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  1. Inhibition of Dual Specific Oncolytic Adenovirus on Esophageal Cancer via Activation of Caspases by a Mitochondrial-dependent Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Jia-qiang; CHI Bao-rong; LI Xiao; LIU Lei; LIU Li-ming; QI Yan-xin; WANG Zhuo-yue; JIN Ning-yi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the anti-tumor effects of dual cancer specific-oncolytic adenovirus Ad-VP on esophageal cancer(EC).The anti-tumor activity of Ad-VP was compared with that of the control recombinant adenoviruses (Ad-GP,Ad-Apoptin,Ad-EGFP) in human esophageal cancer cell EC-109 and human normal liver cell L02 in vitro.In 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT) assays,the growth of EC-109 cells was slightly inhibited by Ad-GP.Ad-Apoptin and Ad-EGFP.However,Ad-VP induced a significant cytotoxic effect.Infection of EC-109 cells with Ad-VP resulted in a significant induction of apoptosis of them in vitro,detected by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole(DAPI) or acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining.The results of Western blot and flow cytometric assay indicate the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential(△ψm),the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3,6 and 7 in Ad-VP infiected EC-109 cells.In contrast,all these assays show almost no effects of the recombinant adenoviruses on L02 cells.These results demonstrate that the treatment of tumors with Ad-VP selectively inhibits tumor growth and induces apoptosis of esophageal cancer cells.Ad-VP may provide a novel and powerful strategy for cancer gene therapy.

  2. Tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 (TSLC1) mediated by dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus exerts specific antitumor actions in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen LEI; Hong-bin LIU; Shi-bing WANG; Xiu-mei ZHOU; Shui-di ZHENG; Ke-ni GUO; Bu-yun MA

    2013-01-01

    Aim:The tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 (TSLC1) is a candidate tumor suppressor of lung cancer,and frequently inactivated in primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).In this study,we investigated the effects of TSLC1 mediated by a dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus on lung cancer,and the mechanisms underlying the antitumor actions.Methods:The recombinant virus Ad·sp-E1A(△24)-TSLC1 was constructed by inserting the TSLC1 gene into the dual-regulated Ad·spE1A(△24) vector,which contained the survivin promoter and a 24 bp deletion within E1A.The antitumor effects of Ad·sp-E1A(△24)-TSLC1 were evaluated in NCI-H460,A549,and H1299 lung cancer cell lines and the normal fibroblast cell line MRC-5,as well as in A549 xenograft model in nude mice.Cell viability was assessed using MTT assay.The expression of TSLC1 and activation of the caspase signaling pathway were detected by Western blot analyses.The tumor tissues from the xenograft models were examined using H&E staining,IHC,TUNEL,and TEM analyses.Results:Infection of A549 lung cancer cells with Ad·sp-E1A(△24)-TSLC1 induced high level expression of TSLC1.Furthermore,the Ad·spE1A(△△24)-TSLC1 virus dose-dependently suppressed the viability of NCI-H460,A549,and H1299 lung cancer cells,and did not affect MRC-5 normal fibroblast cells.Infection of NCI-H460,A549,and H1299 lung cancer cells with Ad·sp-E1A(△24)-TSLC1 induced apoptosis,and increased activation of caspase-8,caspase-3 and PARR.In A549 xenograft model in nude mice,intratumoral injection of Ad.spE1A(△24)-TSLC1 significantly suppressed the tumor volume,and increased the survival rate (from less than 15% to 87.5% at d 60).Histological studies showed that injection of Ad·sp-E1A(△24)-TSLC1 caused tumor cell apoptosis and virus particle propagation in tumor tissues.Conclusion:The oncolytic adenovirus Ad·sp-E1A(△24)-TSLC1 exhibits specific antitumor effects,and is a promising agent for the treatment of lung cancer.

  3. Preclinical pharmacology and toxicology study of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin, a novel dual cancer-specific oncolytic adenovirus

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    Qi, Yanxin [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); Guo, Huanhuan [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); Changchun Brother Biotech Co., Ltd., Changchun, 130000 (China); Hu, Ningning; He, Dongyun [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); The Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Changchun 130122 (China); Zhang, Shi [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); School of Clinical Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun 130001 (China); Chu, Yunjie [Affiliated Hospital of Changchun University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Changchun 130021 (China); Huang, Yubin [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Li, Xiao, E-mail: lixiao06@mails.jlu.edu.cn [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); The Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Changchun 130122 (China); Sun, LiLi, E-mail: linjiaxiaoya@163.com [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Tumor Hospital of Jilin Province, Changchun 130012 (China); Jin, Ningyi, E-mail: ningyij@126.com [Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences of PLA, Changchun 130122 (China); The Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Changchun 130122 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that conditionally replicating adenovirus is safe. We constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin, using a cancer-specific promoter (human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERTp) and a cancer cell-selective apoptosis-inducing gene (Apoptin). Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin was proven effective both in vitro and in vivo in our previous study. In this study, the preclinical safety profiles of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin in animal models were investigated. At doses of 5.0 × 10{sup 8}, 2.5 × 10{sup 9}, and 1.25 × 10{sup 10} viral particles (VP)/kg, Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin had no adverse effects on mouse behavior, muscle cooperation, sedative effect, digestive system, and nervous systems, or on beagle cardiovascular and respiratory systems at 5.0 × 10{sup 8}, 2.5 × 10{sup 9}, and 1.25 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg doses. In acute toxicity tests in mice, the maximum tolerated dose > 5 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg. There was no inflammation or ulceration at the injection sites within two weeks. In repeat-dose toxicological studies, the no observable adverse effect levels of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin in rats (1.25 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg) and beagles (2.5 × 10{sup 9} VP/kg) were 62.5- and 12.5-fold of the proposed clinical dose, respectively. The anti-virus antibody was produced in animal sera. Bone marrow examination revealed no histopathological changes. Guinea pigs sensitized by three repeated intraperitoneal injections of 1.35 × 10{sup 10} VP/mL Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin each and challenged by one intravenous injection of 1.67 × 10{sup 8} VP/kg Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin did not exhibit any sign of systemic anaphylaxis. Our data from different animal models suggest that Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin is a safe anti-tumor therapeutic agent. - Highlights: • We use the rodents and non-rodents animal models to evaluation Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin. • Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin is a safe anti-tumor therapeutic agent. • Demonstrate the safety and feasibility dose of injected Ad

  4. Novel Infectivity-Enhanced Oncolytic Adenovirus with a Capsid-Incorporated Dual-Imaging Moiety for Monitoring Virotherapy in Ovarian Cancer

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    Kristopher J. Kimball

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We sought to develop a cancer-targeted, infectivity-enhanced oncolytic adenovirus that embodies a capsid-labeling fusion for non-invasive dual-modality imaging of ovarian cancer virotherapy. A functional fusion protein composed of fluorescent and nuclear imaging tags was genetically incorporated into the capsid of an infectivity-enhanced conditionally replicative adenovirus. Incorporation of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk and monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1 into the viral capsid and its genomic stability were verified by molecular analyses. Replication and oncolysis were evaluated in ovarian cancer cells. Fusion functionality was confirmed by in vitro gamma camera and fluorescent microscopy imaging. Comparison of tk-mRFP virus to single-modality controls revealed similar replication efficiency and oncolytic potency. Molecular fusion did not abolish enzymatic activity of HSV-tk as the virus effectively phosphorylated thymidine both ex vivo and in vitro. In vitro fluorescence imaging demonstrated a strong correlation between the intensity of fluorescent signal and cytopathic effect in infected ovarian cancer cells, suggesting that fluorescence can be used to monitor viral replication. We have in vitro validated a new infectivity-enhanced oncolytic adenovirus with a dual-imaging modality-labeled capsid, optimized for ovarian cancer virotherapy. The new agent could provide incremental gains toward climbing the barriers for achieving conditionally replicated adenovirus efficacy in human trials.

  5. Converting Tumor-specific Markers Into Reporters of Oncolytic Virus Infection

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    Iankov, Ianko D.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Dietz, Allan B; Russell, Stephen J.; Galanis, Evanthia

    2009-01-01

    Preferential killing of transformed cells, while keeping normal cells and organs unharmed, is the main goal of cancer gene therapy. Genetically engineered trackable markers and imaging reporters enable noninvasive monitoring of transduction efficiency and pharmacokinetics of anticancer virotherapeutics. However, none of these reporters can differentiate between infection in the targeted tumors and that in the normal tissue. Thus, we constructed oncolytic measles virus (MV) armed with a human ...

  6. Expression of RNA interference triggers from an oncolytic herpes simplex virus results in specific silencing in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo

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    Anesti Anna-Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA to tumours remains a major obstacle for the development of RNA interference (RNAi-based therapeutics. Following the promising pre-clinical and clinical results with the oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV OncoVEXGM-CSF, we aimed to express RNAi triggers from oncolytic HSV, which although has the potential to improve treatment by silencing tumour-related genes, was not considered possible due to the highly oncolytic properties of HSV. Methods To evaluate RNAi-mediated silencing from an oncolytic HSV backbone, we developed novel replicating HSV vectors expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA or artificial microRNA (miRNA against the reporter genes green fluorescent protein (eGFP and β-galactosidase (lacZ. These vectors were tested in non-tumour cell lines in vitro and tumour cells that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection both in vitro and in mice xenografts in vivo. Silencing was assessed at the protein level by fluorescent microscopy, x-gal staining, enzyme activity assay, and western blotting. Results Our results demonstrate that it is possible to express shRNA and artificial miRNA from an oncolytic HSV backbone, which had not been previously investigated. Furthermore, oncolytic HSV-mediated delivery of RNAi triggers resulted in effective and specific silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo, with the viruses expressing artificial miRNA being comprehensibly more effective. Conclusions This preliminary data provide the first demonstration of oncolytic HSV-mediated expression of shRNA or artificial miRNA and silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. The vectors developed in this study are being adapted to silence tumour-related genes in an ongoing study that aims to improve the effectiveness of oncolytic HSV treatment in tumours that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection and thus, potentially improve response rates seen

  7. Targeted cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic adenovirus coding for a fully human monoclonal antibody specific for CTLA-4.

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    Dias, J D; Hemminki, O; Diaconu, I; Hirvinen, M; Bonetti, A; Guse, K; Escutenaire, S; Kanerva, A; Pesonen, S; Löskog, A; Cerullo, V; Hemminki, A

    2012-10-01

    Promising clinical results have been achieved with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as ipilimumab and tremelimumab that block cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4, CD152). However, systemic administration of these agents also has the potential for severe immune-related adverse events. Thus, local production might allow higher concentrations at the target while reducing systemic side effects. We generated a transductionally and transcriptionally targeted oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 expressing complete human mAb specific for CTLA-4 and tested it in vitro, in vivo and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal donors and patients with advanced solid tumors. mAb expression was confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Biological functionality was determined in a T-cell line and in PBMCs from cancer patients. T cells of patients, but not those of healthy donors, were activated by an anti-CTLA4mAb produced by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4. In addition to immunological effects, a direct anti-CTLA-4-mediated pro-apoptotic effect was observed in vitro and in vivo. Local production resulted in 43-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor versus plasma anti-CTLA4mAb concentration. Plasma levels in mice remained below what has been reported safe in humans. Replication-competent Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 resulted in 81-fold higher (P<0.05) tumor mAb levels as compared with a replication-deficient control. This is the first report of an oncolytic adenovirus producing a full-length human mAb. High mAb concentrations were seen at tumors with lower systemic levels. Stimulation of T cells of cancer patients by Ad5/3-Δ24aCTLA4 suggests feasibility of testing the approach in clinical trials.

  8. Cancer targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy specific for liver cancer by α-fetoprotein-controlled oncolytic adenovirus expression of SOCS3 and IL-24

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    Xin Cao; Ruicheng Wei; Xinran Liu; Yan Zeng; Hongling Huang; Miao Ding; Kangjian Zhang; Xin-Yuan Liu

    2011-01-01

    The combination of gene therapy and virotherapy for cancer treatment has received close attention and has become a trend in the field of cancer biotherapy.A strategy called 'Cancer Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy' (CTGVT) or 'Gene Armed Oncolytic Viral Therapy'(GAOVT) has been proposed,in which an antitumor gene is inserted into an oncolytic viral vector.In our previous study,a dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with enhanced safety for normal cells and strict liver cancertargeting ability,designated Ad·enAFP· E1A· E1 B (A55)(briefly Ad·enAFP·D55),was successfully constructed. In the current work,interleukin-24 (IL-24) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) genes were packaged into Ad·enAFP·D55.The new constructs,Ad·enAFP·D55-(IL-24) and Ad·enAFP·D55-(SOCS3),showed improved tumoricidal activity in hepatoma cell lines compared with the oncolytic viral vector Ad·enAFP·D55.The coadministrationofAd · enAFP· D55-(IL-24)and Ad·enAFP·D55-(SOCS3) showed much better antitumor effect than Ad·enAFP·D55-(IL-24) or Ad·enAFP·D55-(SOCS3) alone both in vitro and in a nude mouse xenograft model.Moreover,our results also showed that blockade of the Jak/Stat3 pathway by Ad·enAFP·D55-(SOCS3) infection in HuH-7 cells could down-regulate some anti-apoptosis proteins,such as XIAP,Bcl-xL,and survivin,whichmightsensitizethecellsto Ad·enAFP·D55-(IL-24)-induced apoptosis.These results indicate that co-administration of Ad·enAFP·D55-(IL-24) and Ad·enAFP·D55-(SOCS3) may serve as a candidate therapeutic approach for the treatment of liver cancer.

  9. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD is mediated by tumor-specific immunity.

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    Anne Kleijn

    Full Text Available The oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD represents a new promising therapeutic agent for patients with a malignant glioma and is currently under investigation in clinical phase I/II trials. Earlier preclinical studies showed that Delta24-RGD is able to effectively lyse tumor cells, yielding promising results in various immune-deficient glioma models. However, the role of the immune response in oncolytic adenovirus therapy for glioma has never been explored. To this end, we assessed Delta24-RGD treatment in an immune-competent orthotopic mouse model for glioma and evaluated immune responses against tumor and virus. Delta24-RGD treatment led to long-term survival in 50% of mice and this effect was completely lost upon administration of the immunosuppressive agent dexamethasone. Delta24-RGD enhanced intra-tumoral infiltration of F4/80+ macrophages, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and increased the local production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In treated mice, T cell responses were directed to the virus as well as to the tumor cells, which was reflected in the presence of protective immunological memory in mice that underwent tumor rechallenge. Together, these data provide evidence that the immune system plays a vital role in the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic adenovirus therapy of glioma, and may provide angles to future improvements on Delta24-RGD therapy.

  10. HCCS1-armed, quadruple-regulated oncolytic adenovirus specific for liver cancer as a cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy strategy

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    Xu Hai-Neng

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In previously published studies, oncolytic adenovirus-mediated gene therapy has produced good results in targeting cancer cells. However, safety and efficacy, the two most important aspects in cancer therapy, remain serious challenges. The specific expression or deletion of replication related genes in an adenovirus has been frequently utilized to regulate the cancer cell specificity of a virus. Accordingly, in this study, we deleted 24 bp in E1A (bp924-bp947 and the entirety of E1B, including those genes encoding E1B 55kDa and E1B19kDa. We used the survivin promoter (SP to control E1A in order to construct a new adenovirus vector named Ad.SP.E1A(Δ24.ΔE1B (briefly Ad.SPDD. HCCS1 (hepatocellular carcinoma suppressor 1 is a novel tumor suppressor gene that is able to specifically induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The expression cassette AFP-HCCS1-WPRE-SV40 was inserted into Ad.SPDD to form Ad.SPDD-HCCS1, enabling us to improve the safety and efficacy of oncolytic-mediated gene therapy for liver cancer. Results Ad.SPDD showed a decreased viral yield and less toxicity in normal cells but enhanced toxicity in liver cancer cells, compared with the cancer-specific adenovirus ZD55 (E1B55K deletion. Ad.SPDD-HCCS1 exhibited a potent anti-liver-cancer ability and decreased toxicity in vitro. Ad.SPDD-HCCS1 also showed a measurable capacity to inhibit Huh-7 xenograft tumor growth on nude mice. The underlying mechanism of Ad.SPDD-HCCS1-induced liver cancer cell death was found to be via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Ad.SPDD-HCCS1 was able to elicit reduced toxicity and enhanced efficacy both in vitro and in vivo compared to a previously constructed oncolytic adenovirus. Ad.SPDD-HCCS1 could be a promising candidate for liver cancer therapy.

  11. Use of microRNA Let-7 to control the replication specificity of oncolytic adenovirus in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

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    Huajun Jin

    Full Text Available Highly selective therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remains an unmet medical need. In present study, we found that the tumor suppressor microRNA, let-7 was significantly downregulated in a proportion of primary HCC tissues (12 of 33, 36.4% and HCC cell lines. In line with this finding, we have engineered a chimeric Ad5/11 fiber oncolytic adenovirus, SG7011(let7T, by introducing eight copies of let-7 target sites (let7T into the 3' untranslated region of E1A, a key gene associated with adenoviral replication. The results showed that the E1A expression (both RNA and protein levels of the SG7011(let7T was tightly regulated according to the endogenous expression level of the let-7. As contrasted with the wild-type adenovirus and the control virus, the replication of SG7011(let7T was distinctly inhibited in normal liver cells lines (i.e. L-02 and WRL-68 expressing high level of let-7 (>300 folds, whereas was almost not impaired in HCC cells (i.e. Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5 with low level of let-7. Consequently, the cytotoxicity of SG7011(let7T to normal liver cells was successfully decreased while was almost not attenuated in HCC cells in vitro. The antitumor ability of SG7011(let7Tin vivo was maintained in mice with Hep3B xenograft tumor, whereas was greatly decreased against the SMMC-7721 xenograft tumor expressing a high level of let-7 similar with L-02 when compared to the wild-type adenovirus. These results suggested that SG7011(let7T may be a promising anticancer agent or vector to mediate the expression of therapeutic gene, broadly applicable in the treatment for HCC and other cancers where the let-7 gene is downregulated.

  12. Construction and identification of dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with dual-efficacy%双调控双功效溶瘤腺病毒的构建及意义

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    孙立臣; 潘旭波; 周先亭; 宋占文; 苏长青

    2013-01-01

    目的 构建表达Survivin基因小发卡RNA和内皮抑素基因的双调控双功效肿瘤特异性溶瘤腺病毒(CNHK500-shSRV-mE,以下简称双调控腺病毒),为肝癌的基因治疗奠定基础.方法 以人端粒酶逆转录酶启动子(hTERT)调控腺病毒E1a基因,缺氧调控元件序列(HRE)调控E1b基因,重组双调控双功效的肿瘤特异性溶瘤腺病毒载体;于E1区插入Survivin基因序列设计特异shRNA和全长内皮抑素基因构建双调控腺病毒.将双调控腺病毒分别感染人肝癌细胞株SMMC-7721、BEL-7402,观察病毒的增殖活性.结果 双调控腺病毒能在肝癌细胞中特异性高拷贝增殖,而在正常细胞系中几乎不增殖.结论 双调控腺病毒成功构建;其为肝癌的基因治疗奠定了基础.%Objective To construct the dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus carrying surviving-shRNA and endostatin in order to investigate its replicative activity in hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods The hTERT promoter was cloned and used to control El a expression. HRE was cloned and used to control Elb expression. The survivin shRNA and mouse endostatin gene were inserted into adenoviral genome. The recombinant adenovirus was used to infect hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines and its replicative activity was observed. Result The recombinant adenovirus CNHK500-shSRV-mE was replicated selectively in cancer cells but not normal cells. Conclusion CNHK500-shSRV-mE can replicate selectively in cancer cells, which can be used in cancer gene therapy.

  13. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

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    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  14. Evolution of oncolytic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-08-01

    Owing to their replicative capacity, oncolytic viruses (OVs) can evolve under the action of natural selection. Reversion to virulence and recombination with wild-type strains may compromise OV safety, therefore requiring evolutionary risk assessment studies. On the other hand, evolution can be directed in the laboratory to create more potent and safer OVs. Previous work in the experimental evolution field provides a background for OV directed evolution, and has identified interesting exploitable features. While genetic engineering has greatly advanced the field of oncolytic virotherapy, this approach is sometimes curtailed by the complexity and diversity of virus-host interactions. Directed evolution provides an alternative approach that may help to obtain new OVs without prejudice toward the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Oncolytic viruses: a step into cancer immunotherapy

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    Pol JG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan G Pol, Julien Rességuier, Brian D LichtyMcMaster Immunology Research Centre, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is currently under investigation in phase I–III clinical trials for approval as a new cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses (OVs selectively infect, replicate in, and kill tumor cells. For a long time, the therapeutic efficacy was thought to depend on the direct viral oncolysis (virocentric view. The host immune system was considered as a brake that impaired virus delivery and spread. Attention was paid primarily to approaches enhancing virus tumor selectivity and cytotoxicity and/or that limited antiviral responses. Thinking has changed over the past few years with the discovery that OV therapy was also inducing indirect oncolysis mechanisms. Among them, induction of an antitumor immunity following OV injection appeared to be a key factor for an efficient therapeutic activity (immunocentric view. Indeed, tumor-specific immune cells persist post-therapy and can search and destroy any tumor cells that escape the OVs, and thus immune memory may prevent relapse of the disease. Various strategies, which are summarized in this manuscript, have been developed to enhance the efficacy of OV therapy with a focus on its immunotherapeutic aspects. These include genetic engineering and combination with existing cancer treatments. Several are currently being evaluated in human patients and already display promising efficacy.Keywords: oncolytic virus, cancer immunotherapy, tumor antigen, cancer vaccine, combination strategies

  16. Increased therapeutic efficacy of the prostate-specific oncolytic adenovirus Ad[I/PPT-E1A] by reduction of the insulator size and introduction of the full-length E3 region.

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    Danielsson, A; Dzojic, H; Nilsson, B; Essand, M

    2008-04-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses are developing as a complement to traditional cancer therapies. Ad[I/PPT-E1A] is an E1B/E3-deleted virus that replicates exclusively in prostate cells, since the expression of E1A is controlled by the recombinant 1.4 kb prostate-specific PPT promoter. The transcriptional integrity of PPT is maintained by the 3.0 kb mouse H19 insulator that was introduced directly upstream of the PPT sequence. In order to increase the cloning capacity to be able to reintroduce E3 sequences in the 35.7 kb Ad[I/PPT-E1A] genome, various shorter insulators were examined in a luciferase reporter gene assay. It was found that the 1.6 kb core H19 insulator (i) improves the activity of PPT, compared to the 3.0 kb full-length insulator, while still maintaining prostate cell specificity and releasing 1.4 kb of space for insertion of additional sequences. To improve the ability of the virus to efficiently lyse infected cells and persist in vivo, we inserted the adenovirus death protein (ADP) or the full-length adenovirus E3 region. The oncolytic activity of PPT-E1A-based viruses was studied using MTS, crystal violet and replication assays. The virus with the reintroduced full-length E3-region (Ad[i/PPT-E1A, E3]) showed the highest cytopathic effects in vitro. Furthermore, this virus suppressed the growth of aggressively growing prostate tumors in vivo. Therefore, we conclude that Ad[i/PPT-E1A, E3] is a prostate-specific oncolytic adenovirus with a high potential for treating localized prostate cancer.

  17. Addressing dual agency: getting specific about the expectations of professionalism.

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    Tilburt, Jon C

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism requires that physicians uphold the best interests of patients while simultaneously insuring just use of health care resources. Current articulations of these obligations like the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation's Physician Charter do not reconcile how these obligations fit together when they conflict. This is the problem of dual agency. The most common ways of dealing with dual agency: "bunkering"--physicians act as though societal cost issues are not their problem; "bailing"--physicians assume that they are merely agents of society and deliver care typically based on a strongly consequentialist public health ethic; or "balancing"--a vaguely specified attempt to uphold both patient welfare and societal need for judicious resource use simultaneously--all fail. Here I propose how the problem of dual agency might begin to be addressed with rigor and consistency. Without dealing with the dual agency problem and getting more specific about how to reconcile its norms when they conflict, the expectations of professionalism risk being written off as cute, nonbinding aphorisms from the medical profession.

  18. Oncolytic viruses as anticancer vaccines

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    Norman eWoller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy has shown impressive results in preclinical studies and first promising therapeutic outcomes in clinical trials as well. Since viruses are known for a long time as excellent vaccination agents, oncolytic viruses are now designed as novel anticancer agents combining the aspect of lysis-dependent cytoreductive activity with concomitant induction of antitumoral immune responses. Antitumoral immune activation by oncolytic virus infection of tumor tissue comprises both, immediate effects of innate immunity and also adaptive responses for long lasting antitumoral activity which is regarded as the most prominent challenge in clinical oncology. To date, the complex effects of a viral tumor infection on the tumor microenvironment and the consequences for the tumor-infiltrating immune cell compartment are poorly understood. However, there is more and more evidence that a tumor infection by an oncolytic virus opens up a number of options for further immunomodulating interventions such as systemic chemotherapy, generic immunostimulating strategies, dendritic cell-based vaccines, and antigenic libraries to further support clinical efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy.

  19. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldufsky, Joe; Sivendran, Shanthi; Harcharik, Sara; Pan, Michael; Bernardo, Sebastian; Stern, Richard H; Friedlander, Philip; Ruby, Carl E; Saenger, Yvonne; Kaufman, Howard L

    2013-01-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers. PMID:27512656

  20. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldufsky, Joe; Sivendran, Shanthi; Harcharik, Sara; Pan, Michael; Bernardo, Sebastian; Stern, Richard H; Friedlander, Philip; Ruby, Carl E; Saenger, Yvonne; Kaufman, Howard L

    2013-01-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers.

  1. Oncolytic Virotherapy for Hematological Malignancies

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    Swarna Bais

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological malignancies such as leukemias, lymphomas, multiple myeloma (MM, and the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs primarily affect adults and are difficult to treat. For high-risk disease, hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT can be used. However, in the setting of autologous HCT, relapse due to contamination of the autograft with cancer cells remains a major challenge. Ex vivo manipulations of the autograft to purge cancer cells using chemotherapies and toxins have been attempted. Because these past strategies lack specificity for malignant cells and often impair the normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, prior efforts to ex vivo purge autografts have resulted in prolonged cytopenias and graft failure. The ideal ex vivo purging agent would selectively target the contaminating cancer cells while spare normal stem and progenitor cells and would be applied quickly without toxicities to the recipient. One agent which meets these criteria is oncolytic viruses. This paper details experimental progress with reovirus, myxoma virus, measles virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, coxsackievirus, and vaccinia virus as well as requirements for translation of these results to the clinic.

  2. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viral Therapy: A Stride toward Selective Targeting of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchala, Dhaval S; Bhatt, Lokesh K; Prabhavalkar, Kedar S

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic viral therapy, which makes use of replication-competent lytic viruses, has emerged as a promising modality to treat malignancies. It has shown meaningful outcomes in both solid tumor and hematologic malignancies. Advancements during the last decade, mainly genetic engineering of oncolytic viruses have resulted in improved specificity and efficacy of oncolytic viruses in cancer therapeutics. Oncolytic viral therapy for treating cancer with herpes simplex virus-1 has been of particular interest owing to its range of benefits like: (a) large genome and power to infiltrate in the tumor, (b) easy access to manipulation with the flexibility to insert multiple transgenes, (c) infecting majority of the malignant cell types with quick replication in the infected cells and (d) as Anti-HSV agent to terminate HSV replication. This review provides an exhaustive list of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 along with their genetic alterations. It also encompasses the major developments in oncolytic herpes simplex-1 viral therapy and outlines the limitations and drawbacks of oncolytic herpes simplex viral therapy.

  3. CRISPR-Cas9 as a Powerful Tool for Efficient Creation of Oncolytic Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Webb, Eika; Lemoine, Nicholas Robert; Wang, Yaohe

    2016-03-07

    The development of oncolytic viruses has led to an emerging new class of cancer therapeutics. Although the safety profile has been encouraging, the transition of oncolytic viruses to the clinical setting has been a slow process due to modifications. Therefore, a new generation of more potent oncolytic viruses needs to be exploited, following our better understanding of the complex interactions between the tumor, its microenvironment, the virus, and the host immune response. The conventional method for creation of tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses is based on homologous recombination. However, the creation of new mutant oncolytic viruses with large genomes remains a challenge due to the multi-step process and low efficiency of homologous recombination. The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 has hugely advanced the potential to edit the genomes of various organisms due to the ability of Cas9 to target a specific genomic site by a single guide RNA. In this review, we discuss the CRISPR-Cas9 system as an efficient viral editing method for the creation of new oncolytic viruses, as well as its potential future applications in the development of oncolytic viruses. Further, this review discusses the potential of off-target effects as well as CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool for basic research into viral biology.

  4. Replication-selective oncolytic viruses in the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, Bart; van der Poel, Henk G

    2005-02-01

    In the search for novel strategies, oncolytic virotherapy has recently emerged as a viable approach to specifically kill tumor cells. Unlike conventional gene therapy, it uses replication competent viruses that are able to spread through tumor tissue by virtue of viral replication and concomitant cell lysis. Recent advances in molecular biology have allowed the design of several genetically modified viruses, such as adenovirus and herpes simplex virus that specifically replicate in, and kill tumor cells. On the other hand, viruses with intrinsic oncolytic capacity are also being evaluated for therapeutic purposes. In this review, an overview is given of the general mechanisms and genetic modifications by which these viruses achieve tumor cell-specific replication and antitumor efficacy. However, although generally the oncolytic efficacy of these approaches has been demonstrated in preclinical studies the therapeutic efficacy in clinical trails is still not optimal. Therefore, strategies are evaluated that could further enhance the oncolytic potential of conditionally replicating viruses. In this respect, the use of tumor-selective viruses in conjunction with other standard therapies seems most promising. However, still several hurdles regarding clinical limitations and safety issues should be overcome before this mode of therapy can become of clinical relevance.

  5. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldufsky J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Joe Goldufsky,1 Shanthi Sivendran,3 Sara Harcharik,4 Michael Pan,4 Sebastian Bernardo,4 Richard H Stern,5 Philip Friedlander,4 Carl E Ruby,1,2 Yvonne Saenger,4 Howard L Kaufman1,2 Departments of 1Immunology & Microbiology and 2Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL, USA 3Hematology/Oncology Medical Specialists, Lancaster General Health, Lancaster, PA, USA, and Departments of 4Medical Oncology and 5Radiology, Tisch Cancer Institute, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers. Keywords: cancer, gene therapy, oncolytic therapy, virus, treatment

  6. Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Alemany

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic use of viruses against cancer has been revived during the last two decades. Oncolytic viruses replicate and spread inside tumors, amplifying their cytotoxicity and simultaneously reversing the tumor immune suppression. Among different viruses, recombinant adenoviruses designed to replicate selectively in tumor cells have been clinically tested by intratumoral or systemic administration. Limited efficacy has been associated to poor tumor targeting, intratumoral spread, and virocentric immune responses. A deeper understanding of these three barriers will be required to design more effective oncolytic adenoviruses that, alone or combined with chemotherapy or immunotherapy, may become tools for oncologists.

  7. Sulfonimidamide analogs of oncolytic sulfonylureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, J E; Grindey, G B; Ehlhardt, W J; Ray, J E; Boder, G B; Bewley, J R; Klingerman, K K; Gates, S B; Rinzel, S M; Schultz, R M; Weir, L C; Worzalla, J F

    1997-03-14

    A series of sulfonimidamide analogs of the oncolytic diarylsulfonylureas was synthesized and evaluated for (1) in vitro cytotoxicity against CEM cells, (2) in vivo antitumor activity against subaxillary implanted 6C3HED lymphosarcoma, and (3) metabolic breakdown to the o-sulfate of p-chloroaniline. The separated enantiomers of one sulfonimidamide analog displayed very different activities in the in vivo screening model. In general, several analogs demonstrated excellent growth inhibitory activity in the 6C3HED model when dosed orally or intraperitoneally. A correlative structure-activity relationship to the oncolytic sulfonylureas was not apparent.

  8. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

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    Stephanie L. Swift

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system.

  9. Novel oncolytic viral therapies in patients with thoracic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Z

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Zeeshan Ahmad, Robert A Kratzke Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Transplantation, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is the use of replication-competent viruses to treat malignancies. The potential of oncolytic virotherapy as an approach to cancer therapy is based on historical evidence that certain viral infections can cause spontaneous remission of both hematologic and solid tumor malignancies. Oncolytic virotherapy may eliminate cancer cells through either direct oncolysis of infected tumor cells or indirect immune-mediated oncolysis of uninfected tumor cells. Recent advances in oncolytic virotherapy include the development of a wide variety of genetically attenuated RNA viruses with precise cellular tropism and the identification of cell-surface receptors that facilitate viral transfer to the tissue of interest. Current research is also focused on targeting metastatic disease by sustaining the release of progeny viruses from infected tumor cells and understanding indirect tumor cell killing through immune-mediated mechanisms of virotherapy. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate recent evidence on the clinical development of tissue-specific viruses capable of targeting tumor cells and eliciting secondary immune responses in lung cancers and mesothelioma. Keywords: lung cancer, mesothelioma, VSV, adenovirus, measles

  10. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Stephanie L.; Stojdl, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  11. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Cole; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity. PMID:26462293

  12. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Peters

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity.

  13. Oncolytic effects of a novel influenza A virus expressing interleukin-15 from the NS reading frame.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke van Rikxoort

    Full Text Available Oncolytic influenza A viruses with deleted NS1 gene (delNS1 replicate selectively in tumour cells with defective interferon response and/or activated Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signalling pathway. To develop a delNS1 virus with specific immunostimulatory properties, we used an optimised technology to insert the interleukin-15 (IL-15 coding sequence into the viral NS gene segment (delNS1-IL-15. DelNS1 and delNS1-IL-15 exerted similar oncolytic effects. Both viruses replicated and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis in interferon-defective melanoma cells. Virus replication was required for their oncolytic activity. Cisplatin enhanced the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses. The cytotoxic drug increased delNS1 replication and delNS1-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interference with MEK/ERK signalling by RNAi-mediated depletion or the MEK inhibitor U0126 did not affect the oncolytic effects of the delNS1 viruses. In oncolysis sensitive melanoma cells, delNS1-IL-15 (but not delNS1 infection resulted in the production of IL-15 levels ranging from 70 to 1140 pg/mL in the cell culture supernatants. The supernatants of delNS1-IL-15-infected (but not of delNS1-infected melanoma cells induced primary human natural killer cell-mediated lysis of non-infected tumour cells. In conclusion, we constructed a novel oncolytic influenza virus that combines the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses with immunostimulatory properties through production of functional IL-15. Moreover, we showed that the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses can be enhanced in combination with cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Phosphotyrosine Substrate Sequence Motifs for Dual Specificity Phosphatases.

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    Bryan M Zhao

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatases dephosphorylate tyrosine residues of proteins, whereas, dual specificity phosphatases (DUSPs are a subgroup of protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate not only Tyr(P residue, but also the Ser(P and Thr(P residues of proteins. The DUSPs are linked to the regulation of many cellular functions and signaling pathways. Though many cellular targets of DUSPs are known, the relationship between catalytic activity and substrate specificity is poorly defined. We investigated the interactions of peptide substrates with select DUSPs of four types: MAP kinases (DUSP1 and DUSP7, atypical (DUSP3, DUSP14, DUSP22 and DUSP27, viral (variola VH1, and Cdc25 (A-C. Phosphatase recognition sites were experimentally determined by measuring dephosphorylation of 6,218 microarrayed Tyr(P peptides representing confirmed and theoretical phosphorylation motifs from the cellular proteome. A broad continuum of dephosphorylation was observed across the microarrayed peptide substrates for all phosphatases, suggesting a complex relationship between substrate sequence recognition and optimal activity. Further analysis of peptide dephosphorylation by hierarchical clustering indicated that DUSPs could be organized by substrate sequence motifs, and peptide-specificities by phylogenetic relationships among the catalytic domains. The most highly dephosphorylated peptides represented proteins from 29 cell-signaling pathways, greatly expanding the list of potential targets of DUSPs. These newly identified DUSP substrates will be important for examining structure-activity relationships with physiologically relevant targets.

  15. Measles to the Rescue: A Review of Oncolytic Measles Virus

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    Sarah Aref

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapeutic agents are likely to become serious contenders in cancer treatment. The vaccine strain of measles virus is an agent with an impressive range of oncolytic activity in pre-clinical trials with increasing evidence of safety and efficacy in early clinical trials. This paramyxovirus vaccine has a proven safety record and is amenable to careful genetic modification in the laboratory. Overexpression of the measles virus (MV receptor CD46 in many tumour cells may direct the virus to preferentially enter transformed cells and there is increasing awareness of the importance of nectin-4 and signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM in oncolysis. Successful attempts to retarget MV by inserting genes for tumour-specific ligands to antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CD20, CD38, and by engineering the virus to express synthetic microRNA targeting sequences, and “blinding” the virus to the natural viral receptors are exciting measures to increase viral specificity and enhance the oncolytic effect. Sodium iodine symporter (NIS can also be expressed by MV, which enables in vivo tracking of MV infection. Radiovirotherapy using MV-NIS, chemo-virotherapy to convert prodrugs to their toxic metabolites, and immune-virotherapy including incorporating antibodies against immune checkpoint inhibitors can also increase the oncolytic potential. Anti-viral host immune responses are a recognized barrier to the success of MV, and approaches such as transporting MV to the tumour sites by carrier cells, are showing promise. MV Clinical trials are producing encouraging preliminary results in ovarian cancer, myeloma and cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and the outcome of currently open trials in glioblastoma multiforme, mesothelioma and squamous cell carcinoma are eagerly anticipated.

  16. Chemotherapy and Oncolytic Virotherapy: Advanced Tactics in the War against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eNguyen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a traitorous archenemy that threatens our survival. Its ability to evade detection and adapt to various cancer therapies means that it is a moving target that becomes increasingly difficult to attack. Through technological advancements we have developed sophisticated weapons to fight off tumor growth and invasion. However, if we are to stand a chance in this war against cancer, advanced tactics will be required to maximize the use of our available resources. Oncolytic viruses are multi-functional cancer-fighters that can be engineered to suit many different strategies; in particular, their retooling can facilitate increased capacity for direct tumor killing (oncolytic virotherapy and elicit adaptive antitumor immune responses (oncolytic immunotherapy. However, administration of these modified oncolytic viruses alone, rarely induces successful regression of established tumors. This may be attributed to host antiviral immunity that acts to eliminate viral particles, as well as the capacity for tumors to adapt to therapeutic selective pressure. It has been shown that various chemotherapeutic drugs with distinct functional properties can potentiate the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic viruses. In this review, we summarize the chemotherapeutic combinatorial strategies used to optimize virally-induced destruction of tumors. With a particular focus on pharmaceutical immunomodulators, we discuss how specific therapeutic contexts may alter the effects of these synergistic combinations and their implications for future clinical use.

  17. Oncolytic Newcastle Disease Virus as treatment for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.R.A. Buijs (Pascal)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In this thesis, experiments are presented that were undertaken to develop oncolytic NDV for the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Oncolytic viruses (OVs), reported first halfway the previous century, have undergone a tremendous evolution from anecdotal experimental an

  18. DMPD: DUSP meet immunology: dual specificity MAPK phosphatases in control of theinflammatory response. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17114416 DUSP meet immunology: dual specificity MAPK phosphatases in control of theinfl...ml) (.csml) Show DUSP meet immunology: dual specificity MAPK phosphatases in control of theinflammatory resp...onse. PubmedID 17114416 Title DUSP meet immunology: dual specificity MAPK phospha...tases in control of theinflammatory response. Authors Lang R, Hammer M, Mages J. Publication J Immunol. 2006

  19. Oncolytic myxoma virus: the path to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Winnie M; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2013-09-06

    Many common neoplasms are still noncurative with current standards of cancer therapy. More therapeutic modalities need to be developed to significantly prolong the lives of patients and eventually cure a wider spectrum of cancers. Oncolytic virotherapy is one of the promising new additions to clinical cancer therapeutics. Successful oncolytic virotherapy in the clinic will be those strategies that best combine tumor cell oncolysis with enhanced immune responses against tumor antigens. The current candidate oncolytic viruses all share the common property that they are relatively nonpathogenic to humans, yet they have the ability to replicate selectively in human cancer cells and induce cancer regression by direct oncolysis and/or induction of improved anti-tumor immune responses. Many candidate oncolytic viruses are in various stages of clinical and preclinical development. One such preclinical candidate is myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family that, in its natural setting, exhibits a very restricted host range and is only pathogenic to European rabbits. Despite its narrow host range in nature, MYXV has been shown to productively infect various classes of human cancer cells. Several preclinical in vivo modeling studies have demonstrated that MYXV is an attractive and safe candidate oncolytic virus, and hence, MYXV is currently being developed as a potential therapeutic for several cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. This review highlights the preclinical cancer models that have shown the most promise for translation of MYXV into human clinical trials.

  20. The immunoregulatory properties of oncolytic myxoma virus and their implications in therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; McFadden, Grant

    2010-12-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus with a strict rabbit-specific host-tropism for pathogenesis. The immunoregulatory factors encoded by MYXV can suppress some functions of immune effectors from other species. We review their mechanisms of action, implications in therapeutics and the potential to improve MYXV as an oncolytic agent in humans.

  1. The immunoregulatory properties of oncolytic myxoma virus and their implications in therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a poxvirus with a strict rabbit-specific host-tropism for pathogenesis. The immunoregulatory factors encoded by MYXV can suppress some functions of immune effectors from other species. We review their mechanisms of action, implications in therapeutics and the potential to improve MYXV as an oncolytic agent in humans.

  2. Comparison of Liver Detargeting Strategies for Systemic Therapy with Oncolytic Adenovirus Serotype 5

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    Tien V. Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses would ideally be of use for systemic therapy to treat disseminated cancer. To do this safely, this may require multiple layers of cancer specificity. The pharmacology and specificity of oncolytic adenoviruses can be modified by (1 physical retargeting, (2 physical detargeting, (3 chemical shielding, or (4 by modifying the ability of viral early gene products to selectively activate in cancer versus normal cells. We explored the utility of these approaches with oncolytic adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 in immunocompetent Syrian hamsters bearing subcutaneous HaK tumors. After a single intravenous injection to reach the distant tumors, the physically hepatocyte-detargeted virus Ad5-hexon-BAP was more effective than conditionally replicating Ad5-dl1101/07 with mutations in its E1A protein. When these control or Ad5 treated animals were treated a second time by intratumoral injection, prior exposure to Ad5 did not affect tumor growth, suggesting that anti-Ad immunity neither prevented treatment nor amplified anti-tumor immune responses. Ad5-dl1101/07 was next chemically shielded with polyethylene glycol (PEG. While 5 kDa of PEG blunted pro-inflammatory IL-6 production induced by Ad5-dl1101/07, this shielding reduced Ad oncolytic activity.

  3. Structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 27 at 2.38 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S., E-mail: waughd@mail.nih.gov [National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 27 (DUSP27) is reported at 2.38 Å resolution. There are over 100 genes in the human genome that encode protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and approximately 60 of these are classified as dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs). Although many dual-specificity phosphatases are still not well characterized, novel functions have been discovered for some of them that have led to new insights into a variety of biological processes and the molecular basis for certain diseases. Indeed, as the functions of DUSPs continue to be elucidated, a growing number of them are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer, diabetes and inflammatory disorders. Here, the overexpression, purification and structure determination of DUSP27 at 2.38 Å resolution are presented.

  4. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

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    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  5. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo "purging" strategy with oncolytic Myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy.

  6. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsang JJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jovian J Tsang,1,2 Harold L Atkins2,3 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Ottawa, 2Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 3Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation (HSCT to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Keywords: hematopoietic stem cells, oncolytic virus, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stem cell graft purging, hematopoietic malignancy, graft vs host disease

  7. Increasing the Efficacy of Oncolytic Adenovirus Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. M. Wold

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad vectors present a new modality to treat cancer. These vectors attack tumors via replicating in and killing cancer cells. Upon completion of the vector replication cycle, the infected tumor cell lyses and releases progeny virions that are capable of infecting neighboring tumor cells. Repeated cycles of vector replication and cell lysis can destroy the tumor. Numerous Ad vectors have been generated and tested, some of them reaching human clinical trials. In 2005, the first oncolytic Ad was approved for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer by the Chinese FDA. Oncolytic Ads have been proven to be safe, with no serious adverse effects reported even when high doses of the vector were injected intravenously. The vectors demonstrated modest anti-tumor effect when applied as a single agent; their efficacy improved when they were combined with another modality. The efficacy of oncolytic Ads can be improved using various approaches, including vector design, delivery techniques, and ancillary treatment, which will be discussed in this review.

  8. Doxorubicin-enriched, ALDHbr mouse breast cancer stem cells are treatable to oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Xiufen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary objective of this study was to test whether oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 could eradicate chemoresistant cancer stem cells (CSCs. Methods The fluorescent aldefluor reagent-based technique was used to identify and isolate ALDHbr cells as CSCs from the 4T1 murine breast cancer cell line. The presence of ALDHbr 4T1 cells was also examined in 4T1 breast cancer transplanted in immune-competent syngeneic mice. Results Compared with ALDHlo cells, ALDHbr cells had a markedly higher ability to form tumor spheres in vitro and a higher tumorigenic potential in vivo. ALDHbr cells also exhibited increased doxorubicin resistance in vitro, which correlated with a selective increase in the percentage of ALDHbr cells after doxorubicin treatment and an increased expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, a known chemoresistance factor. In contrast, oncolytic HSV1 was able to kill ALDHbr cells in vitro and even more markedly in vivo. Furthermore, in in vivo studies, systemic administration of doxorubicin followed by intratumoral injection of oncolytic HSV1 resulted in much more significant suppression of tumor growth with increased median survival period compared with each treatment given alone (p+ T lymphocytes were induced by oncolytic HSV1, no significant specific T cell response against CSCs was detected in vivo. Conclusions These results suggested that the use of oncolytic HSV1 following doxorubicin treatment may help eradicate residual chemoresistant CSCs in vivo.

  9. Patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells as delivery vehicles for oncolytic virotherapy: novel state-of-the-art technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Manuel; García-Castro, Javier; Melen, Gustavo J; González-Murillo, África; Franco-Luzón, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is gaining interest in the clinic as a new weapon against cancer. In vivo administration of oncolytic viruses showed important limitations that decrease their effectiveness very significantly: the antiviral immune response causes the elimination of the therapeutic effect, and the poor natural ability of oncolytic viruses to infect micrometastatic lesions significantly minimizes the effective dose of virus. This review will focus on updating the technical and scientific foundations of one of the strategies developed to overcome these limitations, ie, using cells as vehicles for oncolytic viruses. Among many candidates, a special type of adult stem cell, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have already been used in the clinic as cell vehicles for oncolytic viruses, partly due to the fact that these cells are actively being evaluated for other indications. MSC carrier cells are used as Trojan horses loaded with oncoviruses, are administered systemically, and release their cargos at the right places. MSCs are equipped with an array of molecules involved in cell arrest in the capillaries (integrins and selectins), migration toward specific parenchymal locations within tissues (chemokine receptors), and invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (proteases). In addition to anatomical targeting capacity, MSCs have a well-recognized role in modulating immune responses by affecting cells of the innate (antigen-presenting cells, natural killer cells) and adaptive immune system (effector and regulatory lymphocytes). Therefore, carrier MSCs may also modulate the immune responses taking place after therapy, ie, the antiviral and the antitumor immune responses.

  10. Selective replication of oncolytic virus M1 results in a bystander killing effect that is potentiated by Smac mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Haipeng; Liang, Jiankai; Tan, Yaqian; Cavenee, Webster K; Yan, Guangmei

    2017-06-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment modality that uses native or genetically modified viruses that selectively replicate in and kill tumor cells. Viruses represent a type of pathogen-associated molecular pattern and thereby induce the up-regulation of dozens of cytokines via activating the host innate immune system. Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic compounds (SMCs), which antagonize the function of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and induce apoptosis, sensitize tumor cells to multiple cytokines. Therefore, we sought to determine whether SMCs sensitize tumor cells to cytokines induced by the oncolytic M1 virus, thus enhancing a bystander killing effect. Here, we report that SMCs potentiate the oncolytic effect of M1 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. This strengthened oncolytic efficacy resulted from the enhanced bystander killing effect caused by the M1 virus via cytokine induction. Through a microarray analysis and subsequent validation using recombinant cytokines, we identified IL-8, IL-1A, and TRAIL as the key cytokines in the bystander killing effect. Furthermore, SMCs increased the replication of M1, and the accumulation of virus protein induced irreversible endoplasmic reticulum stress- and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated apoptosis. Nevertheless, the combined treatment with M1 and SMCs had little effect on normal and human primary cells. Because SMCs selectively and significantly enhance the bystander killing effect and the replication of oncolytic virus M1 specifically in cancer cells, this combined treatment may represent a promising therapeutic strategy.

  11. High voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, William C. (Inventor); Blanco, Mario (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides high capacity and high voltage Li-ion batteries that have a carbonaceous cathode and a nonaqueous electrolyte solution comprising LiF salt and an anion receptor that binds the fluoride ion. The batteries can comprise dual intercalating electrode Li ion batteries. Methods of the present invention use a cathode and electrode pair, wherein each of the electrodes reversibly intercalate ions provided by a LiF salt to make a high voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion battery. The present methods and systems provide high-capacity batteries particularly useful in powering devices where minimizing battery mass is important.

  12. Heterogeneous delivery is a barrier to the translational advancement of oncolytic virotherapy for treating solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller AC

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Amber C Miller,1,2 Stephen J Russell2,3 1Mayo Graduate School, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA; 2Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA; 3Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA Abstract: Oncolytic viruses are a promising experimental anticancer therapy currently undergoing clinical translation. The development of oncolytic virotherapy offers a potential solution to the elusive “one-shot”cancer cure by providing targeted therapy to selectively infect and kill cancer cells while provoking adaptive anticancer immune responses as protection against distant metastasis and recurrent tumor challenge. While this technology has overcome barriers to safety and efficacy through cancer-specific targeting techniques, in order to reach full therapeutic potential, oncolytic therapies must still overcome barriers to intratumoral delivery and spread that result in heterogeneous intratumoral delivery and nonuniform response. This review will discuss barriers to oncolytic virotherapy translation related to mechanisms of delivering virus via tumor vasculature and distributing virus throughout the tumor microenvironment. Barriers include extravasation into the tumor that is dependent on adequate blood flow, tissue perfusion, and tumoral enhanced permeability and retention for transvascular transport. Subsequently, virions must undergo interstitial transport against dense stromal barriers and high interstitial fluid pressure to initiate infection. In order to achieve massive tumor regression, infection must spread to cover large volumes of tumor mass. Furthermore, virus bioavailability is quickly dampened upon systemic administration due to neutralization and sequestration. These barriers to delivery limit the amount of virus that effectively reaches and spreads within the tumor, forcing dose increases that impinge upon limits of production and increase possibility of adverse

  13. Specific survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons for detection of human bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qiang WANG; Jun ZHAO; Jin ZENG; Kai-jie WU; Yu-le CHEN; Xin-ya ng WANG; Luke S CHANG; Da-lin HE

    2011-01-01

    Survivin molecular beacons can be used to detectbladder cancer cells in urine samples non-invasively.The aim of this study is to improve the specificity of detection of bladder cancer cells using survivin dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons (FRET MBs) that have fluorophores forming one donor-acceptor pair.Methods:Survivin-targeting dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer molecular beacons with unique target sequences were designed,which had no overlap with the other genes in the apoptosis inhibitor protein family.Human bladder cancer cell lines 5637,253J and T24,as well as the exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults and patients with bladder cancer were examined.Images of cells were taken using a laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.For assays using dual FRET MBs,the excitation wavelength was 488 nm,and the emission detection wavelengths were 520+20 nm and 560+20 nm,respectively.Results:The human bladder cancer cell lines and exfoliated cells in the urine of patients with bladder cancer incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs exhibited strong fluorescence signals.In contrast,no fluorescence was detected in the survivin-negative human dermal fibroblasts-adult (HDF-a) cells or exfoliated cells in the urine of healthy adults incubated with the survivin dual FRET MBs.Conclusion:The results suggest that the survivin dual FRET MBs may be used as a specific and non-invasive method for early detection and follow-up of patients with bladder cancer.

  14. Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    the rat model. The therapeutic effect of HSV-1 oncolysis on meningeal metastases was presented ( oral ) at the annual meeting of the World Molecular...Abstracts, and Presentations Presentations & Abstracts: 1. Oral Presentation at WMIC, Seoul. “Novel oncolytic HSV-1 therapeutics for breast cancer...tomography of herpes simplex virus 1 oncolysis. Cancer Research. 2007; 67(7): 3295. 3. Kuruppu D, Tanabe KK. Viral oncolysis by herpes simplex virus and

  15. Immunotherapeutic Potential of Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eThorne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of oncolytic viral therapy was based on the hypothesis that engineering tumor-selectivity into the replication potential of viruses would permit direct destruction of tumor cells as a result of viral-mediated lysis, resulting in amplification of the therapy exclusively within the tumor environment. The immune response raised by the virus was considered to be necessary for the safety of the approach, but also something of a hindrance to optimal therapeutic activity and repeat dosing. However the pre-clinical and subsequent clinical success of several oncolytic viruses expressing selected cytokines has demonstrated the potential for harnessing the immune response as an additional and beneficial mechanism of therapeutic activity within the platform. Over the last few years a variety of novel approaches have been incorporated to try to enhance this immunotherapeutic activity. Several innovative and subtle approaches have moved far beyond the expression of a single cytokine transgene, with the hope of optimizing anti-tumor immunity while having minimal detrimental impact on viral oncolytic activity.

  16. Oncolytic virotherapy: the questions and the promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Laure Aurelian Department of Pharmacology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is a new strategy to reduce tumor burden through selective virus replication in rapidly proliferating cells. Oncolytic viruses are members of at least ten virus families, each with its advantages and disadvantages. Here, I briefly review the recent advances and key challenges, as exemplified by the best-studied platforms. Recent advances include preclinical proof of feasibility, clinical evidence of tolerability and effectiveness, and the development of new strategies to improve efficacy. These include engineered tumor selectivity and expression of antitumorigenic genes that could function independently of virus replication, identification of combinatorial therapies that accelerate intratumoral virus propagation, and modification of immune responses and vascular delivery for treatment of metastatic disease. Key challenges are to select “winners” from the distinct oncolytic platforms that can stimulate anti-cancer immunity without affecting virus replication and can lyse cancer stem cells, which are most likely responsible for tumor maintenance, aggressiveness, and recurrence. Preventing the emergence of resistant tumor cells during virotherapy through the activation of multiple death pathways, the development of a better understanding of the mechanisms of cancer stem-cell lysis, and the development of more meaningful preclinical animal models are additional challenges for the next-generation of engineered viruses. Keywords: tumor cell lysis, virus replication, tumor selectivity, programmed cell death, immune response

  17. Design and generation of DVD-Ig™ molecules for dual-specific targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiammarino, Enrico; Ghayur, Tariq; Liu, Junjian

    2012-01-01

    The dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig™) protein is a new type of dual-specific IgG. As a novel therapeutic class, the great potential of the DVD-Ig protein is to simultaneously target two mediators of disease by a single pharmaceutical entity. The molecule contains an Fc region and constant regions in a configuration similar to a conventional IgG; however, the DVD-Ig protein is unique in that each arm of the molecule contains two variable domains (VDs). The VDs within an arm are linked in tandem and can possess different binding specificities. Here, we discuss critical design features of the DVD-Ig protein and describe a methodology for cloning, expressing, and purifying the molecules.

  18. Arabidopsis Yak1 protein (AtYak1) is a dual specificity protein kinase

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2015-10-09

    Yak1 is a member of dual-specificity Tyr phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) that are evolutionarily conserved. The downstream targets of Yak1 and their functions are largely unknown. Here, a homologous protein AtYAK1 was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and the phosphoprotein profiles of the wild type and an atyak1 mutant were compared on two-dimensional gel following Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein gel staining. Annexin1, Annexin2 and RBD were phosphorylated at serine/ threonine residues by the AtYak1 kinase. Annexin1, Annexin2 and Annexin4 were also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues. Our study demonstrated that AtYak1 is a dual specificity protein kinase in Arabidopsis that may regulate the phosphorylation status of the annexin family proteins.

  19. Structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 27 at 2.38 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S. (NCI)

    2012-03-26

    There are over 100 genes in the human genome that encode protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and approximately 60 of these are classified as dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs). Although many dual-specificity phosphatases are still not well characterized, novel functions have been discovered for some of them that have led to new insights into a variety of biological processes and the molecular basis for certain diseases. Indeed, as the functions of DUSPs continue to be elucidated, a growing number of them are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer, diabetes and inflammatory disorders. Here, the overexpression, purification and structure determination of DUSP27 at 2.38 {angstrom} resolution are presented.

  20. Patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells as delivery vehicles for oncolytic virotherapy: novel state-of-the-art technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Manuel Ramírez,1 Javier García-Castro,2 Gustavo J Melen,1 África González-Murillo,1 Lidia Franco-Luzón1 1Oncohematología, Hospital Universitario Niño Jesús, 2Unidad de Biotecnología Celular, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is gaining interest in the clinic as a new weapon against cancer. In vivo administration of oncolytic viruses showed important limitations that decrease their effectiveness very significantly: the antiviral immune response causes the elimination of the therapeutic effect, and the poor natural ability of oncolytic viruses to infect micrometastatic lesions significantly minimizes the effective dose of virus. This review will focus on updating the technical and scientific foundations of one of the strategies developed to overcome these limitations, ie, using cells as vehicles for oncolytic viruses. Among many candidates, a special type of adult stem cell, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, have already been used in the clinic as cell vehicles for oncolytic viruses, partly due to the fact that these cells are actively being evaluated for other indications. MSC carrier cells are used as Trojan horses loaded with oncoviruses, are administered systemically, and release their cargos at the right places. MSCs are equipped with an array of molecules involved in cell arrest in the capillaries (integrins and selectins, migration toward specific parenchymal locations within tissues (chemokine receptors, and invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (proteases. In addition to anatomical targeting capacity, MSCs have a well-recognized role in modulating immune responses by affecting cells of the innate (antigen-presenting cells, natural killer cells and adaptive immune system (effector and regulatory lymphocytes. Therefore, carrier MSCs may also modulate the immune responses taking place after therapy, ie, the antiviral and the antitumor immune responses. Keywords: virotherapy

  1. Questing for an optimal, universal viral agent for oncolytic virotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Paiva, L R; Ferreira, S C

    2011-01-01

    One of the most promising strategies to treat cancer is attacking it with viruses designed to exploit specific altered pathways. Here, the effects of oncolytic virotherapy on tumors having compact, papillary and disconnected morphologies are investigated through computer simulations of a multiscale model coupling macroscopic reaction diffusion equations for the nutrients with microscopic stochastic rules for the actions of individual cells and viruses. The interaction among viruses and tumor cells involves cell infection, intracellular virus replication and release of new viruses in the tissue after cell lysis. The evolution in time of both viral load and cancer cell population, as well as the probabilities for tumor eradication were evaluated for a range of multiplicities of infection, viral entries and burst sizes. It was found that in immunosuppressed hosts, the antitumor efficacy of a virus is primarily determined by its entry efficiency, its replicative capacity within the tumor, and its ability to sprea...

  2. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan KJ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available KJ Allan,1,2 David F Stojdl,1–3 SL Swift1 1Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO Research Institute, 2Department of Biology, Microbiology and Immunology, 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. Keywords: oncolytic, virus, screen, high-throughput, cancer, chemical, genomic, immunotherapy

  3. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2014-12-15

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the immune response of the patient to the virus infection limits the utility of the therapy, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using nonspecific pharmacologic inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumors, and robust monocyte, T-, and NK cell infiltration 3 days after MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumor-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumor-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of cyclophosphamide-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multifaceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with cyclophosphamide-mediated lymphoablation.

  4. Oncolytic virotherapy for treatment of breast cancer, including triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Simona; Koski, Anniina; Liikanen, Ilkka; Vassilev, Lotta; Oksanen, Minna; Siurala, Mikko; Heiskanen, Raita; Hakonen, Tiina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by several distinct biological subtypes, among which triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is one associated with a poor prognosis. Oncolytic virus replication is an immunogenic phenomenon, and viruses can be armed with immunostimulatory molecules to boost virus triggered antitumoral immune responses. Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a chemotherapy drug that is associated with cytotoxicity and immunosuppression at higher doses, whereas immunostimulatory and anti-angiogenic properties are observed at low continuous dosage. Therefore, the combination of oncolytic immuno-virotherapy with low-dose CP is an appealing approach. We investigated the potency of oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF on a TNBC cell line and in vivo in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model, in combination with low-dose CP or its main active metabolite 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HP-CP). Furthermore, we summarized the breast cancer-specific human data on this virus from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP). Low-dose CP increased the efficacy of Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF in vitro and in a TNBC mouse model. In ATAP, treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. Thirteen out of 16 breast cancer patients treated were evaluable for possible benefits with modified RECIST 1.1 criteria: 1 patient had a minor response, 2 had stable disease (SD), and 10 had progressive disease (PD). One patient is alive at 1,771 d after treatment. Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF in combination with low-dose CP showed promising efficacy in preclinical studies and possible antitumor activity in breast cancer patients refractory to other forms of therapy. This preliminary data supports continuing the clinical development of oncolytic adenoviruses for treatment of breast cancer, including TNBC.

  5. Identification of the structural features that mediate binding specificity in the recognition of STAT proteins by dual-specificity phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Christophe; Sticht, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins is regulated by dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs) with high substrate specificity. Although experiments have provided useful information about the phosphatase activity and the specificity for STATs, there is up-to-date no data at a molecular level to explain the specific recognition of STAT substrates by this subfamily of phosphatases. Here, a combined approach of molecular modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations was used to address the binding between DSPs and their STAT substrates. We identified a binding interface at the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain of the DSP VHR that interacts with the SH2-domain of STAT5. This finding is consistent with previous mutational data and supports a "two-step" mechanism for the dephosphorylation event. Application of the same approach suggests the presence of a similar interface between the viral DSP VH1 and STAT1. Furthermore, the interaction network at this interface provides an explanation for the specificity of the DSP-STAT recognition.

  6. Structure of Human Dual Specificity Protein Phosphatase 23, VHZ, Enzyme-Substrate/Product Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal,R.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a crucial role in mitogenic signal transduction and regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Dual specificity protein phosphatase 23 (DUSP23) or VHZ mediates dephosphorylation of phospho-tyrosyl (pTyr) and phospho-seryl/threonyl (pSer/pThr) residues in specific proteins. In vitro, it can dephosphorylate p44ERK1 but not p54SAPK-{beta} and enhance activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Human VHZ, the smallest of the catalytically active protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) reported to date (150 residues), is a class I Cys-based PTP and bears the distinctive active site signature motif HCXXGXXRS(T). We present the crystal structure of VHZ determined at 1.93 angstrom resolution. The polypeptide chain adopts the typical a{beta}a PTP fold, giving rise to a shallow active site cleft that supports dual phosphorylated substrate specificity. Within our crystals, the Thr-135-Tyr-136 from a symmetry-related molecule bind in the active site with a malate ion, where they mimic the phosphorylated TY motif of the MAPK activation loop in an enzyme-substrate/product complex. Analyses of intermolecular interactions between the enzyme and this pseudo substrate/product along with functional analysis of Phe-66, Leu-97, and Phe-99 residues provide insights into the mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis in VHZ.

  7. Inhibition of Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO in Glioblastoma Cells by Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Reinhart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful oncolytic virus treatment of malignant glioblastoma multiforme depends on widespread tumor-specific lytic virus replication and escape from mitigating innate immune responses to infection. Here we characterize a new HSV vector, JD0G, that is deleted for ICP0 and the joint sequences separating the unique long and short elements of the viral genome. We observed that JD0G replication was enhanced in certain glioblastoma cell lines compared to HEL cells, suggesting that a vector backbone deleted for ICP0 may be useful for treatment of glioblastoma. The innate immune response to virus infection can potentially impede oncolytic vector replication in human tumors. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is expressed in response to interferon γ (IFNγ and has been linked to both antiviral functions and to the immune escape of tumor cells. We observed that IFNγ treatment of human glioblastoma cells induced the expression of IDO and that this expression was quelled by infection with both wild-type and JD0G viruses. The role of IDO in inhibiting virus replication and the connection of this protein to the escape of tumor cells from immune surveillance suggest that IDO downregulation by HSV infection may enhance the oncolytic activity of vectors such as JD0G.

  8. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Jovian J; Atkins, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT.

  9. GP73-regulated oncolytic adenoviruses possess potent killing effect on human liver cancer stem-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Liu, Tao; Yang, Yu; Xie, Wenjie; Liu, Xianglei; Huang, Fang; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Xiumei; Liu, Xinyuan; Wang, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, are highly metastatic, chemo-resistant and tumorigenic, and are critical for cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. Oncolytic adenovirus could targetedly kill CSCs and has been acted as a promising anticancer agent. Currently, a novel GP73-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 was constructed to specifically treat liver cancer and exhibited obvious cytotoxicity effect. However, there remains to be confirmed that whether GD55 could effectively eliminate liver CSCs. We first utilized the suspension culture to enrich the liver CSCs-like cells, which acquires the properties of liver CSCs in self-renewal, differentiation, quiescence, chemo-resistance and tumorigenicity. The results indicated that GD55 elicited more significant cytotoxicity and stronger oncolytic effect in liver CSC-like cells compared to common oncolytic virus ZD55. Additionally, GD55 possessed the greater efficacy in suppressing the growth of implanted tumors derived from liver CSC-like cells than ZD55. Furthermore, GD55 induced remarkable apoptosis of liver CSC-like cells in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the propogation of cells and angiogenesis in xenograft tumor tissues. Thus, GD55 may virtually represent an attractive therapeutic agent for targeting liver CSCs to achieve better clinical outcomes for HCC patients. PMID:27121064

  10. Oncolytic virotherapy for pediatric malignancies: future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters AM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Alicia M Waters,1 Gregory K Friedman,2 Eric K Ring,2 Elizabeth A Beierle1 1Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology-Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Pediatric solid tumors remain a major health concern, with nearly 16,000 children diagnosed each year. Of those, ~2,000 succumb to their disease, and survivors often suffer from lifelong disability secondary to toxic effects of current treatments. Countless multimodality ­treatment regimens are being explored to make advances against this deadly disease. One targeted treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy. Conditionally replicating viruses can infect tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Four viruses have been advanced to pediatric clinical trials, including herpes simplex virus-1, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of each virus, pediatric preclinical studies conducted to date, past and ongoing pediatric clinical trials, and potential future direction for these novel viral therapeutics. Keywords: oncolytic virus, herpes simplex virus, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, vaccinia

  11. Dual and multi-stimuli responsive polymeric nanoparticles for programmed site-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, Chao; Klok, Harm-Anton; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-05-01

    In the past decades, polymeric nanoparticles have emerged as a most promising and viable technology platform for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As vehicles, ideal nanoparticles are obliged to possess high drug loading levels, deliver drug to the specific pathological site and/or target cells without drug leakage on the way, while rapidly unload drug at the site of action. To this end, various "intelligent" polymeric nanoparticles that release drugs in response to an internal or external stimulus such as pH, redox, temperature, magnetic and light have been actively pursued. These stimuli-responsive nanoparticles have demonstrated, though to varying degrees, improved in vitro and/or in vivo drug release profiles. In an effort to further improve drug release performances, novel dual and multi-stimuli responsive polymeric nanoparticles that respond to a combination of two or more signals such as pH/temperature, pH/redox, pH/magnetic field, temperature/reduction, double pH, pH and diols, temperature/magnetic field, temperature/enzyme, temperature/pH/redox, temperature/pH/magnetic, pH/redox/magnetic, temperature/redox/guest molecules, and temperature/pH/guest molecules have recently been developed. Notably, these combined responses take place either simultaneously at the pathological site or in a sequential manner from nanoparticle preparation, nanoparticle transporting pathways, to cellular compartments. These dual and multi-stimuli responsive polymeric nanoparticles have shown unprecedented control over drug delivery and release leading to superior in vitro and/or in vivo anti-cancer efficacy. With programmed site-specific drug delivery feature, dual and multi-stimuli responsive nanoparticulate drug formulations have tremendous potential for targeted cancer therapy. In this review paper, we highlight the recent exciting developments in dual and multi-stimuli responsive polymeric nanoparticles for precision drug delivery applications, with a particular focus

  12. Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with Hsp70 gene exerts effective antitumor efficacy in gastric cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Ji, Weidan; Hu, Huanzhang; Ma, Juming; Li, Xiaoya; Mei, Weiqun; Xu, Yang; Hu, Huizhen; Yan, Yan; Song, Qizhe; Li, Zhigang; Su, Changqing

    2014-01-15

    Gene therapy is a promising adjuvant therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. To overcome the limitations of current gene therapy, such as poor transfection efficiency of vectors, low levels of transgene expression and lack of tumor targeting, the Survivin promoter was used to regulate the selective replication of oncolytic adenovirus in tumor cells, and the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) gene was loaded as the anticancer transgene to generate an AdSurp-Hsp70 viral therapy system. The efficacy of this targeted immunotherapy was examined in gastric cancer. The experiments showed that the oncolytic adenovirus can selectively replicate in and lyse the Survivin-positive gastric cancer cells, without significant toxicity to normal cells. AdSurp-Hsp70 reduced viability of cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth of gastric cancer xenografts in immuno-deficient and immuno-reconstruction mouse models. AdSurp-Hsp70 produced dual antitumor effects due to viral replication and high Hsp70 expression. This therapeutic system used the Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus vector to mediate targeted expression of the Hsp70 gene and ensure safety and efficacy for subsequent gene therapy programs against a variety of cancers.

  13. Oncolytic Adenoviruses for Gynecologic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bauerschmitz, Gerd Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising novel approach for treating cancers resistant to or escaping currently available modalities. Treatment approaches are based on taking advantage of molecular differences between normal and tumor cells. Various strategies are currently in clinical development with adenoviruses as the most popular vehicle. Recent developments include improving targeting strategies for gene delivery to tumor cells with tumor specific promoters or infectivity enhancement. A rapidly deve...

  14. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens.

  15. Aging-related decrements during specific phases of the dual-task Timed Up-and-Go test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porciuncula, Franchino S; Rao, Ashwini K; McIsaac, Tara L

    2016-02-01

    It is unclear how young and older adults modulate dual-task mobility under changing postural challenges. To examine age-related changes in dual-task processing during specific phases of dual-task Timed Up-and-Go (TUGdual-task). Healthy young and older adults performed the Timed Up-and-Go (TUG) with the following dual-task conditions: (1) serial-three subtractions, (2) carrying cup of water, (3) combined subtraction and carrying water, and (4) dialing cell phone. The primary outcome was the dual-task cost on performance of TUG (percent change from single- to dual-task) based on duration and peak trunk velocity of each phase: (a) straight-walk, (b) sit-to-stand, (c) turn, (d) turn-to-sit. Mixed-design univariate analysis of variance was performed for each type of task. Older adults had more pronounced mobility decrements than young adults during straight-ahead walking and turns when the secondary task engaged both cognitive and manual modalities. Simple cognitive or manual tasks during TUGdual-task did not differentiate young from older participants. Subtraction performance during simple and complex cognitive conditions differed by phase of the TUG. Manual task performance of carrying water did not vary by phase or age. Our findings suggest that dual-task processing is dynamic across phases of TUGdual-task. Aging-related dual-task decrements are demonstrated during straight-ahead walking and turning, particularly when the secondary task is more complex. Older adults are susceptible to reduced dual-task mobility during straight-ahead walking and turning particularly when attentional loading was increased.

  16. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Man-Ho; Wu, Xia; Kim, Hyoung Seok; Harper, Jeffrey F; Zielinski, Raymond E; Clouse, Steven D; Huber, Steven C

    2012-11-30

    Although calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases, autophosphorylation on tyrosine residues was observed for soybean CDPKβ and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34). We identified Ser-8, Thr-17, Tyr-24 (in the kinase domain), Ser-304, and Ser-358 as autophosphorylation sites of His(6)-GmCDPKβ. Overall autophosphorylation increased kinase activity with synthetic peptides, but autophosphorylation of Tyr-24 appears to attenuate kinase activity based on studies with the Y24F directed mutant. While much remains to be done, it is clear that several CDPKs are dual-specificity kinases, which raises the possibility that phosphotyrosine signaling may play a role in Ca(2+)/CDPK-mediated processes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The dual specificity phosphatase Cdc14B bundles and stabilizes microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumley, Hyekyung [ORNL; Liu, Yie [ORNL; Gomez, Marla V [ORNL; Wang, Yisong [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    The Cdc14 dual-specificity phosphatases regulate key events in the eukaryotic cell cycle. However, little is known about the function of mammalian CDC14B family members. Here, we demonstrate that subcellular localization of CDC14B protein is cell cycle regulated. CDC14B can bind, bundle, and stabilize microtubules in vitro independently of its catalytic activity. Basic amino acid residues within the nucleolar targeting domain are important for both retaining CDC14B in the nucleolus and preventing microtubule bundling. Overexpression of CDC14B resulted in the formation of cytoplasmic CDC14B and microtubule bundles in interphase cells. These microtubule bundles were resistant to microtubule depolymerization reagents and enriched in acetylated -tubulin. Expression of cytoplasmic forms of CDC14B impaired microtubule nucleation from the microtubule organization center. CDC14B is thus a novel microtubule-bundling and -stabilizing protein, whose regulated subcellular localization may help modulate spindle and microtubule dynamics in mitosis.

  18. Oncolytic virotherapy for pediatric malignancies: future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Alicia M; Friedman, Gregory K; Ring, Eric K; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric solid tumors remain a major health concern, with nearly 16,000 children diagnosed each year. Of those, ~2,000 succumb to their disease, and survivors often suffer from lifelong disability secondary to toxic effects of current treatments. Countless multimodality treatment regimens are being explored to make advances against this deadly disease. One targeted treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy. Conditionally replicating viruses can infect tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Four viruses have been advanced to pediatric clinical trials, including herpes simplex virus-1, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of each virus, pediatric preclinical studies conducted to date, past and ongoing pediatric clinical trials, and potential future direction for these novel viral therapeutics. PMID:27579298

  19. Individual-specific transgenerational marking of fish populations based on a barium dual-isotope procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelga-Suarez, Gonzalo; Moldovan, Mariella; Garcia-Valiente, America; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Alonso, J Ignacio Garcia

    2012-01-01

    The present study focuses on the development and evaluation of an individual-specific transgenerational marking procedure using two enriched barium isotopes, (135)Ba and (137)Ba, mixed at a given and selectable molar ratio. The method is based on the deconvolution of the isotope patterns found in the sample into four molar contribution factors: natural xenon (Xe nat), natural barium (Ba nat), Ba135, and Ba137. The ratio of molar contributions between Ba137 and Ba135 is constant and independent of the contribution of natural barium in the sample. This procedure was tested in brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) kept in captivity. Trout were injected with three different Ba137/Ba135 isotopic signatures ca. 7 months and 7 days before spawning to compare the efficiency of the marking procedure at long and short term, respectively. The barium isotopic profiles were measured in the offspring by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Each of the three different isotopic signatures was unequivocally identified in the offspring in both whole eggs and larvae. For 9 month old offspring, the characteristic barium isotope signatures could also be detected in the otoliths even in the presence of a high and variable amount of barium of natural isotope abundance. In conclusion, it can be stated that the proposed dual-isotope marking is inheritable and can be detected after both long-term and short-term marking. Furthermore, the dual-isotope marking can be made individual-specific, so that it allows identification of offspring from a single individual or a group of individuals within a given fish group.

  20. Retargeted oncolytic adenovirus displaying a single variable domain of camelid heavy-chain-only antibody in a fiber protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erp, Elisabeth A; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Kaliberov, Sergey A; Curiel, David T

    2015-01-01

    Conditionally replicative adenoviruses are promising agents for oncolytic virotherapy. Various approaches have been attempted to retarget adenoviruses to tumor-specific antigens to circumvent deficiency of receptor for adenoviral binding and to provide an additional level of tumor specificity. Functional incorporation of highly specific targeting molecules into the viral capsid can potentially retarget adenoviral infection. However, conventional antibodies are not compatible with the cytoplasmic adenovirus capsid synthesis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies for retargeting of adenovirus infection. We have combined transcriptional targeting using a tumor-specific promoter with transductional targeting through viral capsid incorporation of antihuman carcinoembryonic antigen single variable domains. Obtained data demonstrated that employment of a single variable domain genetically incorporated into an adenovirus fiber increased specificity of infection and efficacy of replication of single variable domain-targeted oncolytic adenovirus. The double targeting, both transcriptional through the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 promoter and transductional using the single variable domain, is a promising means to improve the therapeutic index for these advanced generation conditionally replicative adenoviruses. A successful strategy to transductional retargeting of oncolytic adenovirus infection has not been shown before and therefore we believe this is the first employment of transductional targeting using single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies to enhance specificity of conditionally replicative adenoviruses.

  1. Oncolytic vaccinia therapy of squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yong A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel therapies are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC of the head and neck. Historically, vaccinia virus was administered widely to humans as a vaccine and led to the eradication of smallpox. We examined the therapeutic effects of an attenuated, replication-competent vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68 as an oncolytic agent against a panel of six human head and neck SCC cell lines. Results All six cell lines supported viral transgene expression (β-galactosidase, green fluorescent protein, and luciferase as early as 6 hours after viral exposure. Efficient transgene expression and viral replication (>150-fold titer increase over 72 hrs were observed in four of the cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1, GLV-1h68 was highly cytotoxic to the four cell lines, resulting in ≥ 90% cytotoxicity over 6 days, and the remaining two cell lines exhibited >45% cytotoxicity. Even at a very low MOI of 0.01, three cell lines still demonstrated >60% cell death over 6 days. A single injection of GLV-1h68 (5 × 106 pfu intratumorally into MSKQLL2 xenografts in mice exhibited localized intratumoral luciferase activity peaking at days 2–4, with gradual resolution over 10 days and no evidence of spread to normal organs. Treated animals exhibited near-complete tumor regression over a 24-day period without any observed toxicity, while control animals demonstrated rapid tumor progression. Conclusion These results demonstrate significant oncolytic efficacy by an attenuated vaccinia virus for infecting and lysing head and neck SCC both in vitro and in vivo, and support its continued investigation in future clinical trials.

  2. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, KJ; Stojdl, David F; Swift, SL

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  3. Dual regulatory role for phosphatase and tensin homolog in specification of intestinal endocrine cell subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sébastien AB Roy; Marie-Josée Langlois; Julie C Carrier; Fran(c)ois Boudreau; Nathalie Rivard; Nathalie Perreault

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the impact of phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) in the specification of intestinal enteroendocrine subpopulations.METHODS:Using the Cre/IoxP system,a mouse with conditional intestinal epithelial Pten deficiency was generated.Pten mutant mice and controls were sacrificed and small intestines collected for immunofluorescence and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.Blood was collected on 16 h fasted mice by cardiac puncture.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure blood circulating ghrelin,somatostatin (SST) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) levels.RESULTS:Results show an unexpected dual regulatory role for epithelial Pten signalling in the specification/differentiation of enteroendocrine cell subpopulations in the small intestine.Our data indicate that Pten positively regulates chromogranin A (CgA) expressing subpopulations,including cells expressing secretin,ghrelin,gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK).In contrast,Pten negatively regulates the enteroendocrine subtype specification of non-expressing CgA cells such as GIP and SST expressing cells.CONCLUSION:The present results demonstrate that Pten signalling favours the enteroendocrine progenitor to specify into cells expressing CgA including those producing CCK,gastrin and ghrelin.

  4. Identification of Plant Homologues of Dual Specificity Yak1-Related Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Karpov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, Dual Specificity YAK1-Related Kinases (MNB/DYRK were found in slime molds, protista, fungi, and animals, but the existence of plant homologues is still unclear. In the present study, we have identified 14 potential plant homologues with the previously unknown functions, based on the strong sequence similarity. The results of bioinformatics analysis revealed their correspondence to DYRK1A, DYRK1B, DYRK3, and DYRK4. For two plant homologues of animal DYRK1A from Physcomitrella patens and Arabidopsis thaliana spatial structures of catalytic domains were predicted, as well as their complexes with ADP and selective inhibitor d15. Comparative analysis of 3D-structures of the human DYRK1A and plant homologues, their complexes with the specific inhibitors, and results of molecular dynamics confirm their structural and functional similarity with high probability. Preliminary data indicate the presence of potential MNB/DYRK specific phosphorylation sites in such proteins associated with plant cytoskeleton as plant microtubule-associated proteins WVD2 and WDL1, and FH5 and SCAR2 involved in the organization and polarity of the actin cytoskeleton and some kinesin-like microtubule motor proteins.

  5. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke MJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Burke Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, MACC Fund Research Center, Milwaukee, WI, USA Abstract: Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001 is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold. Keywords: oncolytic, virus, oncology, Seneca, valley

  6. Induction of human pancreatic beta cell replication by inhibitors of dual specificity tyrosine regulated kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both result ultimately from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with peak beta cell labeling indices achieving approximately 2% in first year of life1-4. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication rates are very low. While beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts1-8. Hence, there remains an urgent need for diabetes therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput small molecule screen (HTS) revealing a novel class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds, analogues of the small molecule, harmine. We also define dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine, and the Nuclear Factors of activated T-cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation as well as beta cell differentiation. These observations suggest that harmine analogues (“harmalogs”) may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing potency and beta cell specificity are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  7. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    OpenAIRE

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellul...

  8. Oncolytic parvoviruses: from basic virology to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, Antonio; Bonifati, Serena; Scott, Eleanor M; Angelova, Assia L; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-29

    Accumulated evidence gathered over recent decades demonstrated that some members of the Parvoviridae family, in particular the rodent protoparvoviruses H-1PV, the minute virus of mice and LuIII have natural anticancer activity while being nonpathogenic to humans. These studies have laid the foundations for the launch of a first phase I/IIa clinical trial, in which the rat H-1 parvovirus is presently undergoing evaluation for its safety and first signs of efficacy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. After a brief overview of the biology of parvoviruses, this review focuses on the studies which unraveled the antineoplastic properties of these agents and supported their clinical use as anticancer therapeutics. Furthermore, the development of novel parvovirus-based anticancer strategies with enhanced specificity and efficacy is discussed, in particular the development of second and third generation vectors and the combination of parvoviruses with other anticancer agents. Lastly, we address the key challenges that remain towards a more rational and efficient use of oncolytic parvoviruses in clinical settings, and discuss how a better understanding of the virus life-cycle and of the cellular factors involved in virus infection, replication and cytotoxicity may promote the further development of parvovirus-based anticancer therapies, open new prospects for treatment and hopefully improve clinical outcome.

  9. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  10. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkko Ylösmäki

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5 in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  11. Enhanced lysis by bispecific oncolytic measles viruses simultaneously using HER2/neu or EpCAM as target receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan RH Hanauer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To target oncolytic measles viruses (MV to tumors, we exploit the binding specificity of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins. These DARPin-MVs have high tumor selectivity while maintaining excellent oncolytic potency. Stability, small size, and efficacy of DARPins allowed the generation of MVs simultaneously targeted to tumor marker HER2/neu and cancer stem cell (CSC marker EpCAM. For optimization, the linker connecting both DARPins was varied in flexibility and length. Flexibility had no impact on fusion helper activity whereas length had. MVs with bispecific MV-H are genetically stable and revealed the desired double-target specificity. In vitro, the cytolytic activity of bispecific MVs was superior or comparable to mono-targeted viruses depending on the target cells. In vivo, therapeutic efficacy of the bispecific viruses was validated in an orthotopic ovarian carcinoma model revealing an effective reduction of tumor mass. Finally, the power of bispecific targeting was demonstrated on cocultures of different tumor cells thereby mimicking tumor heterogeneity in vitro, more closely reflecting real tumors. Here, bispecific excelled monospecific viruses in efficacy. DARPin-based targeting domains thus allow the generation of efficacious oncolytic viruses with double specificity, with the potential to handle intratumoral variation of antigen expression and to simultaneously target CSCs and the bulk tumor mass.

  12. Moving oncolytic viruses into the clinic: clinical-grade production, purification, and characterization of diverse oncolytic viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Ungerechts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OVs are unique anticancer agents based on their pleotropic modes of action, which include, besides viral tumor cell lysis, activation of antitumor immunity. A panel of diverse viruses, often genetically engineered, has advanced to clinical investigation, including phase 3 studies. This diversity of virotherapeutics not only offers interesting opportunities for the implementation of different therapeutic regimens but also poses challenges for clinical translation. Thus, manufacturing processes and regulatory approval paths need to be established for each OV individually. This review provides an overview of clinical-grade manufacturing procedures for OVs using six virus families as examples, and key challenges are discussed individually. For example, different virus features with respect to particle size, presence/absence of an envelope, and host species imply specific requirements for measures to ensure sterility, for handling, and for determination of appropriate animal models for toxicity testing, respectively. On the other hand, optimization of serum-free culture conditions, increasing virus yields, development of scalable purification strategies, and formulations guaranteeing long-term stability are challenges common to several if not all OVs. In light of the recent marketing approval of the first OV in the Western world, strategies for further upscaling OV manufacturing and optimizing product characterization will receive increasing attention.

  13. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oncolytic Virotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. Denton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy remains a challenge due to toxicity limitations of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oncolytic viruses that selectively replicate and destroy cancer cells are of increasing interest. In addition to direct cell lysis, these vectors stimulate an anti-tumor immune response. A key regulator of tumor immunity is the tumor-associated macrophage population. Macrophages can either support oncolytic virus therapy through pro-inflammatory stimulation of the anti-tumor response at the cost of hindering direct oncolysis or through immunosuppressive protection of virus replication at the cost of hindering the anti-tumor immune response. Despite similarities in macrophage interaction between adult and pediatric tumors and the abundance of research supporting macrophage modulation in adult tumors, there are few studies investigating macrophage modulation in pediatric cancers or modulation of immunotherapy. We review the current state of knowledge regarding macrophages in cancers and their influence on oncolytic virotherapy.

  14. Oncolytic Virotherapy for Multiple Myeloma: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandini M. Thirukkumaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a B-cell malignancy that is currently felt to be incurable. Despite recently approved novel targeted treatments such as lenalidomide and bortezomib, most MM patients' relapse is emphasizing the need for effective and well-tolerated therapies for this deadly disease. The use of oncolytic viruses has garnered significant interest as cancer therapeutics in recent years, and are currently under intense clinical investigation. Both naturally occurring and engineered DNA and RNA viruses have been investigated preclinically as treatment modalities for several solid and hematological malignancies. Presently, only a genetically modified measles virus is in human clinical trials for MM. The information obtained from this and other future clinical trials will guide clinical application of oncolytic viruses as anticancer agents for MM. This paper provides a timely overview of the history of oncolytic viruses for the treatment of MM and future strategies for the optimization of viral therapy for this disease.

  15. Dual specific phosphatase 12 ameliorates cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Ming; Zhao, Yi-Fan; Zhu, Guo-Fu; Peng, Wen-Hui; Zhu, Meng-Yun; Yu, Xue-Jing; Chen, Wei; Xu, Da-Chun; Xu, Ya-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is an independent risk factor of heart failure. However, we still lack effective methods to reverse cardiac hypertrophy. DUSP12 is a member of the dual specific phosphatase (DUSP) family, which is characterized by its DUSP activity to dephosphorylate both tyrosine and serine/threonine residues on one substrate. Some DUSPs have been identified as being involved in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the role of DUSP12 during pathological cardiac hypertrophy is still unclear. In the present study, we observed a significant decrease in DUSP12 expression in hypertrophic hearts and cardiomyocytes. Using a genetic loss-of-function murine model, we demonstrated that DUSP12 deficiency apparently aggravated pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis as well as impaired cardiac function, whereas cardiac-specific overexpression of DUPS12 was capable of reversing this hypertrophic and fibrotic phenotype and improving contractile function. Furthermore, we demonstrated that JNK1/2 activity but neither ERK1/2 nor p38 activity was increased in the DUSP12 deficient group and decreased in the DUSP12 overexpression group both in vitro and in vivo under hypertrophic stress conditions. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK1/2 activity (SP600125) is capable of reversing the hypertrophic phenotype in DUSP12 knockout (KO) mice. DUSP12 protects against pathological cardiac hypertrophy and related pathologies. This regulatory role of DUSP12 is primarily through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibition. DUSP12 could be a promising therapeutic target of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. DUSP12 is down-regulated in hypertrophic hearts. An absence of DUSP12 aggravated cardiac hypertrophy, whereas cardiomyocyte-specific DUSP12 overexpression can alleviate this hypertrophic phenotype with improved cardiac function. Further study demonstrated that DUSP12 inhibited JNK activity to attenuate pathological cardiac hypertrophy. © 2016 The

  16. High affinity antigen recognition of the dual specific variants of herceptin is entropy-driven in spite of structural plasticity.

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    Jenny Bostrom

    Full Text Available The antigen-binding site of Herceptin, an anti-human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2 antibody, was engineered to add a second specificity toward Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF to create a high affinity two-in-one antibody bH1. Crystal structures of bH1 in complex with either antigen showed that, in comparison to Herceptin, this antibody exhibited greater conformational variability, also called "structural plasticity". Here, we analyzed the biophysical and thermodynamic properties of the dual specific variants of Herceptin to understand how a single antibody binds two unrelated protein antigens. We showed that while bH1 and the affinity-improved bH1-44, in particular, maintained many properties of Herceptin including binding affinity, kinetics and the use of residues for antigen recognition, they differed in the binding thermodynamics. The interactions of bH1 and its variants with both antigens were characterized by large favorable entropy changes whereas the Herceptin/HER2 interaction involved a large favorable enthalpy change. By dissecting the total entropy change and the energy barrier for dual interaction, we determined that the significant structural plasticity of the bH1 antibodies demanded by the dual specificity did not translate into the expected increase of entropic penalty relative to Herceptin. Clearly, dual antigen recognition of the Herceptin variants involves divergent antibody conformations of nearly equivalent energetic states. Hence, increasing the structural plasticity of an antigen-binding site without increasing the entropic cost may play a role for antibodies to evolve multi-specificity. Our report represents the first comprehensive biophysical analysis of a high affinity dual specific antibody binding two unrelated protein antigens, furthering our understanding of the thermodynamics that drive the vast antigen recognition capacity of the antibody repertoire.

  17. [Genes of insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity in Bacillus thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymar, S Iu; Isakova, I A; Kuznietsova, L M; Kordium, V A

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal crystal proteins of 15 B. thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory that are toxical for some Lepidoptera and Colorado potato beetle larvae were identified by PAGE electrophoresis. Ten strains produced the crystal proteins with high molecular weight (> 120 kD). PCR with use of broad specificity primers and DNA of these B. thuringiensis strains as template demonstrated the specific PCR products (1000 bp). Amplified DNA fragments were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the genomes of ten strains of B. thuringiensis carried Cry1B genes, which are responsible for production of the insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity. The influence of the solubilization conditions on the structure and toxicity of Cry1B protein for Colorado potato beetle larvae was shown. The dual toxicity of studied B. thuringiensis strains is explained by the Cry1B genes presence in their genomes. These strains may be used to develop the broad specificity bioinsecticides.

  18. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbach, Caroline J; Lichty, Brian D; Bell, John C

    2016-07-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a "one-size fits all" approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms.

  19. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J. Breitbach

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OV are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a “one-size fits all” approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms.

  20. Sphingolipids Are Dual Specific Drug Targets for the Management of Pulmonary Infections: Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lalita; Prakash, Hridayesh

    2017-01-01

    bactericidal potential in macrophages for the control of TB. In this review, we have discussed and emphasized that sphingolipids may represent effective novel, yet dual specific drug targets for controlling pulmonary infections.

  1. Dual-specific Phosphatase-6 (Dusp6) and ERK Mediate AMPA Receptor-induced Oligodendrocyte Death*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domercq, Maria; Alberdi, Elena; Sánchez-Gómez, Maria Victoria; Ariz, Usue; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, are highly vulnerable to glutamate excitotoxicity, a mechanism involved in tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Thus, understanding oligodendrocyte death at the molecular level is important to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat the disease. Here, using microarray analysis and quantitative PCR, we observed that dual-specific phosphatase-6 (Dusp6), an extracellular regulated kinase-specific phosphatase, is up-regulated in oligodendrocyte cultures as well as in optic nerves after AMPA receptor activation. In turn, Dusp6 is overexpressed in optic nerves from multiple sclerosis patients before the appearance of evident damage in this structure. We further analyzed the role of Dusp6 and ERK signaling in excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and observed that AMPA receptor activation induces a rapid increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Blocking Dusp6 expression, which enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation, significantly diminished AMPA receptor-induced oligodendrocyte death. In contrast, MAPK/ERK pathway inhibition with UO126 significantly potentiates excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and increases cytochrome c release, mitochondrial depolarization, and mitochondrial calcium overload produced by AMPA receptor stimulation. Upstream analysis demonstrated that MAPK/ERK signaling alters AMPA receptor properties. Indeed, Dusp6 overexpression as well as incubation with UO126 produced an increase in AMPA receptor-induced inward currents and cytosolic calcium overload. Together, these data suggest that levels of phosphorylated ERK, controlled by Dusp6 phosphatase, regulate glutamate receptor permeability and oligodendroglial excitotoxicity. Therefore, targeting Dusp6 may be a useful strategy to prevent oligodendrocyte death in multiple sclerosis and other diseases involving CNS white matter. PMID:21300799

  2. IL-12 Expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus promotes anti-tumor activity and immunologic control of metastatic ovarian cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eric D; Meza-Perez, Selene; Bevis, Kerri S; Randall, Troy D; Gillespie, G Yancey; Langford, Catherine; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2016-10-27

    Despite advances in surgical aggressiveness and conventional chemotherapy, ovarian cancer remains the most lethal cause of gynecologic cancer mortality; consequently there is a need for new therapeutic agents and innovative treatment paradigms for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Several studies have demonstrated that ovarian cancer is an immunogenic disease and immunotherapy represents a promising and novel approach that has not been completely evaluated in ovarian cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the anti-tumor activity of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus "armed" with murine interleukin-12 and its ability to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. We evaluated the ability of interleukin-12-expressing and control oncolytic herpes simplex virus to kill murine and human ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro. We also administered interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus to the peritoneal cavity of mice that had developed spontaneous, metastatic ovarian cancer and determined overall survival and tumor burden at 95 days. We used flow cytometry to quantify the tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response in the omentum and peritoneal cavity. All ovarian cancer cell lines demonstrated susceptibility to oncolytic herpes simplex virus in vitro. Compared to controls, mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus demonstrated a more robust tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell immune response in the omentum (471.6 cells vs 33.1 cells; p = 0.02) and peritoneal cavity (962.3 cells vs 179.5 cells; p = 0.05). Compared to controls, mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus were more likely to control ovarian cancer metastases (81.2 % vs 18.2 %; p = 0.008) and had a significantly longer overall survival (p = 0.02). Finally, five of 6 mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oHSV had no evidence of metastatic tumor when euthanized at 6 months, compared to two of 4 mice treated

  3. Imaging of intratumoral inflammation during oncolytic virotherapy of tumors by 19F-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.

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    Stephanie Weibel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oncolytic virotherapy of tumors is an up-coming, promising therapeutic modality of cancer therapy. Unfortunately, non-invasive techniques to evaluate the inflammatory host response to treatment are rare. Here, we evaluate (19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI which enables the non-invasive visualization of inflammatory processes in pathological conditions by the use of perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 was used as an oncolytic agent for the treatment of different tumor models. Systemic application of PFC emulsions followed by (1H/(19F MRI of mock-infected and GLV-1h68-infected tumor-bearing mice revealed a significant accumulation of the (19F signal in the tumor rim of virus-treated mice. Histological examination of tumors confirmed a similar spatial distribution of the (19F signal hot spots and CD68(+-macrophages. Thereby, the CD68(+-macrophages encapsulate the GFP-positive viral infection foci. In multiple tumor models, we specifically visualized early inflammatory cell recruitment in Vaccinia virus colonized tumors. Furthermore, we documented that the (19F signal correlated with the extent of viral spreading within tumors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest (19F MRI as a non-invasive methodology to document the tumor-associated host immune response as well as the extent of intratumoral viral replication. Thus, (19F MRI represents a new platform to non-invasively investigate the role of the host immune response for therapeutic outcome of oncolytic virotherapy and individual patient response.

  4. Serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF for treatment of sarcoma in rodents and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Simona; Koski, Anniina; Kipar, Anja; Diaconu, Iulia; Liikanen, Ilkka; Hemminki, Otto; Vassilev, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Pesonen, Saila K; Oksanen, Minna; Heiskanen, Raita; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Hakonen, Tiina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-08-01

    Sarcomas are a relatively rare cancer, but often incurable at the late metastatic stage. Oncolytic immunotherapy has gained attention over the past years, and a wide range of oncolytic viruses have been delivered via intratumoral injection with positive safety and promising efficacy data. Here, we report preclinical and clinical results from treatment of sarcoma with oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF (CGTG-102). Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF is a serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The efficacy of Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF was evaluated on a panel of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) cell lines and in two animal models. Sarcoma specific human data were also collected from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), in preparation for further clinical development. Efficacy was seen in both in vitro and in vivo STS models. Fifteen patients with treatment-refractory STS (13/15) or primary bone sarcoma (2/15) were treated in ATAP, and treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. A total of 12 radiological RECIST response evaluations were performed, and two cases of minor response, six cases of stable disease and four cases of progressive disease were detected in patients progressing prior to virus treatment. Overall, the median survival time post treatment was 170 days. One patient is still alive at 1,459 days post virus treatment. In summary, Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF appears promising for the treatment of advanced STS; a clinical trial for treatment of refractory injectable solid tumors including STS is ongoing.

  5. Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus as a Viro-Immunotherapy: Defeating Cancer with a “Hammer” and “Anvil”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Karl Melzer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have gained much attention in recent years, due, not only to their ability to selectively replicate in and lyse tumor cells, but to their potential to stimulate antitumor immune responses directed against the tumor. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a negative-strand RNA virus, is under intense development as an oncolytic virus due to a variety of favorable properties, including its rapid replication kinetics, inherent tumor specificity, and its potential to elicit a broad range of immunomodulatory responses to break immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment. Based on this powerful platform, a multitude of strategies have been applied to further improve the immune-stimulating potential of VSV and synergize these responses with the direct oncolytic effect. These strategies include: 1. modification of endogenous virus genes to stimulate interferon induction; 2. virus-mediated expression of cytokines or immune-stimulatory molecules to enhance anti-tumor immune responses; 3. vaccination approaches to stimulate adaptive immune responses against a tumor antigen; 4. combination with adoptive immune cell therapy for potentially synergistic therapeutic responses. A summary of these approaches will be presented in this review.

  6. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001) is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold.

  7. Luciferase imaging for evaluation of oncolytic adenovirus replication in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, K; Dias, J D; Bauerschmitz, G J; Hakkarainen, T; Aavik, E; Ranki, T; Pisto, T; Särkioja, M; Desmond, R A; Kanerva, A; Hemminki, A

    2007-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses kill cancer cells by tumor-selective replication. Clinical data have established the safety of the approach but also the need of improvements in potency. Efficacy of oncolysis is linked to effective infection of target cells and subsequent productive replication. Other variables include intratumoral barriers, access to target cells, uptake by non-target organs and immune response. Each of these aspects relates to the location and degree of virus replication. Unfortunately, detection of in vivo replication has been difficult, labor intensive and costly and therefore not much studied. We hypothesized that by coinfection of a luciferase expressing E1-deleted virus with an oncolytic virus, both viruses would replicate when present in the same cell. Photon emission due to conversion of D-Luciferin is sensitive and penetrates tissues well. Importantly, killing of animals is not required and each animal can be imaged repeatedly. Two different murine xenograft models were used and intratumoral coinjections of luciferase encoding virus were performed with eight different oncolytic adenoviruses. In both models, we found significant correlation between photon emission and infectious virus production. This suggests that the system can be used for non-invasive quantitation of the amplitude, persistence and dynamics of oncolytic virus replication in vivo, which could be helpful for the development of more effective and safe agents.

  8. Simultaneous Photoelectrochemical Immunoassay of Dual Cardiac Markers Using Specific Enzyme Tags: A Proof of Principle for Multiplexed Bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Ma, Zheng-Yuan; Ruan, Yi-Fan; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-02-16

    In this Letter, on the basis of the CdS quantum dots functionalized TiO2 nanotubes electrode, we proposed a simultaneous photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay of dual cardiac markers using specific enzyme tags of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and acetylcholine esterase (AChE). ALP and AChE were integrated into the PEC system through the sandwich immunobinding and could specifically catalyze the hydrolysis of ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AAP) or the acetylthiocholine (ATC) to in situ generate ascorbic acid (AA) or thiocholine (TC) for sacrificial electron donating. These two enzymes were thus used to differentiate the signals of two cardiac targets in connection with the sandwich immunorecognition and PEC responses to the corresponding electron donors. This strategy demonstrates a proof of principle for the successful integration of dual enzyme tags with PEC immunoassay that can potentially provide a general format for multiplexed PEC bioanalysis.

  9. Oncolytic viruses as immunotherapy: progress and remaining challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian L

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Laure Aurelian Department of Pharmacology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Oncolytic viruses (OVs comprise an emerging cancer therapeutic modality whose activity involves both direct tumor cell lysis and the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD. Cellular proteins released from the OV-lysed tumor cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns and tumor-associated antigens, activate dendritic cells and elicit adaptive antitumor immunity. Interaction with the innate immune system and the development of long-lasting immune memory also contribute to OV-induced cell death. The degree to which the ICD component contributes to the clinical efficacy of OV therapy is still unclear. Modulation of a range of immune interactions may be beneficial or detrimental in nature and the interactions depend on the specific tumor, the site and extent of the disease, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, the OV platform, the dose, time, and delivery conditions, as well as individual patient responses. To enhance the contribution of ICD, OVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory genes and strategies have been developed to combine OV therapy with chemo- and immune-based therapeutic regimens. However, these approaches carry the risk that they may also be tolerogenic depending on their levels and the presence of other cytokines, their direct antiviral effects, and the timing and conditions of their expression. The contribution of autophagy to adaptive immunity, the ability of the OVs to kill cancer stem cells, and the patient’s baseline immune status are additional considerations. This review focuses on the complex and as yet poorly understood balancing act that dictates the outcome of OV therapy. We summarize current understanding of the OVs’ function in eliciting antitumor immunity and its relationship to therapeutic efficacy. Also discussed are the criteria involved in restraining antiviral

  10. Immunological effects of a tumor necrosis factor alpha-armed oncolytic adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvinen, Mari; Rajecki, Maria; Kapanen, Mika; Parviainen, Suvi; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Diaconu, Iulia; Nokisalmi, Petri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Hemminki, Akseli; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    For long it has been recognized that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has anticancer characteristics, and its use as a cancer therapeutic was proposed already in the 1980s. However, its systemic toxicity has limited its usability. Oncolytic viruses, selectively cancer-killing viruses, have shown great potency, and one of their most useful aspects is their ability to produce high amounts of transgene products locally, resulting in high local versus systemic concentrations. Therefore, the overall magnitude of tumor cell killing results from the combination of oncolysis, transgene-mediated direct effect such as TNFa-mediated apoptosis, and, perhaps most significantly, from activation of the host immune system against the tumor. We generated a novel chimeric oncolytic adenovirus expressing human TNFa, Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa, whose efficacy and immunogenicity were tested in vitro and in vivo. The hTNFa-expressing adenovirus showed increased cancer-eradicating potency, which was shown to be because of elevated apoptosis and necrosis rates and induction of various immune responses. Interestingly, we saw increase in immunogenic cell death markers in Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa-treated cells. Moreover, tumors treated with Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa displayed enhanced presence of OVA-specific cytotoxic T cells. We thus can conclude that tumor eradication and antitumor immune responses mediated by Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa offer a new potential drug candidate for cancer therapy.

  11. Permissivity of the NCI-60 cancer cell lines to oncolytic Vaccinia Virus GLV-1h68

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    Bedognetti Davide

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic viral therapy represents an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. We previously described GLV-1h68, a modified Vaccinia Virus with exclusive tropism for tumor cells, and we observed a cell line-specific relationship between the ability of GLV-1h68 to replicate in vitro and its ability to colonize and eliminate tumor in vivo. Methods In the current study we surveyed the in vitro permissivity to GLV-1h68 replication of the NCI-60 panel of cell lines. Selected cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV strain. In order to identify correlates of permissity to viral infection, we measured transcriptional profiles of the cell lines prior infection. Results We observed highly heterogeneous permissivity to VACV infection amongst the cell lines. The heterogeneity of permissivity was independent of tissue with the exception of B cell derivation. Cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV strain and a significant correlation was found suggesting a common permissive phenotype. While no clear transcriptional pattern could be identified as predictor of permissivity to infection, some associations were observed suggesting multifactorial basis permissivity to viral infection. Conclusions Our findings have implications for the design of oncolytic therapies for cancer and offer insights into the nature of permissivity of tumor cells to viral infection.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of human dual specificity protein phosphatase 1 (DUSP1 gene by glucocorticoids.

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    Lauren E Shipp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucocorticoids are potent anti-inflammatory agents commonly used to treat inflammatory diseases. They convey signals through the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which upon binding to ligands, associates with genomic glucocorticoid response elements (GREs to regulate transcription of associated genes. One mechanism by which glucocorticoids inhibit inflammation is through induction of the dual specificity phosphatase-1 (DUSP1, a.k.a. mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1, MKP-1 gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that glucocorticoids rapidly increased transcription of DUSP1 within 10 minutes in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP scanning, we located a GR binding region between -1421 and -1118 upstream of the DUSP1 transcription start site. This region is active in a reporter system, and mutagenesis analyses identified a functional GRE located between -1337 and -1323. We found that glucocorticoids increased DNase I hypersensitivity, reduced nucleosome density, and increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation within genomic regions surrounding the GRE. ChIP experiments showed that p300 was recruited to the DUSP1 GRE, and RNA interference experiments demonstrated that reduction of p300 decreased glucocorticoid-stimulated DUSP1 gene expression and histone H3 hyperacetylation. Furthermore, overexpression of p300 potentiated glucocorticoid-stimulated activity of a reporter gene containing the DUSP1 GRE, and this coactivation effect was compromised when the histone acetyltransferase domain was mutated. ChIP-reChIP experiments using GR followed by p300 antibodies showed significant enrichment of the DUSP1 GRE upon glucocorticoid treatment, suggesting that GR and p300 are in the same protein complex recruited to the DUSP1 GRE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies identified a functional GRE for the DUSP1 gene. Moreover, the transcriptional activation of DUSP1 by

  13. Treatment of melanoma with a serotype 5/3 chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF: Results in vitro, in rodents and in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Simona; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Veckman, Ville; Liikanen, Ilkka; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Hemminki, Otto; Vassilev, Lotta; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Oksanen, Minna; Heiskanen, Raita; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Matikainen, Sampsa; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Koski, Anniina; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma is refractory to irradiation and chemotherapy, but amenable to immunological approaches such as immune-checkpoint-inhibiting antibodies or adoptive cell therapies. Oncolytic virus replication is an immunogenic phenomenon, and viruses can be armed with immunostimulatory molecules. Therefore, oncolytic immuno-virotherapy of malignant melanoma is an appealing approach, which was recently validated by a positive phase 3 trial. We investigated the potency of oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF on a panel of melanoma cell lines and animal models, and summarized the melanoma-specific human data from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP). The virus effectively eradicated human melanoma cells in vitro and subcutaneous SK-MEL-28 melanoma xenografts in nude mice when combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide. Furthermore, virally-expressed granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated the differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages. In contrast to human cells, RPMI 1846 hamster melanoma cells exhibited no response to oncolytic viruses and the chimeric 5/3 fiber failed to increase the efficacy of transduction, suggesting limited utility of the hamster model in the context of viruses with this capsid. In ATAP, treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. Four out of nine melanoma patients treated were evaluable for possible therapy benefit with modified RECIST criteria: one patient had minor response, two had stable disease, and one had progressive disease. Two patients were alive at 559 and 2,149 days after treatment. Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF showed promising efficacy in preclinical studies and possible antitumor activity in melanoma patients refractory to other forms of therapy. This data supports continuing the clinical development of oncolytic adenoviruses for treatment of malignant melanoma.

  14. A selective Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for vaccinia H1-related phosphatase--a dual-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kim, Eunha; Kang, Hyo Jin; Choi, Eun Joung; Cho, Alvin R; Chung, Sang J; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-07-04

    We report a Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for selective monitoring of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). A rational design based on the structures at the active site of dual-specific PTPs can enable SfBP to selectively monitor the activity of these PTPs with a 93-fold change in brightness. Moreover, screening results of SfBP against 30 classical PTPs and 35 dual-specific PTPs show that it is selective toward vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase, a dual-specific PTP (DUSP-3).

  15. X-ray synchrotron dual energy imaging for material specific study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B.; Agrawal, A. K.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2017-05-01

    X-ray imaging techniques, in general, are used to study the internal structures of an object non-destructively such as anatomy, imperfections, cracks and voids whereas insensitive to spatial distribution of different element or elemental compositions of the object. With the development of advance bright X-ray synchrotron sources and accurate energy tunability using high resolution crystal monochromator, detection of elemental distribution in an object became possible. Quantitative small concentrations with enhance contrast can be detected fast in X-ray synchrotron based dual energy imaging, in comparison to conventional X-ray lab based techniques. We report here the experimental setup, image acquisition and image processing for the dual energy X-ray imaging (DEI) technique to retrieve the spatial distribution of different elements in the object.

  16. Oncolytic Viruses in the Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle G. Potts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder carcinoma is the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Up to 85% of patients with bladder cancer are diagnosed with a tumor that is limited to the bladder mucosa (Ta, T1, and CIS. These stages are commonly termed as non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Although the treatment of NMIBC has greatly improved in recent years, there is a need for additional therapies when patients fail bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that bladder cancer may be an ideal target for oncolytic viruses engineered to selectively replicate in and lyse tumor cells leaving normal cells unharmed. In support of this hypothesis, here we review current treatment strategies for bladder cancer and their shortcomings, as well as recent advancements in oncolytic viral therapy demonstrating encouraging safety profiles and antitumor activity.

  17. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Loskog

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics.

  18. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R

    2015-08-21

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents.

  19. Telomerase-specific oncolytic virotherapy for human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic efficiency of replicative adenovirus CNHK300 targeted in telomerase-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. METHODS: CNHK300, ONYX-015 (55 kDa protein deleted adenovirus) and wtAd5 (wild type adenovirus 5) were compared, and virus proliferation assay, cell viability assay, Western blot and fluorescence microscopy were used to evaluate the proliferation and cytolysis selectivity of CNHK300.RESULTS:The replicative multiples in Hep3B and HepG after 48 h of CNHK300 proliferation were 40625and 65326 fold, respectively, similar to that of wtAd5..However, CNHK300 exhibited attenuated replicative ability in normal fibroblast cell line BJ.CNHK300 could lyse hepatocellular carcinoma cells at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI),but could not affect growth of normal cells even at a high MOI.CONCLUSION:CNHK300 is a cancer-selective replication-competent adenovirus which can cause oncolysis of liver cancer cells as well as wtAd5 (wild type adenovirus 5),but had severely attenuated replicative and cytolytic ability in normal cells. This novel strategy of cancer treatment offers a promising treatment platform.

  20. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viralmRNAexport, and cell cycle disruption.

  1. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  2. Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus elicits anti-glioma immunity in an immunocompetent mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Jiang (Hao); K. Clise-Dwyer (Karen); K.E. Ruisaard (Kathryn); X. Fan (Xuejun); W. Tian (Weihua); J. Gumin (Joy); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); A. Kleijn (Anne); F.F. Lang (Frederick); S. Yung (Sun); L.M. Vence (Luis); C. Gomez-Manzano (Candelaria); J. Fueyo (Juan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Emerging evidence suggests anti-cancer immunity is involved in the therapeutic effect induced by oncolytic viruses. Here we investigate the effect of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus on innate and adaptive anti-glioma immunity. Design: Mouse GL261-glioma model was set up in

  3. Task-specificity of unilateral anodal and dual-M1 tDCS effects on motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karok, Sophia; Fletcher, David; Witney, Alice G

    2017-01-08

    Task-specific effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on motor learning were investigated in 30 healthy participants. In a sham-controlled, mixed design, participants trained on 3 different motor tasks (Purdue Pegboard Test, Visuomotor Grip Force Tracking Task and Visuomotor Wrist Rotation Speed Control Task) over 3 consecutive days while receiving either unilateral anodal over the right primary motor cortex (M1), dual-M1 or sham stimulation. Retention sessions were administered 7 and 28 days after the end of training. In the Purdue Pegboard Test, both anodal and dual-M1 stimulation reduced average completion time approximately equally, an improvement driven by online learning effects and maintained for about 1 week. The Visuomotor Grip Force Tracking Task and the Visuomotor Wrist Rotation Speed Control Task were associated with an advantage of dual-M1 tDCS in consolidation processes both between training sessions and when testing at long-term retention; both were maintained for at least 1 month. This study demonstrates that M1-tDCS enhances and sustains motor learning with different electrode montages. Stimulation-induced effects emerged at different learning phases across the tasks, which strongly suggests that the influence of tDCS on motor learning is dynamic with respect to the functional recruitment of the distributed motor system at the time of stimulation. Divergent findings regarding M1-tDCS effects on motor learning may partially be ascribed to task-specific consequences and the effects of offline consolidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Continued Promise and Many Disappointments of Oncolytic Virotherapy in Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Ahn

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. Oncolytic viruses, including genetically engineered and naturally occurring viruses, can selectively replicate in and induce tumor cell apoptosis without harming normal tissues, thus offering a promising tool in the armamentarium for cancer therapy. While this approach has garnered much interest over the past several decades, there has not been significant headway across various tumor types. The recent approval of talimogene laherparepvec, a second-generation oncolytic herpes simplex virus type-1, for the treatment of metastatic melanoma, confirms the therapeutic potential of oncolytic viral therapy. Herein, we will highlight and review the role of oncolytic viral therapy in gastrointestinal malignancies while discussing its limitations and potential alternative mechanisms to improve its treatment efficacy.

  5. Oncolytic virotherapy in veterinary medicine: current status and future prospects for canine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Sandeep S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oncolytic viruses refer to those that are able to eliminate malignancies by direct targeting and lysis of cancer cells, leaving non-cancerous tissues unharmed. Several oncolytic viruses including adenovirus strains, canine distemper virus and vaccinia virus strains have been used for canine cancer therapy in preclinical studies. However, in contrast to human studies, clinical trials with oncolytic viruses for canine cancer patients have not been reported. An 'ideal' virus has yet to be identified. This review is focused on the prospective use of oncolytic viruses in the treatment of canine tumors - a knowledge that will undoubtedly contribute to the development of oncolytic viral agents for canine cancer therapy in the future.

  6. 特异性溶瘤重组腺病毒KH901的碘标记方法及其生物学分布%Iodination Conditions of KH901, a Tumor-specific Oncolytic Recombinant Adenovirus, and Its ~(125)I-labeled Compounds Biodistribution in Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米彦霞; 李云春; 龙亚红; 解朋

    2009-01-01

    研究一种~(125)I直接标记特异性溶瘤重组腺病毒KH901的简便高效的方法,以及评价~(125)I-KH901的体内生物学行为.采用N-溴代琥珀酰亚胺(NBS)方法对KH901进行标记,确定最佳标记条件;用凝胶过滤层析法对标记物进行分离纯化,纸层析法测定放化纯度.对~(125)I-KH901进行正常小鼠体内生物学分布检测.结果显示,~(125)I-KH901的放化纯达到95%以上,标记率可达到78%;正常小鼠尾静脉注射~(125)I-KH901后体内分布显示肝脏中放射性浓集度最高,24 h检测肝脏仍有较多放射性滞留,可达13.34 %ID/g,标记物在肾脏的摄取也较高,为8.06% ID/g. 因此, N-溴代琥珀酰亚胺(NBS)方法是一种步骤简便、标记率高的比较理想的碘标记病毒方法,~(125)I-KH901主要分布在肝脏和肾脏.%In this research was developed high efficiency method using ~(125)I for directly labeling KH901,a tumor-specific oncolytic recombinant adenovirus,biodistribution of ~(125)I-labeled compound in normal mice was investigated. ~(125)I-KH901 was prepared by N-bromosuccinimide labeling method to find the optimal ratio of labeling response. The compounds were isolated and purified by Sephadex-G10 agarose and the radiochemical purity of compounds was analyzed by paper chromatography. The radioactivity biodistribution in mice was measured at different times after caudal vein injection with 0.1ml ~(125)I-KH901. The labeling yield of ~(125)I-KH901 was 78% and the radiochemical purity was 95% after purification by Sephadex-G10 agarose. Biodistribution revealed that the uptake of ~(125)I-KH901 in liver was higher than in other organs at all time points of the experiment. ~(125)I-KH901 was mainly concentrated in liver,kidneys,spleen and lung. It can be seen that N-bromosuccinimide labeling method is an optimal method with simple steps and high labeling yield in labeling KH901 with ~(125)I. ~(125)I-KH901 has a biodistribution trait which is an advantage to treating liver

  7. Oncolytic herpes viruses, chemotherapeutics, and other cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidwood L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynne Braidwood,1 Sheila V Graham,2 Alex Graham,1 Joe Conner11Virttu Biologics Ltd, Department of Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, UK; 2MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Jarrett Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: Oncolytic viruses are emerging as a potential new way of treating cancers. They are selectively replication-competent viruses that propagate only in actively dividing tumor cells but not in normal cells and, as a result, destroy the tumor cells by consequence of lytic infection. At least six different oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs have undergone clinical trials worldwide to date, and they have demonstrated an excellent safety profile and intimations of efficacy. The first pivotal Phase III trial with an oHSV, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec [OncoVexGM-CSF], is almost complete, with extremely positive early results reported. Intuitively, therapeutically beneficial interactions between oHSV and chemotherapeutic and targeted therapeutic drugs would be limited as the virus requires actively dividing cells for maximum replication efficiency and most anticancer agents are cytotoxic or cytostatic. However, combinations of such agents display a range of responses, with antagonistic, additive, or, perhaps most surprisingly, synergistic enhancement of antitumor activity. When synergistic interactions in cancer cell killing are observed, chemotherapy dose reductions that achieve the same overall efficacy may be possible, resulting in a valuable reduction of adverse side effects. Therefore, the combination of an oHSV with “standard-of-care” drugs makes a logical and reasonable approach to improved therapy, and the addition of a targeted oncolytic therapy with “standard-of-care” drugs merits further investigation, both preclinically and in the clinic. Numerous publications report

  8. Element Specific Observation of Ferromagnetic Interlayer Exchange Coupled Dual Vortex Core Nano Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulecio, Javier; Arena, Dario; Warnicke, Peter; Im, Mi-Young; Pollard, Shawn; Fischer, Peter; Zhu, Yimei

    2013-03-01

    We report on the magnetic evolution of magnetic vortices in nanoscale and multilayer disk structures. The tri-layer structure consists of Co and Permalloy (Py) layers, coupled across a thin (1nm) Cu spacer that provides strong coupling between the Co and Py layers. Element-resolved full-field XMCD microscopy is combined with ultra-high resolution Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, permitting measurement of both layer-resolved domain patterns and the vortex structure averaged across the tri-layer. We examine the evolution of the vortex structure while the nanostructure is cycled through the M-H hysteresis loop. In particular we will discuss the effects of strong interlayer exchanged coupling on a dual vortex core system, including analysis of the layer-resolved coercivity, and the evolution, deformation, annihilation, and nucleation of the vortices.

  9. Modeling depth-variant and domain-specific sorption and biodegradation in dual-permeability media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chittaranjan; Vogel, Tomas; Dusek, Jaromir

    2004-05-01

    A dual-permeability model (S_1D_DUAL) was developed to simulate the transport of land-applied pesticides in macroporous media. In this model, one flow domain was represented by the bulk matrix and the other by the preferential flow domain (PFD) where water and chemicals move at faster rates. The model assumed the validity of Darcian flow and the advective-dispersive solute transport in each of the two domains with inter-domain transfer of water and solutes due to pressure and concentration gradients. It was conceptualized that sorption and biodegradation rates vary with soil depth as well as in each of the two flow domains. In addition to equilibrium sorption, kinetic sorption was simulated in the PFD. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the combined effects of preferential flow, depth- and domain-variant sorption, and degradation on leaching of two pesticides: one with strong sorption potential (trifluralin) and the other with weak sorption potential (atrazine). Simulation results for a test case showed that water flux in the PFD was three times more than in the matrix for selected storm events. When equilibrium sorption was considered, the simulated profile of trifluralin in each domain was similar; however, the atrazine profile was deeper in the PFD than in the bulk matrix under episodic storm events. With an assumption of negligible sorption in the PFD, both the atrazine and the trifluralin profiles moved twice deeper into the PFD. The simulated concentrations of the chemicals were several orders higher in the PFD than in the matrix, even at deeper depths. The volume fraction of the macropores and the sorption and biodegradation properties of the chemicals could also affect the amount of pesticides leaving the root zone. For an intense storm event, slow sorption reaction rates in the PFD produced higher breakthrough concentrations of atrazine at the bottom of the simulated soil profile, thus posing the risk for breakthrough of chemicals from the root zone.

  10. Structural And Biochemical Studies of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype C1 Light Chain Protease: Implications for Dual Substrate Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, R.; Sikorra, S.; Stegmann, C.M.; Pich, A.; Binz, T.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-06-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic disease botulism and tetanus. They block neurotransmitter release through specific proteolysis of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) SNAP-25, syntaxin, and synaptobrevin, which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The catalytic component of the clostridial neurotoxins is their light chain (LC), a Zn2+ endopeptidase. There are seven structurally and functionally related botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), termed serotype A to G, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). Each of them exhibits unique specificity for their target SNAREs and peptide bond(s) they cleave. The mechanisms of action for substrate recognition and target cleavage are largely unknown. Here, we report structural and biochemical studies of BoNT/C1-LC, which is unique among BoNTs in that it exhibits dual specificity toward both syntaxin and SNAP-25. A distinct pocket (S1') near the active site likely achieves the correct register for the cleavage site by only allowing Ala as the P1' residue for both SNAP-25 and syntaxin. Mutations of this SNAP-25 residue dramatically reduce enzymatic activity. The remote a-exosite that was previously identified in the complex of BoNT/A-LC and SNAP-25 is structurally conserved in BoNT/C1. However, mutagenesis experiments show that the a-exosite of BoNT/C1 plays a less stringent role in substrate discrimination in comparison to that of BoNT/A, which could account for its dual substrate specificity.

  11. Preclinical safety assessment of Ad[I/PPT-E1A], a novel oncolytic adenovirus for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Kraaij, Robert; Adamson, Rachel; Maitland, Norman J; Bangma, Chris H

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in the Western world. Patients can be cured only when the tumor has not metastasized outside the prostate. However, treatment with curative intent fails in a significant number of men, often resulting in untreatable progressive disease with a fatal outcome. Oncolytic adenovirus therapy may be a promising adjuvant treatment to reduce local failure or the outgrowth of micrometastatic disease. Within the European gene therapy consortium GIANT, we have developed a novel prostate-specific oncolytic adenovirus: Ad[I/PPT-E1A]. This adenovirus specifically kills prostate cells via prostate-specific replication. This article describes the clinical development of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] with particular reference to the preclinical safety assessment of this novel virus. The preclinical safety assessment involved an efficacy study in a human orthotopic xenograft mouse model, a specificity study in human primary cells, and a toxicity study in normal mice. These studies confirmed that Ad[I/PPT-E1A] efficiently kills prostate tumor cells in vivo, is not harmful to other organs, and is well tolerated in mice after systemic delivery. The safety, as well as the immunological effects of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] as a local adjuvant therapy, will now be studied in a phase I dose-escalating trial in patients with localized prostate cancer who are scheduled for curative radical prostatectomy and can be used as an updated paradigm for similar therapeutic viruses.

  12. Pre-clinical safety assessment of Ad[I/PPT-E1A], a novel oncolytic adenovirus for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Kraaij, Robert; Adamson, Rachel; Maitland, Norman; Bangma, Chris H

    2014-02-18

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in the Western world. Patients can only be cured when the tumour has not metastasised outside the prostate. However, treatment with curative intent fails in a significant number of men, often resulting in untreatable progressive disease with a fatal outcome. Oncolytic adenovirus therapy may be a promising adjuvant treatment to reduce local failure or the outgrowth of micrometastatic disease. Within the European gene therapy consortium GIANT, we have developed a novel prostate-specific oncolytic adenovirus: Ad[I/PPT-E1A] that specifically kills prostate cells via prostate-specific replication. This paper describes the clinical development of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] with particular reference to the pre-clinical safety assessment of this novel virus. The pre-clinical safety assessment involved an efficacy study in a human orthotopic xenograft mouse model, a specificity study in human primary cells and a toxicity study in normal mice. These studies confirmed that Ad[I/PPT-E1A] efficiently kills prostate tumour cells in vivo, is not harmful to other organs and is well-tolerated in mice after systemic delivery. The safety, as well as the immunological effects of Ad[I/PPT-E1A] as a local adjuvant therapy will now be studied in a phase I dose-escalating trial in patients with localised prostate cancer who are scheduled for curative radical prostatectomy and can be used as an updated paradigm for similar therapeutic viruses.

  13. Practice-related optimization and transfer of executive functions: a general review and a specific realization of their mechanisms in dual tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobach, Tilo; Salminen, Tiina; Karbach, Julia; Schubert, Torsten

    2014-11-01

    Improvements in performing demanding and complex task situations are typically related to the optimization of executive functions and efficient behavioral control. The present study systematizes and reviews the optimization of different executive function types: Shifting, Inhibition, Updating, and Dual tasking. In particular, we focus on optimisations of these functions with training and on transfer effects of related training skills to non-trained situations. The aim of the study's empirical part (see also Appendix) was to investigate the specific mechanisms of executive functions in the context of Dual tasking, leading to improved dual-task performance after practice. More specifically, we tested the Efficient Task Instantiation (ETI) model that includes specific assumptions regarding practice-related improvements of executive task coordination skills: Dual-task performance is improved with practice because of an efficient and conjoint instantiation of sets of relevant task information in working memory at the onset of a dual task. According to our knowledge, the ETI model is one of the first that allows illustrating the contribution of cognitive mechanisms underlying practice-related improvements in performing dual tasks and the impact of task coordination skills on this performance.

  14. Shell-encoded Au nanoparticles with tunable electroactivity for specific dual disease biomarkers detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Yaxin; Sun, Yali; Cui, Linyan; Zheng, Fangjie; Zhang, Jiru; Song, Qijun; Xu, Chuanlai

    2018-01-15

    The exploration of electroactive labelling with tailorable and strong differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) responses is of great importance in accurate and sensitive screening of a panel of biomarkers related to cancer. Herein, shell-encoded gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are fabricated and give rise to shell species-dominated DPV peak potentials. Two independent DPV peaks appear at -0.08V for Au@Cu2O core-shell NPs and 0.26V for Au@Ag core-shell NPs. Shell-encoded Au NPs drastically exhibit shell thickness-tunable amplified peak currents. The non-interfering and amplified DPV responses enable shell-encoded Au NPs to be an alternative electrochemical signal amplifier for dual screening of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). The limits of detection (LODs) are calculated to be 1.8pg/mL for CEA and 0.3pg/mL for AFP. In comparison to the parallel single-analyte assays, shell-encoded Au NPs engineered electrochemical aptasensors offer multiplexing capability and show significant prospects in biomedical research and early diagnosis of diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Dual recognition unit strategy improves the specificity of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer biosensor for cerebral ATP assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; He, Xiulan; Zhang, Li; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-01-20

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer has been widely used as a recognition unit for biosensor development; however, its relatively poor specificity toward ATP against adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) essentially limits the application of the biosensors in real systems, especially in the complex cerebral system. In this study, for the first time, we demonstrate a dual recognition unit strategy (DRUS) to construct a highly selective and sensitive ATP biosensor by combining the recognition ability of aptamer toward A nucleobase and of polyimidazolium toward phosphate. The biosensors are constructed by first confining the polyimidazolium onto a gold surface by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), and then the aptamer onto electrode surface by electrostatic self-assembly to form dual-recognition-unit-functionalized electrodes. The constructed biosensor based on DRUS not only shows an ultrahigh sensitivity toward ATP with a detection limit down to the subattomole level but also an ultrahigh selectivity toward ATP without interference from ADP and AMP. The constructed biosensor is used for selective and sensitive sensing of the extracellular ATP in the cerebral system by combining in vivo microdialysis and can be used as a promising neurotechnology to probing cerebral ATP concentration.

  16. Virotherapy of canine tumors with oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h109 expressing an anti-VEGF single-chain antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S Patil

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for cancer therapy. We have previously reported that oncolytic vaccinia virus strains expressing an anti-VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor single-chain antibody (scAb GLAF-1 exhibited significant therapeutic efficacy for treatment of human tumor xenografts. Here, we describe the use of oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h109 encoding GLAF-1 for canine cancer therapy. In this study we analyzed the virus-mediated delivery and production of scAb GLAF-1 and the oncolytic and immunological effects of the GLV-1h109 vaccinia virus strain against canine soft tissue sarcoma and canine prostate carcinoma in xenograft models. Cell culture data demonstrated that the GLV-1h109 virus efficiently infect, replicate in and destroy both tested canine cancer cell lines. In addition, successful expression of GLAF-1 was demonstrated in virus-infected canine cancer cells and the antibody specifically recognized canine VEGF. In two different xenograft models, the systemic administration of the GLV-1h109 virus was found to be safe and led to anti-tumor and immunological effects resulting in the significant reduction of tumor growth in comparison to untreated control mice. Furthermore, tumor-specific virus infection led to a continued production of functional scAb GLAF-1, resulting in inhibition of angiogenesis. Overall, the GLV-1h109-mediated cancer therapy and production of immunotherapeutic anti-VEGF scAb may open the way for combination therapy concept i.e. vaccinia virus mediated oncolysis and intratumoral production of therapeutic drugs in canine cancer patients.

  17. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweeney K

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Katrina Sweeney, Gunnel Halldén Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK Abstract: Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting localized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support

  18. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  19. Production Functions for Water Delivery Systems: Analysis and Estimation Using Dual Cost Function and Implicit Price Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeples, Ronald; Glyer, David

    1987-05-01

    Both policy and technical analysis of water delivery systems have been based on cost functions that are inconsistent with or are incomplete representations of the neoclassical production functions of economics. We present a full-featured production function model of water delivery which can be estimated from a multiproduct, dual cost function. The model features implicit prices for own-water inputs and is implemented as a jointly estimated system of input share equations and a translog cost function. Likelihood ratio tests are performed showing that a minimally constrained, full-featured production function is a necessary specification of the water delivery operations in our sample. This, plus the model's highly efficient and economically correct parameter estimates, confirms the usefulness of a production function approach to modeling the economic activities of water delivery systems.

  20. The catalytic role of aspartic acid-92 in a human dual-specific protein-tyrosine-phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denu, J M; Zhou, G; Guo, Y; Dixon, J E

    1995-03-14

    The mechanism of catalysis for the human dual-specific (vaccinia H1-related) protein-tyrosine-phosphatase was investigated. The pH dependence of the kcat value is bell-shaped when p-nitrophenyl phosphate was employed as a model substrate. The kcat/Km pH profile rises with a slope of 2 and decreases with a slope of -1, indicating that two groups must be unprotonated and one group must be protonated for activity. An amino acid residue with an apparent pKa value of 5.5 +/- 0.2 must be unprotonated and a residue with a pKa value of 5.7 must be unprotonated for activity. The pKa value of the catalytic cysteine-124 (C124) was 5.6 +/- 0.1. The aspartic acid-92-asparagine (D92N) mutant enzyme was 100-fold less active than the native enzyme and exhibited the loss of the basic limb in the pH profiles, suggesting that in the native enzyme D92 must be protonated for activity. The D92 residue is conserved throughout the entire family of dual-specific phosphatases. Mutants glutamic acid-6-glutamine, glutamic acid-32-glutamine, aspartic acid-14-asparagine, and aspartic acid-110-asparagine had less than a 2-fold effect on the kinetic parameters when compared to native enzyme. Based upon the lack of a "burst" in rapid reaction kinetics, formation of the intermediate is rate-limiting with both native and D92N mutant enzymes. In agreement with rate-limiting formation of the intermediate, the pKa value of 5.5 for the group which must be unprotonated for activity was assigned to C124.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Insertion of the human sodium iodide symporter to facilitate deep tissue imaging does not alter oncolytic or replication capability of a novel vaccinia virus

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    Mittra Arjun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oncolytic viruses show promise for treating cancer. However, to assess therapeutic efficacy and potential toxicity, a noninvasive imaging modality is needed. This study aimed to determine if insertion of the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS cDNA as a marker for non-invasive imaging of virotherapy alters the replication and oncolytic capability of a novel vaccinia virus, GLV-1h153. Methods GLV-1h153 was modified from parental vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 to carry hNIS via homologous recombination. GLV-1h153 was tested against human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 for replication via viral plaque assays and flow cytometry. Expression and transportation of hNIS in infected cells was evaluated using Westernblot and immunofluorescence. Intracellular uptake of radioiodide was assessed using radiouptake assays. Viral cytotoxicity and tumor regression of treated PANC-1tumor xenografts in nude mice was also determined. Finally, tumor radiouptake in xenografts was assessed via positron emission tomography (PET utilizing carrier-free 124I radiotracer. Results GLV-1h153 infected, replicated within, and killed PANC-1 cells as efficiently as GLV-1h68. GLV-1h153 provided dose-dependent levels of hNIS expression in infected cells. Immunofluorescence detected transport of the protein to the cell membrane prior to cell lysis, enhancing hNIS-specific radiouptake (P In vivo, GLV-1h153 was as safe and effective as GLV-1h68 in regressing pancreatic cancer xenografts (P 124I-PET. Conclusion Insertion of the hNIS gene does not hinder replication or oncolytic capability of GLV-1h153, rendering this novel virus a promising new candidate for the noninvasive imaging and tracking of oncolytic viral therapy.

  2. Rational engineering of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase into either trehalose or kojibiose dual specificity phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Petersen, B.O.; Westphal, Y.

    2010-01-01

    of the active site pocket as a target for specificity engineering since it contains distinct sequences for different GH65 disaccharide phosphorylases. Substitution of LaMP His413-Glu421, His413-Ile418 and His413-Glu415 from loop 3, that include His413 and Glu415 presumably recognising the alpha-anomeric O-1...... in yields superior of maltose by reverse phosphorolysis with (alpha 1, alpha 1)- and alpha-(1,2)- regioselectivity, respectively, as analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance. The loop 3 in GH65 disaccharide phosphorylase is thus a key determinant for specificity both in phosphorolysis and in regiospecific...

  3. Simple and Specific Dual-Wavelength Excitable Dye Staining for Glycoprotein Detection in Polyacrylamide Gels and Its Application in Glycoproteomics

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    Yu-Hsuan Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a commercially available fluorescent dye, Lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl hydrazine (LRSH, was designed to specifically stain the glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels. Through the periodate/Schiff base mechanism, the fluorescent dye readily attaches to glycoproteins and the fluorescence can be simultaneously observed under either 305 nm or 532 nm excitation therefore, the dye-stained glycoproteins can be detected under a regular UV transilluminator or a more elegant laser-based gel scanner. The specificity and detection limit were examined using a standard protein mixture in polyacrylamide gels in this study. The application of this glycoprotein stain dye was further demonstrated using pregnancy urine samples. The fluorescent spots were further digested in gel and their identities confirmed through LC-MS/MS analysis and database searching. In addition, the N-glycosylation sites of LRSH-labeled uromodulin were readily mapped via in-gel PNGaseF deglycosylation and LC-MS/MS analysis, which indicated that this fluorescent dye labeling does not interfere with enzymatic deglycosylation. Hence, the application of this simple and specific dual-wavelength excitable dye staining in current glycoproteome research is promising.

  4. Structural elucidation of the NADP(H) phosphatase activity of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudipta; Dutta, Anirudha; Dutta, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Das, Amit Kumar

    2016-02-01

    NADP(H)/NAD(H) homeostasis has long been identified to play a pivotal role in the mitigation of reactive oxygen stress (ROS) in the intracellular milieu and is therefore critical for the progression and pathogenesis of many diseases. NAD(H) kinases and NADP(H) phosphatases are two key players in this pathway. Despite structural evidence demonstrating the existence and mode of action of NAD(H) kinases, the specific annotation and the mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatases remains obscure. Here, structural evidence supporting the alternative role of inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) as an NADP(H) phosphatase is reported. Crystal structures of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase (SaIMPase-I) in complex with the substrates D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate and NADP(+) have been solved. The structure of the SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-NADP(+) ternary complex reveals the catalytic mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatase. Moreover, structures of SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-substrate complexes have reinforced the earlier proposal that the length of the active-site-distant helix α4 and its preceding loop are the predisposing factors for the promiscuous substrate specificity of SaIMPase-I. Altogether, the evidence presented suggests that IMPase-family enzymes with a shorter α4 helix could be potential candidates for previously unreported NADP(H) phosphatase activity.

  5. Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: Fed Ex for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmon, Candice; Harrington, Kevin; Kottke, Timothy; Prestwich, Robin; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2009-10-01

    Oncolytic viruses delivered directly into the circulation face many hazards that impede their localization to, and infection of, metastatic tumors. Such barriers to systemic delivery could be overcome if couriers, which confer both protection, and tumor localization, to their viral cargoes, could be found. Several preclincal studies have shown that viruses can be loaded into, or onto, different types of cells without losing the biological activity of either virus or cell carrier. Importantly, such loading can significantly protect the viruses from immune-mediated virus-neutralizing activities, including antiviral antibody. Moreover, an impressive portfolio of cellular vehicles, which have some degree of tropism for tumor cells themselves, or for the biological properties associated with the tumor stroma, is already available. Therefore, it will soon be possible to initiate clinical protocols to test the hypopthesis that cell-mediated delivery can permit efficient shipping of oncolytic viruses from the loading bay (the production laboratory) directly to the tumor in immune-competent patients with metastatic disease.

  6. Pediatric glioma stem cells: biologic strategies for oncolytic HSV virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K Friedman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common adult malignant brain tumor, GBMs in childhood represent less than 10% of pediatric malignant brain tumors and are phenotypically and molecularly distinct from adult GBMs. Similar to adult patients, outcomes for children with high-grade gliomas (HGGs remain poor. Furthermore, the significant morbidity and mortality yielded by pediatric GBM is compounded by neurotoxicity for the developing brain caused by current therapies. Poor outcomes have been attributed to a subpopulation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant cells, termed ‘glioma stem cells’ (GSCs, ‘glioma progenitor cells’, or ‘glioma-initiating cells', which have the ability to initiate and maintain the tumor and to repopulate the recurring tumor after conventional therapy. Future innovative therapies for pediatric HGGs must be able to eradicate these therapy-resistant GSCs. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses, genetically engineered to be safe for normal cells and to express diverse foreign anti-tumor therapeutic genes, have been demonstrated in preclinical studies to infect and kill GSCs and tumor cells equally while sparing normal brain cells. In this review, we discuss the unique aspects of pediatric GSCs, including markers to identify them, the microenvironment they reside in, signaling pathways that regulate them, mechanisms of cellular resistance, and approaches to target GSCs, with a focus on the promising therapeutic, genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV.

  7. Chronic Activation of Innate Immunity Correlates With Poor Prognosis in Cancer Patients Treated With Oncolytic Adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Kristian; Liikanen, Ilkka; Juhila, Juuso; Turkki, Riku; Tähtinen, Siri; Kankainen, Matti; Vassilev, Lotta; Ristimäki, Ari; Koski, Anniina; Kanerva, Anna; Diaconu, Iulia; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Oksanen, Minna; Linder, Nina; Joensuu, Timo; Lundin, Johan; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-02-01

    Despite many clinical trials conducted with oncolytic viruses, the exact tumor-level mechanisms affecting therapeutic efficacy have not been established. Currently there are no biomarkers available that would predict the clinical outcome to any oncolytic virus. To assess the baseline immunological phenotype and find potential prognostic biomarkers, we monitored mRNA expression levels in 31 tumor biopsy or fluid samples from 27 patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Additionally, protein expression was studied from 19 biopsies using immunohistochemical staining. We found highly significant changes in several signaling pathways and genes associated with immune responses, such as B-cell receptor signaling (P immunity before treatment is associated with inferior survival in patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Conversely, lack of chronic innate inflammation at baseline may predict improved treatment outcome, as suggested by good overall prognosis.

  8. Rational engineering of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase into either trehalose or kojibiose dual specificity phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Petersen, Bent O; Westphal, Yvonne; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Abou Hachem, Maher; Duus, Jens Ø; Schols, Henk A; Svensson, Birte

    2010-10-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase (LaMP) of the (alpha/alpha)(6)-barrel glycoside hydrolase family 65 (GH65) catalyses both phosphorolysis of maltose and formation of maltose by reverse phosphorolysis with beta-glucose 1-phosphate and glucose as donor and acceptor, respectively. LaMP has about 35 and 26% amino acid sequence identity with GH65 trehalose phosphorylase (TP) and kojibiose phosphorylase (KP) from Thermoanaerobacter brockii ATCC35047. The structure of L. brevis MP and multiple sequence alignment identified (alpha/alpha)(6)-barrel loop 3 that forms the rim of the active site pocket as a target for specificity engineering since it contains distinct sequences for different GH65 disaccharide phosphorylases. Substitution of LaMP His413-Glu421, His413-Ile418 and His413-Glu415 from loop 3, that include His413 and Glu415 presumably recognising the alpha-anomeric O-1 group of the glucose moiety at subsite +1, by corresponding segments from Ser426-Ala431 in TP and Thr419-Phe427 in KP, thus conferred LaMP with phosphorolytic activity towards trehalose and kojibiose, respectively. Two different loop 3 LaMP variants catalysed the formation of trehalose and kojibiose in yields superior of maltose by reverse phosphorolysis with (alpha1, alpha1)- and alpha-(1,2)-regioselectivity, respectively, as analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance. The loop 3 in GH65 disaccharide phosphorylase is thus a key determinant for specificity both in phosphorolysis and in regiospecific reverse phosphorolysis.

  9. Specificity of motor components in the dual flagellar system of Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubendorfer, Sebastian; Held, Susanne; Windel, Natalie; Paulick, Anja; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai M

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial flagellar motors are intricate nanomachines in which the stator units and rotor component FliM may be dynamically exchanged during function. Similar to other bacterial species, the gammaproteobacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32 possesses a complete secondary flagellar system along with a corresponding stator unit. Expression of the secondary system occurs during planktonic growth in complex media and leads to the formation of a subpopulation with one or more additional flagella at random positions in addition to the primary polar system. We used physiological and phenotypic characterizations of defined mutants in concert with fluorescent microscopy on labelled components of the two different systems, the stator proteins PomB and MotB, the rotor components FliM(1) and FliM(2), and the auxiliary motor components MotX and MotY, to determine localization, function and dynamics of the proteins in the flagellar motors. The results demonstrate that the polar flagellum is driven by a Na(+)-dependent FliM(1)/PomAB/MotX/MotY flagellar motor while the secondary system is rotated by a H(+)-dependent FliM(2)/MotAB motor. The components were highly specific for their corresponding motor and are unlikely to be extensively swapped or shared between the two flagellar systems under planktonic conditions. The results have implications for both specificity and dynamics of flagellar motor components. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. A New Dual-Promoter System for Cardiomyocyte-Specific Conditional Induction of Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Agostini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a key determinant of major pathological processes, including chronic cardiac failure. We developed and tested in vitro a novel system to induce cardiomyocyte-specific apoptosis by virus-mediated delivery of a conditional transgene. The entire system was packaged in a lentiviral vector. We used the cardiomyocyte-specific Na+-Ca2+ exchange promoter to control the transcription of the reverse tetracycline transactivator, while the transgene expression was driven by the tetracycline-responsive element. The proapoptotic transgene of choice was the short isoform of the apoptosis-inducing factor, known to quickly induce the caspase-independent apoptosis when overexpressed in cells. Transduction of cardiomyocyte cells with this vector caused a tetracycline-regulated induction of apoptosis, which was not observed in noncardiac cells. Therefore, our system proved a valuable molecular tool for inducing controlled apoptosis in selected cells. Furthermore, the vector we developed is suitable for “lentivirus transgenesis,” an interesting strategy recently proposed for the genetic manipulation of animals other than mice, including large mammals.

  11. A new dual-promoter system for cardiomyocyte-specific conditional induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Silvia; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Matteucci, Marco; Chiuppesi, Flavia; Giacca, Mauro; Pistello, Mauro; Recchia, Fabio A

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis is a key determinant of major pathological processes, including chronic cardiac failure. We developed and tested in vitro a novel system to induce cardiomyocyte-specific apoptosis by virus-mediated delivery of a conditional transgene. The entire system was packaged in a lentiviral vector. We used the cardiomyocyte-specific Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange promoter to control the transcription of the reverse tetracycline transactivator, while the transgene expression was driven by the tetracycline-responsive element. The proapoptotic transgene of choice was the short isoform of the apoptosis-inducing factor, known to quickly induce the caspase-independent apoptosis when overexpressed in cells. Transduction of cardiomyocyte cells with this vector caused a tetracycline-regulated induction of apoptosis, which was not observed in noncardiac cells. Therefore, our system proved a valuable molecular tool for inducing controlled apoptosis in selected cells. Furthermore, the vector we developed is suitable for "lentivirus transgenesis," an interesting strategy recently proposed for the genetic manipulation of animals other than mice, including large mammals.

  12. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Manbok, E-mail: manbok66@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Rahman, Masmudur M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cogle, Christopher R. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McFadden, Grant [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  13. Evaluation of a new recombinant oncolytic vaccinia virus strain GLV-5b451 for feline mammary carcinoma therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Adelfinger

    Full Text Available Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV infection is a promising approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of a new preclinical model of feline mammary carcinoma (FMC using a recently established cancer cell line, DT09/06. In addition, we evaluated a recombinant vaccinia virus strain, GLV-5b451, expressing the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF single-chain antibody (scAb GLAF-2 as an oncolytic agent against FMC. Cell culture data demonstrate that GLV-5b451 virus efficiently infected, replicated in and destroyed DT09/06 cancer cells. In the selected xenografts of FMC, a single systemic administration of GLV-5b451 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in comparison to untreated tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, tumor-specific virus infection led to overproduction of functional scAb GLAF-2, which caused drastic reduction of intratumoral VEGF levels and inhibition of angiogenesis. In summary, here we have shown, for the first time, that the vaccinia virus strains and especially GLV-5b451 have great potential for effective treatment of FMC in animal model.

  14. Dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) stimulates Aβ42 generation by promoting amyloid precursor protein axonal transport during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunmin; Nah, Jihoon; Han, Jonghee; Choi, Seon-Guk; Kim, Hyunjoo; Park, Jaesang; Pyo, Ha-Kyung; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is generated through the sequential cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Hypoxia is a known risk factor for AD and stimulates Aβ generation by γ-secretase; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we showed that dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) regulates Aβ generation through changes in subcellular localization of the γ-secretase complex and its substrate C99 under hypoxic conditions. DUSP26 was identified as a novel γ-secretase regulator from a genome-wide functional screen using a cDNA expression library. The phosphatase activity of DUSP26 was required for the increase in Aβ42 generation through γ-secretase, but this regulation did not affect the amount of the γ-secretase complex. Interestingly, DUSP26 induced the accumulation of C99 in the axons by stimulating anterograde transport of C99-positive vesicles. Additionally, DUSP26 induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation for APP processing and axonal transport of C99. Under hypoxic conditions, DUSP26 expression levels were elevated together with JNK activation, and treatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125, or the DUSP26 inhibitor NSC-87877, reduced hypoxia-induced Aβ generation by diminishing vesicle trafficking of C99 to the axons. Finally, we observed enhanced DUSP26 expression and JNK activation in the hippocampus of AD patients. Our results suggest that DUSP26 mediates hypoxia-induced Aβ generation through JNK activation, revealing a new regulator of γ-secretase-mediated APP processing under hypoxic conditions. We propose the role of phosphatase dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) in the selective regulation of Aβ42 production in neuronal cells under hypoxic stress. Induction of DUSP26 causes JNK-dependent shift in the subcellular localization of γ-secretase and C99 from the cell body to axons for Aβ42 generation. These findings provide a

  15. Cation-Specific Conformations in a Dual-Function Ion-Pumping Microbial Rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Giordano F Z; Goblirsch, Brandon R; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Spudich, John L

    2015-06-30

    A recently discovered rhodopsin ion pump (DeNaR, also known as KR2) in the marine bacterium Dokdonia eikasta uses light to pump protons or sodium ions from the cell depending on the ionic composition of the medium. In cells suspended in a KCl solution, DeNaR functions as a light-driven proton pump, whereas in a NaCl solution, DeNaR conducts light-driven sodium ion pumping, a novel activity within the rhodopsin family. These two distinct functions raise the questions of whether the conformations of the protein differ in the presence of K(+) or Na(+) and whether the helical movements that result in the canonical E → C conformational change in other microbial rhodopsins are conserved in DeNaR. Visible absorption maxima of DeNaR in its unphotolyzed (dark) state show an 8 nm difference between Na(+) and K(+) in decyl maltopyranoside micelles, indicating an influence of the cations on the retinylidene photoactive site. In addition, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the dark states reveal repositioning of helices F and G when K(+) is replaced with Na(+). Furthermore, the conformational changes assessed by EPR spin-spin dipolar coupling show that the light-induced transmembrane helix movements are very similar to those found in bacteriorhodopsin but are altered by the presence of Na(+), resulting in a new feature, the clockwise rotation of helix F. The results establish the first observation of a cation switch controlling the conformations of a microbial rhodopsin and indicate specific interactions of Na(+) with the half-channels of DeNaR to open an appropriate path for ion translocation.

  16. Utility of the dual-specificity protein kinase TTK as a therapeutic target for intrahepatic spread of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ruoyu; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Haohai; Zhou, Huandi; Sun, Xiaofeng; Csizmadia, Eva; He, Lian; Zhao, Yi; Jiang, Chengyu; Miksad, Rebecca A; Ghaziani, Tahereh; Robson, Simon C; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-09-13

    Therapies for primary liver cancer, the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, remain limited. Following multi-omics analysis (including whole genome and transcriptome sequencing), we were able to identify the dual-specific protein kinase TTK as a putative new prognostic biomarker for liver cancer. Herein, we show that levels of TTK protein are significantly elevated in neoplastic tissues from a cohort of liver cancer patients, when compared with adjacent hepatic tissues. We also tested the utility of TTK targeted inhibition and have demonstrated therapeutic potential in an experimental model of liver cancer in vivo. Following lentiviral shRNA knockdown in several human liver cancer cell lines, we demonstrated that TTK boosts cell growth and promotes cell spreading; as well as protects against senescence and decreases autophagy. In an experimental animal model, we show that in vitro knockdown of TTK effectively blocks intrahepatic growth of human HCC xenografts. Furthermore, we note that, in vivo silencing of TTK, by systemically delivering TTK siRNAs to already tumor-bearing liver, limits intrahepatic spread of liver cancer cells. This intervention is associated with decreased tumor aggressiveness, as well as increased senescence and autophagy. Taken together, our data suggest that targeted TTK inhibition might have clinical utility as an adjunct therapy in management of liver cancer.

  17. Characterization of a human cell line stably over-expressing the candidate oncogene, dual specificity phosphatase 12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Cain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements within primary tumors has been influential in the identification of novel oncogenes. Identification of the "driver" gene(s within cancer-derived amplicons is, however, hampered by the fact that most amplicons contain many gene products. Amplification of 1q21-1q23 is strongly associated with liposarcomas and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization narrowed down the likely candidate oncogenes to two: the activating transcription factor 6 (atf6 and the dual specificity phosphatase 12 (dusp12. While atf6 is an established transcriptional regulator of the unfolded protein response, the potential role of dusp12 in cancer remains uncharacterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the oncogenic potential of dusp12, we established stable cell lines that ectopically over-express dusp12 in isolation and determined whether this cell line acquired properties frequently associated with transformed cells. Here, we demonstrate that cells over-expressing dusp12 display increased cell motility and resistance to apoptosis. Additionally, over-expression of dusp12 promoted increased expression of the c-met proto-oncogene and the collagen and laminin receptor intergrin alpha 1 (itga1 which is implicated in metastasis. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these results suggest that dusp12 is oncologically relevant and exposes a potential association between dusp12 and established oncogenes that could be therapeutically targeted.

  18. Laforin, a dual specificity phosphatase involved in Lafora disease, is present mainly as monomeric form with full phosphatase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas V Dukhande

    Full Text Available Lafora Disease (LD is a fatal neurodegenerative epileptic disorder that presents as a neurological deterioration with the accumulation of insoluble, intracellular, hyperphosphorylated carbohydrates called Lafora bodies (LBs. LD is caused by mutations in either the gene encoding laforin or malin. Laforin contains a dual specificity phosphatase domain and a carbohydrate-binding module, and is a member of the recently described family of glucan phosphatases. In the current study, we investigated the functional and physiological relevance of laforin dimerization. We purified recombinant human laforin and subjected the monomer and dimer fractions to denaturing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, phosphatase assays, protein-protein interaction assays, and glucan binding assays. Our results demonstrate that laforin prevalently exists as a monomer with a small dimer fraction both in vitro and in vivo. Of mechanistic importance, laforin monomer and dimer possess equal phosphatase activity, and they both associate with malin and bind glucans to a similar extent. However, we found differences between the two states' ability to interact simultaneously with malin and carbohydrates. Furthermore, we tested other members of the glucan phosphatase family. Cumulatively, our data suggest that laforin monomer is the dominant form of the protein and that it contains phosphatase activity.

  19. A dual specificity kinase, DYRK1A, as a potential therapeutic target for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raja, Remya; Sathe, Gajanan; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Jain, Ankit P.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Balaji, Sai A.; Chavan, Sandip; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A.; Mathur, Premendu P.; Kumar, Mahesh M.; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Santosh, Vani; Sukumar, Geethanjali; Califano, Joseph A.; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Sidransky, David; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in clinical management, 5-year survival rate in patients with late-stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not improved significantly over the past decade. Targeted therapies have emerged as one of the most promising approaches to treat several malignancies. Though tyrosine phosphorylation accounts for a minority of total phosphorylation, it is critical for activation of signaling pathways and plays a significant role in driving cancers. To identify activated tyrosine kinase signaling pathways in HNSCC, we compared the phosphotyrosine profiles of a panel of HNSCC cell lines to a normal oral keratinocyte cell line. Dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) was one of the kinases hyperphosphorylated at Tyr-321 in all HNSCC cell lines. Inhibition of DYRK1A resulted in an increased apoptosis and decrease in invasion and colony formation ability of HNSCC cell lines. Further, administration of the small molecular inhibitor against DYRK1A in mice bearing HNSCC xenograft tumors induced regression of tumor growth. Immunohistochemical labeling of DYRK1A in primary tumor tissues using tissue microarrays revealed strong to moderate staining of DYRK1A in 97.5% (39/40) of HNSCC tissues analyzed. Taken together our results suggest that DYRK1A could be a novel therapeutic target in HNSCC. PMID:27796319

  20. Functional antibodies produced by oncolytic clostridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Arjan J; Mengesha, Asferd; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J; Theys, Jan; Vooijs, Marc

    2007-12-28

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid cancer and characterized by regions of low oxygen and necrosis due to insufficient blood perfusion. Intratumoral hypoxia triggers the transcription of genes responsible for cell survival. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is a key regulator of this response. HIF activation is associated with resistance to radio- and chemotherapy and poor clinical outcome, and may therefore provide an attractive therapeutic target. Clostridium-based oncolysis is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of hypoxic tumors where these microorganisms naturally home. Here, we report for the first time the isolation of transconjugants of two excellent tumor colonizing Clostridium strains, C. novyi-NT and C. sporogenes, expressing single chain antibodies specific for human HIF-1alpha. This is a first step towards Clostridium-directed antibody therapy (CDAT) that holds promise as a carrier of cancer therapeutics targeting the most resistant regions in human solid cancer.

  1. Oncolytic viruses and their application to cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiocca, E Antonio; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2014-04-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) selectively replicate and kill cancer cells and spread within the tumor, while not harming normal tissue. In addition to this direct oncolytic activity, OVs are also very effective at inducing immune responses to themselves and to the infected tumor cells. OVs encompass a broad diversity of DNA and RNA viruses that are naturally cancer selective or can be genetically engineered. OVs provide a diverse platform for immunotherapy; they act as in situ vaccines and can be armed with immunomodulatory transgenes or combined with other immunotherapies. However, the interactions of OVs with the immune system may affect therapeutic outcomes in opposing fashions: negatively by limiting virus replication and/or spread, or positively by inducing antitumor immune responses. Many aspects of the OV-tumor/host interaction are important in delineating the effectiveness of therapy: (i) innate immune responses and the degree of inflammation induced; (ii) types of virus-induced cell death; (iii) inherent tumor physiology, such as infiltrating and resident immune cells, vascularity/hypoxia, lymphatics, and stromal architecture; and (iv) tumor cell phenotype, including alterations in IFN signaling, oncogenic pathways, cell surface immune markers [MHC, costimulatory, and natural killer (NK) receptors], and the expression of immunosuppressive factors. Recent clinical trials with a variety of OVs, especially those expressing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have demonstrated efficacy and induction of antitumor immune responses in the absence of significant toxicity. Manipulating the balance between antivirus and antitumor responses, often involving overlapping immune pathways, will be critical to the clinical success of OVs.

  2. Attacking postoperative metastases using perioperative oncolytic viruses and viral vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Hwa eTai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection of solid primary malignancies is a mainstay of therapy for cancer patients. Despite being the most effective treatment for these tumors, cancer surgery has been associated with impaired metastatic clearance due to immunosuppression. In preclinical surgery models and human cancer patients, we and others have demonstrated a profound suppression of both natural killer (NK and T cell function in the postoperative period and this plays a major role in the enhanced development of metastases following surgery. Oncolytic viruses (OV were originally designed to selectively infect and replicate in tumours, with the primary objective of directly lysing cancer cells. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that OV infection results in a profound inflammatory reaction within the tumour, initiating innate and adaptive immune responses against it that is critical for its therapeutic benefit. This anti-tumour immunity appears to be mediated predominantly by NK and cytotoxic T cells. In preclinical models, we found that preoperative OV prevents postoperative NK cell dysfunction and attenuates tumor dissemination. Due to theoretical safety concerns of administering live virus prior to surgery in cancer patients, we characterized safe, attenuated versions of OV and viral vaccines that could stimulate NK cells and reduce metastases when administered in the perioperative period. In cancer patients, we observed that in vivo infusion with oncolytic vaccinia virus and ex vivo stimulation with viral vaccines promotes NK cell activation. These preclinical studies provide a novel and clinically relevant setting for OV therapy. Our challenge is to identify safe and promising OV therapies that will activate NK and T cells in the perioperative period preventing the establishment of micrometastatic disease in cancer patients.

  3. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions.

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    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-11-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis-all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting.

  4. Construction of a novel oncolytic adenoviral vector and its biological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Xudong; Han, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xinfeng; Yang, Li; Sheng, Yuqiao; Wen, Jianguo

    2013-02-01

    expression of HSV-1-TK gene making Ad-EITH sensitive to ACV. In conclusion, a novel oncolytic adenoviral vector Ad-EITH was produced which can be used for cancer-specific and efficient viral replication, and its safety is potentially improved as replication can be inhibited by ACV in vitro.

  5. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines.

  6. A novel mobile dual-wavelength laser altimetry system for improved site-specific Nitrogen fertilizer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, J.; Magney, T. S.; Vierling, L. A.; Brown, T. T.; Huggins, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Reducing fertilizer inputs while maintaining yield would increase farmer's profits and similarly lessen the adverse environmental effects of production agriculture. The development of technologies that allow precise, site-specific application of Nitrogen (N) fertilizer has thus been an important research goal over the past decades. Remote sensing of foliar crop properties and function with tractor-mountable optical sensors has thought to be useful to optimize N fertilizer applications. However, on-the-go sensing of foliar crop properties and function has proven difficult, particularly during early crop growth stages when fertilizer decisions are often made. This difficulty arises from the fact that the spectral signal measured by on-the-go sensors is dominated by soil reflectance during early crop growth stages. Here, we present the basic principles behind a novel, dual-wavelength, tractor mountable laser altimetry system that measures the laser return intensity of the reflected green and red laser light. The green (532 nm) and the red (660 nm) wavelength combination allows calculation of a modified Photochemical Reflectance Index (mPRI) that have shown to be sensitive to both crop function and foliar chemistry. The small field of view of the laser points (diameter: 4 mm) combined with its high sampling rate (1000 points sec-1) allows vegetation returns to be isolated from ground returns by using simple thresholds. First tests relating foliar N of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with laser derived mPRI are promising (r2 = 0.72). Further research is needed to test the relationship between laser derived spectral indices and crop function.

  7. The dual-specificity phosphatase 2 (DUSP2) does not regulate obesity-associated inflammation or insulin resistance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Graeme I; Kraakman, Michael J; Kammoun, Helene L; Langley, Katherine G; Estevez, Emma; Banerjee, Ashish; Grumont, Raelene J; Febbraio, Mark A; Gerondakis, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the immune cell profile and the induction of inflammation within adipose tissue are a hallmark of obesity in mice and humans. Dual-specificity phosphatase 2 (DUSP2) is widely expressed within the immune system and plays a key role promoting immune and inflammatory responses dependent on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity. We hypothesised that the absence of DUSP2 would protect mice against obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance. Accordingly, male and female littermate mice that are either wild-type (wt) or homozygous for a germ-line null mutation of the dusp2 gene (dusp2-/-) were fed either a standard chow diet (SCD) or high fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks prior to metabolic phenotyping. Compared with mice fed the SCD, all mice consuming the HFD became obese, developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, and displayed increased macrophage recruitment and markers of inflammation in epididymal white adipose tissue. The absence of DUSP2, however, had no effect on the development of obesity or adipose tissue inflammation. Whole body insulin sensitivity in male mice was unaffected by an absence of DUSP2 in response to either the SCD or HFD; however, HFD-induced insulin resistance was slightly, but significantly, reduced in female dusp2-/- mice. In conclusion, DUSP2 plays no role in regulating obesity-associated inflammation and only a minor role in controlling insulin sensitivity following HFD in female, but not male, mice. These data indicate that rather than DUSP2 being a pan regulator of MAPK dependent immune cell mediated inflammation, it appears to differentially regulate inflammatory responses that have a MAPK component.

  8. [Oncolytic viruses as a new way of treatment of neoplastic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Urszula; Chronowska, Justyna; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-08-01

    Despite the unceasing progression in chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, neoplasms are still the second, after cardiovascular diseases, cause of death in the world. The creation of oncolytic viruses gives hope for increase of anticancer therapy effectiveness. Oncolytic viruses are the type of viruses that selectively infect and cause the lyse of tumor cells excluding normal cells. This mechanism allows to avoid the consequences of the possible replication of the virus, which having entered to the organism, replicates in organism's cells by using the DNA of host cells. The development of genetic engineering and molecular biology has enabled the creation of this kind of genetically modified viruses, which deprive them of their virulence. Currently, there are many clinical trials in progress including the use of oncolytic viruses in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, thyroid cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, melanoma and glioblastoma multiforme treatment. There are parallel studies in animals using the subsequent viruses. Oncolytic viruses treatment is generally well tolerated, without significant side effects. It is worth to point out that this method combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy allows to reduce the use of therapeutic doses, which significantly reduces the toxicity of conventional treatment. Further clinical studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of oncolytic viruses will develop more effective and better tolerated therapeutic protocols in the future.

  9. Effects of nanoparticle coatings on the activity of oncolytic adenovirus-magnetic nanoparticle complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Holm, Per Sonne; Schillinger, Ulrike; Plank, Christian; Mykhaylyk, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Limitations to adenovirus infectivity can be overcome by association with magnetic nanoparticles and enforced infection by magnetic field influence. Here we examined three core-shell-type iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles differing in their surface coatings, particle sizes and magnetic properties for their ability to enhance the oncolytic potency of adenovirus Ad520 and to stabilize it against the inhibitory effects of serum or a neutralizing antibody. It was found that the physicochemical properties of magnetic nanoparticles are critical determinants of the properties which govern the oncolytic productivities of their complexes with Ad520. Although high serum concentration during infection or a neutralizing antibody had strong inhibitory influence on the uptake or oncolytic productivity of the naked virus, one particle type was identified which conferred high protection against both inhibitory factors while enhancing the oncolytic productivity of the internalized virus. This particle type equipped with a silica coating and adsorbed polyethylenimine, displaying a high magnetic moment and high saturation magnetization, mediated a 50% reduction of tumor growth rate versus control upon intratumoral injection of its complex with Ad520 and magnetic field influence, whereas Ad520 alone was inefficient. The correlations between physical properties of the magnetic particles or virus complexes and oncolytic potency are described herein.

  10. Oncolytic Immunotherapy: Dying the Right Way is a Key to Eliciting Potent Antitumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Sheng eGuo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OVs are novel immunotherapeutic agents whose anticancer effects come from both oncolysis and elicited antitumor immunity. OVs induce mostly immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD, including immunogenic apoptosis, necrosis/necroptosis, pyroptosis and autophagic cell death, leading to exposure of calreticulin and heat-shock proteins to the cell surface, and/or released ATP, high mobility group box-1 [HMGB1], uric acid, and other DAMPs as well as PAMPs as danger signals, along with tumor-associated antigens, to activate dendritic cells (DCs and elicit adaptive antitumor immunity. Dying the right way may greatly potentiate adaptive antitumor immunity. The mode of cancer cell death may be modulated by individual OVs and cancer cells as they often encode and express genes that inhibit/promote apoptosis, necroptosis or autophagic cell death. We can genetically engineer OVs with death-pathway-modulating genes and thus skew the infected cancer cells towards certain death pathways for the enhanced immunogenicity. Strategies combining with some standard therapeutic regimens may also change the immunological consequence of cancer cell death. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of danger signals, modes of cancer cell death induced by OVs, the induced danger signals and functions in eliciting subsequent antitumor immunity. We also discuss potential combination strategies to target cells into specific modes of ICD and enhance cancer immunogenicity, including blockade of immune checkpoints, in order to break immune tolerance, improve antitumor immunity and thus the overall therapeutic efficacy.

  11. The strength of the T cell response against a surrogate tumor antigen induced by oncolytic VSV therapy does not correlate with tumor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelle, Valérie; Langlois, Marie-Pierre; Lapierre, Pascal; Charpentier, Tania; Poliquin, Laurent; Lamarre, Alain

    2014-06-01

    Cancer therapy using oncolytic viruses has gained interest in the last decade. Vesicular stomatitis virus is an attractive candidate for this alternative treatment approach. The importance of the immune response against tumor antigens in virotherapy efficacy is now well recognized, however, its relative contribution versus the intrinsic oncolytic capacity of viruses has been difficult to evaluate. To start addressing this question, we compared glycoprotein and matrix mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), showing different oncolytic potentials for B16/B16gp33 melanoma tumor cells in vitro, with the wild-type virus in their ability to induce tumor-specific CD8(+) T cell responses and control tumor progression in vivo. Despite the fact that wild-type and G mutants induced a stronger gp33-specific immune response compared to the MM51R mutant, all VSV strains showed a similar capacity to slow down tumor progression. The effectiveness of the matrix mutant treatment proved to be CD8(+) dependent and directed against tumor antigens other than gp33 since adoptive transfer of isolated CD8(+) T lymphocytes from treated B16gp33-bearing mice resulted in significant protection of naive mice against challenge with the parental tumor. Remarkably, the VSV matrix mutant induced the upregulation of major histocompatibility class-I antigen at the tumor cell surface thus favoring recognition by CD8(+) T cells. These results demonstrate that VSV mutants induce an antitumor immune response using several mechanisms. A better understanding of these mechanisms will prove useful for the rational design of viruses with improved therapeutic efficacy.

  12. Changing faces in virology: the dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaid, Zineb; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Hoeben, Rob C

    2014-10-01

    Viruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transformation and cancer. On the other hand, viruses may provide hope: hope for an efficacious treatment of serious disease. Examples of the latter are the use of viruses as a vaccine, as transfer vector for therapeutic genes in a gene therapy setting, or, more directly, as therapeutic anticancer agent in an oncolytic-virus therapy setting. Already there is evidence for antitumor activity of oncolytic viruses. The antitumor efficacy seems linked to their capacity to induce a tumor-directed immune response. Here, we will provide an overview on the development of oncolytic viruses and their clinical evaluation from the Dutch perspective.

  13. Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus: how far have we come?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolowski NAS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas AS Sokolowski,1 Helen Rizos,2 Russell J Diefenbach1 1Centre for Virus Research, Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy exploits the properties of human viruses to naturally cause cytolysis of cancer cells. The human pathogen herpes simplex virus (HSV has proven particularly amenable for use in oncolytic virotherapy. The relative safety of HSV coupled with extensive knowledge on how HSV interacts with the host has provided a platform for manipulating HSV to enhance the targeting and killing of human cancer cells. This has culminated in the approval of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma. This review focuses on the development of HSV as an oncolytic virus and where the field is likely to head in the future. Keywords: herpes simplex virus, cancer, immunity, combination therapy, oncolysis

  14. Ultrasound-mediated oncolytic virus delivery and uptake for increased therapeutic efficacy: state of art

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    Nande R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rounak Nande,1 Candace M Howard,2 Pier Paolo Claudio,3,4 1Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Marshall University School of Medicine, Huntington, WV, 2Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, 3Department of BioMolecular Sciences and National Center for Natural Products Research, School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, MS, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA Abstract: The field of ultrasound (US has changed significantly from medical imaging and diagnosis to treatment strategies. US contrast agents or microbubbles (MB are currently being used as potential carriers for chemodrugs, small molecules, nucleic acids, small interfering ribonucleic acid, proteins, adenoviruses, and oncolytic viruses. Oncolytic viruses can selectively replicate within and destroy a cancer cell, thus making them a powerful therapeutic in treating late-stage or metastatic cancer. These viruses have been shown to have robust activity in clinical trials when injected directly into tumor nodules. However limitations in oncolytic virus’ effectiveness and its delivery approach have warranted exploration of ultrasound-mediated delivery. Gene therapy bearing adenoviruses or oncolytic viruses can be coupled with MBs and injected intravenously. Following application of US energy to the target region, the MBs cavitate, and the resulting shock wave enhances drug, gene, or adenovirus uptake. Though the underlying mechanism is yet to be fully understood, there is evidence to suggest that mechanical pore formation of cellular membranes allows for the temporary uptake of drugs. This delivery method circumvents the limitations due to stimulation of the immune system that prevented intravenous administration of viruses. This review provides insight into this intriguing new frontier on the delivery of oncolytic viruses to tumor sites.Keywords: microbubbles, ultrasound

  15. Oncolytic viruses: From bench to bedside with a focus on safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Pascal RA; Verhagen, Judith HE; van Eijck, Casper HJ; van den Hoogen, Bernadette G

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents. Several viruses have undergone evaluation in clinical trials in the last decades, and the first agent is about to be approved to be used as a novel cancer therapy modality. In the current review, an overview is presented on recent (pre)clinical developments in the field of oncolytic viruses that have previously been or currently are being evaluated in clinical trials. Special attention is given to possible safety issues like toxicity, environmental shedding, mutation and reversion to wildtype virus. PMID:25996182

  16. Syngeneic syrian hamster tumors feature tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes allowing adoptive cell therapy enhanced by oncolytic adenovirus in a replication permissive setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Havunen, Riikka; Tähtinen, Siri; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Mathis, J Michael; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has shown promising yet sometimes suboptimal results in clinical trials for advanced cancer, underscoring the need for approaches improving efficacy and safety. Six implantable syngeneic tumor cell lines of the Syrian hamster were used to initiate TIL cultures. TIL generated from tumor fragments cultured in human interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 10 d were adoptively transferred into tumor-bearing hamsters with concomitant intratumoral injections of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5-D24) for the assessment of antitumor efficacy. Pancreatic cancer (HapT1) and melanoma (RPMI 1846) TIL exhibited potent and tumor-specific cytotoxicity in effector-to-target (E/T) assays. MHC Class I blocking abrogated the cell killing of RPMI 1846 TIL, indicating cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell activity. When TIL were combined with Ad5-D24 in vitro, HapT1 tumor cell killing was significantly enhanced over single agents. In vivo, the intratumoral administration of HapT1 TIL and Ad5-D24 resulted in improved tumor growth control compared with either treatment alone. Additionally, splenocytes derived from animals treated with the combination of Ad5-D24 and TIL killed autologous tumor cells more efficiently than monotherapy-derived splenocytes, suggesting that systemic antitumor immunity was induced. For the first time, TIL of the Syrian hamster have been cultured, characterized and used therapeutically together with oncolytic adenovirus for enhancing the efficacy of TIL therapy. Our results support human translation of oncolytic adenovirus as an enabling technology for adoptive T-cell therapy of solid tumors.

  17. ET-46ONCOLYTIC VIRAL THERAPY FOR MALIGNANT GLIOMAS USING MYXOMA VIRUS DELETED FOR ANTI-APOPTOTIC M11L GENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklakova, Alexandra; McKenzie, Brienne; Kenchappa, Rajappa; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Brain Tumour Initiating Cells (BTICs) are stem-like cells hypothesized to mediate recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Myxoma virus (MyxV) is a promising oncolytic virus, which is highly effective in conventional long term resistant glioma cell lines and less effective in BTICs. We hypothesized that one possible factor limiting efficacy in BTICs is that cell death following infection with MyxV is inhibited by virally encoded anti-apoptotic proteins, such as the Bcl-2 structural homologue, M011L. To test this we evaluated and compared the efficacy of wtMYXV versus the viral construct MyxV-M011L-KO (in which the anti-apoptotic protein M11L has been deleted) in BTICs. We found that WT-MyxV does not induce significant level of apoptosis in infected BTICs, but that MyxV-M011L-KO induces dramatically more apoptosisas shown by caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and Cytochrome C release from the mitochondria M11L from the WT-MyxV localized to the mitochondrial membrane and prevented the association of Bax with the mitochondrial membrane. Finally, silencing of Bax using specific siRNAs significantly blocked the induction of apoptosis and cell death that occurs after infection with mutant MyxV-M011L-KO virus. Therefore MyxV-M011L-KO, which is has the anti-apoptotic virally derived gene M11L, dramatically improves the oncolytic efficacy in BTICs and this is dependent on the presence of the pro-apoptotic host protein, Bax. This is the first demonstration, that the MyxV mutant, genetically modified to promote apoptosis in tumor initiating cells, is significantly more efficacious than the wildtype virus. Strategies, such as this one, that promotes apoptosis in tumor initiating cells might be particularly effective.

  18. Activation of the human immune system via toll-like receptors by the oncolytic parvovirus H-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieben, Maike; Schäfer, Petra; Dinsart, Christiane; Galle, Peter R; Moehler, Markus

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the function of toll-like receptors (TLRs) during oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV)-induced human immune responses. First, the role of TLRs in the activation of the NFκB transcription factor was characterized; second, the immunologic effects of H-1PV-induced tumor cell lysates (TCL) on human antitumor immune responses were evaluated. A human ex vivo model was used to study immune responses with dendritic cells (DCs). Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) transfected to stably express TLRs were used as potential human DC equivalents to further investigate the role of specific TLRs during immune activation. TLR3 and TLR9 were activated by H-1PV infection, which correlated with NFκB translocation to the nucleus and a reduced cytoplasmic IκB expression. Using a TLR-signaling reporter plasmid (pNiFty-Luc), NFκB activity was increased following H-1PV infection. In addition, human DCs coincubated with H-1PV-induced TCL demonstrated increased TLR3 and TLR9 expression. These data suggest that H-1PV-induced TCL stimulate human DCs at least in part through TLR-dependent signaling pathways. Thus, DC maturation occurred through exposure to H-1PV-induced TCL through TLR-signaling leading to NFκB-dependent activation of the adaptive immune system as indicated by the increased expression of CD86, TLR3 and TLR9. Furthermore, the transcription of various cytokines indicates the activation of immune response, therefore the production of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α was determined. Here, H-1PV-induced TCL significantly enhanced the TNF-α level by DCs after coculture. H-1PV oncolytic virotherapy enhances immune priming by different effects on DCs and generates antitumor immunity. These findings potentially offer a new approach to tumor therapy.

  19. Some specific features in the development of the dual in Slovene as compared to other Slavic languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Derganc

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Tesnierè's work "Les formes du duel en Slovène" and his "Atlas linguistique pour servir à l'étude du duel en slovène" has remained the basic work to consult in dealing with the category of the dual in Slovene and has been used as well by linguists researching this category in other Slavic languages. Tesnieère himself explained the reason for doing his research: the dual greatly interested his teacher A. Meillet and Tesniere wanted to study this category and the way it was disappearing in a modern European language, the choice being very limited (he mentioned certain speakers of Lithuanian, and three Slavic languages: Slovene, Slovincian 1 and Lower Sorbian; Tesnière 1925a: VIII; all references in this paper are to Tesnière 1925a.

  20. Effect of Repeat Dosing of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus on Preclinical Models of Rhabdomyosarcoma

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    Alicia M. Waters

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS, a tumor of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common sarcoma of childhood. Despite multidrug chemotherapy regimens, surgical intervention, and radiation treatment, outcomes remain poor, especially in advanced disease, and novel therapies are needed for the treatment of these aggressive malignancies. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses, such as herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV, are currently being explored as treatments for pediatric tumors. M002, an oncolytic HSV, has both copies of the γ134.5 gene deleted, enabling replication in tumor cells but thwarting infection of normal, postmitotic cells. We hypothesized that M002 would infect human RMS tumor cells and lead to decreased tumor cell survival in vitro and impede tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrated that M002 could infect, replicate in, and decrease cell survival in both embryonal (ERMS and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS cells. Additionally, M002 reduced xenograft tumor growth and increased animal survival in both ARMS and ERMS. Most importantly, we showed for the first time that repeated dosing of oncolytic virus coupled with low-dose radiation provided improved tumor response in RMS. These findings provide support for the clinical investigation of oncolytic HSV in pediatric RMS.

  1. Neuroblastoma cell lines contain pluripotent tumor initiating cells that are susceptible to a targeted oncolytic virus.

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    Yonatan Y Mahller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although disease remission can frequently be achieved for patients with neuroblastoma, relapse is common. The cancer stem cell theory suggests that rare tumorigenic cells, resistant to conventional therapy, are responsible for relapse. If true for neuroblastoma, improved cure rates may only be achieved via identification and therapeutic targeting of the neuroblastoma tumor initiating cell. Based on cues from normal stem cells, evidence for tumor populating progenitor cells has been found in a variety of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four of eight human neuroblastoma cell lines formed tumorspheres in neural stem cell media, and all contained some cells that expressed neurogenic stem cell markers including CD133, ABCG2, and nestin. Three lines tested could be induced into multi-lineage differentiation. LA-N-5 spheres were further studied and showed a verapamil-sensitive side population, relative resistance to doxorubicin, and CD133+ cells showed increased sphere formation and tumorigenicity. Oncolytic viruses, engineered to be clinically safe by genetic mutation, are emerging as next generation anticancer therapeutics. Because oncolytic viruses circumvent typical drug-resistance mechanisms, they may represent an effective therapy for chemotherapy-resistant tumor initiating cells. A Nestin-targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus efficiently replicated within and killed neuroblastoma tumor initiating cells preventing their ability to form tumors in athymic nude mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that human neuroblastoma contains tumor initiating cells that may be effectively targeted by an oncolytic virus.

  2. Recombinant immunomodulating lentogenic or mesogenic oncolytic newcastle disease virus for treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.R.A. Buijs (Pascal); S. van Nieuwkoop (Stefan); Vaes, V. (Vincent); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractOncolytic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) might be a promising new therapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated recombinant NDVs (rNDVs) expressing interferon (rNDV-hIFNβ-F0) or an IFN antagonistic protein (rNDV-NS1-F0), as well as rNDV with

  3. Immunosuppression enhances oncolytic adenovirus replication and antitumor efficacy in the Syrian hamster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Maria A; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Toth, Karoly; Sagartz, John E; Phillips, Nancy J; Wold, William S M

    2008-10-01

    We recently described an immunocompetent Syrian hamster model for oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) that permits virus replication in tumor cells as well as some normal tissues. This model allows exploration of interactions between the virus, tumor, normal organs, and host immune system that could not be examined in the immunodeficient or nonpermissive animal models previously used in the oncolytic Ad field. Here we asked whether the immune response to oncolytic Ad enhances or limits antitumor efficacy. We first determined that cyclophosphamide (CP) is a potent immunosuppressive agent in the Syrian hamster and that CP alone had no effect on tumor growth. Importantly, we found that the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic Ads was significantly enhanced in immunosuppressed animals. In animals that received virus therapy plus immunosuppression, significant differences were observed in tumor histology, and in many cases little viable tumor remained. Notably, we also determined that immunosuppression allowed intratumoral virus levels to remain elevated for prolonged periods. Although favorable tumor responses can be achieved in immunocompetent animals, the rate of virus clearance from the tumor may lead to varied antitumor efficacy. Immunosuppression, therefore, allows sustained Ad replication and oncolysis, which leads to substantially improved suppression of tumor growth.

  4. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part I: strategies for utilizing oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P Cripe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress for improving outcomes in pediatric patients with solid tumors remains slow. In addition, currently available therapies are fraught with numerous side effects, often causing significant life-long morbidity for long-term survivors. The use of viruses to kill tumor cells based on their increased vulnerability to infection is gaining traction, with several viruses moving through early and advanced phase clinical testing. The prospect of increased efficacy and decreased toxicity with these agents is thus attractive for pediatric cancer. In part I of this two-part review, we focus on strategies for utilizing oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV to target pediatric malignancies. We discuss mechanisms of action, routes of delivery, and the role of preexisting immunity on antitumor efficacy. Challenges to maximizing oncolytic HSV in children are examined, and we highlight how these may be overcome through various arming strategies. We review the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating safety of a variety of oncolytic HSVs. In Part II, we focus on the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic HSV in pediatric tumor types, pediatric clinical advances made to date, and future prospects for utilizing HSV in pediatric patients with solid tumors.

  5. Heterologous expression and catalytic properties of the C-terminal domain of starfish cdc25 dual-specificity phosphatase, a cell cycle regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, Shungo; Miyake, Yasuo; Ohmiya, Tadamasa; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Endo, Yasuko; Yumoto, Noboru; Toraya, Tetsuo

    2002-05-01

    The 3'-terminal region of starfish Asterina pectinifera cdc25 cDNA encoding the C-terminal catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The C-terminal domain consisted of 226 amino acid residues containing the signature motif HCxxxxxR, a motif highly conserved among protein tyrosine and dual-specificity phosphatases, and showed phosphatase activity toward p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by SH inhibitors. Mutational studies indicated that the cysteine and arginine residues in the conserved motif are essential for activity, but the histidine residue is not. These results suggest that the enzyme catalyzes the reaction through a two-step mechanism involving a phosphocysteine intermediate like in the cases of other protein tyrosine and dual-specificity phosphatases. The C-terminal domain of Cdc25 activated the histone H1 kinase activity of the purified, inactive form of Cdc2.cyclin B complex (preMPF) from extracts of immature starfish oocytes. Synthetic diphosphorylated di- to nonadecapeptides mimicking amino acid sequences around the dephosphorylation site of Cdc2 still retained substrate activity. Phosphotyrosine and phosphothreonine underwent dephosphorylation in this order. This is the reverse order to that reported for the in vivo and in vitro dephosphorylation of preMPF. Monophosphopeptides having the same sequence served as much poorer substrates. As judged from the results with synthetic phosphopeptides, the presence of two phosphorylated residues was important for specific recognition of substrates by the Cdc25 phosphatase.

  6. DYRK1A (Dual-Specificity Tyrosine-Phosphorylated and -Regulated Kinase 1A: A Gene with Dosage Effect During Development and Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dierssen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available DYRKs (dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases are an emerging family of evolutionarily conserved dual-specificity kinases that play key roles in cell proliferation, survival, and development. The research in the last years suggests a relevant conserved function during neuronal development, related to proliferation and/or differentiation for DYRK1A. It is expressed in neural progenitor cells and has been proposed to participate in the signaling mechanisms that regulate dendrite differentiation. In Drosophila, disruption of the homolog minibrain gene results in flies with reduced neuroblast proliferation, decreased numbers of central brain neurons, and learning/memory deficits. Knockout DYRK1A mice are embryonic lethal, and heterozygotes show decreased viability and region-specific reductions in brain size. In humans, DYRK1A has been proposed to be involved in the neurodevelopmental alterations associated with Down syndrome. The large number of protein interaction and putative substrates described for DYRK1A suggest multiple pathways and functions to be involved in its developmental function. This review focuses on the functional role that DYRK1A plays in brain development.

  7. Oncolytic vaccinia virus synergizes with irinotecan in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolino-Perry, Kathryn; Acuna, Sergio A; Angarita, Fernando A; Sellers, Clara; Zerhouni, Siham; Tang, Nan; McCart, J Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) is complex clinical challenge for which there are limited treatment options. Chemotherapy with or without surgery provides moderate improvements in overall survival and quality of life; nevertheless the 5-year survival remains below 30%. Oncolytic vaccinia virus (VV) shows strong anti-tumour activity in models of CRC, however transient delays in disease progression are insufficient to lead to long-term survival. Here we examined the efficacy of VV with oxaliplatin or SN-38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) in CRC cell lines in vitro and VV with irinotecan in an orthotopic model of metastatic CRC. Synergistic improvements in in vitro cell killing were observed in multiple cell lines. Combination therapy was well tolerated in tumour-bearing mice and the median survival was significantly increased relative to monotherapy despite a drug-dependent decrease in the mean tumour titer. Increased apoptosis following in vitro and in vivo combination therapy was observed. In vitro cell cycle analysis showed increases in S-phase cells following infection occurred in both infected and uninfected cell populations. This corresponded to a 4-fold greater increase in apoptosis in the uninfected compared to infected cells following combination therapy. Combination treatment strategies are among the best options for patients with advanced cancers. VV is currently under clinical investigation in patients with CRC and the data presented here suggest that its combination with irinotecan may provide benefit to a subset of CRC patients. Further, investigation of this combination is necessary to determine the tumour characteristics responsible for mediating synergy. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A bidirectional Tet-dependent promotor construct regulating the expression of E1A for tight control of oncolytic adenovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, Henry; Wang, Xiaomin; Picó, Almudena Hurtado; Wildner, Judith; Suckau, Lennart; Pinkert, Sandra; Sipo, Isaac; Weger, Stefan; Poller, Wolfgang

    2007-01-20

    Tight regulation of oncolytic adenoviruses (oAdV) represents an important requirement for their safe application. Here we describe a new doxycycline (Dox)-dependent oAdV with a bidirectional expression cassette, which drives the expression of the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator (rtTA(s)-M2) from a lung tumor-specific promoter and, in the opposite direction, the expression of the adenoviral E1A gene from a second generation TetO(7) sequence linked to an isolated TATA box. In H441 lung cancer cells, this oAdV showed a strictly Dox-dependent E1A expression, adenoviral replication, cell killing activity and a 450-fold induction of progeny virus production. The virus could be shut off again by withdrawal of Dox and, in contrast to a control oAdV expressing E1A directly from the SP-B promoter, did not replicate in non-target cells. However, the absolute values of virus production and the cell killing activity in the presence of the inducer were still reduced as compared to the control oAdV. The results demonstrate, for the first time, Dox-dependent oAdV replication from a single adenoviral vector genome. Future improvement of the Dox-dependent E1A regulation cassette should lead to the generation of an oAdV well suited to meet the demands for a highly regulated and efficient oncolytic virus for in vivo applications.

  9. A stringent dual control system overseeing transcription and activity of the Cre recombinase for the liver-specific conditional gene knock-out mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wu; Yinghua He; Hongyu Zhang; Xinlan Dai; Xiaoyu Zhou; Jun Gu; Guan Wang; Jingde Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most threatening diseases in Chinese population. Just like in other tissues, tumor initiation and development in liver involve multiple steps of genetic and epigenetic alterations with several unknown details. However, unlike in other tissues, a tis- sue specific inducible Cre recombinase system that allows temporal and spatial deletion of a target DNA fragment is still not available for in vivo functional gene annotation in hepatocytes. In our pursuit to establish such a mouse model, we designed a dual inducible Cre transgene system and tested it in cultured cells. By combining a CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBP β) promoter derived Tet-off expression system and the estrogen receptor (ER) mediated functional control, we show a desirable profile of both hepatocyte-specificity and regulability of the Cre expression in a series of critical assessments in the cell culture system, which provides confidence in continua- tion of our ongoing pursuit in mouse.

  10. Analytical specificity and sensitivity of the novel dual-target GeneProof Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR kit for detection of N. gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golparian, Daniel; Hellmark, Bengt; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-11-01

    Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae relies increasingly on nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The specificity of many gonococcal NAATs has been suboptimal and supplementary testing remains recommended in Europe and several additional countries. The novel dual-target GeneProof Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR kit, targeting porA pseudogene and 16S rRNA gene, showed a high specificity and sensitivity when isolates of non-gonococcal Neisseria and related species (n = 144), and gonococci (n = 104) were tested. However, rare gonococcal porA mutants were only detected in the 16S rRNA gene target and two non-gonococcal isolates showed a low-level cross-reactivity in the 16S rRNA gene target. The detection limit for both targets was 1.5 copies per reaction.

  11. Sensitivity and Specificity of Dual-Isotope 99mTc-Tetrofosmin and 123I Sodium Iodide Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) in Hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerauer, Michael; Graf, Carmen; Schäfer, Niklaus; Huber, Gerhard; Schneider, Paul; Wüthrich, Rudolf; Schmid, Christoph; Steinert, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite recommendations for 99mTc-tetrofosmin dual tracer imaging for hyperparathyroidism in current guidelines, no report was published on dual-isotope 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 123I sodium iodide single-photon-emission-computed-tomography (SPECT). We evaluated diagnostic accuracy and the impact of preoperative SPECT on the surgical procedures and disease outcomes. Analysis of 70 consecutive patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and 20 consecutive patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism. Imaging findings were correlated with surgical results. Concomitant thyroid disease, pre- and postoperative laboratory measurements, histopathological results, type and duration of surgery were assessed. In primary hyperparathyroidism, SPECT had a sensitivity of 80% and a positive predictive value of 93% in patient-based analysis. Specificity was 99% in lesion-based analysis. Patients with positive SPECT elicit higher levels of parathyroid hormone and higher weight of resected parathyroids than SPECT-negative patients. Duration of parathyroid surgery was on average, approximately 40 minutes shorter in SPECT-positive than in SPECT-negative patients (89 ± 46 vs. 129 ± 41 minutes, p = 0.006); 86% of SPECT-positive and 50% of SPECT-negative patients had minimal invasive surgery (p = 0.021). SPECT had lower sensitivity (60%) in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism; however, 90% of these patients had multiple lesions and all of these patients had bilateral lesions. Dual-isotope SPECT with 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 123I sodium iodide has a high diagnostic value in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and allows for saving of operation time. Higher levels of parathyroid hormone and higher glandular weight facilitated detection of parathyroid lesion. Diagnostic accuracy of preoperative imaging was lower in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

  12. Directed Evolution Generates a Novel Oncolytic Virus for the Treatment of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Irene; Harden, Paul; Bauzon, Maxine; Chartier, Cecile; Nye, Julie; Thorne, Steve; Reid, Tony; Ni, Shaoheng; Lieber, Andre; Fisher, Kerry; Seymour, Len; Rubanyi, Gabor M.; Harkins, Richard N.; Hermiston, Terry W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Viral-mediated oncolysis is a novel cancer therapeutic approach with the potential to be more effective and less toxic than current therapies due to the agents selective growth and amplification in tumor cells. To date, these agents have been highly safe in patients but have generally fallen short of their expected therapeutic value as monotherapies. Consequently, new approaches to generating highly potent oncolytic viruses are needed. To address this need, we developed a new method that we term “Directed Evolution” for creating highly potent oncolytic viruses. Methodology/Principal Findings Taking the “Directed Evolution” approach, viral diversity was increased by pooling an array of serotypes, then passaging the pools under conditions that invite recombination between serotypes. These highly diverse viral pools were then placed under stringent directed selection to generate and identify highly potent agents. ColoAd1, a complex Ad3/Ad11p chimeric virus, was the initial oncolytic virus derived by this novel methodology. ColoAd1, the first described non-Ad5-based oncolytic Ad, is 2–3 logs more potent and selective than the parent serotypes or the most clinically advanced oncolytic Ad, ONYX-015, in vitro. ColoAd1's efficacy was further tested in vivo in a colon cancer liver metastasis xenograft model following intravenous injection and its ex vivo selectivity was demonstrated on surgically-derived human colorectal tumor tissues. Lastly, we demonstrated the ability to arm ColoAd1 with an exogenous gene establishing the potential to impact the treatment of cancer on multiple levels from a single agent. Conclusions/Significance Using the “Directed Evolution” methodology, we have generated ColoAd1, a novel chimeric oncolytic virus. In vitro, this virus demonstrated a >2 log increase in both potency and selectivity when compared to ONYX-015 on colon cancer cells. These results were further supported by in vivo and ex vivo studies. Furthermore

  13. Macromolecular bipill of gemcitabine and methotrexate facilitates tumor-specific dual drug therapy with higher benefit-to-risk ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Manasmita; Jain, Roopal; Agrawal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    ) spacer. Covalent conjugation of GEM and MTX via PEG linker not only transformed the solubility profiles of constituent drug molecules, but significantly improved their stability in the presence of plasma. In vitro cytotoxicity studies confirmed that GEM-PEG-MTX exerts higher cytotoxicity (IC50 0.181 μ......M at 24 h) in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cell lines, when compared to free drug congeners, i.e., free GEM (IC50 0.294 μM at 24 h) and free MTX (IC50 0.591 μM at 24 h). Tumor growth inhibition studies in chemically induced breast cancer bearing rats established the superiority of GEM......-PEG-MTX conjugate over all other pharmaceutical preparations including free drugs, physical mixture of GEM and MTX, and PEGylated GEM/MTX. Toxicity studies in tumor bearing rats as well as healthy mice corroborated that dual drug conjugation is an effective means to synergize the therapeutic indices of potential...

  14. Dual Recognition Strategy for Specific and Sensitive Detection of Bacteria Using Aptamer-Coated Magnetic Beads and Antibiotic-Capped Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dan; Yu, Mengqun; Fu, Fei; Han, Weiye; Li, Gan; Xie, Jianping; Song, Yang; Swihart, Mark T; Song, Erqun

    2016-01-01

    Food poisoning and infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus (SA) are serious public health concerns. A method of specific, sensitive, and rapid detection of such bacteria is essential and important. This study presents a strategy that combines aptamer and antibiotic-based dual recognition units with magnetic enrichment and fluorescent detection to achieve specific and sensitive quantification of SA in authentic specimens and in the presence of much higher concentrations of other bacteria. Aptamer-coated magnetic beads (Apt-MB) were employed for specific capture of SA. Vancomycin-stabilized fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs@Van) were prepared by a simple one-step process and used for sensitive quantification of SA in the range of 32-10(8) cfu/mL with the detection limit of 16 cfu/mL via a fluorescence intensity measurement. And using this strategy, about 70 cfu/mL of SA in complex samples (containing 3 × 10(8) cfu/mL of other different contaminated bacteria) could be successfully detected. In comparison to prior studies, the developed strategy here not only simplifies the preparation procedure of the fluorescent probes (AuNCs@Van) to a great extent but also could sensitively quantify SA in the presence of much higher concentrations of other bacteria directly with good accuracy. Moreover, the aptamer and antibiotic used in this strategy are much less expensive and widely available compared to common-used antibodies, making it cost-effective. This general aptamer- and antibiotic-based dual recognition strategy, combined with magnetic enrichment and fluorescent detection of trace bacteria, shows great potential application in monitoring bacterial food contamination and infectious diseases.

  15. Dual DNA vaccination of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against two different rhabdoviruses, VHSV and IHNV, induces specific divalent protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Delgado, L.; Lorenzen, Ellen;

    2009-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding the glycoprotein genes of the salmonid rhabdoviruses VHSV and IHNV are very efficient in eliciting protective immune responses against their respective diseases in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The early anti-viral response (EAVR) provides Protection by 4 days post...... vaccination and is non-specific and transient while the specific anti-viral response (SAVR) is long lasting and highly specific. Since both VHSV and IHNV are endemic in rainbow trout in several geographical regions of Europe and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) on the Pacific coast of North America, co...

  16. Investigation of electron density changes at the onset of a chemical reaction using the state-specific dual descriptor from conceptual density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Proft, Frank; Forquet, Valérian; Ourri, Benjamin; Chermette, Henry; Geerlings, Paul; Morell, Christophe

    2015-04-14

    The electron density changes from reactants towards the transition state of a chemical reaction is expressed as a linear combination of the state-specific dual descriptors (SSDD) of the corresponding reactant complexes. Consequently, the SSDD can be expected to bear important resemblance to the so-called natural orbitals for chemical valence (NOCV), introduced as the orbitals that diagonalize the deformation density matrix of interacting molecules. This agreement is shown for three case studies: the complexation of a Lewis acid with a Lewis base, a SN2 nucleophilic substitution reaction and a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. As such, the SSDD computed for reactant complexes are shown to provide important information about charge transfer interactions during a chemical reaction.

  17. Structural basis for dual nucleotide selectivity of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa provides insight on determinants of nucleotide specificity of aminoglycoside kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kun; Berghuis, Albert M

    2012-04-13

    Enzymatic phosphorylation through a family of enzymes called aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases (APHs) is a major mechanism by which bacteria confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Members of the APH(2″) subfamily are of particular clinical interest because of their prevalence in pathogenic strains and their broad substrate spectra. APH(2″) enzymes display differential preferences between ATP or GTP as the phosphate donor, with aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa (APH(2″)-IVa) being a member that utilizes both nucleotides at comparable efficiencies. We report here four crystal structures of APH(2″)-IVa, two of the wild type enzyme and two of single amino acid mutants, each in complex with either adenosine or guanosine. Together, these structures afford a detailed look at the nucleoside-binding site architecture for this enzyme and reveal key elements that confer dual nucleotide specificity, including a solvent network in the interior of the nucleoside-binding pocket and the conformation of an interdomain linker loop. Steady state kinetic studies, as well as sequence and structural comparisons with members of the APH(2″) subfamily and other aminoglycoside kinases, rationalize the different substrate preferences for these enzymes. Finally, despite poor overall sequence similarity and structural homology, analysis of the nucleoside-binding pocket of APH(2″)-IVa shows a striking resemblance to that of eukaryotic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which also exhibits dual nucleotide specificity. These results, in complement with the multitude of existing inhibitors against CK2, can serve as a structural basis for the design of nucleotide-competitive inhibitors against clinically relevant APH enzymes.

  18. Structural Basis for Dual Nucleotide Selectivity of Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferase IVa Provides Insight on Determinants of Nucleotide Specificity of Aminoglycoside Kinases*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kun; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic phosphorylation through a family of enzymes called aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases (APHs) is a major mechanism by which bacteria confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Members of the APH(2″) subfamily are of particular clinical interest because of their prevalence in pathogenic strains and their broad substrate spectra. APH(2″) enzymes display differential preferences between ATP or GTP as the phosphate donor, with aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa (APH(2″)-IVa) being a member that utilizes both nucleotides at comparable efficiencies. We report here four crystal structures of APH(2″)-IVa, two of the wild type enzyme and two of single amino acid mutants, each in complex with either adenosine or guanosine. Together, these structures afford a detailed look at the nucleoside-binding site architecture for this enzyme and reveal key elements that confer dual nucleotide specificity, including a solvent network in the interior of the nucleoside-binding pocket and the conformation of an interdomain linker loop. Steady state kinetic studies, as well as sequence and structural comparisons with members of the APH(2″) subfamily and other aminoglycoside kinases, rationalize the different substrate preferences for these enzymes. Finally, despite poor overall sequence similarity and structural homology, analysis of the nucleoside-binding pocket of APH(2″)-IVa shows a striking resemblance to that of eukaryotic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which also exhibits dual nucleotide specificity. These results, in complement with the multitude of existing inhibitors against CK2, can serve as a structural basis for the design of nucleotide-competitive inhibitors against clinically relevant APH enzymes. PMID:22371504

  19. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34+ HSPCs. These two features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo MYXV treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138+ myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts prior to reinfusion. PMID:22516053

  20. Systemic treatment of xenografts with vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 reveals the immunologic facet of oncolytic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hui

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GLV-1h68 is an attenuated recombinant vaccinia virus (VACV that selectively colonizes established human xenografts inducing their complete regression. Results Here, we explored xenograft/VACV/host interactions in vivo adopting organism-specific expression arrays and tumor cell/VACV in vitro comparing VACV replication patterns. There were no clear-cut differences in vitro among responding and non-responding tumors, however, tumor rejection was associated in vivo with activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs and innate immune host's effector functions (IEFs correlating with VACV colonization of the xenografts. These signatures precisely reproduce those observed in humans during immune-mediated tissue-specific destruction (TSD that causes tumor or allograft rejection, autoimmunity or clearance of pathogens. We recently defined these common pathways in the "immunologic constant of rejection" hypothesis (ICR. Conclusion This study provides the first prospective validation of a universal mechanism associated with TSD. Thus, xenograft infection by oncolytic VACV, beyond offering a promising therapy of established cancers, may represent a reliable pre-clinical model to test therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the central pathways leading to TSD; this information may lead to the identification of principles that could refine the treatment of cancer and chronic infection by immune stimulation or autoimmunity and allograft rejection through immune tolerance.

  1. Reovirus FAST Protein Enhances Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Oncolytic Virotherapy in Primary and Metastatic Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Le Boeuf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The reovirus fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST proteins are the smallest known viral fusogens (∼100–150 amino acids and efficiently induce cell-cell fusion and syncytium formation in multiple cell types. Syncytium formation enhances cell-cell virus transmission and may also induce immunogenic cell death, a form of apoptosis that stimulates immune recognition of tumor cells. These properties suggest that FAST proteins might serve to enhance oncolytic virotherapy. The oncolytic activity of recombinant VSVΔM51 (an interferon-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV] mutant encoding the p14 FAST protein (VSV-p14 was compared with a similar construct encoding GFP (VSV-GFP in cell culture and syngeneic BALB/c tumor models. Compared with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 exhibited increased oncolytic activity against MCF-7 and 4T1 breast cancer spheroids in culture and reduced primary 4T1 breast tumor growth in vivo. VSV-p14 prolonged survival in both primary and metastatic 4T1 breast cancer models, and in a CT26 metastatic colon cancer model. As with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 preferentially replicated in vivo in tumors and was cleared rapidly from other sites. Furthermore, VSV-p14 increased the numbers of activated splenic CD4, CD8, natural killer (NK, and natural killer T (NKT cells, and increased the number of activated CD4 and CD8 cells in tumors. FAST proteins may therefore provide a multi-pronged approach to improving oncolytic virotherapy via syncytium formation and enhanced immune stimulation.

  2. Imaging characteristics, tissue distribution, and spread of a novel oncolytic vaccinia virus carrying the human sodium iodide symporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oncolytic viruses show promise for treating cancer. However, to assess therapy and potential toxicity, a noninvasive imaging modality is needed. This study aims to determine the in vivo biodistribution, and imaging and timing characteristics of a vaccinia virus, GLV-1h153, encoding the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS. METHODS: GLV-1h153 was modified from GLV-1h68 to encode the hNIS gene. Timing of cellular uptake of radioiodide (131I in human pancreatic carcinoma cells PANC-1 was assessed using radiouptake assays. Viral biodistribution was determined in nude mice bearing PANC-1 xenografts, and infection in tumors confirmed histologically and optically via Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP and bioluminescence. Timing characteristics of enhanced radiouptake in xenografts were assessed via (124I-positron emission tomography (PET. Detection of systemic administration of virus was investigated with both (124I-PET and 99m-technecium gamma-scintigraphy. RESULTS: GLV-1h153 successfully facilitated time-dependent intracellular uptake of (131I in PANC-1 cells with a maximum uptake at 24 hours postinfection (P<0.05. In vivo, biodistribution profiles revealed persistence of virus in tumors 5 weeks postinjection at 10(9 plaque-forming unit (PFU/gm tissue, with the virus mainly cleared from all other major organs. Tumor infection by GLV-1h153 was confirmed via optical imaging and histology. GLV-1h153 facilitated imaging virus replication in tumors via PET even at 8 hours post radiotracer injection, with a mean %ID/gm of 3.82 ± 0.46 (P<0.05 2 days after intratumoral administration of virus, confirmed via tissue radiouptake assays. One week post systemic administration, GLV-1h153-infected tumors were detected via (124I-PET and 99m-technecium-scintigraphy. CONCLUSION: GLV-1h153 is a promising oncolytic agent against pancreatic cancer with a promising biosafety profile. GLV-1h153 facilitated time-dependent hNIS-specific radiouptake in pancreatic

  3. A novel, polymer-coated oncolytic measles virus overcomes immune suppression and induces robust antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaname Nosaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although various therapies are available to treat cancers, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan for the last 30 years, and new therapeutic modalities are urgently needed. As a new modality, there has recently been great interest in oncolytic virotherapy, with measles virus being a candidate virus expected to show strong antitumor effects. The efficacy of virotherapy, however, was strongly limited by the host immune response in previous clinical trials. To enhance and prolong the antitumor activity of virotherapy, we combined the use of two newly developed tools: the genetically engineered measles virus (MV-NPL and the multilayer virus-coating method of layer-by-layer deposition of ionic polymers. We compared the oncolytic effects of this polymer-coated MV-NPL with the naked MV-NPL, both in vitro and in vivo. In the presence of anti-MV neutralizing antibodies, the polymer-coated virus showed more enhanced oncolytic activity than did the naked MV-NPL in vitro. We also examined antitumor activities in virus-treated mice. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antitumor activities were higher in mice treated with polymer-coated MV-NPL than in mice treated with the naked virus. This novel, polymer-coated MV-NPL is promising for clinical cancer therapy in the future.

  4. Entry of Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus into Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shusuke Okunaga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Low-intensity ultrasound is a useful method to introduce materials into cells due to the transient formation of micropores, called sonoporations, on the cell membrane. Whether oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 can be introduced into oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells through membrane pores remains undetermined. Human SCC cell line SAS and oncolytic HSV-1 RH2, which was deficient in the 134.5 gene and fusogenic, were used. Cells were exposed to ultrasound in the presence or absence of microbubbles. The increase of virus entry was estimated by plaque numbers. Viral infection was hardly established without the adsorption step, but plaque number was increased by the exposure of HSV-1-inoculated cells to ultrasound. Plaque number was also increased even if SAS cells were exposed to ultrasound and inoculated with RH2 without the adsorption step. This effect was abolished when the interval from ultrasound exposure to virus inoculation was prolonged. Scanning electron microscopy revealed depressed spots on the cell surface after exposure to ultrasound. These results suggest that oncolytic HSV-1 RH2 can be introduced into SAS cells through ultrasound-mediated pores of the cell membrane that are resealed after an interval.

  5. Preclinical evaluation of oncolytic vaccinia virus for therapy of canine soft tissue sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS.

  6. Predictive and Prognostic Clinical Variables in Cancer Patients Treated With Adenoviral Oncolytic Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Kristian; Liikanen, Ilkka; Koski, Anniina; Heiskanen, Raita; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Otto; Oksanen, Minna; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Hemminki, Kari; Joensuu, Timo; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-08-01

    The development of oncolytic viruses has recently made great progress towards being available to cancer patients. With the breakthrough into clinics, it is crucial to analyze the existing clinical experience and use it as a basis for treatment improvements. Here, we report clinical data from 290 patients treated with oncolytic adenovirus. Using clinical variables and treatment characteristics, we constructed statistical models with regard to treatment response and overall survival (OS). Additionally, we investigated effects of neutralizing antibodies, tumor burden, and peripheral blood leucocyte counts on these outcomes. We found the absence of liver metastases to correlate with an improved rate of disease control (P = 0.021). In multivariate evaluation, patients treated with viruses coding for immunostimulatory granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor were linked to better prognosis (hazard ratio (HR) 0.378, P < 0.001), as well as women with any cancer type (HR 0.694, P = 0.017). In multivariate analysis for imaging response, patients treated via intraperitoneal injection were more likely to achieve disease control (odds ratio (OR) 3.246, P = 0.027). Patients with low neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio before treatment had significantly longer OS (P < 0.001). These findings could explain some of the variation seen in treatment outcomes after virotherapy. Furthermore, the results offer hypotheses for treatment optimization and patient selection in oncolytic adenovirus immunotherapy.

  7. Modulation of the Intratumoral Immune Landscape by Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines and immunotherapeutic approaches to cancers with the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells have recently demonstrated preclinical success and entered clinical trials. Despite advances in these approaches and combinatorial therapeutic regimens, depending on the nature of the cancer and the immune and metabolic landscape within the tumor microenvironment, current immunotherapeutic modalities remain inadequate. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated clear evidence of significant, and sometimes dramatic, antitumor activity, and long-term survival effects of a variety of oncolytic viruses (OVs, particularly oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV. Acting as a multifaceted gene therapy vector and potential adjuvant-like regimens, oHSV can carry genes encoding immunostimulatory molecules in its genome. The oncolytic effect of oHSV and the inflammatory response that the virus stimulates provide a one-two punch at attacking tumors. However, mechanisms underlying oHSV-induced restoration of intratumoral immunosuppression demand extensive research in order to further improve its therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we discuss the current OV-based therapy, with a focus on the unique aspects of oHSV-initiated antiviral and antitumor immune responses, arising from virus-mediated immunological cell death to intratumoral innate and adaptive immunity.

  8. High treatment efficacy by dual targeting of Burkitt's lymphoma xenografted mice with a {sup 177}Lu-based CD22-specific radioimmunoconjugate and rituximab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Tobias; Boetticher, Benedikt; Keller, Armin; Schlegelmilch, Anne; Jaeger, Dirk; Krauss, Juergen [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Mier, Walter; Kraemer, Susanne; Leotta, Karin [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Sauter, Max; Haberkorn, Uwe [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Grosse-Hovest, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Immunology, Tuebingen (Germany); Arndt, Michaela A.E. [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Immunotherapy Program, National Center for Tumor Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Dual-targeted therapy has been shown to be a promising treatment option in recurrent and/or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). We generated radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) comprising either a novel humanized anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody, huRFB4, or rituximab, and the low-energy β-emitter {sup 177}Lu. Both RICs were evaluated as single agents in a human Burkitt's lymphoma xenograft mouse model. To increase the therapeutic efficacy of the anti-CD22 RIC, combination therapy with unlabelled anti-CD20 rituximab was explored. The binding activity of CHX-A''-DTPA-conjugated antibodies to target cells was analysed by flow cytometry. To assess tumour targeting of {sup 177}Lu-labelled antibodies, in vivo biodistribution experiments were performed. For radioimmunotherapy (RIT) studies, non-obese diabetic recombination activating gene-1 (NOD-Rag1{sup null}) interleukin-2 receptor common gamma chain (IL2r γ {sup null}) null mice (NRG mice) were xenografted subcutaneously with Raji Burkitt's lymphoma cells. {sup 177}Lu-conjugated antibodies were administered at a single dose of 9.5 MBq per mouse. For dual-targeted therapy, rituximab was injected at weekly intervals (0.5 - 1.0 mg). Tumour accumulation of RICs was monitored by planar scintigraphy. Conjugation of CHX-A''-DTPA resulted in highly stable RICs with excellent antigen-binding properties. Biodistribution experiments revealed higher tumour uptake of the {sup 177}Lu-labelled anti-CD22 IgG than of {sup 177}Lu-labelled rituximab. Treatment with {sup 177}Lu-conjugated huRFB4 resulted in increased tumour growth inhibition and significantly longer survival than treatment with {sup 177}Lu-conjugated rituximab. The therapeutic efficacy of the anti-CD22 RIC could be markedly enhanced by combination with unlabelled rituximab. These findings suggest that dual targeting with {sup 177}Lu-based CD22-specific RIT in combination with rituximab is a promising new treatment option for

  9. Identification of inhibitors that target dual-specificity phosphatase 5 provide new insights into the binding requirements for the two phosphate pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Terrence S; Span, Elise A; Kalous, Kelsey S; Bongard, Robert; Gastonguay, Adam; Lepley, Michael A; Kutty, Raman G; Nayak, Jaladhi; Bohl, Chris; Lange, Rachel G; Sarker, Majher I; Talipov, Marat R; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani; Sem, Daniel S

    2015-08-19

    Dual-specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5) plays a central role in vascular development and disease. We present a p-nitrophenol phosphate (pNPP) based enzymatic assay to screen for inhibitors of the phosphatase domain of DUSP5. pNPP is a mimic of the phosphorylated tyrosine on the ERK2 substrate (pERK2) and binds the DUSP5 phosphatase domain with a Km of 7.6 ± 0.4 mM. Docking followed by inhibitor verification using the pNPP assay identified a series of polysulfonated aromatic inhibitors that occupy the DUSP5 active site in the region that is likely occupied by the dual-phosphorylated ERK2 substrate tripeptide (pThr-Glu-pTyr). Secondary assays were performed with full length DUSP5 with ERK2 as substrate. The most potent inhibitor has a naphthalene trisulfonate (NTS) core. A search for similar compounds in a drug database identified suramin, a dimerized form of NTS. While suramin appears to be a potent and competitive inhibitor (25 ± 5 μM), binding to the DUSP5 phosphatase domain more tightly than the monomeric ligands of which it is comprised, it also aggregates. Further ligand-based screening, based on a pharmacophore derived from the 7 Å separation of sulfonates on inhibitors and on sulfates present in the DUSP5 crystal structure, identified a disulfonated and phenolic naphthalene inhibitor (CSD (3) _2320) with IC₅₀ of 33 μM that is similar to NTS and does not aggregate. The new DUSP5 inhibitors we identify in this study typically have sulfonates 7 Å apart, likely positioning them where the two phosphates of the substrate peptide (pThr-Glu-pTyr) bind, with one inhibitor also positioning a phenolic hydroxyl where the water nucleophile may reside. Polysulfonated aromatic compounds do not commonly appear in drugs and have a tendency to aggregate. One FDA-approved polysulfonated drug, suramin, inhibits DUSP5 and also aggregates. Docking and modeling studies presented herein identify polysulfonated aromatic inhibitors that do not aggregate, and provide

  10. Burkholderia cenocepacia BC2L-C is a super lectin with dual specificity and proinflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Sulák

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lectins and adhesins are involved in bacterial adhesion to host tissues and mucus during early steps of infection. We report the characterization of BC2L-C, a soluble lectin from the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia, which has two distinct domains with unique specificities and biological activities. The N-terminal domain is a novel TNF-α-like fucose-binding lectin, while the C-terminal part is similar to a superfamily of calcium-dependent bacterial lectins. The C-terminal domain displays specificity for mannose and l-glycero-d-manno-heptose. BC2L-C is therefore a superlectin that binds independently to mannose/heptose glycoconjugates and fucosylated human histo-blood group epitopes. The apo form of the C-terminal domain crystallized as a dimer, and calcium and mannose could be docked in the binding site. The whole lectin is hexameric and the overall structure, determined by electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, reveals a flexible arrangement of three mannose/heptose-specific dimers flanked by two fucose-specific TNF-α-like trimers. We propose that BC2L-C binds to the bacterial surface in a mannose/heptose-dependent manner via the C-terminal domain. The TNF-α-like domain triggers IL-8 production in cultured airway epithelial cells in a carbohydrate-independent manner, and is therefore proposed to play a role in the dysregulated proinflammatory response observed in B. cenocepacia lung infections. The unique architecture of this newly recognized superlectin correlates with multiple functions including bacterial cell cross-linking, adhesion to human epithelia, and stimulation of inflammation.

  11. The combination of i-leader truncation and gemcitabine improves oncolytic adenovirus efficacy in an immunocompetent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Saus, C; Laborda, E; Rodríguez-García, A; Cascalló, M; Moreno, R; Alemany, R

    2014-02-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) i-leader protein is a small protein of unknown function. The C-terminus truncation of the i-leader protein increases Ad release from infected cells and cytotoxicity. In the current study, we use the i-leader truncation to enhance the potency of an oncolytic Ad. In vitro, an i-leader truncated oncolytic Ad is released faster to the supernatant of infected cells, generates larger plaques, and is more cytotoxic in both human and Syrian hamster cell lines. In mice bearing human tumor xenografts, the i-leader truncation enhances oncolytic efficacy. However, in a Syrian hamster pancreatic tumor model, which is immunocompetent and less permissive to human Ad, antitumor efficacy is only observed when the i-leader truncated oncolytic Ad, but not the non-truncated version, is combined with gemcitabine. This synergistic effect observed in the Syrian hamster model was not seen in vitro or in immunodeficient mice bearing the same pancreatic hamster tumors, suggesting a role of the immune system in this synergism. These results highlight the interest of the i-leader C-terminus truncation because it enhances the antitumor potency of an oncolytic Ad and provides synergistic effects with gemcitabine in the presence of an immune competent system.

  12. Exponential enhancement of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus potency by vector-mediated suppression of inflammatory responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomonte, Jennifer; Wu, Lan; Chen, Li; Meseck, Marcia; Ebert, Oliver; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2008-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising strategy for treatment of malignancy, although its effectiveness is hampered by host antiviral inflammatory responses. The efficacy of treatment of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in rats bearing multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be substantially elevated by antibody-mediated depletion of natural killer (NK) cells. In order to test the hypothesis that the oncotyic potency of VSV can be exponentially elevated by evasion of inflammatory responses in vivo, we constructed a recombinant VSV vector expressing equine herpes virus-1 glycoprotein G, which is a broad-spectrum viral chemokine binding protein (rVSV-gG). Infusion of rVSV-gG via the hepatic artery into immune-competent rats bearing syngeneic and multifocal HCC in their livers, resulted in a reduction of NK and NKT cells in the tumors and a 1-log enhancement in intratumoral virus titer in comparison with a reference rVSV vector. The treatment led to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged animal survival without toxicities. These results indicate that rVSV-gG has the potential to be developed as an effective and safe oncolytic agent to treat patients with advanced HCC. Furthermore, the novel concept that oncolytic potency can be substantially enhanced by vector-mediated suppression of host antiviral inflammatory responses could have general applicability in the field of oncolytic virotherapy for cancer.

  13. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2015-07-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts.

  14. Heparin Decreases in Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα)-induced Endothelial Stress Responses Require Transmembrane Protein 184A and Induction of Dual Specificity Phosphatase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Kanyi, Daniela; Hamel, Marianne; Slee, Joshua B; Miller, Elizabeth A; Cipolle, Mark D; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Despite the large number of heparin and heparan sulfate binding proteins, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin alters vascular cell physiology is not well understood. Studies with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) indicate a role for induction of dual specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) that decreases ERK activity and results in decreased cell proliferation, which depends on specific heparin binding. The hypothesis that unfractionated heparin functions to decrease inflammatory signal transduction in endothelial cells (ECs) through heparin-induced expression of DUSP1 was tested. In addition, the expectation that the heparin response includes a decrease in cytokine-induced cytoskeletal changes was examined. Heparin pretreatment of ECs resulted in decreased TNFα-induced JNK and p38 activity and downstream target phosphorylation, as identified through Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Through knockdown strategies, the importance of heparin-induced DUSP1 expression in these effects was confirmed. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy indicated that heparin treatment of ECs reduced TNFα-induced increases in stress fibers. Monoclonal antibodies that mimic heparin-induced changes in VSMCs were employed to support the hypothesis that heparin was functioning through interactions with a receptor. Knockdown of transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A) confirmed its involvement in heparin-induced signaling as seen in VSMCs. Therefore, TMEM184A functions as a heparin receptor and mediates anti-inflammatory responses of ECs involving decreased JNK and p38 activity.

  15. Synthesis and application of a N-1' fluorescent biotinyl derivative inducing the specific carboxy-terminal dual labeling of a novel RhoB-selective scFv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisemartin, L; Chinestra, P; Favre, G; Blonski, C; Faye, J C

    2009-05-20

    The fluorescent site-specific labeling of protein would provide a new, easy-to-use alternative to biochemical and immunochemical methods. We used an intein-mediated strategy for covalent labeling of the carboxy-terminal amino acid of a RhoB-selective scFv previously isolated from a phage display library (a human synthetic V(H) + V(L) scFv phage library). The scFv fused to the Mxe intein was produced in E. coli and purified and was then labeled with a newly synthesized fluorescent biotinyl cysteine derivative capable of inducing scFv-Mxe intein splicing. In this study, we investigated the splicing and labeling properties of various amino acids in the hinge domain between scFv and Mxe under thiol activation. In this dual labeling system, the fluorescein is used for antibody detection and biotin is used for purification, resulting in a high specific activity for fluorescence. We then checked that the purified biotinylated fluorescent scFv retained its selectivity for RhoB without modification of its affinity.

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 3-aminoisoquinolin-1(2H)-one based inhibitors of the dual-specificity phosphatase Cdc25B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Rosenker, Kara M; Paquette, William D; Johnston, Paul A; Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Vogt, Andreas; Bakan, Ahmet; Lazo, John S; Wipf, Peter

    2015-06-15

    The cell division cycle 25B dual specificity phosphatase (Cdc25B) regulates the normal progression of the mammalian cell cycle by dephosphorylating and activating cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes, particularly in response to DNA damage. Elevated Cdc25B levels enable a bypass of normal cell cycle checkpoints, and the overexpression of Cdc25B has been linked to a variety of human cancers. Thus, Cdc25B is an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. Herein we describe the synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of non-quinoid inhibitors of Cdc25B containing the 3-aminoisoquinolin-1(2H)-one pharmacophore. In addition to several strategies that address specific substitution patterns on isoquinolines, we have applied a regioselective Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling methodology to synthesize a new lead structure, 6-(3-aminophenyl)-3-(phenylamino)isoquinolin-1(2H)-one (13), which proved to be a reversible, competitive Cdc25B inhibitor with a Ki of 1.9μM. Compound 13 prevented human cancer cell growth and blocked Cdc25B-mediated mitotic checkpoint bypass. Molecular docking studies support binding near the catalytic site. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The structure of bradyzoite-specific enolase from Toxoplasma gondii reveals insights into its dual cytoplasmic and nuclear functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, Jiapeng [Northwestern University, 320 E. Superior Street, Morton 7-601, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Mouveaux, Thomas [Université Lille Nord de France, (France); Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F. [Northwestern University, 320 E. Superior Street, Morton 7-601, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Tomavo, Stanislas [Université Lille Nord de France, (France); Ngô, Huân M., E-mail: h-ngo@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, 320 E. Superior Street, Morton 7-601, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); BrainMicro LLC, 21 Pendleton Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The second crystal structure of a parasite protein preferentially enriched in the brain cyst of T. gondii has been solved at 2.75 Å resolution. Bradyzoite enolase 1 is reported to have differential functions as a glycolytic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator in bradyzoites. In addition to catalyzing a central step in glycolysis, enolase assumes a remarkably diverse set of secondary functions in different organisms, including transcription regulation as documented for the oncogene c-Myc promoter-binding protein 1. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii differentially expresses two nuclear-localized, plant-like enolases: enolase 1 (TgENO1) in the latent bradyzoite cyst stage and enolase 2 (TgENO2) in the rapidly replicative tachyzoite stage. A 2.75 Å resolution crystal structure of bradyzoite enolase 1, the second structure to be reported of a bradyzoite-specific protein in Toxoplasma, captures an open conformational state and reveals that distinctive plant-like insertions are located on surface loops. The enolase 1 structure reveals that a unique residue, Glu164, in catalytic loop 2 may account for the lower activity of this cyst-stage isozyme. Recombinant TgENO1 specifically binds to a TTTTCT DNA motif present in the cyst matrix antigen 1 (TgMAG1) gene promoter as demonstrated by gel retardation. Furthermore, direct physical interactions of both nuclear TgENO1 and TgENO2 with the TgMAG1 gene promoter are demonstrated in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Structural and biochemical studies reveal that T. gondii enolase functions are multifaceted, including the coordination of gene regulation in parasitic stage development. Enolase 1 provides a potential lead in the design of drugs against Toxoplasma brain cysts.

  18. Tissue dual RNA-seq allows fast discovery of infection-specific functions and riboregulators shaping host-pathogen transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Aaron M; Beckstette, Michael; Pimenova, Maria; Schmühl, Carina; Opitz, Wiebke; Pisano, Fabio; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Dersch, Petra

    2017-01-31

    Pathogenic bacteria need to rapidly adjust their virulence and fitness program to prevent eradication by the host. So far, underlying adaptation processes that drive pathogenesis have mostly been studied in vitro, neglecting the true complexity of host-induced stimuli acting on the invading pathogen. In this study, we developed an unbiased experimental approach that allows simultaneous monitoring of genome-wide infection-linked transcriptional alterations of the host and colonizing extracellular pathogens. Using this tool for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis-infected lymphatic tissues, we revealed numerous alterations of host transcripts associated with inflammatory and acute-phase responses, coagulative activities, and transition metal ion sequestration, highlighting that the immune response is dominated by infiltrating neutrophils and elicits a mixed TH17/TH1 response. In consequence, the pathogen's response is mainly directed to prevent phagocytic attacks. Yersinia up-regulates the gene and expression dose of the antiphagocytic type III secretion system (T3SS) and induces functions counteracting neutrophil-induced ion deprivation, radical stress, and nutritional restraints. Several conserved bacterial riboregulators were identified that impacted this response. The strongest influence on virulence was found for the loss of the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system, which is shown to be essential for the up-regulation of the T3SS on host cell contact. In summary, our established approach provides a powerful tool for the discovery of infection-specific stimuli, induced host and pathogen responses, and underlying regulatory processes.

  19. The dual specificity PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PKI-587 displays efficacy against T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazi, Mohiuddin; Moharram, Sausan A; Marhäll, Alissa; Kazi, Julhash U

    2017-04-28

    Although significant improvements have been made in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), there is a substantial subset of high-risk T-cell ALL (T-ALL) patients with relatively poor prognosis. Like in other leukemia types, alterations of the PI3K/mTOR pathway are predominant in ALL which is also responsible for treatment failure and relapse. In this study, we show that relapsed T-ALL patients display an enrichment of the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Using a panel of inhibitors targeting multiple components of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, we observed that the dual-specific PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PKI-587 was the most selective inhibitor for T-ALL cells dependent on the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Furthermore, we observed that PKI-587 blocked proliferation and colony formation of T-ALL cell lines. Additionally, PKI-587 selectively abrogated PI3K/mTOR signaling without affecting MAPK signaling both in in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway using PKI-587 delayed tumor progression, reduced tumor load and enhanced the survival rate in immune-deficient mouse xenograft models without inducing weight loss in the inhibitor treated mice. This preclinical study shows beneficial effects of PKI-587 on T-ALL that warrants further investigation in the clinical setting.

  20. Hologram QSAR models of a series of 6-arylquinazolin-4-amine inhibitors of a new Alzheimer's disease target: dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase-1A enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Felipe Dias; da Silva Lima, Camilo Henrique; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Castro, Helena Carla; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão

    2015-01-01

    Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase-1A (DYRK1A) is an enzyme directly involved in Alzheimer's disease, since its increased expression leads to β-amyloidosis, Tau protein aggregation, and subsequent formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship (HQSAR, 2D fragment-based) models were developed for a series of 6-arylquinazolin-4-amine inhibitors (36 training, 10 test) of DYRK1A. The best HQSAR model (q2 = 0.757; SEcv = 0.493; R2 = 0.937; SE = 0.251; R2pred = 0.659) presents high goodness-of-fit (R2 > 0.9), as well as high internal (q2 > 0.7) and external (R2pred > 0.5) predictive power. The fragments that increase and decrease the biological activity values were addressed using the colored atomic contribution maps provided by the method. The HQSAR contribution map of the best model is an important tool to understand the activity profiles of new derivatives and may provide information for further design of novel DYRK1A inhibitors.

  1. Single-particle characterization of oncolytic vaccinia virus by flow virometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Vera A; Renner, Tyler M; Varette, Oliver; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Wang, Jiahu; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Bell, John C; Langlois, Marc-André

    2016-09-30

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an oncolytic virus that is currently being evaluated as a promising cancer vaccine in several phase I, II and III clinical trials. Although several quality control tests are performed on each new batch of virus, these do not routinely include a systematic characterization of virus particle homogeneity, or relate the infectious titer to the total number of submicron sized particles (SSPs) present in the sample. SSPs are comprised of infectious virus and non-infectious viral particles, but also cell contaminants derived from the virus isolation procedures, such as cellular vesicles and debris. Here we have employed flow virometry (FV) analysis and sorting to isolate and characterize distinct SSP populations in therapeutic oncolytic VV preparations. We show that VV preparations contain SSPs heterogeneous in size and include large numbers of non-infectious VV particles. Furthermore, we used FV to illustrate how VV has a propensity to aggregate over time and under various handling and storage procedures. Accordingly, we find that together the infectious titer, the total number of SSPs, the number of viral genomes and the level of particle aggregation in a sample constitute useful parameters that greatly facilitate inter-sample assessment of physical quality, and also provides a means to monitor sample deterioration over time. Additionally, we have successfully employed FV sorting to further isolate virus from other particles by identifying a lipophilic dye that preferentially stains VV over other SSPs in the sample. Overall, we demonstrate that FV is a fast and effective tool that can be used to perform quality, and consistency control assessments of oncolytic VV vaccine preparations.

  2. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad R Irwin

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus (MYXV is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV, MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+ MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+ MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2. These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  3. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Chad R; Favis, Nicole A; Agopsowicz, Kate C; Hitt, Mary M; Evans, David H

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+)) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+) MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  4. Oncolytic adenovirus SG600-IL24 selectively kills hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of oncolytic adenovirus SG600-IL24 and replication-incompetent adenovirus Ad.IL-24 on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines and normal liver cell line. METHODS: HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B and MHCC97L) and normal liver cell line (L02) with a different p53 status were infected with SG600-IL24 and Ad.IL-24, respectively. Melanoma differentiation-associated (MDA)-7/interleukin (IL)-24 mRNA and protein expressions in infected cells were detected by reverse transcription-polym...

  5. Angiogenesis inhibition using an oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing endostatin in a murine lung cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Anthony D; McGinn, Christopher M; Fuchs, Bryan C; Kuruppu, Darshini; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Lanuti, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Herpes-mediated viral oncolysis alone is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors. In this study we used a replication conditional, endostatin-expressing herpes simplex virus-1 mutant (HSV-Endo) in a murine lung cancer model. We hypothesized that the anti-angiogenic action of endostatin would improve upon the oncolytic effect of HSV-1. HSV-Endo was evaluated in a pulmonary metastases and orthotopic flank model, where there was significantly less tumor burden and reduced microvessel density compared to a control virus. Endostatin expression appears to improve the anti-tumor effect of HSV-1 in a lung cancer model.

  6. Antibody-conjugated, dual-modal, near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles for antiamyloidgenic activity and specific detection of amyloid-β fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaat H

    2013-10-01

    labeling of the Aβ40 fibrils with the BAM10-conjugated near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles enabled specific detection of Aβ40 fibrils ex vivo by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence imaging. This study highlights the immobilization of the aAβmAb to dual-modal nanoparticles as a potential approach for aAβmAb delivery, eliminating the issue of readministration, and contributes to the development of multifunctional agents for diagnosis and therapy of AD. Keywords: near-infrared fluorescent γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, protein folding, amyloid-β peptide, passive immunotherapy, neurodegenerative diseases

  7. Application of interferon modulators to overcome partial resistance of human ovarian cancers to VSV-GP oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dold

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we described an oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus variant pseudotyped with the nonneurotropic glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, VSV-GP, which was highly effective in glioblastoma. Here, we tested its potency for the treatment of ovarian cancer, a leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. Effective oncolytic activity of VSV-GP could be demonstrated in ovarian cancer cell lines and xenografts in mice; however, remission was temporary in most mice. Analysis of the innate immune response revealed that ovarian cancer cell lines were able to respond to and produce type I interferon, inducing an antiviral state upon virus infection. This is in stark contrast to published data for other cancer cell lines, which were mostly found to be interferon incompetent. We showed that in vitro this antiviral state could be reverted by combining VSV-GP with the JAK1/2-inhibitor ruxolitinib. In addition, for the first time, we report the in vivo enhancement of oncolytic virus treatment by ruxolitinib, both in subcutaneous as well as in orthotopic xenograft mouse models, without causing significant additional toxicity. In conclusion, VSV-GP has the potential to be a potent and safe oncolytic virus to treat ovarian cancer, especially when combined with an inhibitor of the interferon response.

  8. Establishing the lysine-rich protein CEST reporter gene as a CEST MR imaging detector for oncolytic virotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Farrar (Christian T.); J.S. Buhrman (Jason); G. Liu (Guanshu); A. Kleijn (Anne); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); M.T. McMahon (Michael T.); A.A. Gilad (Assaf A.); G. Fulci (Giulia)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To (a) evaluate whether the lysine-rich protein (LRP) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging reporter gene can be engineered into G47Δ, a herpes simplex-derived oncolytic virus that is currently being tested in clinical trials, without disrupting its therapeutic effectiveness and (b) e

  9. Oncolytic and immunologic cancer therapy with GM-CSF-armed vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lili; Fan, Jun; Guo, Mingming; Huang, Biao

    2016-03-28

    Targeted oncolytic vaccinia viruses are being developed as a novel strategy in cancer therapy. Arming vaccinia viruses with immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance antitumor efficacy. Such engineered oncolytic viruses, like JX-594, a Wyeth strain vaccinia virus modified with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have shown promising results and have proceeded rapidly in clinical trials. However, the oncolytic potential of the Chinese vaccine strain Tian Tan (VTT) has not been explored. In this study, we constructed a targeted oncolytic vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9 (VG9) expressing murine GM-CSF (VG9-GMCSF) and evaluated the antitumor effect of this recombinant vaccinia virus in a murine melanoma model. In vitro, viral replication and cytotoxicity of VG9-GMCSF was as potent as VG9; in vivo, VG9-GMCSF significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously implanted melanoma tumors, prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice, and produced an antitumor cytotoxic response. Such antitumor effect may be due to the lytic nature of virus as well as the stimulation of immune activity by GM-CSF production. Our results indicate that VG9-GMCSF induces strong tumoricidal activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for combating cancer.

  10. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K Friedman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies. Many preclinical studies and early phase trials in adults demonstrated that oncolytic HSV can be safely used and are highly effective in killing tumor cells that comprise pediatric malignancies, without generating the toxic side effects of nondiscriminatory chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A variety of engineered viruses have been developed and tested in numerous preclinical models of pediatric cancers and initial trials in patients are underway. In Part II of this review series, we examine the preclinical evidence to support the further advancement of oncolytic HSV in the pediatric population. We discuss clinical advances made to date in this emerging era of oncolytic virotherapy.

  11. Dual-specificity phosphatases are implicated in severe hyperplasia and lack of response to FGF23 of uremic parathyroid glands from rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-García, Pablo; Carrillo-López, Natalia; Naves-Díaz, Manuel; Rodríguez, Isabel; Ortiz, Alberto; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B

    2012-04-01

    Phosphate load accelerates the progression of secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT). In advanced stages of sHPT, there is a marked hyperplasia and resistance to classical regulatory endocrine factors such as calcium, calcitriol, or fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which suppresses PTH secretion by an ERK-dependent mechanism. Nephrectomized rats were fed with a high- or normal-phosphorus diet for different periods of time to induce sHPT. Biochemical parameters, parathyroid gland microarrays, quantitative real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry (ERK/phospho-ERK) were performed. To test the role of dual-specificity phosphatases (Dusp) on parathyroid gland regulation, normal parathyroid glands were cultured with FGF23 and Dusp. Uremic rats fed with a high-phosphorus diet showed more severe sHPT, higher serum FGF23 levels and mortality, and decreased parathyroid Klotho gene expression. In all stages of sHPT, parathyroid microarrays displayed a widespread gene expression down-regulation; only a few genes were overexpressed, among them, Dusp5 and -6. In very severe sHPT, a significant reduction in phospho-ERK (the target of Dusp) and a significant increase of Dusp5 and -6 gene expression were observed. In ex vivo experiments with parathyroid glands, Dusp partially blocked the effect of FGF23 on PTH secretion, suggesting that Dusp might play a role in parathyroid regulation. The overexpression of Dusp and the inactivation of ERK found in the in vivo studies together with the ex vivo results might be indicative of the defense mechanism triggered to counteract hyperplasia, a mechanism that can also contribute to the resistance to the effect of FGF23 on parathyroid gland observed in advanced forms of chronic kidney disease.

  12. Dual-color reporter switching system to discern dimer formations of G-protein-coupled receptors using Cre/loxP site-specific recombination in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Hashimoto, Takamichi; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are physiologically important membrane proteins that represent major molecular targets in pharmaceutical and medicinal fields. Many GPCRs have been shown to form not only homodimers, but also heterodimers that can confer large functional and physiological diversity and are therefore expected to offer new opportunities for the discovery of new drugs. Yeast is a useful host organism that can be used to investigate the interactions between eukaryotic protein pairs, as demonstrated by the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. Previously, we established reporter gene assay systems to screen for GPCR dimer pairs based on the split-ubiquitin membrane Y2H (mY2H) system. However, conventional systems only induce reporter gene expressions from the OFF to ON states. In this study, we therefore designed a reporter switching system that can switch the expressions between two reporter genes (one from ON to OFF and the other from OFF to ON) in response to the Y2H readout. To invoke reporter switching, we took advantage of Cre/loxP site-specific recombination. Through optimization of Cre-mediated reporter gene recombination using the split-ubiquitin mY2H system, we built a dual-color reporter switching system to discern the formations of GPCR dimers. This system enabled monitoring of the formations of homodimers and heterodimers of human serotonin 1A receptor or β2 -adrenergic receptor as well as homodimers of the yeast endogenous pheromone receptor (Ste2p) in yeast cells. Our reporter switching system may be a useful tool for identifying potential molecular targets among GPCR dimers, and is also applicable to other reporter gene assay systems. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2178-2190. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Identification of a dual-specific T cell epitope of the hemagglutinin antigen of an h5 avian influenza virus in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R Haghighi

    Full Text Available Avian influenza viruses (AIV of the H5N1 subtype have caused morbidity and mortality in humans. Although some migratory birds constitute the natural reservoir for this virus, chickens may play a role in transmission of the virus to humans. Despite the importance of avian species in transmission of AIV H5N1 to humans, very little is known about host immune system interactions with this virus in these species. The objective of the present study was to identify putative T cell epitopes of the hemagglutinin (HA antigen of an H5 AIV in chickens. Using an overlapping peptide library covering the HA protein, we identified a 15-mer peptide, H5(246-260, within the HA1 domain which induced activation of T cells in chickens immunized against the HA antigen of an H5 virus. Furthermore, H5(246-260 epitope was found to be presented by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and II molecules, leading to activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets, marked by proliferation and expression of interferon (IFN-gamma by both of these cell subsets as well as the expression of granzyme A by CD8+ T cells. This is the first report of a T cell epitope of AIV recognized by chicken T cells. Furthermore, this study extends the previous finding of the existence of dual-specific epitopes in other species to chickens. Taken together, these results elucidate some of the mechanisms of immune response to AIV in chickens and provide a platform for creation of rational vaccines against AIV in this species.

  14. Impaired spatial learning strategies and novel object recognition in mice haploinsufficient for the dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1A (Dyrk1A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glòria Arqué

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathogenic aneuploidies involve the concept of dosage-sensitive genes leading to over- and underexpression phenotypes. Monosomy 21 in human leads to mental retardation and skeletal, immune and respiratory function disturbances. Most of the human condition corresponds to partial monosomies suggesting that critical haploinsufficient genes may be responsible for the phenotypes. The DYRK1A gene is localized on the human chromosome 21q22.2 region, and has been proposed to participate in monosomy 21 phenotypes. It encodes a dual-specificity kinase involved in neuronal development and in adult brain physiology, but its possible role as critical haploinsufficient gene in cognitive function has not been explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used mice heterozygous for a Dyrk1A targeted mutation (Dyrk1A+/- to investigate the implication of this gene in the cognitive phenotypes of monosomy 21. Performance of Dyrk1A+/- mice was assayed 1/ in a navigational task using the standard hippocampally related version of the Morris water maze, 2/ in a swimming test designed to reveal potential kinesthetic and stress-related behavioral differences between control and heterozygous mice under two levels of aversiveness (25 degrees C and 17 degrees C and 3/ in a long-term novel object recognition task, sensitive to hippocampal damage. Dyrk1A+/- mice showed impairment in the development of spatial learning strategies in a hippocampally-dependent memory task, they were impaired in their novel object recognition ability and were more sensitive to aversive conditions in the swimming test than euploid control animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present results are clear examples where removal of a single gene has a profound effect on phenotype and indicate that haploinsufficiency of DYRK1A might contribute to an impairment of cognitive functions and stress coping behavior in human monosomy 21.

  15. Generation of an adenovirus-parvovirus chimera with enhanced oncolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Andaloussi, Nazim; Bonifati, Serena; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Mailly, Laurent; Daeffler, Laurent; Deryckère, François; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    In this study, our goal was to generate a chimeric adenovirus-parvovirus (Ad-PV) vector that combines the high-titer and efficient gene transfer of adenovirus with the anticancer potential of rodent parvovirus. To this end, the entire oncolytic PV genome was inserted into a replication-defective E1- and E3-deleted Ad5 vector genome. As we found that parvoviral NS expression inhibited Ad-PV chimera production, we engineered the parvoviral P4 early promoter, which governs NS expression, by inserting into its sequence tetracycline operator elements. As a result of these modifications, P4-driven expression was blocked in the packaging T-REx-293 cells, which constitutively express the tetracycline repressor, allowing high-yield chimera production. The chimera effectively delivered the PV genome into cancer cells, from which fully infectious replication-competent parvovirus particles were generated. Remarkably, the Ad-PV chimera exerted stronger cytotoxic activities against various cancer cell lines, compared with the PV and Ad parental viruses, while being still innocuous to a panel of tested healthy primary human cells. This Ad-PV chimera represents a novel versatile anticancer agent which can be subjected to further genetic manipulations in order to reinforce its enhanced oncolytic capacity through arming with transgenes or retargeting into tumor cells.

  16. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus vectors for the treatment of human breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ren-bin; Samuel D.Rabkin

    2005-01-01

    Background Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors can be used for cancer therapy as direct cytotoxic agents, inducers of anti-tumor immune responses, and as expressers of anti-cancer genes. In this study, the efficacy of HSV vectors, G47Δ and NV1023 were examined for the treatment of the human breast cancer.Methods Human breast cancer MDA-MB-435 cells were cultured or implanted subcutaneously in BALB/c nude mice. The cells or tumors were inoculated with G47Δ or NV1023, and cell killing or inhibition of tumor growth determined. Both viruses contained the LacZ gene and expression in infected cells was detected with X-gal histochemistry. Results G47Δ and NV1023 were highly cytotoxic to MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro at very low multiplicities of infection. X-gal staining of infected tumor cells in vitro and in vivo illustrated the replication and spread of both viruses. G47Δ and NV1023 inoculation inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mouse survival. Both vectors behaved similarly.Conclusions Oncolytic HSV vectors, G47Δ and NV1023, were extremely effective at killing human breast cancer cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts in vivo. This novel form of cancer therapy warrants further investigation and consideration of clinical application.

  17. Preclinical evaluation of engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Megison

    Full Text Available Recently, investigators showed that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas that were treated with a neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV, M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal cells. Previous studies have shown antitumor effects of other oHSV against a number of adult tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of M002 against difficult to treat pediatric liver and kidney tumors. We showed that the oHSV, M002, infected, replicated, and decreased cell survival in hepatoblastoma, malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor, and renal sarcoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly increased survival and decreased tumor growth. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 (nectin-1 was present in human hepatoblastoma and malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted these rare aggressive tumor types and that M002 may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed pediatric solid tumors.

  18. Preclinical Evaluation of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for the Treatment of Pediatric Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megison, Michael L.; Gillory, Lauren A.; Stewart, Jerry E.; Nabers, Hugh C.; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Waters, Alicia M.; Coleman, Jennifer M.; Kelly, Virginia; Markert, James M.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Friedman, Gregory K.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, investigators showed that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas that were treated with a neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV), M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal cells. Previous studies have shown antitumor effects of other oHSV against a number of adult tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of M002 against difficult to treat pediatric liver and kidney tumors. We showed that the oHSV, M002, infected, replicated, and decreased cell survival in hepatoblastoma, malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor, and renal sarcoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly increased survival and decreased tumor growth. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 (nectin-1) was present in human hepatoblastoma and malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted these rare aggressive tumor types and that M002 may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed pediatric solid tumors. PMID:24497984

  19. Heat shock and heat shock protein 70i enhance the oncolytic effect of replicative adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, Y S; Blackwell, J L; Li, H; Wang, M; Lei, X; Curiel, D T

    2001-12-01

    Replication-competent viruses are currently being evaluated for their cancer cell-killing properties. These vectors are designed to induce tumor regression after selective viral propagation within the tumor. However, replication-competent viruses have not resulted heretofore in complete tumor eradication in the clinical setting. Recently, heat shock has been reported to partially alleviate replication restriction on an avian adenovirus (Ad) in a human lung cancer cell line. Therefore, we hypothesized that heat shock and overexpression of heat shock protein (hsp) would support the oncolytic effect of a replication-competent human Ad. To this end, we tested the oncolytic and burst kinetics of a replication-competent Ad after exposure to heat shock or to inducible hsp 70 overexpression by a replication-deficient Ad (Adhsp 70i). Heat-shock resulted in augmentation of Ad burst and oncolysis while decreasing total intracellular Ad DNA. Overexpression of hsp 70i also enhanced Ad-mediated oncolysis but did not decrease intracellular Ad DNA levels. We conclude that heat shock and Adhsp 70i enhance the Ad cell-killing potential via distinct mechanisms. A potential therapeutic implication would be the use of local hyperthermia to augment oncolysis by increasing the burst of replication-competent Ad. The role of hsp in Ad-mediated oncolysis should be additionally explored.

  20. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A. [Queen Mary' s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges [CHU Hotel Dieu, INSERM, Nantes (France); CHU de Nantes, Institut des Maladies de l' Appareil Digestif, Nantes (France); Martin-Duque, Pilar [Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud, Zaragoza (Spain); Vieja, Antonio de la [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Madrid (Spain); Briat, Arnaud [INSERM U877, Grenoble (France); Harrington, Kevin J. [Chester Beatty Laboratories, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  1. A novel scalable, robust downstream process for oncolytic rat parvovirus: isoelectric point-based elimination of empty particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuchs, Barbara; Frehtman, Veronika; Riese, Markus; Müller, Marcus; Rommelaere, Jean

    2017-04-01

    The rodent protoparvovirus H-1PV, with its oncolytic and oncosuppressive properties, is a promising anticancer agent currently under testing in clinical trials. This explains the current demand for a scalable, good manufacturing practice-compatible virus purification process yielding high-grade pure infectious particles and overcoming the limitations of the current system based on density gradient centrifugation. We describe here a scalable process offering high purity and recovery. Taking advantage of the isoelectric point difference between full and empty particles, it eliminates most empty particles. Full particles have a significantly higher cationic charge than empty ones, with an isoelectric point of 5.8-6.2 versus 6.3 (as determined by isoelectric focusing and chromatofocusing). Thanks to this difference, infectious full particles can be separated from empty particles and most protein impurities by Convective interaction media(®) diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) anion exchange chromatography: applying unpurified H-1PV to the column in 0.15 M NaCl leaves, the former on the column and the latter in the flow through. The full particles are then recovered by elution with 0.25 M NaCl. The whole large-scale purification process involves filtration, single-step DEAE anion exchange chromatography, buffer exchange by cross-flow filtration, and final formulation in Visipaque/Ringer solution. It results in 98% contaminating protein removal and 96% empty particle elimination. The final infectious particle concentration reaches 3.5E10 plaque forming units (PFU)/ml, with a specific activity of 6.8E11 PFU/mg protein. Overall recovery is over 40%. The newly established method is suitable for use in commercial production.

  2. Targeting gallbladder cancer: oncolytic virotherapy with myxoma virus is enhanced by rapamycin in vitro and further improved by hyaluronan in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Mingzhe; Gong, Wei; Ma, Mingzhe; Chu, Bingfeng; Qin, Yiyu; Zhang, Mingdi; Lun, XueQing; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter; Yong YANG; Quan, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Background Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is highly lethal, and effective treatment will require synergistic anti-tumor management. The study is aimed at investigating the oncolytic value of myxoma virus (MYXV) infection against GBC and optimizing MYXV oncolytic efficiency. Methods We examined the permissiveness of GBC cell lines to MYXV infection and compared the effects of MYXV on cell viability among GBC and control permissive glioma cells in vitro and in vivo after MYXV + rapamycin (Rap) tre...

  3. A dual-immunocytochemical method to localize c-fos protein in specific neurons based on their content of neuropeptides and connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Larsen, P J; Sørensen, G G

    1994-01-01

    Enhanced expression of the immediate early gene c-fos has been used as a marker of cellular activation in many different neuronal pathways. We wished to determine the neurochemical content and the connectivity of neurons, in which expression of c-fos is induced. For this purpose, a dual...

  4. A dual-immunocytochemical method to localize c-fos protein in specific neurons based on their content of neuropeptides and connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Larsen, P J; Sørensen, G G

    1994-01-01

    Enhanced expression of the immediate early gene c-fos has been used as a marker of cellular activation in many different neuronal pathways. We wished to determine the neurochemical content and the connectivity of neurons, in which expression of c-fos is induced. For this purpose, a dual-immunocyt...

  5. Zinc-Finger Nuclease Knockout of Dual-Specificity Protein Phosphatase-5 Enhances the Myogenic Response and Autoregulation of Cerebral Blood Flow in FHH.1BN Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fan; Geurts, Aron M.; Pabbidi, Mallikarjuna R.; Smith, Stanley V.; Harder, David R.; Jacob, Howard; Roman, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the myogenic responses of the renal afferent arteriole (Af-Art) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) and autoregulation of renal and cerebral blood flow (RBF and CBF) were impaired in Fawn Hooded hypertensive (FHH) rats and were restored in a FHH.1BN congenic strain in which a small segment of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway (BN) containing 15 genes including dual-specificity protein phosphatase-5 (Dusp5) were transferred into the FHH genetic background. We identified 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Dusp5 gene in FHH as compared with BN rats, two of which altered CpG sites and another that caused a G155R mutation. To determine whether Dusp5 contributes to the impaired myogenic response in FHH rats, we created a Dusp5 knockout (KO) rat in the FHH.1BN genetic background using a zinc-finger nuclease that introduced an 11 bp frame-shift deletion and a premature stop codon at AA121. The expression of Dusp5 was decreased and the levels of its substrates, phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), were enhanced in the KO rats. The diameter of the MCA decreased to a greater extent in Dusp5 KO rats than in FHH.1BN and FHH rats when the perfusion pressure was increased from 40 to 140 mmHg. CBF increased markedly in FHH rats when MAP was increased from 100 to 160 mmHg, and CBF was better autoregulated in the Dusp5 KO and FHH.1BN rats. The expression of Dusp5 was higher at the mRNA level but not at the protein level and the levels of p-ERK1/2 and p-PKC were lower in cerebral microvessels and brain tissue isolated from FHH than in FHH.1BN rats. These results indicate that Dusp5 modulates myogenic reactivity in the cerebral circulation and support the view that a mutation in Dusp5 may enhance Dusp5 activity and contribute to the impaired myogenic response in FHH rats. PMID:25397684

  6. Zinc-finger nuclease knockout of dual-specificity protein phosphatase-5 enhances the myogenic response and autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in FHH.1BN rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Fan

    Full Text Available We recently reported that the myogenic responses of the renal afferent arteriole (Af-Art and middle cerebral artery (MCA and autoregulation of renal and cerebral blood flow (RBF and CBF were impaired in Fawn Hooded hypertensive (FHH rats and were restored in a FHH.1BN congenic strain in which a small segment of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway (BN containing 15 genes including dual-specificity protein phosphatase-5 (Dusp5 were transferred into the FHH genetic background. We identified 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Dusp5 gene in FHH as compared with BN rats, two of which altered CpG sites and another that caused a G155R mutation. To determine whether Dusp5 contributes to the impaired myogenic response in FHH rats, we created a Dusp5 knockout (KO rat in the FHH.1BN genetic background using a zinc-finger nuclease that introduced an 11 bp frame-shift deletion and a premature stop codon at AA121. The expression of Dusp5 was decreased and the levels of its substrates, phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2, were enhanced in the KO rats. The diameter of the MCA decreased to a greater extent in Dusp5 KO rats than in FHH.1BN and FHH rats when the perfusion pressure was increased from 40 to 140 mmHg. CBF increased markedly in FHH rats when MAP was increased from 100 to 160 mmHg, and CBF was better autoregulated in the Dusp5 KO and FHH.1BN rats. The expression of Dusp5 was higher at the mRNA level but not at the protein level and the levels of p-ERK1/2 and p-PKC were lower in cerebral microvessels and brain tissue isolated from FHH than in FHH.1BN rats. These results indicate that Dusp5 modulates myogenic reactivity in the cerebral circulation and support the view that a mutation in Dusp5 may enhance Dusp5 activity and contribute to the impaired myogenic response in FHH rats.

  7. Synergistic effects of oncolytic reovirus and docetaxel chemotherapy in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prestwich Robin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reovirus type 3 Dearing (T3D has demonstrated oncolytic activity in vitro, in in vivo murine models and in early clinical trials. However the true potential of oncolytic viruses may only be realized fully in combination with other modalities such as chemotherapy, targeted therapy and radiotherapy. In this study, we examine the oncolytic activity of reovirus T3D and chemotherapeutic agents against human prostate cancer cell lines, with particular focus on the highly metastatic cell line PC3 and the chemotherapeutic agent docetaxel. Docetaxel is the standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer and acts by disrupting the normal process of microtubule assembly and disassembly. Reoviruses have been shown to associate with microtubules and may require this association for efficient viral replication. Methods The effects of reovirus and chemotherapy on in vitro cytotoxicity were investigated in PC3 and Du 145 cells and the interactions between agents were assessed by combination index analysis. An Annexin V/propidium iodide fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based assay was used to determine mode of cell death. The effects of reovirus and docetaxel administered as single agent or combination therapy were tested in vivo in a murine model. The effects of docetaxel and reovirus, alone and together, on microtubule stabilisation were investigated by Western blot analysis. Results Variable degrees of synergistic cytotoxicity were observed in PC3 and Du 145 cells exposed to live reovirus and several chemotherapy agents. Combination of reovirus infection with docetaxel exposure led to increased late apoptotic/necrotic cell populations. Reovirus/docetaxel combined therapy led to reduced tumour growth and increased survival in a PC3 tumour bearing mouse model. Microtubule stabilization was enhanced in PC3 cells treated with reovirus/docetaxel combined therapy compared to other reovirus/chemotherapy combinations. Conclusions The co

  8. Characterization of the Antiglioma Effect of the Oncolytic Adenovirus VCN-01.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vera

    Full Text Available Despite the recent advances in the development of antitumor therapies, the prognosis for patients with malignant gliomas remains dismal. Therapy with tumor-selective viruses is emerging as a treatment option for this devastating disease. In this study we characterize the anti-glioma effect of VCN-01, an improved hyaluronidase-armed pRB-pathway-selective oncolytic adenovirus that has proven safe and effective in the treatment of several solid tumors. VCN-01 displayed a significant cytotoxic effect on glioma cells in vitro. In vivo, in two different orthotopic glioma models, a single intra-tumoral administration of VCN-01 increased overall survival significantly and led to long-term survivors free of disease.

  9. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-01-01

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin®) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed. PMID:27019795

  10. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-03-26

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin(®)) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed.

  11. Interferon-β-armed oncolytic adenovirus induces both apoptosis and necroptosis in cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongling Huang; Tian Xiao; Lingfeng He; Hongbin Ji; Xin-Yuan Liu

    2012-01-01

    Interferon-β (IFN-β) has been widely used in cancer therapy,but the clinical trial results are generally disappointing.Our previous studies have shown that an oncolytic adenovirus carrying IFN-β (ZD55-IFN-β) exhibits significant anti-tumor activities.However,the underlying mechanisms are not clear.Here we showed that ZD55-IFN-β infection-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in a p53-dependent manner by activating the ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent DNA damage pathway.In addition, ZD55-IFN-β infection could initiate both caspase-dependent apoptosis and necroptosis in cancer cells.More importantly,ZD55-IFN-β showed a synergistic effect on cancer cells when combined with doxorubicin.These results suggest that the combination of ZD55-IFN-β with doxorubicin may represent a promising clinical strategy in cancer therapy.

  12. Distinct host cell fates for human malignant melanoma targeted by oncolytic rodent parvoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmers, Ellen M; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The rodent parvoviruses are known to be oncoselective, and lytically infect many transformed human cells. Because current therapeutic regimens for metastatic melanoma have low response rates and have little effect on improving survival, this disease is a prime candidate for novel approaches to therapy, including oncolytic parvoviruses. Screening of low-passage, patient-derived melanoma cell lines for multiplicity-dependent killing by a panel of five rodent parvoviruses identified LuIII as the most melanoma-lytic. This property was mapped to the LuIII capsid gene, and an efficiently melanoma tropic chimeric virus shown to undergo three types of interaction with primary human melanoma cells: (1) complete lysis of cultures infected at very low multiplicities; (2) acute killing resulting from viral protein synthesis and DNA replication, without concomitant expansion of the infection, due to failure to export progeny virions efficiently; or (3) complete resistance that operates at an intracellular step following virion uptake, but preceding viral transcription.

  13. A targeting ligand enhances infectivity and cytotoxicity of an oncolytic adenovirus in human pancreatic cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Goto, Naoko; Rin, Yosei; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-10-28

    The addition of a targeting strategy is necessary to enhance oncolysis and secure safety of a conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd). We have constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber, and have successfully identified a pancreatic cancer-targeting ligand (SYENFSA). Here, the usefulness of cancer-targeted CRAd for pancreatic cancer was examined as a preclinical study. First, we constructed a survivin promoter-regulated CRAd expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (EGFP), which displayed the identified targeting ligand (AdSur-SYE). The AdSur-SYE resulted in higher gene transduction efficiency and oncolytic potency than the untargeted CRAd (AdSur) in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. An intratumoral injection of AdSur-SYE significantly suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors, in which AdSur-SYE effectively proliferated and spread. An ectopic infection in adjacent tissues and organs of intratumorally injected AdSur-SYE was decreased compared with AdSur. Then, to examine whether the targeting ligand actually enhanced the infectivity of CRAd in human pancreatic cancer tissues, tumor cells prepared from surgical specimens were infected with viruses. The AdSur-SYE increased gene transduction efficiency 6.4-fold higher than did AdSur in single cells derived from human pancreatic cancer, whereas the infectivity of both vectors was almost the same in the pancreas and other cancers. Immunostaining showed that most EGFP(+) cells were cytokeratin-positive in the sliced tissues, indicating that pancreatic cancer cells but not stromal cells were injected with AdSur-SYE. AdSur-SYE resulted in a stronger oncolysis in the primary pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblasts than AdSur did. CRAd in combination with a tumor-targeting ligand is promising as a next-generation of oncolytic virotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

  14. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC.

  15. Tunneling nanotubes: an alternate route for propagation of the bystander effect following oncolytic viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Ady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs are ultrafine, filamentous actin-based cytoplasmic extensions which form spontaneously to connect cells at short and long-range distances. We have previously described long-range intercellular communication via TNTs connecting mesothelioma cells in vitro and demonstrated TNTs in intact tumors from patients with mesothelioma. Here, we investigate the ability of TNTs to mediate a viral thymidine kinase based bystander effect after oncolytic viral infection and administration of the nucleoside analog ganciclovir. Using confocal microscopy we assessed the ability of TNTs to propagate enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, which is encoded by the herpes simplex virus NV1066, from infected to uninfected recipient cells. Using time-lapse imaging, we observed eGFP expressed in infected cells being transferred via TNTs to noninfected cells; additionally, increasing fluorescent activity in recipient cells indicated cell-to-cell transmission of the eGFP-expressing NV1066 virus had also occurred. TNTs mediated cell death as a form of direct cell-to-cell transfer following viral thymidine kinase mediated activation of ganciclovir, inducing a unique long-range form of the bystander effect through transmission of activated ganciclovir to nonvirus-infected cells. Thus, we provide proof-of-principle demonstration of a previously unknown and alternative mechanism for inducing apoptosis in noninfected recipient cells. The conceptual advance of this work is that TNTs can be harnessed for delivery of oncolytic viruses and of viral thymidine kinase activated drugs to amplify the bystander effect between cancer cells over long distances in stroma-rich tumor microenvironments.

  16. p21 promotes oncolytic adenoviral activity in ovarian cancer and is a potential biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockley Michelle

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 replicates selectively within and lyses cells with a dysregulated Rb pathway, a finding seen in > 90% human cancers. dl922-947 is more potent than wild type adenovirus and the E1B-deletion mutant dl1520 (Onyx-015. We wished to determine which host cell factors influence cytotoxicity. SV40 large T-transformed MRC5-VA cells are 3-logs more sensitive to dl922-947 than isogenic parental MRC5 cells, confirming that an abnormal G1/S checkpoint increases viral efficacy. The sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to dl922-947 varied widely: IC50 values ranged from 51 (SKOV3ip1 to 0.03 pfu/cell (TOV21G. Cells sensitive to dl922-947 had higher S phase populations and supported earlier E1A expression. Cytotoxicity correlated poorly with both infectivity and replication, but well with expression of p21 by microarray and western blot analyses. Matched p21+/+ and -/- Hct116 cells confirmed that p21 influences dl922-947 activity in vitro and in vivo. siRNA-mediated p21 knockdown in sensitive TOV21G cells decreases E1A expression and viral cytotoxicity, whilst expression of p21 in resistant A2780CP cells increases virus activity in vitro and in intraperitoneal xenografts. These results highlight that host cell factors beyond simple infectivity can influence the efficacy of oncolytic adenoviruses. p21 expression may be an important biomarker of response in clinical trials.

  17. Dual diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Dual diagnosis denotes intertwining of intellectual disabilities with mental disorders. With the help of systematic examination of literature, intellectual disabilities are determined (they are characterized by subaverage intellectual activity and difficulties in adaptive skills), along side mental disorders. Their influence is seen in changes of thinking, perception, emotionality, behaviour and cognition. Mental disorders often occur with people with intellectual disabilities (data differs f...

  18. Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with Hsp70 gene exerts effective antitumor efficacy in gastric cancer immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Weiguo; Ji, Weidan; Hu, Huanzhang; Ma, Juming; Li, Xiaoya; Mei, Weiqun; Xu, Yang; Hu, Huizhen; Yan, Yan; Song, Qizhe; Li, Zhigang; Su, Changqing

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising adjuvant therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. To overcome the limitations of current gene therapy, such as poor transfection efficiency of vectors, low levels of transgene expression and lack of tumor targeting, the Survivin promoter was used to regulate the selective replication of oncolytic adenovirus in tumor cells, and the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) gene was loaded as the anticancer transgene to generate an AdSurp-Hsp70 viral therapy system. The effica...

  19. Combination effect of oncolytic adenovirus therapy and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir in hepatic carcinoma animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-qun ZHENG; Yin XU; Ren-jie YANG; Bin WU; Xiao-hua TAN; Yi-de QIN; Qun-wei ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Oncolytic adenovirus, also called conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAD), can selectively propagate in tumor cells and cause cell lysis. The released viral progeny can infect neighboring cancer cells, initiating a cascade that can lead to the ultimate destruction of the tumor. Suicide gene therapy using herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) and ganciclovir (GCV) offers a potential treatment strategy for cancer and is undergoing preclinical trials for a variety of tumors.We hypothesized that HSV-TK gene therapy combined with oncolytic adenoviral therapy would have an enhanced effect compared with the individual effects of the therapies and is a potential novel therapeutic strategy to treat liver cancer. Methods: To address our hypothesis, a novel CRAD was created, which consisted of a telomerase-dependent oncolytic adenovirus engineered to express E1A and HSV-TK genes (Ad-ETK). The combined effect of Ad-ETK and GCV was assessed both in vitro and in vivo in nude mice bearing HepG2 cell-derived tumors. Expression of the therapeutic genes by the transduced tumor cells was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting.Results: We confirmed that Ad-ETK had antitumorigenic effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) both in vitro and in vivo, and the TK/GCV system enhanced oncolytic adenoviral therapy. We confirmed that both E1A and HSV-TK genes were expressed in vivo.Conclusion: The Ad-ETK construct should provide a relatively safe and selective approach to killing cancer cells and should be investigated as an adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Myxoma Virus Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Gemcitabine and Is an Effective Oncolytic Virotherapeutic in Models of Disseminated Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wennier, Sonia Tusell; Liu, Jia; Li, Shoudong; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mona, Mahmoud; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a novel oncolytic virus that has been shown to replicate in pancreatic cancer cells, but its efficacy in animal models of pancreatic cancer has not been determined. The efficacy of MYXV as monotherapy or in combination with gemcitabine was evaluated in intraperitoneal dissemination (IPD) models of pancreatic cancer. The effects of an intact immune system on the efficacy of MYXV therapy was tested by comparing immunodeficient versus immunocompetent murine models and comb...

  1. Asymmetry in Dual Language Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Amrein

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity for dual-language programs to deliver specific benefits to students with different primary and secondary language skills continues to be debated. Individuals favoring dual language assert that as it relies upon a reciprocal approach, dual language students acquire dual language proficiency without the need for teachers to translate from one language to another. By utilizing and conserving the language skills that students bring, dual language students also gain cross-cultural understandings and an expanded opportunity to realize academic success in the future. Research that explores whether these programs meet the needs of monolingual and bilingual students is limited. The intent of this study is not to criticize dual language practice. Instead, it is to describe a newly implemented dual language immersion program that exists and operates in Phoenix, Arizona. In particular, this study examines the practices of dual language teachers at Leigh Elementary School and the challenges encountered as school personnel worked to provide students with different primary and secondary language skills increased opportunities to learn.

  2. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 induces cell death and DAMP release by mitochondria distortion in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eike, Liv-Marie; Yang, Nannan; Rekdal, Øystein; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2015-10-27

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are naturally occurring molecules found in most species, in which they play a significant role in the first line defense against intruding pathogens, and several HDPs have been shown to possess anticancer activity. Structure-activity relationship studies on the HDP bovine lactoferricin revealed a de novo design of a nonamer peptide LTX-315, with oncolytic properties. In the present study, we investigated the oncolytic activity of LTX-315 in human melanoma cells (A375). LTX-315 induced a rapid plasma membrane disruption and cell death within 2 hours. At a low concentration, fluorescence-labeled LTX-315 was internalized and accumulated in cytoplasmic vacuoles in close proximity to the mitochondria. The mitochondrial membrane potential was shown to depolarize as a consequence of LTX-315 treatment and at ultrastructural level, the mitochondria morphology was significantly altered. Release of danger signals (DAMPs) such as ATP, Cytochrome C and HMGB1 into the cell supernatant of cultured cells was evident minutes after peptide treatment. The oncolytic effect of LTX-315 involving perturbation of both the cell membrane and the mitochondria with subsequent release of DAMPs may highlight the ability of LTX-315 to induce complete regression and long-term protective immune responses as previously reported in experimental animal models.

  3. Effects of capsid-modified oncolytic adenoviruses and their combinations with gemcitabine or silica gel on pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Pisto, Tommi; Koskinen, Mika; Jokinen, Mika; Kiviluoto, Tuula; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Jalonen, Harry; Koski, Anniina; Kangasniemi, Anna; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-07-01

    Conventional cancer treatments often have little impact on the course of advanced pancreatic cancer. Although cancer gene therapy with adenoviruses is a promising developmental approach, the primary receptor is poorly expressed in pancreatic cancers which might compromise efficacy and thus targeting to other receptors could be beneficial. Extended stealth delivery, combination with standard chemotherapy or circumvention of host antiadenoviral immune response might improve efficacy further. In this work, capsid-modified adenoviruses were studied for transduction of cell lines and clinical normal and tumor tissue samples. The respective oncolytic viruses were tested for oncolytic activity in vitro and in vivo. Survival was studied in a peritoneally disseminated pancreas cancer model, with or without concurrent gemcitabine while silica implants were utilized for extended intraperitoneal virus delivery. Immunocompetent mice and Syrian hamsters were used to study the effect of silica mediated delivery on antiviral immune responses and subsequent in vivo gene delivery. Capsid modifications selectively enhanced gene transfer to malignant pancreatic cancer cell lines and clinical samples. The respective oncolytic viruses resulted in increased cell killing in vitro, which translated into a survival benefit in mice. Early proinfammatory cytokine responses and formation of antiviral neutralizing antibodies was partially avoided with silica implants. The implant also shielded the virus from pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, while increasing the pancreas/liver gene delivery ratio six-fold. In conclusion, capsid modified adenoviruses would be useful for testing in pancreatic cancer trials. Silica implants might increase the safety and efficacy of the approach.

  4. Efficient colonization and therapy of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC using the oncolytic vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus strains is one of the most promising new strategies for cancer therapy. In this study, we analyzed for the first time the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 in two human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines HuH7 and PLC/PRF/5 (PLC in cell culture and in tumor xenograft models. By viral proliferation assays and cell survival tests, we demonstrated that GLV-1h68 efficiently colonized, replicated in, and did lyse these cancer cells in culture. Experiments with HuH7 and PLC xenografts have revealed that a single intravenous injection (i.v. of mice with GLV-1h68 resulted in a significant reduction of primary tumor sizes compared to uninjected controls. In addition, replication of GLV-1h68 in tumor cells led to strong inflammatory and oncolytic effects resulting in intense infiltration of MHC class II-positive cells like neutrophils, macrophages, B cells and dendritic cells and in up-regulation of 13 pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, GLV-1h68 infection of PLC tumors inhibited the formation of hemorrhagic structures which occur naturally in PLC tumors. Interestingly, we found a strongly reduced vascular density in infected PLC tumors only, but not in the non-hemorrhagic HuH7 tumor model. These data demonstrate that the GLV-1h68 vaccinia virus may have an enormous potential for treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma in man.

  5. A novel immunosensing platform for highly sensitive prostate specific antigen detection based on dual-quenching of photocurrent from CdSe sensitized TiO2 electrode by gold nanoparticles decorated polydopamine nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu-Xiang; Cao, Jun-Tao; Liu, Yan-Ming; Ma, Shu-Hui

    2017-05-15

    Herein, a novel photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensing platform for highly sensitive detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) was constructed based on dual-quenching of photocurrent from CdSe sensitized TiO2 electrode by gold nanoparticles decorated dopamine-melanin nanospheres (AuNPs-Dpa-melanin CNSs). In this proposal, CdSe sensitized TiO2 was used as photoelectrochemical matrix and the functional AuNPs-Dpa-melanin CNSs were used as signal quenching element. The dual quenching of the gold nanoparticles decorated Dpa-melanin CNSs to the CdSe sensitized TiO2 was achieved as follows: (i) the strong energy transfer between the CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and Au NPs diminishes the photocurrent signal of CdSe QDs; (ii) the steric hindrance of AuNPs-Dpa-melanin CNSs partly obstructs the diffusion of the electron donor, i.e. ascorbic acid, to the surface of photoelectrode, which make the depleting efficiency of the photogenerated holes decrease, leading to a declined photocurrent intensity. On the basis of the dual quenching effect of AuNPs-Dpa-melanin CNSs, a competitive immunosensing platform for PSA was designed upon the specific binding of anti-PSA to PSA and PSA functionalized AuNPs-Dpa-melanin CNSs conjugates. This proposed immunosensor possesses wide linear range from 1.0×10(-11)gmL(-1) to 1.0×10(-7)gmL(-1) with the detection limit of 2.7pgmL(-1). Moreover, the applicability of the present method was demonstrated in the determination of PSA in human serum. The strategy creates new paradigms for PSA and other tumor markers detection and demonstrates high sensitivity, good specificity, and satisfied applicability in complex biological samples.

  6. QCD Dual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We uncover a novel solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions for QCD. Interestingly in the perturbative regime the new gauge theory, if interpreted as a possible QCD dual, predicts the critical number of flavors above which QCD in the nonperturbative regime, develops an infrared stable...... fixed point. Remarkably this value is identical to the maximum bound predicted in the nonpertubative regime via the all-orders conjectured beta function for nonsupersymmetric gauge theories.......We uncover a novel solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions for QCD. Interestingly in the perturbative regime the new gauge theory, if interpreted as a possible QCD dual, predicts the critical number of flavors above which QCD in the nonperturbative regime, develops an infrared stable...

  7. 表达期特异性双荧光蛋白的转基因弓形虫的构建%Construction of transgenic Toxoplasma gondii expressing dual-fluoresecent stage-specific proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦雷; 张厚双; 蔺智兵; 周勇志; 曹杰; 周金林

    2011-01-01

    The conversion from tachyzoite to bradyzoite in Toxoplasma gondii accompany the expression of stage-specific proteins and this experiment aimed at constructing the dual-fluorescent stage-specific parasite. In this experiment, the tachyzoite-specified SAG1 promoter promoted the EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) gene while the bradyzoite-spec-ified BAG1 promoter promoted the RFP (Red Fluorescent Protein) gene in order to construct the dual-fluorescent expression vector. Then,the vector was transformed to the parasites by electroporation. The results were confirmed by pyrimethimine screening and fluorescence. The PCR assay detected the EGFP gene and RFP gene from the genome of the dual-fluorescent parasites. It was concluded that the Toxoplasma gondii expressing dual-fluoresecent stage-specific proteins were constructed in this experiment.%目的 构建速殖子期特异表达绿色荧光和缓殖子期特异表达红色荧光的转基因弓形虫.方法 利用速殖子期特异性表达的SAG1基因启动子启动绿色荧光蛋白(EGFP)基因,利用缓殖子期特异性表达的BAG1基因启动子启动红色荧光蛋白( RFP)基因,构建期特异性表达双荧光的质粒,通过电转化将质粒转化进弓形虫体内进行表达.结果 经过息疟定抗性筛选得到阳性重组子,经荧光观察观察到了在速殖子时期表达的绿色荧光虫体和经缓殖子诱导后表达红色荧光的缓殖子虫体;通过PCR检测也检测到了EGFP和RFP基因.结论 本试验成功构建表达期特异性双荧光蛋白的转基因弓形虫.

  8. Complex spatial dynamics of oncolytic viruses in vitro: mathematical and experimental approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Wodarz

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses replicate selectively in tumor cells and can serve as targeted treatment agents. While promising results have been observed in clinical trials, consistent success of therapy remains elusive. The dynamics of virus spread through tumor cell populations has been studied both experimentally and computationally. However, a basic understanding of the principles underlying virus spread in spatially structured target cell populations has yet to be obtained. This paper studies such dynamics, using a newly constructed recombinant adenovirus type-5 (Ad5 that expresses enhanced jellyfish green fluorescent protein (EGFP, AdEGFPuci, and grows on human 293 embryonic kidney epithelial cells, allowing us to track cell numbers and spatial patterns over time. The cells are arranged in a two-dimensional setting and allow virus spread to occur only to target cells within the local neighborhood. Despite the simplicity of the setup, complex dynamics are observed. Experiments gave rise to three spatial patterns that we call "hollow ring structure", "filled ring structure", and "disperse pattern". An agent-based, stochastic computational model is used to simulate and interpret the experiments. The model can reproduce the experimentally observed patterns, and identifies key parameters that determine which pattern of virus growth arises. The model is further used to study the long-term outcome of the dynamics for the different growth patterns, and to investigate conditions under which the virus population eliminates the target cells. We find that both the filled ring structure and disperse pattern of initial expansion are indicative of treatment failure, where target cells persist in the long run. The hollow ring structure is associated with either target cell extinction or low-level persistence, both of which can be viewed as treatment success. Interestingly, it is found that equilibrium properties of ordinary differential equations describing the

  9. Regression of Human Prostate Tumors and Metastases in Nude Mice following Treatment with the Recombinant Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus GLV-1h68

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus strains is one of the most promising new strategies for cancer therapy. In the current study, we analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 against two human prostate cancer cell lines DU-145 and PC-3 in cell culture and in tumor xenograft models. By viral proliferation assays and cell survival tests, we demonstrated that GLV-1h68 was able to infect, replicate in, and lyse these prostate cancer cells in culture. In DU-145 and PC-3 tumor xenograft models, a single intravenous injection with GLV-1h68 resulted in a significant reduction of primary tumor size. In addition, the GLV-1h68-infection led to strong inflammatory and oncolytic effects resulting in drastic reduction of regional lymph nodes with PC-3 metastases. Our data documented that the GLV-1h68 virus has a great potential for treatment of human prostate carcinoma.

  10. Antigen profiling analysis of vaccinia virus injected canine tumors: oncolytic virus efficiency predicted by boolean models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Alexander; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Adelfinger, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe for the first time the use of dynamic boolean modeling for tumor growth prediction of vaccinia virus GLV-1h68-injected canine tumors including canine mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), canine mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), canine prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and canine soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). Additionally, the STSA-1 xenografted mice were injected with either LIVP 1.1.1 or LIVP 5.1.1 vaccinia virus strains.   Antigen profiling data of the four different vaccinia virus-injected canine tumors were obtained, analyzed and used to calculate differences in the tumor growth signaling network by type and tumor type. Our model combines networks for apoptosis, MAPK, p53, WNT, Hedgehog, TK cell, Interferon, and Interleukin signaling networks. The in silico findings conform with in vivo findings of tumor growth. Boolean modeling describes tumor growth and remission semi-quantitatively with a good fit to the data obtained for all cancer type variants. At the same time it monitors all signaling activities as a basis for treatment planning according to antigen levels. Mitigation and elimination of VACV- susceptible tumor types as well as effects on the non-susceptible type CT1258 are predicted correctly. Thus the combination of Antigen profiling and semi-quantitative modeling optimizes the therapy already before its start.

  11. Preclinical evaluation of engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A Gillory

    Full Text Available Despite intensive research efforts and therapeutic advances over the last few decades, the pediatric neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma, continues to be responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Novel therapeutic options are needed for this tumor. Recently, investigators have shown that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas treated with an engineered, neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV, M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ 1 34.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal neural cells. We hypothesized that M002 would also be effective in the neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma. We showed that M002 infected, replicated, and decreased survival in neuroblastoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly decreased tumor growth, and that this effect was augmented with the addition of ionizing radiation. Importantly, survival could be increased by subsequent doses of radiation without re-dosing of the virus. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 was expressed by numerous neuroblastoma cell lines and was also present in human neuroblastoma specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted neuroblastoma and that this oHSV may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed neuroblastoma.

  12. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of a replicating oncolytic adenovirus to tumors using focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Rifai, Bassel; Carlisle, Robert C; Choi, James; Arvanitis, Costas D; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin C

    2013-07-10

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) and ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery are powerful novel technologies. OV selectively self-amplify and kill cancer cells but their clinical use has been restricted by limited delivery from the bloodstream into the tumor. Ultrasound has been previously exploited for targeted release of OV in vivo, but its use to induce cavitation, microbubble oscillations, for enhanced OV tumor extravasation and delivery has not been previously reported. By identifying and optimizing the underlying physical mechanism, this work demonstrates that focused ultrasound significantly enhances the delivery and biodistribution of systemically administered OV co-injected with microbubbles. Up to a fiftyfold increase in tumor transgene expression was achieved, without any observable tissue damage. Ultrasound exposure parameters were optimized as a function of tumor reperfusion time to sustain inertial cavitation, a type of microbubble activity, throughout the exposure. Passive detection of acoustic emissions during treatment confirmed inertial cavitation as the mechanism responsible for enhanced delivery and enabled real-time monitoring of successful viral delivery.

  13. Preclinical Evaluation of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for the Treatment of Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillory, Lauren A.; Megison, Michael L.; Stewart, Jerry E.; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Nabers, Hugh C.; Waters, Alicia M.; Kelly, Virginia; Coleman, Jennifer M.; Markert, James M.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Friedman, Gregory K.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts and therapeutic advances over the last few decades, the pediatric neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma, continues to be responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Novel therapeutic options are needed for this tumor. Recently, investigators have shown that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas treated with an engineered, neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV), M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal neural cells. We hypothesized that M002 would also be effective in the neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma. We showed that M002 infected, replicated, and decreased survival in neuroblastoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly decreased tumor growth, and that this effect was augmented with the addition of ionizing radiation. Importantly, survival could be increased by subsequent doses of radiation without re-dosing of the virus. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 was expressed by numerous neuroblastoma cell lines and was also present in human neuroblastoma specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted neuroblastoma and that this oHSV may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed neuroblastoma. PMID:24130898

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors improve the replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Cody

    Full Text Available New therapies are needed for metastatic breast cancer patients. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV is an exciting therapy being developed for use against aggressive tumors and established metastases. Although oHSV have been demonstrated safe in clinical trials, a lack of sufficient potency has slowed the clinical application of this approach. We utilized histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, which have been noted to impair the innate antiviral response and improve gene transcription from viral vectors, to enhance the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. A panel of chemically diverse HDAC inhibitors were tested at three different doses (LD50 for their ability to modulate the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. Several of the tested HDAC inhibitors enhanced oHSV replication at low multiplicity of infection (MOI following pre-treatment of the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and the oHSV-resistant cell line 4T1, but not in the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Inhibitors of class I HDACs, including pan-selective compounds, were more effective for increasing oHSV replication compared to inhibitors that selectively target class II HDACs. These studies demonstrate that select HDAC inhibitors increase oHSV replication in breast cancer cells and provides support for pre-clinical evaluation of this combination strategy.

  15. Immune response is an important aspect of the antitumor effect produced by a CD40L-encoding oncolytic adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconu, Iulia; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hirvinen, Mari L M; Escutenaire, Sophie; Ugolini, Matteo; Pesonen, Saila K; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Kanerva, Anna; Loskog, Angelica S I; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus is an attractive platform for immunotherapy because virus replication is highly immunogenic and not subject to tolerance. Although oncolysis releases tumor epitopes and provides costimulatory danger signals, arming the virus with immunostimulatory molecules can further improve efficacy. CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) induces apoptosis of tumor cells and triggers several immune mechanisms, including a T-helper type 1 (T(H)1) response, which leads to activation of cytotoxic T cells and reduction of immunosuppression. In this study, we constructed a novel oncolytic adenovirus, Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L, which features a chimeric Ad5/3 capsid for enhanced tumor transduction, a human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter for tumor selectivity, and human CD40L for increased efficacy. Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo via oncolytic and apoptotic effects, and (Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L)-mediated oncolysis resulted in enhanced calreticulin exposure and HMGB1 and ATP release, which were suggestive of immunogenicity. In two syngeneic mouse models, murine CD40L induced recruitment and activation of antigen-presenting cells, leading to increased interleukin-12 production in splenocytes. This effect was associated with induction of the T(H)1 cytokines IFN-γ, RANTES, and TNF-α. Tumors treated with Ad5/3-CMV-mCD40L also displayed an enhanced presence of macrophages and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells but not B cells. Together, our findings show that adenoviruses coding for CD40L mediate multiple antitumor effects including oncolysis, apoptosis, induction of T-cell responses, and upregulation of T(H)1 cytokines.

  16. Comparison of Prostate-Specific Promoters and the Use of PSP-Driven Virotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men today. Although virus-based gene therapy is a promising strategy to combat advanced prostate cancer, its current effectiveness is limited partially due to inefficient cellular transduction in vivo. To overcome this obstacle, conditional oncolytic viruses (such as conditional replication adenovirus (CRAD are developed to specifically target prostate without (or with minimal systemic toxicity due to viral self-replication. In this study, we have analyzed and compared three prostate-specific promoters (PSA, probasin, and MMTV LTR for their specificity and activity both in vitro and in vivo. Both mice model with xenograft prostate tumor model and canine model were used. The best PSP was selected to construct a prostate-specific oncolytic adenovirus (CRAD by controlling the adenoviral E1 region. The efficacy and specificity of CRAD on prostate cancer cells were examined in cell culture and animal models.

  17. Human precision-cut liver tumor slices as a tumor patient-individual predictive test system for oncolytic measles vaccine viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, Martina; Armeanu, Sorin; Smirnow, Irina; Kupka, Susan; Wagner, Silvia; Wehrmann, Manfred; Rots, Marianne G.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Weiss, Thomas S.; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Gregor, Michael; Bitzer, Michael; Lauer, Ulrich M.

    2009-01-01

    Availability of an individualized preselection of oncolytic viruses to be used for virotherapy of tumor patients would be of great help. Using primary liver tumor resection specimens we evaluated the precision-cut liver slice (PCLS) technology as a novel in vitro test system for characterization of

  18. Potential for Improving Potency and Specificity of Reovirus Oncolysis with Next-Generation Reovirus Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Viruses that specifically replicate in tumor over normal cells offer promising cancer therapies. Oncolytic viruses (OV not only kill the tumor cells directly; they also promote anti-tumor immunotherapeutic responses. Other major advantages of OVs are that they dose-escalate in tumors and can be genetically engineered to enhance potency and specificity. Unmodified wild type reovirus is a propitious OV currently in phase I–III clinical trials. This review summarizes modifications to reovirus that may improve potency and/or specificity during oncolysis. Classical genetics approaches have revealed reovirus variants with improved adaptation towards tumors or with enhanced ability to establish specific steps of virus replication and cell killing among transformed cells. The recent emergence of a reverse genetics system for reovirus has provided novel strategies to fine-tune reovirus proteins or introduce exogenous genes that could promote oncolytic activity. Over the next decade, these findings are likely to generate better-optimized second-generation reovirus vectors and improve the efficacy of oncolytic reotherapy.

  19. Meganuclease-mediated virus self-cleavage facilitates tumor-specific virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürlevik, Engin; Schache, Peter; Goez, Anneliese; Kloos, Arnold; Woller, Norman; Armbrecht, Nina; Manns, Michael P; Kubicka, Stefan; Kühnel, Florian

    2013-09-01

    Meganucleases can specifically cleave long DNA sequence motifs, a feature that makes them an ideal tool for gene engineering in living cells. In a proof-of-concept study, we investigated the use of the meganuclease I-Sce I for targeted virus self-disruption to generate high-specific oncolytic viruses. For this purpose, we provided oncolytic adenoviruses with a molecular circuit that selectively responds to p53 activation by expression of I-Sce I subsequently leading to self-disruption of the viral DNA via heterologous I-Sce I recognition sites within the virus genome. We observed that virus replication and cell lysis was effectively impaired in p53-normal cells, but not in p53-dysfunctional tumor cells. I-Sce I activity led to effective intracellular processing of viral DNA as confirmed by detection of specific cleavage products. Virus disruption did not interfere with E1A levels indicating that reduction of functional virus genomes was the predominant cause for conditional replication. Consequently, tumor-specific replication was further enhanced when E1A expression was additionally inhibited by targeted transcriptional repression. Finally, we demonstrated p53-dependent oncolysis by I-Sce I-expressing viruses in vitro and in vivo, and demonstrated effective inhibition of tumor growth. In summary, meganuclease-mediated virus cleavage represents a promising approach to provide oncolytic viruses with attractive safety profiles.

  20. Oncolytic reovirus induces intracellular redistribution of Ras to promote apoptosis and progeny virus release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garant, K A; Shmulevitz, M; Pan, L; Daigle, R M; Ahn, D-G; Gujar, S A; Lee, P W K

    2016-02-11

    Reovirus is a naturally oncolytic virus that preferentially replicates in Ras-transformed cells and is currently undergoing clinical trials as a cancer therapeutic. Ras transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by enhancing virion disassembly during entry, viral progeny production, and virus release through apoptosis; however, the mechanism behind the latter is not well understood. Here, we show that reovirus alters the intracellular location of oncogenic Ras to induce apoptosis of H-RasV12-transformed fibroblasts. Reovirus infection decreases Ras palmitoylation levels and causes accumulation of Ras in the Golgi through Golgi fragmentation. With the Golgi being the site of Ras palmitoylation, treatment of target cells with the palmitoylation inhibitor, 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), prompts a greater accumulation of H-RasV12 in the Golgi, and a dose-dependent increase in progeny virus release and subsequent spread. Conversely, tethering H-RasV12 to the plasma membrane (thereby preventing its movement to the Golgi) allows for efficient virus production, but results in basal levels of reovirus-induced cell death. Analysis of Ras downstream signaling reveals that cells expressing cycling H-RasV12 have elevated levels of phosphorylated JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), and that Ras retained at the Golgi body by 2BP increases activation of the MEKK1/MKK4/JNK signaling pathway to promote cell death. Collectively, our data suggest that reovirus induces Golgi fragmentation of target cells, and the subsequent accumulation of oncogenic Ras in the Golgi body initiates apoptotic signaling events required for virus release and spread.

  1. Systemic Delivery of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Decorin for the Treatment of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuefeng; Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Hu, Zebin; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R; Guise, Theresa; Yun, Chae-Ok; Brendler, Charles B; Iozzo, Renato V; Seth, Prem

    2015-12-01

    The development of novel therapies for breast cancer bone metastasis is a major unmet medical need. Toward that end, we have constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad.dcn, and a nonreplicating adenovirus, Ad(E1-).dcn, both containing the human decorin gene. Our in vitro studies showed that Ad.dcn produced high levels of viral replication and the decorin protein in the breast tumor cells. Ad(E1-).dcn-mediated decorin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells downregulated the expression of Met, β-catenin, and vascular endothelial growth factor A, all of which are recognized decorin targets and play pivotal roles in the progression of breast tumor growth and metastasis. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited cell migration and induced mitochondrial autophagy in MDA-MB-231 cells. Mice bearing MDA-MB-231-luc skeletal metastases were systemically administered with the viral vectors, and skeletal tumor growth was monitored over time. The results of bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography indicated that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn significantly inhibited the progression of bone metastases. At the terminal time point, histomorphometric analysis, micro-computed tomography, and bone destruction biomarkers showed that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn reduced tumor burden and inhibited bone destruction. A nonreplicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).luc expressing the luciferase 2 gene had no significant effect on inhibiting bone metastases, and in several assays, Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn were better than Ad.luc, a replicating virus expressing the luciferase 2 gene. Our data suggest that adenoviral replication coupled with decorin expression could produce effective antitumor responses in a MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis model of breast cancer. Thus, Ad.dcn could potentially be developed as a candidate gene therapy vector for treating breast cancer bone metastases.

  2. Intratumoral modulation of the inducible co-stimulator ICOS by recombinant oncolytic virus promotes systemic anti-tumour immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Ricca, Jacob; Plitt, Tamar; Palese, Peter; Sharma, Padmanee; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Allison, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that locoregional cancer therapeutic approaches with oncolytic viruses can lead to systemic anti-tumour immunity, although the appropriate targets for intratumoral immunomodulation using this strategy are not known. Here we find that intratumoral therapy with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), in addition to the activation of innate immunity, upregulates the expression of T-cell co-stimulatory receptors, with the inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) being most notable. To explore ICOS as a direct target in the tumour, we engineered a recombinant NDV-expressing ICOS ligand (NDV-ICOSL). In the bilateral flank tumour models, intratumoral administration of NDV-ICOSL results in enhanced infiltration with activated T cells in both virus-injected and distant tumours, and leads to effective rejection of both tumours when used in combination with systemic CTLA-4 blockade. These findings highlight that intratumoral immunomodulation with an oncolytic virus expressing a rationally selected ligand can be an effective strategy to drive systemic efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:28194010

  3. Myxoma virus sensitizes cancer cells to gemcitabine and is an effective oncolytic virotherapeutic in models of disseminated pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennier, Sonia Tusell; Liu, Jia; Li, Shoudong; Rahman, Masmudur M; Mona, Mahmoud; McFadden, Grant

    2012-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a novel oncolytic virus that has been shown to replicate in pancreatic cancer cells, but its efficacy in animal models of pancreatic cancer has not been determined. The efficacy of MYXV as monotherapy or in combination with gemcitabine was evaluated in intraperitoneal dissemination (IPD) models of pancreatic cancer. The effects of an intact immune system on the efficacy of MYXV therapy was tested by comparing immunodeficient versus immunocompetent murine models and combination therapy with gemcitabine was also evaluated. In cell culture, MYXV replication was robust in a broad range of pancreatic cancer cells and also showed increased oncolysis in combination with gemcitabine. In animal models, MYXV treatment conferred survival benefits over control or gemcitabine-treated cohorts regardless of the cell line or animal model used. MYXV monotherapy was most effective in an immunocompetent IPD model, and resulted in 60% long-term survivors. In Pan02 engrafted immunocompetent IPD models, sequential treatment in which MYXV was administered first, followed by gemcitabine, was the most effective and resulted in 100% long-term survivors. MYXV is an effective oncolytic virus for pancreatic cancer and can be combined with gemcitabine to enhance survival, particularly in the presence of an intact host immune system.

  4. Complementary induction of immunogenic cell death by oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV and gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Assia L; Grekova, Svitlana P; Heller, Anette; Kuhlmann, Olga; Soyka, Esther; Giese, Thomas; Aprahamian, Marc; Bour, Gaétan; Rüffer, Sven; Cziepluch, Celina; Daeffler, Laurent; Rommelaere, Jean; Werner, Jens; Raykov, Zahari; Giese, Nathalia A

    2014-05-01

    Novel therapies employing oncolytic viruses have emerged as promising anticancer modalities. The cure of particularly aggressive malignancies requires induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD), coupling oncolysis with immune responses via calreticulin, ATP, and high-mobility group box protein B1 (HMGB1) release from dying tumor cells. The present study shows that in human pancreatic cancer cells (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma [PDAC] cells n=4), oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) activated multiple interconnected death pathways but failed to induce calreticulin exposure or ATP release. In contrast, H-1PV elevated extracellular HMGB1 levels by 4.0±0.5 times (58%±9% of total content; up to 100 ng/ml) in all infected cultures, whether nondying, necrotic, or apoptotic. An alternative secretory route allowed H-1PV to overcome the failure of gemcitabine to trigger HMGB1 release, without impeding cytotoxicity or other ICD activities of the standard PDAC medication. Such broad resistance of H-1PV-induced HMGB1 release to apoptotic blockage coincided with but was uncoupled from an autocrine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) loop. That and the pattern of viral determinants maintained in gemcitabine-treated cells suggested the activation of an inflammasome/caspase 1 (CASP1) platform alongside DNA detachment and/or nuclear exclusion of HMGB1 during early stages of the viral life cycle. We concluded that H-1PV infection of PDAC cells is signaled through secretion of the alarmin HMGB1 and, besides its own oncolytic effect, might convert drug-induced apoptosis into an ICD process. A transient arrest of cells in the cyclin A1-rich S phase would suffice to support compatibility of proliferation-dependent H-1PV with cytotoxic regimens. These properties warrant incorporation of the oncolytic virus H-1PV, which is not pathogenic in humans, into multimodal anticancer treatments. The current therapeutic concepts targeting aggressive malignancies require an induction of immunogenic cell death

  5. Dock6, a Dock-C subfamily guanine nucleotide exchanger, has the dual specificity for Rac1 and Cdc42 and regulates neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Yamauchi, Junji; Sanbe, Atsushi; Tanoue, Akito

    2007-02-15

    Small GTPases of the Rho family, Rho, Rac, and Cdc42, are critical regulators of the changes in the actin cytoskeleton. Rho GTPases are typically activated by Dbl-homology (DH)-domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Recent genetic and biochemical studies revealed a new type of GEF for the Rho GTPases. This family is composed of 11 genes, designated as Dock1 to Dock11, and is structurally divided into four classes Dock-A, -B, -C, and -D. Dock-A and -B subfamilies are typically GEFs specific for Rac1, while the Dock-D subfamily is specific for Cdc42. Here we show that Dock6, a member of the Dock-C subfamily, exchanges GDP for GTP for Rac1 and Cdc42 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we find that, in mouse N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells, expression of Dock6 is increased following differentiation. Transfection of the catalytic Dock Homology Region-2 (DHR-2) domain of Dock6 promotes neurite outgrowth mediated by Rac1 and Cdc42. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous Dock6 by small interference RNA reduces activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 and neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these results suggest that Dock6 differs from all of the identified Dock180-related proteins, in that it is the GEF specific for both Rac1 and Cdc42 and may be one of physiological regulators of neurite outgrowth.

  6. Selective targeting of HPV-16 E6/E7 in cervical cancer cells with a potent oncolytic adenovirus and its enhanced effect with radiotherapy in vitro and vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sima, Ni; Kong, Debo; Luo, Aiyue; Gao, Qinglei; Liao, Shujie; Li, Wei; Han, Lingfei; Wang, Juan; Wang, Shixuan; Lu, Yunping; Wang, Daowen; Xu, Gang; Zhou, Jianfeng; Meng, Li; Ma, Ding

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that oncolytic adenovirus specifically targeted tumor cells while sparing normal cells. Here, we report a novel E1A-mutant adenovirus (M6) with antisense HPV16 E6 E7 DNA inserted into the deleted 6.7K/gp19K region of E3. The target effects of M6 on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cells were evaluated in vivo and in vitro. By using cytopathic effect (CPE) and viral replication assays, we verified M6 was competent to selectively replicate in cervical cancer cells in vitro. Moreover, we found infection of M6 was able to inhibit the expression of HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes and induce apoptosis of HPV16-positive cervical cancer cells. Further analysis in vitro revealed that the invasive ability of SiHa cells was significantly inhibited by M6. To determine if M6 synergized with radiotherapy-induced anti-tumor activity against HPV16-related cancer cells, we transfected SiHa cells with M6 followed by a single exposure to radiation. A significantly suppression of cell growth and induced apoptosis was observed in SiHa cells received M6 transfection combined with radiotherapy. Animal experiments showed that M6 transfection notably improved the survival of tumor-bearing mice in combination with radiotherapy, much superior to that of those treated by Adv5/dE1A plus radiation or M6 alone. These findings indicated the anti-tumoral efficacy of M6 on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cells and its synergic therapeutic application in radiation for cervical cancer. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tamoxifen-regulated adenoviral E1A chimeras for the control of tumor selective oncolytic adenovirus replication in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipo, I; Wang, X; Hurtado Picó, A; Suckau, L; Weger, S; Poller, W; Fechner, H

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacological control is a desirable safety feature of oncolytic adenoviruses (oAdV). It has recently been shown that oAdV replication may be controlled by drug-dependent transcriptional regulation of E1A expression. Here, we present a novel concept that relies on tamoxifen-dependent regulation of E1A activity through functional linkage to the mutated hormone-binding domain of the murine estrogen receptor (Mer). Four different E1A-Mer chimeras (ME, EM, E(DeltaNLS)M, MEM) were constructed and inserted into the adenoviral genome under control of a lung-specific surfactant protein B promoter. The highest degree of regulation in vitro was seen for the corresponding oAdVs Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM, which exhibited an up to 100-fold higher oAdV replication in the presence as compared with the absence of 4-OH-tamoxifen. Moreover, destruction of nontarget cells was six- and 13-fold reduced for Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM, respectively, as compared with Ad.E. Further investigations supported tamoxifen-dependent regulation of Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M and Ad.MEM in vivo. Induction of Ad.E(DeltaNLS)M inhibited growth of H441 lung tumors as efficient as a control oAdV expressing E1A. E(DeltaNLS)M and the MEM chimeras can be easily inserted into a single vector genome, which extends their application to existing oAdVs and strongly facilitates in vivo application.

  8. Population thinking and natural selection in dual-inheritance theory

    OpenAIRE

    Houkes, WN Wybo

    2012-01-01

    A deflationary perspective on theories of cultural evolution, in particular dual-inheritance theory, has recently been proposed by Lewens. On this ‘pop-culture’ analysis, dual-inheritance theorists apply population thinking to cultural phenomena, without claiming that cultural items evolve by natural selection. This paper argues against this pop-culture analysis of dual-inheritance theory. First, it focuses on recent dual-inheritance models of specific patterns of cultural change. These model...

  9. 基于二元线性回归的发动机比功率选择研究%Engine specific power selection research based on dual linear regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆良

    2012-01-01

    Statistic data was collected regarding to 154 types of sedans of the five best seller automobile series in the domestic market in 2010. Their complete vehicle kerb weight, maximum speed and engine power data were gathered and relevant relations were discussed. Least square method was adopted, dual linear regression analysis was performed and engine specific power math-ematic model was constructed. Significance test and accuracy test were carried out to the model. The result showed that the derived model is effective and can provide evidence for engine specific power selection.%通过对2010年国内最畅销的五大车系共154种轿车的整备质量、最高车速及发动机功率进行统计,讨论了三者之间的关系.应用最小二乘法进行二元线性回归分析,构建了发动机比功率的数学模型.对该模型进行了显著性检验和精度检验,结果表明模型有效,可为发动机比功率的选择提供依据.

  10. Malignant focal hepatic lesions complicating underlying liver disease: dual-phase contrast-enhanced spiral CT sensitivity and specificity in orthotopic liver transplant patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortele, K.J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Gent (Belgium); Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); De Keukeleire, K. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Gent (Belgium); Praet, M. [Dept. of Pathology, University Hospital Gent, Gent (Belgium); Van Vlierberghe, H. [Dept. of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Gent, Gent (Belgium); Hemptinne, B. de [Dept. of Surgery, University Hospital Gent, Gent (Belgium); Ros, P.R. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of contrast-enhanced biphasic spiral CT as a screening tool in the preoperative evaluation of orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) patients. Spiral-CT examinations were performed before liver transplantation in 53 patients. Scans were retrospectively reviewed and compared with pathologic findings in fresh-sectioned livers. When findings between spiral CT and pathology were discordant, formalized livers were reexamined with lesion-by lesion evaluation. Fresh pathologic evaluation revealed 23 liver lesions (16 HCC, 7 macro-regenerative nodules). Malignancy was identified in 13 of 53 patients (24.5%). Pre-transplantation spiral CT depicted 27 liver lesions (23 HCC, 4 macro-regenerative nodules). Malignancy was suspected in 14 patients (26.4%). In 10 of 53 (18.9%), spiral CT and pathologic evaluation were discordant. Subsequent retrospective pathologic evaluation showed malignancy in 4 additional patients. Spiral CT compared with the retrospective pathologic findings revealed 36 real-negative, 14 real-positive, 0 false-positive, and 3 false-negative patients with malignancy. Sensitivity and specificity of spiral CT in detection of malignancy was 82 and 100%, respectively. Contrast-enhanced biphasic spiral CT is an accurate technique in the evaluation of patients preceding OLT. Routine fresh-sectioned liver pathologic findings are not as sensitive as previously estimated. (orig.)

  11. TrmB, a sugar sensing regulator of ABC transporter genes in Pyrococcus furiosus exhibits dual promoter specificity and is controlled by different inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Moulakakis, Christina; Koning, Sonja M; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2005-09-01

    TrmB is the transcriptional repressor for the gene cluster of the trehalose/maltose ABC transporter of the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus litoralis and Pyrococcus furiosus (malE or TM operon), with maltose and trehalose acting as inducers. We found that TrmB (the protein is identical in both organisms) also regulated the transcription of genes encoding a separate maltodextrin ABC transporter in P. furiosus (mdxE or MD operon) with maltotriose, longer maltodextrins and sucrose acting as inducers, but not with maltose or trehalose. In vitro transcription of the malE and the mdxE operons was inhibited by TrmB binding to the different operator sequences. Inhibition of the TM operon was released by maltose and trehalose whereas inhibition of the MD operon was released by maltotriose and larger maltodextrins as well as by sucrose. Scanning mutagenesis of the TM operator revealed the role of the palindromic TACTNNNAGTA sequence for TrmB recognition. TrmB exhibits a broad spectrum of sugar-binding specificity, binding maltose, sucrose, maltotriose and trehalose in decreasing order of affinity, half-maximal binding occurring at 20, 60, 250 and 500 microM substrate concentration respectively. Of all substrates, only maltose shows sigmoidal binding characteristics with a Hill coefficient of 2. As measured by molecular sieve chromatography and cross-linking TrmB behaved as dimer in dilute buffer solution at room temperature. We conclude that TrmB acts as a bifunctional transcriptional regulator acting on two different promoters and being differentially controlled by binding to different sugars. We believe this to represent a novel strategy of prokaryotic transcription regulation.

  12. Generation and characterization of ABT-981, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig(TM)) molecule that specifically and potently neutralizes both IL-1α and IL-1β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Susan E; Wu, Chengbin; Ambrosi, Dominic J; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Bose, Sahana; Miller, Renee; Conlon, Donna M; Tarcsa, Edit; Chari, Ravi; Ghayur, Tariq; Kamath, Rajesh V

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1Ra contribute to immune regulation and inflammatory processes by exerting a wide range of cellular responses, including expression of cytokines and chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases, and nitric oxide synthetase. IL-1α and IL-1β bind to IL-1R1 complexed to the IL-1 receptor accessory protein and induce similar physiological effects. Preclinical and clinical studies provide significant evidence for the role of IL-1 in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA), including cartilage degradation, bone sclerosis, and synovial proliferation. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of ABT-981, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig) of the IgG1/k subtype that specifically and potently neutralizes IL-1α and IL-1β. In ABT-981, the IL-1β variable domain resides in the outer domain of the DVD-Ig, whereas the IL-1α variable domain is located in the inner position. ABT-981 specifically binds to IL-1α and IL-1β, and is physically capable of binding 2 human IL-1α and 2 human IL-1β molecules simultaneously. Single-dose intravenous and subcutaneous pharmacokinetics studies indicate that ABT-981 has a half-life of 8.0 to 10.4 d in cynomolgus monkey and 10.0 to 20.3 d in rodents. ABT-981 exhibits suitable drug-like-properties including affinity, potency, specificity, half-life, and stability for evaluation in human clinical trials. ABT-981 offers an exciting new approach for the treatment of OA, potentially addressing both disease modification and symptom relief as a disease-modifying OA drug.

  13. Structural and Functional Characterization of the PaaI Thioesterase from Streptococcus pneumoniae Reveals a Dual Specificity for Phenylacetyl-CoA and Medium-chain Fatty Acyl-CoAs and a Novel CoA-induced Fit Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandokar, Yogesh B; Srivastava, Parul; Sarker, Subir; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Aragao, David; Cowieson, Nathan; Forwood, Jade K

    2016-01-22

    PaaI thioesterases are members of the TE13 thioesterase family that catalyze the hydrolysis of thioester bonds between coenzyme A and phenylacetyl-CoA. In this study we characterize the PaaI thioesterase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpPaaI), including structural analysis based on crystal diffraction data to 1.8-Å resolution, to reveal two double hotdog domains arranged in a back to back configuration. Consistent with the crystallography data, both size exclusion chromatography and small angle x-ray scattering data support a tetrameric arrangement of thioesterase domains in solution. Assessment of SpPaaI activity against a range of acyl-CoA substrates showed activity for both phenylacetyl-CoA and medium-chain fatty-acyl CoA substrates. Mutagenesis of putative active site residues reveals Asn(37), Asp(52), and Thr(68) are important for catalysis, and size exclusion chromatography analysis and x-ray crystallography confirm that these mutants retain the same tertiary and quaternary structures, establishing that the reduced activity is not a result of structural perturbations. Interestingly, the structure of SpPaaI in the presence of CoA provides a structural basis for the observed substrate specificity, accommodating a 10-carbon fatty acid chain, and a large conformational change of up to 38 Å in the N terminus, and a loop region involving Tyr(38)-Tyr(39). This is the first time PaaI thioesterases have displayed a dual specificity for medium-chain acyl-CoAs substrates and phenylacetyl-CoA substrates, and we provide a structural basis for this specificity, highlighting a novel induced fit mechanism that is likely to be conserved within members of this enzyme family.

  14. Dual-specificity phosphatase 14 protects the heart from aortic banding-induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction through inactivation of TAK1-P38MAPK/-JNK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Yi; Zhou, Qing; Yang, Ling-Chao; Chen, Yi-He; Hou, Jian-Wen; Guo, Kai; Wang, Yue-Peng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2016-03-01

    Dual-specificity phosphatase 14 (Dusp14), an important negative modulator of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, has been implicated in inflammatory immune response, cancers, cell differentiation and proliferation. The role of Dusp14 in chronic pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy has not been explored. Here we have shown that Dusp14-/- knockout mice and cardiac-specific Dusp14 transgenic mice were generated and subjected to aortic banding (AB) for 4 weeks. Our results demonstrated that genetic loss of Dusp14 significantly aggravated cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, ventricular dilation and dysfunction, whereas transgenic cardiac-specific Dusp14 overexpression significantly attenuated AB-induced cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. In vitro, adenoviral overexpression of constitutive Dusp14 blocked angiotensin II-induced hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes, while Dusp14 knockdown led to opposite effects. Mechanistically, excessive phosphorylation of TAK1, P38MAPK and JNK1/2 was evidenced in Dusp14-/- knockout mice post-AB and inactivation of TAK1-P38MAPK and -JNK1/2 signaling using TAK1 inhibitor 5Z-7-ox shares similar antihypertrophic effect as Dusp14 overexpression. Moreover, we show that Dusp14 directly interacted with TAK1. Results from present experiments indicate that Dusp14 protects the heart from AB-induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction possibly through inactivation of TAK1-P38MAPK/-JNK1/2 signaling pathway. Future studies are warranted to test the feasibility of overexpressing Dusp14 as a therapeutic strategy to attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and failure.

  15. A Case Study of Dual Language Program Administrators: The Teachers We Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Joan R.

    2017-01-01

    In support of growing numbers of dual language programs nation-wide, dual language school administrators seek to find teachers who are specifically prepared to work with dual language learners for additive biliteracy. For this research the author utilized a case study design to explore practicing dual language administrators' perspectives…

  16. Hologram QSAR Models of a Series of 6-Arylquinazolin-4-Amine Inhibitors of a New Alzheimer’s Disease Target: Dual Specificity Tyrosine-Phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase-1A Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Dias Leal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase-1A (DYRK1A is an enzyme directly involved in Alzheimer’s disease, since its increased expression leads to β-amyloidosis, Tau protein aggregation, and subsequent formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Hologram quantitative structure-activity relationship (HQSAR, 2D fragment-based models were developed for a series of 6-arylquinazolin-4-amine inhibitors (36 training, 10 test of DYRK1A. The best HQSAR model (q2 = 0.757; SEcv = 0.493; R2 = 0.937; SE = 0.251; R2pred = 0.659 presents high goodness-of-fit (R2 > 0.9, as well as high internal (q2 > 0.7 and external (R2pred > 0.5 predictive power. The fragments that increase and decrease the biological activity values were addressed using the colored atomic contribution maps provided by the method. The HQSAR contribution map of the best model is an important tool to understand the activity profiles of new derivatives and may provide information for further design of novel DYRK1A inhibitors.

  17. Antitumor effects of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2 against colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin L

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lei Yin,1–3 Chunhong Zhao,3 Jixia Han,4 Zengjun Li,2 Yanan Zhen,3 Ruixue Xiao,3 Zhongfa Xu,3 Yanlai Sun2 1School of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, 2Department of Gastrointestinal Cancer Surgery, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, 3Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, 4Department of General Surgery, The Sixth People’s Hospital of Jinan, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Background: The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC is on the rise. Furthermore, late-stage diagnoses and limited efficacious treatment options make CRC a complex clinical challenge. Therefore, a new therapeutic regimen with a completely novel therapeutic mechanism is necessary for CRC. In the present study, the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2 (oHSV2 in CRC was assessed in vitro and in vivo. oHSV2 is an oncolytic agent derived from herpes simplex virus type 2 that encodes granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.Materials and methods: We investigated the cytopathic effects of oHSV2 in CRC cell lines using the MTT assay. Then, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of oHSV2 were examined by flow cytometry. We generated a model of CRC with mouse CRC cell CT26 in BALB/c mice. The antitumor effects and adaptive immune response of oHSV2 were assessed in tumor-bearing mice. The therapeutic efficacy of oHSV2 was compared with the traditional chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil.Results: The in vitro data showed that oHSV2 infected the CRC cell lines successfully and that the tumor cells formed a significant number of syncytiae postinfection. The oHSV2 killed cancer cells independent of the cell cycle and mainly caused tumor cells necrosis. The in vivo results showed that oHSV2 significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of

  18. FDG-PET/CT for Monitoring Response of Melanoma to the Novel Oncolytic Viral Therapy Talimogene Laherparepvec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Matthew F; Curiel, Clara N; Lattimore, Lois; Avery, Ryan J; Kuo, Phillip H

    2017-02-01

    61-year-old woman with stage IIIa (T3a N1a M0) left lower leg melanoma with lesions suggestive of in-transit metastases 8 months following wide local excision and femoral nodal dissection. FDG-PET/CT demonstrated 5 FDG-avid in-transit nodal metastases in the distal left leg, confirmed on biopsy. Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) oncolytic immunotherapy consisting of intralesional injections of modified herpes simplex virus-expressing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was completed over 6 months. Subsequent FDG-PET/CT demonstrated reduced or resolved FDG activity in the treated in-transit metastases and a new FDG-avid left thigh in-transit metastasis. FDG-PET/CT can monitor response to T-VEC and potentially other novel viral immunotherapies.

  19. Interview with Robert Coffin, inventor of T-VEC: the first oncolytic immunotherapy approved for the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Interviewed by Ellen Clarke, Commissioning Editor, Future Science Group. Robert Coffin is co-founder and CEO of Replimune. Previously he was Founder and CTO of BioVex Inc, a spin out from his research group at University College London in 1999. He was the inventor of all BioVex products including OncoVEXGM-CSF (talimogene laherparepvec; T-VEC; Imlygic) and oversaw all research and clinical development including bringing T-VEC through to two pivotal Phase 3 studies in melanoma and head and neck cancer. BioVex was acquired by Amgen in 2011 where he was VP Global Development until 2013. T-VEC was approved by the FDA for use in advanced melanoma in October 2015, the first oncolytic therapy or gene therapy to be approved in USA. He was awarded a PhD in virology from Imperial College London prior to his move to University College London in 1991.

  20. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutzen Brian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS, has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. Methods We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. Results MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. Conclusions These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for

  1. 11R-P53 and GM-CSF Expressing Oncolytic Adenovirus Target Cancer Stem Cells with Enhanced Synergistic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Sai-qun; Ye, Zhen-long; Liu, Pin-yi; Huang, Yao; Li, Lin-fang; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Hai-li; Jin, Hua-jun; Qian, Qi-jun

    2017-01-01

    Targeting cancer stem cells with oncolytic virus (OV) holds great potential for thorough elimination of cancer cells. Based on our previous studies, we here established 11R-P53 and mGM-CSF carrying oncolytic adenovirus (OAV) SG655-mGMP and investigated its therapeutic effect on hepatocellular carcinoma stem cells Hep3B-C and teratoma stem cells ECCG5. Firstly, the augmenting effect of 11R in our construct was tested and confirmed by examining the expression of EGFP with Fluorescence and FCM assays after transfecting Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells with OVA SG7605-EGFP and SG7605-11R-EGFP. Secondly, the expressions of 11R-P53 and GM-CSF in Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells after transfection with OAV SG655-mGMP were detected by Western blot and Elisa assays, respectively. Thirdly, the enhanced growth inhibitory and augmented apoptosis inducing effects of OAV SG655-mGMP on Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells were tested with FCM assays by comparing with the control, wild type 5 adenovirus, 11R-P53 carrying OVA in vitro. Lastly, the in vivo therapeutic effect of OAV SG655-mGMP toward ECCG5 cell-formed xenografts was studied by measuring tumor volumes post different treatments with PBS, OAV SG655-11R-P53, OAV SG655-mGM-CSF and OAV SG655-mGMP. Treatment with OAV SG655-mGMP induced significant xenograft growth inhibition, inflammation factor AIF1 expression and immune cells infiltration. Therefore, our OAV SG655-mGMP provides a novel platform to arm OVs to target cancer stem cells.

  2. Prime-boost using Separate Oncolytic Viruses in Combination with Checkpoint Blockade Improves Anti-tumor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilett, Elizabeth; Kottke, Timothy; Thompson, Jill; Rajani, Karishma; Zaidi, Shane; Evgin, Laura; Coffey, Matt; Ralph, Christy; Diaz, Rosa; Pandha, Hardev; Harrington, Kevin; Selby, Peter; Bram, Richard; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The anti-tumor effects associated with oncolytic virus therapy are mediated significantly through immune-mediated mechanisms which depends both on the type of virus and the route of delivery. Here, we show that intra-tumoral (i.t.) oncolysis by Reovirus induced the priming of a CD8+, Th1-type anti-tumor response. In contrast, systemically delivered VSV expressing a cDNA library of melanoma antigens (VSV-ASMEL) promoted a potent anti-tumor CD4+ Th17 response. Therefore, we hypothesised that combining the Reovirus-induced CD8+ T cell response, with the VSV-ASMEL CD4+ Th17 helper response, would produce enhanced anti-tumor activity. Consistent with this, priming with i.t. Reovirus, followed by an intra-venous VSV-ASMEL Th17 boost, significantly improved survival of mice bearing established subcutaneous (s.c.) B16 melanoma tumors. We also show that combination of either therapy alone with anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade augmented both the Th1 response induced by systemically delivered Reovirus in combination with GM-CSF, and also the Th17 response induced by VSV-ASMEL. Significantly, anti-PD-1 also uncovered an anti-tumor Th1 response following VSV-ASMEL treatment that was not seen in the absence of checkpoint blockade. Finally, the combination of all three treatments (priming with systemically delivered Reovirus, followed by double boosting with systemic VSV-ASMEL and anti-PD-1) significantly enhanced survival, with long-term cures, compared to any individual, or double, combination therapies, associated with strong Th1 and Th17 responses to tumor antigens. Our data show that it is possible to generate fully systemic, highly effective anti-tumor immunovirotherapy by combining oncolytic viruses, along with immune checkpoint blockade, to induce complimentary mechanisms of anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:27779616

  3. Extended disease-free interval of 6 years in a recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with G207 oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whisenhunt Jr TR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas R Whisenhunt Jr, Kiran F Rajneesh, James R Hackney, James M Markert Department of Neurosurgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a relentless primary central nervous system malignancy that remains resistant to conventional therapy despite major advances in clinical neurooncology. This report details the case of a patient who had failed conventional treatment for recurrent GBM and was ultimately treated with a genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 vector, G207. Methods: Case report detailing the outcomes of one patient enrolled into the gene therapy arm of the Neurovir G207 protocol whereby stereotactic injection of 120 µL G207 viral suspension containing 1×107 plaque-forming units (or active viral particles was made into the enhancing region of the tumor. Results: In this patient, despite aggressive surgical resection, adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, tumor progression occurred. However, with G207 oncolytic therapy and brief exposures to second and third treatments, this patient had an extended survival time of 7.5 years and a 6-year apparent disease-free interval, an extraordinarily unusual finding in the pretemozolomide era. Conclusion: With minimal adjunctive chemotherapy, including one course of temozolomide, one course of procarbazine, and four cycles of irinotecan, the patient survived over 7 years before the next recurrence. Addition of G207 to this patient’s traditional therapy may have been the critical treatment producing her prolonged survival. This report demonstrates the potential for long-term response to a one-time treatment with oncolytic HSV and encourages continued research on oncolytic viral therapy for GBM. Keywords: oncolytic virotherapy, malignant glioma, tumor, herpes simplex, HSV-1, immunotherapy

  4. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ho Young [Department of Microbiology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Manbok [Department of Medical Science, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [BK21+, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells.

  5. Association of Topoisomerase II (TOP2A) and Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 6 (DUSP6) Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Radiation Treatment Response and Prognosis of Lung Cancer in Han Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian-Lu; Ren, Yang-Wu; Wang, He-Tong; Yu, Hong; Zhao, Yu-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Background Mutations of DNA topoisomerase II (TOP2A) are associated with chemotherapy resistance, whereas dual-specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6) negatively regulates members of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase superfamily to control cell proliferation. This study assessed TOP2A and DUSP6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients for association with chemoradiotherapy responses and prognosis. Material/Methods A total of 140 Chinese patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled and subjected to genotyping of TOP2A rs471692 and DUSP6 rs2279574 using Taqman PCR. An independent sample t test was used to analyze differences in tumor regression after radiotherapy versus SNP risk factors. Kaplan-Meier curves analyzed overall survival, followed by the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard models. Results There were no significant associations of TOP2A rs471692 and DUSP6 rs2279574 polymorphisms or clinicopathological variables with response to chemoradiotherapy (p>0.05). Comparing overall survival of 87 patients with stage I–III NSCLC treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy to clinicopathological variables, the data showed that tumor regression, weight loss, clinical stage, and cigarette smoking were independent prognostic predictors (p=0.009, 0.043, 0.004, and 0.025, respectively). Tumor regression rate >0.34 was associated with patent survival versus tumor regression rate ≤0.34 (p=0.007). Conclusions TOP2A rs471692 and DUSP6 rs2279574 SNPs were not associated with chemoradiotherapy response, whereas tumor regression, weight loss, clinical stage, and cigarette smoking were independent prognostic predictors for these Chinese patients with NSCLC. PMID:28231233

  6. Oncolytic targeting of androgen-sensitive prostate tumor by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV: consequences of deficient interferon-dependent antiviral defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbard Gene B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment utilizes viruses for selective infection and death of cancer cells without any adverse effect on normal cells. We previously reported that the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a novel oncolytic virus against androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. The present study extends the result to androgen-dependent prostate cancer, and explores the underlying mechanism that triggers RSV-induced oncolysis of prostate cancer cells. Methods The oncolytic effect of RSV on androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and on androgen-independent RM1 murine prostate cancer cells was studied in vitro in culture and in vivo in a xenograft or allograft tumor model. In vitro, cell viability, infectivity and apoptosis were monitored by MTT assay, viral plaque assay and annexin V staining, respectively. In vivo studies involved virus administration to prostate tumors grown in immune compromised nude mice and in syngeneic immune competent C57BL/6J mice. Anti-tumorogenic oncolytic activity was monitored by measuring tumor volume, imaging bioluminescent tumors in live animals and performing histopathological analysis and TUNEL assay with tumors Results We show that RSV imposes a potent oncolytic effect on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. RSV infectivity was markedly higher in LNCaP cells compared to the non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 human prostate cells. The enhanced viral burden led to LNCaP cell apoptosis and growth inhibition of LNCaP xenograft tumors in nude mice. A functional host immune response did not interfere with RSV-induced oncolysis, since growth of xenograft tumors in syngeneic C57BL/6J mice from murine RM1 cells was inhibited upon RSV administration. LNCaP cells failed to activate the type-I interferon (IFNα/β-induced transcription factor STAT-1, which is required for antiviral gene expression, although these cells could produce IFN in response to RSV infection. The

  7. Production of bioactive soluble interleukin-15 in complex with interleukin-15 receptor alpha from a conditionally-replicating oncolytic HSV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Gaston

    Full Text Available Oncolytic type-1 herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs lacking the γ134.5 neurovirulence gene are being evaluated for treatment of a variety of malignancies. oHSVs replicate within and directly kill permissive cancer cells. To augment their anti-tumor activity, oHSVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory molecules, including cytokines, to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. Interleukin-15 (IL-15 holds potential as an immunotherapeutic cytokine because it has been demonstrated to promote both natural killer (NK cell-mediated and CD8(+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The purpose of these studies was to engineer an oHSV producing bioactive IL-15. Two oHSVs were constructed encoding murine (mIL-15 alone (J100 or with the mIL-15 receptor α (mIL-15Rα, J100D to determine whether co-expression of these proteins is required for production of bioactive mIL-15 from oHSV. The following were demonstrated: i both oHSVs retain replication competence and cytotoxicity in permissive tumor cell lines. ii Enhanced production of mIL-15 was detected in cell lysates of neuro-2a cells following J100D infection as compared to J100 infection, suggesting that mIL-15Rα improved mIL-15 production. iii Soluble mIL-15 in complex with mIL-15Rα was detected in supernates from J100D-infected, but not J100-infected, neuro-2a, GL261, and CT-2A cells. These cell lines vary in permissiveness to oHSV replication and cytotoxicity, demonstrating soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex production from J100D was independent of direct oHSV effects. iv The soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex produced by J100D was bioactive, stimulating NK cells to proliferate and reduce the viability of syngeneic GL261 and CT-2A cells. v J100 and J100D were aneurovirulent inasmuch as no neuropathologic effects were documented following direct inoculation into brains of CBA/J mice at up to 1x10(7 plaque forming units. The production of mIL-15/mIL-15Rα from multiple tumor lines, as well

  8. Dual Income Taxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter Birch

    This paper discusses the principles and practices of dual income taxation in the Nordic countries. The first part of the paper explains the rationale and the historical background for the introduction of the dual income tax and describes the current Nordic tax practices. The second part...... of the paper focuses on the problems of taxing income from small businesses and the issue of corporate-personal tax integration under the dual income tax, considering alternative ways of dealing with these challenges. In the third and final part of the paper, I briefly discuss whether introducing a dual income...... tax could be relevant for New Zealand....

  9. Dual Income Taxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter Birch

    This paper discusses the principles and practices of dual income taxation in the Nordic countries. The first part of the paper explains the rationale and the historical background for the introduction of the dual income tax and describes the current Nordic tax practices. The second part...... of the paper focuses on the problems of taxing income from small businesses and the issue of corporate-personal tax integration under the dual income tax, considering alternative ways of dealing with these challenges. In the third and final part of the paper, I briefly discuss whether introducing a dual income...... tax could be relevant for New Zealand....

  10. Dual-fuel, dual-throat engine preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrien, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    A propulsion system analysis of the dual fuel, dual throat engine for launch vehicle applications was conducted. Basic dual throat engine characterization data were obtained to allow vehicle optimization studies to be conducted. A preliminary baseline engine system was defined.

  11. Dual targeting of peroxisomal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eAst

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular compartmentalization into organelles serves to separate biological processes within the environment of a single cell. While some metabolic reactions are specific to a single organelle, others occur in more than one cellular compartment. Specific targeting of proteins to compartments inside of eukaryotic cells is mediated by defined sequence motifs. To achieve multiple targeting to different compartments cells use a variety of strategies. Here, we focus on mechanisms leading to dual targeting of peroxisomal proteins. In many instances, isoforms of peroxisomal proteins with distinct intracellular localization are encoded by separate genes. But also single genes can give rise to differentially localized proteins. Different isoforms can be generated by use of alternative transcriptional start sites, by differential splicing or ribosomal read-through of stop codons. In all these cases different peptide variants are produced, of which only one carries a peroxisomal targeting signal. Alternatively, peroxisomal proteins contain additional signals that compete for intracellular targeting. Dual localization of proteins residing in both the cytoplasm and in peroxisomes may also result from use of inefficient targeting signals. The recent observation that some bona fide cytoplasmic enzymes were also found in peroxisomes indicates that dual targeting of proteins to both the cytoplasm and the peroxisome might be more widespread. Although current knowledge of proteins exhibiting only partial peroxisomal targeting is far from being complete, we speculate that the metabolic capacity of peroxisomes might be larger than previously assumed.

  12. Dual Headquarters Involvement in Subsidiary Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nell, Phillip Christopher; Kappen, Philip; Dellestrand, Henrik

    . The current paper takes on this neglected question by empirically investigating corporate and divisional headquarters direct involvement in innovation development projects at the subsidiary level. Analyses that draw upon 85 innovation development projects in 23 multinational enterprises reveal that dual...... innovation importance, i.e., an innovation that is important for the division and the corporate level, drives dual headquarters involvement in innovation development. Contrary to expectations, no significant effect of dual embeddedness on dual headquarters involvement is found. The network size...... on headquarters. It appears that multiple headquarters do get involved in specific subsidiary activities and that the theoretical advancements on headquarters should be discussed in the context of their complexity to reflect the nature of the contemporary multinational enterprise....

  13. Sickle Cells Abolish Melanoma Tumorigenesis in Hemoglobin SS Knockin Mice and Augment the Tumoricidal Effect of Oncolytic Virus In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chiang Wang; Willmon, Candice; Wu, Li-Chen; Knopick, Peter; Thoerner, Jutta; Vile, Richard; Townes, Tim M; Terman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Insights from the study of cancer resistance in animals have led to the discovery of novel anticancer pathways and opened new venues for cancer prevention and treatment. Sickle cells (SSRBCs) from subjects with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA) have been shown to target hypoxic tumor niches, induce diffuse vaso-occlusion, and potentiate a tumoricidal response in a heme- and oxidant-dependent manner. These findings spawned the hypothesis that SSRBCs and the vasculopathic microenvironment of subjects with SCA might be inimical to tumor outgrowth and thereby constitute a natural antitumor defense. We therefore implanted the B16F10 melanoma into humanized hemoglobin SS knockin mice which exhibit the hematologic and vasculopathic sequelae of human SCA. Over the 31-day observation period, hemoglobin SS mice showed no significant melanoma outgrowth. By contrast, 68-100% of melanomas implanted in background and hemoglobin AA knockin control mice reached the tumor growth end point (p SS knockin mice also exhibited established markers of underlying vasculopathy, e.g., chronic hemolysis (anemia, reticulocytosis) and vascular inflammation (leukocytosis) that differed significantly from all control groups. Genetic differences or normal AA gene knockin do not explain the impaired tumor outgrowth in SS knockin mice. These data point instead to the chronic pro-oxidative vasculopathic network in these mice as the predominant cause. In related studies, we demonstrate the ability of the sickle cell component of this system to function as a therapeutic vehicle in potentiating the oncolytic/vasculopathic effect of RNA reovirus. Sickle cells were shown to efficiently adsorb and transfer the virus to melanoma cells where it induced apoptosis even in the presence of anti-reovirus neutralizing antibodies. In vivo, SSRBCs along with their viral cargo rapidly targeted the tumor and initiated a tumoricidal response exceeding that of free virus and similarly loaded normal RBCs without

  14. Anti-cancer effects of oncolytic viral therapy combined with photodynamic therapy in human pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Yazan S; Wright, Kathleen; Melcher, Alan; Jayne, David

    2015-02-26

    Oncolytic viral therapy and photodynamic therapy are potential therapies for inoperable or advanced pancreatic cancer. Our aim was to investigate the anti-cancer killing effects of reovirus therapy combined with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-mediated photodynamic therapy on a variety of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Pancreatic cancer cell lines (PsPC-1 and BXPC-3) and a non-cancer control cell line (HEK293) were infected with reovirus serotype 3 strain Dearing (T3D) at 0, 0·1, 1, and 10 plaque-forming units (PFU) per cell for 48 h. Cells were incubated with PpIX pro-drug 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 mM for 4 h. Then, cells were photo-irradiated for 15 min with visible red light-emitting diodes with a light-fluence of 0·54 J/cm(2) of 653 nm (PpIX optimal excitation wavelength). The killing effects of reovirus combined with PpIX-mediated photodynamic therapy were analysed in methylthiazoltetrazolium (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The effect of adding reovirus after photodynamic therapy was also assessed. The statistical significance of the difference between groups was assessed with the two-tailed Student's t test. pphotodynamic therapy resulted in a significantly increased cytotoxic effect compared with reovirus monotherapy and photodynamic therapy (p=0·042) with 100% cell death observed across pancreatic cell lines with 10 PFU per cell combined with 1 and 2 mM 5-ALA. There was no difference in cytotoxicity observed between added reovirus before or after photodynamic therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first in-vitro study to combine reovirus oncolytic viral therapy with PpIX-mediated photodynamic therapy to treat pancreatic cancer. These results show a significant additive effect in cell killing and they provide initial evidence for a novel combined therapeutic intervention. National Institute for Health Research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dual energy CT: New horizon in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  16. Dual-Energy CT: New Horizon in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Goo, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  17. Treatment approaches for dual diagnosis clients in England

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, S.; Meier, P.S.; Stirling, J.; Berry, M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction - Dual diagnosis (DD, co-occurrence of substance use and mental health problems) prevalence data in England are limited to specific regions and reported rates vary widely. Reliable information on actual service provision for dual diagnosis clients has not been collated. Thus a national survey was carried out to estimate dual diagnosis prevalence in treatment populations and describe the service provision available for this client population in drug/alcohol (DAS) and mental health...

  18. The Dual Career Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtin, Lee

    1980-01-01

    The dual career couple is forced to make a series of choices and compromises that impact the realms of marriage and career. The dilemmas that confront dual career marriages can be overcome only by compromise, accommodation, and mutual understanding on the part of the individuals involved. A revamping of human resources and recruitment programs is…

  19. Dual Credit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Noreen

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, legislation to improve access to dual-credit programs and to reduce disparities in access and completion--particularly for low income and underrepresented students--was enacted. The new law focused on expanding access to College in the High School but acknowledged issues in other dual-credit programs and reinforced the notion that cost…

  20. Dual Youla parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    A different aspect of using the parameterisation of all systems stabilised by a given controller, i.e. the dual Youla parameterisation, is considered. The relation between system change and the dual Youla parameter is derived in explicit form. A number of standard uncertain model descriptions are...

  1. Self-Dual Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Self-dual gravity is a diffeomorphism invariant theory in four dimensions that describes two propagating polarisations of the graviton and has a negative mass dimension coupling constant. Nevertheless, this theory is not only renormalisable but quantum finite, as we explain. We also collect various facts about self-dual gravity that are scattered across the literature.

  2. Optical dual self functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华建文; 刘立人; 王宁

    1997-01-01

    A recipe to construct the exact dual self-Fourier-Fresnel-transform functions is shown, where the Dirac comb function and transformable even periodic function are used. The mathematical proof and examples are given Then this kind of self-transform function is extended to the feasible optical dual self-transform functions.

  3. Dual doubled geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Riccioni, Fabio; Alvarez-Gaumé, L.

    2011-01-01

    We probe doubled geometry with dual fundamental branes. i.e. solitons. Restricting ourselves first to solitonic branes with more than two transverse directions we find that the doubled geometry requires an effective wrapping rule for the solitonic branes which is dual to the wrapping rule for fundam

  4. Research on Dual Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Li; Fucai Qian; Peilin Fu

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent progress by the authors in developing two solution frameworks for dual control. The first solution framework considers a class of dual control problems where there exists a parameter uncertainty in the observation equation of the LQG problem. An analytical active dual control law is derived by a variance minimization approach. The issue of how to determine an optimal degree of active learning is then addressed, thus achieving an optimality for this class of dual control problems. The second solution framework considers a general class of discrete-time LQG problems with unknown parameters in both state and observation equations. The best possible (partial) closed-loop feedback control law is derived by exploring the future nominal posterior probabilities, thus taking into account the effect of future learning when constructing the optimal nominal dual control.

  5. Synergistic combination of valproic acid and oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV as a potential therapy against cervical and pancreatic carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junwei; Bonifati, Serena; Hristov, Georgi; Marttila, Tiina; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Stanzel, Sven; Schnölzer, Martina; Mougin, Christiane; Aprahamian, Marc; Grekova, Svitlana P; Raykov, Zahari; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The rat parvovirus H-1PV has oncolytic and tumour-suppressive properties potentially exploitable in cancer therapy. This possibility is being explored and results are encouraging, but it is necessary to improve the oncotoxicity of the virus. Here we show that this can be achieved by co-treating cancer cells with H-1PV and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) such as valproic acid (VPA). We demonstrate that these agents act synergistically to kill a range of human cervical carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. Strikingly, in rat and mouse xenograft models, H-1PV/VPA co-treatment strongly inhibits tumour growth promoting complete tumour remission in all co-treated animals. At the molecular level, we found acetylation of the parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 at residues K85 and K257 to modulate NS1-mediated transcription and cytotoxicity, both of which are enhanced by VPA treatment. These results warrant clinical evaluation of H-1PV/VPA co-treatment against cervical and pancreatic ductal carcinomas. © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  6. Combination of Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses Armed with Angiostatin and IL-12 Enhances Antitumor Efficacy in Human Glioblastoma Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV can potentially spread throughout the tumor, reach isolated infiltrating cells, kill them, and deliver anticancer agents. However, the host responds to oHSV by inducing intratumoral infiltration of macrophages that can engulf the virus, limiting the potential of this therapeutic strategy. Hypervascularity is a pathognomonic feature of glioblastoma (GBM and is a promising therapeutic target. Antiangiogenic treatments have multiple benefits, including the capacity to increase oHSV efficacy by suppressing macrophage extravasation and infiltration into the tumor. Angiostatin is an antiangiogenic polypeptide, and interleukin-12 (IL-12 is an immunostimulatory cytokine with strong antiangiogenic effects. Clinical use of each has been limited by delivery issues and systemic toxicity.We tested a combination treatment strategy using oHSVs expressing angiostatin (G47Δ-mAngio and IL-12 (G47Δ-mIL12 in two orthotopic human GBMmodels. Intratumoral injection of G47Δ-mAngio and G47Δ-mIL12 in mice bearing intracranial U87 or tumors derived from glioblastoma stem cells significantly prolonged survival compared to each armed oHSV alone. This was associated with increased antiangiogenesis and virus spread and decreased macrophages. These data support the paradigm of using oHSV expressing different antiangiogenic agents and show for the first time that oHSVs expressing angiostatin and IL-12 can improve efficacy in human GBM models.

  7. Replication-competent, oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 mutants induce a bystander effect following ganciclovir treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chenhong; Mori, Isamu; Goshima, Fumi; Ushijima, Yoko; Nawa, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2007-10-01

    Cells expressing herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (tk) are killed by ganciclovir (GCV). Adjacent cells without HSV-tk also die, a phenomenon known as the 'bystander effect'. However, there is no evidence that replication-competent HSV induces a bystander effect in the presence of GCV. Therefore, we investigated the bystander effect in HEp-2 cells infected with replication-competent, oncolytic HSV-1 mutants, hrR3 and HF10. In cells infected at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 3, GCV did not induce apoptosis. At low MOIs of 0.3 and 0.03, however, a number of adjacent, uninfected cells apoptosed following GCV treatment. Irrespective of GCV treatment, HEp-2 cells expressed minimal levels of connexin 43 (Cx43). However, Cx43 expression was enhanced by GCV in response to infection with HF10 at an MOI of 0.3, but not at an MOI of 3. Expression of other proteins involved in gap junctions, including Cx26 and Cx40, was not augmented under these conditions. The PKA and PI3K signal transduction pathways are likely involved in enhanced Cx43 expression as inhibitors of these pathways prevented Cx43 upregulation. These results suggest that infection with replication-competent HSV-1 induces the bystander effect in cells treated with GCV because of efficient intercellular transport of active GCV through abundant gap junctions. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Oncolytic adenovirus and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy results in synergistic antitumor activity against soft-tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siurala, Mikko; Bramante, Simona; Vassilev, Lotta; Hirvinen, Mari; Parviainen, Suvi; Tähtinen, Siri; Guse, Kilian; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Kanerva, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-02-15

    Despite originating from several different tissues, soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) are often grouped together as they share mesenchymal origin and treatment guidelines. Also, with some exceptions, a common denominator is that when the tumor cannot be cured with surgery, the efficacy of current therapies is poor and new treatment modalities are thus needed. We have studied the combination of a capsid-modified oncolytic adenovirus CGTG-102 (Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF) with doxorubicin, with or without ifosfamide, the preferred first-line chemotherapeutic options for most types of STS. We show that CGTG-102 and doxorubicin plus ifosfamide together are able to increase cell killing of Syrian hamster STS cells over single agents, as well as upregulate immunogenic cell death markers. When tested in vivo against established STS tumors in fully immunocompetent Syrian hamsters, the combination was highly effective. CGTG-102 and doxorubicin (without ifosfamide) resulted in synergistic antitumor efficacy against human STS xenografts in comparison with single agent treatments. Doxorubicin increased adenoviral replication in human and hamster STS cells, potentially contributing to the observed therapeutic synergy. In conclusion, the preclinical data generated here support clinical translation of the combination of CGTG-102 and doxorubicin, or doxorubicin plus ifosfamide, for the treatment of STS, and provide clues on the mechanisms of synergy.

  9. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification.

  10. Ultrasound-induced cavitation enhances the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of an oncolytic virus in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Arvanitis, Costas D; Rifai, Bassel; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-01-30

    We investigated whether ultrasound-induced cavitation at 0.5 MHz could improve the extravasation and distribution of a potent breast cancer-selective oncolytic adenovirus, AdEHE2F-Luc, to tumour regions that are remote from blood vessels. We developed a novel tumour-mimicking model consisting of a gel matrix containing human breast cancer cells traversed by a fluid channel simulating a tumour blood vessel, through which the virus and microbubbles could be made to flow. Ultrasonic pressures were chosen to maximize either broadband emissions, associated with inertial cavitation, or ultraharmonic emissions, associated with stable cavitation, while varying duty cycle to keep the total acoustic energy delivered constant for comparison across exposures. None of the exposure conditions tested affected cell viability in the absence of the adenovirus. When AdEHE2F-Luc was delivered via the vessel, inertial cavitation increased transgene expression in tumour cells by up to 200 times. This increase was not observed in the absence of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor cell expression, discounting sonoporation as the mechanism of action. In the presence of inertial cavitation, AdEHE2F-Luc distribution was greatly improved in the matrix surrounding the vessel, particularly in the direction of the ultrasound beam; this enabled AdEHE2F-Luc to kill up to 80% of cancer cells within the ultrasound focal volume in the gel 24 hours after delivery, compared to 0% in the absence of cavitation.

  11. Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Data Driven Policy Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, Eric; Witt, M. Allison; Blankenberger, Bob; Franklin, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The use of dual credit has been expanding rapidly. Dual credit is a college course taken by a high school student for which both college and high school credit is given. Previous studies provided limited quantitative evidence that dual credit/dual enrollment is directly connected to positive student outcomes. In this study, predictive statistics…

  12. Enhanced antitumor effect of novel dual-targeted paclitaxel liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Shuyan; Su Bo; Li Wei; Ding Yongmei; Tang Liang; Zhou Wei; Song Yin; Li Heyan; Zhou Caicun, E-mail: caicunzhou@yahoo.com.cn [Cancer Institute of Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, 507 Zhengmin Road, Shanghai (China)

    2010-10-15

    A novel dual-targeted peptide containing an alpha V integrins specific ligand and a neuropilin-1 specific motif was developed which showed an increased specific targeting affinity to tumors. Active dual-targeted liposomes were then produced with this peptide and exhibited greater binding activity than single-targeted liposomes in vitro. Paclitaxel entrapped in this formulation greatly increased the uptake of paclitaxel in the targeting cells and significantly suppressed the growth of HUVEC and A549 cells compared with general paclitaxel injections (Taxol) and single-targeted paclitaxel liposomes. The treatment of tumor xenograft models with dual-targeted paclitaxel liposomes also resulted in better tumor growth inhibition than any other treatment groups. Therefore, the dual-targeted paclitaxel liposomes prepared in the present study might be a more promising drug for cancer treatment. Furthermore, the dual-targeting approach may produce synergistic effects that can be applied in the development of new targeted drug delivery systems.

  13. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  14. Dual energy CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Najami, Issam; Drue, Henrik Christian; Steele, Robert

    2017-01-01

    and inaccurate with existing methods. Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT) enables qualitative tissue differentiation by simultaneous scanning with different levels of energy. We aimed to assess the feasibility of DECT in quantifying tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy in loco-advanced rectal cancer. METHODS...... to determine the average quantitative parameters; effective-Z, water- and iodine-concentration, Dual Energy Index (DEI), and Dual Energy Ratio (DER). These parameters were compared to the regression in the resection specimen as measured by the pathologist. RESULTS: Changes in the quantitative parameters...

  15. Learning Words for Life: Promoting Vocabulary in Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillanders, Cristina; Castro, Dina C.; Franco, Ximena

    2014-01-01

    Vocabulary development plays a critical role in young dual language learners' success in school. As teachers become aware of how they use language in the classroom, systematically teach specific words in a variety of ways, and learn about dual language learners' level of English acquisition and sociocultural experiences, they can help…

  16. Learning Words for Life: Promoting Vocabulary in Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillanders, Cristina; Castro, Dina C.; Franco, Ximena

    2014-01-01

    Vocabulary development plays a critical role in young dual language learners' success in school. As teachers become aware of how they use language in the classroom, systematically teach specific words in a variety of ways, and learn about dual language learners' level of English acquisition and sociocultural experiences, they can help…

  17. Toxicology and Biodistribution Studies for MGH2.1, an Oncolytic Virus that Expresses Two Prodrug-activating Genes, in Combination with Prodrugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kasai, Kazue; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Liu, Fang; Kerr, Samantha; Wang, Jiang, 1959-; Phelps, Mitch; Potter, Philip M.; Goins, William B; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2013-01-01

    MGH2.1 is a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) oncolytic virus that expresses two prodrug-activating transgenes: the cyclophosphamide (CPA)-activating cytochrome P4502B1 (CYP2B1) and the CPT11-activating secreted human intestinal carboxylesterase (shiCE). Toxicology and biodistribution of MGH2.1 in the presence/absence of prodrugs was evaluated in mice. MGH2.1 ± prodrugs was cytotoxic to human glioma cells, but not to normal cells. Pharmacokinetically, intracranial MGH2.1 did not significantl...

  18. Prostate-Specific and Tumor-Specific Targeting of an Oncolytic HSV-1 Amplicon/Helper Virus for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Analys is of hum an coagulation factor IX gene m utations causing hemophilia B in two B.C. families. 2 Published article : The SRS superfamily of...no herpetic lesions were seen in CMV-ICP4-143T–treated and CMV-ICP4-145T– treated animals, although some gastritis developed 28 days after the viral

  19. Walkable dual emissions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Hai-Bing; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Kang, Bin; Deng, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Walkable dual emissions, in which the emission bands of the walker reversibly cross or leave those of the stationary ones depending on temperature and concentration, have been demonstrated in cyclic...

  20. Identifying HIV-1 dual infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelissen Marion

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is no exception to the phenomenon that a second, productive infection with another strain of the same virus is feasible. Experiments with RNA viruses have suggested that both coinfections (simultaneous infection with two strains of a virus and superinfections (second infection after a specific immune response to the first infecting strain has developed can result in increased fitness of the viral population. Concerns about dual infections with HIV are increasing. First, the frequent detection of superinfections seems to indicate that it will be difficult to develop a prophylactic vaccine. Second, HIV-1 superinfections have been associated with accelerated disease progression, although this is not true for all persons. In fact, superinfections have even been detected in persons controlling their HIV infections without antiretroviral therapy. Third, dual infections can give rise to recombinant viruses, which are increasingly found in the HIV-1 epidemic. Recombinants could have increased fitness over the parental strains, as in vitro models suggest, and could exhibit increased pathogenicity. Multiple drug resistant (MDR strains could recombine to produce a pan-resistant, transmittable virus. We will describe in this review what is presently known about super- and re-infection among ambient viral infections, as well as the first cases of HIV-1 superinfection, including HIV-1 triple infections. The clinical implications, the impact of the immune system, and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy will be covered, as will as the timing of HIV superinfection. The methods used to detect HIV-1 dual infections will be discussed in detail. To increase the likelihood of detecting a dual HIV-1 infection, pre-selection of patients can be done by serotyping, heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA, counting the degenerate base codes in the HIV-1 genotyping sequence, or surveying unexpected increases in the

  1. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xilin; Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs.

  2. Enhancement of tumor cell death by combining cisplatin with an oncolytic adenovirus carrying MDA-7/IL-24

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-mei WU; Kang-jian ZHANG; Xue-tian YUE; Yi-qiang WANG; Yi YANG; Gong-chu LI; Na LI; Yi-gang WANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to creatively implement a novel chemo-gene-virotherapeutic strategy and further strengthen the antitumor effect in cancer cells by the combined use of ZD55-IL-24 and cisplatin. Methods: ZD55-IL-24 is an oncolytic adenovirus that harbors interleukin 24 (IL-24), which has a strong antitumor effect and was identified and evaluated by PCR, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis. Enhancement of cancer cell death using a combination of ZD55-IL-24 and cisplatin was assessed in several cancer cell lines by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cytopathic effect (CPE) assay. Apoptosis induction by treatment with ZD55-IL-24 and/or cisplatin was detected in BEL7404 and SMMC7721 by morphological evaluation, apoptotic cell staining, and flow cytometry analysis. In addition, negative effects on normal cells were evaluated in the L-02 cell line using the MTT assay,the CPE assay, morphological evaluation, apoptotic cell staining, and flow cytometry analysis. Results: The combination of ZD55-IL-24 and cisplatin, which is superior to ZD55-IL-24, cisplatin, and ZD55-EGFP, as well as ZD55-EGFP plus cisplatin, resulted in a significantly increased effect. Most importantly, conjugation of ZD55-IL-24 with cisplatin had toxic effects equal to that of cisplatin and did not have overlapping toxicities in normal cells.Conclusions: This study showed that ZD55-IL-24 conjugated with cisplatin exhibited a remarkably increased cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing effect in cancer cells and significantly reduced the toxicity in normal cells through the use of a reduced dose.

  3. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok; Kang, Ho Young; Kim, Manbok; Koh, Sang Seok; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling.

  4. Combination of the oral histone deacetylase inhibitor resminostat with oncolytic measles vaccine virus as a new option for epi-virotherapeutic treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Ruf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic therapies such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi not only have the capability to decrease tumor cell proliferation and to induce tumor cell death but also to silence antiviral response genes. Here, we investigated whether the combination of an oncolytic measles vaccine virus (MeV with the novel oral HDACi resminostat (Res, being in clinical testing in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, results in an enhanced efficacy of this epi-virotherapeutic approach compared to any of the two corresponding monotherapies. When testing a panel of human hepatoma cell lines, we found (i a significantly improved rate of primary infections when using oncolytic MeV under concurrent treatment with resminostat, (ii a boosted cytotoxic effect of the epi-virotherapeutic combination (Res + MeV with enhanced induction of apoptosis, and, quite importantly, (iii an absence of any resminostat-induced impairment of MeV replication and spread. Beyond that, we could also show that (iv resminostat, after hepatoma cell stimulation with exogenous human interferon (IFN-β, is able to prevent the induction of IFN-stimulated genes, such as IFIT-1. This finding outlines the possible impact of resminostat on cellular innate immunity, being instrumental in overcoming resistances to MeV-mediated viral oncolysis. Thus, our results support the onset of epi-virotherapeutic clinical trials in patients exhibiting advanced stages of HCC.

  5. Chapter three--Syrian hamster as an animal model to study oncolytic adenoviruses and to evaluate the efficacy of antiviral compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, William S M; Toth, Karoly

    2012-01-01

    The Syrian (golden) hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) has served as a useful model for different aspects of biology for at least 50 years, and its use has been expanding recently. In earlier years, among other things, it was a model for cancer development. More recently, it has become a model for many different infectious diseases. It has also become an alternative model for the study of oncolytic adenovirus vectors for cancer gene therapy. Among several other human pathogens, the hamster is permissive for the replication of human species C adenoviruses, which are the parental virus for the majority of adenovirus vectors in use today. These vectors replicate in some of the established hamster tumor cell lines that can be used to generate tumors in vivo, that is, one can study oncolytic (replication competent) adenoviruses in a permissive, immunocompetent model. This has afforded the opportunity to study the effect of the host immune system on the vector-infected tumor and has allowed the use of a more relevant animal model to determine the safety and biodistribution of replication-competent adenoviruses. The hamster has also been used to evaluate antiviral compounds and vaccines against many viruses, including adenoviruses, flaviviruses, alphaviruses, arenaviruses, bunyaviruses, and paramyxoviruses.

  6. Preclinical Evaluation of Oncolytic Δγ134.5 Herpes Simplex Virus Expressing Interleukin-12 for Therapy of Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Cody

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The metastasis of breast cancer to the brain and central nervous system (CNS is a problem of increasing importance. As improving treatments continue to extend patient survival, the incidence of CNS metastases from breast cancer is on the rise. New treatments are needed, as current treatments are limited by deleterious side effects and are generally palliative. We have previously described an oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV, designated M002, which lacks both copies of the γ134.5 neurovirulence gene and carries a murine interleukin 12 (IL-12 expression cassette, and have validated its antitumor efficacy in a variety of preclinical models of primary brain tumors. However, M002 has not been yet evaluated for use against metastatic brain tumors. Here, we demonstrate the following: both human breast cancer and murine mammary carcinoma cells support viral replication and IL-12 expression from M002; M002 replicates in and destroys breast cancer cells from a variety of histological subtypes, including “triple-negative” and HER2 overexpressing; M002 improves survival in an immunocompetent model more effectively than does a non-cytokine control virus. Thus, we conclude from this proof-of-principle study that a γ134.5-deleted IL-12 expressing oncolytic HSV may be a potential new therapy for breast cancer brain metastases.

  7. Dual Syntax for XML Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2008-01-01

    XML is successful as a machine processable data interchange format, but it is often too verbose for human use. For this reason, many XML languages permit an alternative more legible non-XML syntax. XSLT stylesheets are often used to convert from the XML syntax to the alternative syntax; however......, such transformations are not reversible since no general tool exists to automatically parse the alternative syntax back into XML. We present XSugar, which makes it possible to manage dual syntax for XML languages. An XSugar specification is built around a context-free grammar that unifies the two syntaxes...... of a language. Given such a specification, the XSugar tool can translate from alternative syntax to XML and vice versa. Moreover, the tool statically checks that the transformations are reversible and that all XML documents generated from the alternative syntax are valid according to a given XML schema....

  8. Dual Syntax for XML Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2005-01-01

    XML is successful as a machine processable data interchange format, but it is often too verbose for human use. For this reason, many XML languages permit an alternative more legible non-XML syntax. XSLT stylesheets are often used to convert from the XML syntax to the alternative syntax; however......, such transformations are not reversible since no general tool exists to automatically parse the alternative syntax back into XML. We present XSugar, which makes it possible to manage dual syntax for XML languages. An XSugar specification is built around a context-free grammar that unifies the two syntaxes...... of a language. Given such a specification, the XSugar tool can translate from alternative syntax to XML and vice versa. Moreover, the tool statically checks that the transformations are reversible and that all XML documents generated from the alternative syntax are valid according to a given XML schema....

  9. Dual-fuel, dual-mode rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a dual fuel, dual mode rocket engine designed to improve the performance of earth-to-orbit vehicles. For any vehicle that operates from the earth's surface to earth orbit, it is advantageous to use two different fuels during its ascent. A high density impulse fuel, such as kerosene, is most efficient during the first half of the trajectory. A high specific impulse fuel, such as hydrogen, is most efficient during the second half of the trajectory. The invention allows both fuels to be used with a single rocket engine. It does so by adding a minimum number of state-of-the-art components to baseline single made rocket engines, and is therefore relatively easy to develop for near term applications. The novelty of this invention resides in the mixing of fuels before exhaust nozzle cooling. This allows all of the engine fuel to cool the exhaust nozzle, and allows the ratio of fuels used throughout the flight depend solely on performance requirements, not cooling requirements.

  10. Dual phase evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Green, David G; Abbass, Hussein A

    2014-01-01

    This book explains how dual phase evolution operates in all these settings and provides a detailed treatment of the subject. The authors discuss the theoretical foundations for the theory, how it relates to other phase transition phenomena and its advantages in evolutionary computation and complex adaptive systems. The book provides methods and techniques to use this concept for problem solving. Dual phase evolution concerns systems that evolve via repeated phase shifts in the connectivity of their elements. It occurs in vast range of settings, including natural systems (species evolution, landscape ecology, geomorphology), socio-economic systems (social networks) and in artificial systems (annealing, evolutionary computing).

  11. Critical Role of Autophagy in the Processing of Adenovirus Capsid-Incorporated Cancer-Specific Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Klein

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are highly immunogenic and are being examined as potential vectors for immunotherapy. Infection by oncolytic adenovirus is followed by massive autophagy in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesize that autophagy regulates the processing of adenoviral proteins for antigen presentation. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the presentation of viral antigens by infected cells using an antibody cocktail of viral capsid proteins. We found that viral antigens were processed by JNK-mediated autophagy, and that autophagy was required for their presentation. Consistent with these results, splenocytes isolated from virus-immunized mice were activated by infected cells in an MHC II-dependent manner. We then hypothesize that this mechanism can be utilized to generate an efficient cancer vaccine. To this end, we constructed an oncolytic virus encompassing an EGFRvIII cancer-specific epitope in the adenoviral fiber. Infection of cancer cells with this fiber-modified adenovirus resulted in recognition of infected cancer cells by a specific anti-EGFRvIII antibody. However, inhibition of autophagy drastically decreased the capability of the specific antibody to detect the cancer-related epitope in infected cells. Our data suggest that combination of adenoviruses with autophagy inducers may enhance the processing and presentation of cancer-specific antigens incorporated into capsid proteins.

  12. Commuting Dual Toeplitz Operators on the Polydisk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Feng LU; Shu Xia SHANG

    2007-01-01

    On the polydisk, the commutativity of dual Toeplitz operators is studied. We obtain characterizations of commuting dual Toeplitz operators, essentially commuting dual Toeplitz operators and essentially semi-commuting dual Toeplitz operators.

  13. Dual diagnosis among physicians: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braquehais, María Dolores; Lusilla, Pilar; Bel, Miquel Jordi; Navarro, María Cecilia; Nasillo, Viviana; Díaz, Albert; Valero, Sergi; Padrós, Jaume; Bruguera, Eugeni; Casas, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    Co-occurrence of mental disorders and substance use disorders (dual diagnosis) among doctors is a cause of serious concern due to its negative personal, professional, and social consequences. This work provides an overview of the prevalence of dual diagnosis among physicians, suggests a clinical etiological model to explain the development of dual diagnosis in doctors, and recommends some treatment strategies specifically for doctors. The most common presentation of dual diagnosis among doctors is the combination of alcohol use disorders and affective disorders. There are also high rates of self-medication with benzodiazepines, legal opiates, and amphetamines compared to the general population, and cannabis use disorders are increasing, mainly in young doctors. The prevalence of nicotine dependence varies from one country to another depending on the nature of public health policies. Emergency medicine physicians, psychiatrists, and anaesthesiologists are at higher risk for developing a substance use disorder compared with other doctors, perhaps because of their knowledge of and access to certain legal drugs. Two main pathways may lead doctors toward dual diagnosis: (a) the use of substances (often alcohol or self-prescribed drugs) as an unhealthy strategy to cope with their emotional or mental distress and (b) the use of substances for recreational or other purposes. In both cases, doctors tend to delay seeking help once a problem has been established, often for many years. Denial, minimization, and rationalization are common defense mechanisms, maybe because of the social stigma associated with mental or substance use disorders, the risk of losing employment/medical license, and a professional culture of perfectionism and denial of emotional needs or failures. Personal vulnerability interacts with these factors to increase the risk of a dual diagnosis developing in some individuals. When doctors with substance use disorders accept treatment in programs

  14. Early Dual Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genesee, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Parents and child care personnel in English-dominant parts of the world often express misgivings about raising children bilingually. Their concerns are based on the belief that dual language learning during the infant-toddler stage confuses children, delays their development, and perhaps even results in reduced language competence. In this…

  15. A novel tetracycline-controlled transactivator-transrepressor system enables external control of oncolytic adenovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, H; Wang, X; Srour, M; Siemetzki, U; Seltmann, H; Sutter, A P; Scherübl, H; Zouboulis, C C; Schwaab, R; Hillen, W; Schultheiss, H-P; Poller, W

    2003-09-01

    The use of restricted replication-competent adenoviruses (RRCAs) inducing tumor cell-specific lysis is a promising approach in cancer gene therapy. However, the use of RRCAs in humans carries considerable risk, since after injection into the patient, further regulation or inhibition of virus replication from the outside is impossible. Therefore, we have developed a novel system allowing external pharmacological control of RRCA replication. We show here that a tumor-selective E1B-deleted RRCA can be tightly regulated by use of doxycycline (dox)-controlled adenoviral E1A gene expression, which in turn determines vector replication. RRCA replication is switched on by addition and switched off by withdrawal of dox. The system results in efficient tumor cell killing after induction by dox, whereas cells are unaffected by the uninduced system. It was also employed for efficient external control of transgene expression from cotransfected replication-deficient adenovectors. Furthermore, the use of a liver cell-specific human alpha1-antitrypsin (hAAT)-promoter driving a tetracycline-controlled transcriptional silencer allowed specific protection of cells with hAAT-promoter activity in the absence of dox in vitro and in vivo, delineating a new principle of 'tissue protective' gene therapy. The concept of external control of RRCAs may help to improve the safety of cancer gene therapy.

  16. Dual Y-Shaped Monopole Antenna for Dual-Band WLAN/WiMAX Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqing Zhai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual-band design of monopole antenna with two coupled Y-shaped strips for WLAN/WiMAX applications is presented. By the introduction of dual Y-shaped strips, two separated impedance bandwidths of 22.4% (3.28~4.10 GHz and 19.2% (4.90~5.94 GHz can be obtained to meet the specifications of the WLAN/WiMAX communication band applications. The proposed antenna is successfully simulated, designed, and measured, demonstrating the matched impedance and good radiation characteristics with an overall dimension of 17.7×26×1 mm3.

  17. Philosophical aspects of dual use technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovit, Svitlana V; Williams, Erin D

    2010-03-01

    The term dual use technologies refers to research and technology with the potential both to yield valuable scientific knowledge and to be used for nefarious purposes with serious consequences for public health or the environment. There are two main approaches to assessing dual use technologies: pragmatic and metaphysical. A pragmatic approach relies on ethical principles and norms to generate specific guidance and policy for dual use technologies. A metaphysical approach exhorts us to the deeper study of human nature, our intentions, goals, values ideals and social relations when considering dual use technology. Use of science and technology (S and T) is determined by two components of human nature: human intentions and choices. We have drawn a distinction between specific measures, goals and intentions with respect to technologies in order to show that moral judgment about technologies must precede their use. Understanding of our intentionality and values, and our moral ideals, as a measurable, tangible part of the real world is important for the prevention of any possible harm from S and T. In the context of dual use technologies, we stress the importance of three main understandings of human nature: vulnerability, responsibility and narrative identity. These can become a strong ontological "antidote" to technology's poisoning of modern man. Each new technology can be measured and compared with man's values, traditions and societal norms. This can be done bearing in mind the concept that human nature is not dualistic, but pluralistic. A system of ethical principles that includes the principles of good intentions, the correspondence of goals and means, the balancing of risks and benefits, simplicity, and contextuality, will help ensure that technologies are more humanistic and friendly to human beings.

  18. Dual photon absorptiometry: Validation of mineral and fat measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heymsfield, S.B.; Wang, J.; Sulet, M.; Lichtman, S.; Pierson, R.N. Jr. (Saint Luke' s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (USA)); Kehayias, J. (Tufts Univ., Boston, MA (USA). USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts Univ.); Kamen, Y.; Dilmanian, F.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Lindsay, R. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA). Coll. of Physicians and Surgeons)

    1989-01-01

    Photons passing through human tissue undergo attenuation in relation to the specific chemical substances with which they interact. By selecting two appropriate photon energies and recording their attenuation, the investigator can solve simultaneous equations that subdivide body mass into two components: soft tissue and bone mineral ash. The aim of this paper is to describe and to validate the estimates of body composition derived by dual photon systems. The initial studies largely involved dual photon absorptiometers, although the discussion will also include the more recently developed dual energy x-ray absorptiometers. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Chains of N=2, D=4 heterotic type II duals

    CERN Document Server

    Aldazabal, G; Font, A; Quevedo, Fernando

    1996-01-01

    We report on a search for N=2 heterotic strings that are dual candidates of type II compactifications on Calabi-Yau threefolds described as K3 fibrations. We find many new heterotic duals by using standard orbifold techniques. The associated type II compactifications fall into chains in which the proposed duals are heterotic compactifications related one another by a sequential Higgs mechanism. This breaking in the heterotic side typically involves the sequence SU(4)\\rightarrow SU(3)\\rightarrow SU(2)\\rightarrow 0, while in the type II side the weights of the complex hypersurfaces and the structure of the K3 quotient singularities also follow specific patterns.

  20. Dual-readout Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, N; Cardini, A.; Cascella, M.; Cei, F.; De Pedis, D.; Fracchia, S.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; Genova, P.; Hauptman, J.; La Rotonda, L.; Lee, S.; Livan, M.; Meoni, E.; Moggi, A.; Pinci, D.; Policicchio, A.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sill, A.; Venturelli, T.; Wigmans, R.

    2013-01-01

    The RD52 Project at CERN is a pure instrumentation experiment whose goal is to un- derstand the fundamental limitations to hadronic energy resolution, and other aspects of energy measurement, in high energy calorimeters. We have found that dual-readout calorimetry provides heretofore unprecedented information event-by-event for energy resolution, linearity of response, ease and robustness of calibration, fidelity of data, and particle identification, including energy lost to binding energy in nuclear break-up. We believe that hadronic energy resolutions of {\\sigma}/E $\\approx$ 1 - 2% are within reach for dual-readout calorimeters, enabling for the first time comparable measurement preci- sions on electrons, photons, muons, and quarks (jets). We briefly describe our current progress and near-term future plans. Complete information on all aspects of our work is available at the RD52 website http://highenergy.phys.ttu.edu/dream/.

  1. Higher Representations Duals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We uncover novel solutions of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions for scalarless gauge theories with matter transforming according to higher dimensional representations of the underlying gauge group. We argue that, if the duals exist, they are gauge theories with fermions transforming...... according to the defining representation of the dual gauge group. The resulting conformal windows match the one stemming from the all-orders beta function results when taking the anomalous dimension of the fermion mass to be unity which are also very close to the ones obtained using the Schwinger......-Dyson approximation. We use the solutions to gain useful insight on the conformal window of the associated electric theory. A consistent picture emerges corroborating previous results obtained via different analytic methods and in agreement with first principle lattice explorations....

  2. Dual Campus High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen P. Mombourquette

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available September 2010 witnessed the opening of the first complete dual campus high school in Alberta. Catholic Central High School, which had been in existence since 1967 in one building, now offered courses to students on two campuses. The “dual campus” philosophy was adopted so as to ensure maximum program flexibility for students. The philosophy, however, was destined to affect student engagement and staff efficacy as the change in organizational structure, campus locations, and course availability was dramatic. Changing school organizational structure also had the potential of affecting student achievement. A mixed-methods study utilizing engagement surveys, efficacy scales, and interviews with students and teachers was used to ascertain the degree of impact. The results of the study showed that minimal impact occurred to levels of student engagement, minor negative impact to staff efficacy, and a slight increase to student achievement results.

  3. Dual Double Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Penas, Victor A; Riccioni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    We present the dual formulation of double field theory at the linearized level. This is a classically equivalent theory describing the duals of the dilaton, the Kalb-Ramond field and the graviton in a T-duality or O(D,D) covariant way. In agreement with previous proposals, the resulting theory encodes fields in mixed Young-tableau representations, combining them into an antisymmetric 4-tensor under O(D,D). In contrast to previous proposals, the theory also requires an antisymmetric 2-tensor and a singlet, which are not all pure gauge. The need for these additional fields is analogous to a similar phenomenon for "exotic" dualizations, and we clarify this by comparing with the dualizations of the component fields. We close with some speculative remarks on the significance of these observations for the full non-linear theory yet to be constructed.

  4. Dual-comb MIXSEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, S. M.; Zaugg, C. A.; Klenner, A.; Mangold, M.; Golling, M.; Tilma, B. W.; Keller, U.

    2015-03-01

    We present a single semiconductor disk laser simultaneously emitting two different gigahertz modelocked pulse trains. A birefringent crystal inside a modelocked integrated external-cavity surface-emitting laser (MIXSEL) separates the cavity beam into two spatially separated beams with perpendicular polarizations on the MIXSEL chip. This MIXSEL then generates two orthogonally polarized collinear modelocked pulse trains from one simple straight cavity. Superimposing the beams on a photo detector creates a microwave beat signal, representing a strikingly simple setup to down-convert the terahertz optical frequencies into the electronically accessible microwave regime. This makes the dual-comb MIXSEL scheme an ultra-compact and cost-efficient candidate for dual-comb spectroscopy applications.

  5. Armed Oncolytic Adenovirus-Expressing PD-L1 Mini-Body Enhances Antitumor Effects of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells in Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanoue, Kiyonori; Rosewell Shaw, Amanda; Watanabe, Norihiro; Porter, Caroline; Rana, Bhakti; Gottschalk, Stephen; Brenner, Malcolm; Suzuki, Masataka

    2017-04-15

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells (CAR T cells) produce proinflammatory cytokines that increase expression of T-cell checkpoint signals such as PD-L1, which may inhibit their functionality against solid tumors. In this study, we evaluated in human tumor xenograft models the proinflammatory properties of an oncolytic adenovirus (Onc.Ad) with a helper-dependent Ad (HDAd) that expresses a PD-L1 blocking mini-antibody (mini-body; HDPDL1) as a strategy to enhance CAR T-cell killing. Coadministration of these agents (CAd-VECPDL1) exhibited oncolytic effects with production of PD-L1 mini-body locally at the tumor site. On their own, HDPDL1 exhibited no antitumor effect and CAd-VECPDL1 alone reduced tumors only to volumes comparable to Onc.Ad treatment. However, combining CAd-VECPDL1 with HER2.CAR T cells enhanced antitumor activity compared with treatment with either HER2.CAR T cells alone or HER2.CAR T cells plus Onc.Ad. The benefits of locally produced PD-L1 mini-body by CAd-VECPDL1 could not be replicated by infusion of anti-PD-L1 IgG plus HER2.CAR T cells and coadministration of Onc.Ad in an HER2(+) prostate cancer xenograft model. Overall, our data document the superiority of local production of PD-L1 mini-body by CAd-VECPDL1 combined with administration of tumor-directed CAR T cells to control the growth of solid tumors. Cancer Res; 77(8); 2040-51. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Herpes simplex virus type-1(HSV-1 oncolytic and highly fusogenic mutants carrying the NV1020 genomic deletion effectively inhibit primary and metastatic tumors in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Andrew T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NV1020 oncolytic herpes simplex virus type-1 has shown significant promise for the treatment of many different types of tumors in experimental animal models and human trials. Previously, we described the construction and use of the NV1020-like virus OncSyn to treat human breast tumors implanted in nude mice. The syncytial mutation gKsyn1 (Ala-to-Val at position 40 was introduced into the OncSyn viral genome cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome using double-red mutagenesis in E. coli to produce the OncdSyn virus carrying syncytial mutations in both gB(syn3 and gK(syn1. Results The OncdSyn virus caused extensive virus-induced cell fusion in cell culture. The oncolytic potential of the OncSyn and OncdSyn viruses was tested in the highly metastatic syngeneic mouse model system, which utilizes 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells implanted within the interscapular region of Balb/c mice. Mice were given three consecutive intratumor injections of OncSyn, OncdSyn, or phosphate buffered saline four days apart. Both OncSyn and OncdSyn virus injections resulted in significant reduction of tumor sizes (p Conclusion These results show that the attenuated, but highly fusogenic OncSyn and OncdSyn viruses can effectively reduce primary and metastatic breast tumors in immuncompetent mice. The available bac-cloned OncSyn and OncdSyn viral genomes can be rapidly modified to express a number of different anti-tumor and immunomodulatory genes that can further enhance their anti-tumor potency.

  7. Resistance to oncolytic myxoma virus therapy in nf1(-/-/trp53(-/- syngeneic mouse glioma models is independent of anti-viral type-I interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz J Zemp

    Full Text Available Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1 (+/- Trp53 (+/- mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV. These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models.

  8. Resistance to oncolytic myxoma virus therapy in nf1(-/-)/trp53(-/-) syngeneic mouse glioma models is independent of anti-viral type-I interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Maxwell, Lori; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1 (+/-) Trp53 (+/-) mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV). These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β) could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models.

  9. Transduction and oncolytic profile of a potent replication-competent adenovirus 11p vector (RCAd11pGFP in colon carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Silver

    Full Text Available Replication-competent adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vectors promise to be more efficient gene delivery vehicles than their replication-deficient counterparts, and chimeric Ad5 vectors that are capable of targeting CD46 are more effective than Ad5 vectors with native fibers. Although several strategies have been used to improve gene transduction and oncolysis, either by modifying their tropism or enhancing their replication capacity, some tumor cells are still relatively refractory to infection by chimeric Ad5. The oncolytic effects of the vectors are apparent in certain tumors but not in others. Here, we report the biological and oncolytic profiles of a replication-competent adenovirus 11p vector (RCAd11pGFP in colon carcinoma cells. CD46 was abundantly expressed in all cells studied; however, the transduction efficiency of RCAd11pGFP varied. RCAd11pGFP efficiently transduced HT-29, HCT-8, and LS174T cells, but it transduced T84 cells, derived from a colon cancer metastasis in the lung, less efficiently. Interestingly, RCAd11p replicated more rapidly in the T84 cells than in HCT-8 and LS174T cells and as rapidly as in HT-29 cells. Cell toxicity and proliferation assays indicated that RCAd11pGFP had the highest cell-killing activities in HT29 and T84 cells, the latter of which also expressed the highest levels of glycoproteins of the carcinoma embryonic antigen (CEA family. In vivo experiments showed significant growth inhibition of T84 and HT-29 tumors in xenograft mice treated with either RCAd11pGFP or Ad11pwt compared to untreated controls. Thus, RCAd11pGFP has a potent cytotoxic effect on colon carcinoma cells.

  10. Preferential colonization of metastases by oncolytic vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 in a human PC-3 prostate cancer model in nude mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Donat

    Full Text Available Recently, we showed that the oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 has a significant therapeutic potential in treating lymph node metastases of human PC-3 prostate carcinoma in tumor xenografts. In this study, underlying mechanisms of the virus-mediated metastases reduction were analyzed. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that virus-treatment resulted in a drastically decrease of blood and lymph vessels, representing essential routes for PC-3 cell migration, in both tumors and metastases. Thus, GLV-1h68 drastically reduced essential routes for the metastatic spread of PC-3 cells. Furthermore, analysis of viral distribution in GLV-1h68-injected tumor-bearing mice by plaque assays, revealed significantly higher virus titers in metastases compared to solid tumors. To elucidate conditions potentially mediating the preferential viral colonization and eradication of metastases, microenvironmental components of uninfected tumors and metastases were compared by microscopic studies. These analyses revealed that PC-3 lymph node metastases showed increased vascular permeability, higher proliferation status of tumor cells as determined by BrdU- and Ki-67 assays and lesser necrosis of PC-3 cells than solid tumors. Moreover, an increased number of immune cells (MHCII(+/CD68(+ macrophages, MHCII(+/CD19(+ B lymphocytes combined with an up-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was observed in metastases in comparison to primary PC-3 tumors. We propose that these microenvironmental components mediated the metastatic tropism of GLV-1h68. Therefore, vaccinia virus-based oncolytic virotherapy might offer a novel treatment of metastatic prostate carcinomas in humans.

  11. Dual-readout Calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Akchurin, N.; Bedeschi, F.; Cardini, A.; Cascella, M.; Cei, F.; Pedis, D.; Fracchia, S.; Franchino, S.; Fraternali, M.; Gaudio, G.; P. Genova; Hauptman, J.; La Rotonda, L.; Lee, S.; Livan, M.(INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia, Italy)

    2013-01-01

    The RD52 Project at CERN is a pure instrumentation experiment whose goal is to understand the fundamental limitations to hadronic energy resolution, and other aspects of energy measurement, in high energy calorimeters. We have found that dual-readout calorimetry provides heretofore unprecedented information event-by-event for energy resolution, linearity of response, ease and robustness of calibration, fidelity of data, and particle identification, including energy lost to binding energy in n...

  12. Dual-Schemata Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tadahiro; Sawaragi, Tetsuo

    In this paper, a new machine-learning method, called Dual-Schemata model, is presented. Dual-Schemata model is a kind of self-organizational machine learning methods for an autonomous robot interacting with an unknown dynamical environment. This is based on Piaget's Schema model, that is a classical psychological model to explain memory and cognitive development of human beings. Our Dual-Schemata model is developed as a computational model of Piaget's Schema model, especially focusing on sensori-motor developing period. This developmental process is characterized by a couple of two mutually-interacting dynamics; one is a dynamics formed by assimilation and accommodation, and the other dynamics is formed by equilibration and differentiation. By these dynamics schema system enables an agent to act well in a real world. This schema's differentiation process corresponds to a symbol formation process occurring within an autonomous agent when it interacts with an unknown, dynamically changing environment. Experiment results obtained from an autonomous facial robot in which our model is embedded are presented; an autonomous facial robot becomes able to chase a ball moving in various ways without any rewards nor teaching signals from outside. Moreover, emergence of concepts on the target movements within a robot is shown and discussed in terms of fuzzy logics on set-subset inclusive relationships.

  13. A Dual-Band Dual-Polarized Array for Spaceborne SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozar, David M.; Schaubert, Daniel H.; Targonski, Stephen D.; Zawadski, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Future synthetic aperture radar antennas will be significantly more sophisticated than their earlier counterparts, requiring enhanced electrical capabilities such as operation at multiple frequencies with multiple polarization ability, as well as desirable non-electrical features such as light weight, easy and reliable deployability, and low cost. The present paper describes the results of a prototype SAR array developed with these considerations in mind. This paper will describe the development of a dual-frequency array operating at L and C bands, with dual linear polarization capability at both bands. Unlike most earlier dual-band arrays, this array shares the same radiating aperture for both bands and both polarizations, resulting the smallest possible aperture area for a given gain specification. A critical constraint in this project was a requirement for an extremely light weight package, leading to the use of foam substrates with thin dielectric membranes for metalizations of the radiating elements and feed networks.

  14. The combined effects of oncolytic reovirus plus Newcastle disease virus and reovirus plus parvovirus on U87 and U373 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkassar, Muhannad; Gärtner, Barbara; Roemer, Klaus; Graesser, Friedrich; Rommelaere, Jean; Kaestner, Lars; Haeckel, Isabelle; Graf, Norbert

    2011-09-01

    Previous results had documented oncolytic capacity of reovirus, parvovirus and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on several tumor cell types. To test whether combinations of these viruses may increase this capacity, human U87- and U373-glioblastoma cells, in vitro or xenografted into immuno-compromised mice, were subjected to simultaneous double infections and analyzed. Our results show that reovirus (serotype-3) plus NDV (Hitcher-B1) and reovirus plus parvovirus-H1 lead to a significant increase in tumor cell killing in vitro in both cell lines (Kruskal-Wallis test, P 95%) after combined infection. These data thus indicate that a synergistic anti-tumor effect can be achieved by the combined infection with oncolytic viruses.

  15. Population thinking and natural selection in dual-inheritance theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houkes, Wybo

    2012-05-01

    A deflationary perspective on theories of cultural evolution, in particular dual-inheritance theory, has recently been proposed by Lewens. On this 'pop-culture' analysis, dual-inheritance theorists apply population thinking to cultural phenomena, without claiming that cultural items evolve by natural selection. This paper argues against this pop-culture analysis of dual-inheritance theory. First, it focuses on recent dual-inheritance models of specific patterns of cultural change. These models exemplify population thinking without a commitment to natural selection of cultural items. There are grounds, however, for doubting the added explanatory value of the models in their disciplinary context-and thus grounds for engaging in other potentially explanatory projects based on dual-inheritance theory. One such project is suggested by advocates of the theory. Some of the motivational narratives that they offer can be interpreted as setting up an adaptationist project with regard to cumulative change in cultural items. We develop this interpretation here. On it, dual-inheritance theory features two interrelated selection processes, one on the level of genetically inherited learning mechanisms, another on the level of the cultural items transmitted through these mechanisms. This interpretation identifies a need for further modelling efforts, but also offers scope for enhancing the explanatory power of dual-inheritance theory.

  16. Adolescents and Dual Diagnosis in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matali, José Luis; Andión, Oscar; Pardo, Marta; Iniesta, Raquel; Serrano, Eduard; San, Luis

    2016-03-02

    In recent years, both the prevalence of drug use and related child and adolescent psychiatric emergencies have risen sharply. There are few studies about the impact on child and adolescent emergency services. This study has a twofold aim. The first is to describe the prevalence of substance use disorders, mental disorders and dual diagnosis (substance use problems plus mental disorder) in adolescents in psychiatric emergency service. The second is to analyze clinical and healthcare differences between patients with dual diagnosis and patients with a mental disorder without substance use disorder.We retrospectively reviewed 4012 discharge forms for emergencies treated at the psychiatric emergency department during the period 2007-2009. We obtained a sample of 1795 visits. This sample was divided into two groups: the dual diagnosis group (n = 477) and the psychiatric disorder group (n = 1318).The dual diagnosis group accounted for 26.5% of psychiatric emergencies analyzed. Compared to the psychiatric disorder group,the dual diagnosis group had significantly more conduct disorders, social problems, involuntariness in the visit, less hospital admissions and less connection with the healthcare network.Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services. This patient group requires specialized care both at emergency services and in specific units. Accordingly, these units should play a triple role when handling dual diagnosis: detection, brief treatment and referral to a specialised unit.

  17. Alexander Duals of Multipermutohedron Ideals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajay Kumar; Chanchal Kumar

    2014-02-01

    An Alexander dual of a multipermutohedron ideal has many combinatorial properties. The standard monomials of an Artinian quotient of such a dual correspond bijectively to some -parking functions, and many interesting properties of these Artinian quotients are obtained by Postnikov and Shapiro (Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 356 (2004) 3109–3142). Using the multigraded Hilbert series of an Artinian quotient of an Alexander dual of multipermutohedron ideals, we obtained a simple proof of Steck determinant formula for enumeration of -parking functions. A combinatorial formula for all the multigraded Betti numbers of an Alexander dual of multipermutohedron ideals are also obtained.

  18. Dual massive gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morand, Kevin, E-mail: Kevin.Morand@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Solodukhin, Sergey N., E-mail: Sergey.Solodukhin@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson - CNRS, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2012-08-29

    The linearized massive gravity in three dimensions, over any maximally symmetric background, is known to be presented in a self-dual form as a first order equation which encodes not only the massive Klein-Gordon type field equation but also the supplementary transverse-traceless conditions. We generalize this construction to higher dimensions. The appropriate dual description in d dimensions, additionally to a (non-symmetric) tensor field h{sub {mu}{nu}}, involves an extra rank-(d-1) field equivalently represented by the torsion rank-3 tensor. The symmetry condition for h{sub {mu}{nu}} arises on-shell as a consequence of the field equations. The action principle of the dual theory is formulated. The focus has been made on four dimensions. Solving one of the fields in terms of the other and putting back in the action one obtains two other equivalent formulations of the theory in which the action is quadratic in derivatives. In one of these representations the theory is formulated entirely in terms of a rank-2 non-symmetric tensor h{sub {mu}{nu}}. This quadratic theory is not identical to the Fierz-Pauli theory and contains the coupling between the symmetric and antisymmetric parts of h{sub {mu}{nu}}. Nevertheless, the only singularity in the propagator is the same as in the Fierz-Pauli theory so that only the massive spin-2 particle is propagating. In the other representation, the theory is formulated in terms of the torsion rank-3 tensor only. We analyze the conditions which follow from the field equations and show that they restrict to 5 degrees of freedom thus producing an alternative description to the massive spin-2 particle. A generalization to higher dimensions is suggested.

  19. Towards a Dual Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holli, Anne Maria; Harder, Mette Marie Stæhr

    2016-01-01

    countries acknowledged as forerunners in gender equality, which also have ‘fairly strong’ parliamentary standing committees. The results show that both committees on gender equality can be regarded as ‘feminist’ in character and both interact with relevant civil society organisations. Their impact......Drawing on insights from state feminism and legislative studies on parliamentary committees, this article develops a dual approach for the comparative analysis of committees on gender equality. Empirically, it compares the standing committees on gender equality in Denmark and Finland, two Nordic...

  20. Dual cure photocatalyst systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVoe, R.J.; Brown-Wensley, K.A.; Holmes, G.L.; Mathis, M.D.; McCormick, F.B.; Palazzotto, M.C.; Spurgeon, K.M. (Minnesota Mining and Mfg. Co., St. Paul, MN (USA). Corporate Research Labs.)

    1990-01-01

    A family of dual cure photocatalyst systems is being developed to be used in the solventless processing of organic coatings. The photocatalyst systems consist of organometallic compounds often in combination with other agents. Upon photolysis, the photocatalyst system generates a Lewis acid and a free radical. The Lewis acid can initiate the polymerization of epoxies or the addition of isocyanates and polyols to form polyurethanes while the free radical can initiate the polymerization of acrylates. The performance of the various photocatalyst systems will be compared on the basis of the physical properties of the cured compositions they produce. 17 figs.

  1. Antibody-targeted NY-ESO-1 to mannose receptor or DEC-205 in vitro elicits dual human CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses with broad antigen specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takemasa; Matsuzaki, Junko; Kelly, Marcus P; Ramakrishna, Venky; Vitale, Laura; He, Li-Zhen; Keler, Tibor; Odunsi, Kunle; Old, Lloyd J; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha

    2011-01-15

    Immunization of cancer patients with vaccines containing full-length tumor Ags aims to elicit specific Abs and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Vaccination with protein Ags, however, often elicits only CD4(+) T cell responses without inducing Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, as exogenous protein is primarily presented to CD4(+) T cells. Recent data revealed that Ab-mediated targeting of protein Ags to cell surface receptors on dendritic cells could enhance the induction of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. We investigated in this study if these observations were applicable to NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis Ag widely used in clinical cancer vaccine trials. We generated two novel targeting proteins consisting of the full-length NY-ESO-1 fused to the C terminus of two human mAbs against the human mannose receptor and DEC-205, both internalizing molecules expressed on APC. These targeting proteins were evaluated for their ability to activate NY-ESO-1-specific human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in vitro. Both targeted NY-ESO-1 proteins rapidly bound to their respective targets on APC. Whereas nontargeted and Ab-targeted NY-ESO-1 proteins similarly activated CD4(+) T cells, cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells was only efficiently induced by targeted NY-ESO-1. In addition, both mannose receptor and DEC-205 targeting elicited specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from PBLs of cancer patients. Receptor-specific delivery of NY-ESO-1 to APC appears to be a promising vaccination strategy to efficiently generate integrated and broad Ag-specific immune responses against NY-ESO-1 in cancer patients.

  2. Dual-Energy CT of Rectal Cancer Specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Najami, Issam; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Madsen, Gunvor

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An accurate method to assess malignant lymph nodes in the mesorectum is needed. Dual-energy CT scans simultaneously with 2 levels of energy and thereby provides information about tissue composition based on the known effective Z value of different tissues. Each point investigated...... is represented by a certain effective Z value, which allows for information on its composition. OBJECTIVE: We wanted to standardize a method for dual-energy scanning of rectal specimens to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of benign versus malignant lymph node differentiation. Histopathological evaluation...... cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured accuracy of differentiating benign from malignant lymph nodes by investigating the following: 1) gadolinium, iodine, and water concentrations in lymph nodes; 2) dual-energy ratio; 3) dual-energy index; and 4) effective Z value. RESULTS: Optimal discriminations...

  3. [Dual diagnosis in anxiety disorders: pharmacologic treatment recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáiz Martínez, Pilar Alejandra; Jimenez Treviño, Luis; Díaz Mesa, Eva M; García-Portilla González, M Paz; Marina González, Pedro; Al-Halabí, Susana; Szerman, Néstor; Bobes García, Julio; Ruiz, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and substance use disorders are highly comorbid (between 18% and 37%), and such comorbidity complicates treatment and worsens prognosis (including higher suicide risk). There are not many research works on the specific pharmacologic treatment of dual comorbid anxiety disorders. Most authors recommend a simultaneous approach of both, anxiety and substance use, disorders. Research data on pharmacotherapy suggest that psychotropics used in the treatment of anxiety disorders are also effective in dual diagnosis. SSRIs are considered first-line therapy in the treatment of dual anxiety while benzodiacepines should be avoided. New generation antiepileptic have shown efficacy in case series and open label studies in the latest years, thus being a promising treatment option for dual comorbid anxiety disorders, specially pregabalin in generalized anxiety disorder.

  4. Development of Dual Power Multirotor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin E. Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical take-off and landing (VTOL aircraft has good flight characteristics and system performance without runway. The multirotor system has been tried to expand into larger size for longer endurance or higher payload. But the motor power to endurance ratio has been limited. Due to the specific energy of gasoline being much higher than battery, introducing gasoline engine into multirotor system can be considered. This paper proposes a dual power multirotor system to combine a quadrotor using gasoline engines to provide major lift in shorter arm with another quadrotor using brushless DC motors to offer most controllable force with longer arm. System design, fabrication, and verification of the proposed dual power multirotor system development are presented. Preliminary flights have achieved 16 kg payload for long endurance flight. This is useful for various applications with advanced improvements.

  5. BREAKTHROUGH INDEX AND SPECIFIC DEPOSIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awatif Soaded Al-Saqqar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The dual filter was tested in this study to improve the performance of the filtration process in water treatment plants. Porcelanite rocks were selected to be the dual media with sand in the experimental work. The work required installing a pilot filtration unit in the location of the filters in one of the water treatment plants. The pilot filtration consists of three plastic column filters, acting parallel and simultaneously. The first contains 70 cm sand, the second and third were dual filters (porcelanite with sand of different types. The dual media was tested at different filtration rates (5, 7.5, 10, and 15 m/hr. The results showed that the dual filters had better performance than sand filters and reduced the specific deposit (σ and the breakthrough index (BI. In the dual filters the specific deposit was about (16 to 65 % less than in sand filters and the breakthrough index (BI was specified weak for rates 5 and 7 m/hr, light at 10 m/hr, and medium at 15 m/hr.

  6. Comparison Of Modified Dual Ternary Indexing And Multi-Key Hashing Algorithms For Music Information Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In this work we have compared two indexing algorithms that have been used to index and retrieve Carnatic music songs. We have compared a modified algorithm of the Dual ternary indexing algorithm for music indexing and retrieval with the multi-key hashing indexing algorithm proposed by us. The modification in the dual ternary algorithm was essential to handle variable length query phrase and to accommodate features specific to Carnatic music. The dual ternary indexing algorithm is ...

  7. Robust dual-response optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanikoglu, Ihsan; den Hertog, Dick; Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a robust optimization reformulation of the dual-response problem developed in response surface methodology. The dual-response approach fits separate models for the mean and the variance and analyzes these two models in a mathematical optimization setting. We use metamodels esti

  8. Dual-Credit in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Credit-based transition programs provide high school students with opportunities to jump start their college education. The Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) offers college credit through dual-credit programs. While KCTCS dual-credit offerings have been successful in helping high school students start their college education…

  9. Dual-core Itanium Processor

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Intel’s first dual-core Itanium processor, code-named "Montecito" is a major release of Intel's Itanium 2 Processor Family, which implements the Intel Itanium architecture on a dual-core processor with two cores per die (integrated circuit). Itanium 2 is much more powerful than its predecessor. It has lower power consumption and thermal dissipation.

  10. Dual Card,Double Happiness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    As Christmas Day and New Year Day draw near, why not treat yourself with a smart digital gizmo. Then, the Samsung Dual-card Cellphone is what you are longing for. Samsung B5712C, the first dual-card model released by Samsung,

  11. Benefits of Dual Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallstrum, Kiara

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this paper examines how dual language education (DLE) programs are valuable. The literature shows that children do much more than just thrive in a dual language environment. According to research, children who are bilingual are cognitively, academically, intellectually, socially and verbally more advantaged than their monolingual…

  12. Study on the deletion of derivative chromosome 9 in chronic myeloid leukemia patients with extra-signal or dual colour/dual fusion probe, and local-specific inspector 9q34 probe%应用LSI9q34探针及ES/DCDF探针检测慢性粒细胞白血病患者der(9)缺失的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高琳滢; 毛平; 应逸; 杜庆华; 陈晓燕

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究慢性粒细胞性白血病(CML)患者衍生9号染色体[der(9)]部分序列缺失情况,探讨LSI 9q34探针在检测der(9)缺失中的联合应用价值.方法 对52例CML患者采用不加任何刺激剂的骨髓进行24 h短期培养法制备染色体,吉姆萨显带进行核型分析.应用ES/DCDF探针及LSI 9q34探针对骨髓间期细胞进行荧光原位杂交,并检测der(9)部分序列缺失.结果 52例中经ES/DCDF探针检测全部为ber-abl融合基因阳性,其中12例患者伴有der(9)部分缺失,占23.0%,经LSI 9q34探针检测有11例患者伴有der(9)部分缺失.结论 LSI9q34探针在判断CML患者是否伴有der(9)缺失方面有较好的特异性.伴有缺失的患者疾病进展较快,预后较差,甲磺酸依马替尼治疗不能完全逆转其负性作用,建议所有bcr-abl融合基因阳性的CML患者均应行 LSI 9q34探针检测,以指导临床治疗.%Objective To study the frequency of the derivative chromosome 9 [der(9)] deletion among patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and explore the application value of local-specific inspector (LSI) 9q34 probe in detect the der (9) deletion. Methods Cytogenetic analysis was performed by 24 h unstimulated culture, GTG banding and karyotype. Dual colour/dual fusion or extra signal(ES) DNA probe was used to perform interphase-FISH for the detection of bcr-abl fusion gene in 52 patients with CML. LSI 9q34 DNA probe was used to detect der(9) deletion. Results FISH results showed bcr-abl fusion gene existed in all 52 patients with CML. der(9) deletion was detected in 12 patients with ES/DCDF probe, but only in 11 patients with LSI 9q34 probe. Conclusion It's more efficient in detection of der(9) deletion with LSI 9q34 probe. Deletion of der(9) might be a poor prognostic factor for CML patients, and LSI 9q34 probe should be used in all the CML patients with positive bcr-abl fusion gene.

  13. Dual-horizon Peridynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Huilong; Cai, Yongchang; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new Peridynamic approach that naturally includes varying horizon sizes and completely solves the "ghost force" issue. Therefore, the concept of dual-horizon is introduced to consider the unbalanced interactions between the particles with different horizon sizes. The present formulation is proved to fulfill both the balances of linear momentum and angular momentum. Neither the "partial stress tensor" nor the "`slice" technique are needed to ameliorate the ghost force issue in \\cite{Silling2014}. The consistency of reaction forces is naturally fulfilled by a unified simple formulation. The method can be easily implemented to any existing peridynamics code with minimal changes. A simple adaptive refinement procedure is proposed minimizing the computational cost. The method is applied here to the three Peridynamic formulations, namely bond based, ordinary state based and non-ordinary state based Peridynamics. Both two- and three- dimensional examples including the Kalthof-Winkler experi...

  14. Dual Criteria Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel;

    2014-01-01

    The most popular models of decision making use a single criterion to evaluate projects or lotteries. However, decision makers may actually consider multiple criteria when evaluating projects. We consider a dual criteria model from psychology. This model integrates the familiar tradeoffs between...... risk and utility that economists traditionally assume, allowance for rank-dependent decision weights, and consideration of income thresholds. We examine the issues involved in full maximum likelihood estimation of the model using observed choice data. We propose a general method for integrating...... the multiple criteria, using the logic of mixture models, which we believe is attractive from a decision-theoretic and statistical perspective. The model is applied to observed choices from a major natural experiment involving intrinsically dynamic choices over highly skewed outcomes. The evidence points...

  15. Fusion of the BCL9 HD2 domain to E1A increases the cytopathic effect of an oncolytic adenovirus that targets colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pittet Anne-Laure

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wnt signaling pathway is activated by mutations in the APC and β-catenin genes in many types of human cancer. β-catenin is stabilized by these mutations and activates transcription in part by acting as a bridge between Tcf/LEF proteins and the HD2 domain of the BCL9 coactivator. We have previously described oncolytic adenoviruses with binding sites for Tcf/LEF transcription factors inserted into the early viral promoters. These viruses replicate selectively in cells with activation of the Wnt pathway. To increase the activity of these viruses we have fused the viral transactivator E1A to the BCL9 HD2 domain. Methods Luciferase assays, co-immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, immunofluorescent cell staining and cytopathic effect assays were used to characterize the E1A-HD2 fusion protein and virus in vitro. Growth curves of subcutaneous SW620 colon cancer xenografts were used to characterize the virus in vivo. Results The E1A-HD2 fusion protein binds to β-catenin in vivo and activates a Tcf-regulated luciferase reporter better than wild-type E1A in cells with activated Wnt signaling. Expression of the E1A-HD2 protein promotes nuclear import of β-catenin, mediated by the strong nuclear localization signal in E1A. Tcf-regulated viruses expressing the fusion protein show increased expression of viral proteins and a five-fold increase in cytopathic effect (CPE in colorectal cancer cell lines. There was no change in viral protein expression or CPE in HeLa cells, indicating that E1A-HD2 viruses retain selectivity for cells with activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. Despite increasing the cytopathic effect of the virus in vitro, fusion of the HD2 domain to E1A did not increase the burst size of the virus in vitro or the anti-tumor effect of the virus in an SW620 xenograft model in vivo. Conclusion Despite an increase in the nuclear pool of β-catenin, the effects on viral activity in colon cancer cells were small

  16. The Power of Integrators, Financiers, and Insurers to Reduce Proliferation Risks: Nuclear Dual-Use Goods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weise, Rachel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hund, Gretchen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Globalization of manufacturing supply chains has changed the nature of nuclear proliferation. Before 1991, nonproliferation efforts focused almost exclusively on limiting the spread of materials and equipment specifically designed for nuclear use -- reactors, centrifuges, and fissile material. Dual-use items, those items with both nuclear and non-nuclear applications, were not closely scrutinized or controlled. However, in 1991 the international community discovered that Iraq had developed a fairly sophisticated nuclear weapons program by importing dual-use items; this discovery spurred the international community to increase controls on dual-use technologies. Despite these international efforts, dual-use items are still a challenge for those seeking to limit proliferation.

  17. A natural differential calculus on Lie bialgebras with dual of triangular type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijligenberg, N.W. van den; Martini, R.

    1995-01-01

    We prove that for a specific class of Lie bialgebras, there exists a natural differential calculus. This class consists of the Lie bialgebras for which the dual Lie bialgebra is of triangular type. The differential calculus is explicitly constructed with the help of the $R$-matrix from the dual. The

  18. Dual Credit Enrollment and GPA by Ethnicity and Gender at Texas 2-Year Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert D., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the extent to which differences were present in dual credit course enrollment. Specifically examined were whether differences were present in the first semester GPA and at the end of the first two semesters for students who enrolled in dual credit courses while in high school from…

  19. A natural differential calculus on Lie bialgebras with dual of triangular type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hijligenberg, N.; van den Hijligenberg, N.W.; Martini, Ruud

    1995-01-01

    We prove that for a specific class of Lie bialgebras, there exists a natural differential calculus. This class consists of the Lie bialgebras for which the dual Lie bialgebra is of triangular type. The differential calculus is explicitly constructed with the help of the $R$-matrix from the dual. The

  20. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio;

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the...

  1. Influence of carrier cells on the clinical outcome of children with neuroblastoma treated with high dose of oncolytic adenovirus delivered in mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melen, Gustavo J; Franco-Luzón, Lidia; Ruano, David; González-Murillo, África; Alfranca, Arantzazu; Casco, Fernando; Lassaletta, Álvaro; Alonso, Mercedes; Madero, Luís; Alemany, Ramón; García-Castro, Javier; Ramírez, Manuel

    2016-02-28

    We report here our clinical experience of a program of compassionate use of Celyvir--autologous marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) carrying an oncolytic adenovirus--for treating children with advanced metastatic neuroblastoma. Children received weekly doses of Celyvir with no concomitant treatments. The tolerance was excellent, with very mild and self-limited viral-related symptoms. Patients could be distinguished based on their response to therapy: those who had a clinical response (either complete, partial or stabilization) and those who did not respond. We found differences between patients who responded versus those who did not when analyzing their respective MSCs, at the expression levels of adhesion molecules (CCR1, CXCR1 and CXCR4) and in migration capacities in transwell assays, and in immune-related molecules (IFNγ, HLA-DR). These results suggest interpatient differences in the homing and immune modulation capacities of the therapy administered. In addition, the pretherapy immune T cell status and the T effector response were markedly different between responders and non-responders. We conclude that multidoses of Celyvir have an excellent safety profile in children with metastatic neuroblastoma. Intrinsic patients' and MSCs' factors appear to be related to clinical outcome.

  2. Anti-cancer effect of oncolytic adenovirus-armed shRNA targeting MYCN gene on doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Zhuo, Baobiao; Yin, Yiyu; Han, Tao; Li, Shixian; Li, Zhengwei; Wang, Jian

    2017-09-09

    Chemotherapy is one of the few effective choices for patients with neuroblastoma. However, the development of muti-drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy is a major obstacle to the effective treatment of advanced or recurrent neuroblastoma. The muti-drug resistance-associated protein (MRP), which encodes a transmembrane glycoprotein, is a key regulator of MDR. The expression of MRP is a close correlation with MYCN oncogene in neuroblastoma. We have recently shown ZD55-shMYCN (oncolytic virus armed with shRNA against MYCN) can down-regulate MYCN to inhibit tumor cells proliferation and induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma. Here we further report ZD55-shMYCN re-sensitized doxorubicin-resistant cells to doxorubicin (as shown by reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and inhibited cell migration), and reduced the in vivo growth rate of neuroblastoma xenografts by down-regulation of MRP expression. Sequential therapy with doxorubicin did not affect the replication of ZD55-shMYCN in doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma cells, but decreased the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, MMP-1. Thus, this synergistic effect of ZD55-shMYCN in combination with doxorubicin provides a novel therapy strategy for doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma, and is a promising approach for further clinical development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Synergistic suppression effect on tumor growth of ovarian cancer by combining cisplatin with a manganese superoxide dismutase-armed oncolytic adenovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shibing; Shu, Jing; Chen, Li; Chen, Xiaopan; Zhao, Jianhong; Li, Shuangshuang; Mou, Xiaozhou; Tong, Xiangmin

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy on the basis of oncolytic adenovirus is a novel approach for human cancer therapeutics. We aim to investigate whether it will synergistically reinforce their antiovarian cancer activities when the combined use of ZD55-manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and cisplatin was performed. The experiments in vitro showed that ZD55-MnSOD enhances cisplatin-induced apoptosis and causes remarkable ovarian cancer cell death. Apoptosis induction by treatment with ZD55-MnSOD and/or cisplatin was detected in SKOV-3 by apoptotic cell staining, flow cytometry, and western blot analysis. In addition, the cytotoxicity caused by ZD55-MnSOD to normal cells was examined by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay and western blot analysis. Animal experiment further confirmed that combination of ZD55-MnSOD and cisplatin achieved significant inhibition of SKOV-3 ovarian tumor xenografted growth. In summary, we have demonstrated that ZD55-MnSOD can sensitize human ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin-induced cell death and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. These findings indicate that the combined treatment with ZD55-MnSOD and cisplatin could represent a rational approach for antiovarian cancer therapy.

  4. Toxicology and Biodistribution Studies for MGH2.1, an Oncolytic Virus that Expresses Two Prodrug-activating Genes, in Combination with Prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Kazue; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Liu, Fang; Kerr, Samantha; Wang, Jiang; Phelps, Mitch; Potter, Philip M; Goins, William B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2013-08-06

    MGH2.1 is a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) oncolytic virus that expresses two prodrug-activating transgenes: the cyclophosphamide (CPA)-activating cytochrome P4502B1 (CYP2B1) and the CPT11-activating secreted human intestinal carboxylesterase (shiCE). Toxicology and biodistribution of MGH2.1 in the presence/absence of prodrugs was evaluated in mice. MGH2.1 ± prodrugs was cytotoxic to human glioma cells, but not to normal cells. Pharmacokinetically, intracranial MGH2.1 did not significantly alter the metabolism of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered prodrugs in mouse plasma, brain, or liver. MGH2.1 did not induce an acute inflammatory reaction. MGH2.1 DNA was detected in brains of mice inoculated with 10(8) pfus for up to 60 days. However, only one animal showed evidence of viral gene expression at this time. Expression of virally encoded genes was restricted to brain. Intracranial inoculation of MGH2.1 did not induce lethality at 10(8) pfus in the absence of prodrugs and at 10(6) pfus in the presence of prodrugs. This study provides safety and toxicology data justifying a possible clinical trial of intratumoral injection of MGH2.1 with peripheral administration of CPA and/or CPT11 prodrugs in humans with malignant gliomas.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e113; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.38; published online 6 August 2013.

  5. The Man of Dual Nationality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yoshio

    1985-01-01

    Presents an English translation of the first few pages, set in a Japanese internment camp in the U.S. during World War II, of a Japanese novel about the problems of dual nationality and personal identity. (KH)

  6. Lp-dual Quermassintegral sums

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we first introduce a concept of L_p-dual Quermassintegral sum function of convex bodies and establish the polar projection Minkowski inequality and the polar projection Aleksandrov-Fenchel inequality for L_p-dual Quermassintegral sums.Moreover,by using Lutwak’s width-integral of index i,we establish the L_p-Brunn-Minkowski inequality for the polar mixed projec- tion bodies.As applications,we prove some interrelated results.

  7. Dual pairs in fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gay-Balmaz, François

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a rigorous study of the dual pair structure of the ideal fluid and the dual pair structure for the $n$-dimensional Camassa-Holm (EPDiff) equation, including the proofs of the necessary transitivity results. In the case of the ideal fluid, we show that a careful definition of the momentum maps leads naturally to central extensions of diffeomorphism groups such as the group of quantomorphisms and the Ismagilov central extension.

  8. DESIGN OF A DUAL KEYBOARD

    OpenAIRE

    V. Ragavi; G. Geetha

    2013-01-01

    The design of a computer keyboard with dual function is proposed. This computer keyboard called Dual Keyboard can function both as a normal keyboard and as a pressure sensitive keyboard. The proposed device has a switch that decides the function. The keyboard makes use of sensors placed beneath the keys to measure the pressure applied on the key by the user. This device has many applications. In this study, it is applied to mitigate Denial of Service (DoS) attack.

  9. Fast dual tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Philip M.

    1990-09-01

    This paper can be considered as a continuation of the work by Carrion and Carneiro (1989), where a generalized approach to linearized inversion of geophysical data was developed. Their method allows one to incorporate virtually any constraints in the inversion and reformulate the problem in the dual space of Langrangian multipliers (see also Carrion, 1989a). The constrained tomography makes traveltime inversion robust: it automatically rejects “bad data” which correspond to solutions beyond the chosen constraints and allows one to start inversion with an arbitrary chosen initial model.In this paper, I will derive basic formulas for constrained tomographic imaging that can be used in such areas of geophysics as global mapping of the earth interior, exploration geophysics, etc. The method is fast: an example that will be shown in the paper took only 6 min. of VAX CPU time. Had the conventional least-squares matrix inversion been used it would have taken more than 10 hours of the CPU time to solve the same problem.

  10. Fast dual tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrion, P.M. (PPPG/UFBA - Campus Universitario da Federacao, Salvador-Bahia (Brazil))

    1990-09-01

    This paper can be considered as a continuation of the work by Carrion and Carneiro (1989), where a generalized approach to linearized inversion of geophysical data was developed. Their method allows one to incorporate virtually any constraints in the inversion and reformulate the problem in the dual space of Langrangian multipliers (see also Carrion, 1989a). The constrained tomography makes traveltime inversion robust: it automatically rejects bad data which correspond to solutions beyond the chosen constraints and allows one to start inversion with an arbitrary chosen initial model. In this paper, the author derives basic formulas for constrained tomographic imaging that can be used in such areas of geophysics as global mapping of the earth interior, exploration geophysics, etc. The method is fast: an example that will be shown in the paper took only 6 min. of VAX CPU time. Had the conventional least-squares matrix inversion been used it would have taken more than 10 hours of the CPU time to solve the same problem.

  11. Homogeneous M2 duals

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, José

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the search for new gravity duals to M2 branes with $N>4$ supersymmetry --- equivalently, M-theory backgrounds with Killing superalgebra $\\mathfrak{osp}(N|4)$ for $N>4$ --- we classify (except for a small gap) homogeneous M-theory backgrounds with symmetry Lie algebra $\\mathfrak{so}(n) \\oplus \\mathfrak{so}(3,2)$ for $n=5,6,7$. We find that there are no new backgrounds with $n=6,7$ but we do find a number of new (to us) backgrounds with $n=5$. All backgrounds are metrically products of the form $\\operatorname{AdS}_4 \\times P^7$, with $P$ riemannian and homogeneous under the action of $\\operatorname{SO}(5)$, or $S^4 \\times Q^7$ with $Q$ lorentzian and homogeneous under the action of $\\operatorname{SO}(3,2)$. At least one of the new backgrounds is supersymmetric (albeit with only $N=2$) and we show that it can be constructed from a supersymmetric Freund--Rubin background via a Wick rotation. Two of the new backgrounds have only been approximated numerically.

  12. Using Live Dual Modeling to Help Preservice Teachers Develop TPACK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liangyue; Lei, Jing

    2012-01-01

    To help preservice teachers learn about teaching with technology--specifically, technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK)--the researchers designed and implemented a Live Dual Modeling strategy involving both live behavior modeling and cognitive modeling in this study. Using qualitative research methods, the researchers investigated…

  13. Reasoning on the Autism Spectrum: A Dual Process Theory Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark; Lewton, Marcus; Ashwin, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Dual process theory proposes two distinct reasoning processes in humans, an intuitive style that is rapid and automatic and a deliberative style that is more effortful. However, no study to date has specifically examined these reasoning styles in relation to the autism spectrum. The present studies investigated deliberative and intuitive reasoning…

  14. Dual Sensory Loss and Its Impact on Everyday Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Mark; Horowitz, Amy; Su, Ya-ping

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relation of dual and single sensory impairments, within the context of cognitive function, by using the framework of everyday competence in terms of the probability of difficulty with specific personal and instrumental activities of daily living (ADLs and IADLs, respectively). Design and Methods: The Longitudinal…

  15. Productivity growth and efficiency measurement : a dual approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper derives output technical efficiency from a dual system of input demand and output supply equations using the concept of virtual prices. The underlying production function is firm-specific through intercept terms and slope parameters. The approach is used to decompose total factor

  16. Color confinement and dual superconductivity of the vacuum. IV

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, M; Lucini, B; Paffuti, G; Pica, C

    2005-01-01

    A scaling analysis is made of the order parameter describing monopole condensation at the deconfining transition of N_f=2 QCD around the chiral point. In accordance with scaling properties of the specific heat, studied in a previous paper, scaling is consistent with a first order transition. The status of dual superconductivity of the vacuum as a mechanism of color confinement is reviewed.

  17. Reasoning on the Autism Spectrum: A Dual Process Theory Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark; Lewton, Marcus; Ashwin, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Dual process theory proposes two distinct reasoning processes in humans, an intuitive style that is rapid and automatic and a deliberative style that is more effortful. However, no study to date has specifically examined these reasoning styles in relation to the autism spectrum. The present studies investigated deliberative and intuitive reasoning…

  18. Productivity growth and efficiency measurement : a dual approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper derives output technical efficiency from a dual system of input demand and output supply equations using the concept of virtual prices. The underlying production function is firm-specific through intercept terms and slope parameters. The approach is used to decompose total factor producti

  19. Assimilation of Dual-Polarimetric Radar Observations with WRF GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Fehnel, Traci; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Dual-polarimetric (dual-pol) radar typically transmits both horizontally and vertically polarized radio wave pulses. From the two different reflected power returns, more accurate estimate of liquid and solid cloud and precipitation can be provided. The upgrade of the traditional NWS WSR-88D radar to include dual-pol capabilities will soon be completed for the entire NEXRAD network. Therefore, the use of dual-pol radar network will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The assimilation of dual-pol radar data is especially challenging as few guidelines have been provided by previous research. It is our goal to examine how to best use dual-pol radar data to improve forecast of severe storm and forecast initialization. In recent years, the Development Testbed Center (DTC) has released the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) DA system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this study explores regional assimilation of the dual-pol radar variables from the WSR-88D radars for real case storms. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on incorporating the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and radial velocity (VR) data for initializing convective storms, with a significant focus being on an improved representation of hydrometeor fields. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to dual-pol variables. Beyond the dual-pol variable assimilation procedure developing within a GSI framework, highresolution (=1 km) WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast

  20. Laser Power Transmission Employing a Dual-Use Photovoltaic Concentrator at the Receiving End Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a wireless laser power transmission system employing a dual-use photovoltaic concentrator at the receiving end. Specifically, the laser...

  1. An anti-fouling aptasensor for detection of thrombin by dual polarization interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Hu, Tao; Chen, Chuanxia; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2015-04-04

    An anti-fouling surface was designed to effectively resist nonspecific protein adsorption using dual polarization interferometry, based on which the aptasensor for detection of thrombin was fabricated according to the specific interaction between thrombin and its 15-mer aptamer.

  2. Laser Power Transmission Employing a Dual-Use Photovoltaic Concentrator at the Receiving End Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a wireless laser power transmission system employing a dual-use photovoltaic concentrator at the receiving end. Specifically, the laser...

  3. Design of Dual Bandpass and Bandreject LC Ladder Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hospodka

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the design of two-passband bandpass and two-stopband bandreject LC ladder filters. The design method is based on the special dual frequency transformation that transforms normalized lowpass to either bandpass with two passbands or to bandreject with two stopbands that are specified by four cutoff frequencies. The paper shows analytical solution relating these four cutoff frequencies to parameters of dual frequency transformation. It enables a direct computation of dual band LC filter elements from a normalized lowpass filter by means of simple relations. These relations have been implemented in the mathematical program Maple (TM as new user functions. They are supposed to be used as an enhancement of Syntfil package which is intended for analog filter design in program Maple. Specific application is shown on an example of the two-passband bandpass LC filter design.

  4. Thoracic applications of dual energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy-Jardin, Martine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pontana, Francois; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Tacelli, Nunzia; Santangelo, Teresa; Remy, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Recent technological advances in multidetector computed tomography (CT) have led to the introduction of dual-source CT, which allows acquisition of CT data at the same energy or at 2 distinct tube voltage settings during a single acquisition. The advantage of the former is improvement of temporal resolution, whereas the latter offers new options for CT imaging, allowing tissue characterization and functional analysis with morphologic evaluation. The most investigated application has been iodine mapping at pulmonary CT angiography. The material decomposition achievable opens up new options for recognizing substances poorly characterized by single-energy CT. Although it is too early to draw definitive conclusions on dual-energy CT applications, this article reviews the results already reported with the first generation of dual-source CT systems.

  5. Nonword reading: comparing dual-route cascaded and connectionist dual-process models with human data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Stephen C; Coltheart, Max; Palethorpe, Sallyanne; Castles, Anne

    2012-10-01

    Two prominent dual-route computational models of reading aloud are the dual-route cascaded (DRC) model, and the connectionist dual-process plus (CDP+) model. While sharing similarly designed lexical routes, the two models differ greatly in their respective nonlexical route architecture, such that they often differ on nonword pronunciation. Neither model has been appropriately tested for nonword reading pronunciation accuracy to date. We argue that empirical data on the nonword reading pronunciation of people is the ideal benchmark for testing. Data were gathered from 45 Australian-English-speaking psychology undergraduates reading aloud 412 nonwords. To provide contrast between the models, the nonwords were chosen specifically because DRC and CDP+ disagree on their pronunciation. Both models failed to accurately match the experiment data, and both have deficiencies in nonword reading performance. However, the CDP+ model performed significantly worse than the DRC model. CDP++, the recent successor to CDP+, had improved performance over CDP+, but was also significantly worse than DRC. In addition to highlighting performance shortcomings in each model, the variety of nonword responses given by participants points to a need for models that can account for this variety.

  6. Safety Study: Intraventricular Injection of a Modified Oncolytic Measles Virus into Measles-Immune, hCD46-Transgenic, IFNαRko Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Sangeet; Peng, Kah-Whye; Steele, Michael B; Jenks, Nathan; Ma, Hong; Kohanbash, Gary; Phillips, Joanna J; Raffel, Corey

    2016-12-01

    The modified Edmonston vaccine strain of measles virus (MV) has shown potent oncolytic efficacy against various tumor types and is being investigated in clinical trials. Our laboratory showed that MV effectively kills medulloblastoma tumor cells in both localized disease and when tumor cells are disseminated through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Although the safety of repeated intracerebral injection of modified MV in rhesus macaques has been established, the safety of administering MV into CSF has not been adequately investigated. In this study, we assessed the safety of MV-NIS (MV modified to express the human sodium iodide symporter protein) injected into the CSF of measles-immunized and measles virus-susceptible transgenic (CD46, IFNαRko) mice. Treated animals were administered a single intraventricular injection of 1 × 10(5) or 1 × 10(6) TCID50 (50% tissue culture infective dose) of MV-NIS. Detailed clinical observation was performed over a 90-day period. Clinically, we did not observe any measles-related toxic effects or behavioral abnormality in animals of any treated cohort. The complete blood count and blood chemistry analysis results were found to be within normal range for all the cohorts. Histologic examination of brains and spinal cords revealed inflammatory changes, mostly related to the needle track; these resolved by day 21 postinjection. To assess viral biodistribution, quantitative RT-PCR to detect the measles virus N-protein was performed on blood and brain samples. Viral RNA was not detectable in the blood as soon as 2 days after injection, and virus cleared from the brain by 45 days postadministration in all treatment cohorts. In conclusion, our data suggest that a single injection of modified MV into the CSF is safe and can be used in future therapeutic applications.

  7. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytag, Svend O., E-mail: sfreyta1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Stricker, Hans [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Lu, Mei [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Peabody, James [Vattikuti Urology Institute, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee [Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli [Pathology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Rodriguez, Ron [Urology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  8. Ad5/48 hexon oncolytic virus expressing sTGFβRIIFc produces reduced hepatic and systemic toxicities and inhibits prostate cancer bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weidong; Zhang, Zhenwei; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Morgan, Melanie; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart; Guise, Theresa; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Brendler, Charles; Seth, Prem

    2014-08-01

    We are interested in developing oncolytic adenoviruses for the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastases. A key limitation of Adenovirus 5 (Ad5) is that upon systemic administration, it produces major liver and systemic toxicities. To address this issue, a chimaeric Ad5/48 adenovirus mHAd.sTβRFc was created. Seven hypervariable regions of Ad5 hexon present in Ad5-based Ad.sTβRFc expressing soluble transforming growth factor beta receptor II-Fc fusion protein (sTGβRIIFc), were replaced by those of Ad48. mHAd.sTβRFc, like Ad.sTβRFc, was replication competent in the human PCa cells, and produced high levels of sTGβRIIFc expression. Compared to Ad.sTβRFc, the systemic delivery of mHAd.sTβRFc in nude mice resulted in much reduced systemic toxicity, and reduced liver sequestration. Ad.sTβRFc produced significant liver necrosis, and increases in alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6 levels, while mHAd.sTβRFc produced much reduced responses of these markers. Intravenous delivery of Ad.sTβRFc or mHAd.sTβRFc (5 × 10(10) viral particles/mouse) in nude mice bearing PC-3-luc PCa bone metastases produced inhibition of bone metastases. Moreover, a larger dose of the mHAd.sTβRFc (4 × 10(11) viral particles /mouse) was also effective in inhibiting bone metastases. Thus, mHAd.sTβRFc could be developed for the treatment of PCa bone metastases.

  9. The oncolytic virus dl922-947 reduces IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 expression and impairs angiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastolo, Viviana; Di Somma, Sarah; Scamardella, Eloise; Gigantino, Vincenzo; Franco, Renato; Marone, Gianni; Portella, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human solid tumor and current treatments are ineffective in increasing patients' survival. Thus, the development of new therapeutic approaches for ATC is needed. We have previously shown that the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 induces ATC cell death in vitro and tumor regression in vivo. However, the impact of dl922-947 on the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment is still unknown. Since viruses are able to regulate cytokine and chemokine production from infected cells, we sought to investigate whether dl922-947 virotherapy has such effect on ATC cells, thereby modulating ATC microenvironment. dl922-947 decreased IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 production by the ATC cell lines 8505-c and BHT101-5. These results correlated with dl922-947-mediated reduction of NF-κB p65 binding to IL8 promoter in 8505-c and BHT101-5 cells and CCL2 promoter in 8505-c cells. IL-8 stimulates cancer cell proliferation, survival and invasion, and also angiogenesis. dl922-947-mediated reduction of IL-8 impaired ATC cell motility in vitro and ATC-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We also show that dl922-947-mediated reduction of the monocyte-attracting chemokine CCL2 decreased monocyte chemotaxis in vitro and tumor macrophage density in vivo. Interestingly, dl922-947 treatment induced the switch of tumor macrophages toward a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype, likely by increasing the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ. Altogether, we demonstrate that dl922-947 treatment re-shape the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment by modulating cancer-cell intrinsic factors and the immune response. An in-depth knowledge of dl922-947-mediated effects on ATC microenvironment may help to refine ATC virotherapy in the context of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26625205

  10. Towards a big crunch dual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertog, Thomas E-mail: hertog@vulcan2.physics.ucsb.edu; Horowitz, Gary T

    2004-07-01

    We show there exist smooth asymptotically anti-de Sitter initial data which evolve to a big crunch singularity in a low energy supergravity limit of string theory. This opens up the possibility of using the dual conformal field theory to obtain a fully quantum description of the cosmological singularity. A preliminary study of this dual theory suggests that the big crunch is an endpoint of evolution even in the full string theory. We also show that any theory with scalar solitons must have negative energy solutions. The results presented here clarify our earlier work on cosmic censorship violation in N=8 supergravity. (author)

  11. DUAL BAND MONOPOLE ANTENNA DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jithu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The WLAN and Bluetooth applications become popular in mobile devices, integrating GSM and ISM bands operation in one compact antenna, can reduce the size of mobile devices. Recently, lot many investigations are carried out in designing a dual band antennas with operating frequencies in GSM band and in ISM band for mobile devices. Printed monopoles are under this investigation. In this paper, dual-band printed monopoles are presented to operate at GSM band i.e. 900 MHz and ISM band i.e. 2.4 GHz. We intend to observe the antenna characteristics on the network analyzer and verify the theoretical results with the practical ones.

  12. DESIGN OF A DUAL KEYBOARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ragavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a computer keyboard with dual function is proposed. This computer keyboard called Dual Keyboard can function both as a normal keyboard and as a pressure sensitive keyboard. The proposed device has a switch that decides the function. The keyboard makes use of sensors placed beneath the keys to measure the pressure applied on the key by the user. This device has many applications. In this study, it is applied to mitigate Denial of Service (DoS attack.

  13. Nuclearity for Dual Operator Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhe Dong; Jicheng Tao

    2010-02-01

    In this short paper, we study the nuclearity for the dual operator space $V^∗$ of an operator space . We show that $V^∗$ is nuclear if and only if $V^{∗∗∗}$ is injective, where $V^{∗∗∗}$ is the third dual of . This is in striking contrast to the situation for general operator spaces. This result is used to prove that $V^{∗∗}$ is nuclear if and only if is nuclear and $V^{∗∗}$ is exact.

  14. CARDIOVASCULAR ENDOCRINOLOGY Dual RAAS blockade has dual effects on outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerspink, Hiddo J. Lambers; de Zeeuw, Dick

    Makani and colleagues report that dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is associated with harm despite previous studies showing that this approach decreases blood pressure and albuminuria. Do these results imply that we should abandon surrogate markers? Or should we become more

  15. Dual-band dual-polarized array for WLAN applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, JM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available ) simultaneously. The two linear polarizations have separate ports. The presented design is characterized by dual-band operation, reasonably good front-to-back ratios, average gains of 5.2 dBi and 6.2 dBi over the 2.4 and 5.2 GHz bands respectively, stable end...

  16. A dual method for maximum entropy restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    A simple iterative dual algorithm for maximum entropy image restoration is presented. The dual algorithm involves fewer parameters than conventional minimization in the image space. Minicomputer test results for Fourier synthesis with inadequate phantom data are given.

  17. Sparsity and spectral properties of dual frames

    CERN Document Server

    Krahmer, Felix; Lemvig, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    We study sparsity and spectral properties of dual frames of a given finite frame. We show that any finite frame has a dual with no more than $n^2$ non-vanishing entries, where $n$ denotes the ambient dimension, and that for most frames no sparser dual is possible. Moreover, we derive an expression for the exact sparsity level of the sparsest dual for any given finite frame using a generalized notion of spark. We then study the spectral properties of dual frames in terms of singular values of the synthesis operator. We provide a complete characterization for which spectral patterns of dual frames are possible for a fixed frame. For many cases, we provide simple explicit constructions for dual frames with a given spectrum, in particular, if the constraint on the dual is that it be tight.

  18. Dual-Doppler Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    When two or more Doppler weather radar systems are monitoring the same region, the Doppler velocities can be combined to form a three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector field thus providing for a more intuitive analysis of the wind field. A real-time display of the 3-D winds can assist forecasters in predicting the onset of convection and severe weather. The data can also be used to initialize local numerical weather prediction models. Two operational Doppler Radar systems are in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS); these systems are operated by the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) and the National Weather Service Melbourne, Fla. (NWS MLB). Dual-Doppler applications were considered by the 45 SW in choosing the site for the new radar. Accordingly, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), NWS MLB and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to investigate the feasibility of establishing dual-Doppler capability using the two existing systems. This study investigated technical, hardware, and software requirements necessary to enable the establishment of a dual-Doppler capability. Review of the available literature pertaining to the dual-Doppler technique and consultation with experts revealed that the physical locations and resulting beam crossing angles of the 45 SW and NWS MLB radars make them ideally suited for a dual-Doppler capability. The dual-Doppler equations were derived to facilitate complete understanding of dual-Doppler synthesis; to determine the technical information requirements; and to determine the components of wind velocity from the equation of continuity and radial velocity data collected by the two Doppler radars. Analysis confirmed the suitability of the existing systems to provide the desired capability. In addition, it is possible that both 45 SW radar data and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data from Orlando International Airport could be used to alleviate any

  19. Dual symmetry in a generalized Maxwell theory

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, F T; McKeon, D G C

    2016-01-01

    We examine Podolsky's electrodynamics, which is noninvariant under the usual duality transformation. We deduce a generalization of Hodge's star duality, which leads to a dual gauge field and restores to a certain extent the dual symmetry. The model becomes fully dual symmetric asymptotically when it reduces to the Maxwell theory. We argue that this strict dual symmetry directly implies the existence of the basic invariants of the electromagnetic fields.

  20. Dual of QCD with One Adjoint Fermion

    CERN Document Server

    Mojaza, Matin; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the anomalous dimension of the Dirac fermion mass operator to be less than one in the conformal window.

  1. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting towards intracellular targets, which increases their success comparatively to specific one-target drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials.

  2. Dual Enrollment for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Linsey; Hughes, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Dual enrollment programs allow high school students to enroll in college courses and potentially earn college credit. The term concurrent enrollment is sometimes used interchangeably with dual enrollment, and sometimes to refer to a particular model of dual enrollment. In some programs, students earn high school and college credit simultaneously;…

  3. Dual Enrollment in Spanish: One Working Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Melanie; Chambers, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Dual enrollment is now a nation-wide phenomenon as all 50 states currently offer some form of dual-enrollment program to secondary-school students (Karp, Bailey, Hughes, and Fermin 2005). However, dual enrollment itself is often difficult to define as programs vary from school to school (Jordan, Cavalluzzo, and Corallo 2006). Therefore, language…

  4. Sparsity and spectral properties of dual frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krahmer, Felix; Kutyniok, Gitta; Lemvig, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    We study sparsity and spectral properties of dual frames of a given finite frame. We show that any finite frame has a dual with no more than $n^2$ non-vanishing entries, where $n$ denotes the ambient dimension, and that for most frames no sparser dual is possible. Moreover, we derive an expressio...

  5. Dual Enrollment in Spanish: One Working Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Melanie; Chambers, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Dual enrollment is now a nation-wide phenomenon as all 50 states currently offer some form of dual-enrollment program to secondary-school students (Karp, Bailey, Hughes, and Fermin 2005). However, dual enrollment itself is often difficult to define as programs vary from school to school (Jordan, Cavalluzzo, and Corallo 2006). Therefore, language…

  6. Pairs of dual periodic frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Goh, Say Song

    2012-01-01

    is needed. The purpose of the present paper is to provide constructions of dual pairs of frames in the setting of the Hilbert space of periodic functions L2(0,2π). The frames constructed are given explicitly as trigonometric polynomials, which allows for an efficient calculation of the coefficients...

  7. Noncommutative Self-dual Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    García-Compéan, H; Ramírez, C; Sabido, M

    2003-01-01

    Starting from a self-dual formulation of gravity, we obtain a noncommutative theory of pure Einstein theory in four dimensions. In order to do that, we use Seiberg-Witten map. It is shown that the noncommutative torsion constraint is solved by the vanishing of commutative torsion. Finally, the noncommutative corrections to the action are computed up to second order.

  8. Design of dual pressure regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Kang Dae; Kim, Myoung Sub [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we designed sandwich type pressure regulator for air pressure control system. As a result of research, we obtained several important conclusions. First, we decided theory of poppet valve and relief valve which are used in sandwich type pressure regulator, and then designed prototype of pressure regulator. Second, we organized circuit diagram of dual pressure regulator of air pressure control system.

  9. Dual Processing and Diagnostic Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Geoff

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I review evidence from two theories in psychology relevant to diagnosis and diagnostic errors. "Dual Process" theories of thinking, frequently mentioned with respect to diagnostic error, propose that categorization decisions can be made with either a fast, unconscious, contextual process called System 1 or a slow, analytical,…

  10. Physical Health and Dual Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Debbie; Keen, Sarah; Mauro, Pia

    2008-01-01

    The physical health of people with mental illness may be neglected for a variety of reasons. This paper looks at the common physical health problems experienced by people with a dual diagnosis of substance misuse and serious mental illness, and suggests ways of assessing and managing them.

  11. Nitrogen-doped dual mesoporous carbon for the selective oxidation of ethylbenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aibing; Yu, Yifeng; Wang, Rujie; Yu, Yunhong; Zang, Wenwei; Tang, Pei; Ma, Ding

    2015-08-01

    A nanocasting method to fabricate nitrogen-doped dual mesoporous carbon is proposed by the carbonization of nitrile functional ionic liquid (FIL) grafted SBA-15 for the first time. These carbon materials have high nitrogen content (12.8%), large specific surface areas (763 m2 g-1) and uniform rod morphologies, which are derived from FILs grafted on the surface of SBA-15. Furthermore, by adjusting the impregnation amount of ionic liquids on SBA-15, pore structures of these carbon materials can be adjusted from single to dual mesopores. The developed dual mesoporous carbon materials exhibit good catalytic performance in the selective oxidation of ethylbenzene, ascribed to the promoting effects of nitrogen-doping, high surface area and dual mesostructure. It may be concluded that the dual mesostructure has an advantage over a single mesostructure to obtain a fast mass transport rate, resulting in higher acetophenone yield.A nanocasting method to fabricate nitrogen-doped dual mesoporous carbon is proposed by the carbonization of nitrile functional ionic liquid (FIL) grafted SBA-15 for the first time. These carbon materials have high nitrogen content (12.8%), large specific surface areas (763 m2 g-1) and uniform rod morphologies, which are derived from FILs grafted on the surface of SBA-15. Furthermore, by adjusting the impregnation amount of ionic liquids on SBA-15, pore structures of these carbon materials can be adjusted from single to dual mesopores. The developed dual mesoporous carbon materials exhibit good catalytic performance in the selective oxidation of ethylbenzene, ascribed to the promoting effects of nitrogen-doping, high surface area and dual mesostructure. It may be concluded that the dual mesostructure has an advantage over a single mesostructure to obtain a fast mass transport rate, resulting in higher acetophenone yield. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03802b

  12. Scale Factor Self-Dual Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    dS, U Camara; Sotkov, G M

    2015-01-01

    We implement a conformal time scale factor duality for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models, which is consistent with the weak energy condition. The requirement for self-duality determines the equations of state for a broad class of barotropic fluids. We study the example of a universe filled with two interacting fluids, presenting an accelerated and a decelerated period, with manifest UV/IR duality. The associated self-dual scalar field interaction turns out to coincide with the "radiation-like" modified Chaplygin gas models. We present an equivalent realization of them as gauged K\\"ahler sigma models (minimally coupled to gravity) with very specific and interrelated K\\"ahler- and super-potentials. Their applications in the description of hilltop inflation and also as quintessence models for the late universe are discussed.

  13. Dual arm robotic system with sensory input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozguner, U.

    1987-01-01

    The need for dual arm robots in space station assembly and satellite maintainance is of increasing significance. Such robots will be in greater demand in the future when numerous tasks will be assigned to them to relieve the direct intervention of humans in space. Technological demands from these robots will be high. They will be expected to perform high speed tasks with a certain degree of autonomy. Various levels of sensing will have to be used in a sophisticated control scheme. Ongoing research in control, sensing and real-time software to produce a two-arm robotic system than can accomplish generic assembly tasks is discussed. The control hierarchy and the specific control approach are discussed. A decentralized implementation of model-reference adaptive control using Variable Structure controllers and the incorporation of tactile feedback is considered.

  14. A study on dual readout crystal calorimeter for hadron and jet energy measurement at a future lepton collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Studies of requirements and specifications of crystals are necessary to develop a new generation of crystals for dual readout crystal hadron or total absorption calorimeter. This is a short and basic study of the characteristics and hadron energy measurement of PbWO4 and BGO crystals for scintillation and Cerenkov Dual Readout hadron calorimeter.

  15. Dual leadership in a hospital practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thude, Bettina Ravnborg; Thomsen, Svend Erik; Stenager, Egon

    2017-01-01

    in the hospital context and develops a categorizing tool for being able to distinguish dual leadership teams from each other. It is important to reveal if there are any indicators that can be used for optimising dual leadership teams in the health-care sector and in other organisations......., this study aims to analyse three different dual leadership pairs at a Danish hospital. Furthermore, this study develops a tool to characterize dual leadership teams from each other. Design/methodology/approach This is a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Six leaders were interviewed...... that power balance, personal relations and decision processes are important factors for creating efficient dual leaderships. The study develops a categorizing tool to use for further research or for organizations, to describe and analyse dual leaderships. Originality/value The study describes dual leadership...

  16. 基于SSA修复机制和特异性核酸酶活性检测的双荧光报告载体系统的开发及应用%Development and application of dual-fluorescence reporter systems for measuring specific nuclease activity based on SSA repair mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩芙蓉; 王令; 徐坤; 张智英; 王昕

    2015-01-01

    报告载体系统因构建快捷、改造简单、操作容易、经济有效,并且能通过介导筛选核酸酶阳性细胞富集基因组修饰的阳性细胞克隆,而成为特异性核酸酶活性检测的重要手段。基于非同源末端连接(Non-homologous end joining,NHEJ)修复机制的报告系统在引入DNA双链断裂(Double strand breaks,DSBs)后,经过优化最高也只有2/3的概率实现报告基因的修复;而单链退火(Single strand annealing,SSA)修复机制在引入DSBs后,理论上可以实现报告基因100%的修复,具有更高的灵敏度,有利于活性较低的特异性核酸酶活性的检测,为基因组修饰研究中特异性核酸酶活性的检测提供了有效的手段。本研究设计并构建了3套基于 SSA 修复机制的双荧光报告载体系统,并应用mRFP-eGFP系统检测了3对ZFNs的有效活性,其活性检测结果分别为8.9%、9.3%和5.0%,该研究为核酸酶活性的检测提供了有效的手段。%Reporter vector system has become an important method for measuring activity of specific nucleas-es because of its fast construction, simple modification, easy operation, economic effectiveness as well as its role in enriching positive cells with genomic modification through mediating screen of specific nucleases positive cells. After in-troducing double strand breaks (DSBs), a reporter system based on non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated repair can only repair maximally two thirds of reporter genes after optimization, while single strand annealing (SSA)-mediated repair can repair all reporter genes theoretically which has higher sensitivity and facilitates the de-tection of specific nuclease with low activity and provides an effective way to detect specific nuclease activity in genome modification studies. In this study, we designed and constructed three sets of dual-fluorescence reporter systems based on SSA repair mechanism and applied the mRFP-eGFP system in

  17. The HDAC Inhibitors Scriptaid and LBH589 Combined with the Oncolytic Virus Delta24-RGD Exert Enhanced Anti-Tumor Efficacy in Patient-Derived Glioblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte M E Berghauser Pont

    Full Text Available A phase I/II trial for glioblastoma with the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD was recently completed. Delta24-RGD conditionally replicates in cells with a disrupted retinoblastoma-pathway and enters cells via αvβ3/5 integrins. Glioblastomas are differentially sensitive to Delta24-RGD. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi affect integrins and share common cell death pathways with Delta24-RGD. We studied the combination treatment effects of HDACi and Delta24-RGD in patient-derived glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSC, and we determined the most effective HDACi.SAHA, Valproic Acid, Scriptaid, MS275 and LBH589 were combined with Delta24-RGD in fourteen distinct GSCs. Synergy was determined by Chou Talalay method. Viral infection and replication were assessed using luciferase and GFP encoding vectors and hexon-titration assays. Coxsackie adenovirus receptor and αvβ3 integrin levels were determined by flow cytometry. Oncolysis and mechanisms of cell death were studied by viability, caspase-3/7, LDH and LC3B/p62, phospho-p70S6K. Toxicity was studied on normal human astrocytes. MGMT promotor methylation status, TCGA classification, Rb-pathway and integrin gene expression levels were assessed as markers of responsiveness.Scriptaid and LBH589 acted synergistically with Delta24-RGD in approximately 50% of the GSCs. Both drugs moderately increased αvβ3 integrin levels and viral infection in responding but not in non-responding GSCs. LBH589 moderately increased late viral gene expression, however, virus titration revealed diminished viral progeny production by both HDACi, Scriptaid augmented caspase-3/7 activity, LC3B conversion, p62 and phospho-p70S6K consumption, as well as LDH levels. LBH589 increased LDH and phospho-p70S6K consumption. Responsiveness correlated with expression of various Rb-pathway genes and integrins. Combination treatments induced limited toxicity to human astrocytes.LBH589 and Scriptaid combined with Delta24-RGD revealed synergistic anti

  18. A modified hTERT promoter-directed oncolytic adenovirus replication with concurrent inhibition of TGFbeta signaling for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z; Robbins, J S; Pister, A; Zafar, M B; Zhang, Z-W; Gupta, J; Lee, K J; Newman, K; Neuman, K; Yun, C-O; Guise, T; Seth, P

    2010-04-01

    We were interested in developing oncolytic adenoviral vectors that can be administered systemically for the treatment of breast cancer. To restrict viral replication in breast tumor cells, we constructed mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc, a 01/07-based adenoviral vector expressing the soluble form of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor II fused with the human Fc IgG1 (sTGFbetaRIIFc) gene, in which viral replication is under the control of a modified human telomerase reverse transcriptase (mhTERT) promoter. In addition, mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc-mediated sTGFbetaRIIFc production targets the TGFbeta pathway known to contribute to the tumor progression of breast cancer metastasis. We chose to use the mhTERT promoter because it was found to be relatively more active (approximately 20 times) in breast cancer cells compared with normal human cells. We showed that infection of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells for 48 h with mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc produced high levels of sTGFbetaRIIFc (greater than 1 microg ml(-1)) in the medium. Breast cancer cells produced nearly a 6000-fold increase in viral titers during the 48 h infection period. However, mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc replication was attenuated in normal cells. Infection of breast cancer cells with a replication-deficient virus Ad(E1(-)).sTbetaRFc also produced high levels of sTGFbetaRIIFc, but under these conditions, no detectable viral replication was observed. Adenoviral-mediated production of sTGFbetaRIIFc was shown to bind with TGFbeta-1, and to abolish the effects of TGFbeta-1 on downstream SMAD-3 phosphorylation. The administration of mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc intravenously into MDA-MB-231 human xenograft-bearing mice resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth and production of sTGFbetaRIIFc in the blood. Conversely, intravenous injection of Ad(E1(-)).sTbetaRFc did not show a significant inhibition of tumor growth, but resulted in sTGFbetaRIIFc in the blood, suggesting that viral replication along with s

  19. A modified hTERT Promoter-directed Oncolytic Adenovirus Replication with Concurrent Inhibition of TGFβ Signaling for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zebin; Robbins, John S.; Pister, Amanda; Zafar, M. Behzad; Zhang, Zhen-Wei; Gupta, Janhavi; Lee, K. Jessica; Neuman, Kam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Guise, Theresa; Seth, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Our laboratory is interested to develop oncolytic adenoviral vectors that can be administered systemically for the treatment of breast cancer. To restrict viral replication in breast tumor cells, we have constructed mhTERTAd.sTβRFc, a 01/07 based adenoviral vector expressing the soluble form of TGFβ receptor II fused with human Fc IgG1 (sTGFβRIIFc) gene, in which viral replication is under the control of modified human telomerase reverse transcriptase (mhTERT) promoter. In addition, mhTERTAd.sTβRFc-mediated sTGFβRIIFc production would target growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway known to contribute to the tumor progression breast cancer metastasis. We chose to use mhTERT promoter because it was found to be relatively more active (approximately 20-times) in breast cancer cells compared to normal human cells. We showed that infection of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells for 48 hrs with mhTERTAd.sTβRFc produced high levels of sTGFβRIIFc (greater than 1 μg/ml) in the medium. Breast cancer cells produced nearly 6,000-fold increase in the viral titers during 48 hrs infection period. However, mhTERTAd.sTβRFc replication was attenuated in normal cells. Infection of breast cancer cells with a replication deficient virus Ad(E1-).sTβRFc also produced high levels of sTGFβRIIFc, but under these conditions no detectable viral replication was observed. Adenoviral-mediated production of sTGFβRIIFc was shown to bind with TGFβ-1, and abolished the effects of TGFβ-1 on downstream SMAD-3 phosphorylation. The administration of mhTERTAd.sTβRFc intravenously into MDA-MB-231 human xenograft bearing mice resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth, and production of sTGFβRIIFc in the blood. On the other hand, intravenous injection of Ad(E1-).sTβRFc did not exhibit significant inhibition of the tumor growth, but resulted in the sTGFβRIIFc in the blood, suggesting that viral replication along with sTGFβRIIFc protein production play a critical role in inducing

  20. Specific Phobias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mental Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Specific phobias Treatment More information on specific phobias A specific ... targeted psychotherapy. Return to top More information on Specific phobias Explore other publications and websites Phobias (Copyright © American ...

  1. Dual Mode Slotted Monopole Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-05

    of 15 DUAL MODE SLOTTED MONOPOLE ANTENNA STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by...REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0002] None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0003] The present invention is directed...such as this that is capable of radiating at a different frequency below this cutoff. The present invention provides a means by which the overall

  2. Dual geometries and spacetime singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Quirós, I

    2000-01-01

    The concept of geometrical duality is disscused in the context of Brans-Dicke theory and extended to general relativity. It is shown, in some generic cases, that spacetime singularities that arise in usual Riemannian general relativity, may be avoided in its dual representation: Weyl-like general relativity, thus providing a singularity-free picture of the World that is physicaly equivalent to the canonical general relativistic one.

  3. Dual arm master controller concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuban, D.P.; Perkins, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) slave was designed with an anthropomorphic stance, gear/torque tube power drives, and modular construction. These features resulted in increased inertia, friction, and backlash relative to tape-driven manipulators. Studies were performed which addressed the human factors design and performance trade-offs associated with the corresponding master controller best suited for the ASM. The results of these studies, as well as the conceptual design of the dual arm master controller, are presented. 6 references, 3 figures.

  4. Dual Fluidized Bed Biomass Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-30

    The dual fluidized bed reactor is a recirculating system in which one half of the unit operates as a steam pyrolysis device for biomass. The pyrolysis occurs by introducing biomass and steam to a hot fluidized bed of inert material such as coarse sand. Syngas is produced during the pyrolysis and exits the top of the reactor with the steam. A crossover arm, fed by gravity, moves sand and char from the pyrolyzer to the second fluidized bed. This sand bed uses blown air to combust the char. The exit stream from this side of the reactor is carbon dioxide, water and ash. There is a second gravity fed crossover arm to return sand to the pyrolysis side. The recirculating action of the sand and the char is the key to the operation of the dual fluidized bed reactor. The objective of the project was to design and construct a dual fluidized bed prototype reactor from literature information and in discussion with established experts in the field. That would be appropriate in scale and operation to measure the relative performance of the gasification of biomass and low ranked coals to produce a high quality synthesis gas with no dilution from nitrogen or combustion products.

  5. NASA's Dual-Fuel Airbreathing Hypersonic Vehicle Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James L.; Eiswirth, Edward A.

    1996-01-01

    A Mach 10 cruise vehicle provides a quick response, global reach capability with high survivability. For operations from CONUS, mission radii on the order of 8,000 nmi are sufficient. For missions which return to CONUS, a dual-fueled vehicle is superior, due to its capability to in-flight refuel. However, for one-way mission, an all-hydrogen vehicle is preferable because of its higher specific impulse.

  6. Potential of vesicular stomatitis virus as an oncolytic therapy for recurrent and drug-resistant ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua F. Heiber; Xiang-Xi Xu; Glen N. Barber

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade,we have gained significant understanding of the mechanism by which vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) specifically kills cancer cells.Dysregulation of translation and defective innate immunity are beth thought to contribute to VSV oncolysis.Safety and efficacy are important objectives to consider in evaluating VSV as a therapy for malignant disease.Ongoing efforts may enable VSV virotherapy to be considered in the near future to treat drug-resistant ovarian cancer when other options have been exhausted.In this article,we review the development of VSV as a potential therapeutic approach for recurrent or drug-resistant ovarian cancer.

  7. 40 CFR 600.107-93 - Fuel specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1978... specifications for mixtures of petroleum and methanol fuels for methanol dual fuel vehicles are given in §...

  8. Resistance to Oncolytic Myxoma Virus Therapy in Nf1−/−/Trp53−/− Syngeneic Mouse Glioma Models Is Independent of Anti-Viral Type-I Interferon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Maxwell, Lori; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1+/−Trp53+/− mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV). These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β) could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models. PMID:23762429

  9. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting toward intracellular targets, which increases their success compartively to one-target specific drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials. PMID:28271058

  10. Dual Headquarters Involvement in Subsidiary Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellestrand, Henrik; Kappen, Philip; Nell, Phillip Christopher

    2014-01-01

    innovation importance, i.e., an innovation that is important for the division and the corporate level, drives dual headquarters involvement in innovation development. Contrary to expectations, no significant effect of dual embeddedness on dual headquarters involvement is found. The network size......The strategy and international business literature has identified the overall potential for headquarters to add value by allocating resources to subsidiary activities, but little is known about the extent to which multiple headquarters simultaneously involves itself in subsidiary operations...

  11. Behavioral Assessment of Listening Effort Using a Dual-Task Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Jana; Lemke, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Published investigations (n = 29) in which a dual-task experimental paradigm was employed to measure listening effort during speech understanding in younger and older adults were reviewed. A summary of the main findings reported in the articles is provided with respect to the participants’ age-group and hearing status. Effects of different signal characteristics, such as the test modality, on dual-task outcomes are evaluated, and associations with cognitive abilities and self-report measures of listening effort are described. Then, several procedural issues associated with the use of dual-task experiment paradigms are discussed. Finally, some issues that warrant future research are addressed. The review revealed large variability in the dual-task experimental paradigms that have been used to measure the listening effort expended during speech understanding. The differences in experimental procedures used across studies make it difficult to draw firm conclusions concerning the optimal choice of dual-task paradigm or the sensitivity of specific paradigms to different types of experimental manipulations. In general, the analysis confirmed that dual-task paradigms have been used successfully to measure differences in effort under different experimental conditions, in both younger and older adults. Several research questions that warrant further investigation in order to better understand and characterize the intricacies of dual-task paradigms were identified. PMID:28091178

  12. Effect of dual modification with hydroxypropylation and cross-linking on physicochemical properties of taro starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Bidyut Jyoti; Sit, Nandan

    2016-04-20

    Dual modification of taro starch by hydroxypropylation and cross-linking was carried out and the properties of the modified starches were investigated. Two different levels of hydroxypropylation (5 and 10%) and cross-linking (0.05 and 0.10%) were used in different sequences. The amylose contents of the starch decreased due to single and dual modification. For the dual-modified starches, the swelling, solubility and clarity was found to increase with level of hydroxypropylation and decrease with level of cross-linking. The freeze-thaw stability of the dual-modified starches was also affected by the sequence of modification. The viscosities of the cross-linked and dual-modified starches were more than native and hydroxypropylated starches. The firmness of the dual-modified starches was also higher than native and single modified starches. The dual-modified starches have benefits of both type of modifications and could be used for specific purposes e.g. food products requiring high viscosity as well as freeze-thaw stability.

  13. Running at Double Pace: Women in Dual-Profession Marriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Deborah Elwell

    Although the problems facing dual-profession couples are almost universally acknowledged, studies on dual-profession couples have only recently emerged from those on dual-worker or dual-career families. To explore the perceptions that women in dual-profession marriages have of their roles, conflicts, and coping strategies, focus group interviews…

  14. Antitumor activity of an hTERT promoter-regulated tumor-selective oncolytic adenovirus in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Su; Xing-Hua Wang; Jie Chen; Yong-Jing Liu; Wei-Guo Wang; Lin-Fang Li; Meng-Chao Wu; Qi-Jun Qian

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct a tumor-selective replicationcompetent adenovirus (RCAd), SG300, using a modified promoter of human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT).METHODS: The antitumor efficacy of SG300 in epatocellular carcinoma was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In vitro cell viability by MTT assay was used to assess the tumor-selective oncolysis and safety features of SG300, andin vivo antitumor activity of SG300 was assessed in established hepatocellular carcinoma models in nude mice.RESULTS: SG300 could lyse hepatocellular carcinoma cells at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI), but could not affect growth of normal cells even at a high MOI.Both in Hep3B and SMMC-7721 xenograft models of hepatocellular carcinoma, SG300 had an obvious antitumor effect, resulting in a decrease in tumor volume. Its selective oncolysis to tumor cells and safety to normal cells was also superior to that of ONYX-015.Pathological examination of tumor specimens showed that SG300 replicated selectively in cancer cells and resulted in apoptosis and necrosis of cancer cells.CONCLUSION: hTERT promoter-regulated replicative adenovirus SG300 has a better cancer-selective replication-competent ability, and can specifically kill a wide range of cancer cells with positive telomerase activity, and thus has better potential for targeting therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. A robust dual reporter system to visualize and quantify gene expression mediated by transcription activator-like effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uhde-Stone Claudia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs are a class of naturally occurring transcription effectors that recognize specific DNA sequences and modulate gene expression. The modularity of TALEs DNA binding domain enables sequence-specific perturbation and offers broad applications in genetic and epigenetic studies. Although the efficient construction of TALEs has been established, robust functional tools to assess their functions remain lacking. Results We established a dual reporter system that was specifically designed for real-time monitoring and quantifying gene expression mediated by TALEs. We validated both sensitivity and specificity of this dual-reporter system in mammalian cells, and demonstrated that this dual reporter system is robust and potentially amenable to high throughput (HTP applications. Conclusion We have designed, constructed and validated a novel dual reporter system for assessing TALE mediated gene regulations. This system offers a robust and easy-to- use tool for real-time monitoring and quantifying gene expression in mammalian cells.

  16. Dual Language Learning / Duale Spracherlernung. Learning German through English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fee-Alexandra Haase

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we examine the impact of English in the learning process of the German language exemplified with the example of the second language acquisition process of the German language in the programs of German in the Department of Foreign Languages of the University of Nizwa in Oman. This study focuses on the distinct features of students in Oman learning German as a second language in an institution of higher education in Oman. The contrastive rhetoric of a German – Oman Arabic language contact situation is challenging and a unique field of research, which allows us to study the process of foreign language learning (L2 and the implementation of the culture of the native language L1 (Arabic. The reflection of the L1 culture, the Arab Oman culture, in the language learning process of the L2 language (German will be described, analyzed and discussed aiming the improvement of the L2 learning process. This article investigates into the process of learning German in an Arabic country of native speakers of Arabic from the perspective of the cultural differences of both cultures in terms of their linguistic prepositions.Received: 17/09/2013 / Accepted: 23/11/2013How to reference this articleHaase, F-A. (2014. Dual Language Learning / Duale Spracherlernung. Learning German through English. Foro de Educación, 12(17, pp. 197-216. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/fde.2014.012.017.010

  17. Alternative dosing of dual PI3K and MEK inhibition in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokinen Elina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathways are thought to be the central transducers of oncogenic signals in solid malignancies, and there has been a lot of enthusiasm for developing inhibitors of these pathways for cancer therapy. Some preclinical models have suggested that combining inhibitors of both parallel pathways may be more efficacious, but it remains unknown whether dual inhibition with high enough concentrations of the drugs to achieve meaningful target inhibition is tolerable in a clinical setting. Furthermore, the predictive factors for dual inhibition are unknown. Methods Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines (n=12 with the most frequent oncogenic backgrounds (K-Ras mut n=3, EGFR mut n=3, ALK translocated n=3, and triple-negative n=3 were exposed to PI3K inhibitors (ZSTK474, PI-103 or MEK inhibitor (CI-1040 alone or in combination and analysed with an MTS growth/cytotoxicity assay and statistically by combination index analysis. The activity of the intracellular signaling pathways in response to the inhibitor treatments was analysed with a western blot using phospho-specific antibodies to AKT, ERK1/2, S6, and 4E-BPI. For the differential dosing schedule experiments, additional breast and colon cancer cell lines known to be sensitive to dual inhibition were included. Results Two of the 12 NSCLC cell lines tested, H3122 (ALK translocated and H1437 (triple-negative, showed increased cytotoxicity upon dual MEK and PI3K inhibition. Furthermore, MDA-MB231 (breast and HCT116 (colon, showed increased cytotoxicity upon dual inhibition, as in previous studies. Activation of parallel pathways in the dual inhibition-sensitive lines was also noted in response to single inhibitor treatment. Otherwise, no significant differences in downstream intracellular pathway activity (S6 and 4E-BPI were noted between PI3K alone and dual inhibition other than the increased cytotoxicity of the latter. In the alternative dosing

  18. The Dual Language Program Planner: A Guide for Designing and Implementing Dual Language Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Elizabeth R.; Olague, Natalie; Rogers, David

    This guide offers a framework to facilitate the planning process for dual language programs, assuming at least a basic working knowledge of the central characteristics and essential features of dual language models. It provides an overview of the various models that serve linguistically diverse student populations, defining the term dual language…

  19. Dual arm master controller development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuban, D.P.; Perkins, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The advanced servomanipulator (ASM) slave was designed with an anthropomorphic stance, gear/torque tube power drives, and modular construction. These features resulted in increased inertia, friction, and backlash relative to tape-driven manipulators. Studies were performed which addressed the human factors design and performance trade-offs associated with the corresponding master controller best suited for the ASM. The results of these studies, as well as the conceptual design of the dual arm master controller, are presented. This work was performed as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. USB Dual-Mode Function IP Core Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the specification and implement of a Universal Serial Bus (USB) dual-mode function IP core used for embedded system. Controlled by micro controller/CPU, the novel IP core can function as a USB host controller or USB peripheral controller. When configured as a USB host controller, it supports all USB 1.1 transaction types; supports automatic preamble insertion, and automatic SOF generation and transmission. Otherwise, when it is configured as a USB device by a microprocessor, it operates as a USB peripheral controller compliant with USB2.0 specification.

  1. Reasoning on the Autism Spectrum: A Dual Process Theory Account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark; Lewton, Marcus; Ashwin, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Dual process theory proposes two distinct reasoning processes in humans, an intuitive style that is rapid and automatic and a deliberative style that is more effortful. However, no study to date has specifically examined these reasoning styles in relation to the autism spectrum. The present studies investigated deliberative and intuitive reasoning profiles in: (1) a non-clinical sample from the general population with varying degrees of autism traits (n = 95), and (2) males diagnosed with ASD (n = 17) versus comparisons (n = 18). Taken together, the results suggest reasoning on the autism spectrum is compatible with the processes proposed by Dual Process Theory and that higher autism traits and ASD are characterised by a consistent bias towards deliberative reasoning (and potentially away from intuition).

  2. Dual-Cell HSDPA for Network Energy Saving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micallef, Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    consumption. This paper proposes an energy saving feature that exploits variations in network traffic. Based on the individual load of each sector, the feature determines if the secondary carrier is detrimental for reaching some pre-set minimum requirements. Each sector is allowed to switch off one......The increasing demand for mobile broadband is pushing existing 3G networks closer to their capacity limit. Additional carriers together with new HSPA features (HSPA+) are expected to provide the next necessary boost in network capacity. One specific feature in HSPA+ is referred to as Dual......-Cell HSDPA (or Dual-Carrier HSDPA). This feature allows for a single user to be simultaneously scheduled over two carriers, effectively doubling its achievable data rate. The addition of a secondary carrier will require additional radio equipment at the base station site, increasing the overall energy...

  3. Dual Ectopic Thyroid: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sood

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The ectopic thyroid gland is a rare entity which is mostly found along the line of descent of"nthe thyroid gland. Most of the patients present with midline swelling and usually seek medical"nattention. Dual ectopic thyroid gland is even rarer. The clinical examination and different imaging"nmodalities establish its diagnosis. Radionuclide studies are highly sensitive and specific in"ndemonstrating the functional tissues in patients with ectopic thyroid, thereby guiding further"nmanagement. The authors reported a case of ectopic thyroid gland in a girl with midline neck"nswelling initially, subsequently lost to follow-up. She again presented with enlarged swelling after"na period of three years with dual ectopic thyroid in the neck region on thyroid scan. Thyroid"nscintigraphy demonstrated that progression in the size of ectopic glands was due to neglect in"ntreatment.

  4. Egalité filles-garçons : un objectif à l’épreuve du double usage des dispositifs d’accompagnement à la scolarité Girl-boy equality: an objective against specific help project’s dual-use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Morin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cet article propose un regard sur l’égalité scolaire filles-garçons par le biais des dispositifs d’accompagnement à la scolarité en collectif, c'est-à-dire en équipements de quartier. Basé sur une recherche ethnographique, il s’interroge plus précisément sur la manière dont les enfants s’approprient les dispositifs d’accompagnement proposés. Les premiers résultats montrent qu’ils en ont un « double usage » de soutien scolaire et d’aide aux devoirs, mais aussi de socialisation et d’apprentissages des rôles parentaux, notamment par les filles. Les enfants sont « libres » de fréquenter l’un ou l’autre des dispositifs du quartier. Cette « liberté » s’exerce dans une logique d’appropriation sexuée du quartier comme territoire de jeux et de socialisation qui entre en correspondance avec les spécialisations de l’offre d’accompagnement scolaire locale. Cette correspondance n’est pas sans rappeler les rapports socio-sexués au savoir, qui sont construits au sein de l’école. Ainsi, on constate d’une part que l’appropriation est genrée et d’autre part qu’elle reflète les scolarités proposées aux filles et aux garçons. En ne tenant pas compte de la socialisation sexuée et des rapports socio-sexués au savoir, les dispositifs vont dans le sens des inégalités de genre en construction chez les jeunes.This article looks at gender inequality in specific help projects for students. In French city suburbs, children are offered to get some extra homework help. These projects are implemented by associations in order to help students who need to be explained how to learn and do their homework. Based on an ethnographic approach, this research tried to determine how children appropriate themselves this help. First results indicate that children have a “dual use” of homework help projects. The first use is about homework, but there is another use for girls who have to learn parental

  5. Exact self-dual skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Shnir, Ya.

    2017-09-01

    We introduce a Skyrme type model with the target space being the sphere S3 and with an action possessing, as usual, quadratic and quartic terms in field derivatives. The novel character of the model is that the strength of the couplings of those two terms are allowed to depend upon the space-time coordinates. The model should therefore be interpreted as an effective theory, such that those couplings correspond in fact to low energy expectation values of fields belonging to a more fundamental theory at high energies. The theory possesses a self-dual sector that saturates the Bogomolny bound leading to an energy depending linearly on the topological charge. The self-duality equations are conformally invariant in three space dimensions leading to a toroidal ansatz and exact self-dual Skyrmion solutions. Those solutions are labelled by two integers and, despite their toroidal character, the energy density is spherically symmetric when those integers are equal and oblate or prolate otherwise.

  6. DUAL Gamma-Ray Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Boggs, S; von Ballmoos, P; Takahashi, T; Gehrels, N; Tueller, J; Baring, M; Beacom, J; Diehl, R; Greiner, J; Grove, E; Hartmann, D; Hernanz, M; Jean, P; Johnson, N; Kanbach, G; Kippen, M; Knödlseder, J; Leising, M; Madejski, G; McConnell, M; Milne, P; Motohide, K; Nakazawa, K; Oberlack, U; Phlips, B; Ryan, J; Skinner, G; Starrfield, S; Tajima, H; Wulf, E; Zoglauer, A; Zych, A

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy presents an extraordinary scientific potential for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. In order to take full advantage of this potential, the next generation of instrumentation for this domain will have to achieve an improvement in sensitivity over present technologies of at least an order of magnitude. The DUAL mission concept takes up this challenge in two complementary ways: a very long observation of the entire sky, combined with a large collection area for simultaneous observations of Type Ia SNe. While the Wide-Field Compton Telescope (WCT) accumulates data from the full gamma-ray sky (0.1-10 MeV) over the entire mission lifetime, the Laue-Lens Telescope (LLT) focuses on 56Co emission from SNe Ia (0.8-0.9 MeV), collecting gamma-rays from its large area crystal lens onto the WCT. Two separated spacecraft flying in formation will maintain the DUAL payloads at the lens' focal distance.

  7. The effect of single-task and dual-task balance exercise programs on balance performance in adults with osteoporosis: a randomized controlled preliminary trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konak, H E; Kibar, S; Ergin, E S

    2016-11-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious disease characterized by muscle weakness in the lower extremities, shortened length of trunk, and increased dorsal kyphosis leading to poor balance performance. Although balance impairment increases in adults with osteoporosis, falls and fall-related injuries have been shown to occur mainly during the dual-task performance. Several studies have shown that dual-task performance was improved with specific repetitive dual-task exercises.

  8. College Course Grades for Dual Enrollment Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, Jill D.; Allen, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    This study compared college course grade outcomes, both during and after high school, of dual-enrollment students to those of traditional students. The study was based on a large, multiyear sample of Iowa high school and community college students. The results showed that while in high school, dual-enrollment students consistently outperformed…

  9. 7 CFR 7.17 - Dual office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dual office. 7.17 Section 7.17 Agriculture Office of... STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.17 Dual office. (a) County committee membership. A member of... any other county office employee. (b) Community committee membership. A member of the...

  10. Learning from the Past: Dual Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, Nicole; Justice, Madeline

    2014-01-01

    This study involved identifying, categorizing, and comparing critical incidents related to qualifying dual credit high school students' decisions to enroll or not to enroll in dual credit coursework in either a traditional or early college high school. The purpose of the study was (a) to identify the reasons qualifying students decide to enroll in…

  11. "Dual" Classes See Growth in Popularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2012-01-01

    Growing numbers of schools are offering dual-language classes, where teachers split instruction between English and a second language. The numbers of dual-language-immersion programs have been steadily growing in public schools over the past decade or so, rising to more than 2,000 in 2011-12, according to estimates from national experts. That…

  12. Unraveling executive functioning in dual diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijkers, J.C.L.M.; Vissers, C.T.W.M.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    In mental health, the term dual-diagnosis is used for the co-occurrence of Substance Use Disorder (SUD) with another mental disorder. These co-occurring disorders can have a shared cause, and can cause/intensify each other's expression. Forming a threat to health and society, dual-diagnosis is assoc

  13. Theories of Dual Diagnosis in Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Sevin, Jay A.

    1994-01-01

    Provides historical review of theory development in the field of dual diagnosis, defined as co-occurrence of mental health disorders with mental retardation. Noting that current etiological theories have practical implications for treatment and prevention of dual diagnosis, discusses current status of etiological theories and future directions for…

  14. Self-Dual Weak Hopf Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Munir AHMED; Fang LI

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we define the notion of self-dual graded weak Hopf algebra and self-dual semilattice graded weak Hopf algebra. We give characterization of finite-dimensional such algebras when they are in structually simple forms in the sense of E. L. Green and E. N. Morcos. We also give the definition of self-dual weak Hopf quiver and apply these types of quivers to classify the finite-dimensional self-dual semilattice graded weak Hopf algebras. Finally, we prove partially the conjecture given by N. Andruskiewitsch and H.-J. Schneider in the case of finite-dimensional pointed semilattice graded weak Hopf algebra H when grH is self-dual.

  15. El anillo de los números duales

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Haydee; Luque, Carlos Julio

    2007-01-01

    Se inicia con una presentación de la estructura de * - Álgebra de los números duales; se muestran diferentes representaciones que permiten la definición de potencias racionales de números duales, lo que exige una extensión de su estructura a un anillo de números duales con coeficientes complejos. Seguidamente se estudian la función exponencial dual y la función logaritmo dual que permiten la definición de potencias duales de un número dual; luego se estudian ecuaciones en los números duales h...

  16. El anillo de los números duales

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Haydee; Luque, Carlos Julio

    2007-01-01

    Se inicia con una presentación de la estructura de * - Álgebra de los números duales; se muestran diferentes representaciones que permiten la definición de potencias racionales de números duales, lo que exige una extensión de su estructura a un anillo de números duales con coeficientes complejos. Seguidamente se estudian la función exponencial dual y la función logaritmo dual que permiten la definición de potencias duales de un número dual; luego se estudian ecuaciones en los números duales h...

  17. Dual use of tobacco among Bangladeshi men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Zaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dual use of tobacco (using smoking and smokeless forms in Bangladesh is uncommon in women but common in men. Dual users are at additional risk of cancers and heart diseases compared with a single form of tobacco use. Knowledge about their socioeconomic background is necessary for planning appropriate interventions. We report here socioeconomic background of the dual users of tobacco from a nationally representative survey. Methods: The study adopted a probability proportionate to size sampling technic of divisional population stratified into urban and rural areas to recruit men aged 25 years or older from their households. A total of 4312 men were recruited. Variables included questions on 20 household assets, tobacco use and other behavioral risk factors, and measurement of body weight and height. Results: The average age of dual users was 46.7 years old compared to 43.4 and 52.3 years for smokers and smokeless tobacco users. Prevalence of "smoking only," "smokeless only" and "dual use" of tobacco was 40.6%, 15.2%, and 14.2%, respectively. Among all tobacco users, dual users constituted 20%. These dual users had lower educational achievement, rural residence, lower intake of fruit, and higher intake of alcohol. They were more undernourished as indicated by a thin body mass index compared to nonusers and smokers. Dual users were of socioeconomically deprived as measured by wealth quartiles constructed out of household assets. Conclusion: Dual use of tobacco is common in Bangladesh, and it is intimately linked with socioeconomic deprivation. Poverty reduction strategy and campaigns should address tobacco control not only tobacco in general, but its dual use in particular.

  18. When a Single Antiplatelet Agent for Stroke Prevention Is Not Enough: Current Evidence and Future Applications of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kristy; Kim, Anthony S

    2016-04-01

    For secondary stroke prevention, long-term dual antiplatelet therapy is not recommended due to increased bleeding risks. There is no specific evidence for using dual antiplatelet therapy for cervical artery dissection or for adding a second antiplatelet agent after a stroke while taking aspirin monotherapy. For patients with atrial fibrillation and stroke/TIA unable to tolerate warfarin, aspirin monotherapy is reasonable. Dual antiplatelet therapy carries a similar risk of major bleeding as warfarin that offsets reductions in stroke risk. Dual antiplatelet therapy is recommended for endovascular cerebrovascular stenting procedures, although the optimal duration of therapy is not well established. Short-term dual antiplatelet therapy when initiated acutely after minor stroke/TIA, particularly in Asian populations or for intracranial atherosclerosis, holds promise though studies to evaluate this approach more generally are ongoing. New antiplatelet agents and additional data on the pharmacogenetics of clopidogrel metabolism have the potential to help to individualize these recommendations moving forward.

  19. Quantum dynamics in dual spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.

    1993-12-31

    Quantum mechanics gives us information about spectra of dynamical variables and transition rates including scattering cross sections. They can be exhibited as spectral information in analytically continued spaces and their duals. Quantum mechanics formulated in these generalized spaces is used to study scattering and time evolution. It is shown that the usual asymptotic condition is inadequate to deal with scattering of composite or unstable particles. Scattering theory needs amendment when the interacting system is not isospectral with the free Hamiltonian, and the amendment is formulated. Perturbation theory in generalized spaces is developed and used to study the deletion and augmentation of the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. A complete set of algebraically independent constants for an interacting system is obtained. The question of the breaking of time symmetry is discussed.

  20. Dual Watermarking Scheme with Encryption

    CERN Document Server

    Dhanalakshmi, R

    2010-01-01

    Digital Watermarking is used for copyright protection and authentication. In the proposed system, a Dual Watermarking Scheme based on DWT SVD with chaos encryption algorithm, will be developed to improve the robustness and protection along with security. DWT and SVD have been used as a mathematical tool to embed watermark in the image. Two watermarks are embedded in the host image. The secondary is embedded into primary watermark and the resultant watermarked image is encrypted using chaos based logistic map. This provides an efficient and secure way for image encryption and transmission. The watermarked image is decrypted and a reliable watermark extraction scheme is developed for the extraction of the primary as well as secondary watermark from the distorted image.