limit also the possibilities of calculation with the code. The TSTC has been able to complete the calculations of the T-matrix code for a modified AERONET AR distribution with a maximum AR of 4.7 instead of 3 for the standard distribution. Comparison between the simulated properties of spheroids and of spheres of same volume confirms, in agreement with the literature, that significant differences are observed in the vicinity of the mineral resonant peaks (λ ca. 8.3–8.7 µm for quartz, ca. 9.3–9.5 µm for clays) and that they are due to absorption by the small particles. This is a favorable circumstance for the TSTC, which is concerned with the contribution of the largest particles. This technique of numerical calculation improves the accuracy of the simulated radiative parameters of mineral dust, which must lead to a progress in view of applications such as remote sensing or determination of energy balance of dust in the thermal infrared (TIR), incompletely investigated so far. - Highlights: • Completion of computation of mineral

  8. Validating the accuracy of SO2 gas retrievals in the thermal infrared (8-14 μm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, Andrea; Porter, John N.; Wright, Robert; Lucey, Paul G.

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying sulfur dioxide (SO2) in volcanic plumes is important for eruption predictions and public health. Ground-based remote sensing of spectral radiance of plumes contains information on the path-concentration of SO2. However, reliable inversion algorithms are needed to convert plume spectral radiance measurements into SO2 path-concentrations. Various techniques have been used for this purpose. Recent approaches have employed thermal infrared (TIR) imaging between 8 μm and 14 μm to provide two-dimensional mapping of plume SO2 path-concentration, using what might be described as "dual-view" techniques. In this case, the radiance (or its surrogate brightness temperature) is computed for portions of the image that correspond to the plume and compared with spectral radiance obtained for adjacent regions of the image that do not (i.e., "clear sky"). In this way, the contribution that the plume makes to the measured radiance can be isolated from the background atmospheric contribution, this residual signal being converted to an estimate of gas path-concentration via radiative transfer modeling. These dual-view approaches suffer from several issues, mainly the assumption of clear sky background conditions. At this time, the various inversion algorithms remain poorly validated. This paper makes two contributions. Firstly, it validates the aforementioned dual-view approaches, using hyperspectral TIR imaging data. Secondly, it introduces a new method to derive SO2 path-concentrations, which allows for single point SO2 path-concentration retrievals, suitable for hyperspectral imaging with clear or cloudy background conditions. The SO2 amenable lookup table algorithm (SO2-ALTA) uses the MODTRAN5 radiative transfer model to compute radiance for a variety (millions) of plume and atmospheric conditions. Rather than searching this lookup table to find the best fit for each measured spectrum, the lookup table was used to train a partial least square regression (PLSR) model

  9. Evaluation of digital infra-red thermal imaging as an adjunctive screening method for breast carcinoma: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassiwala, Muffazzal; Mathur, Poonam; Mathur, Rajkumar; Farid, Khan; Shukla, Sapna; Gupta, P K; Jain, Beena

    2014-12-01

    Early screening plays a pivotal role in management of breast cancer. Given the socio-economic situation in India, there is a strong felt need for a screening tool which reaches the masses rather than waiting for the masses to reach tertiary centers to be screened. Digital infra-red thermal imaging (DITI) or breast thermography as a screening test offers this possibility and needs to be carefully assessed in Indian scenario. The study involved 1008 female patients of age 20-60 years that had not been diagnosed of cancer of breast earlier. All the subjects in this population were screened for both the breasts using DITI. Based on the measured temperature gradients (ΔT) in thermograms, the subjects were classified in one of the three groups, normal (ΔT ≤ 2.5), abnormal (ΔT > 2.5, breast cancer (ΔT ≥ 3). All those having (ΔT > 2.5) underwent triple assessment that consisted of clinical examination, radiological and histopathological examination. Those with normal thermograms were subjected to only clinical examination. Forty nine female breasts had thermograms with temperature gradients exceeding 2.5 and were subjected to triple assessment. Forty one of these which had ΔT ≥ 3 were proven to be having cancer of breast and were offered suitable treatment. Eight thermograms had temperature gradients exceeding 2.5 but less than 3. Most of these were lactating mothers or had fibrocystic breast diseases. As a screening modality, DITI showed sensitivity of 97.6%, specificity of 99.17%, positive predictive value 83.67% and negative predictive value 99.89%. Based on the results of this study involving 1008 subjects for screening of breast cancer, thermography turns out to be a very useful tool for screening. Because it is non-contact, pain-free, radiation free and comparatively portable it can be used in as a proactive technique for detection of breast carcinoma. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The infrared spectroscopy in the study of the bone crystallinity thermally affected; La espectroscopia infrarroja en el estudio de la cristalinidad del hueso afectado termicamente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, C.; Tiesler, V. [Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Facultad de Ciencias Antropoloicas. 97000 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Azamar, J.A.; Alvarado G, J.J.; Quintana, P. [CINVESTAV-Unidad Merida, Depto. Fisica Aplicada, Km 6 Ant. Carr. a Progreso, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Bone is made up by both organic and inorganic components. Among the latter stands out hydroxyapatite (HAP), composed by hexagonal crystallites arranged in a laminar form. The size of the hydroxyapatite crystals may be altered by different conditions, among those figures thermal exhibition, since during burning the bone eliminates organic matrix and thus promotes the crystallization process of the material. An experimental series was designed to measure crystallinity, in which pig bone remains were burnt at different temperatures and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). By means of analogy a comparison was made between the infrared spectra in order to compare with the ones obtained from the archaeological samples, coming from the Classic period Maya sites of Calakmul and Becan, Campeche. (Author)

  11. Thermal infrared properties of the Martian atmosphere 4. Predictions of the presence of dust and ice clouds from Viking IRTM spectral measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the response of the Martian atmosphere at the wavelengths measured by the Viking infrared thermal mapper instrument (IRTM) to the presence of varying amounts of dust and water ice clouds. A detailed radiative transfer study is represented to show that these IRTM measurements at channels centered at 7, 9, 11, and 20 μm may be used to differentiate between the presence of dust and water ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere. They show further that these measurements may also be used to provide some information on the structure of the lower atmosphere. The use of the IRTM measurements in the manner we describe can provide information associated with the thermal characteristics of Martian dust storms

  12. Changes in the performance characteristics of a GaAs near infrared light emitting diode when exposed to various current and thermal stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The changes that occurred in the optical and electrical characteristics of a near infrared, GaAs light emitting diode, when operated under various levels and combinations of current and thermal stresses are discussed. A total of forty parts were operated for two thousand hours under eight different sets of dc current and ambient temperature conditions. Degradation in the radiant optical power of these devices was thirty-four percent when operated at their rated current and an ambient temperature of 298K (25 C). Derating the current and/or the thermal stress reduced the degradation of this parameter in approximately a linear manner. All degraded devices behaved similarly, exhibiting rapid nonlinear degradation followed by a gradual linear degradation and finally a period of stable operation. An attempt was made to correlate initial device condition to degradation during stress testing, but met with little success.

  13. Thermally and vibrationally induced conformational isomerizations, infrared spectra, and photochemistry of gallic acid in low-temperature matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justino, Licínia L. G.; Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui

    2016-07-01

    Near-infrared (near-IR) narrowband selective vibrational excitation and annealing of gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid) isolated in cryogenic matrices were used to induce interconversions between its most stable conformers. The isomerizations were probed by infrared spectroscopy. An extensive set of quantum chemical calculations, carried out at the DFT(B3LYP)/6-311++G(d,p) level of approximation, was used to undertake a detailed analysis of the ground state potential energy surface of the molecule. This investigation of the molecule conformational space allowed extracting mechanistic insights into the observed annealing- or near-IR-induced isomerization processes. The infrared spectra of the two most stable conformers of gallic acid in N2, Xe, and Ar matrices were fully assigned. Finally, the UV-induced photochemistry of the matrix isolated compound was investigated.

  14. Thermally and vibrationally induced conformational isomerizations, infrared spectra, and photochemistry of gallic acid in low-temperature matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justino, Licínia L. G.; Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared (near-IR) narrowband selective vibrational excitation and annealing of gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid) isolated in cryogenic matrices were used to induce interconversions between its most stable conformers. The isomerizations were probed by infrared spectroscopy. An extensive set of quantum chemical calculations, carried out at the DFT(B3LYP)/6-311++G(d,p) level of approximation, was used to undertake a detailed analysis of the ground state potential energy surface of the molecule. This investigation of the molecule conformational space allowed extracting mechanistic insights into the observed annealing- or near-IR-induced isomerization processes. The infrared spectra of the two most stable conformers of gallic acid in N 2 , Xe, and Ar matrices were fully assigned. Finally, the UV-induced photochemistry of the matrix isolated compound was investigated.

  15. Thermally and vibrationally induced conformational isomerizations, infrared spectra, and photochemistry of gallic acid in low-temperature matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justino, Licínia L. G., E-mail: liciniaj@ci.uc.pt; Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui [CQC, Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2016-07-07

    Near-infrared (near-IR) narrowband selective vibrational excitation and annealing of gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid) isolated in cryogenic matrices were used to induce interconversions between its most stable conformers. The isomerizations were probed by infrared spectroscopy. An extensive set of quantum chemical calculations, carried out at the DFT(B3LYP)/6-311++G(d,p) level of approximation, was used to undertake a detailed analysis of the ground state potential energy surface of the molecule. This investigation of the molecule conformational space allowed extracting mechanistic insights into the observed annealing- or near-IR-induced isomerization processes. The infrared spectra of the two most stable conformers of gallic acid in N{sub 2}, Xe, and Ar matrices were fully assigned. Finally, the UV-induced photochemistry of the matrix isolated compound was investigated.

  16. A hybrid strain and thermal energy harvester based on an infra-red sensitive Er3+ modified poly(vinylidene fluoride) ferroelectret structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sujoy Kumar; Xie, Mengying; Bowen, Christopher Rhys; Davies, Philip R; Morgan, David J; Mandal, Dipankar

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a novel infra-red (IR) sensitive Er 3+ modified poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) (Er-PVDF) film is developed for converting both mechanical and thermal energies into useful electrical power. The addition of Er 3+ to PVDF is shown to improve piezoelectric properties due to the formation of a self-polarized ferroelectric β-phase and the creation of an electret-like porous structure. In addition, we demonstrate that Er 3+ acts to enhance heat transfer into the Er-PVDF film due to its excellent infrared absorbance, which, leads to rapid and large temperature fluctuations and improved pyroelectric energy transformation. We demonstrate the potential of this novel material for mechanical energy harvesting by creating a durable ferroelectret energy harvester/nanogenerator (FTNG). The high thermal stability of the β-phase enables the FTNG to harvest large temperature fluctuations (ΔT ~ 24 K). Moreover, the superior mechanosensitivity, S M  ~ 3.4 VPa -1 of the FTNG enables the design of a wearable self-powered health-care monitoring system by human-machine integration. The combination of rare-earth ion, Er 3+ with the ferroelectricity of PVDF provides a new and robust approach for delivering smart materials and structures for self-powered wireless technologies, sensors and Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

  17. In-Flight Validation of Mid and Thermal Infrared Remotely Sensed Data Using the Lake Tahoe and Salton Sea Automated Validation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Simon J.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation includes an introduction, Lake Tahoe site layout and measurements, Salton Sea site layout and measurements, field instrument calibration and cross-calculations, data reduction methodology and error budgets, and example results for MODIS. Summary and conclusions are: 1) Lake Tahoe CA/NV automated validation site was established in 1999 to assess radiometric accuracy of satellite and airborne mid and thermal infrared data and products. Water surface temperatures range from 4-25C.2) Salton Sea CA automated validation site was established in 2008 to broaden range of available water surface temperatures and atmospheric water vapor test cases. Water surface temperatures range from 15-35C. 3) Sites provide all information necessary for validation every 2 mins (bulk temperature, skin temperature, air temperature, wind speed, wind direction, net radiation, relative humidity). 4) Sites have been used to validate mid and thermal infrared data and products from: ASTER, AATSR, ATSR2, MODIS-Terra, MODIS-Aqua, Landsat 5, Landsat 7, MTI, TES, MASTER, MAS. 5) Approximately 10 years of data available to help validate AVHRR.

  18. Change detection and characterization of volcanic activity using ground based low-light and near infrared cameras to monitor incandescence and thermal signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrild, Martin; Webley, Peter; Dehn, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge and understanding of precursory events and thermal signatures are vital for monitoring volcanogenic processes, as activity can often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash up to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing techniques to monitor and detect this activity is essential, but often the required equipment and maintenance is expensive. Our investigation explores the use of low-light cameras to image volcanic activity in the visible to near infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These cameras are ideal for monitoring as they are cheap, consume little power, are easily replaced and can provide near real-time data. We focus here on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts, that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate image pixel brightness values to determine relative changes and flag increases in activity. The script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential consumers and increase the application of these tools across the volcanological community. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures and effusion rates to be determined from pixel brightness. The results of a field campaign in June, 2013 to Stromboli volcano, Italy, are also presented here. Future field campaigns to Latin America will include collaborations with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala, to apply our techniques to Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes.

  19. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  20. Mapping Weathering and Alteration Minerals in the Comstock and Geiger Grade Areas using Visible to Thermal Infrared Airborne Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Greg R.; Calvin, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    To support research into both precious metal exploration and environmental site characterization a combination of high spatial/spectral resolution airborne visible, near infrared, short wave infrared (VNIR/SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) image data were acquired to remotely map hydrothermal alteration minerals around the Geiger Grade and Comstock alteration regions, and map the mineral by-products of weathered mine dumps in Virginia City. Remote sensing data from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), SpecTIR Corporation's airborne hyperspectral imager (HyperSpecTIR), the MODIS-ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER), and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEBASS) were acquired and processed into mineral maps based on the unique spectral signatures of image pixels. VNIR/SWIR and TIR field spectrometer data were collected for both calibration and validation of the remote data sets, and field sampling, laboratory spectral analyses and XRD analyses were made to corroborate the surface mineralogy identified by spectroscopy. The resulting mineral maps show the spatial distribution of several important alteration minerals around each study area including alunite, quartz, pyrophyllite, kaolinite, montmorillonite/muscovite, and chlorite. In the Comstock region the mineral maps show acid-sulfate alteration, widespread propylitic alteration and extensive faulting that offsets the acid-sulfate areas, in contrast to the larger, dominantly acid-sulfate alteration exposed along Geiger Grade. Also, different mineral zones within the intense acid-sulfate areas were mapped. In the Virginia City historic mining district the important weathering minerals mapped include hematite, goethite, jarosite and hydrous sulfate minerals (hexahydrite, alunogen and gypsum) located on mine dumps. Sulfate minerals indicate acidic water forming in the mine dump environment. While there is not an immediate threat to the community, there are clearly sources of

  1. The Development of a Low-Cost, Near Infrared, High-Temperature Thermal Imaging System and Its Application to the Retrieval of Accurate Lava Lake Temperatures at Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Charles Wilkes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Near infrared thermal cameras can provide useful low-cost imaging systems for high temperature applications, as an alternative to ubiquitous mid-/long-wavelength infrared systems. Here, we present a new Raspberry Pi-based near infrared thermal camera for use at temperatures of ≈>500 °C. We discuss in detail the building of the optical system, calibration using a Sakuma-Hattori model and quantification of uncertainties in remote temperature retrievals. We then present results from the deployment of the system on Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua, where the active lava lake was imaged. Temperatures reached a maximum of 1104 ± 14 °C and the lake radiative power output was found to range between 30 and 45 MW. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published ground-based data on the thermal characteristics of this relatively nascent lava lake, which became visible in late 2015.

  2. Estimating the top altitude of optically thick ice clouds from thermal infrared satellite observations using CALIPSO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, Patrick; Yost, Chris R.; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Chen, Yan

    2008-06-01

    The difference between cloud-top altitude Z top and infrared effective radiating height Z eff for optically thick ice clouds is examined using April 2007 data taken by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) and the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). For even days, the difference ΔZ between CALIPSO Z top and MODIS Z eff is 1.58 +/- 1.26 km. The linear fit between Z top and Z eff , applied to odd-day data, yields a difference of 0.03 +/- 1.21 km and can be used to estimate Z top from any infrared-based Z eff for thick ice clouds. Random errors appear to be due primarily to variations in cloud ice-water content (IWC). Radiative transfer calculations show that ΔZ corresponds to an optical depth of ~1, which based on observed ice-particle sizes yields an average cloud-top IWC of ~0.015 gm-3, a value consistent with in situ measurements. The analysis indicates potential for deriving cloud-top IWC using dual-satellite data.

  3. Effects of salicylic acid elicitor against aphids on wheat and detection of infestation using infrared thermal imaging technique in Ismailia, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Farag Mahmoud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum sativum L. is one of the most important cereal crops in Egypt. Insect pests, such as aphids, are major threats in terms of yield reduction. Induced resistance in wheat using salicylic acid as a foliar application was tested on the farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, Suez Canal University during 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 seasons. Three wheat cultivars, Gemeza 9, Sakha 93 and Giza 168, were sprayed three times with two concentrations of salicylic acid (SA, 200 mg/l and 100 mg/l, after early detection of aphid infestation by infrared thermal imaging. The infrared thermal imaging technique is based on significant differences in surface temperature between infested and healthy leaves. Imaging data are digital, and a computer program can be used to detect infestation rapidly. The results showed that aphid infestation raised the temperature of infested leaves, compared to healthy leaves. The range temperature difference between maximum and minimum temperatures (At was 1.1 ºC in healthy leaves and 3.9 ºC in infected leaves. The results of SA application showed significant differences in the mean number of aphids and in reduction of infestation among treatments and cultivars. The higher of the two SA rates (200 mg/l gave higher efficacy in the three cultivars than the lower rate (100 mg/l over the five weeks of trial. The highest efficacy against aphids was reached one week after application (86.28% for Giza, 85.89% for Gemesa and 70.54% for Sakha. Moreover, SA treatment enhanced the wheat yield of all three cultivars, compared with control plants. The three cultivars (Giza, Gemesa and Sakha produced higher yields than the control when sprayed with 200 mg/l SA. Their grain yield was 2,491.5, 2,455.0, and 2,327.25 kg/feddan (1 fed = 0.42 ha, respectively. In conclusion, infrared thermal imaging can be employed in identification of infected leaves. Also, the application of SA on wheat induced plant resistance to aphids.

  4. Infrared observations of eclipses of Io, its thermophysical parameters, and the thermal radiation of the Loki volcano and environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinton, William M.; Kaminski, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Observations of Io during eclipses by Jupiter in 1981-1984 are reported. Data obtained at 3.45-30 microns using bolometer system No. 1 on the 3-m IRTF telescope at Mauna Kea are presented in extensive tables and graphs and analyzed by means of least-squares fitting of thermophysical models to the eclipse cooling and heating curves, thermal-radiation calculations for the Io volcanoes, and comparison with Voyager data. Best fits are obtained for a model comprising (1) a bright region with a vertically inhomogeneous surface and (2) a dark vertically homogeneous region with thermal inertia only about 0.1 times that of (1). Little evidence of volcanic-flux variability during the period is found, and the majority (but not all) of the excess thermal IR radiation in the sub-Jovian hemisphere is attributed to the Loki volcano and its lava lake.

  5. Combined holography and thermography in a single sensor through image-plane holography at thermal infrared wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Marc P; Vandenrijt, Jean-François; Thizy, Cédric; Alexeenko, Igor; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Vollheim, Birgit; Lopez, Ion; Jorge, Iagoba; Rochet, Jonathan; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-10-20

    Holographic interferometry in the thermal wavelengths range, combining a CO(2) laser and digital hologram recording with a microbolometer array based camera, allows simultaneously capturing temperature and surface shape information about objects. This is due to the fact that the holograms are affected by the thermal background emitted by objects at room temperature. We explain the setup and the processing of data which allows decoupling the two types of information. This natural data fusion can be advantageously used in a variety of nondestructive testing applications.

  6. The influence of insulation of walls of industrial objects on thermal regime at the heating system of gas infrared radiators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagornova Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a numerical study of the process of heat transfer from the gas infrared emitters in the heated accommodation are represented. Simulation was conducted taking into account the heat withdrawal in the enclosing constructions and of heat exchange with the environment. The estimation of the average values of temperatures of air indoors in the dependence on the different intensity of heat withdrawal into the vertical walls is carried out (when the layer of insulation is present, and without it.

  7. Developing a semi/automated protocol to post-process large volume, High-resolution airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery for urban waste heat mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mir Mustafizur

    In collaboration with The City of Calgary 2011 Sustainability Direction and as part of the HEAT (Heat Energy Assessment Technologies) project, the focus of this research is to develop a semi/automated 'protocol' to post-process large volumes of high-resolution (H-res) airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery to enable accurate urban waste heat mapping. HEAT is a free GeoWeb service, designed to help Calgary residents improve their home energy efficiency by visualizing the amount and location of waste heat leaving their homes and communities, as easily as clicking on their house in Google Maps. HEAT metrics are derived from 43 flight lines of TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) data acquired on May 13--14, 2012 at night (11:00 pm--5:00 am) over The City of Calgary, Alberta (˜825 km 2) at a 50 cm spatial resolution and 0.05°C thermal resolution. At present, the only way to generate a large area, high-spatial resolution TIR scene is to acquire separate airborne flight lines and mosaic them together. However, the ambient sensed temperature within, and between flight lines naturally changes during acquisition (due to varying atmospheric and local micro-climate conditions), resulting in mosaicked images with different temperatures for the same scene components (e.g. roads, buildings), and mosaic join-lines arbitrarily bisect many thousands of homes. In combination these effects result in reduced utility and classification accuracy including, poorly defined HEAT Metrics, inaccurate hotspot detection and raw imagery that are difficult to interpret. In an effort to minimize these effects, three new semi/automated post-processing algorithms (the protocol) are described, which are then used to generate a 43 flight line mosaic of TABI-1800 data from which accurate Calgary waste heat maps and HEAT metrics can be generated. These algorithms (presented as four peer-reviewed papers)---are: (a) Thermal Urban Road Normalization (TURN)---used to mitigate the microclimatic

  8. Infrared thermography - a non-invasive tool to evaluate thermal status of neonatal pigs based on surface temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund Kammersgaard, Trine; Malmkvist, Jens; Pedersen, Lene Juul

    2013-01-01

    and IRmax was improved (Ppiglets having RT... to be used without the need for manual restraint of the pigs. On the basis of the results of this study, we propose that IRmax temperature from full-body thermograms has implication as a valid tool to assess the thermal status in neonatal piglets but not as an identical substitute for RT....

  9. An Efficient Approach for Pixel Decomposition to Increase the Spatial Resolution of Land Surface Temperature Images from MODIS Thermal Infrared Band Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST images retrieved from the thermal infrared (TIR band data of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS have much lower spatial resolution than the MODIS visible and near-infrared (VNIR band data. The coarse pixel scale of MODIS LST images (1000 m under nadir have limited their capability in applying to many studies required high spatial resolution in comparison of the MODIS VNIR band data with pixel scale of 250–500 m. In this paper we intend to develop an efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of MODIS LST image using the VNIR band data as assistance. The unique feature of this approach is to maintain the thermal radiance of parent pixels in the MODIS LST image unchanged after they are decomposed into the sub-pixels in the resulted image. There are two important steps in the decomposition: initial temperature estimation and final temperature determination. Therefore the approach can be termed double-step pixel decomposition (DSPD. Both steps involve a series of procedures to achieve the final result of decomposed LST image, including classification of the surface patterns, establishment of LST change with normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI and building index (NDBI, reversion of LST into thermal radiance through Planck equation, and computation of weights for the sub-pixels of the resulted image. Since the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER with much higher spatial resolution than MODIS data was on-board the same platform (Terra as MODIS for Earth observation, an experiment had been done in the study to validate the accuracy and efficiency of our approach for pixel decomposition. The ASTER LST image was used as the reference to compare with the decomposed LST image. The result showed that the spatial distribution of the decomposed LST image was very similar to that of the ASTER LST image with a root mean square error

  10. An efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of land surface temperature images from MODIS thermal infrared band data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Qin, Zhihao; Li, Wenjuan; Song, Caiying; Karnieli, Arnon; Zhao, Shuhe

    2014-12-25

    Land surface temperature (LST) images retrieved from the thermal infrared (TIR) band data of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have much lower spatial resolution than the MODIS visible and near-infrared (VNIR) band data. The coarse pixel scale of MODIS LST images (1000 m under nadir) have limited their capability in applying to many studies required high spatial resolution in comparison of the MODIS VNIR band data with pixel scale of 250-500 m. In this paper we intend to develop an efficient approach for pixel decomposition to increase the spatial resolution of MODIS LST image using the VNIR band data as assistance. The unique feature of this approach is to maintain the thermal radiance of parent pixels in the MODIS LST image unchanged after they are decomposed into the sub-pixels in the resulted image. There are two important steps in the decomposition: initial temperature estimation and final temperature determination. Therefore the approach can be termed double-step pixel decomposition (DSPD). Both steps involve a series of procedures to achieve the final result of decomposed LST image, including classification of the surface patterns, establishment of LST change with normalized difference of vegetation index (NDVI) and building index (NDBI), reversion of LST into thermal radiance through Planck equation, and computation of weights for the sub-pixels of the resulted image. Since the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) with much higher spatial resolution than MODIS data was on-board the same platform (Terra) as MODIS for Earth observation, an experiment had been done in the study to validate the accuracy and efficiency of our approach for pixel decomposition. The ASTER LST image was used as the reference to compare with the decomposed LST image. The result showed that the spatial distribution of the decomposed LST image was very similar to that of the ASTER LST image with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 2

  11. Addressing Thermal Model Run Time Concerns of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Hume; Guerrero, Sergio; Hawk, John; Rodriguez, Juan; McDonald, Carson; Jackson, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) utilizes an existing 2.4 m diameter Hubble sized telescope donated from elsewhere in the federal government for near-infrared sky surveys and Exoplanet searches to answer crucial questions about the universe and dark energy. The WFIRST design continues to increase in maturity, detail, and complexity with each design cycle leading to a Mission Concept Review and entrance to the Mission Formulation Phase. Each cycle has required a Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) analysis to ensure the design can meet the stringent pointing and stability requirements. As such, the models have also grown in size and complexity leading to increased model run time. This paper addresses efforts to reduce the run time while still maintaining sufficient accuracy for STOP analyses. A technique was developed to identify slews between observing orientations that were sufficiently different to warrant recalculation of the environmental fluxes to reduce the total number of radiation calculation points. The inclusion of a cryocooler fluid loop in the model also forced smaller time-steps than desired, which greatly increases the overall run time. The analysis of this fluid model required mitigation to drive the run time down by solving portions of the model at different time scales. Lastly, investigations were made into the impact of the removal of small radiation couplings on run time and accuracy. Use of these techniques allowed the models to produce meaningful results within reasonable run times to meet project schedule deadlines.

  12. Study on the performance of infrared thermal imaging light source for detection of impact defects in CFRP composite sandwich panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Sang [R and D, Korea Research Institute of Smart Material and Structures System Association, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Man Yong; Kwon, Koo Ahn; Park, Jeong Hak; Choi, Won Jae [Safety measurement center, Korea research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hyun Chul [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Recently, composite materials have been mainly used in the main wings, ailerons, and fuselages of aircraft and rotor blades of helicopters. Composite materials used in rapid moving structures are subject to impact by hail, lightning, and bird strike. Such an impact can destroy fiber tissues in the composite materials as well as deform the composite materials, resulting in various problems such as weakened rigidity of the composite structure and penetration of water into tiny cracks. In this study, experiments were conducted using a 2 kW halogen lamp which is most frequently used as a light source, a 2 kW near-infrared lamp, which is used for heating to a high temperature, and a 6 kW xenon flash lamp which emits a large amount of energy for a moment. CFRP composite sandwich panels using Nomex honeycomb core were used as the specimens. Experiments were carried out under impact damages of 1, 4 and 8 J. It was found that the detection of defects was fast when the xenon flash lamp was used. The detection of damaged regions was excellent when the halogen lamp was used. Furthermore, the near-infrared lamp is an effective technology for showing the surface of a test object.

  13. Study on the performance of infrared thermal imaging light source for detection of impact defects in CFRP composite sandwich panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Sang; Choi, Man Yong; Kwon, Koo Ahn; Park, Jeong Hak; Choi, Won Jae; Jung, Hyun Chul

    2017-01-01

    Recently, composite materials have been mainly used in the main wings, ailerons, and fuselages of aircraft and rotor blades of helicopters. Composite materials used in rapid moving structures are subject to impact by hail, lightning, and bird strike. Such an impact can destroy fiber tissues in the composite materials as well as deform the composite materials, resulting in various problems such as weakened rigidity of the composite structure and penetration of water into tiny cracks. In this study, experiments were conducted using a 2 kW halogen lamp which is most frequently used as a light source, a 2 kW near-infrared lamp, which is used for heating to a high temperature, and a 6 kW xenon flash lamp which emits a large amount of energy for a moment. CFRP composite sandwich panels using Nomex honeycomb core were used as the specimens. Experiments were carried out under impact damages of 1, 4 and 8 J. It was found that the detection of defects was fast when the xenon flash lamp was used. The detection of damaged regions was excellent when the halogen lamp was used. Furthermore, the near-infrared lamp is an effective technology for showing the surface of a test object

  14. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the secondary structure and thermal denaturation of CaATPase from rabbit skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworsky, Mark; Brauner, Joseph W.; Mendelsohn, Richard

    Fourier transform i.r. spectroscopy has been used to monitor structural alterations induced by thermal denaturation of the intrinsic membrane protein CaATPase in aqueous media. The protein has been isolated, purified and studied in five forms: (i) In its native lipid environment after isolation from rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum, both in H 2O and D 2O suspensions. (ii) After both mild and extensive tryptic digestion has cleaved those residues external to the membrane bilayer. (iii) Reconstituted in vesicle form with bovine brain sphingomyelin. Fourier deconvolution techniques have been used to enhance the resolution of the intrinsically overlapped Amide I and Amide II spectral regions. Large spectral alterations apparent in the deconvoluted spectra occur in these regions upon thermal denaturation of the protein which are consistent with the formation of a large proportion of β-antiparallel sheet form. The alteration parallels the loss in ATPase activity. A mild tryptic digestion increases slightly the proportion of α-helix and/or random coil secondary structure. A thermal transition to a form containing a high proportion of β structure is still evident. Extensive tryptic digestion nearly abolishes the alpha helical plus random coil secondary structure, while producing a high proportion of β form which is resistant to further thermally induced structural alterations. Studies of CaATPase reconstituted into vesicles with bovine brain sphingomyelin reveal a higher proportion of β structure than the native enzyme, with further introduction of β structure on thermal denaturation. Both the utility of deconvolution techniques and the necessity for caution in their application are apparent from the current experiments.

  15. Structural features and functional properties of water in model DMPC membranes: thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDCs) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridelli, M. G.; Capelletti, R.; Mora, C.

    2013-12-01

    Thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDCs) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies were employed to investigate the state of water incorporated in a model DMPC (dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine) membrane. The lipid multilayers, highly inhomogeneous from the dielectric point of view, originate complex TSDC spectra critically dependent on the sample water content and thermal history. Different temperature ranges were chosen to polarize the sample, i.e. 100-300 K (type I) and 100-285 K (type II). The purpose of the latter choice was to avoid any sample heating above the DMPC phase transition temperature (295 K) along the sample polarization. According to the results, water in a fully hydrated system (aw = 0.92) (1) is ordered around the hydrophilic head molecular groups, (2) is layered in the interbilayer space and (3) penetrates among the hydrocarbon chains. It can assume different local structural configurations depending on the lipid packing. Irreversible conformational transitions in the lipid array system were monitored as a consequence of different dehydration treatments. FTIR absorption measurements were performed to study the water sorption kinetics into a DMPC thin film. The water related OH band was decomposed into three components, describing three water states, with different propensity to the H-bond formation. The changes of the lipid characteristic groups (CH2/CH3, PO_{2}^{-} and C=O) absorption bands as a function of increasing hydration level were monitored and discussed.

  16. Structural features and functional properties of water in model DMPC membranes: thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDCs) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridelli, M G; Capelletti, R; Mora, C

    2013-01-01

    Thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDCs) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies were employed to investigate the state of water incorporated in a model DMPC (dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine) membrane. The lipid multilayers, highly inhomogeneous from the dielectric point of view, originate complex TSDC spectra critically dependent on the sample water content and thermal history. Different temperature ranges were chosen to polarize the sample, i.e. 100–300 K (type I) and 100–285 K (type II). The purpose of the latter choice was to avoid any sample heating above the DMPC phase transition temperature (295 K) along the sample polarization. According to the results, water in a fully hydrated system (a w  = 0.92) (1) is ordered around the hydrophilic head molecular groups, (2) is layered in the interbilayer space and (3) penetrates among the hydrocarbon chains. It can assume different local structural configurations depending on the lipid packing. Irreversible conformational transitions in the lipid array system were monitored as a consequence of different dehydration treatments. FTIR absorption measurements were performed to study the water sorption kinetics into a DMPC thin film. The water related OH band was decomposed into three components, describing three water states, with different propensity to the H-bond formation. The changes of the lipid characteristic groups (CH 2 /CH 3 , PO 2 − and C=O) absorption bands as a function of increasing hydration level were monitored and discussed. (paper)

  17. Infrared image processing devoted to thermal non-contact characterization-Applications to Non-Destructive Evaluation, Microfluidics and 2D source term distribution for multispectral tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batsale, Jean-Christophe; Pradere, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The cost of IR cameras is more and more decreasing. Beyond the preliminary calibration step and the global instrumentation, the infrared image processing is then one of the key step for achieving in very broad domains.Generally the IR images are coming from the transient temperature field related to the emission of a black surface in response to an external or internal heating (active IR thermography). The first applications were devoted to the so called thermal Non-Destructive Evaluation methods by considering a thin sample and 1D transient heat diffusion through the sample (transverse diffusion). With simplified assumptions related to the transverse diffusion, the in-plane diffusion and transport phenomena can be also considered.A general equation can be applied in order to balance the heat transfer at the pixel scale or between groups of pixels in order to estimate several fields of thermophysical properties (heterogeneous field of in-plane diffusivity, flow distributions, source terms).There is a lot of possible strategies to process the space and time distributed big amount of data (previous integral transformation of the images, compression, elimination of the non useful areas...), generally based on the necessity to analyse the derivative versus space and time of the temperature field. Several illustrative examples related to the Non-Destructive Evaluation of heterogeneous solids, the thermal characterization of chemical reactions in microfluidic channels and the design of systems for multispectral tomography, will be presented. (paper)

  18. Remote detection of canopy water stress in coniferous forests using the NS001 Thematic Mapper Simulator and the thermal infrared multispectral scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Lars L.; Running, Steven W.; Riggs, George A.

    1990-01-01

    Water stress was induced in two coniferous forest stands in West Germany by severing tree sapwood. Leaf water potential, Psi(L), measurements indicated that maximum, naturally occurring levels of water stress developed in the stressed plots while control plots exhibited natural diurnal trends. Images of each site were obtained with the Thematic Mapper Simulator (NS001) and the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) 12 to 15 days after stress induction. NS001 bands 2 to 6, NS001 indices combining bands 4 and 6, and NS001 and TIMS thermal bands showed significant radiance differences between stressed and control plots when large differences in Psi(L) and relative water content (RWC) existed during the morning overflights at Munich. However, the NS001 and TIMS sensors could not detect the slightly smaller differences in Psi(L) and RWC during the Munich afternoon and Frankfurt overflights. The results suggest that routine detection of canopy water stress under operational conditions is difficult utilizing current sensor technology.

  19. Relationship among eye and muzzle temperatures measured using digital infrared thermal imaging and vaginal and rectal temperatures in hair sheep and cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, W D; Godfrey, R W; Ketring, R C; Vinson, M C; Willard, S T

    2014-11-01

    Digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI) using a thermal camera has potential to be a useful tool for the production animal industry. Thermography has been used in both humans and a wide range of animal species to measure body temperature as a method to detect injury or inflammation. The objective of these experiments was to compare the temperature of the eye (EYE) or muzzle (MUZ) measured using DITI to vaginal (VT) and rectal temperature (RT) as measures of core body temperature in hair sheep and beef cattle. In Exp.1 EYE, VT and RT were measured in lactating, multiparous hair sheep ewes (St. Croix White, n = 10, and Dorper × St. Croix White, n = 10) in a non-febrile state 5 times over a 48-h period. Data loggers were used to measure VT and a digital veterinary thermometer was used to measure RT. There was a high correlation (P 0.10) between RT or VT and MUZ. The findings of these three studies indicate that temperature of the eye, measured using DITI, can be used as an indicator of core body temperature in hair sheep and beef cattle as an alternative to using vaginal or rectal temperature.

  20. Transforming Image-Objects into Multiscale Fields: A GEOBIA Approach to Mitigate Urban Microclimatic Variability within H-Res Thermal Infrared Airborne Flight-Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mustafizur Rahman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to minimize complex urban microclimatic variability within high-resolution (H-Res airborne thermal infrared (TIR flight-lines, we describe the Thermal Urban Road Normalization (TURN algorithm, which is based on the idea of pseudo invariant features. By assuming a homogeneous road temperature within a TIR scene, we hypothesize that any variation observed in road temperature is the effect of local microclimatic variability. To model microclimatic variability, we define a road-object class (Road, compute the within-Road temperature variability, sample it at different spatial intervals (i.e., 10, 20, 50, and 100 m then interpolate samples over each flight-line to create an object-weighted variable temperature field (a TURN-surface. The optimal TURN-surface is then subtracted from the original TIR image, essentially creating a microclimate-free scene. Results at different sampling intervals are assessed based on their: (i ability to visually and statistically reduce overall scene variability and (ii computation speed. TURN is evaluated on three non-adjacent TABI-1800 flight-lines (~182 km2 that were acquired in 2012 at night over The City of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. TURN also meets a recent GEOBIA (Geospatial Object Based Image Analysis challenge by incorporating existing GIS vector objects within the GEOBIA workflow, rather than relying exclusively on segmentation methods.

  1. The retrieval of two-dimensional distribution of the earth's surface aerodynamic roughness using SAR image and TM thermal infrared image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Renhua; WANG; Jinfeng; ZHU; Caiying; SUN; Xiaomin

    2004-01-01

    After having analyzed the requirement on the aerodynamic earth's surface roughness in two-dimensional distribution in the research field of interaction between land surface and atmosphere, this paper presents a new way to calculate the aerodynamic roughness using the earth's surface geometric roughness retrieved from SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and TM thermal infrared image data. On the one hand, the SPM (Small Perturbation Model) was used as a theoretical SAR backscattering model to describe the relationship between the SAR backscattering coefficient and the earth's surface geometric roughness and its dielectric constant retrieved from the physical model between the soil thermal inertia and the soil surface moisture with the simultaneous TM thermal infrared image data and the ground microclimate data. On the basis of the SAR image matching with the TM image, the non-volume scattering surface geometric information was obtained from the SPM model at the TM image pixel scale, and the ground pixel surface's equivalent geometric roughness-height standard RMS (Root Mean Square) was achieved from the geometric information by the transformation of the typical topographic factors. The vegetation (wheat, tree) height retrieved from spectrum model was also transferred into its equivalent geometric roughness. A completely two-dimensional distribution map of the equivalent geometric roughness over the experimental area was produced by the data mosaic technique. On the other hand, according to the atmospheric eddy currents theory, the aerodynamic surface roughness was iterated out with the atmosphere stability correction method using the wind and the temperature profiles data measured at several typical fields such as bare soil field and vegetation field. After having analyzed the effect of surface equivalent geometric roughness together with dynamic and thermodynamic factors on the aerodynamic surface roughness within the working area, this paper first establishes a scale

  2. Analysis of the structural organization and thermal stability of two spermadhesins. Calorimetric, circular dichroic and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, M; Gasset, M; Laynez, J; López-Zumel, C; Usobiaga, P; Töpfer-Petersen, E; Calvete, J J

    1995-12-15

    The CUB domain is a widespread 110-amino-acid module found in functionally diverse, often developmentally regulated proteins, for which an antiparallel beta-barrel topology similar to that in immunoglobulin V domains has been predicted. Spermadhesins have been proposed as a subgroup of this protein family built up by a single CUB domain architecture. To test the proposed structural model, we have analyzed the structural organization of two members of the spermadhesin protein family, porcine seminal plasma proteins I/II (PSP-I/PSP-II) heterodimer and bovine acidic seminal fluid protein (aSFP) homodimer, using differential scanning calorimetry, far-ultraviolet circular dichroism and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermal unfolding of PSP-I/PSP-II and aSFP were irreversible and followed a one-step process with transition temperatures (Tm) of 60.5 degrees C and 78.6 degrees C, respectively. The calorimetric enthalpy changes (delta Hcat) of thermal denaturation were 439 kJ/mol for PSP-I/PSP-II and 660 kJ/mol for aSFP dimer. Analysis of the calorimetric curves of PSP-I/PSP-II showed that the entire dimer constituted the cooperative unfolding unit. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and deconvolution of circular dichroic spectra using a convex constraint analysis indicated that beta-structure and turns are the major structural element of both PSP-I/PSP-II (53% of beta-sheet, 21% of turns) and aSFP (44% of beta-sheet, 36% of turns), and that the porcine and the bovine proteins contain little, if any, alpha-helical structure. Taken together, our results indicate that the porcine and the bovine spermadhesin molecules are probably all-beta-structure proteins, and would support a beta-barrel topology like that predicted for the CUB domain. Other beta-structure folds, such as the Greek-key pattern characteristic of many carbohydrate-binding protein domains cannot be eliminated. Finally, the same combination of biophysical techniques was used to characterize the

  3. Thermal evaluation by infrared measurement of implant site preparation between single and gradual drilling in artificial bone blocks of different densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlhenrich, S C; Abouridouane, M; Heussen, N; Hölzle, F; Klocke, F; Modabber, A

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of bone density and drilling protocol on heat generation during implant bed preparation. Ten single and 10 gradual implant sites with diameters of 2.8, 3.5, and 4.2mm were prepared in four artificial bone blocks (density types I-IV; D1-D4). Drilling was done at constant speed (1500rpm) and with external irrigation (50ml/min); vertical speed was set at 2mm/s. An infrared camera was used for temperature measurements. Significantly higher temperatures for single drilling were found between 2.8-mm drills in D1 (P=0.0014) and D4 (P<0.0001) and between 3.5-mm drills in D3 (P=0.0087) and D4 (P<0.0001), as well as between 4.2-mm drills in D1 (P<0.0001) and D4 (P=0.0014). Low bone density led to a thermal decrease after single drilling and a thermal increase after gradual drilling. Burs with a large diameter always showed a higher temperature generation. In comparisons between 2.8- and 4.2-mm diameters for both single and gradual drills, significant differences (P<0.001) were noted for bone types II, III, and IV. Single drilling could generate more heat than traditional sequential drilling, and bone density, as well as drill diameter, influenced thermal increases. Particularly in lower-density bone, conventional sequential drilling seems to raise the temperature less. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The development of large-aperture test system of infrared camera and visible CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingwen; Geng, Anbing; Wang, Bo; Wang, Haitao; Wu, Yanying

    2015-10-01

    Infrared camera and CCD camera dual-band imaging system is used in many equipment and application widely. If it is tested using the traditional infrared camera test system and visible CCD test system, 2 times of installation and alignment are needed in the test procedure. The large-aperture test system of infrared camera and visible CCD camera uses the common large-aperture reflection collimator, target wheel, frame-grabber, computer which reduces the cost and the time of installation and alignment. Multiple-frame averaging algorithm is used to reduce the influence of random noise. Athermal optical design is adopted to reduce the change of focal length location change of collimator when the environmental temperature is changing, and the image quality of the collimator of large field of view and test accuracy are also improved. Its performance is the same as that of the exotic congener and is much cheaper. It will have a good market.

  5. Thermal Infrared Spectra of a Suite of Forsterite Samples and Ab-initio Modelling of theirs Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, A.; Stangarone, C.; Helbert, J.; Tribaudino, M.; Prencipe, M.

    2017-12-01

    Forsterite is the dominating component in olivine, a major constituent in ultrafemic rocks, as well as planetary bodies. Messenger X-ray spectrometer has shown that Mg-rich silicate minerals, such as enstatite and forsterite, dominate Mercury's surface (Weider et al 2012). A careful and detailed acquaintance with the forsterite spectral features and their dependence wrt environmental conditions on Mercury is needed to interpret the remote sensing data from previous and forthcoming missions. We propose an experimental vs calculation approach to reproduce and describe the spectral features of forsterite. TIR emissivity measurements are performed by the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) of DLR. PSL offers the unique capability to measure the emissivity of samples at temperature up to 1000K under vacuum conditions. TIR emissivity and reflectance measurements are performed on 11 olivine samples having a different composition within the forsterite-fayalite series. When available, the sample has been measured in 2 different grain sizes (chameleon-like effects of Mercury surface already observed (Helbert et al. 2013), this study wants to point out the main spectral features due to the composition and temperature. Our results are used to create a theoretical background to interpret the high temperature infrared emissivity spectra from MERTIS onboard the ESA BepiColombo mission to Mercury (Helbert et al. 2010).

  6. Mapping rock forming minerals at Boundary Canyon, Death Valey National Park, California, using aerial SEBASS thermal infrared hyperspectral image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslett, Zan; Taranik, James V.; Riley, Dean N.

    2018-02-01

    Aerial spatially enhanced broadband array spectrograph system (SEBASS) long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral image data were used to map the distribution of rock-forming minerals indicative of sedimentary and meta-sedimentary lithologies around Boundary Canyon, Death Valley, California, USA. Collection of data over the Boundary Canyon detachment fault (BCDF) facilitated measurement of numerous lithologies representing a contact between the relatively unmetamorphosed Grapevine Mountains allochthon and the metamorphosed core complex of the Funeral Mountains autochthon. These included quartz-rich sandstone, quartzite, conglomerate, and alluvium; muscovite-rich schist, siltstone, and slate; and carbonate-rich dolomite, limestone, and marble, ranging in age from late Precambrian to Quaternary. Hyperspectral data were reduced in dimensionality and processed to statistically identify and map unique emissivity spectra endmembers. Some minerals (e.g., quartz and muscovite) dominate multiple lithologies, resulting in a limited ability to differentiate them. Abrupt variations in image data emissivity amongst pelitic schists corresponded to amphibolite; these rocks represent gradation from greenschist- to amphibolite-metamorphic facies lithologies. Although the full potential of LWIR hyperspectral image data may not be fully utilized within this study area due to lack of measurable spectral distinction between rocks of similar bulk mineralogy, the high spectral resolution of the image data was useful in characterizing silicate- and carbonate-based sedimentary and meta-sedimentary rocks in proximity to fault contacts, as well as for interpreting some mineral mixtures.

  7. Dual-band LTCC antenna based on 0.95Zn2SiO4-0.05CaTiO3 ceramics for GPS/UMTS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Gang; Li, Yu-Xia; Guo, Mei

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present a compact low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) dual-band antenna by using the electromagnetic coupling effect concept for global positioning system (GPS) and universal mobile telecommunication system (UMTS) applications. The overall dimension of the antenna is 8.6 mm × 13.0 mm × 1.1 mm. It consists of double meander lines and a via hole line. The top meander line operates at the upper band, and the bottom radiating patch is designed for the lower band. The via-hole line is employed to connect the double meander lines. Because of the effect of the coupled line, total dimension of the proposed antenna is greatly reduced. With the 2.5: voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) impedance bandwidth definition, the lower and upper bands have the bandwidths of 110 MHz and 150 MHz, respectively. The proposed antenna is successfully designed, simulated, and analyzed by a high frequency structure simulator (HFSS). And the antenna is manufactured by using the 0.95Zn2SiO4-0.05CaTiO3 ceramics (εr = 7.1, tanδ = 0.00038) that is prepared by ourselves. The results show that the antenna is compact, efficient, and of near omnidirectional radiation pattern. Project supported by the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20133718120009), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Provence, China (Grant Nos. ZR2013FQ002 and ZR2014FQ006), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M551935), the Qingdao Municipality Postdoctoral Science Foundation, China, and the Scientific Research Foundation of Shandong University of Science and Technology for Recruited Talents, China (Grant Nos. 2013RCJJ042 and 2014RCJJ052).

  8. Retrieval of Land Surface Temperature over the Heihe River Basin Using HJ-1B Thermal Infrared Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Ouyang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The reliable estimation of spatially distributed Land Surface Temperature (LST is useful for monitoring regional land surface heat fluxes. A single-channel method is developed to derive the LST over the Heihe River Basin in China using data from the infrared sensor (IRS onboard the Chinese “Environmental and Disaster Monitoring and Forecasting with a Small Satellite Constellation” (HJ-1B for short for one of the satellites, with ancillary water vapor information from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS products (MOD05 and in situ automatic sun tracking photometer CE318 data for the first time. In situ LST data for the period from mid-June to mid-September 2012 were acquired from automatic meteorological stations (AMS that are part of Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER project. MOD05-based LST and CE318-based LST are compared with in situ measurements at 16 AMS sites with land cover types of vegetable, maize and orchards. The results show that the use of the MOD05 product could achieve a comparable accuracy in LST retrieval with that achieved using the CE318 data. The largest difference between the MOD05-based LST and CE318-based LST is 0.84 K throughout the study period over the Heihe River Basin. The standard deviation (STD, root mean square error (RMSE, and correlation coefficient (R of HJ-1B/IRS vs. the in situ measurements are 2.45 K, 2.78 K, and 0.67, respectively, whereas those for the MODIS 1 km LST product vs. the in situ measurements are 4.07 K, 2.98 K, and 0.79, respectively. The spatial pattern of the HJ-1B/LST over the study area in the Heihe River Basin generally agreed well with the MODIS 1 km LST product and contained more detailed spatial textures.

  9. An introductory analysis of digital infrared thermal imaging guided oral cancer detection using multiresolution rotation invariant texture features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, M.; Das Gupta, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Anjum, N.; Patsa, S.; Ray, J. G.

    2017-03-01

    This manuscript presents an analytical treatment on the feasibility of multi-scale Gabor filter bank response for non-invasive oral cancer pre-screening and detection in the long infrared spectrum. Incapability of present healthcare technology to detect oral cancer in budding stage manifests in high mortality rate. The paper contributes a step towards automation in non-invasive computer-aided oral cancer detection using an amalgamation of image processing and machine intelligence paradigms. Previous works have shown the discriminative difference of facial temperature distribution between a normal subject and a patient. The proposed work, for the first time, exploits this difference further by representing the facial Region of Interest(ROI) using multiscale rotation invariant Gabor filter bank responses followed by classification using Radial Basis Function(RBF) kernelized Support Vector Machine(SVM). The proposed study reveals an initial increase in classification accuracy with incrementing image scales followed by degradation of performance; an indication that addition of more and more finer scales tend to embed noisy information instead of discriminative texture patterns. Moreover, the performance is consistently better for filter responses from profile faces compared to frontal faces.This is primarily attributed to the ineptness of Gabor kernels to analyze low spatial frequency components over a small facial surface area. On our dataset comprising of 81 malignant, 59 pre-cancerous, and 63 normal subjects, we achieve state-of-the-art accuracy of 85.16% for normal v/s precancerous and 84.72% for normal v/s malignant classification. This sets a benchmark for further investigation of multiscale feature extraction paradigms in IR spectrum for oral cancer detection.

  10. Graphene metascreen for designing compact infrared absorbers with enhanced bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Pai-Yen; Farhat, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    We propose a compact, wideband terahertz and infrared absorber, comprising a patterned graphene sheet on a thin metal-backed dielectric slab. This graphene-based nanostructure can achieve a low or negative effective permeability, necessary for realizing the perfect absorption. The dual-reactive property found in both the plasmonic graphene sheet and the grounded highpermittivity slab introduces extra poles into the equivalent circuit model of the system, thereby resulting in a dual-band or broadband magnetic resonance that enhances the absorption bandwidth. More interestingly, the two-dimensional patterned graphene sheet significantly simplifies the design and fabrication processes for achieving resonant magnetic response, and allows the frequency-reconfigurable operation via electrostatic gating.

  11. Graphene metascreen for designing compact infrared absorbers with enhanced bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Pai-Yen

    2015-03-31

    We propose a compact, wideband terahertz and infrared absorber, comprising a patterned graphene sheet on a thin metal-backed dielectric slab. This graphene-based nanostructure can achieve a low or negative effective permeability, necessary for realizing the perfect absorption. The dual-reactive property found in both the plasmonic graphene sheet and the grounded highpermittivity slab introduces extra poles into the equivalent circuit model of the system, thereby resulting in a dual-band or broadband magnetic resonance that enhances the absorption bandwidth. More interestingly, the two-dimensional patterned graphene sheet significantly simplifies the design and fabrication processes for achieving resonant magnetic response, and allows the frequency-reconfigurable operation via electrostatic gating.

  12. Feasibility Study on S-Band Microwave Radiation and 3D-Thermal Infrared Imaging Sensor-Aided Recognition of Polymer Materials from End-of-Life Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiu Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With the increase the worldwide consumption of vehicles, end-of-life vehicles (ELVs have kept rapidly increasing in the last two decades. Metallic parts and materials of ELVs can be easily reused and recycled, but the automobile shredder residues (ASRs, of which elastomer and plastic materials make up the vast majority, are difficult to recycle. ASRs are classified as hazardous materials in the main industrial countries, and are required to be materially recycled up to 85–95% by mass until 2020. However, there is neither sufficient theoretical nor practical experience for sorting ASR polymers. In this research, we provide a novel method by using S-Band microwave irradiation together with 3D scanning as well as infrared thermal imaging sensors for the recognition and sorting of typical plastics and elastomers from the ASR mixture. In this study, an industrial magnetron array with 2.45 GHz irradiation was utilized as the microwave source. Seven kinds of ELV polymer (PVC, ABS, PP, EPDM, NBR, CR, and SBR crushed scrap residues were tested. After specific power microwave irradiation for a certain time, the tested polymer materials were heated up to different extents corresponding to their respective sensitivities to microwave irradiation. Due to the variations in polymer chemical structure and additive agents, polymers have different sensitivities to microwave radiation, which leads to differences in temperature rises. The differences of temperature increase were obtained by a thermal infrared sensor, and the position and geometrical features of the tested scraps were acquired by a 3D imaging sensor. With this information, the scrap material could be recognized and then sorted. The results showed that this method was effective when the tested polymer materials were heated up to more than 30 °C. For full recognition of the tested polymer scraps, the minimum temperature variations of 5 °C and 10.5 °C for plastics and elastomers were needed

  13. Applications of satellite data to the studies of agricultural meteorology, 2: Relationship between air temperature and surface temperature measured by infrared thermal radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, I.; Tani, H.; Morikawa, S.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed in order to establish interpretation keys for estimation of air temperature from satellite IR data. Field measurements were carried out over four kinds of land surfaces including seven different field crops on the university campus at Sapporo. The air temperature was compared with the surface temperature measured by infrared thermal radiometer (National ER2007, 8.5-12.5μm) and, also with other meteorological parameters (solar radiation, humidity and wind speed). Also perpendicular vegetation index (PVI) was measured to know vegetation density of lands by ho radio-spectralmeter (Figs. 1 & 2). Table 1 summarizes the measurements taken in these experiments.The correlation coefficients between air temperature and other meteorological parameters for each area are shown in Table 2. The best correlation coefficient for total data was obtained with surface temperature, and it suggests the possibility that air temperature may be estimated by satellite IR data since they are related to earth surface temperatures.Further analyses were done between air temperature and surface temperature measured with thermal infrared radiometer.The following conclusions may be drawn:(1) Air temperature from meteorological site was well correlated to surface temperature of lands that were covered with dense plant and water, for example, grass land, paddy field and rye field (Table 2).(2) The correlation coefficients and the regression equations on grass land, paddy field and rye field were almost the same (Fig. 3). The mean correlation coefficient for these three lands was 0.88 and the regression equation is given in Eq. (2).(3) There was good correlation on bare soil land also, but had large variations (Fig. 3).(4) The correlations on crop fields depend on the density of plant cover. Good correlation is obtained on dense vegetative fields.(5) Small variations about correlation coefficients were obtained for the time of day (Table 3).(6) On the other hand, large

  14. An 80x80 microbolometer type thermal imaging sensor using the LWIR-band CMOS infrared (CIR) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankut, Firat; Cologlu, Mustafa H.; Askar, Hidir; Ozturk, Hande; Dumanli, Hilal K.; Oruc, Feyza; Tilkioglu, Bilge; Ugur, Beril; Akar, Orhan Sevket; Tepegoz, Murat; Akin, Tayfun

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces an 80x80 microbolometer array with a 35 μm pixel pitch operating in the 8-12 μm wavelength range, where the detector is fabricated with the LWIR-band CMOS infrared technology, shortly named as CIR, which is a novel microbolometer implementation technique developed to reduce the detector cost in order to enable the use of microbolometer type sensors in high volume markets, such as the consumer market and IoT. Unlike the widely used conventional surface micromachined microbolometer approaches, MikroSens' CIR detector technology does not require the use of special high TCR materials like VOx or a-Si, instead, it allows to implement microbolometers with standard CMOS layers, where the suspended bulk micromachined structure is obtained by only few consecutive selective MEMS etching steps while protecting the wirebond pads with a simple lithograpy step. This approach not only reduces the fabrication cost but also increases the production yield. In addition, needing simple subtractive post-CMOS fabrication steps allows the CIR technology to be carried out in any CMOS and MEMS foundry in a truly fabless fashion, where industrially mature and Au-free wafer level vacuum packaging technologies can also be carried out, leading to cost advantage, simplicity, scalability, and flexibility. The CIR approach is used to implement an 80x80 FPA with 35 μm pixel pitch, namely MS0835A, using a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The fabricated sensor is measured to provide NETD (Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference) value of 163 mK at 17 fps (frames per second) and 71 mK at 4 fps with F/1.0 optics in a dewar environment. The measurement results of the wafer level vacuum packaged sensors with one side AR coating shows an NETD values of 112 mK at 4 fps with F/1.1 optics, i.e., demonstrates a good performance for high volume low-cost applications like advanced presence detection and human counting applications. The CIR approach of MikroSens is scalable and can be used to

  15. Temperature increase at the light guide tip of 15 contemporary LED units and thermal variation at the pulpal floor of cavities: an infrared thermographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M; DeVito-Moraes, A; Francci, C; Moraes, R; Pereira, T; Froes-Salgado, N; Yamazaki, L; Silva, L; Zezell, D

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a comprehensive investigation on the temperature increase at the light guide tip of several commercial light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing units (LCUs) and the associated thermal variation (ΔT) at the pulpal floor of dental cavities was carried out. In total, 15 LEDs from all generations were investigated, testing a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) unit as a reference. The irradiance level was measured with a power meter, and spectral distribution was analyzed using a spectrometer. Temperature increase at the tip was measured with a type-K thermocouple connected to a thermometer, while ΔT at the pulpal floor was measured by an infrared photodetector in class V cavities, with a 1-mm-thick dentin pulpal floor. The relationship among measured irradiance, ΔT at the tip, and ΔT at the pulpal floor was investigated using regression analyses. Large discrepancies between the expected and measured irradiances were detected for some LCUs. Most of the LCUs showed an emission spectrum narrower than the QTH unit, with emission peaks usually between 450 and 470 nm. The temperature increase at the tip followed a logarithmic growth for LCUs with irradiance ≥1000 mW/cm(2), with ΔT at the tip following the measured irradiance linearly (R(2)=0.67). Linear temperature increase at the pulpal floor over the 40-second exposure time was observed for several LCUs, with linear association between ΔT at the pulpal floor and measured irradiance (R(2)=0.39) or ΔT at the tip (R(2)=0.28). In conclusion, contemporary LED units show varied irradiance levels that affect the temperature increase at the light guide tip and, as a consequence, the thermal variation at the pulpal floor of dental cavities.

  16. An Assessment of Polynomial Regression Techniques for the Relative Radiometric Normalization (RRN of High-Resolution Multi-Temporal Airborne Thermal Infrared (TIR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mustafizur Rahman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal Infrared (TIR remote sensing images of urban environments are increasingly available from airborne and satellite platforms. However, limited access to high-spatial resolution (H-res: ~1 m TIR satellite images requires the use of TIR airborne sensors for mapping large complex urban surfaces, especially at micro-scales. A critical limitation of such H-res mapping is the need to acquire a large scene composed of multiple flight lines and mosaic them together. This results in the same scene components (e.g., roads, buildings, green space and water exhibiting different temperatures in different flight lines. To mitigate these effects, linear relative radiometric normalization (RRN techniques are often applied. However, the Earth’s surface is composed of features whose thermal behaviour is characterized by complexity and non-linearity. Therefore, we hypothesize that non-linear RRN techniques should demonstrate increased radiometric agreement over similar linear techniques. To test this hypothesis, this paper evaluates four (linear and non-linear RRN techniques, including: (i histogram matching (HM; (ii pseudo-invariant feature-based polynomial regression (PIF_Poly; (iii no-change stratified random sample-based linear regression (NCSRS_Lin; and (iv no-change stratified random sample-based polynomial regression (NCSRS_Poly; two of which (ii and iv are newly proposed non-linear techniques. When applied over two adjacent flight lines (~70 km2 of TABI-1800 airborne data, visual and statistical results show that both new non-linear techniques improved radiometric agreement over the previously evaluated linear techniques, with the new fully-automated method, NCSRS-based polynomial regression, providing the highest improvement in radiometric agreement between the master and the slave images, at ~56%. This is ~5% higher than the best previously evaluated linear technique (NCSRS-based linear regression.

  17. Comparison of satellite-derived LAI and precipitation anomalies over Brazil with a thermal infrared-based Evaporative Stress Index for 2003-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Martha C.; Zolin, Cornelio A.; Hain, Christopher R.; Semmens, Kathryn; Tugrul Yilmaz, M.; Gao, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Shortwave vegetation index (VI) and leaf area index (LAI) remote sensing products yield inconsistent depictions of biophysical response to drought and pluvial events that have occurred in Brazil over the past decade. Conflicting reports of severity of drought impacts on vegetation health and functioning have been attributed to cloud and aerosol contamination of shortwave reflectance composites, particularly over the rainforested regions of the Amazon basin which are subject to prolonged periods of cloud cover and episodes of intense biomass burning. This study compares timeseries of satellite-derived maps of LAI from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and precipitation from the Tropical Rainfall Mapping Mission (TRMM) with a diagnostic Evaporative Stress Index (ESI) retrieved using thermal infrared remote sensing over South America for the period 2003-2013. This period includes several severe droughts and floods that occurred both over the Amazon and over unforested savanna and agricultural areas in Brazil. Cross-correlations between absolute values and standardized anomalies in monthly LAI and precipitation composites as well as the actual-to-reference evapotranspiration (ET) ratio used in the ESI were computed for representative forested and agricultural regions. The correlation analyses reveal strong apparent anticorrelation between MODIS LAI and TRMM precipitation anomalies over the Amazon, but better coupling over regions vegetated with shorter grass and crop canopies. The ESI was more consistently correlated with precipitation patterns over both landcover types. Temporal comparisons between ESI and TRMM anomalies suggest longer moisture buffering timescales in the deeper rooted rainforest systems. Diagnostic thermal-based retrievals of ET and ET anomalies, such as used in the ESI, provide independent information on the impacts of extreme hydrologic events on vegetation health in comparison with VI and precipitation-based drought

  18. Determination of thermal diffusivity of dental enamel and dentin as a function of temperature, using infrared thermography; Determinacao da difusividade termica do esmalte e dentina em funcao de temperatura, utilizando termografia no infravermelho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Thiago Martini

    2009-07-01

    In this work it was developed a software that calculates automatically, the thermal diffusivity value as a function of temperature in materials. The infrared thermography technique was used for data acquisition of temperature distribution as a function of time. These data were used to adjust a temperature function obtained from the homogeneous heat equation with specific boundary conditions. For that, an infrared camera (detecting from 8 {mu}m to 9 {mu}m) was calibrated to detect temperature ranging from 185 degree C up to 1300 degree C at an acquisition rate of 300 Hz. It was used, 10 samples of dental enamel and 10 samples of dentin, with 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm, which were obtained from bovine lower incisor teeth. These samples were irradiated with an Er:Cr:YSGG pulsed laser ({lambda} = 2,78 {mu}m). The resulting temperature was recorded 2 s prior, 10 s during irradiation and continuing for 2 more seconds after it. After each irradiation, all obtained thermal images were processed in the software, creating a file with the data of thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature. Another file with the thermal diffusivity values was also calculated after each laser pulse. The mean result of thermal diffusivity obtained for dental enamel was 0,0084 {+-} 0,001 cm2/s for the temperature interval of 220-550 degree C. The mean value for thermal diffusivity obtained for dentin was 0,0015 0,0004 cm2/s in temperatures up to 360 degree C; however, this value increases for higher temperatures. According to these results, it was possible to conclude that the use of infrared thermography, associated with the software developed in this work, is an efficient method to determine the thermal diffusivity values as a function of temperature in different materials. (author)

  19. Thermal infrared sounding observations of lower atmospheric variances at Mars and their implications for gravity wave activity: a preliminary examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavens, N. G.

    2017-12-01

    It has been recognized for over two decades that the mesoscale statistical variance observed by Earth-observing satellites at temperature-sensitive frequencies above the instrumental noise floor is a measure of gravity wave activity. These types of observation have been made by a variety of satellite instruments have been an important validation tool for gravity wave parameterizations in global and mesoscale models. At Mars, the importance of topographic and non-topographic sources of gravity waves for the general circulation is now widely recognized and the target of recent modeling efforts. However, despite several ingenious studies, gravity wave activity near hypothetical lower atmospheric sources has been poorly and unsystematically characterized, partly because of the difficulty of separating the gravity wave activity from baroclinic wave activity and the thermal tides. Here will be presented a preliminary analysis of calibrated radiance variance at 15.4 microns (635-665 cm-1) from nadir, off-nadir, and limb observations by the Mars Climate Sounder on board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The overarching methodology follows Wu and Waters (1996, 1997). Nadir, off-nadir, and lowest detector limb observations should sample variability with vertical weighting functions centered high in the lower atmosphere (20-30 km altitude) and full width half maximum (FWHM) 20 km but be sensitive to gravity waves with different horizontal wavelengths and slightly different vertical wavelengths. This work is supported by NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program (NNX14AM32G). References Wu, D.L. and J.W. Waters, 1996, Satellite observations of atmospheric variances: A possible indication of gravity waves, GRL, 23, 3631-3634. Wu D.L. and J.W. Waters, 1997, Observations of Gravity Waves with the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder. In: Hamilton K. (eds) Gravity Wave Processes. NATO ASI Series (Series I: Environmental Change), vol 50. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg.

  20. Thermal analysis of silicon carbide coating on a nickel based superalloy substrate and thickness measurement of top layers by lock-in infrared thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Kim, Won Tae [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper, we investigate the capacity of the lock-in infrared thermography technique for the evaluation of non-uniform top layers of a silicon carbide coating with a nickel based superalloy sample. The method utilized a multilayer heat transfer model to analyze the surface temperature response. The modelling of the sample was done in ANSYS. The sample consists of three layers, namely, the metal substrate, bond coat and top coat. A sinusoidal heating at different excitation frequencies was imposed upon the top layer of the sample according to the experimental procedures. The thermal response of the excited surface was recorded, and the phase angle image was computed by Fourier transform using the image processing software, MATLAB and Thermofit Pro. The correlation between the coating thickness and phase angle was established for each excitation frequency. The most appropriate excitation frequency was found to be 0.05 Hz. The method demonstrated potential in the evaluation of coating thickness and it was successfully applied to measure the non-uniform top layers ranging from 0.05 mm to 1 mm with an accuracy of 0.000002 mm to 0.045 mm.

  1. Two-dimensional network formation of cardiac myocytes in agar microculture chip with 1480 nm infrared laser photo-thermal etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kensuke; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2003-11-01

    We have developed a new method that enables agar microstructures to be used to cultivate cells and that allows cell network patterns to be controlled. The method makes use of non-contact three-dimensional photo-thermal etching with a 1480 nm infrared focused laser beam, which is strongly absorbed by water and agar gel, to form the shapes of agar microstructures. It allows microstructures to be easily formed in an agar layer within a few minutes, with cell-culture holes formed by the spot heating of a 100 mW laser and tunnels by the tracing of a 100 microm s(-1), 40 mW laser. We cultivated rat cardiac myocytes in adjacent microstructures and observed synchronized beating in them 90 min after they had made physical contact. Our results indicate that the system can make and use microstructures for cell-network cultivation in a minimal amount of time without any expensive microfabrication facilities or complicated procedures.

  2. Integrated thermal infrared imaging and Structure-from-Motion photogrametry to map apparent temperature and radiant hydrothermal heat flux at Mammoth Mountain, CA USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Aaron; George Hilley,; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a method to create high-resolution (cm-scale) orthorectified and georeferenced maps of apparent surface